Science.gov

Sample records for partial cmb maps

  1. Cosmic string induced CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Landriau, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2011-02-15

    We compute maps of CMB temperature fluctuations seeded by cosmic strings using high resolution simulations of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We create full-sky, 18 deg. and 3 deg. CMB maps, including the relevant string contribution at each resolution from before recombination to today. We extract the angular power spectrum from these maps, demonstrating the importance of recombination effects. We briefly discuss the probability density function of the pixel temperatures, their skewness, and kurtosis.

  2. Faraday rotation in CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Granados, Beatriz; Battaner, Eduardo; Florido, Estrella

    2016-10-01

    WMAP CMB polarization maps have been used to detect a low signal of Faraday Rotation (FR). If this detection is not interpreted as simple noise, it could be produced: at the last scattering surface (LSS) (z=1100), being primordial, at Reionization (z=10), in the Milky Way. The second interpretation is favoured here. In this case magnetic fields at Reionization with peak values of the order of 10-8 G should produce this observational FR.

  3. Preferred axis of CMB parity asymmetry in the masked maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Wen; Huang, Qing-Guo; Santos, Larissa

    2016-06-01

    Both WMAP and Planck data show a significant odd-multipole preference in the large scales of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. If this pattern originates from cosmological effects, then it can be considered a crucial clue for a violation in the cosmological principle. By defining various direction dependent statistics in the full-sky Planck 2015 maps (see, for instance, Naselsky et al. (2012); W. Zhao (2014)), we found that the CMB parity asymmetry has a preferred direction, which is independent of the choices of the statistics. In particular, this preferred axis is strongly aligned with those in the CMB quadrupole and octopole, as well as that in the CMB kinematic dipole, which hints to their non-cosmological origin. In realistic observations, the foreground residuals are inevitable, and should be properly masked out in order to avoid possible misinterpretation of the results. In this paper, we extend our previous analyses to the masked Planck 2015 data. By defining a similar direction dependent statistic in the masked map, we find a preferred direction of the CMB parity asymmetry, in which the axis also coincides with that found in the full-sky analysis. Therefore, our conclusions on the CMB parity violation and its directional properties are confirmed.

  4. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolini, Claudia; Fantaye, Yabebal; Martinelli, Matteo; Carbone, Carmelita; Baccigalupi, Carlo

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at l simeq 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δl simeq 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000lesssimllesssim2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  5. N-body lensed CMB maps: lensing extraction and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Carbone, Carmelita E-mail: y.t.fantaye@astro.uio.no E-mail: carmelita.carbone@brera.inaf.it

    2014-02-01

    We reconstruct shear maps and angular power spectra from simulated weakly lensed total intensity (TT) and polarised (EB) maps of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies, obtained using Born approximated ray-tracing through the N-body simulated Cold Dark Matter (CDM) structures in the Millennium Simulations (MS). We compare the recovered signal with the ΛCDM prediction, on the whole interval of angular scales which is allowed by the finite box size, extending from the degree scale to the arcminute, by applying a quadratic estimator in the flat sky limit; we consider PRISM-like instrumental specification for future generation CMB satellites, corresponding to arcminute angular resolution of 3.2' and sensitivity of 2.43 μK-arcmin. The noise contribution in the simulations closely follows the estimator prediction, becoming dominated by limits in the angular resolution for the EB signal, at ℓ ≅ 1500. The recovered signal shows no visible departure from predictions of the weak lensing power within uncertainties, when considering TT and EB data singularly. In particular, the reconstruction precision reaches the level of a few percent in bins with Δℓ ≅ 100 in the angular multiple interval 1000∼<ℓ∼<2000 for T, and about 10% for EB. Within the adopted specifications, polarisation data do represent a significant contribution to the lensing shear, which appear to faithfully trace the underlying N-body structure down to the smallest angular scales achievable with the present setup, validating at the same time the latter with respect to semi-analytical predictions from ΛCDM cosmology at the level of CMB lensing statistics. This work demonstrates the feasibility of CMB lensing studies based on large scale simulations of cosmological structure formation in the context of the current and future high resolution and sensitivity CMB experiment.

  6. Cosmological Parameters from CMB Maps without Likelihood Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racine, B.; Jewell, J. B.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wehus, I. K.

    2016-03-01

    We propose an efficient Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for estimating cosmological parameters from cosmic microwave background (CMB) data without the use of likelihood approximations. It builds on a previously developed Gibbs sampling framework that allows for exploration of the joint CMB sky signal and power spectrum posterior, P({\\boldsymbol{s}},{C}{\\ell }| {\\boldsymbol{d}}), and addresses a long-standing problem of efficient parameter estimation simultaneously in regimes of high and low signal-to-noise ratio. To achieve this, our new algorithm introduces a joint Markov chain move in which both the signal map and power spectrum are synchronously modified, by rescaling the map according to the proposed power spectrum before evaluating the Metropolis-Hastings accept probability. Such a move was already introduced by Jewell et al., who used it to explore low signal-to-noise posteriors. However, they also found that the same algorithm is inefficient in the high signal-to-noise regime, since a brute-force rescaling operation does not account for phase information. This problem is mitigated in the new algorithm by subtracting the Wiener filter mean field from the proposed map prior to rescaling, leaving high signal-to-noise information invariant in the joint step, and effectively only rescaling the low signal-to-noise component. To explore the full posterior, the new joint move is then interleaved with a standard conditional Gibbs move for the sky map. We apply our new algorithm to simplified simulations for which we can evaluate the exact posterior to study both its accuracy and its performance, and find good agreement with the exact posterior; marginal means agree to ≲0.006σ and standard deviations to better than ˜3%. The Markov chain correlation length is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained by other standard samplers in the field.

  7. Non Gaussian Minkowski functionals and extrema counts for CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Codis, Sandrine; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    In the conference presentation we have reviewed the theory of non-Gaussian geometrical measures for 3D Cosmic Web of the matter distribution in the Universe and 2D sky data, such as Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps that was developed in a series of our papers. The theory leverages symmetry of isotropic statistics such as Minkowski functionals and extrema counts to develop post Gaussian expansion of the statistics in orthogonal polynomials of invariant descriptors of the field, its first and second derivatives. The application of the approach to 2D fields defined on a spherical sky was suggested, but never rigorously developed. In this paper we present such development treating the effects of the curvature and finiteness of the spherical space $S_2$ exactly, without relying on flat-sky approximation. We present Minkowski functionals, including Euler characteristic and extrema counts to the first non-Gaussian correction, suitable for weakly non-Gaussian fields on a sphere, of which CMB is the prime example.

  8. Planck 2015 results. IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-to-polarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales ℓ ≳ 40. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with ℓ< 20 are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with respect to algorithmic and modelling choices. The resulting polarization maps have rms instrumental noise ranging between 0.21 and 0.27μK averaged over 55' pixels, and between 4.5 and 6.1μK averaged over 3.4 parcm pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1σ level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses. However, the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity is consistent with zero within 2σ for all local, equilateral, and orthogonal configurations of the bispectrum

  9. Searching for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps using a combined estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, C.P.; Wuensche, C.A.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I.S. E-mail: bernui@on.br E-mail: ca.wuensche@inpe.br

    2014-01-01

    The extensive search for deviations from Gaussianity in cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) data is very important due to the information about the very early moments of the universe encoded there. Recent analyses from Planck CMB data do not exclude the presence of non-Gaussianity of small amplitude, although they are consistent with the Gaussian hypothesis. The use of different techniques is essential to provide information about types and amplitudes of non-Gaussianities in the CMB data. In particular, we find interesting to construct an estimator based upon the combination of two powerful statistical tools that appears to be sensitive enough to detect tiny deviations from Gaussianity in CMB maps. This estimator combines the Minkowski functionals with a Neural Network, maximizing a tool widely used to study non-Gaussian signals with a reinforcement of another tool designed to identify patterns in a data set. We test our estimator by analyzing simulated CMB maps contaminated with different amounts of local primordial non-Gaussianity quantified by the dimensionless parameter f{sub  NL}. We apply it to these sets of CMB maps and find ∼> 98% of chance of positive detection, even for small intensity local non-Gaussianity like f{sub  NL} = 38±18, the current limit from Planck data for large angular scales. Additionally, we test the suitability to distinguish between primary and secondary non-Gaussianities: first we train the Neural Network with two sets, one of nearly Gaussian CMB maps (|f{sub  NL}| ≤ 10) but contaminated with realistic inhomogeneous Planck noise (i.e., secondary non-Gaussianity) and the other of non-Gaussian CMB maps, that is, maps endowed with weak primordial non-Gaussianity (28 ≤ f{sub  NL} ≤ 48); after that we test an ensemble composed of CMB maps either with one of these non-Gaussian contaminations, and find out that our method successfully classifies ∼ 95% of the tested maps as being CMB maps containing primordial or

  10. CMB anisotropy power spectrum using linear combinations of WMAP maps

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Jain, Pankaj; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-15

    In recent years the goal of estimating different cosmological parameters precisely has set new challenges in the effort to accurately measure the angular power spectrum of the CMB. This has required removal of foreground contamination as well as detector noise bias with reliability and precision. Recently, a novel, model-independent method for the estimation of the CMB angular power spectrum solely from multifrequency observations has been proposed and implemented on the first year WMAP data by Saha et al. 2006. All previous estimates of the power spectrum of the CMB are based upon foreground templates using data sets from different experiments. However, our methodology demonstrates that the CMB angular spectrum can be reliably estimated with precision from a self-contained analysis of the WMAP data. In this work we provide a detailed description of this method. We also study and identify the biases present in our power spectrum estimate. We apply our methodology to extract the power spectrum from the WMAP data.

  11. Detecting anomalies in CMB maps: a new method

    SciTech Connect

    Neelakanta, Jayanth T.

    2015-10-01

    Ever since WMAP announced its first results, different analyses have shown that there is weak evidence for several large-scale anomalies in the CMB data. While the evidence for each anomaly appears to be weak, the fact that there are multiple seemingly unrelated anomalies makes it difficult to account for them via a single statistical fluke. So, one is led to considering a combination of these anomalies. But, if we ''hand-pick'' the anomalies (test statistics) to consider, we are making an a posteriori choice. In this article, we propose two statistics that do not suffer from this problem. The statistics are linear and quadratic combinations of the a{sub ℓ m}'s with random co-efficients, and they test the null hypothesis that the a{sub ℓ m}'s are independent, normally-distributed, zero-mean random variables with an m-independent variance. The motivation for considering multiple modes is this: because most physical models that lead to large-scale anomalies result in coupling multiple ℓ and m modes, the ''coherence'' of this coupling should get enhanced if a combination of different modes is considered. In this sense, the statistics are thus much more generic than those that have been hitherto considered in literature. Using fiducial data, we demonstrate that the method works and discuss how it can be used with actual CMB data to make quite general statements about the incompatibility of the data with the null hypothesis.

  12. A special kind of local structure in the CMB intensity maps: duel peak structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ti-Pei

    2009-03-01

    We study the local structure of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature maps released by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team, and find a new kind of structure, which can be described as follows: a peak (or valley) of average temperature is often followed by a peak of temperature fluctuation that is 4° away. This structure is important for the following reasons: both the well known cold spot detected by Cruz et al. and the hot spot detected by Vielva et al. with the same technology (the third spot in their article) have such structure; more spots that are similar to them can be found on CMB maps and they also tend to be significant cold/hot spots; if we change the 4° characteristic into an artificial one, such as 3° or 5°, there will be less 'similar spots', and the temperature peaks or valleys will be less significant. The presented 'similar spots' have passed a strict consistency test which requires them to be significant on at least three different CMB temperature maps. We hope that this article could arouse some interest in the relationship of average temperature with temperature fluctuation in local areas; meanwhile, we are also trying to find an explanation for it which might be important to CMB observation and theory.

  13. SILC: a new Planck internal linear combination CMB temperature map using directional wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present new clean maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies (as measured by Planck) constructed with a novel internal linear combination (ILC) algorithm using directional, scale-discretized wavelets - scale-discretized, directional wavelet ILC or Scale-discretised, directional wavelet Internal Linear Combination (SILC). Directional wavelets, when convolved with signals on the sphere, can separate the anisotropic filamentary structures which are characteristic of both the CMB and foregrounds. Extending previous component separation methods, which use the frequency, spatial and harmonic signatures of foregrounds to separate them from the cosmological background signal, SILC can additionally use morphological information in the foregrounds and CMB to better localize the cleaning algorithm. We test the method on Planck data and simulations, demonstrating consistency with existing component separation algorithms, and discuss how to optimize the use of morphological information by varying the number of directional wavelets as a function of spatial scale. We find that combining the use of directional and axisymmetric wavelets depending on scale could yield higher quality CMB temperature maps. Our results set the stage for the application of SILC to polarization anisotropies through an extension to spin wavelets.

  14. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope. PMID:26974631

  15. Designs for a large-aperture telescope to map the CMB 10× faster.

    PubMed

    Niemack, Michael D

    2016-03-01

    Current large-aperture cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes have nearly maximized the number of detectors that can be illuminated while maintaining diffraction-limited image quality. The polarization-sensitive detector arrays being deployed in these telescopes in the next few years will have roughly 10⁴ detectors. Increasing the mapping speed of future instruments by at least an order of magnitude is important to enable precise probes of the inflationary paradigm in the first fraction of a second after the big bang and provide strong constraints on cosmological parameters. The CMB community has begun planning a next generation "Stage IV" CMB project that will be comprised of multiple telescopes with between 10⁵-10⁶ detectors to pursue these goals. This paper introduces the new crossed Dragone telescope and receiver optics designs that increase the usable diffraction-limited field-of-view, and therefore the mapping speed, by an order of magnitude compared to the upcoming generation of large-aperture instruments. Polarization systematics and engineering considerations are presented, including a preliminary receiver model to demonstrate that these designs will enable high efficiency illumination of >10⁵ detectors in a next generation CMB telescope.

  16. Comparing and combining the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica; Devlin, Mark J.; Herbig, Thomas; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman

    2001-05-15

    We present a method for comparing and combining maps with different resolutions and beam shapes, and apply it to the Saskatoon, QMAP, and COBE-DMR data sets. Although the Saskatoon and QMAP maps detect signals at the 21{sigma} and 40{sigma} levels, respectively, their difference is consistent with pure noise, placing strong limits on possible systematic errors. In particular, we obtain quantitative upper limits on relative calibration and pointing errors. Splitting the combined data by frequency shows similar consistency between the Ka and Q bands, placing limits on foreground contamination. The visual agreement between the maps is equally striking. Our combined QMAP+Saskatoon map, nicknamed QMASK, is publicly available on the web together with its 6495x6495 noise covariance matrix. This thoroughly tested data set covers a large enough area (648 square degrees -- currently the largest degree-scale map available) to allow a statistical comparison with COBE-DMR, showing good agreement.

  17. Non-Gaussian extrema counts for CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosyan, Dmitri; Pichon, Christophe; Gay, Christophe

    2011-10-15

    In the context of the geometrical analysis of weakly non-Gaussian cosmic microwave background maps, the 2D differential extrema counts as functions of the excursion set threshold is derived from the full moments expansion of the joint probability distribution of an isotropic random field, its gradient, and invariants of the Hessian. Analytic expressions for these counts are given to second order in the non-Gaussian correction, while a Monte Carlo method to compute them to arbitrary order is presented. Matching count statistics to these estimators is illustrated on fiducial non-Gaussian Planck data.

  18. Semi-blind Bayesian inference of CMB map and power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vansyngel, Flavien; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Cardoso, Jean-François; Benabed, Karim

    2016-04-01

    We present a new blind formulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) inference problem. The approach relies on a phenomenological model of the multifrequency microwave sky without the need for physical models of the individual components. For all-sky and high resolution data, it unifies parts of the analysis that had previously been treated separately such as component separation and power spectrum inference. We describe an efficient sampling scheme that fully explores the component separation uncertainties on the inferred CMB products such as maps and/or power spectra. External information about individual components can be incorporated as a prior giving a flexible way to progressively and continuously introduce physical component separation from a maximally blind approach. We connect our Bayesian formalism to existing approaches such as Commander, spectral mismatch independent component analysis (SMICA), and internal linear combination (ILC), and discuss possible future extensions.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CMB intensity map from WMAP and Planck PR2 data (Bobin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a novel estimation of the CMB map reconstructed from the Planck 2015 data (PR2) and the WMAP nine-year data (Bennett et al., 2013ApJS..208...20B), which updates the CMB map we published in (Bobin et al., 2014A&A...563A.105B). This new map is based on the sparse component separation method L-GMCA (Bobin et al., 2013A&A...550A..73B). Additionally, the map benefits from the latest advances in this field (Bobin et al., 2015, IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing, 63, 1199), which allows us to accurately discriminate between correlated components. In this update to our previous work, we show that this new map presents significant improvements with respect to the available CMB map estimates. (3 data files).

  20. Noise power spectrum estimation and fast map making for CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amblard, A.; Hamilton, J.-Ch.

    2004-04-01

    We present a method designed to estimate the noise power spectrum in the time domain for CMB experiments. The noise power spectrum is extracted from the time ordered data avoiding the contamination coming from sky signal and accounting the pixellisation of the signal and the projection of the noise when making intermediate sky projections. This method is simple to implement and relies on Monte-Carlo simulations, it runs on a simple desk computer. We also propose a trick for filtering data before making coadded maps in order to avoid ringing due to the presence of signal in the timelines. These algorithms were succesfully tested on Archeops data.

  1. Statistical isotropy violation in WMAP CMB maps resulting from non-circular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Rotti, Aditya; Pant, Nidhi; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Statistical isotropy (SI) of cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations is a key observational test to validate the cosmological principle underlying the standard model of cosmology. While a detection of SI violation would have immense cosmological ramification, it is important to recognise their possible origin in systematic effects of observations. The WMAP seven year (WMAP-7) release claimed significant deviation from SI in the bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) coefficients and . Here we present the first explicit reproduction of the measurements reported in WMAP-7, confirming that beam systematics alone can completely account for the measured SI violation. The possibility of such a systematic origin was alluded to in WMAP-7 paper itself and other authors but not as explicitly so as to account for it accurately. We simulate CMB maps using the actual WMAP non-circular beams and scanning strategy. Our estimated BipoSH spectra from these maps match the WMAP-7 results very well. It is also evident that only a very careful and adequately detailed modelling, as carried out here, can conclusively establish that the entire signal arises from non-circular beam effect. This is important since cosmic SI violation signals are expected to be subtle and dismissing a large SI violation signal as observational artefact based on simplistic plausibility arguments run the serious risk of "throwing the baby out with the bathwater".

  2. Maps of CMB lensing deflection from N-body simulations in Coupled Dark Energy Cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, Carmelita; Baldi, Marco; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: marco.baldi5@unibo.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-09-01

    We produce lensing potential and deflection-angle maps in order to simulate the weak gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via ray-tracing through the COupled Dark Energy Cosmological Simulations (CoDECS), the largest suite of N-body simulations to date for interacting Dark Energy cosmologies. The constructed maps faithfully reflect the N-body cosmic structures on a range of scales going from the arcminute to the degree scale, limited only by the resolution and extension of the simulations. We investigate the variation of the lensing pattern due to the underlying Dark Energy (DE) dynamics, characterised by different background and perturbation behaviours as a consequence of the interaction between the DE field and Cold Dark Matter (CDM). In particular, we study in detail the results from three cosmological models differing in the background and perturbations evolution at the epoch in which the lensing cross section is most effective, corresponding to a redshift of ∼ 1, with the purpose to isolate their imprints in the lensing observables, regardless of the compatibility of these models with present constraints. The scenarios investigated here include a reference ΛCDM cosmology, a standard coupled DE (cDE) scenario, and a ''bouncing'' cDE scenario. For the standard cDE scenario, we find that typical differences in the lensing potential result from two effects: the enhanced growth of linear CDM density fluctuations with respect to the ΛCDM case, and the modified nonlinear dynamics of collapsed structures induced by the DE-CDM interaction. As a consequence, CMB lensing highlights the DE impact in the cosmological expansion, even in the degenerate case where the amplitude of the linear matter density perturbations, parametrised through σ{sub 8}, is the same in both the standard cDE and ΛCDM cosmologies. For the ''bouncing'' scenario, we find that the two opposite behaviours of the lens density contrast and of the matter abundance lead to

  3. CMB Lensing Cross Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleem, Lindsey

    2014-03-01

    A new generation of experiments designed to conduct high-resolution, low-noise observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)--including ACTpol, Planck, POLARBEAR and SPTpol--are producing exquisite measurements of the gravitational lensing of the CMB. Such measurements, covering large fractions of the sky, provide detailed maps of the projected mass distribution extending to the surface of the CMB's last scattering. Concurrently, a large number of deep, wide-area imaging and spectroscopic surveys (e.g., the Dark Energy Survey (DES),WISE all-sky survey, Subaru HyperSuprimeCam Survey, LSST, MS-DESI, BigBoss, etc.) are, or will soon be, providing maps of the distribution of galaxies in the Universe. Correlations of such tracer populations with lensing data allows new probes of where and how galaxies form in the dark matter skeleton of the Universe. Recent correlations of maps of galaxy and quasar densities with lensing convergence maps have produced significant measurements of galaxy bias. The near-term prospect for improvements in such measurements is notable as more precise lensing data from CMB polarization experiments will help to break cosmological and astrophysical parameter degeneracies. Work by the Planck, SPT, and POLARBEAR collaborations has also focused on the correlation of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) with CMB lensing convergence maps. This correlation is particularly strong as the redshifts of the CIB and CMB lensing kernel are well matched. Such correlations probe high-redshift structure, constraining models of star-formation and the characteristic mass scale for halos hosting CIB galaxies and have also been used to demonstrate the first detection of CMB B-mode polarization--an important milestone in CMB observations. Finally, combining galaxy number density, cosmic shear and CMB lensing maps has the potential to provide valuable systematic tests for upcoming cosmological results from large optical surveys such as LSST.

  4. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-03-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired.

  5. Lensing-induced morphology changes in CMB temperature maps in modified gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munshi, D.; Hu, B.; Matsubara, T.; Coles, P.; Heavens, A.

    2016-04-01

    Lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) changes the morphology of pattern of temperature fluctuations, so topological descriptors such as Minkowski Functionals can probe the gravity model responsible for the lensing. We show how the recently introduced two-to-two and three-to-one kurt-spectra (and their associated correlation functions), which depend on the power spectrum of the lensing potential, can be used to probe modified gravity theories such as f(R) theories of gravity and quintessence models. We also investigate models based on effective field theory, which include the constant-Ω model, and low-energy Hořava theories. Estimates of the cumulative signal-to-noise for detection of lensing-induced morphology changes, reaches Script O(103) for the future planned CMB polarization mission COrE+. Assuming foreground removal is possible to lmax=3000, we show that many modified gravity theories can be rejected with a high level of significance, making this technique comparable in power to galaxy weak lensing or redshift surveys. These topological estimators are also useful in distinguishing lensing from other scattering secondaries at the level of the four-point function or trispectrum. Examples include the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect which shares, with lensing, a lack of spectral distortion. We also discuss the complication of foreground contamination from unsubtracted point sources.

  6. The Kullback-Leibler divergence as an estimator of the statistical properties of CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-David, Assaf; Jackson, Andrew D.; Liu, Hao E-mail: liuhao@nbi.dk

    2015-06-01

    The identification of unsubtracted foreground residuals in the cosmic microwave background maps on large scales is of crucial importance for the analysis of polarization signals. These residuals add a non-Gaussian contribution to the data. We propose the Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence as an effective, non-parametric test on the one-point probability distribution function of the data. With motivation in information theory, the KL divergence takes into account the entire range of the distribution and is highly non-local. We demonstrate its use by analyzing the large scales of the Planck 2013 SMICA temperature fluctuation map and find it consistent with the expected distribution at a level of 6%. Comparing the results to those obtained using the more popular Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, we find the two methods to be in general agreement.

  7. Probing the statistical properties of CMB B-mode polarization through Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Larissa; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The detection of the magnetic type B-mode polarization is the main goal of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. In the standard model, the B-mode map is a strong non-gaussian field due to the CMB lensing component. Besides the two-point correlation function, the other statistics are also very important to dig the information of the polarization map. In this paper, we employ the Minkowski functionals to study the morphological properties of the lensed B-mode maps. We find that the deviations from Gaussianity are very significant for both full and partial-sky surveys. As an application of the analysis, we investigate the morphological imprints of the foreground residuals in the B-mode map. We find that even for very tiny foreground residuals, the effects on the map can be detected by the Minkowski functional analysis. Therefore, it provides a complementary way to investigate the foreground contaminations in the CMB studies.

  8. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R. These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R=0) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits. PMID:27575138

  9. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R. These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R=0) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  10. Theory of short periodic orbits for partially open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

    2016-07-01

    We extend the semiclassical theory of short periodic orbits [M. Novaes et al., Phys. Rev. E 80, 035202(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.035202] to partially open quantum maps, which correspond to classical maps where the trajectories are partially bounced back due to a finite reflectivity R . These maps are representative of a class that has many experimental applications. The open scar functions are conveniently redefined, providing a suitable tool for the investigation of this kind of system. Our theory is applied to the paradigmatic partially open tribaker map. We find that the set of periodic orbits that belongs to the classical repeller of the open map (R =0 ) is able to support the set of long-lived resonances of the partially open quantum map in a perturbative regime. By including the most relevant trajectories outside of this set, the validity of the approximation is extended to a broad range of R values. Finally, we identify the details of the transition from qualitatively open to qualitatively closed behavior, providing an explanation in terms of short periodic orbits.

  11. Prototype of Partial Cutting Tool of Geological Map Images Distributed by Geological Web Map Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nonogaki, S.; Nemoto, T.

    2014-12-01

    Geological maps and topographical maps play an important role in disaster assessment, resource management, and environmental preservation. These map information have been distributed in accordance with Web services standards such as Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Map Tile Service (WMTS) recently. In this study, a partial cutting tool of geological map images distributed by geological WMTS was implemented with Free and Open Source Software. The tool mainly consists of two functions: display function and cutting function. The former function was implemented using OpenLayers. The latter function was implemented using Geospatial Data Abstraction Library (GDAL). All other small functions were implemented by PHP and Python. As a result, this tool allows not only displaying WMTS layer on web browser but also generating a geological map image of intended area and zoom level. At this moment, available WTMS layers are limited to the ones distributed by WMTS for the Seamless Digital Geological Map of Japan. The geological map image can be saved as GeoTIFF format and WebGL format. GeoTIFF is one of the georeferenced raster formats that is available in many kinds of Geographical Information System. WebGL is useful for confirming a relationship between geology and geography in 3D. In conclusion, the partial cutting tool developed in this study would contribute to create better conditions for promoting utilization of geological information. Future work is to increase the number of available WMTS layers and the types of output file format.

  12. Mapping target signatures via partial unmixing of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boardman, Joseph W.; Kruse, Fred A.; Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    A complete spectral unmixing of a complicated AVIRIS scene may not always be possible or even desired. High quality data of spectrally complex areas are very high dimensional and are consequently difficult to fully unravel. Partial unmixing provides a method of solving only that fraction of the data inversion problem that directly relates to the specific goals of the investigation. Many applications of imaging spectrometry can be cast in the form of the following question: 'Are my target signatures present in the scene, and if so, how much of each target material is present in each pixel?' This is a partial unmixing problem. The number of unmixing endmembers is one greater than the number of spectrally defined target materials. The one additional endmember can be thought of as the composite of all the other scene materials, or 'everything else'. Several workers have proposed partial unmixing schemes for imaging spectrometry data, but each has significant limitations for operational application. The low probability detection methods described by Farrand and Harsanyi and the foreground-background method of Smith et al are both examples of such partial unmixing strategies. The new method presented here builds on these innovative analysis concepts, combining their different positive attributes while attempting to circumvent their limitations. This new method partially unmixes AVIRIS data, mapping apparent target abundances, in the presence of an arbitrary and unknown spectrally mixed background. It permits the target materials to be present in abundances that drive significant portions of the scene covariance. Furthermore it does not require a priori knowledge of the background material spectral signatures. The challenge is to find the proper projection of the data that hides the background variance while simultaneously maximizing the variance amongst the targets.

  13. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  14. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  15. The CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fergusson, J.R.; Liguori, M.; Shellard, E.P.S. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2012-12-01

    We use a separable mode expansion estimator with WMAP7 data to estimate the bispectrum for all the primary families of non-Gaussian models, including non-scaling feature (periodic) models, the flat (trans-Planckian) model, DBI and ghost inflation, as well as previously constrained simple cases. We review the late-time mode expansion estimator methodology which can be applied to any non-separable primordial and CMB bispectrum model, and we demonstrate how the method can be used to reconstruct the CMB bispectrum from an observational map. We extend the previous validation of the general estimator using local map simulations. We apply the estimator to the coadded WMAP 7-year V and W channel maps, reconstructing the WMAP bispectrum using l < 500 multipoles and n = 50 orthonormal 3D eigenmodes; both the mode expansion parameters and the reconstructed 3D WMAP bispectrum are plotted. We constrain all popular nearly scale-invariant models, ensuring that the theoretical bispectrum is well-described by a convergent mode expansion. Constraints from the local model f{sub NL} = 20.31±27.64 and the equilateral model f{sub NL} = 10.19±127.38 (F{sub NL} = 1.90±23.79) are consistent with previously published results. (Here, we use a nonlinearity parameter F{sub NL} normalised to the local case, to allow more direct comparison between different models.) Notable new constraints from our method include those for the constant model F{sub NL} = 7.82±24.57, the flat model F{sub NL} = 7.31±26.22, and warm inflation F{sub NL} = 2.10±25.83. We investigate feature models, which break scale invariance, surveying a wide parameter range for both the scale and phase (scanning for feature models with an effective period l* > 150). We find no significant evidence of non-Gaussianity for all cases well-described by the given eigenmodes. In the overall non-Gaussian analysis, we find one anomalous mode n = 33 with a 3.39σ amplitude which could give rise to an oscillatory model signal with l*

  16. The SPIDER CMB polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trangsrud, Amy R.

    SPIDER is a balloon-borne millimeter-wave telescope designed to study the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). SPIDER will map 10% of the full sky with degree-scale beams to search for the distinctive inflationary gravitational wave signal on angular scales between 1 degree and 10 degrees, thereby probing the energy scale of inflation. In its first flight, SPIDER will field 2,400 antenna-coupled bolometers split between two bands centered at 93 GHz and 148 GHz. Slot antenna arrays, band defining microstrip filters and superconducting bolometers are all fabricated photolithographically on a shared silicon substrate. SPIDER's detectors are split amongst six monochromatic on-axis refractors in a shared helium-cooled cryostat. This thesis reviews the design of SPIDER and its antenna-coupled bolometers, and details the currently achieved performance of SPIDER's receivers.

  17. Multiple mapping conditioning for flames with partial premixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenburg, A.; Cleary, M.J.

    2008-10-15

    Fully closed multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) is used to model partially premixed flames in homogeneous, isotropic decaying turbulence where the partial premixing is caused by local extinction and reignition phenomena. Two reference variables that represent mixing and reaction progress, such as mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, are used to emulate turbulent scalar fluctuations. Local extinction is achieved by a priori coupling between scalar dissipation and temperature fluctuations via a correlation function that is based on the conditionally averaged sensible enthalpy at stoichiometric composition. The proposed model provides closures for the joint PDF of mixture fraction and sensible enthalpy, for the conditional variance equation of a reactive scalar, and for the doubly conditioned dissipation terms. Model results are compared with DNS in three flame cases with varying levels of local extinction, up to global extinction. The joint PDF predicted by MMC is in fair agreement with DNS. It constitutes, however, a clear improvement over conventional models using preassumed distribution functions for the PDFs. The doubly conditioned dissipation terms are modeled well and the results for all major chemical species are in good agreement with DNS. Predictions for intermediate species are also satisfactory. (author)

  18. Measuring velocites using the CMB & LSS

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, Albert; /Fermilab /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2006-07-01

    Here is discussed various ways by which the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation can be use to measure the velocities of matter in the universe. We include some new statistical techniques for using the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect and integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect to determine velocities by correlating wide area CMB maps with overlapping large-scale structure (LSS) surveys.

  19. Cosmological parameter estimation: impact of CMB aberration

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Notari, Alessio E-mail: notari@ffn.ub.es

    2013-04-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons, i.e. aberration, and a shift in their frequency, i.e. Doppler effect. Both effects distort the temperature multipoles a{sub lm}'s via a mixing matrix at any l. The common lore when performing a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation is to consider that Doppler affects only the l = 1 multipole, and neglect any other corrections. In this paper we reconsider the validity of this assumption, showing that it is actually not robust when sky cuts are included to model CMB foreground contaminations. Assuming a simple fiducial cosmological model with five parameters, we simulated CMB temperature maps of the sky in a WMAP-like and in a Planck-like experiment and added aberration and Doppler effects to the maps. We then analyzed with a MCMC in a Bayesian framework the maps with and without aberration and Doppler effects in order to assess the ability of reconstructing the parameters of the fiducial model. We find that, depending on the specific realization of the simulated data, the parameters can be biased up to one standard deviation for WMAP and almost two standard deviations for Planck. Therefore we conclude that in general it is not a solid assumption to neglect aberration in a CMB based cosmological parameter estimation.

  20. A neural-network based estimator to search for primordial non-Gaussianity in Planck CMB maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Ferreira, I. S.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2015-09-01

    We present an upgraded combined estimator, based on Minkowski Functionals and Neural Networks, with excellent performance in detecting primordial non-Gaussianity in simulated maps that also contain a weighted mixture of Galactic contaminations, besides real pixel's noise from Planck cosmic microwave background radiation data. We rigorously test the efficiency of our estimator considering several plausible scenarios for residual non-Gaussianities in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps, with the intuition to optimize the training procedure of the Neural Network to discriminate between contaminations with primordial and secondary non-Gaussian signatures. We look for constraints of primordial local non-Gaussianity at large angular scales in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps. For the SMICA map we found fNL = 33 ± 23, at 1σ confidence level, in excellent agreement with the WMAP-9yr and Planck results. In addition, for the other three Planck maps we obtain similar constraints with values in the interval fNL in [33, 41], concomitant with the fact that these maps manifest distinct features in reported analyses, like having different pixel's noise intensities.

  1. A MEASUREMENT OF THE CORRELATION OF GALAXY SURVEYS WITH CMB LENSING CONVERGENCE MAPS FROM THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Bleem, L. E.; Becker, M. R.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Van Engelen, A.; Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Aird, K. A.; Armstrong, R.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Brodwin, M.; Busha, M. T.; Cho, H. M.; Desai, S.; Dore, O.; and others

    2012-07-01

    We compare cosmic microwave background lensing convergence maps derived from South Pole Telescope (SPT) data with galaxy survey data from the Blanco Cosmology Survey, WISE, and a new large Spitzer/IRAC field designed to overlap with the SPT survey. Using optical and infrared catalogs covering between 17 and 68 deg{sup 2} of sky, we detect a correlation between the SPT convergence maps and each of the galaxy density maps at >4{sigma}, with zero correlation robustly ruled out in all cases. The amplitude and shape of the cross-power spectra are in good agreement with theoretical expectations and the measured galaxy bias is consistent with previous work. The detections reported here utilize a small fraction of the full 2500 deg{sup 2} SPT survey data and serve as both a proof of principle of the technique and an illustration of the potential of this emerging cosmological probe.

  2. Direct Cortical Mapping via Solving Partial Differential Equations on Implicit Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonggang; Thompson, Paul M.; Dinov, Ivo; Osher, Stanley; Toga, Arthur W.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for cortical mapping that computes a direct map between two cortical surfaces while satisfying constraints on sulcal landmark curves. By computing the map directly, we can avoid conventional intermediate parameterizations and help simplify the cortical mapping process. The direct map in our method is formulated as the minimizer of a flexible variational energy under landmark constraints. The energy can include both a harmonic term to ensure smoothness of the map and general data terms for the matching of geometric features. Starting from a properly designed initial map, we compute the map iteratively by solving a partial differential equation (PDE) defined on the source cortical surface. For numerical implementation, a set of adaptive numerical schemes are developed to extend the technique of solving PDEs on implicit surfaces such that landmark constraints are enforced. In our experiments, we show the flexibility of the direct mapping approach by computing smooth maps following landmark constraints from two different energies. We also quantitatively compare the metric preserving property of the direct mapping method with a parametric mapping method on a group of 30 subjects. Finally, we demonstrate the direct mapping method in the brain mapping applications of atlas construction and variability analysis. PMID:17379568

  3. General CMB and primordial trispectrum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, D. M.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Fergusson, J. R.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we present trispectrum estimation methods which can be applied to general nonseparable primordial and CMB trispectra. We review the relationship between the reduced CMB trispectrum and the reduced primordial trispectrum. We present a general optimal estimator for the connected part of the trispectrum, for which we derive a quadratic term to incorporate the effects of inhomogeneous noise and masking. We describe a general algorithm for creating simulated maps with given arbitrary (and independent) power spectra, bispectra, and trispectra. We propose a universal definition of the trispectrum parameter TNL, so that the integrated trispectrum on the observational domain can be consistently compared between theoretical models. We define a shape function for the primordial trispectrum, together with a shape correlator and a useful parametrization for visualizing the trispectrum; these methods might also be applied to the late-time trispectrum for large-scale structure. We derive separable analytic CMB solutions in the large-angle limit for constant and local models. We present separable mode decompositions which can be used to describe any primordial or CMB trispectra on their respective wave number or multipole domains. By extracting coefficients of these separable basis functions from an observational map, we are able to present an efficient estimator for any given theoretical model with a nonseparable trispectrum. The estimator has two manifestations, comparing the theoretical and observed coefficients at either primordial or late times, thus encompassing a wider range of models, such as secondary anisotropies, lensing, and cosmic strings. We show that these mode decomposition methods are numerically tractable with order l5 operations for the CMB estimator and approximately order l6 for the general primordial estimator (reducing to order l3 in both cases for a special class of models). We also demonstrate how the trispectrum can be reconstructed from

  4. Correlation between sphere distributions of gamma-ray bursts and CMB fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Khabibullina, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from catalogs of the BATSE and BeppoSAX space observatories relative to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data by Planck space mission is studied. Three methods were applied for data analysis: (1) a histogram of CMB signal values in GRB directions, (2) mosaic correlation maps calculated for GRB locations and CMB distribution, (3) calculation of an average response in the area of "average GRB population" on the CMB map. A correlation between GRB locations and CMB fluctuations was detected which can be interpreted as systematic effects in the process of observations. Besides, in the averaged areas of CMB maps, a difference between the distributions of average fluctuations for short and long GRBs was detected which can be caused by different natures of these events.

  5. The partial captivity condition for U(1) extensions of expanding maps on the circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yushi; Tsujii, Masato; Wittsten, Jens

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns the compact group extension f:T2→T2,f(x,s)=(E(x),s+τ(x) mod 1) of an expanding map E:{{{S}}1}\\to {{{S}}1} . The dynamics of f and its stochastic perturbations have previously been studied under the so-called partial captivity condition. Here we prove a supplementary result that shows that partial captivity is a \\mathscr{C}r generic condition on τ, once we fix E.

  6. Large-Angle Anomalies in the CMB

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Schwarz, Dominik J.; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2010-01-01

    We review the recently found large-scale anomalies in the maps of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. These include alignments of the largest modes of CMB anisotropy with each other and with geometry and direction of motion of the solar ssystem, and the unusually low power at these largest scales. We discuss these findings in relation to expectation from standard inflationary cosmology, their statistical significance, the tools to study them, and the various attempts to explain them.

  7. Primordial magnetism in CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogosian, Levon

    2014-03-01

    A large scale B-mode signal in the CMB polarization would constitute a smoking gun of Inflation and is the main target of several ongoing and upcoming experiments. In this contribution, I consider distinguishing features of another potential source of primordial B-modes - magnetic fields. In particular, the Faraday Rotation of CMB polarization provides a distinctive signature of cosmic magnetic fields through the characteristic frequency dependence and the mode-coupling correlations of the CMB variables. I discuss constraints on primordial magnetism that can be expected from future CMB experiments, taking into account the obstruction caused by the magnetic field of the Milky Way.

  8. Status of CMB Observations in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The 2.725 K cosmic microwave background has played a key role in the development of modern cosmology by providing a solid observational foundation for constraining possible theories of what happened at very large redshifts and theoretical speculation reaching back almost to the would-be big bang initial singularity. After recounting some of the lesser known history of this area, I summarize the current observational situation and also discuss some exciting challenges that lie ahead: the search for B modes, the precision mapping of the CMB gravitational lensing potential, and the ultra-precise characterization of the CMB frequency spectrum, which would allow the exploitation of spectral distortions to probe new physics.

  9. General parity-odd CMB bispectrum estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2014-05-01

    We develop a methodology for estimating parity-odd bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This is achieved through the extension of the original separable modal methodology to parity-odd bispectrum domains (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd). Through numerical tests of the parity-odd modal decomposition with some theoretical bispectrum templates, we verify that the parity-odd modal methodology can successfully reproduce the CMB bispectrum, without numerical instabilities. We also present simulated non-Gaussian maps produced by modal-decomposed parity-odd bispectra, and show the consistency with the exact results. Our new methodology is applicable to all types of parity-odd temperature and polarization bispectra.

  10. POLARBEAR CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, H.; Ade, P.; Akiba, Y.; Anthony, A.; Arnold, K.; Barron, D.; Boettger, D.; Borrill, J.; Chapmann, S.; Chinone, Y.; Dobbs, M. A.; Errard, J.; Fabbian, G.; Feng, C.; Flanigan, D.; Fuller, G.; Ghribi, A.; Grainger, W.; Halverson, N.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Hazumi, M.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Howard, J.; Hyland, P.; Inoue, Y.; Jaffe, A.; Jaehnig, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Katayama, N.; Keating, B.; Kermish, Z.; Kimura, N.; Kisner, T.; Lee, A. T.; Le Jeune, M.; Linder, E.; Lungu, M.; Matsuda, F.; Matsumura, T.; Miller, N. J.; Morii, H.; Moyerman, S.; Myers, M. J.; O'Brient, R.; Okamura, T.; Paar, H.; Peloton, J.; Quealy, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Richards, P. L.; Ross, C.; Shimizu, A.; Shimon, M.; Shimmin, C.; Sholl, M.; Siritanasak, P.; Spieler, H.; Stebor, N.; Steinbach, B.; Stompor, R.; Suzuki, A.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tomaru, T.; Tucker, C.; Yadav, A.; Zahn, O.

    POLARBEAR is a ground-based experiment in the Atacama desert in hile, measuring the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. One of the science goals of POLARBEAR is to detect the B-mode polarization pattern of the CMB produced by primordial gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation. The detection of the B-mode polarization provides strong evidence for inflationary cosmological models. POLARBEAR is expected to reach a sensitivity to the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.025 at 95% confidence level, using the data from two years of observation. With a beam size of 3.5 arcminutes, POLARBEAR is also sensitive to B-mode polarization signals at small-angular scales produced by weak gravitational lensing of large-scale structure. POLARBEAR is expected to provide a constraint on the sum of neutrino masses because of their effect on the large-scale structure. POLARBEAR was deployed in late 2011 and started observing in early 2012 at 150 GHz with an array of 1,274 polarization sensitive antenna-coupled Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers. The current status of the POLARBEAR experiment is reported.

  11. Partial sequence of MAP2 in the region of a shared epitope with Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles.

    PubMed

    Kosik, K S; Orecchio, L D; Bakalis, S; Duffy, L; Neve, R L

    1988-08-01

    A 3.3-kilobase DNA complementary to human microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) was sequenced by the dideoxy method. The 3' end terminates at an internal EcoRI site before the polyA tail. Due to the arrangement of the cDNA insert in the lambda gt11 vector, the MAP2 fragment is not fused to beta-galactosidase when expressed. The Chou Fasman algorithm for the initial 58 amino acids from the first in-frame methionine predicts an alpha helix. Beyond this point, a series of turns is predicted until amino acid 160. The frequent presence of basic residues in proximity to serines or threonines is consistent with multiple phosphorylation sites. The minimum specificity determinant for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase is repeated 13 times. The sequence of a region containing a MAP2 epitope that is shared with the Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangle was determined by DNase treatment of the cDNA and antibody selecting the small resultant clones in a lambda gt11 sublibrary. Likewise, a MAP2 epitope that is not shared with the neurofibrillary tangle also has been located. Both epitopes are in the projection portion of the molecule. A bovine MAP2 cyanogen bromide fragment, which contains the epitope shared with the neurofibrillary tangle, is partially insoluble under aqueous conditions, probably due to the aggregation of oppositely charged residues. Thus, rapid cleavage of MAP2 to small peptides is probably necessary in vivo to prevent the aggregation of larger cleavage fragments.

  12. Amplifier arrays for CMB polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Lawrence, Charles R.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Wells, Mary M.; Kangaslahti, Pekka; Dawson, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    Cryogenic low noise amplifier technology has been successfully used in the study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). MMIC (Monolithic Millimeter wave Integrated Circuit) technology makes the mass production of coherent detection receivers feasible.

  13. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a linearized formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However, this procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y -type distortions which is degenerate with the thermal Sunyaev Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and primordial y -distortions. They can nevertheless be well modeled and accounted for. We show that the distortions arise from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y -channel which couples to all multipoles, mostly affecting the range ℓ≲400 . This should be visible in Planck's y -maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 12. We note however that such frequency-dependent terms carry no new information on the nature of the CMB dipole. This implies that the real significance of Planck's Doppler coupling measurements is actually lower than reported by the collaboration. Finally, we quantify the level of contamination in tSZ and primordial y -type distortions and show that it is above the sensitivity of proposed next-generation CMB experiments.

  14. CMB Polarization with BICEP2 and Keck-Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pryke, Clement; BICEP2 and Keck-Array Collaborations

    2013-01-01

    BICEP2 is an evolution from the highly successful BICEP CMB polarization experiment. In turn Keck-Array is an array of BICEP2 like receivers to achieve an additional increase in sensitivity. All these experiments are located at the South Pole in Antarctica and target the CMB B-mode polarization signal which is predicted to exist in many simpler models of Inflation at angular scales of several degrees. The design and performance of BICEP2 and Keck-Array is described and some preliminary polarization maps are presented.

  15. CMB anomalies after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2016-09-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP and by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the solar system, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary ΛCDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, which seem to imply a violation of statistical isotropy and scale invariance of inflationary perturbations. In this contribution we present a critical analysis of our current understanding and discuss several ideas of how to make further progress.

  16. Multiparental Mapping of Plant Height and Flowering Time QTL in Partially Isogenic Sorghum Families

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, R. H.; Thurber, C. S.; Assaranurak, I.; Brown, P. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sorghum varieties suitable for grain production at temperate latitudes show dwarfism and photoperiod insensitivity, both of which are controlled by a small number of loci with large effects. We studied the genetic control of plant height and flowering time in five sorghum families (A–E), each derived from a cross between a tropical line and a partially isogenic line carrying introgressions derived from a common, temperate-adapted donor. A total of 724 F2:3 lines were phenotyped in temperate and tropical environments for plant height and flowering time and scored at 9139 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing. Biparental mapping was compared with multiparental mapping in different subsets of families (AB, ABC, ABCD, and ABCDE) using both a GWAS approach, which fit each QTL as a single effect across all families, and using a joint linkage approach, which fit QTL effects as nested within families. GWAS using all families (ABCDE) performed best at the cloned Dw3 locus, whereas joint linkage using all families performed best at the cloned Ma1 locus. Both multiparental approaches yielded apparently synthetic associations due to genetic heterogeneity and were highly dependent on the subset of families used. Comparison of all mapping approaches suggests that a GA2-oxidase underlies Dw1, and that a mir172a gene underlies a Dw1-linked flowering time QTL. PMID:25237111

  17. Multiparental mapping of plant height and flowering time QTL in partially isogenic sorghum families.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R H; Thurber, C S; Assaranurak, I; Brown, P J

    2014-09-01

    Sorghum varieties suitable for grain production at temperate latitudes show dwarfism and photoperiod insensitivity, both of which are controlled by a small number of loci with large effects. We studied the genetic control of plant height and flowering time in five sorghum families (A-E), each derived from a cross between a tropical line and a partially isogenic line carrying introgressions derived from a common, temperate-adapted donor. A total of 724 F2:3 lines were phenotyped in temperate and tropical environments for plant height and flowering time and scored at 9139 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing. Biparental mapping was compared with multiparental mapping in different subsets of families (AB, ABC, ABCD, and ABCDE) using both a GWAS approach, which fit each QTL as a single effect across all families, and using a joint linkage approach, which fit QTL effects as nested within families. GWAS using all families (ABCDE) performed best at the cloned Dw3 locus, whereas joint linkage using all families performed best at the cloned Ma1 locus. Both multiparental approaches yielded apparently synthetic associations due to genetic heterogeneity and were highly dependent on the subset of families used. Comparison of all mapping approaches suggests that a GA2-oxidase underlies Dw1, and that a mir172a gene underlies a Dw1-linked flowering time QTL. PMID:25237111

  18. Multiparental mapping of plant height and flowering time QTL in partially isogenic sorghum families.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R H; Thurber, C S; Assaranurak, I; Brown, P J

    2014-09-18

    Sorghum varieties suitable for grain production at temperate latitudes show dwarfism and photoperiod insensitivity, both of which are controlled by a small number of loci with large effects. We studied the genetic control of plant height and flowering time in five sorghum families (A-E), each derived from a cross between a tropical line and a partially isogenic line carrying introgressions derived from a common, temperate-adapted donor. A total of 724 F2:3 lines were phenotyped in temperate and tropical environments for plant height and flowering time and scored at 9139 SNPs using genotyping-by-sequencing. Biparental mapping was compared with multiparental mapping in different subsets of families (AB, ABC, ABCD, and ABCDE) using both a GWAS approach, which fit each QTL as a single effect across all families, and using a joint linkage approach, which fit QTL effects as nested within families. GWAS using all families (ABCDE) performed best at the cloned Dw3 locus, whereas joint linkage using all families performed best at the cloned Ma1 locus. Both multiparental approaches yielded apparently synthetic associations due to genetic heterogeneity and were highly dependent on the subset of families used. Comparison of all mapping approaches suggests that a GA2-oxidase underlies Dw1, and that a mir172a gene underlies a Dw1-linked flowering time QTL.

  19. Comparative mapping reveals partial conservation of synteny at the apomixis locus in Paspalum spp.

    PubMed

    Pupilli, F; Martinez, E J; Busti, A; Calderini, O; Quarin, C L; Arcioni, S

    2004-01-01

    In plants, gametophytic apomixis is a form of asexual reproduction that leads to the formation of seed-derived offspring that are genetically identical to the mother plant. A common set of RFLP markers, including five rice anchor markers previously shown to be linked to apomixis in Paspalum simplex, were used to detect linkage with apomixis in P. notatum and P. malacophyllum. A comparative map of the region around the apomixis locus was constructed for the three Paspalum species, and compared to the rice map. The locus that controls apomixis in P. simplex was almost completely conserved in the closely related species P. malacophyllum, whereas it was only partially represented in the distantly related species P. notatum. Although strong synteny of markers was noted between this locus and a portion of rice chromosome 12 in both P. simplex and P. malacophyllum, the same locus in P. notatum was localized to a hybrid chromosome which carries markers that map to rice chromosomes 2 and 12. All three Paspalum species showed recombination suppression at the apomixis locus; in the case of P. notatum, this might be due to a heterozygosity for a translocation that most probably negatively interferes with chromosomal pairing near the locus. A common set of markers that show linkage with apomixis in all three Paspalum species define a portion of the apomixis-controlling locus that is likely to contain genes critical for apomictic reproduction.

  20. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-15

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay l{sup -6} for large multipole l. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At l{approx}500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |f{sub NL}{sup loc}|{approx_equal}10{sup 3}, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at l=10. Current bounds on f{sub NL} are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our f{sub NL} estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  1. CMB temperature bispectrum induced by cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2009-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) bispectrum of the temperature anisotropies induced by a network of cosmic strings is derived for small angular scales, under the assumption that the principal cause of temperature fluctuations is the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We provide analytical expressions for all isosceles triangle configurations in Fourier space. Their overall amplitude is amplified as the inverse cube of the angle and diverges for flat triangles. The isosceles configurations generically lead to a negative bispectrum with a power-law decay ℓ-6 for large multipole ℓ. However, collapsed triangles are found to be associated with a positive bispectrum whereas the squeezed triangles still exhibit negative values. We then compare our analytical estimates to a direct computation of the bispectrum from a set of 300 statistically independent temperature maps obtained from Nambu-Goto cosmic string simulations in a Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker universe. We find good agreement for the overall amplitude, the power-law behavior, and the angle dependency of the various triangle configurations. At ℓ˜500 the cosmic string Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect contributes approximately the same equilateral CMB bispectrum amplitude as an inflationary model with |fNLloc|≃103, if the strings contribute about 10% of the temperature power spectrum at ℓ=10. Current bounds on fNL are not derived using cosmic string bispectrum templates, and so our fNL estimate cannot be used to derive bounds on strings. However it does suggest that string bispectrum templates should be included in the search of CMB non-Gaussianities.

  2. Bolometeric detector arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Day, P.; Goldin, A.; Golwala, S.; Holmes, W.; Irwin, K.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Rossinot, P.; Sterb, J.; Vayonakis, A.; Wang, G.; Yun, M.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the development of antenna coupled bolometers for CMB polarization experiments. The necessary components of a bolometric CMB polarimeter - a beam forming element, a band defining filter, and detectors - are all fabricated on a silicon chip with photolithography.

  3. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster {alpha}-glucosidase: Partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.F.; Roberts, D.B.

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for {alpha}-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enable us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with {alpha}- 1 -4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster alpha-glucosidase: partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping.

    PubMed

    Parker, G F; Roberts, D B

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for alpha-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enabled us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with alpha-1-4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism.

  5. Dynamics of Hollow Atom Formation in Intense X-Ray Pulses Probed by Partial Covariance Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, L. J.; Zhaunerchyk, V.; Mucke, M.; Squibb, R. J.; Siano, M.; Eland, J. H. D.; Linusson, P.; v. d. Meulen, P.; Salén, P.; Thomas, R. D.; Larsson, M.; Foucar, L.; Ullrich, J.; Motomura, K.; Mondal, S.; Ueda, K.; Osipov, T.; Fang, L.; Murphy, B. F.; Berrah, N.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J. D.; Schorb, S.; Messerschmidt, M.; Glownia, J. M.; Cryan, J. P.; Coffee, R. N.; Takahashi, O.; Wada, S.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Richter, R.; Prince, K. C.; Feifel, R.

    2013-08-01

    When exposed to ultraintense x-radiation sources such as free electron lasers (FELs) the innermost electronic shell can efficiently be emptied, creating a transient hollow atom or molecule. Understanding the femtosecond dynamics of such systems is fundamental to achieving atomic resolution in flash diffraction imaging of noncrystallized complex biological samples. We demonstrate the capacity of a correlation method called “partial covariance mapping” to probe the electron dynamics of neon atoms exposed to intense 8 fs pulses of 1062 eV photons. A complete picture of ionization processes competing in hollow atom formation and decay is visualized with unprecedented ease and the map reveals hitherto unobserved nonlinear sequences of photoionization and Auger events. The technique is particularly well suited to the high counting rate inherent in FEL experiments.

  6. Amiba Observation of CMB Anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Kin-Wang

    2003-03-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropies (AMiBA), a 13-element dual-channel 85-105 GHz interferometer array with full polarization capabilities, is being built to search for high redshift clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect as well as to probe the polarization properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We discuss several important issues in the observation of the CMB anisotropies such as observing strategy, l space resolution and mosaicing, optimal estimation of the power spectra, and ground pickup removal.

  7. Probing cosmic strings with satellite CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, E.; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Smoot, G.F. E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2010-09-01

    We study the problem of searching for cosmic string signal patterns in the present high resolution and high sensitivity observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). This article discusses a technique capable of recognizing Kaiser-Stebbins effect signatures in total intensity anisotropy maps from isolated strings. We derive the statistical distributions of null detections from purely Gaussian fluctuations and instrumental performances of the operating satellites, and show that the biggest factor that produces confusion is represented by the acoustic oscillation features of the scale comparable to the size of horizon at recombination. Simulations show that the distribution of null detections converges to a χ{sup 2} distribution, with detectability threshold at 99% confidence level corresponding to a string induced step signal with an amplitude of about 100 μK which corresponds to a limit of roughly Gμ ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup −6}. We implement simulations for deriving the statistics of spurious detections caused by extra-Galactic and Galactic foregrounds. For diffuse Galactic foregrounds, which represents the dominant source of contamination, we construct sky masks outlining the available region of the sky where the Galactic confusion is sub-dominant, specializing our analysis to the case represented by the frequency coverage and nominal sensitivity and resolution of the Planck experiment. As for other CMB measurements, the maximum available area, corresponding to 7%, is reached where the foreground emission is expected to be minimum, in the 70–100 GHz interval.

  8. Delensing the CMB with the cosmic infrared background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwin, Blake D.; Schmittfull, Marcel

    2015-08-01

    As confusion with lensing B modes begins to limit experiments that search for primordial B-mode polarization, robust methods for delensing the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization sky are becoming increasingly important. We investigate in detail the possibility of delensing the CMB with the cosmic infrared background (CIB), emission from dusty star-forming galaxies that is an excellent tracer of the CMB lensing signal, in order to improve constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r . We find that the maps of the CIB, such as current Planck satellite maps at 545 GHz, can be used to remove more than half of the lensing B-mode power. Calculating optimal combinations of different large-scale-structure tracers for delensing, we find that coadding CIB data and external arcminute-resolution CMB lensing reconstruction can lead to significant additional improvements in delensing performance. We investigate whether measurement uncertainty in the CIB power spectra will degrade the delensing performance if no model of the CIB spectra is assumed, and instead the CIB power spectra are marginalized over, when constraining r . We find that such uncertainty does not significantly affect B-mode surveys smaller than a few thousand degrees. Even for larger surveys it causes only a moderate reduction in CIB delensing performance, especially if the surveys have high (arcminute) resolution, which allows self calibration of the delensing procedure. Though further work on the impact of foreground residuals is required, our overall conclusions for delensing with current CIB data are optimistic: this delensing method can tighten constraints on r by a factor up to ≈2.2 , and by a factor up to ≈4 when combined with external lensing reconstruction for ≈3 μ K -arcmin noise, without requiring the modeling of CIB properties. CIB delensing is thus a promising method for the upcoming generation of CMB polarization surveys.

  9. Advanced Antenna-Coupled Superconducting Detector Arrays for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James

    2014-01-01

    We are developing high-sensitivity millimeter-wave detector arrays for measuring the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This development is directed to advance the technology readiness of the Inflation Probe mission in NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program. The Inflation Probe is a fourth-generation CMB satellite that will measure the polarization of the CMB to astrophysical limits, characterizing the inflationary polarization signal, mapping large-scale structure based on polarization induced by gravitational lensing, and mapping Galactic magnetic fields through measurements of polarized dust emission. The inflationary polarization signal is produced by a background of gravitational waves from the epoch of inflation, an exponential expansion of space-time in the early universe, with an amplitude that depends on the physical mechanism producing inflation. The inflationary polarization signal may be distinguished by its unique 'B-mode' vector properties from polarization from the density variations that predominantly source CMB temperature anisotropy. Mission concepts for the Inflation Probe are being developed in the US, Europe and Japan. The arrays are based on planar antennas that provide integral beam collimation, polarization analysis, and spectral band definition in a compact lithographed format that eliminates discrete fore-optics such as lenses and feedhorns. The antennas are coupled to transition-edge superconducting bolometers, read out with multiplexed SQUID current amplifiers. The superconducting sensors and readouts developed in this program share common technologies with NASA X-ray and FIR detector applications. Our program targets developments required for space observations, and we discuss our technical progress over the past two years and plans for future development. We are incorporating arrays into active sub-orbital and ground-based experiments, which advance technology readiness while producing state of the art CMB

  10. What will we learn from the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, S.

    1997-10-01

    Within the next decade, experiments measuring the anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) will add greatly to our knowledge of the universe. There are dozens of experiments scheduled to take data over the next several years, capped by the satellite missions of NASA (MAP) and ESA (PLANCK). What will we learn from these experiments? I argue that the potential pay-off is immense: We are quite likely to determine cosmological parameters to unprecedented accuracy. This will provide key information about the theory of structure formation and even about the physics behind inflation. If the experiments succeed, can anything spoil this pay-off? I focus on three possible spoilers - foregrounds, reionization, and defect models - and argue that we have every reason to be optimistic.

  11. Cross-correlation analysis of CMB with foregrounds for residuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aluri, Pavan K.; Rath, Pranati K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we try to probe whether a clean cosmic microwave background (CMB) map obtained from the raw satellite data using a cleaning procedure is sufficiently clean. Specifically, we study if there are any foreground residuals still present in the cleaned data using a cross-correlation statistic. Residual contamination is expected to be present, primarily, in the Galactic plane due to the high emission from our own Galaxy. A foreground mask is applied conventionally to avoid biases in the estimated quantities of interest due to foreground leakage. Here, we map foreground residuals, if present, in the unmasked region i.e. outside a CMB analysis mask. Further locally extended foreground-contaminated regions, found eventually, are studied to understand them better. The few contaminated regions thus identified may be used to slightly extend the available masks to make them more stringent.

  12. How accurately can suborbital experiments measure the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira-Costa, Angelica de; Tegmark, Max; Devlin, Mark J.; Page, Lyman; Miller, Amber D.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Xu Yongzhong

    2005-02-15

    Great efforts are currently being channeled into ground- and balloon-based CMB experiments, mainly to explore polarization and anisotropy on small angular scales. To optimize instrumental design and assess experimental prospects, it is important to understand in detail the atmosphere-related systematic errors that limit the science achievable with new instruments. As a step in this direction, we spatially compare the 648 square degree ground- and balloon-based QMASK map with the atmosphere-free WMAP map, finding beautiful agreement on all angular scales where both are sensitive. Although much work remains on quantifying atmospheric effects on CMB experiments, this is a reassuring quantitative assessment of the power of the state-of-the-art fast-Fourier-transform- and matrix-based mapmaking techniques that have been used for QMASK and virtually all subsequent experiments.

  13. Distinguishing between the Partial-Mapping Preparation Hypothesis and the Failure-to-Engage Hypothesis of Residual Switch Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsen, Job P.; de Jong, Ritske

    2010-01-01

    Lien, Ruthruff, Remington, & Johnston (2005) reported residual switch cost differences between stimulus-response (S-R) pairs and proposed the partial-mapping preparation (PMP) hypothesis, which states that advance preparation will typically be limited to a subset of S-R pairs because of structural capacity limitations, to account for these…

  14. Can CMB Experiments Find Planet Nine?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    authors propose that CMB experiments with high enough resolution (~5m telescopes and larger) could have the ability to detect Planet Nine!Theres one major catch: how can we differentiate between Planet Nine and the ~4000 foreground asteroids that are brighter than 30 mJy at millimeter wavelengths?Cowan and collaborators argue that this can be done using a combination of asteroid databases and parallax measurements. The authors calculate that Planet Nine should move roughly a few arcseconds per day, mostly due to parallax. In comparison, asteroids will move ~10 arcminutes per day in a combination of proper motion and parallax an order of magnitude faster than Planet Nine.Resolution ConstraintsTo hunt down Planet Nine, we therefore need telescopes that can not only resolve a 30 mJy point source, but can also resolve an annual parallax motion of ~5 arcminutes per year.The authors demonstrate that several current and planned CMB experiments have the resolution and ability to detect Planet Nine, provided that they map large swatches of the sky and return to the same regions every few months. These experiments include CCAT, the South Pole Telescope, the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, CMB-S4, and even possibly Planck.With the astronomical community coming together to brainstormwaysto trackdown this elusive possible planet, the use of CMB experiments is an intriguing option. And even if Planet Nine is discovered by other means, measuring its heat signaturewillteach usmore about the internal workings of giant planets.CitationNicolas B. Cowan et al 2016 ApJ 822 L2. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/822/1/L2

  15. Early Universe with CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souradeep, Tarun

    2011-12-01

    The Universe is the grandest conceivable scale on which the human mind can strive to understand nature. The amazing aspect of cosmology, the branch of science that attempts to understand the origin and evolution of the Universe, is that it is largely comprehensible by applying the same basic laws of physics that we use for other branches of physics. The observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) is understood by applying the basic laws of radiative processes and transfer, masterfully covered in the classic text by S. Chandrasekhar, in the cosmological context. In addition to the now widely acclaimed temperature anisotropy, there is also linear polarization information imprinted on the observed Cosmic Microwave background. CMB polarization already has addressed, and promises to do a lot more to unravel the deepest fundamental queries about physics operating close to the origin of the Universe.

  16. The quintessential CMB, past & future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon; Sigurdson, Kris; Maxiboom Collaboration

    2001-02-01

    The past, present and future of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy research is discussed, with emphasis on the Boomerang and Maxima balloon experiments. These data are combined with large scale structure (LSS) information derived from local cluster abundances and galaxy clustering and high redshift supernova (SN1) observations to explore the inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ωb,ωcdm,Ωtot,ΩQ,wQ,ns,τC,σ8}. After marginalizing over the other cosmic and experimental variables, we find the current CMB+LSS+SN1 data gives Ωtot=1.04+/-0.05, consistent with (non-baroque) inflation theory. Restricting to Ωtot=1, we find a nearly scale invariant spectrum, ns=1.03+/-0.07. The CDM density, ωcdm=0.17+/-0.02, is in the expected range, but the baryon density, ωb≡Ωbh2=0.030+/-0.004, is slightly larger than the current 0.019+/-0.002 Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimate. Substantial dark (unclustered) energy is inferred, ΩQ~0.68+/-0.05, and CMB+LSS ΩQ values are compatible with the independent SN1 estimates. The dark energy equation of state, parameterized by a quintessence-field pressure-to-density ratio wQ, is not well determined by CMB+LSS (wQ<-0.3 at 95% CL), but when combined with SN1 the resulting wQ<-0.7 limit is quite consistent with the wQ=-1 cosmological constant case. Though forecasts of statistical errors on parameters for current and future experiments are rosy, rooting out systematic errors will define the true progress. .

  17. Probing gravity at large scales through CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; Ho, Shirley

    2015-06-01

    We describe a methodology to probe gravity with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence κ, specifically by measuring EG, the ratio of the Laplacian of the gravitational scalar potential difference to the velocity divergence. Using CMB lensing instead of galaxy-galaxy lensing avoids intrinsic alignments while also lacking a hard limit on the lens redshift and significant uncertainties in the source plane. We model EG for general relativity and modified gravity, finding that EG for f(R) gravity should be scale dependent due to the scale dependence of the growth rate f. Next, we construct an estimator for EG in terms of the galaxy-CMB lensing and galaxy clustering angular power spectra, along with the redshift-space distortion parameter β. We also forecast statistical errors for EG from the current Planck CMB lensing map and the spectroscopic galaxy and quasar samples from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 11, being 9 per cent with galaxies and 8 per cent when quasars are included. We also find that upcoming spectroscopic and photometric surveys, combined with the final Planck lensing map, can measure precisely the redshift- and scale dependence of EG out to redshifts z = 2 and higher, with photometric surveys having an advantage due to their high number densities. Advanced ACTPol's lensing map will increase the EG sensitivity even further. Finally, we find that Advanced ACTPol cross-correlated with spectroscopic (photometric) surveys can differentiate between general relativity and f(R) gravity at the level of 3σ (13σ). Performing a <1 per cent measurement of EG requires a 10 per cent precision in β from Euclid or Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, currently achievable with a spectroscopic survey but difficult with only a photometric survey.

  18. Interacted QTL mapping in partial NCII design provides evidences for breeding by design.

    PubMed

    Bu, Su Hong; Zhao, Xinwang; Xinwang, Zhao; Yi, Can; Wen, Jia; Tu, Jinxing; Jinxing, Tu; Zhang, Yuan Ming

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of heterosis in rice, maize and rapeseed has revolutionized crop production. Although elite hybrid cultivars are mainly derived from the F1 crosses between two groups of parents, named NCII mating design, little has been known about the methodology of how interacted effects influence quantitative trait performance in the population. To bridge genetic analysis with hybrid breeding, here we integrated an interacted QTL mapping approach with breeding by design in partial NCII mating design. All the potential main and interacted effects were included in one full model. If the number of the effects is huge, bulked segregant analysis were used to test which effects were associated with the trait. All the selected effects were further shrunk by empirical Bayesian, so significant effects could be identified. A series of Monte Carlo simulations was performed to validate the new method. Furthermore, all the significant effects were used to calculate genotypic values of all the missing F1 hybrids, and all these F1 phenotypic or genotypic values were used to predict elite parents and parental combinations. Finally, the new method was adopted to dissect the genetic foundation of oil content in 441 rapeseed parents and 284 F1 hybrids. As a result, 8 main-effect QTL and 37 interacted QTL were found and used to predict 10 elite restorer lines, 10 elite sterile lines and 10 elite parental crosses. Similar results across various methods and in previous studies and a high correlation coefficient (0.76) between the predicted and observed phenotypes validated the proposed method in this study.

  19. Non-Gaussianity and CMB aberration and Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Catena, Riccardo; Liguori, Michele; Renzi, Alessandro; Notari, Alessio E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it E-mail: arenzi@pd.infn.it

    2013-09-01

    The peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame induces a deflection in the arrival direction of the observed photons (also known as CMB aberration) and a Doppler shift in the measured photon frequencies. As a consequence, aberration and Doppler effects induce non trivial correlations between the harmonic coefficients of the observed CMB temperature maps. In this paper we investigate whether these correlations generate a bias on non-Gaussianity estimators f{sub NL}. We perform this analysis simulating a large number of temperature maps with Planck-like resolution (lmax = 2000) as different realizations of the same cosmological fiducial model (WMAP7yr). We then add to these maps aberration and Doppler effects employing a modified version of the HEALPix code. We finally evaluate a generalization of the Komatsu, Spergel and Wandelt non-Gaussianity estimator for all the simulated maps, both when peculiar velocity effects have been considered and when these phenomena have been neglected. Using the value v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} for our peculiar velocity, we found that the aberration/Doppler induced non-Gaussian signal is at most of about half of the cosmic variance σ for f{sub NL} both in a full-sky and in a cut-sky experimental configuration, for local, equilateral and orthogonal estimators. We conclude therefore that when estimating f{sub NL} it is safe to ignore aberration and Doppler effects if the primordial map is already Gaussian. More work is necessary however to assess whether a map which contains non-Gaussianity can be significantly distorted by a peculiar velocity.

  20. A CMB GIBBS SAMPLER FOR LOCALIZED SECONDARY ANISOTROPIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, Philip; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Fuskeland, Unni; Wehus, Ingunn K.; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Górski, Krzysztof M.; Jewell, Jeffrey B.

    2015-07-20

    In addition to primary fluctuations, cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. However, secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev–Zel’dovich (TSZ–KSZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB. We develop a Bayesian formalism to rigorously characterize anisotropies that are localized on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalized to estimate the properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally tractable using a simple implementation based on the existing Commander component separation code and discuss how other types of secondary anisotropy can be accommodated within our framework.

  1. Reconstruction of CMB temperature anisotropies with primordial CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guo-Chin; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2016-07-01

    Scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation in galaxy clusters induces polarization signals determined by the quadrupole anisotropy in the photon distribution at the location of clusters. This `remote quadrupole' derived from the measurements of the induced polarization in galaxy clusters provides an opportunity to reconstruct local CMB temperature anisotropies. In this Letter, we develop an algorithm of the reconstruction through the estimation of the underlying primordial gravitational potential, which is the origin of the CMB temperature and polarization fluctuations and CMB induced polarization in galaxy clusters. We found a nice reconstruction for the quadrupole and octopole components of the CMB temperature anisotropies with the assistance of the CMB induced polarization signals. The reconstruction can be an important consistency test on the puzzles of CMB anomalies, especially for the low-quadrupole and axis-of-evil problems reported in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and Planck data.

  2. Nonlinear electrodynamics and CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Cuesta, Herman J. Mosquera; Lambiase, G. E-mail: lambiase@sa.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    Recently WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments have set stringent constraints on the polarization angle of photons propagating in an expanding universe: Δα = (−2.4±1.9)°. The polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB) is reviewed in the context of nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED). We compute the polarization angle of photons propagating in a cosmological background with planar symmetry. For this purpose, we use the Pagels-Tomboulis (PT) Lagrangian density describing NLED, which has the form L ∼ (X/Λ{sup 4}){sup δ−1} X, where X = ¼F{sub αβ}F{sup αβ}, and δ the parameter featuring the non-Maxwellian character of the PT nonlinear description of the electromagnetic interaction. After looking at the polarization components in the plane orthogonal to the (x)-direction of propagation of the CMB photons, the polarization angle is defined in terms of the eccentricity of the universe, a geometrical property whose evolution on cosmic time (from the last scattering surface to the present) is constrained by the strength of magnetic fields over extragalactic distances.

  3. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  4. QTL mapping of partial resistance in winter wheat to Stagonospora nodorum blotch.

    PubMed

    Czembor, Pawel C; Arseniuk, Edward; Czaplicki, Andrzej; Song, Qijiang; Cregan, Perry B; Ueng, Peter P

    2003-08-01

    Stagonospora nodorum blotch is an important foliar and glume disease in cereals. Inheritance of resistance in wheat appears to be quantitative. To date, breeding of partially resistant cultivars has been the only effective way to combat this pathogen. The partial resistance components, namely length of incubation period, disease severity, and length of latent period, were evaluated on a population of doubled haploids derived from a cross between the partially resistant Triticum aestivum 'Liwilla' and susceptible Triticum aestivum 'Begra'. Experiments were conducted in a controlled environment and the fifth leaf was examined. Molecular analyses were based on bulked segregant analyses using 240 microsatellite markers. Four QTLs were significantly associated with partial resistance components and were located on chromosomes 2B, 3B, 5B, and 5D. The percentage of phenotypic variance explained by a single QTL ranged from 14 to 21% for incubation period, from 16 to 37% for disease severity, and from 13 to 28% for latent period,

  5. Circular polarization of the CMB: Foregrounds and detection prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Soma; Lubin, Philip

    2016-07-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) is one of the finest probes of cosmology. Its all-sky temperature and linear polarization fluctuations have been measured precisely at a level of δ T /TCMB˜10-6 . In contrast, circular polarization (C P ) of the CMB has not been precisely explored. The current upper limit on the C P of the CMB is at a level of δ V /TCMB˜10-4 and is limited on large scales. Some of the cosmologically important sources which can induce a C P in the CMB include early Universe symmetry breaking, a primordial magnetic field, galaxy clusters, and Pop III stars (also known as the first stars). Among these sources, Pop III stars are expected to induce the strongest signal with levels strongly dependent on the frequency of observation and on the number, Np, of the Pop III stars per halo. Optimistically, a C P signal in the CMB resulting from the Pop III stars could be at a level of δ V /TCMB˜2 ×10-7 in scales of 1° at 10 GHz, which is much smaller than the currently existing upper limits on the C P measurements. Primary foregrounds in the cosmological C P detection will come from the galactic synchrotron emission, which is naturally (intrinsically) circularly polarized. We use data-driven models of the galactic magnetic field, thermal electron density, and relativistic electron density to simulate all-sky maps of the galactic C P . This work also points out that the galactic C P levels are important below 50 GHz and is an important factor for telescopes aiming to detect primordial B modes using C P as a systematic rejection channel. In this paper, we focus on a SNR evaluation for the detectability of the Pop III induced C P signal in the CMB. We find that a SNR higher than unity is achievable, for example, with a 10 m telescope and an observation time of 20 months at 10 GHz, if Np≥100 . We also find that, if frequency of observation and resolution of the beam is appropriately chosen, a SNR higher than unity is possible with Np≥10 and

  6. Planck 2015 results. XVI. Isotropy and statistics of the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Aluri, P. K.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casaponsa, B.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Pant, N.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-08-01

    We test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies using observations made by the Planck satellite. Our results are based mainly on the full Planck mission for temperature, but also include some polarization measurements. In particular, we consider the CMB anisotropy maps derived from the multi-frequency Planck data by several component-separation methods. For the temperature anisotropies, we find excellent agreement between results based on these sky maps over both a very large fraction of the sky and a broad range of angular scales, establishing that potential foreground residuals do not affect our studies. Tests of skewness, kurtosis, multi-normality, N-point functions, and Minkowski functionals indicate consistency with Gaussianity, while a power deficit at large angular scales is manifested in several ways, for example low map variance. The results of a peak statistics analysis are consistent with the expectations of a Gaussian random field. The "Cold Spot" is detected with several methods, including map kurtosis, peak statistics, and mean temperature profile. We thoroughly probe the large-scale dipolar power asymmetry, detecting it with several independent tests, and address the subject of a posteriori correction. Tests of directionality suggest the presence of angular clustering from large to small scales, but at a significance that is dependent on the details of the approach. We perform the first examination of polarization data, finding the morphology of stacked peaks to be consistent with the expectations of statistically isotropic simulations. Where they overlap, these results are consistent with the Planck 2013 analysis based on the nominal mission data and provide our most thorough view of the statistics of the CMB fluctuations to date.

  7. Spin-SILC: CMB polarisation component separation with spin wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Keir K.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Leistedt, Boris; McEwen, Jason D.; Pontzen, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    We present Spin-SILC, a new foreground component separation method that accurately extracts the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarisation E and B modes from raw multifrequency Stokes Q and U measurements of the microwave sky. Spin-SILC is an internal linear combination method that uses spin wavelets to analyse the spin-2 polarisation signal P = Q + iU. The wavelets are additionally directional (non-axisymmetric). This allows different morphologies of signals to be separated and therefore the cleaning algorithm is localised using an additional domain of information. The advantage of spin wavelets over standard scalar wavelets is to simultaneously and self-consistently probe scales and directions in the polarisation signal P = Q + iU and in the underlying E and B modes, therefore providing the ability to perform component separation and E-B decomposition concurrently for the first time. We test Spin-SILC on full-mission Planck simulations and data and show the capacity to correctly recover the underlying cosmological E and B modes. We also demonstrate a strong consistency of our CMB maps with those derived from existing component separation methods. Spin-SILC can be combined with the pseudo- and pure E-B spin wavelet estimators presented in a companion paper to reliably extract the cosmological signal in the presence of complicated sky cuts and noise. Therefore, it will provide a computationally-efficient method to accurately extract the CMB E and B modes for future polarisation experiments.

  8. Disformal transformations on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burrage, Clare; Cespedes, Sebastian; Davis, Anne-Christine

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study the role of disformal transformation on cosmological backgrounds and its relation to the speed of sound for tensor modes. A speed different from one for tensor modes can arise in several contexts, such as Galileons theories or massive gravity, nevertheless the speed is very constrained to be one by observations of gravitational wave emission. It has been shown that in inflation a disformal transformation allows to set the speed for tensor modes to one without making changes to the curvature power spectrum. Here we show that this invariance does not hold when considering the CMB anisotropy power spectrum. It turns out that the after doing the transformation there is an imprint on the acoustic peaks and the diffusion damping. This has interesting consequences; here we explore quartic galileon theories which allow a modified speed for tensor modes. For these theories the transformation can be used to constraint the parameter space in different regimes.

  9. Search for primordial symmetry breakings in CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-06-01

    There are possibilities to violate symmetries (e.g. parity and rotational invariance) in the primordial cosmological fluctuations. Such symmetry breakings can imprint very rich signatures in late-time phenomena, which may be possible to observe. Especially, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) will change its face drastically, corresponding to the symmetry-breaking types, since the harmonic-space representation is very sensitive to the statistical, spin and angular dependences of cosmological perturbations. Here, we discuss (1) general responses of CMB to the symmetry breakings, (2) some theoretical models creating interesting CMB signatures, and (3) aspects of the estimation from observational data.

  10. A CMB foreground study in WMAP data: Extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It serves as a primary tool to understand the global properties, content and evolution of the universe. Since 2001, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite has been napping the full sky anisotropy with unprecedented accuracy, precision and reliability. The CMB angular power spectrum calculated from the WMAP full sky maps not only enables accurate testing of cosmological models, but also places significant constraints on model parameters. The CMB signal in the WMAP sky maps is contaminated by microwave emission from the Milky Way and from extragalactic sources. Therefore, in order to use the maps reliably for cosmological studies, the foreground signals must be well understood and removed from the maps. This thesis focuses on the separation of two foreground contaminants from the WMAP maps: extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission. Extragalactic point sources constitute the most important foreground on small angular scales. Various methods have been applied to the WMAP single frequency maps to extract sources. However, due to the limited angular resolution of WMAP, it is possible to confuse positive CMB excursions with point sources or miss sources that are embedded in negative CMB fluctuations. We present a novel CMB-free source finding technique that utilizes the spectrum difference of point sources and CMB to form internal linear combinations of multifrequency maps to suppress the CMB and better reveal sources. When applied to the WMAP 41, 64 and 94 GHz maps, this technique has not only enabled detection of sources that are previously cataloged by independent methods, but also allowed disclosure of new sources. Without the noise contribution from the CMB, this method responds rapidly with the integration time. The number of detections varies as 0( t 0.72 in the two-band search and 0( t 0.70 in the three-band search from one year to five years

  11. Genome-wide association mapping of partial resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome-wide association mapping has recently emerged as a valuable approach to refine genetic basis of polygenic resistance to plant diseases, which are increasingly used in integrated strategies for durable crop protection. Aphanomyces euteiches is a soil borne pathogen of pea and other legumes wor...

  12. CMB temperature lensing power reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Efstathiou, George; Challinor, Anthony; Bielewicz, Pawel

    2011-02-15

    We study the reconstruction of the lensing potential power spectrum from CMB temperature data, with an eye to the Planck experiment. We work with the optimal quadratic estimator of Okamoto and Hu, which we characterize thoroughly in an application to the reconstruction of the lensing power spectrum. We find that at multipoles L<250, our current understanding of this estimator is biased at the 15% level by beyond-gradient terms in the Taylor expansion of lensing effects. We present the full lensed trispectrum to fourth order in the lensing potential to explain this effect. We show that the low-L bias, as well as a previously known bias at high L, is relevant to the determination of cosmology and must be corrected for in order to avoid significant parameter errors. We also investigate the covariance of the reconstructed power, finding broad correlations of {approx_equal}0.1%. Finally, we discuss several small improvements which may be made to the optimal estimator to mitigate these problems.

  13. Statistical aspect of trait mapping using a dense set of markers: A partial review

    SciTech Connect

    Dupuis, J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a review of statistical methods used to locate trait loci using maps of markers spanning the whole genome. Such maps are becoming readily available and can be especially useful in mapping traits that are non Mendelian. Genome-wide search for a trait locus is often called a {open_quotes}global search{close_quotes}. Global search methods include, but are not restricted to, identifying disease susceptibility genes using affected relative pairs, finding quantitative trait loci in experimental organisms and locating quantitative trait loci in humans. For human linkage, we concentrate on methods using pairs of affected relatives rather than pedigree analysis. We begin in the next section with a review of work on the use of affected pairs of relatives to identify gene loci that increase susceptibility to a particular disease. We first review Risch`s 1990 series of papers. Risch`s method can be used to search the entire genome for such susceptibility genes. Using Risch`s idea Elston explored the issue of how many pairs and markers are necessary to reach a certain probability of detecting a locus if there exists one. He proposed a more economical two stage design that uses few markers at the first stage but adds markers around the {open_quotes}promising{close_quotes} area of the genome at the second stage. However, Risch and Elston do not use multipoint linkage analysis, which takes into account all markers at once (rather than one at a time) in the calculation of the test statistic. Such multipoint methods for affected relatives have been developed by Feingold and Feingold et al. The last authors` multipoint method is based on a continuous specification of identity by descent between the affected relatives but can also be used for a set of linked markers spanning the genome. A brief description of their method and treatment of more complex issues such as combining relative pairs is included. 29 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Quantifying the Effect of Component Covariances in CMB Extraction from Multi-frequency Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Nicholas G.

    2008-01-01

    Linear combination methods provide a global method for component separation of multi-frequency data. We present such a method that allows for consideration of possible covariances between the desired cosmic microwave background signal and various foreground signals that are also present. We also recover information on the foregrounds including the number of foregrounds, their spectra and templates. In all this, the covariances, which we would only expect to vanish 'in the mean' are included as parameters expressing the fundamental uncertainty due to this type of cosmic variance. When we make the reasonable assumption that the CMB is Gaussian, we can compute both a mean recovered CMB map and also an RMS error map, The mean map coincides with WMAP's Internal Linear Combination map.

  15. Polarized cosmic microwave background map recovery with sparse component separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobin, J.; Sureau, F.; Starck, J.-L.

    2015-11-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting this information from microwave surveys requires distinguishing between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which means solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies, but very rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to distinguish between the various components. More recent methods, which instead emphasize the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimates of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, we here introduce a new component separation technique dubbed the polarized generalized morphological component analysis (PolGMCA), which refines previous work to specifically work on the estimation of the polarized CMB maps: i) it benefits from a recently introduced sparsity-based mechanism to cope with partially correlated components; ii) it builds upon estimator aggregation techniques to further yield a better noise contamination/non-Gaussian foreground residual trade-off. The PolGMCA algorithm is evaluated on simulations of full-sky polarized microwave sky simulations using the Planck Sky Model (PSM). The simulations show that the proposed method achieves a precise recovery of the CMB map in polarization with low-noise and foreground contamination residuals. It provides improvements over standard methods, especially on the Galactic center, where estimating the CMB is challenging.

  16. Variable major proteins of Borrelia hermsii. Epitope mapping and partial sequence analysis of CNBr peptides

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    The variable major proteins (VMP) of serotypes 7 and 21 of the relapsing fever agent Borrelia hermsii were isolated by detergent extraction and high performance liquid chromatography. Cyanogen bromide (CNBr) digestion of the isolated VMP yielded two peptides of apparent molecular weights 20,000 (20 K) and 16 K from VMP7, and three peptides of 14.5, 14, and 7 K mol wt from VMP21. Serotype-specific monoclonal antibodies bound in Western blots to one of each of the two or three CNBr fragments from the homologous VMP. A single monoclonal antibody bound to the whole cells, the isolated VMP, and a CNBr fragment of both serotype 7 and serotype 21. (This crossreactive antibody did not, however, bind to any of four other serotypes examined.) Regional conservation of structure between VMP7 and VMP21 was also shown by amino acid sequence analysis of the N-termini of the five CNBr fragments. One pair of aligned fragments from VMP7 and VMP21 had 80% amino acid homology in sequence; a second pair had 40% homology. The partial amino acid homologies between two VMP suggest that these proteins are products of members of a polygene family. PMID:2409197

  17. The CMB as a Dark Energy probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    We give a brief review of the known effects of a dynamical vacuum cosmological component, the dark energy, on the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We distinguish between a "classic" class of observables, used so far to constrain the average of the dark energy abundance in the redshift interval in which it is relevant for acceleration, and a "modern" class, aiming at the measurement of its differential redshift behavior. We show that the gravitationally lensed CMB belongs to the second class, as it can give a measure of the dark energy abundance at the time of equality with matter, occurring at about redshift 0.5. Indeed, the dark energy abundance at that epoch influences directly the lensing strength, which is injected at about the same time, if the source is the CMB. We illustrate this effect focusing on the curl (BB) component of CMB polarization, which is dominated by lensing on arcminute angular scales. An increasing dark energy abundance at the time of equality with matter, parameterized by a rising first order redshift derivative of its equation of state today, makes the BB power drop- ping with respect to a pure ΛCDM cosmology, keeping the other cosmological parameters and primordial amplitude fixed. We briefly comment on the forthcoming probes which might measure the lensing power on CMB.

  18. Mapping brain Fos immunoreactivity in response to water deprivation and partial rehydration: Influence of sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Carolina; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Vivas, Laura; De Luca, Laurival A

    2015-11-01

    Water deprivation (WD) followed by water intake to satiety, produces satiation of thirst and partial rehydration (PR). Thus, WD-PR is a natural method to differentiate thirst from sodium appetite. WD-PR also produces Fos immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in interconnected areas of a brain circuit postulated to subserve sodium appetite. In the present work, we evaluated the effect of sodium intake on Fos-ir produced by WD-PR in brain areas operationally defined according to the literature as either facilitatory or inhibitory to sodium intake. Isotonic NaCl was available for ingestion in a sodium appetite test performed immediately after a single episode of WD-PR. Sodium intake decreased Fos-ir in facilitatory areas such as the lamina terminalis (particularly subfornical organ and median preoptic nucleus), central amygdala and hypothalamic parvocellular paraventricular nucleus in the forebrain. Sodium intake also decreased Fos-ir in inhibitory areas such as the area postrema, lateral parabrachial nucleus and nucleus of the solitary tract in the hindbrain. In contrast, sodium intake further increased Fos-ir that was activated by water deprivation in the dorsal raphe nucleus, another inhibitory area localized in the hindbrain. WD-PR increased Fos-ir in the core and shell of the nucleus accumbens. Sodium intake reduced Fos-ir in both parts of the accumbens. In summary, sodium intake following WD-PR reduced Fos-ir in most facilitatory and inhibitory areas, but increased Fos-ir in another inhibitory area. It also reduced Fos-ir in a reward area (accumbens). The results suggest a functional link between sodium intake and the activity of the hindbrain-forebrain circuitry subserving reward and sodium appetite in response to water deprivation.

  19. Mapping amorphous material on a partially crystalline surface: nanothermal analysis for simultaneous characterisation and imaging of lactose compacts.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xuan; Reading, Mike; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2009-04-01

    The use of nanothermal analysis for mapping amorphous and crystalline lactose at a nanoscale is explored. Compressed tablets of amorphous and crystalline lactose (alone and mixed) were prepared and localised thermomechanical analysis (L-TMA) performed using micro- and nanothermal analysis in a addition to single point variable temperature pull-off force measurements. L-TMA was shown to be able to identify the different materials at a nanoscale via measurement of the thermal events associated with the amorphous and crystalline regions, while pull off force measurements showed that the adhesion of the amorphous material increased on approaching the T(g). Imaging was performed isothermally using topographic and pulsed force mode (PFM) measurements; both approaches were capable of discriminating two regions which L-TMA conformed to correspond to the two materials. In addition, force volume imaging (FVI) is suggested as a further approach to mapping the surfaces. We demonstrate that performing heated tip PFM measurements at a temperature close to the T(g) allows greater discrimination between the two regions. We therefore suggest that the nanothermal approach allows both characterisation and imaging of partially amorphous surfaces, and also demonstrate that heated tip imaging allows greater discrimination between crystalline and amorphous materials than is possible using ambient studies. PMID:18752293

  20. CMB μ distortion from primordial gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ota, Atsuhisa; Yamaguchi, Masahide; Takahashi, Tomo; Tashiro, Hiroyuki E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp E-mail: gucci@phys.titech.ac.jp

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new mechanism of generating the μ distortion in cosmic microwave background (CMB) originated from primordial gravitational waves. Such μ distortion is generated by the damping of the temperature anisotropies through the Thomson scattering, even on scales larger than that of Silk damping. This mechanism is in sharp contrast with that from the primordial curvature (scalar) perturbations, in which the temperature anisotropies mainly decay by Silk damping effects. We estimate the size of the μ distortion from the new mechanism, which can be used to constrain the amplitude of primordial gravitational waves on smaller scales independently from the CMB anisotropies, giving more wide-range constraint on their spectral index by combining the amplitude from the CMB anisotropies.

  1. Planck CMB anomalies: astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects and the curse of masking

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, A.; Starck, J.-L.; Paykari, P.; Sureau, F.; Bobin, J. E-mail: jstarck@cea.fr E-mail: florent.sureau@cea.fr

    2014-08-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes will be made available for download here http://www.cosmostat.org/anomaliesCMB.html.

  2. CMB lensing forecasts for constraining the primordial perturbations: adding to the CMB temperature and polarization information

    SciTech Connect

    Kasanda, Simon Muya; Moodley, Kavilan E-mail: moodleyk41@ukzn.ac.za

    2014-12-01

    We forecast how current (PLANCK) and future (PRISM) cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments constrain the adiabatic mode and its admixtures with primordial isocurvature modes. The forecasts are based on measurements of the reconstructed CMB lensing potential and lensing-induced CMB B-mode polarization anisotropies in combination with the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization anisotropies. We first study the characteristic features of the CMB temperature, polarization and lensing spectra for adiabatic and isocurvature modes. We then consider how information from the CMB lensing potential and B-mode polarization induced by lensing can improve constraints on an admixture of adiabatic and three correlated isocurvature modes. We find that the CMB lensing spectrum improves constraints on isocurvature modes by at most 10% for the PLANCK and PRISM experiments. The limited improvement is a result of the low amplitude of isocurvature lensing spectra and cancellations between these spectra that render them only slightly detectable. There is a larger gain from using the lensing-induced B-mode polarization spectrum measured by PRISM. In this case constraints on isocurvature mode amplitudes improve by as much as 40% relative to the CMB temperature and E-mode polarization constraints. The addition of both lensing and lensing-induced B-mode polarization information constrains isocurvature mode amplitudes at the few percent level or better. In the case of admixtures of the adiabatic mode with one or two correlated isocurvature modes we find that constraints at the percent level or better are possible. We investigate the dependence of our results to various assumptions in our analysis, such as the inclusion of dark energy parameters, the CMB temperature-lensing correlation, and the presence of primordial tensor modes, and find that these assumptions do not significantly change our main results.

  3. Studying reionization with secondary CMB anisotropies .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verde, L.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Haiman, Z.; Jimenez, R.

    It is an open question in Cosmology how the process of reionization happened and how the first galaxies and cosmological structures formed. Known probes of reionization are: Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization, observations of neutral hydrogen 21 cm hyperfine line, or direct observation of the first galaxies. Here we concentrate on possible signatures of the metal enrichment of the inter-galactic medium from the first stars, through their effects on the CMB. Detailed signal-to-noise calculations still need to be carried out to find out wether these effects are accessible to balloon-borne experiments.

  4. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeval, Christophe; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Bouchet, François R.

    2016-02-01

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = Script O(1) × 10-6 match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  5. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-01

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l , and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with the data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl . The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. After showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.

  6. CMB (And Other) Challenges To BBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, G.; Kneller, J. P.; Zentner, A.

    2002-02-01

    Primordial nucleosynthesis provides a probe of the universal abundance of baryons when the universe was only a few minutes old. Recent observations of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) probe the baryon abundance when the universe was several hundred thousand years old. Observations of type Ia supernovae and clusters of galaxies in the very recent past, when the universe is several billion years old and older, provide a complementary measure of the baryon density in excellent agreement with the early universe values. The general agreement among the three measurements represents an impressive confirmation of the standard model of cosmology. However, there is a hint that the CMB observations may not be in perfect agreement with those from big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). If this ``tension" between BBN and the CMB persists, the standard model of cosmology may need to be modified. Here, in a contribution dedicated to Silvia Torres-Peimbert and Manuel Peimbert, we describe how an asymmetry between neutrinos and antineutrinos (``neutrino degeneracy") has the potential for resolving this possible conflict between BBN and the CMB.

  7. Cosmological CPT violation and CMB polarization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jun-Qing

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility of testing Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry with cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. We consider two kinds of Chern-Simons (CS) term, electromagnetic CS term and gravitational CS term, and study their effects on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. By combining current CMB polarization measurements, the seven-year WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003 and BICEP observations, we obtain a tight constraint on the rotation angle Δα = -2.28±1.02 deg (1 σ), indicating a 2.2 σ detection of the CPT violation. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. After adding the QUaD polarization data, the constraint becomes -1.34 < Δα < 0.82 deg at 95% confidence level. When comparing with the effect of electromagnetic CS term, the gravitational CS term could only generate TB and EB power spectra with much smaller amplitude. Therefore, the induced parameter epsilon can not be constrained from the current polarization data. Furthermore, we study the capabilities of future CMB measurements, Planck and CMBPol, on the constraints of Δα and epsilon. We find that the constraint of Δα can be significantly improved by a factor of 15. Therefore, if this rotation angle effect can not be taken into account properly, the constraints of cosmological parameters will be biased obviously. For the gravitational CS term, the future Planck data still can not constrain epsilon very well, if the primordial tensor perturbations are small, r < 0.1. We need the more accurate CMBPol experiment to give better constraint on epsilon.

  8. CMB Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keisler, Ryan

    2013-04-01

    I will describe a program of cosmological research centered on using measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) to address questions relevant to physics: What is the absolute mass scale of neutrinos? How many species of neutrino-like particles were present in the early Universe? How does gravity behave on cosmological scales? Did inflation occur, and, if so, at what energy scale? A new generation of CMB experiments is targeting these questions, and I will focus on recent results from the South Pole Telescope (SPT). The SPT is a ground-based mm-wave observatory located at the geographic south pole in Antarctica, and in 2011 finished its initial, 2500 square-degree ``SPT-SZ'' survey. The data from this survey provided an unprecedented combination of resolution, area, and sensitivity, and has been used to make ground-breaking measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the gravitational lensing of the CMB. These measurements have, in conjunction with data from the WMAP satellite, led to strong constraints on the number of neutrino-like particle species present in the early universe and the shape of the power spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. The SPT-SZ data overlaps with the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, and the joint dataset will provide new probes of large-scale structure, such as the relative velocities of massive galaxy clusters. In 2012, a new polarization-sensitive camera, SPTpol, was installed on the SPT, and I will summarize its performance and prospects for detecting the B-mode CMB polarization pattern. Finally, I will touch on what will be possible with a third-generation camera, SPT-3G. The leap in sensitivity provided by this camera will yield, for example, a constraint on the sum of the neutrino masses relevant for exploring the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  9. On the applicability of the approximate Poincaré mapping to the analysis of dynamics induced by ODE systems II. Proximity of coordinate partial derivatives of Poincaré mappings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakaleinikov, L. A.; Silbergleit, A. S.

    The uniform closeness of coordinates partial derivatives of the approximate and exact Poincaré maps for ODE systems with hyperbolic fixed point possessing the homoclinic orbit connecting this point to itself is studied. The conditions of the uniform bound existence for the difference between these derivatives in the domain of uniform closeness of the approximate and exact Poincaré maps are found. It is shown that partial derivatives for the systems with more than one unstable direction are generally not uniformly close.

  10. Detection of thermal SZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation in Planck nominal mission data

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, J. Colin; Spergel, David N. E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-02-01

    The nominal mission maps from the Planck satellite contain a wealth of information about secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), including those induced by the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and gravitational lensing. As both the tSZ and CMB lensing signals trace the large-scale matter density field, the anisotropies sourced by these processes are expected to be correlated. We report the first detection of this cross-correlation signal, which we measure at 6.2σ significance using the Planck data. We take advantage of Planck's multifrequency coverage to construct a tSZ map using internal linear combination techniques, which we subsequently cross-correlate with the publicly-released Planck CMB lensing potential map. The cross-correlation is subject to contamination from the cosmic infrared background (CIB), which is known to correlate strongly with CMB lensing. We correct for this contamination via cross-correlating our tSZ map with the Planck 857 GHz map and confirm the robustness of our measurement using several null tests. We interpret the signal using halo model calculations, which indicate that the tSZ-CMB lensing cross-correlation is a unique probe of the physics of intracluster gas in high-redshift, low-mass groups and clusters. Our results are consistent with extrapolations of existing gas physics models to this previously unexplored regime and show clear evidence for contributions from both the one- and two-halo terms, but no statistically significant evidence for contributions from diffuse, unbound gas outside of collapsed halos. We also show that the amplitude of the signal depends rather sensitively on the amplitude of fluctuations (σ{sub 8}) and the matter density (Ω{sub m}), scaling as σ{sub 8}{sup 6.1}Ω{sub m}{sup 1.5} at ℓ = 1000. We constrain the degenerate combination σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.282){sup 0.26} = 0.824±0.029, a result that is in less tension with primordial CMB constraints than some recent t

  11. Mapping of a Gene Determining Familial Partial Epilepsy with Variable Foci to Chromosome 22q11-q12

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lan; Labuda, Malgorzata; Li, Dong-Sheng; Hudson, Thomas J.; Desbiens, Richard; Patry, Georges; Verret, Simon; Langevin, Pierre; Mercho, Suha; Seni, Marie-Hélène; Scheffer, Ingrid; Dubeau, François; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Andermann, Frederick; Andermann, Eva; Pandolfo, Massimo

    1999-01-01

    Summary We identified two large French-Canadian families segregating a familial partial epilepsy syndrome with variable foci (FPEVF) characterized by mostly nocturnal seizures arising from frontal, temporal, and occasionally occipital epileptic foci. There is no evidence for structural brain damage or permanent neurological dysfunction. The syndrome is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait with incomplete penetrance. We mapped the disease locus to a 3.8-cM interval on chromosome 22q11-q12, between markers D22S1144 and D22S685. Using the most conservative diagnostic scheme, the maximum cumulative LOD score was 6.53 at recombination fraction (θ) 0 with D22S689. The LOD score in the larger family was 5.34 at θ=0 with the same marker. The two families share an identical linked haplotype for ⩾10 cM, including the candidate interval, indicating a recent founder effect. A severe phenotype in one of the probands may be caused by homozygosity for the causative mutation, as suggested by extensive homozygosity for the linked haplotype and a bilineal family history of epilepsy. An Australian family with a similar phenotype was not found to link to chromosome 22, indicating genetic heterogeneity of FPEVF. PMID:10577924

  12. A Bayesian Estimate of the CMB-Large-scale Structure Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Santos, E.; Carvalho, F. C.; Penna-Lima, M.; Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Evidences for late-time acceleration of the universe are provided by multiple probes, such as Type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background (CMB), and large-scale structure (LSS). In this work, we focus on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary CMB fluctuations generated by evolving gravitational potentials due to the transition between, e.g., the matter and dark energy (DE) dominated phases. Therefore, assuming a flat universe, DE properties can be inferred from ISW detections. We present a Bayesian approach to compute the CMB-LSS cross-correlation signal. The method is based on the estimate of the likelihood for measuring a combined set consisting of a CMB temperature and galaxy contrast maps, provided that we have some information on the statistical properties of the fluctuations affecting these maps. The likelihood is estimated by a sampling algorithm, therefore avoiding the computationally demanding techniques of direct evaluation in either pixel or harmonic space. As local tracers of the matter distribution at large scales, we used the Two Micron All Sky Survey galaxy catalog and, for the CMB temperature fluctuations, the ninth-year data release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP9). The results show a dominance of cosmic variance over the weak recovered signal, due mainly to the shallowness of the catalog used, with systematics associated with the sampling algorithm playing a secondary role as sources of uncertainty. When combined with other complementary probes, the method presented in this paper is expected to be a useful tool to late-time acceleration studies in cosmology.

  13. Applications of the Gaussian kinematic formula to CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantaye, Yabebal; Marinucci, Domenico; Hansen, Frode; Maino, Davide

    2015-03-01

    The Gaussian kinematic formula (GKF) [R. J. Adler and J. E. Taylor, Random Fields and Geometry (Springer, New York, 2007).] is an extremely powerful tool allowing for explicit analytic predictions of expected values of Minkowski functionals under realistic experimental conditions for cosmological data collections. In this paper, we implement Minkowski functionals on multipoles and needlet components of CMB fields, thus allowing a better control of cosmic variance and extraction of information on both harmonic and real domains; we then exploit the GKF to provide their expected values on spherical maps, in the presence of arbitrary sky masks, and under non-Gaussian circumstances. All our results are validated by numerical experiments, which show a perfect agreement between theoretical predictions and Monte Carlo simulations.

  14. First measurement of the cross-correlation of CMB lensing and galaxy lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hand, Nick; Leauthaud, Alexie; Das, Sudeep; Sherwin, Blake D.; Addison, Graeme E.; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Charbonnier, Aldée; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Erben, Thomas; Hajian, Amir; Halpern, Mark; Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Heymans, Catherine; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Hincks, Adam D.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kosowsky, Arthur; Makler, Martin; Miller, Lance; Moodley, Kavilan; Moraes, Bruno; Niemack, Michael D.; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima; Shan, Huanyuan; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Taylor, James E.; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Welker, Charlotte; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps derived from Atacama Cosmology Telescope data with galaxy lensing convergence maps as measured by the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey. The CMB-galaxy lensing cross power spectrum is measured for the first time with a significance of 4.2 σ , which corresponds to a 12% constraint on the amplitude of density fluctuations at redshifts ˜0.9 . With upcoming improved lensing data, this novel type of measurement will become a powerful cosmological probe, providing a precise measurement of the mass distribution at intermediate redshifts and serving as a calibrator for systematic biases in weak lensing measurements.

  15. Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1978-01-01

    Geologic mapping in the United States increased by about one-quarter in the past year. Examinations of mapping trends were in the following categories: (1) Mapping at scales of 1:100, 000; (2) Metric-scale base maps; (3) International mapping, and (4) Planetary mapping. (MA)

  16. Foreword: Dark energy and CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Huterer, Dragan

    2015-03-01

    Maps of the Universe when it was 400,000 years old from observations of the cosmic microwave background and over the last ten billion years from galaxy surveys point to a compelling cosmological model. This model requires a very early epoch of accelerated expansion, inflation, during which the seeds of structure were planted via quantum mechanical fluctuations. These seeds began to grow via gravitational instability during the epoch in which dark matter dominated the energy density of the universe, transforming small perturbations laid down during inflation into nonlinear structures such as million light-year sized clusters, galaxies, stars, planets, and people. Over the past few billion years, we have entered a new phase, during which the expansion of the Universe is accelerating presumably driven by yet another substance, dark energy.

  17. Swiss cheese and a cheesy CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valkenburg, Wessel

    2009-06-01

    It has been argued that the Swiss-Cheese cosmology can mimic Dark Energy, when it comes to the observed luminosity distance-redshift relation. Besides the fact that this effect tends to disappear on average over random directions, we show in this work that based on the Rees-Sciama effect on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the Swiss-Cheese model can be ruled out if all holes have a radius larger than about 35 Mpc. We also show that for smaller holes, the CMB is not observably affected, and that the small holes can still mimic Dark Energy, albeit in special directions, as opposed to previous conclusions in the literature. However, in this limit, the probability of looking in a special direction where the luminosity of supernovae is sufficiently supressed becomes very small, at least in the case of a lattice of spherical holes considered in this paper.

  18. Constraining fundamental physics with future CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Martinelli, Matteo; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pagano, Luca; Sherwin, Blake D.; Spergel, David N.

    2010-12-15

    The Planck experiment will soon provide a very accurate measurement of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. This will let cosmologists determine most of the cosmological parameters with unprecedented accuracy. Future experiments will improve and complement the Planck data with better angular resolution and better polarization sensitivity. This unexplored region of the CMB power spectrum contains information on many parameters of interest, including neutrino mass, the number of relativistic particles at recombination, the primordial helium abundance, and the injection of additional ionizing photons by dark matter self-annihilation. We review the imprint of each parameter on the CMB and forecast the constraints achievable by future experiments by performing a Monte Carlo analysis on synthetic realizations of simulated data. We find that next generation satellite missions such as CMBPol could provide valuable constraints with a precision close to that expected in current and near future laboratory experiments. Finally, we discuss the implications of this intersection between cosmology and fundamental physics.

  19. CMB Polarization Detector Operating Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randle, Kirsten; Chuss, David; Rostem, Karwan; Wollack, Ed

    2015-04-01

    Examining the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides the only known way to probe the physics of inflation in the early universe. Gravitational waves produced during inflation are posited to produce a telltale pattern of polarization on the CMB and if measured would provide both tangible evidence for inflation along with a measurement of inflation's energy scale. Leading the effort to detect and measure this phenomenon, Goddard Space Flight Center has been developing high-efficiency detectors. In order to optimize signal-to-noise ratios, sources like the atmosphere and the instrumentation must be considered. In this work we examine operating parameters of these detectors such as optical power loading and photon noise. SPS Summer Internship at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center.

  20. Reconciling the local void with the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Nadathur, Seshadri; Sarkar, Subir

    2011-03-15

    In the standard cosmological model, the dimming of distant Type Ia supernovae is explained by invoking the existence of repulsive ''dark energy'' which is causing the Hubble expansion to accelerate. However, this may be an artifact of interpreting the data in an (oversimplified) homogeneous model universe. In the simplest inhomogeneous model which fits the SNe Ia Hubble diagram without dark energy, we are located close to the center of a void modeled by a Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi metric. It has been claimed that such models cannot fit the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and other cosmological data. This is, however, based on the assumption of a scale-free spectrum for the primordial density perturbation. An alternative physically motivated form for the spectrum enables a good fit to both SNe Ia (Constitution/Union2) and CMB (WMAP 7-yr) data, and to the locally measured Hubble parameter. Constraints from baryon acoustic oscillations and primordial nucleosynthesis are also satisfied.

  1. On the recovery of ISW fluctuations using large-scale structure tracers and CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonavera, L.; Barreiro, R. B.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we present a method to extract the signal induced by the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). It makes use of the Linear Covariance-Based filter introduced by Barreiro et al., and combines CMB data with any number of large-scale structure (LSS) surveys and lensing information. It also exploits CMB polarization to reduce cosmic variance. The performance of the method has been thoroughly tested with simulations taking into account the impact of non-ideal conditions such as incomplete sky coverage or the presence of noise. In particular, three galaxy surveys are simulated, whose redshift distributions peak at low (z ≃ 0.3), intermediate (z ≃ 0.6) and high redshift (z ≃ 0.9). The contribution of each of the considered data sets as well as the effect of a mask and noise in the reconstructed ISW map is studied in detail. When combining all the considered data sets (CMB temperature and polarization, the three galaxy surveys and the lensing map), the proposed filter successfully reconstructs a map of the weak ISW signal, finding a perfect correlation with the input signal for the ideal case and around 80 per cent, on average, in the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage. We find that including CMB polarization improves the correlation between input and reconstruction although only at a small level. Nonetheless, given the weakness of the ISW signal, even modest improvements can be of importance. In particular, in realistic situations, in which less information is available from the LSS tracers, the effect of including polarization is larger. For instance, for the case in which the ISW signal is recovered from CMB plus only one survey, and taking into account the presence of noise and incomplete sky coverage, the improvement in the correlation coefficient can be as large as 10 per cent.

  2. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Mota, David F.; Ricciardone, Angelo; Arroja, Frederico

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by Ph(k) = Ph(0)(k) [ 1 + ∑LM fL(k) gLM YLM (hat k)], where Ph(0)(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f0(k) = f2(k) propto k-2 are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely l2 = l1 ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and l2 = l1 ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g00 = 30 and g2M = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  3. Extreme data compression for the CMB

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zablocki, Alan; Dodelson, Scott

    2016-04-28

    We apply the Karhunen-Loéve methods to cosmic microwave background (CMB) data sets, and show that we can recover the input cosmology and obtain the marginalized likelihoods in Λ cold dark matter cosmologies in under a minute, much faster than Markov chain Monte Carlo methods. This is achieved by forming a linear combination of the power spectra at each multipole l, and solving a system of simultaneous equations such that the Fisher matrix is locally unchanged. Instead of carrying out a full likelihood evaluation over the whole parameter space, we need evaluate the likelihood only for the parameter of interest, with themore » data compression effectively marginalizing over all other parameters. The weighting vectors contain insight about the physical effects of the parameters on the CMB anisotropy power spectrum Cl. The shape and amplitude of these vectors give an intuitive feel for the physics of the CMB, the sensitivity of the observed spectrum to cosmological parameters, and the relative sensitivity of different experiments to cosmological parameters. We test this method on exact theory Cl as well as on a Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)-like CMB data set generated from a random realization of a fiducial cosmology, comparing the compression results to those from a full likelihood analysis using CosmoMC. Furthermore, after showing that the method works, we apply it to the temperature power spectrum from the WMAP seven-year data release, and discuss the successes and limitations of our method as applied to a real data set.« less

  4. What is the distance to the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Clarkson, Chris; Umeh, Obinna; Maartens, Roy; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: umeobinna@gmail.com E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2014-11-01

    The success of precision cosmology depends not only on accurate observations, but also on the theoretical model --- which must be understood to at least the same level of precision. Subtle relativistic effects can lead to biased measurements if they are neglected. One such effect gives a systematic shift in the distance-redshift relation away from its background value, due to the non-linear relativistic conservation of total photon flux. We also show directly how this shift follows from a fully relativistic analysis of the geodesic deviation equation. We derive the expectation value of the shift using second-order perturbations about a concordance background, and show that the distance to last scattering is increased by 1%. We argue that neglecting this shift could lead to a significant bias in the background cosmological parameters, because it alters the meaning of the background model. A naive adjustment of CMB parameter estimation if this shift is really a correction to the background would raise the H{sub 0} value inferred from the CMB by 5%, potentially removing the tension with local measurements of H{sub 0}. Other CMB parameters which depend on the distance would also be shifted by ∼ 1σ when combined with local H{sub 0} data. While our estimations rely on a simplistic analysis, they nevertheless illustrate that accurately defining the background model in terms of the expectation values of observables is critical when we aim to determine the model parameters at the sub-percent level.

  5. The theoretical agenda in CMB research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. R.

    The terrain that theorists cover in this CMB golden age is described. The author ponders early universe physics in quest of the fluctuation generator. He extolls the virtues of inflation and defects. He transports fields, matter and radiation into the linear (primary anisotropies) and nonlinear (secondary anisotropies) regimes. The author validates the linear codes to deliver accurate predictions for experimentalists to shoot at. He struggles at the computing edge to push the nonlinear simulations from only illustrative to fully predictive. He is now phenomenologists, optimizing statistical techniques for extrating truths and their errors from current and future experiments. He begins to clean foregrounds. He joins CMB experimental teams. He combines the CMB with large scale structure, galaxy and other cosmological observations in search of current concordance. The brave use all topical data. Others carefully craft their prior probabilities to downweight data sets. The author is always unbiased. He declares theories sick, dead, ugly. Sometimes he cures them, resurrect them, rarely beautify them. The goal is to understand how all cosmic structure we see arose and what the Universe is made of, and to use this to discover the laws of ultrahigh energy physics.

  6. Phases of new physics in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Daniel; Wallisch, Benjamin; Green, Daniel; Meyers, Joel E-mail: drgreen@cita.utoronto.ca E-mail: b.wallisch@damtp.cam.ac.uk

    2016-01-01

    Fluctuations in the cosmic neutrino background are known to produce a phase shift in the acoustic peaks of the cosmic microwave background. It is through the sensitivity to this effect that the recent CMB data has provided a robust detection of free-streaming neutrinos. In this paper, we revisit the phase shift of the CMB anisotropy spectrum as a probe of new physics. The phase shift is particularly interesting because its physical origin is strongly constrained by the analytic properties of the Green's function of the gravitational potential. For adiabatic fluctuations, a phase shift requires modes that propagate faster than the speed of fluctuations in the photon-baryon plasma. This possibility is realized by free-streaming relativistic particles, such as neutrinos or other forms of dark radiation. Alternatively, a phase shift can arise from isocurvature fluctuations. We present simple models to illustrate each of these effects. We then provide observational constraints from the Planck temperature and polarization data on additional forms of radiation. We also forecast the capabilities of future CMB Stage IV experiments. Whenever possible, we give analytic interpretations of our results.

  7. Needlet detection of features in the WMAP CMB sky and the impact on anisotropies and hemispherical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrobon, Davide; Amblard, Alexandre; Cooray, Asantha; Balbi, Amedeo; Cabella, Paolo; Marinucci, Domenico

    2008-11-15

    We apply spherical needlets to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year cosmic microwave background (CMB) data set, to search for imprints of nonisotropic features in the CMB sky. We use the needlets' localization properties to resolve peculiar features in the CMB sky and to study how these features contribute to the anisotropy power spectrum of the CMB. In addition to the now well-known 'cold spot' of the CMB map in the southern hemisphere, we also find two hot spots at greater than 99% confidence level, again in the southern hemisphere and closer to the Galactic plane. While the cold spot contributes to the anisotropy power spectrum in the multipoles between l=6 to l=33, the hot spots are found to be dominating the anisotropy power in the range between l=6 and l=18. Masking both the cold and the two hot spots results in a reduction by about 15% in the amplitude of the angular power spectrum of CMB around l=10. The resulting changes to the cosmological parameters when the power spectrum is estimated masking these features (in addition to the WMAP team's KQ85 mask) are within the 1{sigma} errors published with the WMAP mask only. We also study the asymmetry between the angular power spectra evaluated on the northern and southern hemispheres. When the features detected by needlets are masked, we find that the difference in the power, measured in terms of the anisotropy variance between l=4 and l=18, is reduced by a factor 2. We make available a mask related to needlet features for more detailed studies on asymmetries in the CMB anisotropy sky.

  8. Planck CMB Anomalies: Astrophysical and Cosmological Secondary Effects and the Curse of Masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassat, Anais

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale anomalies have been reported in CMB data with both WMAP and Planck data. These could be due to foreground residuals and or systematic effects, though their confirmation with Planck data suggests they are not due to a problem in the WMAP or Planck pipelines. If these anomalies are in fact primordial, then understanding their origin is fundamental to either validate the standard model of cosmology or to explore new physics. We investigate three other possible issues: 1) the trade-off between minimising systematics due to foreground contamination (with a conservative mask) and minimising systematics due to masking, 2) astrophysical secondary effects (the kinetic Doppler quadrupole and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect), and 3) secondary cosmological signals (the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect). We address the masking issue by considering new procedures that use both WMAP and Planck to produce higher quality full-sky maps using the sparsity methodology (LGMCA maps). We show the impact of masking is dominant over that of residual foregrounds, and the LGMCA full-sky maps can be used without further processing to study anomalies. We consider four official Planck PR1 and two LGMCA CMB maps. Analysis of the observed CMB maps shows that only the low quadrupole and quadrupole-octopole alignment seem significant, but that the planar octopole, Axis of Evil, mirror parity and cold spot are not significant in nearly all maps considered. After subtraction of astrophysical and cosmological secondary effects, only the low quadrupole may still be considered anomalous, meaning the significance of only one anomaly is affected by secondary effect subtraction out of six anomalies considered. In the spirit of reproducible research all reconstructed maps and codes are available online.

  9. Unavoidable CMB Spectral Features and Blackbody Photosphere of Our Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2015-01-01

    Spectral features in the CMB energy spectrum contain a wealth of information about the physical processes in the early Universe, z ≲ 2 × 106. The CMB spectral distortions are complementary to all other probes of cosmology. In fact, most of the information contained in the CMB spectrum is inaccessible by any other means. This review outlines the main physics behind the spectral features in the CMB throughout the history of the Universe, concentrating on the distortions which are inevitable and must be present at a level observable by the next generation of proposed CMB experiments. The spectral distortions considered here include spectral features from cosmological recombination, resonant scattering of CMB by metals during reionization which allows us to measure their abundances, y-type distortions during and after reionization and μ-type and i-type (intermediate between μ and y) distortions created at redshifts z ≳ 1.5 × 104.

  10. CMB as a Probe of New Physics and Old Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluscevic, Vera

    Cosmic birefringence (CB)---a rotation of photon-polarization plane in vacuum---is a generic signature of new scalar fields that could provide dark energy. Previously, WMAP observations excluded a uniform CB-rotation angle larger than a degree. In this thesis, we develop a minimum-variance--estimator formalism for reconstructing direction-dependent rotation from full-sky CMB maps, and forecast more than an order-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity with incoming Planck data and future satellite missions. Next, we perform the first analysis of WMAP-7 data to look for rotation-angle anisotropies and report null detection of the rotation-angle power-spectrum multipoles below L=512, constraining quadrupole amplitude of a scale-invariant power to less than one degree. We further explore the use of a cross-correlation between CMB temperature and the rotation for detecting the CB signal, for different quintessence models. We find that it may improve sensitivity in case of marginal detection, and provide an empirical handle for distinguishing details of new physics indicated by CB. We then consider other parity-violating physics beyond standard models---in particular, a chiral inflationary-gravitational-wave background. We show that WMAP has no constraining power, while a cosmic-variance--limited experiment would be capable of detecting only a large parity violation. In case of a strong detection of EB/TB correlations, CB can be readily distinguished from chiral gravity waves. We next adopt our CB analysis to investigate patchy screening of the CMB, driven by inhomogeneities during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We constrain a toy model of reionization with WMAP-7 data, and show that data from Planck should start approaching interesting portions of the EoR parameter space and can be used to exclude reionization tomographies with large ionized bubbles. In light of the upcoming data from low-frequency radio observations of the redshifted 21-cm line from the EoR, we

  11. Planck 2013 results. XV. CMB power spectra and likelihood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Rahlin, A.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the Planck 2013 likelihood, a complete statistical description of the two-point correlation function of the CMB temperature fluctuations that accounts for all known relevant uncertainties, both instrumental and astrophysical in nature. We use this likelihood to derive our best estimate of the CMB angular power spectrum from Planck over three decades in multipole moment, ℓ, covering 2 ≤ ℓ ≤ 2500. The main source of uncertainty at ℓ ≲ 1500 is cosmic variance. Uncertainties in small-scale foreground modelling and instrumental noise dominate the error budget at higher ℓs. For ℓ < 50, our likelihood exploits all Planck frequency channels from 30 to 353 GHz, separating the cosmological CMB signal from diffuse Galactic foregrounds through a physically motivated Bayesian component separation technique. At ℓ ≥ 50, we employ a correlated Gaussian likelihood approximation based on a fine-grained set of angular cross-spectra derived from multiple detector combinations between the 100, 143, and 217 GHz frequency channels, marginalising over power spectrum foreground templates. We validate our likelihood through an extensive suite of consistency tests, and assess the impact of residual foreground and instrumental uncertainties on the final cosmological parameters. We find good internal agreement among the high-ℓ cross-spectra with residuals below a few μK2 at ℓ ≲ 1000, in agreement with estimated calibration uncertainties. We compare our results with foreground-cleaned CMB maps derived from all Planck frequencies, as well as with cross-spectra derived from the 70 GHz Planck map, and find broad agreement in terms of spectrum residuals and cosmological parameters. We further show that the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology is in excellent agreement with preliminary PlanckEE and TE polarisation spectra. We find that the standard ΛCDM cosmology is well constrained by Planck from the measurements at ℓ ≲ 1500. One specific example is the

  12. What do we learn from the CMB observations?

    SciTech Connect

    Rubakov, V. A.; Vlasov, A. D.

    2012-09-15

    We give an account, at nonexpert and quantitative level, of physics behind the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization and their peculiar features. We discuss, in particular, how cosmological parameters are determined from the CMB measurements and their combinations with other observations. We emphasize that CMB is the major source of information on the primordial density perturbations and, possibly, gravitational waves, and discuss the implication for our understanding of the extremely early Universe.

  13. CMB Anisotropies Two Years after Cobe: Observations, Theory and the Future - Proceedings of the 1994 Cwru Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Lawrence M.

    1995-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * I. The Experimental Situation Two Years After COBE: Anisotropies, and the CMB Power Spectrum * COBE DMR Data, Signal and Noise: Color Plates * CMB Two Years After the COBE Discovery of Anisotropies * Comparison of Spectral Index Determinations * Two-Point Correlations in the COBE-DMR Two-Year Anisotropy Maps * A Preliminary Analysis of UCSB's South Pole 1993-94 Results * CMB Anisotropy Measurements During the Fourth Flight of MAX * Observations of the Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background by the Firs, SK93, and MSAM-I Experiments * The Python Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment * II. Theoretical Implications and Cosmology: The Early Universe, Large Scale Structure and Dark Matter * Testing Inflationary Cosmology and Measuring Cosmological Parameters Using the Cosmic Microwave Background * Inflation Confronts the CMB: An Analysis Including the Effects of Foreground * Testing Inflation with MSAM, MAX Tenerife and COBE * CMBR Anisotropy Due to Gravitational Radiation in Inflationary Cosmologies * Black Holes From Blue Spectra * Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies and the Geometry of the Universe * Ω and Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies * CDM Cosmogony in an Open Universe * Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Anisotropy Induced by Cosmic Strings * Temperature Anisotropies in a Universe with Global Defects * The Nature Versus Nurture of Anisotropies * The Existence of Baryons at z = 1000 * Polarization-Temperature Correlations in the Microwave Background * III. Related Issues: BBN Limits on ΩB, and Comparing Theoretical Predictions and Observations * Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and ΩB: A Guide for CMB Interpreters * Quoting Experimental Information

  14. Optimal bispectrum estimator and simulations of the CMB lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe non-Gaussian signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, A.; Wandelt, B.; Elsner, F.; Liguori, M.

    2013-07-01

    We present the tools to optimally extract the lensing-integrated Sachs Wolfe (L-ISW) bispectrum signal from future cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We implemented two different methods to simulate the non-Gaussian CMB maps with the L-ISW signal: a non-perturbative method based on the FLINTS lensing code and the separable mode-expansion method. We implemented the Komatsu, Spergel, and Wandelt (KSW) optimal estimator analysis for the L-ISW bispectrum and tested it on the non-Gaussian simulations for realistic CMB experimental settings with an inhomogeneous sky coverage. We show that the estimator approaches the Cramer-Rao bound and that Wiener filtering the L-ISW simulations slightly improves the estimate of fNLL-ISW by ≤ 10%. For a realistic CMB experimental setting that accounts for anisotropic noise and masked sky, we show that the linear term of the estimator is highly correlated to the cubic term and it is necessary to recover the signal and the optimal error bars. We also show that the L-ISW bispectrum, if not correctly accounted for, yields an underestimation of the fNLlocal error bars of ≃ 4%. A joint analysis of the non-Gaussian shapes and/or L-ISW template subtraction is needed to recover unbiased results of the primordial non-Gaussian signal from ongoing and future CMB experiments.

  15. Forecast constraints on inflation from combined CMB and gravitational wave direct detection experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Gordon, Christopher; Silk, Joseph; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2010-04-15

    We study how direct detection of the inflationary gravitational wave background constrains inflationary parameters and complements CMB polarization measurements. The error ellipsoids calculated using the Fisher information matrix approach with Planck and the direct detection experiment, Big Bang Observer (BBO), show different directions of parameter degeneracy, and the degeneracy is broken when they are combined. For a slow-roll parametrization, we show that BBO could significantly improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio compared with Planck alone. We also look at a quadratic and a natural inflation model. In both cases, if the temperature of reheating is also treated as a free parameter, then the addition of BBO can significantly improve the error bars. In the case of natural inflation, we find that the addition of BBO could even partially improve the error bars of a cosmic variance-limited CMB experiment.

  16. CMB anisotropies from acausal scaling seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, Sandro; Kunz, Martin; Durrer, Ruth

    2009-04-15

    We investigate models where structure formation is initiated by scaling seeds: We consider rapidly expanding relativistic shells of energy and show that they can fit current CMB and large scale structure data if they expand with superluminal velocities. These acausally expanding shells provide a viable alternative to inflation for cosmological structure formation with the same minimal number of parameters to characterize the initial fluctuations. Causally expanding shells alone cannot fit present data. Hybrid models where causal shells and inflation are mixed also provide good fits.

  17. When can preheating affect the CMB?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujikawa, Shinji; Bassett, Bruce A.

    2002-05-01

    We discuss the principles governing the selection of inflationary models for which preheating can affect the CMB. This is a (fairly small) subset of those models which have nonnegligible entropy/isocurvature perturbations on large scales during inflation. We study new models which belong to this class-two-field inflation with negative nonminimal coupling and hybrid/double/supernatural inflation models where the tachyonic growth of entropy perturbations can lead to the variation of the curvature perturbation, /R, on super-Hubble scales. Finally, we present evidence against recent claims for the variation of /R in the absence of substantial super-Hubble entropy perturbations.

  18. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Mota, David F.; Arroja, Frederico E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  19. Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Douglas M.; McIntosh, Willard L.

    1979-01-01

    The area of geological mapping in the United States in 1978 increased greatly over that reported in 1977; state geological maps were added for California, Idaho, Nevada, and Alaska last year. (Author/BB)

  20. Testing distance duality with CMB anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy; Väliviita, Jussi; Kosonen, Ville

    2016-04-01

    We constrain deviations of the form T propto (1+z)1+epsilon from the standard redshift-temperature relation, corresponding to modifying distance duality as DL = (1+z)2(1+epsilon) DA. We consider a consistent model, in which both the background and perturbation equations are changed. For this purpose, we introduce a species of dark radiation particles to which photon energy density is transferred, and assume epsilon >= 0. The Planck 2015 release high multipole temperature plus low multipole data give the limit epsilon < 4.5 × 10-3 at 95% C.L. The main obstacle to improving this CMB-only result is strong degeneracy between epsilon and the physical matter densities ωb and ωc. A constraint on deuterium abundance improves the limit to epsilon < 1.8 × 10-3. Adding the Planck high-multipole CMB polarisation and BAO data leads to a small improvement; with this maximal dataset we obtain epsilon < 1.3 × 10-3. This dataset constrains the present dark radiation energy density to at most 12% of the total photon plus dark radiation density. Finally, we discuss the degeneracy between dark radiation and the effective number of relativistic species Neff, and consider the impact of dark radiation perturbations and allowing epsilon < 0 on the results.

  1. Testing distance duality with CMB anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy; Väliviita, Jussi; Kosonen, Ville

    2016-04-01

    We constrain deviations of the form T propto (1+z)1+epsilon from the standard redshift-temperature relation, corresponding to modifying distance duality as DL = (1+z)2(1+epsilon) DA. We consider a consistent model, in which both the background and perturbation equations are changed. For this purpose, we introduce a species of dark radiation particles to which photon energy density is transferred, and assume epsilon >= 0. The Planck 2015 release high multipole temperature plus low multipole data give the limit epsilon < 4.5 × 10‑3 at 95% C.L. The main obstacle to improving this CMB-only result is strong degeneracy between epsilon and the physical matter densities ωb and ωc. A constraint on deuterium abundance improves the limit to epsilon < 1.8 × 10‑3. Adding the Planck high-multipole CMB polarisation and BAO data leads to a small improvement; with this maximal dataset we obtain epsilon < 1.3 × 10‑3. This dataset constrains the present dark radiation energy density to at most 12% of the total photon plus dark radiation density. Finally, we discuss the degeneracy between dark radiation and the effective number of relativistic species Neff, and consider the impact of dark radiation perturbations and allowing epsilon < 0 on the results.

  2. Measuring primordial gravitational waves from CMB B−modes in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories

    SciTech Connect

    Antolini, Claudia; Martinelli, Matteo; Fantaye, Yabebal; Baccigalupi, Carlo E-mail: mmartin@sissa.it E-mail: bacci@sissa.it

    2013-02-01

    We evaluate our capability to constrain the abundance of primordial tensor perturbations (primordial gravitational waves, PGWs) in cosmologies with generalized expansion histories in the epoch of cosmic acceleration. Forthcoming satellite and sub-orbital experiments probing polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) are expected to measure the B−mode power in CMB polarization, coming from PGWs on the degree scale, as well as gravitational lensing on arcminute scales; the latter is the main competitor for the measurement of PGWs, and is directly affected by the underlying expansion history, determined by the presence of a Dark Energy (DE) component. In particular, we consider early DE possible scenarios, in which the expansion history is substantially modified at the epoch in which the CMB lensing is most relevant. We show that the introduction of a parametrized DE may induce a variation as large as 30% in the ratio of the power of lensing and PGWs on the degree scale. We find that adopting the nominal specifications of upcoming satellite measurements, the constraining power on PGWs is weakened by the inclusion of the extra degrees of freedom, resulting in a reduction of about 10% of the upper limits on r in fiducial models with no GWs, as well as a comparable increase in the error bars in models with non-zero tensor power. Moreover, we find that the inclusion of sub-orbital CMB experiments, capable of mapping the B−mode power up to the angular scales which are affected by lensing, has the effect of restoring the forecasted performances with a fixed cosmological expansion history corresponding to a cosmological constant. Finally, we show how the combination of CMB data with Type Ia SuperNovae (SNe), Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Hubble constant allows to constrain simultaneously the primordial tensor power and the DE quantities in the parametrization we consider, consisting of present abundance and first redshift derivative of the energy

  3. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Maldonado, Felipe; Rotti, Aditya

    2015-04-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand keenly the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  4. Mapping matter jointly with CMB lensing and Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin; Rotti, Aditya; Maldonado, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    In the near future, Stage III and Stage IV Cosmic Microwave Background experiments will measure to high precision the lensing distortions that trace matter fluctuations in the universe. On a similar timescale DES, HSC, WFIRST, EUCLID, DESI, LSST, and other surveys will provide galaxy redshift information, imaging, and cosmic shear data over large regions of the sky. Taking a holistic, Bayesian approach to combine datasets, we seek to understand the statistical properties of joint estimates of the matter distribution and its correlations, including their non-Gaussian likelihoods.

  5. SPIDER: a new balloon-borne experiment to measure CMB polarization on large angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montroy, T. E.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Brevick, J.; Contaldi, C. R.; Crill, B. P.; Crites, A.; Doré, O.; Duband, L.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Lange, A. E.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P.; Mulder, J.; Netterfield, C. B.; Pascale, E.; Ruhl, J. E.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Turner, A.; Viero, M.

    2006-06-01

    We describe SPIDER, a novel balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) on large angular scales. The primary goal of SPIDER is to detect the faint signature of inflationary gravitational waves in the CMB polarization. The payload consists of six telescopes, each operating in a single frequency band and cooled to 4 K by a common LN/LHe cryostat. The primary optic for each telescope is a 25 cm diameter lens cooled to 4 K. Each telescope feeds an array of antenna coupled, polarization sensitive sub-Kelvin bolometers that covers a 20 degree diameter FOV with diffraction limited resolution. The six focal planes span 70 to 300 GHz in a manner optimized to separate polarized galactic emission from CMB polarization, and together contain over 2300 detectors. Polarization modulation is achieved by rotating a cryogenic half-wave plate in front of the primary optic of each telescope. The cryogenic system is designed for 30 days of operation. Observations will be conducted during the night portions of a mid-latitude, long duration balloon flight which will circumnavigate the globe from Australia. By spinning the payload at 1 rpm with the six telescopes fixed in elevation, SPIDER will map approximately half of the sky at each frequency on each night of the flight.

  6. Constraining gravity at the largest scales through CMB lensing and galaxy velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullen, Anthony R.; Alam, Shadab; He, Siyu; Ho, Shirley

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a new method to constrain gravity on the largest cosmological scales by combining measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and the galaxy velocity field. EG is a statistic, constructed from a gravitational lensing tracer and a measure of velocities such as redshift-space distortions (RSD), that can discriminate between gravity models while being independent of clustering bias and σ8. While traditionally, the lensing field for EG has been probed through galaxy lensing, CMB lensing has been proposed as a more robust tracer of the lensing field for EG at higher redshifts while avoiding intrinsic alignments. We perform the largest-scale measurement of EG ever, up to 150 Mpc h-1, by cross-correlating the Planck CMB lensing map with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) CMASS galaxy sample and combining this with our measurement of the CMASS auto-power spectrum and the RSD parameter β. We report EG(z = 0.57) = 0.243 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (sys), a measurement in tension with the general relativity (GR) prediction at a level of 2.6σ. Note that our EG measurement deviates from GR only at scales greater than 80 Mpc h-1, scales which have not been probed by previous EG tests. Upcoming surveys, which will provide an order-of-magnitude reduction in statistical errors, can significantly constrain alternative gravity models when combined with better control of systematics.

  7. Genome-wide association mapping of partial resistance to Phytophthora sojae in soybean plant introductions from the Republic of Korea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root and stem rot is one of the most yield-limiting diseases of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr], caused by the oomycete Phytophthora sojae. Partial resistance is controlled by several genes and, compared to single gene (Rps gene) resistance to P. sojae, places less selection pressure on...

  8. CMB non-gaussianity from vector fields

    SciTech Connect

    Peloso, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite has recently measured the CMB temperature anisotropies with unprecedented accuracy, and it has provided strong bounds on primordial non-gaussianity. Such bounds constrain models of inflation, and mechanisms that produce the primordial perturbations. We discuss the non-gaussian signatures from the interactions of the inflation φ with spin-1 fields. We study the two different cases in which the inflaton is (i) a pseudo-scalar field with a (φ)/(fa) F·F interaction with a vector field, and (ii) a scalar field with a f (φ)F² interaction. In the first case we obtain the strong limit f{sub a} ≥ 10¹⁶GeV on the decay constant. In the second case, specific choices of the function f (φ) can lead to a non-gaussianity with a characteristic shape not encountered in standard models of scalar field inflation, and which has also been constrained by Planck.

  9. Reionization history and CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Kinney, William H.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y. E-mail: gnedin@fnal.edu

    2013-05-01

    We study how uncertainty in the reionization history of the universe affects estimates of other cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background. We analyze WMAP7 data and synthetic Planck-quality data generated using a realistic scenario for the reionization history of the universe obtained from high-resolution numerical simulation. We perform parameter estimation using a simple sudden reionization approximation, and using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) technique proposed by Mortonson and Hu. We reach two main conclusions: (1) Adopting a simple sudden reionization model does not introduce measurable bias into values for other parameters, indicating that detailed modeling of reionization is not necessary for the purpose of parameter estimation from future CMB data sets such as Planck. (2) PCA analysis does not allow accurate reconstruction of the actual reionization history of the universe in a realistic case.

  10. Observed parity-odd CMB temperature bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Liguori, Michele; Fergusson, James R. E-mail: michele.liguori@pd.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    Parity-odd non-Gaussianities create a variety of temperature bispectra in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), defined in the domain: ℓ{sub 1} + ℓ{sub 2} + ℓ{sub 3} = odd. These models are yet unconstrained in the literature, that so far focused exclusively on the more common parity-even scenarios. In this work, we provide the first experimental constraints on parity-odd bispectrum signals in WMAP 9-year temperature data, using a separable modal parity-odd estimator. Comparing theoretical bispectrum templates to the observed bispectrum, we place constraints on the so-called nonlineality parameters of parity-odd tensor non-Gaussianities predicted by several Early Universe models. Our technique also generates a model-independent, smoothed reconstruction of the bispectrum of the data for parity-odd configurations.

  11. CMB temperature trispectrum of cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-15

    We provide an analytical expression for the trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies induced by cosmic strings. Our result is derived for the small angular scales under the assumption that the temperature anisotropy is induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. The trispectrum is predicted to decay with a noninteger power-law exponent l{sup -{rho}}with 6<{rho}<7, depending on the string microstructure, and thus on the string model. For Nambu-Goto strings, this exponent is related to the string mean square velocity and the loop distribution function. We then explore two classes of wave number configuration in Fourier space, the kite and trapezium quadrilaterals. The trispectrum can be of any sign and appears to be strongly enhanced for all squeezed quadrilaterals.

  12. CMB temperature trispectrum of cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Ringeval, Christophe; Suyama, Teruaki

    2010-03-01

    We provide an analytical expression for the trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies induced by cosmic strings. Our result is derived for the small angular scales under the assumption that the temperature anisotropy is induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. The trispectrum is predicted to decay with a noninteger power-law exponent ℓ-ρ with 6<ρ<7, depending on the string microstructure, and thus on the string model. For Nambu-Goto strings, this exponent is related to the string mean square velocity and the loop distribution function. We then explore two classes of wave number configuration in Fourier space, the kite and trapezium quadrilaterals. The trispectrum can be of any sign and appears to be strongly enhanced for all squeezed quadrilaterals.

  13. Mapping of quantitative trait loci associated with partial resistance to phytophthora sojae and flooding tolerance in soybean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora root rot (PRR) caused by Phytophthora sojae Kaufm. & Gerd. and flooding can limit growth and productivity, of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], especially on poorly drained soils. The primary objective of this research project was to map quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with f...

  14. USING LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICTIONS TO MAP WATERSHEDS THAT ARE VULNERABLE TO NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development have mapped and interpreted landscape-scale (i.e., broad scale) ecological metrics among watersheds in the upper White River watershed, producing the first geospatial models of water quality vulnerabili...

  15. USING LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY AND PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICITIONS TO MAP WATERSHEDS THAT ARE VULNERABLE TO NON-POINT SOURCE POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency¿s Office of Research and Development have mapped and interpreted landscape-scale (i.e., broad scale) ecological metrics among watersheds in the upper White River watershed, producing the first geospatial models of water quality vulnerabili...

  16. Future of Colombo Airport (CMB) as an Airline Hub

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayalath, J. T. D.; Bandara, J. M. S. J.

    2001-01-01

    Aviation throughout the world has seen profound changes within the last two decades. Today more and more airports are looking for hub operations. However, as the success of hub operation would depend on a number of parameters such as geographic location, route network, facilities available, passengers' acceptance etc., not all airports would be able to operate as successful hubs. This paper investigates the possibility for (he Bandaranayake international airport, Colombo, Sri Lanka (CMB) to emerge as a hub airport in the South Asian region. It is found that CMB is situated in a geographically advantageous position in the region with respect to the airline route network. Comparison of travel distances between CMB and prominent O-D pairs and evaluation of airline schedules at relevant established hub airports indicates that CMB could operate as a directional hub serving the South Asian market if the number of destinations with daily flights could be increased.

  17. Cosmology from CMB polarization with POLARBEAR and the Simons Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Darcy; POLARBEAR Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    POLARBEAR is a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The science goals of the POLARBEAR project are to do a deep search for CMB B-mode polarization created by inflationary gravitational waves, as well as characterize the CMB B-mode signal from gravitational lensing. POLARBEAR-1 started observations in 2012. The POLARBEAR team has published results from its first season of observations on a small fraction of the sky, including a measurement of a non-zero B-mode polarization angular power spectrum at sub-degree scales, where the dominant signal is gravitational lensing of the CMB. Improving these measurements requires precision characterization of the CMB polarization signal over large fractions of the sky, at multiple frequencies. To achieve these goals, POLARBEAR has begun expanding to include an additional two 3.5 meter telescopes with multi-chroic receivers, known as the Simons Array. With high sensitivity and large sky coverage, the Simons Array will create a detailed survey of B-mode polarization, and its spectral information will be used to extract the CMB signal from astrophysical foregrounds. The Simons Array data will place strong constraints on the sum of the neutrino masses, when combined with data from the next generation of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. We present the status of this funded instrument and its expected capabilities.

  18. Large angular scale CMB anisotropy from an excited initial mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sojasi, A.; Mohsenzadeh, M.; Yusofi, E.

    2016-07-01

    According to inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of new physics hypotheses. The initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, as it can affect observables such as the CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. The recent Planck constraint on spectral index motivated us to examine the effect of a new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy at large angular scales. In so doing, it is found that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit ℓ < 200 a tiny deviation appears. Also, it is shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on a free parameter with mass dimension H << M * < M p and on the slow-roll parameter ɛ. Supported by the Islamic Azad University, Rasht Branch, Rasht, Iran

  19. Influence of Planck foreground masks in the large angular scale quadrant CMB asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, L.; Cabella, P.; Villela, T.; Zhao, W.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The measured cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular distribution shows high consistency with the ΛCDM model, which predicts cosmological isotropy as one of its fundamental characteristics. However, isotropy violations were reported in CMB temperature maps of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and confirmed by Planck satellite data. Aims: Our purpose is to investigate the influence of different sky cuts (masks) employed in the analysis of CMB angular distribution, in particular in the excess of power in the southeastern quadrant (SEQ) and the lack of power in the northeastern quadrant (NEQ), found in both WMAP and Planck data. Methods: We compared the two-point correlation function (TPCF) computed for each quadrant of the CMB foreground-cleaned temperature maps to 1000 Monte Carlo (MC) simulations generated assuming the ΛCDM best-fit power spectrum using four different masks, from the least to the most severe one: mask-rulerminimal, UT78, U73, and U66. In addition to the quadrants and for a better understanding of these anomalies, we computed the TPCF using the mask-rulerminimal for circular regions in the map where the excess and lack of power are present. We also compared, for completeness, the effect of Galactic cuts (+/-10, 20, 25, and 30 degrees above/below the Galactic plane) in the TPCF calculations as compared to the MC simulations. Results: We found consistent results for three masks, namely mask-rulerminimal, U73, and U66. The results indicate that the excess of power in the SEQ tends to vanish as the portion of the sky covered by the mask increases and the lack of power in the NEQ remains virtually unchanged. A different result arises for the newly released UT78 Planck mask. When this mask is applied, the NEQ is no longer anomalous. On the other hand, the excess of power in the SEQ becomes the most significant one among the masks. Nevertheless, the asymmetry between the SEQ and NEQ is independent of the mask and it disagrees

  20. Symmetry of the CMB sky as a new test of its statistical isotropy. Non cosmological octupole?

    SciTech Connect

    Naselsky, P.; Hansen, M.; Kim, J. E-mail: kirstejn@nbi.dk

    2011-09-01

    In this article we propose a novel test for statistical anisotropy of the CMB ΔT( n-circumflex = (θ,φ)). The test is based on the fact, that the Galactic foregrounds have a remarkably strong symmetry with respect to their antipodal points with respect to the Galactic plane, while the cosmological signal should not be symmetric or asymmetric under these transitions. We have applied the test for the octupole component of the WMAP ILC 7 map, by looking at a{sub 3,1} and a{sub 3,3}, and their ratio to a{sub 3,2} both for real and imaginary values. We find abnormal symmetry of the octupole component at the level of 0.58%, compared to Monte Carlo simulations. By using the analysis of the phases of the octupole we found remarkably strong cross-correlations between the phases of the kinematic dipole and the ILC 7 octupole, in full agreement with previous results. We further test the multipole range 2 < l < 100, by investigating the ratio between the l+m = even and l+m = odd parts of power spectra. We compare the results to simulations of a Gaussian random sky, and find significant departure from the statistically isotropic and homogeneous case, for a very broad range of multipoles. We found that for the most prominent peaks of our estimator, the phases of the corresponding harmonics are coherent with phases of the octupole. We believe, our test would be very useful for detections of various types of residuals of the foreground and systematic effects at a very broad range of multipoles 2 ≤ l ≤ 1500−3000 for the forthcoming PLANCK CMB map, before any conclusions about primordial non-Gaussianity and statistical anisotropy of the CMB.

  1. CMB constraints on cosmic strings and superstrings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charnock, Tom; Avgoustidis, Anastasios; Copeland, Edmund J.; Moss, Adam

    2016-06-01

    We present the first complete Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of cosmological models with evolving cosmic (super)string networks, using the unconnected segment model in the unequal-time correlator formalism. For ordinary cosmic string networks, we derive joint constraints on Λ cold dark matter (CDM) and string network parameters, namely the string tension G μ , the loop-chopping efficiency cr, and the string wiggliness α . For cosmic superstrings, we obtain joint constraints on the fundamental string tension G μF, the string coupling gs, the self-interaction coefficient cs, and the volume of compact extra dimensions w . This constitutes the most comprehensive CMB analysis of Λ CDM cosmology+strings to date. For ordinary cosmic string networks our updated constraint on the string tension, obtained using Planck2015 temperature and polarization data, is G μ <1.1 ×10-7 in relativistic units, while for cosmic superstrings our constraint on the fundamental string tension after marginalizing over gs, cs, and w is G μF<2.8 ×10-8.

  2. Angular-planar CMB power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Thiago S.; Abramo, L. Raul

    2009-09-15

    Gaussianity and statistical isotropy of the Universe are modern cosmology's minimal set of hypotheses. In this work we introduce a new statistical test to detect observational deviations from this minimal set. By defining the temperature correlation function over the whole celestial sphere, we are able to independently quantify both angular and planar dependence (modulations) of the CMB temperature power spectrum over different slices of this sphere. Given that planar dependence leads to further modulations of the usual angular power spectrum C{sub l}, this test can potentially reveal richer structures in the morphology of the primordial temperature field. We have also constructed an unbiased estimator for this angular-planar power spectrum which naturally generalizes the estimator for the usual C{sub l}'s. With the help of a chi-square analysis, we have used this estimator to search for observational deviations of statistical isotropy in WMAP's 5 year release data set (ILC5), where we found only slight anomalies on the angular scales l=7 and l=8. Since this angular-planar statistic is model-independent, it is ideal to employ in searches of statistical anisotropy (e.g., contaminations from the galactic plane) and to characterize non-Gaussianities.

  3. CMB seen through random Swiss Cheese

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavinto, Mikko; Räsänen, Syksy

    2015-10-01

    We consider a Swiss Cheese model with a random arrangement of Lemaȋtre-Tolman-Bondi holes in ΛCDM cheese. We study two kinds of holes with radius rb=50 h-1 Mpc, with either an underdense or an overdense centre, called the open and closed case, respectively. We calculate the effect of the holes on the temperature, angular diameter distance and, for the first time in Swiss Cheese models, shear of the CMB . We quantify the systematic shift of the mean and the statistical scatter, and calculate the power spectra. In the open case, the temperature power spectrum is three orders of magnitude below the linear ISW spectrum. It is sensitive to the details of the hole, in the closed case the amplitude is two orders of magnitude smaller. In contrast, the power spectra of the distance and shear are more robust, and agree with perturbation theory and previous Swiss Cheese results. We do not find a statistically significant mean shift in the sky average of the angular diameter distance, and obtain the 95% limit |Δ DA/bar DA|lesssim 10-4. We consider the argument that areas of spherical surfaces are nearly unaffected by perturbations, which is often invoked in light propagation calculations. The closed case is consistent with this at 1σ, whereas in the open case the probability is only 1.4%.

  4. CMB-lensing beyond the Born approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozzi, Giovanni; Fanizza, Giuseppe; Di Dio, Enea; Durrer, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the weak lensing corrections to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies considering effects beyond the Born approximation. To this aim, we use the small deflection angle approximation, to connect the lensed and unlensed power spectra, via expressions for the deflection angles up to third order in the gravitational potential. While the small deflection angle approximation has the drawback to be reliable only for multipoles l lesssim 2500, it allows us to consistently take into account the non-Gaussian nature of cosmological perturbation theory beyond the linear level. The contribution to the lensed temperature power spectrum coming from the non-Gaussian nature of the deflection angle at higher order is a new effect which has not been taken into account in the literature so far. It turns out to be the leading contribution among the post-Born lensing corrections. On the other hand, the effect is smaller than corrections coming from non-linearities in the matter power spectrum, and its imprint on CMB lensing is too small to be seen in present experiments.

  5. The CMB bispectrum in the squeezed limit

    SciTech Connect

    Creminelli, Paolo; Pitrou, Cyril; Vernizzi, Filippo E-mail: cyril.pitrou@gmail.com

    2011-11-01

    The CMB bispectrum generated by second-order effects at recombination can be calculated analytically when one of the three modes has a wavelength much longer than the other two and is outside the horizon at recombination. This was pointed out in [1] and here we correct their results. We derive a simple formula for the bispectrum, f{sub NL}{sup loc} = −(1/6+cos 2θ)⋅(1−1/2⋅dln (l{sub S}{sup 2}C{sub S})/dln l{sub S}), where C{sub S} is the short scale spectrum and θ the relative orientation between the long and the short modes. This formula is exact and takes into account all effects at recombination, including recombination-lensing, but neglects all late-time effects such as ISW-lensing. The induced bispectrum in the squeezed limit is small and will negligibly contaminate the Planck search for a local primordial signal: this will be biased only by f{sub NL}{sup loc} ≈ −0.4. The above analytic formula includes the primordial non-Gaussianity of any single-field model. It also represents a consistency check for second-order Boltzmann codes: we find substantial agreement with the current version of the CMBquick code.

  6.  CMB anomalies after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2016-09-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP and by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the solar system, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary ΛCDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, which seem to imply a violation of statistical isotropy and scale invariance of inflationary perturbations. In this contribution we present a critical analysis of our current understanding and discuss several ideas of how to make further progress.

  7. The effect of inhomogeneities on the distance to the last scattering surface and the accuracy of the CMB analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2011-02-01

    The standard analysis of the CMB data assumes that the distance to the last scattering surface can be calculated using the distance-redshift relation as in the Friedmann model. However, in the inhomogeneous universe, even if (δρ) = 0, the distance relation is not the same as in the unperturbed universe. This can be of serious consequences as a change of distance affects the mapping of CMB temperature fluctuations into the angular power spectrum C{sub l}. In addition, if the change of distance is relatively uniform no new temperature fluctuations are generated. It is therefore a different effect than the lensing or ISW effects which introduce additional CMB anisotropies. This paper shows that the accuracy of the CMB analysis can be impaired by the accuracy of calculation of the distance within the cosmological models. Since this effect has not been fully explored before, to test how the inhomogeneities affect the distance-redshift relation, several methods are examined: the Dyer-Roeder relation, lensing approximation, and non-linear Swiss-Cheese model. In all cases, the distance to the last scattering surface is different than when homogeneity is assumed. The difference can be as low as 1% and as high as 80%. An usual change of the distance is around 20–30%. Since the distance to the last scattering surface is set by the position of the CMB peaks, in order to have a good fit, the distance needs to be adjusted. After correcting the distance, the cosmological parameters change. Therefore, a not properly estimated distance to the last scattering surface can be a major source of systematics. This paper shows that if inhomogeneities are taken into account when calculating the distance then models with positive spatial curvature and with Ω{sub Λ} ∼ 0.8−0.9 are preferred.

  8. Can we detect hot/cold spots in the CMB with Minkowski Functionals?

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eugene A.; Simon, Dennis E-mail: dsimon@astro.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the utility of Minkowski Functionals as a probe of cold/hot disk-like structures in the CMB. In order to construct an accurate estimator, we resolve a long-standing issue with the use of Minkowski Functionals as probes of the CMB sky — namely that of systematic differences (''residuals'') when numerical and analytical MF are compared. We show that such residuals are in fact by-products of binning, whereas it was originally attributed to pixelation or masking effects. We then derive a map-independent estimator that encodes the effects of binning, applicable to beyond our present work. Using this residual-free estimator, we show that small disk-like effects (as claimed by Vielva et al. [1,2]) can be detected only when a large sample of such maps are averaged over. In other words, our estimator is noise-dominated for small disk sizes at WMAP resolution. To confirm our suspicion, we apply our estimator to the WMAP7 data to obtain a null result.

  9. Can residuals of the solar system foreground explain low multipole anomalies of the CMB?

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Kim, J.; Frejsel, A.M.; Ramazanov, S.; Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Burigana, C. E-mail: jkim@nbi.dk E-mail: sabir_ra@nbi.dk E-mail: wzhao7@nbi.ku.dk

    2012-10-01

    The low multipole anomalies of the Cosmic Microwave Background has received much attention during the last few years. It is still not ascertained whether these anomalies are indeed primordial or the result of systematics or foregrounds. An example of a foreground, which could generate some non-Gaussian and statistically anisotropic features at low multipole range, is the very symmetric Kuiper Belt in the outer solar system. In this paper, expanding upon the methods presented in [1], we investigate the contributions from the Kuiper Belt objects (KBO) to the WMAP ILC 7 map, whereby we can minimize the contrast in power between even and odd multipoles in the CMB, discussed in [2,3]. We submit our KBO de-correlated CMB signal to several tests, to analyze its validity, and find that incorporation of the KBO emission can decrease the quadrupole-octupole alignment and parity asymmetry problems, provided that the KBO signals has a non-cosmological dipole modulation, associated with the statistical anisotropy of the ILC 7 map. Additionally, we show that the amplitude of the dipole modulation, within a 2σ interval, is in agreement with the corresponding amplitudes, discussed in [4].

  10. External priors for the next generation of CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Manzotti, Alessandro; Dodelson, Scott; Park, Youngsoo

    2015-12-08

    Planned cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments can dramatically improve what we know about neutrino physics, inflation, and dark energy. The low level of noise, together with improved angular resolution, will increase the signal to noise of the CMB polarized signal as well as the reconstructed lensing potential of high redshift large scale structure. Projected constraints on cosmological parameters are extremely tight, but these can be improved even further with information from external experiments. Here, we examine quantitatively the extent to which external priors can lead to improvement in projected constraints from a CMB-Stage IV (S4) experiment on neutrino and dark energy properties. We find that CMB S4 constraints on neutrino mass could be strongly enhanced by external constraints on the cold dark matter density $\\Omega_{c}h^{2}$ and the Hubble constant $H_{0}$. If polarization on the largest scales ($\\ell<50$) will not be measured, an external prior on the primordial amplitude $A_{s}$ or the optical depth $\\tau$ will also be important. A CMB constraint on the number of relativistic degrees of freedom, $N_{\\rm eff}$, will benefit from an external prior on the spectral index $n_{s}$ and the baryon energy density $\\Omega_{b}h^{2}$. Finally, an external prior on $H_{0}$ will help constrain the dark energy equation of state ($w$).

  11. Measurements of the CMB temperature at z=0.89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Sebastien; Curran, Steve; Beelen, Alexandre; Aalto, Susanne; Combes, Francoise; Guelin, Michel; Black, John Harry; Horellou, Cathy

    2011-04-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is one of the strongest pillars of the Big Bang theory. Determining the CMB temperature at high redshift has considerable interest to probe the T_CMB-z law and test decaying dark energy models. Our recent ATCA 7 mm spectral line survey toward the z=0.89 molecular absorber located in front of the lensed quasar PKS1830-211 has allowed us to detect a collection of about 30 different molecular species and to derive rotation temperatures of some of them toward one image of the quasar. Averaging these rotation temperatures, we obtain a value of 5.2 pm 0.3 K, consistent with the value T_CMB=5.14 K from standard cosmology. We now propose to strengthen this result by determining the rotation temperatures of a set of molecules toward the second lensed image, projected on the other side of the absorbing galaxy bulge, in a completely independent line of sight. We will therefore obtain a new, independent and presumably more robust measurement of T_CMB at z=0.89. A total of 8 hours of observations is requested in order to conduct the multi-transition analysis in the 7 mm and 3 mm bands.

  12. Parity violation in the CMB trispectrum from the scalar sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-10-01

    Under the existence of chiral non-Gaussian sources during inflation, the trispectrum of primordial curvature perturbations can break parity. We examine signatures of the induced trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. It is confirmed via a harmonic-space analysis that, as a consequence of parity violation, such a CMB trispectrum has nonvanishing signal in the ℓ1+ℓ2+ℓ3+ℓ4=odd domain, which is prohibited in the concordance cosmology. When the curvature trispectrum is parametrized with Legendre polynomials, the CMB signal due to the Legendre dipolar term is enhanced at the squeezed configurations in ℓ space, yielding a high signal-to-noise ratio. A Fisher matrix computation results in a minimum detectable size of the dipolar coefficient in a cosmic-variance-limited-level temperature survey as d1odd=640 . In an inflationary model where the inflaton field couples to the gauge field via an f (ϕ )(F2+F F ˜) interaction, the curvature trispectrum contains such a parity-odd dipolar term. We find that, in this model, the CMB trispectrum yields a high signal-to-noise ratio compared with the CMB power spectrum or bispectrum. Therefore, the ℓ1+ℓ2+ℓ3+ℓ4=odd signal could be a promising observable of cosmological parity violation.

  13. Rayleigh scattering: blue sky thinking for future CMB observations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Antony

    2013-08-01

    Rayleigh scattering from neutral hydrogen during and shortly after recombination causes the CMB anisotropies to be significantly frequency dependent at high frequencies. This may be detectable with Planck, and would be a strong signal in any future space-based CMB missions. The later peak of the Rayleigh visibility compared to Thomson scattering gives an increased large-scale CMB polarization signal that is a greater than 4% effect for observed frequencies ν ∼> 500GHz. There is a similar magnitude suppression on small scales from additional damping. Due to strong correlation between the Rayleigh and primary signal, measurement of the Rayleigh component is limited by noise and foregrounds, not cosmic variance of the primary CMB, and should observable over a wide range of angular scales at frequencies 200GHz ∼< ν ∼< 800GHz. I give new numerical calculations of the temperature and polarization power spectra, and show that future CMB missions could measure the temperature Rayleigh cross-spectrum at high precision, detect the polarization from Rayleigh scattering, and also accurately determine the cross-spectra between the Rayleigh temperature signal and primary polarization. The Rayleigh scattering signal may provide a powerful consistency check on recombination physics. In principle it can be used to measure additional horizon-scale primordial perturbation modes at recombination, and distinguish a significant tensor mode B-polarization signal from gravitational lensing at the power spectrum level.

  14. Fine mapping of qSB-11(LE), the QTL that confers partial resistance to rice sheath blight.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Shimin; Yin, Yuejun; Pan, Cunhong; Chen, Zongxiang; Zhang, Yafang; Gu, Shiliang; Zhu, Lihuang; Pan, Xuebiao

    2013-05-01

    Sheath blight (SB), caused by Rhizoctonia solani kühn, is one of the most serious global rice diseases. No major resistance genes to SB have been identified so far. All discovered loci are quantitative resistance to rice SB. The qSB-11(LE) resistance quantitative trait locus (QTL) has been previously reported on chromosome 11 of Lemont (LE). In this study, we report the precise location of qSB-11 (LE) . We developed a near isogenic line, NIL-qSB11(TQ), by marker-assisted selection that contains susceptible allele(s) from Teqing (TQ) at the qSB-11 locus in the LE genetic background. NIL-qSB11(TQ) shows higher susceptibility to SB than LE in both field and greenhouse tests, suggesting that this region of LE contains a QTL contributing to SB resistance. In order to eliminate the genetic background effects and increase the accuracy of phenotypic evaluation, a total of 112 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs) with the substituted segment specific to the qSB-11 (LE) region were produced as the fine mapping population. The genetic backgrounds and morphological characteristics of these CSSLs are similar to those of the recurrent parent LE. The donor TQ chromosomal segments in these CSSL lines contiguously overlap to bridge the qSB-11 (LE) region. Through artificial inoculation, all CSSLs were evaluated for resistance to SB in the field in 2005. For the recombinant lines, their phenotypes were evaluated in the field for another 3 years and during the final year were also evaluated in a controlled greenhouse environment, showing a consistent phenotype in SB resistance across years and conditions. After comparing the genotypic profile of each CSSL with its phenotype, we are able to localize qSB-11 (LE) to the region defined by two cleaved-amplified polymorphic sequence markers, Z22-27C and Z23-33C covering 78.871 kb, based on the rice reference genome. Eleven putative genes were annotated within this region and three of them were considered the most likely

  15. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Righi, M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-02-01

    Context: Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. Aims: We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects that are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. Methods: We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. Results: We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution of such star-forming haloes will be one of the most significant foregrounds in the high frequency channels of future CMB experiments, such as PLANCK, ACT and SPT. The correlation term, due to the clustering of multiple haloes at redshift z ~ 2-6, is dominant in the broad range of angular scales 200 ⪉ l ⪉ 3000. Poisson fluctuations due to bright sub-millimeter sources are more important at higher l, but since they are generated from the bright sources, such contribution could be strongly reduced if bright sources are excised from the sky maps. The contribution of the correlation term to the angular power spectrum depends strongly on the redshift evolution of the escape fraction of UV photons and the resulting temperature of the dust. The measurement of this signal will therefore give important information about the sub-millimeter emission and the escape fraction of UV photons from galaxies, in the early stage of their evolution.

  16. Optimized Large-scale CMB Likelihood and Quadratic Maximum Likelihood Power Spectrum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gjerløw, E.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Jewell, J. B.; Plaszczynski, S.; Wehus, I. K.

    2015-11-01

    We revisit the problem of exact cosmic microwave background (CMB) likelihood and power spectrum estimation with the goal of minimizing computational costs through linear compression. This idea was originally proposed for CMB purposes by Tegmark et al., and here we develop it into a fully functioning computational framework for large-scale polarization analysis, adopting WMAP as a working example. We compare five different linear bases (pixel space, harmonic space, noise covariance eigenvectors, signal-to-noise covariance eigenvectors, and signal-plus-noise covariance eigenvectors) in terms of compression efficiency, and find that the computationally most efficient basis is the signal-to-noise eigenvector basis, which is closely related to the Karhunen-Loeve and Principal Component transforms, in agreement with previous suggestions. For this basis, the information in 6836 unmasked WMAP sky map pixels can be compressed into a smaller set of 3102 modes, with a maximum error increase of any single multipole of 3.8% at ℓ ≤ 32 and a maximum shift in the mean values of a joint distribution of an amplitude-tilt model of 0.006σ. This compression reduces the computational cost of a single likelihood evaluation by a factor of 5, from 38 to 7.5 CPU seconds, and it also results in a more robust likelihood by implicitly regularizing nearly degenerate modes. Finally, we use the same compression framework to formulate a numerically stable and computationally efficient variation of the Quadratic Maximum Likelihood implementation, which requires less than 3 GB of memory and 2 CPU minutes per iteration for ℓ ≤ 32, rendering low-ℓ QML CMB power spectrum analysis fully tractable on a standard laptop.

  17. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    SciTech Connect

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A.; Jaeckel, J. E-mail: joerg.jaeckel@durham.ac.uk E-mail: andreas.ringwald@desy.de

    2009-11-01

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini-charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster.

  18. New constraints on anisotropic rotation of CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mingzhe; Yu, Bo E-mail: yubo@pmo.ac.cn

    2013-06-01

    The coupling of a scalar field to electromagnetic field via the Chern-Simons term will rotate the polarization directions of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The rotation angle which relies on the distribution of the scalar field on the CMB sky is direction dependent. Such anisotropies will give rise to new distortions to the power spectra of CMB polarization and it can be used to probe the detailed physics of the scalar field. In this paper we use the updated observational data to constrain the anisotropic rotation angle in a model independent way. We find that the dominant effect of the anisotropic rotation on CMB comes from its variance and it is constrained tightly by the current data.

  19. Effect of intermediate Minkowskian evolution on CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Mironov, S.A.; Rubakov, V.A.; Ramazanov, S.R. E-mail: Sabir.Ramazanov@ulb.ac.be

    2014-04-01

    We consider a non-inflationary early Universe scenario in which relevant scalar perturbations get frozen out at some point, but then are defrosted and follow a long nearly Minkowskian evolution before the hot era. This intermediate stage leaves specific imprint on the CMB 3-point function, largely independent of details of microscopic physics. In particular, the CMB bispectrum undergoes oscillations in the multipole l space with roughly constant amplitude. The latter is in contrast to the oscillatory bispectrum enhanced in the flattened triangle limit, as predicted by inflation with non-Bunch-Davies vacuum. Given this and other peculiar features of the bispectrum, stringent constraints imposed by the Planck data may not apply. The CMB 3-point function is suppressed by the inverse duration squared of the Minkowskian evolution, but can be of observable size for relatively short intermediate Minkowskian stage.

  20. TESTING CPT SYMMETRY WITH CURRENT AND FUTURE CMB MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Si-Yu; Zhang, Xinmin; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Hong; Li, Mingzhe

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we use the current and future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments to test the Charge-Parity-Time Reversal (CPT) symmetry. We consider a CPT-violating interaction in the photon sector L{sub cs}∼p{sub μ}A{sub ν} F-tilde {sup μν}, which gives rise to a rotation of the polarization vectors of the propagating CMB photons. By combining the 9 yr WMAP, BOOMERanG 2003, and BICEP1 observations, we obtain the current constraint on the isotropic rotation angle α-bar =−2.12±1.14 (1σ), indicating that the significance of the CPT violation is about 2σ. Here, we particularly take the systematic errors of CMB measurements into account. Then, we study the effects of the anisotropies of the rotation angle [Δα( n-hat )] on the CMB polarization power spectra in detail. Due to the small effects, the current CMB polarization data cannot constrain the related parameters very well. We obtain the 95% C.L. upper limit of the variance of the anisotropies of the rotation angle C {sup α}(0) < 0.035 from all of the CMB data sets. More interestingly, including the anisotropies of rotation angle could lower the best-fit value of r and relax the tension on the constraints of r between BICEP2 and Planck. Finally, we investigate the capabilities of future Planck polarization measurements on α-bar and Δα( n-hat ). Benefited from the high precision of Planck data, the constraints of the rotation angle can be significantly improved.

  1. Low-Frequency Measurements of the CMB Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, Giovanni; Levin, S.; Limon,M.; Smoot, George F.; Sironi, G.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G.

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amundsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82, 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements possible from a polar observing site.

  2. Loop quantum cosmology, non-Gaussianity, and CMB power asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agullo, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    We argue that the anomalous power asymmetry observed in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) may have originated in a cosmic bounce preceding inflation. In loop quantum cosmology (LQC), the big bang singularity is generically replaced by a bounce due to quantum gravitational effects. We compute the spectrum of inflationary non-Gaussianity and show that strong correlation between observable scales and modes with longer (superhorizon) wavelength arise as a consequence of the evolution of perturbations across the LQC bounce. These correlations are strongly scale dependent and induce a dipole-dominated modulation on large angular scales in the CMB, in agreement with observations.

  3. Nonisotropy in the CMB power spectrum in single field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, John F.; Dutta, Koushik; Ross, Andreas

    2009-07-15

    Contaldi et al.[C. R. Contaldi, M. Peloso, L. Kofman, and A. Linde, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 07 (2003) 002] have suggested that an initial period of kinetic energy domination in single field inflation may explain the lack of CMB power at large angular scales. We note that in this situation it is natural that there also be a spatial gradient in the initial value of the inflaton field, and that this can provide a spatial asymmetry in the observed CMB power spectrum, manifest at low values of l. We investigate the nature of this asymmetry and comment on its relation to possible anomalies at low l.

  4. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Frommert, Mona; Durrer, Ruth; Michaud, Jérôme E-mail: Ruth.Durrer@unige.ch

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of the cosmic microwave background using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. We show that, when we correctly de-correlate the data, the partition function of the Kolmogorov stochasticity parameter is compatible with the Kolmogorov distribution and, contrary to previous claims, the CMB data are compatible with Gaussian fluctuations with the correlation function given by standard ΛCDM. We then use the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test to derive upper bounds on residual point source power in the CMB, and indicate the promise of this statistics for further datasets, especially Planck, to search for deviations from Gaussianity and for detecting point sources and Galactic foregrounds.

  5. Observing the CMB with the AMiBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyan, R.

    I discuss the capabilities and limitations of the AMiBA for imaging CMB anisotropies. Michael Kesteven (ATNF-CSIRO) has proposed drift-scanning as an observing strategy for measuring and rejecting any instrumental response that the close-packed interferometers may have to the local environment. The advantages of mosaic imaging CMB anisotropies using a co-mounted interferometric array in a drift-scanning observing mode are discussed. A particular case of mosaic imaging a sky strip using a two-element AMiBA prototype interferometer is considered and the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of sky anisotropy using this observing strategy is analysed.

  6. Reconciling CMB and structure growth measurements with dark energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Tram, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study a coupled quintessence model with pure momentum exchange and present the effects of such an interaction on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and matter power spectrum. For a wide range of negative values of the coupling parameter β structure growth is suppressed and the model can reconcile the tension between cosmic microwave background observations and structure growth inferred from cluster counts. We find that this model is as good as Λ CDM for CMB and baryon acoustic oscillation data, while the addition of cluster data makes the model strongly preferred, improving the best-fit χ2 value by more than 16.

  7. Robust forecasts on fundamental physics from the foreground-obscured, gravitationally-lensed CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errard, Josquin; Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Jaffe, Andrew H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent results from the BICEP, Keck Array and Planck Collaborations demonstrate that Galactic foregrounds are an unavoidable obstacle in the search for evidence of inflationary gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. Beyond the foregrounds, the effect of lensing by intervening large-scale structure further obscures all but the strongest inflationary signals permitted by current data. With a plethora of ongoing and upcoming experiments aiming to measure these signatures, careful and self-consistent consideration of experiments' foreground- and lensing-removal capabilities is critical in obtaining credible forecasts of their performance. We investigate the capabilities of instruments such as Advanced ACTPol, BICEP3 and Keck Array, CLASS, EBEX10K, PIPER, Simons Array, SPT-3G and SPIDER, and projects as COrE+, LiteBIRD-ext, PIXIE and Stage IV, to clean contamination due to polarized synchrotron and dust from raw multi-frequency data, and remove lensing from the resulting co-added CMB maps (either using iterative CMB-only techniques or through cross-correlation with external data). Incorporating these effects, we present forecasts for the constraining power of these experiments in terms of inflationary physics, the neutrino sector, and dark energy parameters. Made publicly available through an online interface, this tool enables the next generation of CMB experiments to foreground-proof their designs, optimize their frequency coverage to maximize scientific output, and determine where cross-experimental collaboration would be most beneficial. We find that analyzing data from ground, balloon and space instruments in complementary combinations can significantly improve component separation performance, delensing, and cosmological constraints over individual datasets. In particular, we find that a combination of post-2020 ground- and space-based experiments could achieve constraints such as σ(r)~1.3×10-4, σ(nt)~0.03, σ( ns )~1.8×10

  8. Exploring two-spin internal linear combinations for the recovery of the CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Cobos, R.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Vielva, P.; Martínez-González, E.; Barreiro, R. B.

    2016-06-01

    We present a methodology to recover cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization in which the quantity P = Q + iU is linearly combined at different frequencies using complex coefficients. This is the most general linear combination of the Q and U Stokes parameters which preserves the physical coherence of the residual contribution on the CMB estimation. The approach is applied to the internal linear combination (ILC) and the internal template fitting (ITF) methodologies. The variance of P of the resulting map is minimized to compute the coefficients of the linear combination. One of the key aspects of this procedure is that it serves to account for a global frequency-dependent shift of the polarization phase. Although in the standard case, in which no global E-B transference depending on frequency is expected in the foreground components, minimizing <|P|2> is similar to minimizing and separately (as previous methodologies proceed), multiplying Q and U by different coefficients induces arbitrary changes in the polarization angle and it does not preserve the coherence between the spinorial components. The approach is tested on simulations, obtaining a similar residual level with respect to the one obtained with other implementations of the ILC, and perceiving the polarization rotation of a toy model with the frequency dependence of the Faraday rotation.

  9. The Szekeres Swiss Cheese model and the CMB observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolejko, Krzysztof

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents the application of the Szekeres Swiss Cheese model to the analysis of observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. The impact of inhomogeneous matter distribution on the CMB observations is in most cases studied within the linear perturbations of the Friedmann model. However, since the density contrast and the Weyl curvature within the cosmic structures are large, this issue is worth studying using another approach. The Szekeres model is an inhomogeneous, non-symmetrical and exact solution of the Einstein equations. In this model, light propagation and matter evolution can be exactly calculated, without such approximations as small amplitude of the density contrast. This allows to examine in more realistic manner the contribution of the light propagation effect to the measured CMB temperature fluctuations. The results of such analysis show that small-scale, non-linear inhomogeneities induce, via Rees-Sciama effect, temperature fluctuations of amplitude 10-7-10-5 on angular scale ϑ < 0.24° ( ℓ > 750). This is still much smaller than the measured temperature fluctuations on this angular scale. However, local and uncompensated inhomogeneities can induce temperature fluctuations of amplitude as large as 10-3, and thus can be responsible the low multipoles anomalies observed in the angular CMB power spectrum.

  10. Joint Bayesian Component Separation and CMB Power Spectrum Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eriksen, H. K.; Jewell, J. B.; Dickinson, C.; Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2008-01-01

    We describe and implement an exact, flexible, and computationally efficient algorithm for joint component separation and CMB power spectrum estimation, building on a Gibbs sampling framework. Two essential new features are (1) conditional sampling of foreground spectral parameters and (2) joint sampling of all amplitude-type degrees of freedom (e.g., CMB, foreground pixel amplitudes, and global template amplitudes) given spectral parameters. Given a parametric model of the foreground signals, we estimate efficiently and accurately the exact joint foreground- CMB posterior distribution and, therefore, all marginal distributions such as the CMB power spectrum or foreground spectral index posteriors. The main limitation of the current implementation is the requirement of identical beam responses at all frequencies, which restricts the analysis to the lowest resolution of a given experiment. We outline a future generalization to multiresolution observations. To verify the method, we analyze simple models and compare the results to analytical predictions. We then analyze a realistic simulation with properties similar to the 3 yr WMAP data, downgraded to a common resolution of 3 deg FWHM. The results from the actual 3 yr WMAP temperature analysis are presented in a companion Letter.

  11. CHEMICAL MASS BALANCE MODEL: EPA-CMB8.2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) method has been a popular approach for receptor modeling of ambient air pollutants for over two decades. For the past few years the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Office of Air Quality Plannin...

  12. CMB Lensing as a probe of beyond ΛCDM Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, F.; Baghram, S.; Firouzjahi, H.

    2016-09-01

    The observation of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB) and the Large Structures indicate that the standard model of Cosmology known as ΛCDM works well. In this essay we propose that the CMB lensing is a prominent probe to study any deviation from this model. Deviations from cosmological constant and nearly Gaussian, adiabatic, nearly scale invariant and isotropic initial conditions can be studied by CMB lensing. We show how the angular power spectrum of CMB lensing potential is an observable which encapsulates the effect of initial conditions and Dark Energy. The amplitude and the scale dependence of a dipole modulation in initial conditions is studied with CMB lensing potential and convergence.

  13. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, Gμ << 10{sup -7}, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  14. Partially pre-calculated weights for the backpropagation learning regime and high accuracy function mapping using continuous input RAM-based sigma-pi nets.

    PubMed

    Neville, R S; Stonham, T J; Glover, R J

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present a methodology that partially pre-calculates the weight updates of the backpropagation learning regime and obtains high accuracy function mapping. The paper shows how to implement neural units in a digital formulation which enables the weights to be quantised to 8-bits and the activations to 9-bits. A novel methodology is introduced to enable the accuracy of sigma-pi units to be increased by expanding their internal state space. We, also, introduce a novel means of implementing bit-streams in ring memories instead of utilising shift registers. The investigation utilises digital "Higher Order" sigma-pi nodes and studies continuous input RAM-based sigma-pi units. The units are trained with the backpropagation learning regime to learn functions to a high accuracy. The neural model is the sigma-pi units which can be implemented in digital microelectronic technology. The ability to perform tasks that require the input of real-valued information, is one of the central requirements of any cognitive system that utilises artificial neural network methodologies. In this article we present recent research which investigates a technique that can be used for mapping accurate real-valued functions to RAM-nets. One of our goals was to achieve accuracies of better than 1% for target output functions in the range Y epsilon [0,1], this is equivalent to an average Mean Square Error (MSE) over all training vectors of 0.0001 or an error modulus of 0.01. We present a development of the sigma-pi node which enables the provision of high accuracy outputs. The sigma-pi neural model was initially developed by Gurney (Learning in nets of structured hypercubes. PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering, Brunel University, Middlessex, UK, 1989; available as Technical Memo CN/R/144). Gurney's neuron models, the Time Integration Node (TIN), utilises an activation that was derived from a bit-stream. In this article we present a new methodology for storing sigma

  15. Partially pre-calculated weights for the backpropagation learning regime and high accuracy function mapping using continuous input RAM-based sigma-pi nets.

    PubMed

    Neville, R S; Stonham, T J; Glover, R J

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present a methodology that partially pre-calculates the weight updates of the backpropagation learning regime and obtains high accuracy function mapping. The paper shows how to implement neural units in a digital formulation which enables the weights to be quantised to 8-bits and the activations to 9-bits. A novel methodology is introduced to enable the accuracy of sigma-pi units to be increased by expanding their internal state space. We, also, introduce a novel means of implementing bit-streams in ring memories instead of utilising shift registers. The investigation utilises digital "Higher Order" sigma-pi nodes and studies continuous input RAM-based sigma-pi units. The units are trained with the backpropagation learning regime to learn functions to a high accuracy. The neural model is the sigma-pi units which can be implemented in digital microelectronic technology. The ability to perform tasks that require the input of real-valued information, is one of the central requirements of any cognitive system that utilises artificial neural network methodologies. In this article we present recent research which investigates a technique that can be used for mapping accurate real-valued functions to RAM-nets. One of our goals was to achieve accuracies of better than 1% for target output functions in the range Y epsilon [0,1], this is equivalent to an average Mean Square Error (MSE) over all training vectors of 0.0001 or an error modulus of 0.01. We present a development of the sigma-pi node which enables the provision of high accuracy outputs. The sigma-pi neural model was initially developed by Gurney (Learning in nets of structured hypercubes. PhD Thesis, Department of Electrical Engineering, Brunel University, Middlessex, UK, 1989; available as Technical Memo CN/R/144). Gurney's neuron models, the Time Integration Node (TIN), utilises an activation that was derived from a bit-stream. In this article we present a new methodology for storing sigma

  16. Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Polarization calibration analysis for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopman, Brian; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. Achieving first light in 2013, ACTPol is entering its third observation season. Advanced ACTPol is a next generation upgrade for ACTPol, with additional frequencies, polarization modulation, and new detector arrays, that will begin in 2016. I will first present an overview of the two projects and then focus on describing the methods used for polarization angle calibration of the ACTPol detectors. These methods utilize polarization ray tracing in the optical design software CODEV together with detector positions determined from planet observations and represent a critical input for mapping the polarization of the CMB.

  17. Preliminary DMR measurements of the CMB isotropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; De Amici, G.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.; Rokke, L.

    1991-01-01

    The COBE Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument has produced preliminary full-sky maps at frequencies 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz. The redundant channels and matched beams at three frequencies distinguish the DMR from previous large-scale surveys. Galactic emission is seen unambiguously at all three frequencies. The only large-scale anisotropy detected in the cosmic microwave background is the dipole anisotropy. There is no clear evidence for any other large-angular-scale feature in the maps. Without correcting for any systematic effects, we are able to place limits DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 3 x 10 exp -5 for the rms quadrupole amplitude, DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for monochromatic fluctuations, and DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 4 x 10 exp -5 for Gaussian fluctuations (all limits are 95 percent C.L. with TO = 2.735 K). The data limit DeltaT/T sub 0 less than 10 exp -4 for any feature larger than 7 deg. We briefly review the DMR and discuss some implications of these results in cosmology.

  18. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  19. New CMB constraints for Abelian Higgs cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizarraga, Joanes; Urrestilla, Jon; Daverio, David; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin

    2016-10-01

    We present cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra from recent numerical simulations of cosmic strings in the Abelian Higgs model and compare them to CMB power spectra measured by Planck. We obtain revised constraints on the cosmic string tension parameter Gμ. For example, in the ΛCDM model with the addition of strings and no primordial tensor perturbations, we find Gμ < 2.0 × 10‑7 at 95% confidence, about 20% lower than the value obtained from previous simulations, which had 1/64 of the spatial volume. The increased computational volume also makes it possible to simulate fully the physical equations of motion, in which the string cores shrink in comoving coordinates. We find however that this, and the larger dynamic range, changes the amplitude of the power spectra by only about 10%. The main cause of the stronger constraints on Gμ is instead an improved treatment of the string evolution across the radiation-matter transition.

  20. Inflation in the closed FLRW model and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonga, Béatrice; Gupt, Brajesh; Yokomizo, Nelson

    2016-10-01

    Recent cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations put strong constraints on the spatial curvature via estimation of the parameter Ωk assuming an almost scale invariant primordial power spectrum. We study the evolution of the background geometry and gauge-invariant scalar perturbations in an inflationary closed FLRW model and calculate the primordial power spectrum. We find that the inflationary dynamics is modified due to the presence of spatial curvature, leading to corrections to the nearly scale invariant power spectrum at the end of inflation. When evolved to the surface of last scattering, the resulting temperature anisotropy spectrum (CTTl) shows deficit of power at low multipoles (l < 20). By comparing our results with the recent Planck data we discuss the role of spatial curvature in accounting for CMB anomalies and in the estimation of the parameter Ωk. Since the curvature effects are limited to low multipoles, the Planck estimation of cosmological parameters remains robust under inclusion of positive spatial curvature.

  1. Reconstructing the primordial power spectrum from the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Christopher; Bucher, Martin

    2012-10-01

    We propose a straightforward and model independent methodology for characterizing the sensitivity of CMB and other experiments to wiggles, irregularities, and features in the primordial power spectrum. Assuming that the primordial cosmological perturbations are adiabatic, we present a function space generalization of the usual Fisher matrix formalism applied to a CMB experiment resembling Planck with and without ancillary data. This work is closely related to other work on recovering the inflationary potential and exploring specific models of non-minimal, or perhaps baroque, primordial power spectra. The approach adopted here, however, most directly expresses what the data is really telling us. We explore in detail the structure of the available information and quantify exactly what features can be reconstructed and at what statistical significance.

  2. Superconducting Coplanar Switch and Phase Shifter for CMB Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Cammilleri, V. D.; Belier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Gadot, F.; Ghribi, A.; Piat, M.; Tartari, A.; Zanonni, M.

    2016-08-01

    The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterization of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimize systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. A new generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting microbridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the injected current compared to the critical current. If the current injected inside the bridge is lower than the critical current, the phase of the signal passing through the bridge is tunable. A first prototype of this component working as a switch and as a phase shifter at 10 GHz has been made. The principle, the setup, and the first measurements made at 4 K will be shown.

  3. The ISW imprints of voids and superclusters on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotchkiss, S.; Nadathur, S.; Gottlöber, S.; Iliev, I. T.; Knebe, A.; Watson, W. A.; Yepes, G.

    2016-10-01

    We examine the stacked integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) imprints on the CMB along the lines of sight of voids and superclusters in galaxy surveys, using the Jubilee ISW simulation and mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues. We show that the expected signal in the concordance \\Lam CDM model is much smaller than the primary anisotropies arising at the last scattering surface and therefore any currently claimed detections of such an imprint cannot be caused by the ISW effect in \\Lam CDM. We look for the existence of such a signal in the Planck CMB using a catalogue of voids and superclusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), but find a result completely consistent with \\Lam CDM - i.e., a null detection.

  4. CMB dipole asymmetry from a fast roll phase

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumdar, Anupam; Wang, Lingfei

    2013-10-01

    The observed CMB (cosmic microwave background) dipole asymmetry cannot be explained by a single field model of inflation - it inevitably requires more than one field where one of the fields is responsible for amplifying the super-Hubble fluctuations beyond the pivot scale. Furthermore the current constraints on f{sub NL} and τ{sub NL} require that such an amplification cannot produce large non-Gaussianity. In this paper we propose a model to explain this dipole asymmetry from a spectator field, which is responsible for generating all the curvature perturbations, but has a temporary fast roll phase before the Hubble exit of the pivot scale. The current data prefers spectator scenario because it leaves no isocurvature perturbations. The spectator model will also satisfy the well-known constraints arising from quasars, and the quadrupole and octupole of the CMB.

  5. Antenna-coupled TES bolometer arrays for CMB polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, C. L.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J.; Chattopadhyay, G.; Day, P. K.; Golwala, S.; Kenyon, M.; Lange, A. E.; LeDuc, H. G.; Nguyen, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Orlando, A.; Transgrud, A.; Turner, A.; Wang, G.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design and performance of polarization selective antenna-coupled TES arrays that will be used in several upcoming Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments: SPIDER, BICEP-2/SPUD. The fully lithographic polarimeter arrays utilize planar phased-antennas for collimation (F/4 beam) and microstrip filters for band definition (25% bandwidth). These devices demonstrate high optical efficiency, excellent beam shapes, and well-defined spectral bands. The dual-polarization antennas provide well-matched beams and low cross polarization response, both important for high-fidelity polarization measurements. These devices have so far been developed for the 100 GHz and 150 GHz bands, two premier millimeter-wave atmospheric windows for CMB observations. In the near future, the flexible microstrip-coupled architecture can provide photon noise-limited detection for the entire frequency range of the CMBPOL mission. This paper is a summary of the progress we have made since the 2006 SPIE meeting in Orlando, FL.

  6. Conformal invariance, dark energy, and CMB non-gaussianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil

    2012-09-01

    In addition to simple scale invariance, a universe dominated by dark energy naturally gives rise to correlation functions possessing full conformal invariance. This is due to the mathematical isomorphism between the conformal group of certain three dimensional slices of de Sitter space and the de Sitter isometry group SO(4,1). In the standard homogeneous, isotropic cosmological model in which primordial density perturbations are generated during a long vacuum energy dominated de Sitter phase, the embedding of flat spatial Bbb R3 sections in de Sitter space induces a conformal invariant perturbation spectrum and definite prediction for the shape of the non-Gaussian CMB bispectrum. In the case in which the density fluctuations are generated instead on the de Sitter horizon, conformal invariance of the Bbb S2 horizon embedding implies a different but also quite definite prediction for the angular correlations of CMB non-Gaussianity on the sky. Each of these forms for the bispectrum is intrinsic to the symmetries of de Sitter space, and in that sense, independent of specific model assumptions. Each is different from the predictions of single field slow roll inflation models, which rely on the breaking of de Sitter invariance. We propose a quantum origin for the CMB fluctuations in the scalar gravitational sector from the conformal anomaly that could give rise to these non-Gaussianities without a slow roll inflaton field, and argue that conformal invariance also leads to the expectation for the relation nS-1 = nT between the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor power spectrum. Confirmation of this prediction or detection of non-Gaussian correlations in the CMB of one of the bispectral shape functions predicted by conformal invariance can be used both to establish the physical origins of primordial density fluctuations, and distinguish between different dynamical models of cosmological vacuum dark energy.

  7. High altitude measurements of fluctuations in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.D. )

    1990-01-15

    The detection of fluctuations in the primordial CMB emission requires long integrations on limited areas of the sky; such extensive observations are best made from the ground on (high) dry sites. A current programme of measurements is described covering the frequency range 5 to 32 GHz using equipment at Teide Observatory, Tenerife, and in Antarctica. A bolometer system is under development for observations in the range 100 to 300 GHz to be made on Mauna Kea.

  8. Testing inflation and curvaton scenarios with CMB distortions

    SciTech Connect

    Clesse, Sébastien; Garbrecht, Björn; Zhu, Yi E-mail: garbrecht@tum.de

    2014-10-01

    Prior to recombination, Silk damping causes the dissipation of energy from acoustic waves into the monopole of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), resulting in spectral distortions. These can be used to probe the primordial scalar power spectrum on smaller scales than it is possible with CMB anisotropies. An enhancement of power on these scales is nevertheless required for the resulting distortions to be detectable by future experiments like PIXIE. In this paper, we examine all 49 single-field inflation models listed by Martin et al. in the Encyclopaedia Inflationaris [1] and find that only one of these may lead to a detectable level of distortions in a tuned region of its parameter space, namely the original hybrid model. Three effective multi-field scenarios are also studied: with softly and suddenly turning trajectories, and with a mild waterfall trajectory. Softly turning trajectories do not induce distortions at any detectable level, whereas a sudden turn in the field space or a mild waterfall trajectory predicts a peak (plus damped oscillations in the sudden turn case) in the scalar power spectrum, which can lead to an observable amount of CMB distortions. Finally, another scenario leading to potentially detectable distortions involves a curvaton whose blue spectrum is subdominant on CMB angular scales and overtakes the inflaton spectrum on smaller scales. In this case however, we show that the bounds from ultra compact minihaloes are not satisfied. Expectations for an ultimate PRISM-class experiment characterized by an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of ten are discussed for some models.

  9. Relic vector field and CMB large scale anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xingang; Wang, Yi E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-10-01

    We study the most general effects of relic vector fields on the inflationary background and density perturbations. Such effects are observable if the number of inflationary e-folds is close to the minimum requirement to solve the horizon problem. We show that this can potentially explain two CMB large scale anomalies: the quadrupole-octopole alignment and the quadrupole power suppression. We discuss its effect on the parity anomaly. We also provide analytical template for more detailed data comparison.

  10. Conformal invariance, dark energy, and CMB non-gaussianity

    SciTech Connect

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Mazur, Pawel O.; Mottola, Emil E-mail: mazur@physics.sc.edu

    2012-09-01

    In addition to simple scale invariance, a universe dominated by dark energy naturally gives rise to correlation functions possessing full conformal invariance. This is due to the mathematical isomorphism between the conformal group of certain three dimensional slices of de Sitter space and the de Sitter isometry group SO(4,1). In the standard homogeneous, isotropic cosmological model in which primordial density perturbations are generated during a long vacuum energy dominated de Sitter phase, the embedding of flat spatial R{sup 3} sections in de Sitter space induces a conformal invariant perturbation spectrum and definite prediction for the shape of the non-Gaussian CMB bispectrum. In the case in which the density fluctuations are generated instead on the de Sitter horizon, conformal invariance of the S{sup 2} horizon embedding implies a different but also quite definite prediction for the angular correlations of CMB non-Gaussianity on the sky. Each of these forms for the bispectrum is intrinsic to the symmetries of de Sitter space, and in that sense, independent of specific model assumptions. Each is different from the predictions of single field slow roll inflation models, which rely on the breaking of de Sitter invariance. We propose a quantum origin for the CMB fluctuations in the scalar gravitational sector from the conformal anomaly that could give rise to these non-Gaussianities without a slow roll inflaton field, and argue that conformal invariance also leads to the expectation for the relation n{sub S}−1 = n{sub T} between the spectral indices of the scalar and tensor power spectrum. Confirmation of this prediction or detection of non-Gaussian correlations in the CMB of one of the bispectral shape functions predicted by conformal invariance can be used both to establish the physical origins of primordial density fluctuations, and distinguish between different dynamical models of cosmological vacuum dark energy.

  11. CMB imprints of a pre-inflationary climbing phase

    SciTech Connect

    Dudas, E.; Kitazawa, N.; Patil, S.P.; Sagnotti, A. E-mail: patil@cpht.polytechnique.fr E-mail: sagnotti@sns.it

    2012-05-01

    We discuss the implications for cosmic microwave background (CMB) observables, of a class of pre-inflationary dynamics suggested by string models where SUSY is broken due to the presence of D-branes and orientifolds preserving incompatible portions of it. In these models the would-be inflaton is forced to emerge from the initial singularity climbing up a mild exponential potential, until it bounces against a steep exponential potential of ''brane SUSY breaking'' scenarios, and as a result the ensuing descent gives rise to an inflationary epoch that begins when the system is still well off its eventual attractor. If a pre-inflationary climbing phase of this type had occurred within 6-7 e-folds of the horizon exit for the largest observable wavelengths, displacement off the attractor and initial-state effects would conspire to suppress power in the primordial scalar spectrum, enhancing it in the tensor spectrum and typically superposing oscillations on both. We investigate these imprints on CMB observables over a range of parameters, examine their statistical significance, and provide a semi-analytic rationale for our results. It is tempting to ascribe at least part of the large-angle anomalies in the CMB to pre-inflationary dynamics of this type.

  12. Lensing bias to CMB measurements of compensated isocurvature perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Chen He; Grin, Daniel; Hu, Wayne

    2016-08-01

    Compensated isocurvature perturbations (CIPs) are modes in which the baryon and dark matter density fluctuations cancel. They arise in the curvaton scenario as well as some models of baryogenesis. While they leave no observable effects on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at linear order, they do spatially modulate two-point CMB statistics and can be reconstructed in a manner similar to gravitational lensing. Due to the similarity between the effects of CMB lensing and CIPs, lensing contributes nearly Gaussian random noise to the CIP estimator that approximately doubles the reconstruction noise power. Additionally, the cross correlation between lensing and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect generates a correlation between the CIP estimator and the temperature field even in the absence of a correlated CIP signal. For cosmic-variance limited temperature measurements out to multipoles l ≤2500 , subtracting a fixed lensing bias degrades the detection threshold for CIPs by a factor of 1.3, whether or not they are correlated with the adiabatic mode.

  13. Novel calibration system with sparse wires for CMB polarization receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, O.; Nguyen, H.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Kusaka, A. /Chicago U., KICP

    2011-07-01

    B-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. To achieve better sensitivity to this faint signal, CMB polarization experiments aim to maximize the number of detector elements, resulting in a large focal plane receiver. Detector calibration of the polarization response becomes essential. It is extremely useful to be able to calibrate 'simultaneously' all detectors on the large focal plane. We developed a novel calibration system that rotates a large 'sparse' grid of metal wires, in front of and fully covering the field of view of the focal plane receiver. Polarized radiation is created via the reflection of ambient temperature from the wire surface. Since the detector has a finite beam size, the observed signal is smeared according to the beam property. The resulting smeared polarized radiation has a reasonable intensity (a few Kelvin or less) compared to the sky temperature ({approx}10 K observing condition). The system played a successful role for receiver calibration of QUIET, a CMB polarization experiment located in the Atacama desert in Chile. The successful performance revealed that this system is applicable to other experiments based on different technologies, e.g. TES bolometers.

  14. CMB lensing reconstruction in the presence of diffuse polarized foregrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Fantaye, Y.; Baccigalupi, C.; Leach, S.M.; Yadav, A.P.S. E-mail: bacci@sissa.it E-mail: ayadav@physics.ucsd.edu

    2012-12-01

    The measurement and characterization of the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is key goal of the current and next generation of CMB experiments. We perform a case study of a three-channel balloon-borne CMB experiment observing the sky at (l,b)=(250°,−38°) and attaining a sensitivity of 5.25 μK−arcmin with 8' angular resolution at 150 GHz, in order to assess whether the effect of polarized Galactic dust is expected to be a significant contaminant to the lensing signal reconstructed using the EB quadratic estimator. We find that for our assumed dust model, polarization fractions of about as low as a few percent may lead to a significant dust bias to the lensing convergence power spectrum. We investigated a parametric component separation method, proposed by Stompor et al. (2009), as well as a template cleaning method, for mitigating the effect of this dust bias. The template-based method recovers unbiased convergence power spectrum in all polarization fraction cases we considered, while for the component separation technique we find a dust contrast regime in which the accuracy of the profile likelihood spectral index estimate breaks down, and in which external information on the dust frequency scaling is needed. We propose a criterion for putting a requirement on the accuracy with which the dust spectral index must be estimated or constrained, and demonstrate that if this requirement is met, then the dust bias can be removed.

  15. Cosmological avatars of the landscape. II. CMB and LSS signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Holman, R.; Mersini-Houghton, L.; Takahashi, T.

    2008-03-15

    This is the second paper in the series that confronts predictions of a model of the landscape with cosmological observations. We show here how the modifications of the Friedmann equation due to the decohering effects of long wavelength modes on the wave function of the Universe defined on the landscape leave unique signatures on the CMB spectra and large scale structure (LSS). We show that the effect of the string corrections is to suppress {sigma}{sub 8} and the CMB temperature-temperature (TT) spectrum at large angles, thereby bringing WMAP and SDSS data for {sigma}{sub 8} into agreement. We find interesting features imprinted on the matter power spectrum P(k): power is suppressed at large scales indicating the possibility of primordial voids competing with the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect. Furthermore, power is enhanced at structure and substructure scales, k{approx_equal}10{sup -2-0}h Mpc{sup -1}. Our smoking gun for discriminating this proposal from others with similar CMB and LSS predictions comes from correlations between cosmic shear and temperature anisotropies, which here indicate a noninflationary channel of contribution to LSS, with unique ringing features of nonlocal entanglement displayed at structure and substructure scales.

  16. Mapping QTLs and QTL x environment interaction for CIMMYT maize drought stress program using factorial regression and partial least squares methods.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Mateo; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Crossa, Jose; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel

    2006-04-01

    The study of QTL x environment interaction (QEI) is important for understanding genotype x environment interaction (GEI) in many quantitative traits. For modeling GEI and QEI, factorial regression (FR) models form a powerful class of models. In FR models, covariables (contrasts) defined on the levels of the genotypic and/or environmental factor(s) are used to describe main effects and interactions. In FR models for QTL expression, considerable numbers of genotypic covariables can occur as for each putative QTL an additional covariable needs to be introduced. For large numbers of genotypic and/or environmental covariables, least square estimation breaks down and partial least squares (PLS) estimation procedures become an attractive alternative. In this paper we develop methodology for analyzing QEI by FR for estimating effects and locations of QTLs and QEI and interpreting QEI in terms of environmental variables. A randomization test for the main effects of QTLs and QEI is presented. A population of F2 derived F3 families was evaluated in eight environments differing in drought stress and soil nitrogen content and the traits yield and anthesis silking interval (ASI) were measured. For grain yield, chromosomes 1 and 10 showed significant QEI, whereas in chromosomes 3 and 8 only main effect QTLs were observed. For ASI, QTL main effects were observed on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 8, and 10, whereas QEI was observed only on chromosome 8. The assessment of the QEI at chromosome 1 for grain yield showed that the QTL main effect explained 35.8% of the QTL + QEI variability, while QEI explained 64.2%. Minimum temperature during flowering time explained 77.6% of the QEI. The QEI analysis at chromosome 10 showed that the QTL main effect explained 59.8% of the QTL + QEI variability, while QEI explained 40.2%. Maximum temperature during flowering time explained 23.8% of the QEI. Results of this study show the possibilities of using FR for mapping QTL and for dissecting QEI in terms

  17. Forecasts for CMB μ and i-type spectral distortion constraints on the primordial power spectrum on scales 8∼

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2013-06-01

    Silk damping at redshifts 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼CMB anisotropies on scales corresponding to the comoving wavenumbers 8∼CMB monopole, creating distortions from a blackbody in the CMB spectrum of the μ-type and the i-type. We study, using Fisher matrices, the constraints we can get from measurements of these spectral distortions on the primordial power spectrum from future experiments such as Pixie, and how these constraints change as we change the frequency resolution and the sensitivity of the experiment. We show that the additional information in the shape of the i-type distortions, in combination with the μ-type distortions, allows us to break the degeneracy between the amplitude and the spectral index of the power spectrum on these scales and leads to much tighter constraints. We quantify the information contained in both the μ-type distortions and the i-type distortions taking into account the partial degeneracy with the y-type distortions and the temperature of the blackbody part of the CMB. We also calculate the constraints possible on the primordial power spectrum when the spectral distortion information is combined with the CMB anisotropies measured by the WMAP, SPT, ACT and Planck experiments.

  18. Dipole anisotropy of galaxy distribution: Does the CMB rest frame exist in the local universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Itoh, Yousuke; Yahata, Kazuhiro; Takada, Masahiro

    2010-08-15

    The peculiar motion of the Earth causes a dipole anisotropy modulation in the distant galaxy distribution due to the aberration effect. However, the amplitude and angular direction of the effect is not necessarily the same as those of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole anisotropy due to the growth of cosmic structures. In other words exploring the aberration effect may give us a clue to the horizon-scale physics perhaps related to the cosmic acceleration. In this paper we develop a method to explore the dipole angular modulation from the pixelized galaxy data on the sky, properly taking into account the covariances due to the shot noise and the intrinsic galaxy clustering contamination as well as the partial sky coverage. We applied the method to the galaxy catalogs constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 data. After constructing the four galaxy catalogs that are different in the ranges of magnitudes and photometric redshifts to study possible systematics, we found that the most robust sample against systematics indicates no dipole anisotropy in the galaxy distribution. This finding is consistent with the expectation from the concordance {Lambda}-dominated cold dark matter model. Finally, we argue that an almost full-sky galaxy survey such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope may allow for a significant detection of the aberration effect of the CMB dipole having the precision of constraining the angular direction to {approx}20 deg in radius. Assuming a hypothetical Large Synoptic Survey Telescope galaxy survey, we find that this method can confirm or reject the result implied from a stacked analysis of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect of X-ray luminous clusters in Kashlinsky et al. (2008, 2009) if the implied cosmic bulk flow is not extended out to the horizon.

  19. The binned bispectrum estimator: template-based and non-parametric CMB non-Gaussianity searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, Martin; Racine, Benjamin; van Tent, Bartjan

    2016-05-01

    We describe the details of the binned bispectrum estimator as used for the official 2013 and 2015 analyses of the temperature and polarization CMB maps from the ESA Planck satellite. The defining aspect of this estimator is the determination of a map bispectrum (3-point correlation function) that has been binned in harmonic space. For a parametric determination of the non-Gaussianity in the map (the so-called fNL parameters), one takes the inner product of this binned bispectrum with theoretically motivated templates. However, as a complementary approach one can also smooth the binned bispectrum using a variable smoothing scale in order to suppress noise and make coherent features stand out above the noise. This allows one to look in a model-independent way for any statistically significant bispectral signal. This approach is useful for characterizing the bispectral shape of the galactic foreground emission, for which a theoretical prediction of the bispectral anisotropy is lacking, and for detecting a serendipitous primordial signal, for which a theoretical template has not yet been put forth. Both the template-based and the non-parametric approaches are described in this paper.

  20. Light WIMPs, equivalent neutrinos, BBN, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steigman, Gary; Nollett, Kenneth M.

    Recent updates to the observational determinations of the primordial abundances of helium (4He) and deuterium are compared to the predictions of BBN to infer the universal ratio of baryons to photons, eta 10 equiv 1010(n_B/ngamma )0 (or, the present Universe baryon mass density parameter, {Ω_B h^{2} = eta 10/273.9) as well as to constrain the effective number of neutrinos ({N_eff) and the number of equivalent neutrinos ({ΔN_ν}). These BBN results are compared to those derived independently from the Planck CMB data. In the absence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪆ 20 MeV), {N_eff = 3.05(1 + ensuremath {DeltaN_ nu }/3). In this case, there is excellent agreement between BBN and the CMB but, the joint fit reveals that {ΔN_ν} = 0.40±0.17, disfavoring standard big bang nucleosynthesis (SBBN) ({ΔN_ν} = 0) at ˜ 2.4 sigma , as well as a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1) at ˜ 3.5 sigma . In the presence of a light WIMP ({m_χ} ⪉ 20 MeV), the relation between {N_eff and {ΔN_&nu}; depends on the WIMP mass, leading to degeneracies among {N_eff, {ΔN_ν}, and {m_χ}. The complementary and independent BBN and CMB data can break some of these degeneracies. Depending on the nature of the light WIMP (Majorana or Dirac fermion, real or complex scalar) the joint BBN + CMB analyses set a lower bound to {m_χ} in the range 0.5 - 5 MeV (mchi /me ⪆ 1 - 10) and, they identify best fit values for {m_χ} in the range 5 - 10 MeV. The joint BBN + CMB analyses find a best fit value for the number of equivalent neutrinos, {ΔN_ν} ≈ 0.65, nearly independent of the nature of the WIMP. The best fit still disfavors the absence of dark radiation ({ΔN_ν} = 0 at ˜ 95% confidence), while allowing for the presence of a sterile neutrino ({ΔN_ν} = 1 at ⪉ 1 sigma ). For all cases considered here, the lithium problem persists. These results, presented at the Rencontres de l'Observatoire de Paris 2013 - ESO Workshop and summarized in these proceedings, are based on \\citet{kngs}.

  1. Re-evaluation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, R.

    2009-12-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has an almost perfect black-body spectrum, with polarization. These characteristics are inconsistent with the Standard Big Bang (SBB) model. An almost perfect spectrum can arise only from a surface of last scattering which is an almost perfect black-body. Thermodynamically, this is matter in thermal equilibrium, absorbing almost 100% of incident radiation and re-emitting it as black-body radiation. By definition, a perfect black-body is matter at zero kelvin, and cold matter better approaches this perfection. SBB theory describes the CMB as originating from a hydrogen-helium plasma, condensing at a temperature of about 3,000 K. Such a surface would exhibit a continuous radiation spectrum, not unlike that of the sun, which is shown to have a spectrum similar, but not identical to, a black-body spectrum. An imperfect spectrum, even stretched 1100 fold as in the SBB model, remains an imperfect spectrum. Also, a plasma would not support the orientation required to impart polarization to the CMB. A better explanation of the observational evidence is possible if one views the observable universe as part of, and originating from, a much larger structure. Here we propose a defined physical description for such a model. It is shown how a "cosmic fabric" of spin-oriented atomic hydrogen, at zero kelvin, surrounding a matter-depletion zone and the observable universe, would produce the CMB observations. The cosmic fabric would be a perfect black-body and subsequently re-emit an almost perfect black-body spectrum. The radiation would be almost perfectly isotropic, imposed by the spherical distribution of the surface of last scattering, and spin-oriented hydrogen would impart the observed polarization. This geometry also obviates the so-called "horizon problem" of the SBB, why the CMB radiation is essentially isotropic when coming from points of origin with no apparent causal contact. This problem was supposedly "solved" with the

  2. Angular power spectrum of the FastICA CMB component from BEAST data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donzelli, Simona

    We present the angular power spectrum of the CMB component extracted with FASTICA from the data of the Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope (BEAST), operating in Q two input channels FASTICA returns two possible independent components. We found that one of them has an unphysical spectral behaviour, due to the poor S/N ratio, while the other is a reasonable CMB component. After a detailed calibration procedure based on Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations we extracted the angular power spectrum for the identified CMB component and found a very good agreement with the already published BEAST CMB angular power spectrum

  3. A FOREGROUND-CLEANED COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP FROM NON-GAUSSIANITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Rajib

    2011-10-01

    In this Letter, we present a new method to estimate a foreground-cleaned cosmic microwave background (CMB) map at a resolution of 1{sup 0} by minimizing the non-Gaussian properties of the cleaned map which arise dominantly due to diffuse foreground emission components from the Milky Way. We employ simple kurtosis statistic as the measure of non-Gaussian properties and perform a linear combination of five frequency maps provided by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) in its seven-year data release in such a way that the cleaned map has a minimum kurtosis which leads to a non-Gaussianity-minimized, foreground-cleaned CMB map. We validate the method by performing Monte Carlo simulations. To minimize any residual foreground contamination from the cleaned map we flag out the region near the galactic plane based upon results from simulations. Outside the masked region our new estimate of the CMB map matches well with the WMAP's Internal Linear Combination (ILC) map. A simple pseudo-C{sub l} -based CMB TT power spectrum derived from the non-Gaussianity minimized map reproduces the earlier results of WMAP's power spectrum. An important advantage of the method is that it does not introduce any negative bias in angular power spectrum in the low multipole regime, unlike usual ILC method. Comparing our results with the previously published results we argue that CMB results are robust with respect to specific foreground removal algorithms employed.

  4. Quantifying Tensions between CMB and Distance Datasets in Models with Free Curvature or Lensing Amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandis, S.; Rapetti, D.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Dietrich, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) by the Planck Collaboration have produced arguably the most powerful observational evidence in support of the standard model of cosmology, i.e. the spatially flat ΛCDM paradigm. In this work, we perform model selection tests to examine whether the base CMB temperature and large scale polarization anisotropy data from Planck 2015 (P15) prefer any of eight commonly used one-parameter model extensions with respect to flat ΛCDM. We find a clear preference for models with free curvature, ΩK, or free amplitude of the CMB lensing potential, AL. We also further develop statistical tools to measure tension between datasets. We use a Gaussianization scheme to compute tensions directly from the posterior samples using an entropy-based method, the surprise, as well as a calibrated evidence ratio presented here for the first time. We then proceed to investigate the consistency between the base P15 CMB data and six other CMB and distance datasets. In flat ΛCDM we find a 4.8σ tension between the base P15 CMB data and a distance ladder measurement, whereas the former are consistent with the other datasets. In the curved ΛCDM model we find significant tensions in most of the cases, arising from the well-known low power of the low-ℓ multipoles of the CMB data. In the flat ΛCDM+AL model, however, all datasets are consistent with the base P15 CMB observations except for the CMB lensing measurement, which remains in significant tension. This tension is driven by the increased power of the CMB lensing potential derived from the base P15 CMB constraints in both models, pointing at either potentially unresolved systematic effects or the need for new physics beyond the standard flat ΛCDM model.

  5. CMB quenching of high-redshift radio-loud AGNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.; Haardt, F.; Ciardi, B.; Sbarrato, T.; Gallo, E.; Tavecchio, F.; Celotti, A.

    2015-10-01

    The very existence of more than a dozen of high-redshift (z ≳ 4) blazars indicates that a much larger population of misaligned powerful jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN) was already in place when the Universe was ≲1.5 Gyr old. Such parent population proved to be very elusive, and escaped direct detection in radio surveys so far. High-redshift blazars themselves seem to be failing in producing extended radio lobes, raising questions about the connection between such class and the vaster population of radio galaxies. We show that the interaction of the jet electrons with the intense cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation explains the lack of extended radio emission in high-redshift blazars and in their parent population, helping to explain the apparently missing misaligned counterparts of high-redshift blazars. On the other hand, the emission from the more compact and more magnetized hotspots are less affected by the enhanced CMB energy density. By modelling the spectral energy distribution of blazar lobes and hotspots, we find that most of them should be detectable by low-frequency deep radio observations, e.g. by LOw-Frequency ARray for radio astronomy and by relatively deep X-ray observations with good angular resolution, e.g. by the Chandra satellite. At high redshifts, the emission of a misaligned relativistic jet, being debeamed, is missed by current large sky area surveys. The isotropic flux produced in the hotspots can be below ˜1 mJy and the isotropic lobe radio emission is quenched by the CMB cooling. Consequently, even sources with very powerful jets can go undetected in current radio surveys, and misclassified as radio-quiet AGNs.

  6. Tomography of the Reionization Epoch with Multifrequency CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2006-12-01

    We study the constraints that future multifrequency cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments will be able to set on the metal enrichment history of the intergalactic medium at the epoch of reionization. We forecast the signal-to-noise ratio for the detection of the signal introduced into the CMB by resonant scattering off metals at the end of the cosmic dark ages. We take into account systematics associated with cross-channel calibration, errors in reconstruction of the point-spread function, and inaccurate foreground removal. We develop an algorithm to optimally extract the signal generated by metals during reionization and to accurately remove the contamination due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. Although demanding levels of foreground characterization and control of systematics are required, they are very distinct from those encountered in H I 21 cm studies and CMB polarization, and this fact encourages the study of resonant scattering off metals as an alternative way of conducting tomography of the reionization epoch. A realistic experiment, looking at clean regions of the sky, can detect changes of 3%-12% (95% confidence level) in the O III abundance (with respect to its solar value) in the redshift range z=12-22 for reionization redshift zre>10. However, for zre<10 one can only set upper limits on N II abundance increments of ~60% solar in the redshift range z=5.5-9 (95% c.l.). These constraints assume that cross-channel calibration is accurate to 1 part in 104, which constitutes the most critical technical requirement of this method but is still achievable with current technology.

  7. Hidden dark matter sector, dark radiation, and the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacko, Zackaria; Cui, Yanou; Hong, Sungwoo; Okui, Takemichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider theories where dark matter is composed of a thermal relic of weak scale mass, whose couplings to the standard model (SM) are however too small to give rise to the observed abundance. Instead, the abundance is set by annihilation to light hidden sector states that carry no charges under the SM gauge interactions. In such a scenario the constraints from direct and indirect detection, and from collider searches for dark matter, can easily be satisfied. The masses of such light hidden states can be protected by symmetry if they are Nambu-Goldstone bosons, fermions, or gauge bosons. These states can then contribute to the cosmic energy density as dark radiation, leading to observable signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Furthermore, depending on whether or not the light hidden sector states self-interact, the fraction of the total energy density that free-streams is either decreased or increased, leading to characteristic effects on both the scalar and tensor components of the CMB anisotropy that allows these two cases to be distinguished. The magnitude of these signals depends on the number of light degrees of freedom in the hidden sector, and on the temperature at which it kinetically decouples from the SM. We consider a simple model that realizes this scenario, based on a framework in which the SM and hidden sector are initially in thermal equilibrium through the Higgs portal, and show that the resulting signals are compatible with recent Planck results, while large enough to be detected in upcoming experiments such as CMBPol and CMB Stage-IV. Invisible decays of the Higgs into hidden sector states at colliders can offer a complementary probe of this model.

  8. Foreground-induced biases in CMB polarimeter self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Hill, James; Johnson, Bradley

    2016-06-01

    Precise polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) require accurate knowledge of the instrument orientation relative to the sky frame used to define the cosmological Stokes parameters. Suitable celestial calibration sources that could be used to measure the polarimeter orientation angle are limited, so current experiments commonly `self-calibrate.' The self-calibration method exploits the theoretical fact that the EB and TB cross-spectra of the CMB vanish in the standard cosmological model, so any detected EB and TB signals must be due to systematic errors. However, this assumption neglects the fact that polarized Galactic foregrounds in a given portion of the sky may have non-zero EB and TB cross-spectra. If these foreground signals remain in the observations, then they will bias the self-calibrated telescope polarization angle and produce a spurious B-mode signal. In this paper, we estimate the foreground-induced bias for various instrument configurations and then expand the self-calibration formalism to account for polarized foreground signals. Assuming the EB correlation signal for dust is in the range constrained by angular power spectrum measurements from Planck at 353 GHz (scaled down to 150 GHz), then the bias is negligible for high angular resolution experiments, which have access to CMB-dominated high 'ell' modes with which to self-calibrate. Low-resolution experiments observing particularly dusty sky patches can have a bias as large as 0.5°. A miscalibration of this magnitude generates a spurious BB signal corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of approximately r ~ 2 × 10-3, within the targeted range of planned experiments.

  9. Foreground-induced biases in CMB polarimeter self-calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Hill, J. Colin; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2016-04-01

    Precise polarization measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) require accurate knowledge of the instrument orientation relative to the sky frame used to define the cosmological Stokes parameters. Suitable celestial calibration sources that could be used to measure the polarimeter orientation angle are limited, so current experiments commonly `self-calibrate.' The self-calibration method exploits the theoretical fact that the EB and TB cross-spectra of the CMB vanish in the standard cosmological model, so any detected EB and TB signals must be due to systematic errors. However, this assumption neglects the fact that polarized Galactic foregrounds in a given portion of the sky may have non-zero EB and TB cross-spectra. If these foreground signals remain in the observations, then they will bias the self-calibrated telescope polarization angle and produce a spurious B-mode signal. In this paper, we estimate the foreground-induced bias for various instrument configurations and then expand the self-calibration formalism to account for polarized foreground signals. Assuming the EB correlation signal for dust is in the range constrained by angular power spectrum measurements from Planck at 353 GHz (scaled down to 150 GHz), then the bias is negligible for high angular resolution experiments, which have access to CMB-dominated high ℓ modes with which to self-calibrate. Low-resolution experiments observing particularly dusty sky patches can have a bias as large as 0.5°. A miscalibration of this magnitude generates a spurious BB signal corresponding to a tensor-to-scalar ratio of approximately r ˜ 2 × 10-3, within the targeted range of planned experiments.

  10. Cosmological implications of the CMB large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Melia, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck may have uncovered several anomalies in the full cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky that could indicate possible new physics driving the growth of density fluctuations in the early universe. These include an unusually low power at the largest scales and an apparent alignment of the quadrupole and octopole moments. In a ΛCDM model where the CMB is described by a Gaussian Random Field, the quadrupole and octopole moments should be statistically independent. The emergence of these low probability features may simply be due to posterior selections from many such possible effects, whose occurrence would therefore not be as unlikely as one might naively infer. If this is not the case, however, and if these features are not due to effects such as foreground contamination, their combined statistical significance would be equal to the product of their individual significances. In the absence of such extraneous factors, and ignoring the biasing due to posterior selection, the missing large-angle correlations would have a probability as low as ∼0.1% and the low-l multipole alignment would be unlikely at the ∼4.9% level; under the least favorable conditions, their simultaneous observation in the context of the standard model could then be likely at only the ∼0.005% level. In this paper, we explore the possibility that these features are indeed anomalous, and show that the corresponding probability of CMB multipole alignment in the R{sub h}=ct universe would then be ∼7–10%, depending on the number of large-scale Sachs–Wolfe induced fluctuations. Since the low power at the largest spatial scales is reproduced in this cosmology without the need to invoke cosmic variance, the overall likelihood of observing both of these features in the CMB is ⩾7%, much more likely than in ΛCDM, if the anomalies are real. The key physical ingredient responsible for this difference is the existence in the former of a

  11. Pure pseudo- Cℓ estimators for CMB B-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Kendrick M.

    2006-12-01

    Fast heuristically weighted, or pseudo-Cℓ, estimators are a frequently used method for estimating power spectra in CMB surveys with large numbers of pixels. Recently, Challinor and Chon showed that the E-B mixing in these estimators can become a dominant contaminant at low noise levels, ultimately limiting the gravity wave signal which can be detected on a finite patch of sky. We define a modified version of the estimators which eliminates E-B mixing and is near-optimal at all noise levels.

  12. Planck Visualization Project: Seeing and Hearing the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Der Veen, Jatila; Lubin, P. M.; 2; Alper, B.; 3; Smith, W.; 4; McGee, R.; 5; US Planck Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The Planck Education and Public Outreach collaborators at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Purdue University have prepared a variety of materials to present the science goals of the Planck Mission to the public. Here we present our interactive simulation of the Cosmic Microwave Background, in which the user can change the ingredients of the universe and hear the different harmonics. We also present how we derive information about the early universe from the power spectrum of the CMB by using the physics of music for the public.

  13. Stimulation of MAP-2 kinase activity in T lymphocytes by anti-CD3 or anti-Ti monoclonal antibody is partially dependent on protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Nel, A E; Hanekom, C; Rheeder, A; Williams, K; Pollack, S; Katz, R; Landreth, G E

    1990-04-01

    Signaling via the alpha-beta T cell Ag receptor (Ti)-CD3 complex is a complicated event that implicates several protein kinases, most notably protein kinase C (PKC). We have recently identified a serine kinase in T lymphocytes with the following characteristics: molecular mass 43 kDa, in vitro substrate affinity for microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP-2) with a preference for Mn2+ during the catalytic reaction, and elution from DEAE resin over a salt range 100 to 200 mM NaCl. This kinase is activated in a rapidly reversible fashion during ligation of CD3/Ti by a process which involves prior phosphorylation; in vitro exposure of activated 43-kDa MAP-2 kinase (MAP-K) to an immobilized phosphatase abrogated its kinase activity. We now show that a MAP-2K response could also be obtained during treatment with mAb to Ti and the specific PKC agonist, PMA. Although the kinetics of the former response was rapidly reversible, PMA elicited a more prolonged response. The dose responsiveness for PMA was similar to the requirements for PKC activation in intact lymphocytes. Moreover, as with PKC, we found that the CD3-induced MAP-2K response could be further enhanced by using a second layer cross-linking antibody. The specificity of CD3/Ti in the Jurkat cell response is demonstrated by the fact that OKT-11(CD2) and anti-CD4 mAb did not stimulate a MAP-2K response. It was also not possible to elicit a response in a Jurkat cell mutant that lacks surface expression of CD3 and Ti. The specificity of PKC in these events was further explored with the cell permeant diacylglycerol, 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol, and the nonagonist phorbol ester, 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate: whereas the former was an effective inducer of the MAP-2K response, the latter failed to yield any stimulation. Prior exposure of Jurkat cells to 100 mM PMA for 24 h eliminated greater than 60% of the MAP-2K response during anti-CD3 treatment. This response could also be inhibited in dose-dependent fashion by prior

  14. Lensing as a probe of early universe: from CMB to galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Farbod; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2016-05-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation lensing is a promising tool to study the physics of early universe. In this work we probe the imprints of deviations from isotropy and scale invariance of primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum on CMB lensing potential and convergence. Specifically, we consider a scale-dependent hemispherical asymmetry in primordial power spectrum. We show that the CMB lensing potential and convergence and also the cross-correlation of the CMB lensing and late time galaxy convergence can probe the amplitude and the scale dependence of the dipole modulation. As another example, we consider a primordial power spectrum with local feature. We show that the CMB lensing and the cross-correlation of the CMB lensing and galaxy lensing can probe the amplitude and the shape of the local feature. We show that the cross correlation of CMB lensing convergence and galaxy lensing is capable to probe the effects of local features in power spectrum on smaller scales than the CMB lensing. Finally we showed that the current data can constrain the amplitude and moment dependence of dipole asymmetry.

  15. CMB lensing bispectrum from nonlinear growth of the large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2016-06-01

    We discuss detectability of the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing. The lensing signals involved in the CMB fluctuations have been measured from multiple CMB experiments, such as Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), Planck, POLARBEAR, and South Pole Telescope (SPT). The reconstructed CMB lensing signals are useful to constrain cosmology via their angular power spectrum, while detectability and cosmological application of their bispectrum induced by the nonlinear evolution are not well studied. Extending the analytic estimate of the galaxy lensing bispectrum presented by Takada and Jain (2004) to the CMB case, we show that even near term CMB experiments such as Advanced ACT, Simons Array and SPT3G could detect the CMB lensing bispectrum induced by the nonlinear growth of the large-scale structure. In the case of the CMB Stage-IV, we find that the lensing bispectrum is detectable at ≳50 σ statistical significance. This precisely measured lensing bispectrum has rich cosmological information, and could be used to constrain cosmology, e.g., the sum of the neutrino masses and the dark-energy properties.

  16. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Ringeval, Christophe E-mail: christophe.ringeval@uclouvain.be

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10{sup -1} down to 10{sup -7}. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  17. Impact of post-Born lensing on the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratten, Geraint; Lewis, Antony

    2016-08-01

    Lensing of the CMB is affected by post-Born lensing, producing corrections to the convergence power spectrum and introducing field rotation. We show numerically that the lensing convergence power spectrum is affected at the lesssim 0.2% level on accessible scales, and that this correction and the field rotation are negligible for observations with arcminute beam and noise levels gtrsim 1 μK arcmin. The field rotation generates ~ 2.5% of the total lensing B-mode polarization amplitude (0.2% in power on small scales), but has a blue spectrum on large scales, making it highly subdominant to the convergence B modes on scales where they are a source of confusion for the signal from primordial gravitational waves. Since the post-Born signal is non-linear, it also generates a bispectrum with the convergence. We show that the post-Born contributions to the bispectrum substantially change the shape predicted from large-scale structure non-linearities alone, and hence must be included to estimate the expected total signal and impact of bispectrum biases on CMB lensing reconstruction quadratic estimators and other observables. The field-rotation power spectrum only becomes potentially detectable for noise levels ll 1 μK arcmin, but its bispectrum with the convergence may be observable at ~ 3σ with Stage IV observations. Rotation-induced and convergence-induced B modes are slightly correlated by the bispectrum, and the bispectrum also produces additional contributions to the lensed BB power spectrum.

  18. Hidden in the background: a local approach to CMB anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno Sánchez, Juan C.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate a framework aiming to provide a common origin for the large-angle anomalies detected in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), which are hypothesized as the result of the statistical inhomogeneity developed by different isocurvature fields of mass m~ H present during inflation. The inhomogeneity arises as the combined effect of (i) the initial conditions for isocurvature fields (obtained after a fast-roll stage finishing many e-foldings before cosmological scales exit the horizon), (ii) their inflationary fluctuations and (iii) their coupling to other degrees of freedom. Our case of interest is when these fields (interpreted as the precursors of large-angle anomalies) leave an observable imprint only in isolated patches of the Universe. When the latter intersect the last scattering surface, such imprints arise in the CMB. Nevertheless, due to their statistically inhomogeneous nature, these imprints are difficult to detect, for they become hidden in the background similarly to the Cold Spot. We then compute the probability that a single isocurvature field becomes inhomogeneous at the end of inflation and find that, if the appropriate conditions are given (which depend exclusively on the preexisting fast-roll stage), this probability is at the percent level. Finally, we discuss several mechanisms (including the curvaton and the inhomogeneous reheating) to investigate whether an initial statistically inhomogeneous isocurvature field fluctuation might give rise to some of the observed anomalies. In particular, we focus on the Cold Spot, the power deficit at low multipoles and the breaking of statistical isotropy.

  19. Conformal invariance, dynamical dark energy and the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, Emil

    2010-01-01

    Einstein's General Relativity receives quantum corrections relevant at cosmological distance scales. These effects arise from conformal scalar degrees of freedom in the extended Effective Field Theory (EFT) of gravity required by the trace anomaly of the quantum stress tensor in curved space. Scalar degrees of freedom in cosmology arise naturally from the effective action of the trace anomaly in the Standard Model, without the ad hoc introduction of an inflaton field. In the EFT including the trace anomaly terms, {Lambda}{sub eff} becomes dynamical and potentially dependent upon both space and time. The fluctuations of these anomaly scalars may also influence the spectrum and statistics of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Under the hypothesis that scale invariance should be promoted to full conformal invariance, an hypothesis supported by the embedding of the conformal group of three dimensional flat sections in de Sitter space, the form of the CMB bi-spectrum can be fixed, and the tri-spectrum constrained. The angular spectra predicted by conformal invariance differ from those suggested by simple models of inflation.

  20. An estimator for statistical anisotropy from the CMB bispectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, N.; Dimastrogiovanni, E.; Matarrese, S.; Liguori, M.; Riotto, A. E-mail: dimastro@pd.infn.it E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2012-01-01

    Various data analyses of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provide observational hints of statistical isotropy breaking. Some of these features can be studied within the framework of primordial vector fields in inflationary theories which generally display some level of statistical anisotropy both in the power spectrum and in higher-order correlation functions. Motivated by these observations and the recent theoretical developments in the study of primordial vector fields, we develop the formalism necessary to extract statistical anisotropy information from the three-point function of the CMB temperature anisotropy. We employ a simplified vector field model and parametrize the bispectrum of curvature fluctuations in such a way that all the information about statistical anisotropy is encoded in some parameters λ{sub LM} (which measure the anisotropic to the isotropic bispectrum amplitudes). For such a template bispectrum, we compute an optimal estimator for λ{sub LM} and the expected signal-to-noise ratio. We estimate that, for f{sub NL} ≅ 30, an experiment like Planck can be sensitive to a ratio of the anisotropic to the isotropic amplitudes of the bispectrum as small as 10%. Our results are complementary to the information coming from a power spectrum analysis and particularly relevant for those models where statistical anisotropy turns out to be suppressed in the power spectrum but not negligible in the bispectrum.

  1. How well can future CMB missions constrain cosmic inflation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme; Ringeval, Christophe; Vennin, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    We study how the next generation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) measurement missions (such as EPIC, LiteBIRD, PRISM and COrE) will be able to constrain the inflationary landscape in the hardest to disambiguate situation in which inflation is simply described by single-field slow-roll scenarios. Considering the proposed PRISM and LiteBIRD satellite designs, we simulate mock data corresponding to five different fiducial models having values of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ranging from 10-1 down to 10-7. We then compute the Bayesian evidences and complexities of all Encyclopædia Inflationaris models in order to assess the constraining power of PRISM alone and LiteBIRD complemented with the Planck 2013 data. Within slow-roll inflation, both designs have comparable constraining power and can rule out about three quarters of the inflationary scenarios, compared to one third for Planck 2013 data alone. However, we also show that PRISM can constrain the scalar running and has the capability to detect a violation of slow roll at second order. Finally, our results suggest that describing an inflationary model by its potential shape only, without specifying a reheating temperature, will no longer be possible given the accuracy level reached by the future CMB missions.

  2. Parity violation in the CMB bispectrum by a rolling pseudoscalar

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Saga, Shohei E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-11-01

    We investigate parity-violating signatures of temperature and polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in an inflationary model where a rolling pseudoscalar produces large equilateral tensor non-Gaussianity. By a concrete computation based on full-sky formalism, it is shown that resultant CMB bispectra have nonzero signals in both parity-even (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = even) and parity-odd (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd) spaces, and are almost uncorrelated with usual scalar-mode equilateral bispectra. These characteristic signatures and polarization information help to detect such tensor non-Gaussianity. Use of both temperature and E-mode bispectra potentially improves of 400% the detectability with respect to an analysis with temperature bispectrum alone. Considering B-mode bispectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio may be able to increase by 3 orders of magnitude. We present the 1σ uncertainties of a parameter depending on a coupling constant and a rolling condition for the pseudoscalar expected in the Planck and the proposed PRISM experiments.

  3. Development of 1000 arrays MKID camera for the CMB observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karatsu, Kenichi; Naruse, Masato; Nitta, Tom; Sekine, Masakazu; Sekimoto, Yutaro; Noguchi, Takashi; Uzawa, Yoshinori; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Kiuchi, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    A precise measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides us a wealth of information about early universe. LiteBIRD is a future satellite mission lead by High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and its scientific target is detection of the B-mode polarization of the CMB, which is a footprint of primordial gravitational waves generated during inflation era, but has not been successfully observed so far due to lack of sensitivity. Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector (MKID) is one candidate of sensitive millimeterwave camera which will be able to detect the B-mode polarization. We have been developing MKID at National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) in cooperation with KEK and RIKEN for the focal plane detector of the LiteBIRD. The developed technologies are: fabrication process of MKIDs with epitaxially-formed aluminum (Al) on silicon (Si) wafer; optical system of the camera consisting of double-slot antenna with Si lens array; and readout circuit utilizing Fast Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FFTS). With these technologies, we designed a prototype MKIDs camera for the LiteBIRD.

  4. Joint resonant CMB power spectrum and bispectrum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Münchmeyer, Moritz; Wandelt, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    We develop the tools necessary to assess the statistical significance of resonant features in the CMB correlation functions, combining power spectrum and bispectrum measurements. This significance is typically addressed by running a large number of simulations to derive the probability density function (PDF) of the feature-amplitude in the Gaussian case. Although these simulations are tractable for the power spectrum, for the bispectrum they require significant computational resources. We show that, by assuming that the PDF is given by a multivariate Gaussian where the covariance is determined by the Fisher matrix of the sine and cosine terms, we can efficiently produce spectra that are statistically close to those derived from full simulations. By drawing a large number of spectra from this PDF, both for the power spectrum and the bispectrum, we can quickly determine the statistical significance of candidate signatures in the CMB, considering both single frequency and multifrequency estimators. We show that for resonance models, cosmology and foreground parameters have little influence on the estimated amplitude, which allows us to simplify the analysis considerably. A more precise likelihood treatment can then be applied to candidate signatures only. We also discuss a modal expansion approach for the power spectrum, aimed at quickly scanning through large families of oscillating models.

  5. CMB quadrupole suppression. II. The early fast roll stage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2006-12-15

    Within the effective field theory of inflation, an initialization of the classical dynamics of the inflaton with approximate equipartition between the kinetic and potential energy of the inflaton leads to a brief fast roll stage that precedes the slow roll regime. The fast roll stage leads to an attractive potential in the wave equations for the mode functions of curvature and tensor perturbations. The evolution of the inflationary perturbations is equivalent to the scattering by this potential and a useful dictionary between the scattering data and observables is established. Implementing methods from scattering theory we prove that this attractive potential leads to a suppression of the quadrupole moment for CMB and B-mode angular power spectra. The scale of the potential is determined by the Hubble parameter during slow roll. Within the effective field theory of inflation at the grand unification (GUT) energy scale we find that if inflation lasts a total number of e-folds N{sub tot}{approx}59, there is a 10%-20% suppression of the CMB quadrupole and about 2%-4% suppression of the tensor quadrupole. The suppression of higher multipoles is smaller, falling off as 1/l{sup 2}. The suppression is much smaller for N{sub tot}>59, therefore if the observable suppression originates in the fast roll stage, there is the upper bound N{sub tot}{approx}59.

  6. Angular dependence of primordial trispectra and CMB spectral distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Bartolo, Nicola; Liguori, Michele

    2016-10-01

    Under the presence of anisotropic sources in the inflationary era, the trispectrum of the primordial curvature perturbation has a very specific angular dependence between each wavevector that is distinguishable from the one encountered when only scalar fields are present, characterized by an angular dependence described by Legendre polynomials. We examine the imprints left by curvature trispectra on the TTμ bispectrum, generated by the correlation between temperature anisotropies (T) and chemical potential spectral distortions (μ) of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Due to the angular dependence of the primordial signal, the corresponding TTμ bispectrum strongly differs in shape from TTμ sourced by the usual gNL or τNL local trispectra, enabling us to obtain an unbiased estimation. From a Fisher matrix analysis, we find that, in a cosmic-variance-limited (CVL) survey of TTμ, a minimum detectable value of the quadrupolar Legendre coefficient is d2 ~ 0.01, which is 4 orders of magnitude better than the best value attainable from the TTTT CMB trispectrum. In the case of an anisotropic inflationary model with a f(phi)F2 interaction (coupling the inflaton field phi with a vector kinetic term F2), the size of the curvature trispectrum is related to that of quadrupolar power spectrum asymmetry, g*. In this case, a CVL measurement of TTμ makes it possible to measure g* down to 10‑3.

  7. MODELING ATMOSPHERIC EMISSION FOR CMB GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Errard, J.; Borrill, J.; Ade, P. A. R.; Akiba, Y.; Chinone, Y.; Arnold, K.; Atlas, M.; Barron, D.; Elleflot, T.; Baccigalupi, C.; Fabbian, G.; Boettger, D.; Chapman, S.; Cukierman, A.; Delabrouille, J.; Ducout, A.; Feeney, S.; Feng, C.; and others

    2015-08-10

    Atmosphere is one of the most important noise sources for ground-based cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. By increasing optical loading on the detectors, it amplifies their effective noise, while its fluctuations introduce spatial and temporal correlations between detected signals. We present a physically motivated 3D-model of the atmosphere total intensity emission in the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We derive a new analytical estimate for the correlation between detectors time-ordered data as a function of the instrument and survey design, as well as several atmospheric parameters such as wind, relative humidity, temperature and turbulence characteristics. Using an original numerical computation, we examine the effect of each physical parameter on the correlations in the time series of a given experiment. We then use a parametric-likelihood approach to validate the modeling and estimate atmosphere parameters from the polarbear-i project first season data set. We derive a new 1.0% upper limit on the linear polarization fraction of atmospheric emission. We also compare our results to previous studies and weather station measurements. The proposed model can be used for realistic simulations of future ground-based CMB observations.

  8. CMB Science: Opportunities for a Cryogenic Filter-Bank Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartari, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral science is experiencing a renewed interest after the impressive result of COBE-FIRAS in the early Nineties. In 2011, the PIXIE proposal contributed to reopen the prospect of measuring deviations from a perfect 2.725 K planckian spectrum. Both COBE-FIRAS and PIXIE are differential Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSes) capable to operate in the null condition across ˜ 2 frequency decades (in the case of PIXIE, the frequency span is 30 GHz-6 THz). We discuss a complementary strategy to observe CMB spectral distortions at frequencies lower than 250 GHz, down to the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the spectrum. The throughput advantage that makes the FTS capable of achieving exquisite sensitivity via multimode operation becomes limited at lower frequencies. We demonstrate that an array of 100 cryogenic planar filter-bank spectrometers coupled to single mode antennas, on a purely statistical ground, can perform better than an FTS between tens of GHz and 200 GHz (a relevant frequency window for cosmology) in the hypothesis that (1) both instruments have the same frequency resolution and (2) both instruments are operated at the photon noise limit (with the FTS frequency band extending from ˜ tens of GHz up to 1 THz). We discuss possible limitations of these hypotheses, and the constraints that have to be fulfilled (mainly in terms of efficiency) in order to operate a cryogenic filter-bank spectrometer close to its ultimate sensitivity limit.

  9. Testable polarization predictions for models of CMB isotropy anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, Cora; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Hu, Wayne

    2008-03-15

    Anomalies in the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature sky measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been suggested as possible evidence for a violation of statistical isotropy on large scales. In any physical model for broken isotropy, there are testable consequences for the CMB polarization field. We develop simulation tools for predicting the polarization field in models that break statistical isotropy locally through a modulation field. We study two different models: dipolar modulation, invoked to explain the asymmetry in power between northern and southern ecliptic hemispheres, and quadrupolar modulation, posited to explain the alignments between the quadrupole and octopole. For the dipolar case, we show that predictions for the correlation between the first 10 multipoles of the temperature and polarization fields can typically be tested at better than the 98% CL. For the quadrupolar case, we show that the polarization quadrupole and octopole should be moderately aligned. Such an alignment is a generic prediction of explanations which involve the temperature field at recombination and thus discriminate against explanations involving foregrounds or local secondary anisotropy. Predicted correlations between temperature and polarization multipoles out to l=5 provide tests at the {approx}99% CL or stronger for quadrupolar models that make the temperature alignment more than a few percent likely. As predictions of anomaly models, polarization statistics move beyond the a posteriori inferences that currently dominate the field.

  10. Direct cDNA selection with DNA microdissected from mouse chromosome 16: isolation of novel clones and construction of a partial transcription map of the C3-C4 region.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Hodes, M E; Wang, Y; Feng, Y; Ghetti, B; Dlouhy, S R

    1996-08-01

    A group of cDNA segments was selected by direct hybridization of mouse cerebellar cDNAs against genomic DNA pools generated by microdissection of the mouse chromosome 16 (MMU16) C3-C4 region. After elimination of repetitive sequences and adjustment for redundancy among clones, 34 novel cDNA fragments were isolated. The MMU16 origin of clones was confirmed by genetic linkage mapping. Reverse transcription PCR indicated that approximately 68% of the cDNAs represent transcripts that are expressed in adult mouse cerebellum. Northern blotting showed that some of these are predominantly or solely expressed in brain. This work demonstrates that DNA microdissected from banded MMU16 can be used for direct cDNA selection, thus enabling construction of a new, region-specific partial transcription map. This selected cDNA library should be a useful reagent for further molecular neurobiological studies.

  11. Efficient decomposition of cosmic microwave background polarization maps into pure E, pure B, and ambiguous components

    SciTech Connect

    Bunn, Emory F.

    2011-04-15

    Separation of the B component of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization map from the much larger E component is an essential step in CMB polarimetry. For a map with incomplete sky coverage, this separation is necessarily hampered by the presence of ambiguous modes which could be either E or B modes. I present an efficient pixel-space algorithm for removing the ambiguous modes and separating the map into pure E and B components. The method, which works for arbitrary geometries, does not involve generating a complete basis of such modes and scales the cube of the number of pixels on the boundary of the map.

  12. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Hebert, K.

    2009-08-01

    Unfortunately, the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is contaminated by emission originating in the Milky Way (synchrotron, free-free and dust emission). Since the cosmological information is statistically in nature, it is essential to remove this foreground emission and leave the CMB with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80 % of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors.

  13. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  14. Map showing drill-hole depths, lithologic intercepts, and partial isopachs of basin fill in the Winnemucca 1 degree by 2 degrees Quadrangle, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moring, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    Wells logs used for this map of the Winnemucca quadrangle are from the following sources: (1) logs of more than 1,000 water wells reported to the State of Nevada Division of Water Resources, which are on file with them in Reno and at the with U.S. Geological Survey in Carson City, (2) 44 petroleum wells collected by the Nevada Bureau of Mines (Lintz, 1957; Schilling and Garside, 1968; Garside and Schilling, 1977, Garside and others, 1977; 1988), and (3) Two geothermal wells reported in Zoback (1979) and Flynn and others (1982). Data from isostatic residual and Bouguer gravity maps by Wagini (1985) contributed to the interpretation of basin configuration. Gravity models of Dixie Valley (Schaefer, 1982, and Speed, 1976) and Grass Valley (Grannell and Noble, 1977) and seismic profiles of Grass and Pine Valleys (Potter and others, 1987) helped refine basis interpretations in those areas. The geologic base map of Paleozoic and Mesozoic igneous and sedimentary rocks, Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and Cenozoic structures was simplified from Stewart and Carlson (1976b).

  15. Planck 2014 and beyond: the CMB polarization at large angular scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangilli, Anna

    2015-08-01

    One of the main challenge left for the present and the future CMB experiments is the high precision measurement of the CMB polarization at large angular scales. The reionization bump in the CMB polarization EE and BB power spectra encodes unique informations about the reionization history of the Universe and the inflationary epoch. Such valuable information can be accessed only with an unprecedented accuracy and care on each step of the data analysis and its interpretation. The Planck 2014 release represents a first step towards the accurate characterization of the CMB polarization on the full sky. In this talk I will go through a brief introduction about the CMB polarization mainly focusing on the large angular scales. I will show how the EE and BB spectra at low-l can be used to improve the constraints on the cosmological parameters, in particular those related to the reionization history (τ) and the amount of tensor modes (r). As a Planck Scientist I will present, on behalf of the Planck collaboration, the status of the CMB analysis at large scales after the 2014 release. I will present different methods that can be used for the low-l analysis, focusing on a spectral based approach (Mangilli et al. in preparation). Finally I will present the theoretical implications of the results and the future prospects in view of the Planck release at the end of 2015 and future CMB experiments.

  16. Measurement of CMB Polarization with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Emily; ACTPol Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization-sensitive receiver for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope designed to make sensitive, high-resolution measurements of the polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with the goal of investigating the properties of inflation, dark energy, dark matter, and neutrinos in the early Universe. The ACTPol receiver employs three kilo-pixel arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer detectors. The first and second of these arrays, which were deployed in 2013 and 2014, respectively, and observed at 146 GHz, are among the most sensitive millimeter-wave polarimeters currently fielded and demonstrate the significant polarization measurement capabilities of the ACTPol instrument. I will present an overview of the first two seasons of observations, discussing the optimization of the detector arrays, the on-sky instrument performance, the observation and data-reduction strategies, and the science results.

  17. Overview of Current and Planned CMB Ballooning Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanany, Shaul

    2016-03-01

    Balloon-borne experiments have a unique role in probing the polarization of the CMB. They enable access to frequencies that can not be probed by ground-based instruments, they can straight-forwardly measure signals on large angular scales, and they serve as test-beds for technologies that are ultimately used on space missions. With these roles in mind, I will discuss the status of the three NASA-funded experiments EBEX, SPIDER and PIPER, and their complementarity with ground-based efforts. I will also discuss plans for next generation instruments, with which the detector count is expected to increase by another factor of 10 to about 10,000.

  18. Minimal cutoff vacuum state constraints from CMB bispectrum statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Schaar, Jan Pieter van der

    2011-02-15

    In this short note we translate the best available observational bounds on the CMB bispectrum amplitudes into constraints on a specific scale-invariant new physics hypersurface model of vacuum state modifications, as first proposed by Danielsson, in general models of single-field inflation. As compared to the power spectrum the bispectrum constraints are less ambiguous and provide an interesting upper bound on the cutoff scale in general models of single-field inflation with a small speed of sound. This upper bound is incompatible with the power spectrum constraint for most of the parameter domain, leaving very little room for minimal cutoff vacuum state modifications in general single-field models with a small speed of sound.

  19. The effective gravitational decoupling between dark matter and the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Voruz, Luc; Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas E-mail: Julien.Lesgourgues@cern.ch

    2014-03-01

    e present a detailed and self-contained analytical derivation of the evolution of sub-horizon cosmological perturbations before decoupling, based on previous work by S. Weinberg. These solutions are valid in the minimal ΛCDM scenario, to first order in perturbation theory, in the tight-coupling limit and neglecting neutrino shear stress. We compare them to exact numerical solutions computed by a Boltzmann code, and we find the two to be in very good agreement. The analytic solutions show explicitly that CDM and the baryon-photon fluid effectively behave as separate self-gravitating fluids until the epoch of baryon drag. This in turn leads to the surprising conclusion that the CMB is much less sensitive to the clustering properties of minimally coupled Dark Matter models than what would be naively expected.

  20. Constraints on cosmological birefringence energy dependence from CMB polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, G.; Paci, F. E-mail: fpaci@sissa.it

    2013-02-01

    We study the possibility of constraining the energy dependence of cosmological birefringence by using CMB polarization data. We consider four possible behaviors, characteristic of different theoretical scenarios: energy-independent birefringence motivated by Chern-Simons interactions of the electromagnetic field, linear energy dependence motivated by a 'Weyl' interaction of the electromagnetic field, quadratic energy dependence, motivated by quantum gravity modifications of low-energy electrodynamics, and inverse quadratic dependence, motivated by Faraday rotation generated by primordial magnetic fields. We constrain the parameters associated to each kind of dependence and use our results to give constraints on the models mentioned. We forecast the sensitivity that Planck data will be able to achieve in this respect.

  1. Optimal analysis of azimuthal features in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Stephen; Senatore, Leonardo; Smith, Kendrick E-mail: senatore@stanford.edu

    2013-10-01

    We present algorithms for searching for azimuthally symmetric features in CMB data. Our algorithms are fully optimal for masked all-sky data with inhomogeneous noise, computationally fast, simple to implement, and make no approximations. We show how to implement the optimal analysis in both Bayesian and frequentist cases. In the Bayesian case, our algorithm for evaluating the posterior likelihood is so fast that we can do a brute-force search over parameter space, rather than using a Monte Carlo Markov chain. Our motivating example is searching for bubble collisions, a pre-inflationary signal which can be generated if multiple tunneling events occur in an eternally inflating spacetime, but our algorithms are general and should be useful in other contexts.

  2. B-mode CMB polarization from patchy screening during reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorkin, Cora; Hu, Wayne; Smith, Kendrick M.

    2009-05-15

    B modes in CMB polarization from patchy reionization arise from two effects: generation of polarization from scattering of quadrupole moments by reionization bubbles and fluctuations in the screening of E modes from recombination. The scattering contribution has been studied previously, but the screening contribution has not yet been calculated. We show that on scales smaller than the acoustic scale (l > or approx. 300), the B-mode power from screening is larger than the B-mode power from scattering. The ratio approaches a constant {approx}2.5 below the damping scale (l > or approx. 2000). On degree scales relevant for gravitational waves (l < or approx. 100), screening B modes have a white noise tail and are subdominant to the scattering effect. These results are robust to uncertainties in the modeling of patchy reionization.

  3. μ distortions or running: A guaranteed discovery from CMB spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabass, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the implications of a PIXIE-like experiment, which would measure μ -type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a level of σμ=(1 /n )×10-8 , with n ≥1 representing an improved sensitivity (e.g. n =10 corresponds to PRISM). Using Planck data and considering the six-parameter Λ CDM model, we compute the posterior for μ8≡μ ×108 and find μ8=1.5 7-0.13+0.11 (68% C.L.). This becomes μ8=1.2 8-0.52+0.30 (68% C.L.) when the running αs of the spectral index is included. We point out that a sensitivity of about 3 ×PIXIE implies a guaranteed discovery: μ distortion is detected or αs≥0 is excluded (both at 95% C.L. or higher). This threshold sensitivity sets a clear benchmark for CMB spectrometry. For a combined analysis of PIXIE and current Planck data, we discuss the improvement on measurements of the tilt ns and the running αs and the dependence on the choice of the pivot. A fiducial running of αs=-0.01 (close to the Planck best fit) leads to a detection of negative running at 2 σ for 5 ×PIXIE . A fiducial running of αs=-0.02 , still compatible with Planck, requires 3 ×PIXIE to rule out αs=0 (at 95% C.L.). We propose a convenient and compact visualization of the improving constraints on the tilt, running and tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  4. CMB quadrupole suppression. I. Initial conditions of inflationary perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanovsky, D.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2006-12-15

    We investigate the issue of initial conditions of curvature and tensor perturbations at the beginning of slow roll inflation and their effect on the power spectra. Renormalizability and small backreaction constrain the high k behavior of the Bogoliubov coefficients that define these initial conditions. We introduce a transfer function D(k) which encodes the effect of generic initial conditions on the power spectra. The constraint from renormalizability and small backreaction entails that D(k)(less-or-similar sign){mu}{sup 2}/k{sup 2} for large k, implying that observable effects from initial conditions are more prominent in the low multipoles. This behavior affects the CMB quadrupole by the observed amount {approx}10%-20% when {mu} is of the order of the energy scale of inflation. The effects on high l-multipoles are suppressed by a factor {approx}1/l{sup 2} due to the falloff of D(k) for large wave vectors k. We show that the determination of generic initial conditions for the fluctuations is equivalent to the scattering problem by a potential V({eta}) localized just prior to the slow roll stage. Such potential leads to a transfer function D(k) which automatically obeys the renormalizability and small backreaction constraints. We find that an attractive potential V({eta}) yields a suppression of the lower CMB multipoles. Both for curvature and tensor modes, the quadrupole suppression depends only on the energy scale of V({eta}), and on the time interval where V({eta}) is nonzero. A suppression of the quadrupole for curvature perturbations consistent with the data is obtained when the scale of the potential is of the order of k{sub Q}{sup 2} where k{sub Q} is the wave vector whose physical wavelength is the Hubble radius today.

  5. Beyond y and μ: the shape of the CMB spectral distortions in the intermediate epoch, 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-Garching.mpg.de

    2012-09-01

    We calculate numerical solutions and analytic approximations for the intermediate-type spectral distortions. Detection of a μ-type distortion (saturated comptonization) in the CMB will constrain the time of energy injection to be at a redshift 2 × 10{sup 6}∼>z∼>2 × 10{sup 5}, while a detection of a y-type distortion (minimal comptonization) will mean that there was heating of CMB at redshift z∼<1.5 × 10{sup 4}. We point out that the partially comptonized spectral distortions, generated in the redshift range 1.5 × 10{sup 4}∼CMB spectral distortions has the possibility to constrain precisely not only the amount of energy release in the early Universe but also the mechanism, for example, particle annihilation and Silk damping can be distinguished from particle decay. The intermediate-type distortion templates and software code using these templates to calculate the CMB spectral distortions for user-defined energy injection rate is made publicly available.

  6. CMB constraints on dark matter models with large annihilation cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Iocco, Fabio; Bertone, Gianfranco; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2009-07-15

    The injection of secondary particles produced by dark matter (DM) annihilation around redshift {approx}1000 would inevitably affect the process of recombination, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and polarization. We show that the most recent CMB measurements provided by the WMAP satellite mission place interesting constraints on DM self-annihilation rates, especially for models that exhibit a large Sommerfeld enhancement of the annihilation cross section, as recently proposed to fit the PAMELA and ATIC results. Furthermore, we argue that upcoming CMB experiments such as Planck, will improve the constraints by at least 1 order of magnitude, thus providing a sensitive probe of the properties of DM particles.

  7. From Cavendish to PLANCK: Constraining Newton's gravitational constant with CMB temperature and polarization anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Smoot, George F.; Zahn, Oliver

    2009-07-15

    We present new constraints on cosmic variations of Newton's gravitational constant by making use of the latest CMB data from WMAP, BOOMERANG, CBI and ACBAR experiments and independent constraints coming from big bang nucleosynthesis. We found that current CMB data provide constraints at the {approx}10% level, that can be improved to {approx}3% by including big bang nucleosynthesis data. We show that future data expected from the Planck satellite could constrain G at the {approx}1.5% level while an ultimate, cosmic variance limited, CMB experiment could reach a precision of about 0.4%, competitive with current laboratory measurements.

  8. Multilocus half-tetrad analysis and centromere mapping in citrus: evidence of SDR mechanism for 2n megagametophyte production and partial chiasma interference in mandarin cv 'Fortune'.

    PubMed

    Cuenca, J; Froelicher, Y; Aleza, P; Juárez, J; Navarro, L; Ollitrault, P

    2011-10-01

    The genetic structure of 2n gametes and, particularly, the parental heterozygosity restitution at each locus depends on the meiotic process by which they originated, with first-division restitution and second-division restitution (SDR) being the two major mechanisms. The origin of 2n gametes in citrus is still controversial, although sexual polyploidisation is widely used for triploid seedless cultivar development. In this study, we report the analysis of 2n gametes of mandarin cv 'Fortune' by genotyping 171 triploid hybrids with 35 simple sequence repeat markers. The microsatellite DNA allele counting-peak ratios method for allele-dosage evaluation proved highly efficient in segregating triploid progenies and allowed half-tetrad analysis (HTA) by inferring the 2n gamete allelic configuration. All 2n gametes arose from the female genitor. The observed maternal heterozygosity restitution varied between 10 and 82%, depending on the locus, thus SDR appears to be the mechanism underlying 2n gamete production in mandarin cv 'Fortune'. A new method to locate the centromere, based on the best fit between observed heterozygosity restitution within a linkage group and theoretical functions under either partial or no chiasmata interference hypotheses was successfully applied to linkage group II. The maximum value of heterozygosity restitution and the pattern of restitution along this linkage group would suggest there is partial chiasma interference. The implications of such a restitution mechanism for citrus breeding are discussed.

  9. Planck 2015 results. XI. CMB power spectra, likelihoods, and robustness of parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Gerbino, M.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    likelihood results against specific extensions to the baseline cosmology, which are particularly sensitive to data at high multipoles. For instance, the effective number of neutrino species remains compatible with the canonical value of 3.046. For this first detailed analysis of Planck polarization spectra, we concentrate at high multipoles on the E modes, leaving the analysis of the weaker B modes to future work. At low multipoles we use temperature maps at all Planck frequencies along with a subset of polarization data. These data take advantage of Planck's wide frequency coverage to improve the separation of CMB and foreground emission. Within the baseline ΛCDM cosmology this requires τ = 0.078 ± 0.019 for the reionization optical depth, which is significantly lower than estimates without the use of high-frequency data for explicit monitoring of dust emission. At high multipoles we detect residual systematic errors in E polarization, typically at the μK2 level; we therefore choose to retain temperature information alone for high multipoles as the recommended baseline, in particular for testing non-minimal models. Nevertheless, the high-multipole polarization spectra from Planck are already good enough to enable a separate high-precision determination of the parameters of the ΛCDM model, showing consistency with those established independently from temperature information alone.

  10. Toward a Tomographic Analysis of the Cross-Correlation between Planck CMB Lensing and H-ATLAS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchini, F.; Lapi, A.; Calabrese, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Danese, L.; de Zotti, G.; Bourne, N.; Cooray, A.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Valiante, E.

    2016-07-01

    We present an improved and extended analysis of the cross-correlation between the map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential derived from the Planck mission data and the high-redshift galaxies detected by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in the photometric redshift range {z}{{ph}}≥slant 1.5. We compare the results based on the 2013 and 2015 Planck datasets, and investigate the impact of different selections of the H-ATLAS galaxy samples. Significant improvements over our previous analysis have been achieved thanks to the higher signal-to-noise ratio of the new CMB lensing map recently released by the Planck collaboration. The effective galaxy bias parameter, b, for the full galaxy sample, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the galaxy auto-power spectrum is found to be b={3.54}-0.14+0.15. Furthermore, a first tomographic analysis of the cross-correlation signal is implemented by splitting the galaxy sample into two redshift intervals: 1.5≤slant {z}{{ph}}\\lt 2.1 and {z}{{ph}}≥slant 2.1. A statistically significant signal was found for both bins, indicating a substantial increase with redshift of the bias parameter: b=2.89+/- 0.23 for the lower and b={4.75}-0.25+0.24 for the higher redshift bin. Consistent with our previous analysis, we find that the amplitude of the cross-correlation signal is a factor of {1.45}-0.13+0.14 higher than expected from the standard ΛCDM model for the assumed redshift distribution. The robustness of our results against possible systematic effects has been extensively discussed, although the tension is mitigated by passing from 4 to 3σ.

  11. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: CMB polarization at 200 < ℓ < 9000

    SciTech Connect

    Naess, Sigurd; Allison, Rupert; Calabrese, Erminia; Hasselfield, Matthew; McMahon, Jeff; Coughlin, Kevin; Datta, Rahul; Niemack, Michael D.; De Bernardis, Francesco; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Battaglia, Nick; Beall, James A.; Britton, Joe; Cho, Hsiao-mei; Bond, J Richard; Crichton, Devin; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; and others

    2014-10-01

    We report on measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and celestial polarization at 146 GHz made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) in its first three months of observing. Four regions of sky covering a total of 270 square degrees were mapped with an angular resolution of 1.3'. The map noise levels in the four regions are between 11 and 17 μK-arcmin. We present TT, TE, EE, TB, EB, and BB power spectra from three of these regions. The observed E-mode polarization power spectrum, displaying six acoustic peaks in the range 200 < ℓ < 3000, is an excellent fit to the prediction of the best-fit cosmological models from WMAP9+ACT and Planck data. The polarization power spectrum, which mainly reflects primordial plasma velocity perturbations, provides an independent determination of cosmological parameters consistent with those based on the temperature power spectrum, which results mostly from primordial density perturbations. We find that without masking any point sources in the EE data at ℓ < 9000, the Poisson tail of the EE power spectrum due to polarized point sources has an amplitude less than 2.4 μ {sup 2} at ℓ = 3000 at 95% confidence. Finally, we report that the Crab Nebula, an important polarization calibration source at microwave frequencies, has 8.7% polarization with an angle of 150.7{sup o} ± 0.6{sup o} when smoothed with a 5' Gaussian beam.

  12. Using White Dish CMB Anisotropy Data to Probe Open and Flat-A CDM Cosmogonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratra, Bharat; Ganga, Ken; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tucker, G. S.; Griffin, G. S.; Nguyen, H. T.; Peterson, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a similar analysis of the Tucker at al. (1993, hereafter T93) White Dish CMB anisotropy data collected at the South Pole. The white dish detector and telescope are described in Tucker et al. (1994).

  13. Using CMB data to constrain non-isotropic Planck-scale modifications to Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Migliaccio, Marina; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Polenta, Gianluca E-mail: Marina.Migliaccio@roma2.infn.it E-mail: giovanni.amelino-camelia@roma1.infn.it E-mail: paolo.natoli@roma2.infn.it

    2011-11-01

    We develop a method to constrain non-isotropic features of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization, of a type expected to arise in some models describing quantum gravity effects on light propagation. We describe the expected signatures of this kind of anomalous light propagation on CMB photons, showing that it will produce a non-isotropic birefringence effect, i.e. a rotation of the CMB polarization direction whose observed amount depends in a peculiar way on the observation direction. We also show that the sensitivity levels expected for CMB polarization studies by the Planck satellite are sufficient for testing these effects if, as assumed in the quantum-gravity literature, their magnitude is set by the minute Planck length.

  14. A cytomegalovirus protein with properties of herpes simplex virus ICP8: partial purification of the polypeptide and map position of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Kemble, G W; McCormick, A L; Pereira, L; Mocarski, E S

    1987-01-01

    We demonstrated the presence of a single-stranded DNA-binding protein in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells with properties analogous to those of herpes simplex virus (HSV) ICP8. Using monoclonal antibody specific for the CMV protein, we analyzed its fluorescence pattern and time of synthesis, mapped the gene encoding it by using a lambda gt11 library of CMV DNA fragments, and monitored its purification by phosphocellulose and DNA-Sepharose chromatography. In all characteristics we examined, the CMV protein behaved analogously to HSV ICP8. Our results are consistent with a functional role of CMV ICP8 in viral replication that is similar to that of HSV ICP8 and with the evolutionary conservation of the gene of interest in two divergent herpesviruses. Images PMID:3041036

  15. CMB B-mode polarization from Thomson scattering in the local universe

    SciTech Connect

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Loeb, Abraham; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2005-03-15

    The polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is widely recognized as a potential source of information about primordial gravitational waves. The gravitational wave contribution can be separated from the dominant CMB polarization created by density perturbations at the times of recombination and reionization because it generates both E and B polarization modes, whereas the density perturbations create only E polarization. The limits of our ability to measure gravitational waves are thus determined by statistical and systematic errors from CMB experiments, foregrounds, and nonlinear evolution effects such as gravitational lensing of the CMB. Usually it is assumed that most foregrounds can be removed because of their frequency dependence, however Thomson scattering of the CMB quadrupole by electrons in the Galaxy or nearby structures shares the blackbody frequency dependence of the CMB. If the optical depth from these nearby electrons is anisotropic, the polarization generated can include B modes even if no tensor perturbations are present. We estimate this effect for the Galactic disk and nearby extragalactic structures, and find that it contributes to the B polarization at the level of {approx}(1-2)x10{sup -4} {mu}K per logarithmic interval in multipole l for l<30. This is well below the detectability level even for a future CMB polarization satellite and hence is negligible. Depending on its structure and extent, the Galactic corona may be a source of B-modes comparable to the residual large-scale lensing B-mode after the latter has been cleaned using lensing reconstruction techniques. For an extremely ambitious post-Planck CMB experiment, Thomson scattering in the Galactic corona is thus a potential contaminant of the gravitational wave signal; conversely, if the other foregrounds can be cleaned out, such an experiment might be able to constrain models of the corona.

  16. Large-scale anomalies of the CMB in the curvaton scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hao; Frejsel, Anne Mette; Naselsky, Pavel E-mail: frejsel@nbi.dk

    2013-07-01

    We extend the curvaton scenario presented by Erickcek et al. [1,2], to explain how the even-odd multipole asymmetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) (also called parity asymmetry, [3,4]) and power anisotropies can be generated by the curvaton field, which acts as an extra component to the spectrum of adiabatic perturbations in the inflationary epoch. Our work provides a possible cosmic explanation to the CMB large-scale asymmetry problems besides systematics and unknown residuals.

  17. CMB B-mode polarization from Thomson scattering in the local universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Christopher M.; Loeb, Abraham; Afshordi, Niayesh

    2005-03-01

    The polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is widely recognized as a potential source of information about primordial gravitational waves. The gravitational wave contribution can be separated from the dominant CMB polarization created by density perturbations at the times of recombination and reionization because it generates both E and B polarization modes, whereas the density perturbations create only E polarization. The limits of our ability to measure gravitational waves are thus determined by statistical and systematic errors from CMB experiments, foregrounds, and nonlinear evolution effects such as gravitational lensing of the CMB. Usually it is assumed that most foregrounds can be removed because of their frequency dependence, however Thomson scattering of the CMB quadrupole by electrons in the Galaxy or nearby structures shares the blackbody frequency dependence of the CMB. If the optical depth from these nearby electrons is anisotropic, the polarization generated can include B modes even if no tensor perturbations are present. We estimate this effect for the Galactic disk and nearby extragalactic structures, and find that it contributes to the B polarization at the level of ˜(1 2)×10-4 μK per logarithmic interval in multipole ℓ for ℓ<30. This is well below the detectability level even for a future CMB polarization satellite and hence is negligible. Depending on its structure and extent, the Galactic corona may be a source of B-modes comparable to the residual large-scale lensing B-mode after the latter has been cleaned using lensing reconstruction techniques. For an extremely ambitious post-Planck CMB experiment, Thomson scattering in the Galactic corona is thus a potential contaminant of the gravitational wave signal; conversely, if the other foregrounds can be cleaned out, such an experiment might be able to constrain models of the corona.

  18. Quantum slow-roll and quantum fast-roll inflationary initial conditions: CMB quadrupole suppression and further effects on the low CMB multipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, F. J.; Vega, H. J. de; Sanchez, N. G.

    2008-10-15

    Quantum fast-roll initial conditions for the inflaton which are different from the classical fast-roll conditions and from the quantum slow-roll conditions can lead to inflation that lasts long enough. These quantum fast-roll initial conditions for the inflaton allow for kinetic energies of the same order of the potential energies and nonperturbative inflaton modes with nonzero wave numbers. Their evolution starts with a transitory epoch where the redshift due to the expansion succeeds to assemble the quantum excited modes of the inflaton in a homogeneous (zero mode) condensate, and the large value of the Hubble parameter succeeds to overdamp the fast roll of the redshifted inflaton modes. After this transitory stage the effective classical slow-roll epoch is reached. Most of the e-folds are produced during the slow-roll epoch, and we recover the classical slow-roll results for the scalar and tensor metric perturbations plus corrections. These corrections are important if scales which are horizon size today exited the horizon by the end of the transitory stage and, as a consequence, the lower cosmic microwave background (CMB) multipoles get suppressed or enhanced. Both for scalar and tensor metric perturbations, fast roll leads to a suppression of the amplitude of the perturbations (and of the low CMB multipoles), while the quantum precondensate epoch gives an enhancement of the amplitude of the perturbations (and of the low CMB multipoles). These two types of corrections can compete and combine in a scale dependent manner. They turn out to be smaller in new inflation than in chaotic inflation. These corrections arise as natural consequences of the quantum nonperturbative inflaton dynamics, and can allow a further improvement of the fitting of inflation plus the {lambda}CMB model to the observed CMB spectra. In addition, the corrections to the tensor metric perturbations will provide an independent test of this model. Thus, the effects of quantum inflaton fast

  19. Bias to CMB lensing measurements from the bispectrum of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Vanessa; Schmittfull, Marcel; Sherwin, Blake D.

    2016-08-01

    The rapidly improving precision of measurements of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) also requires a corresponding increase in the precision of theoretical modeling. A commonly made approximation is to model the CMB deflection angle or lensing potential as a Gaussian random field. In this paper, however, we analytically quantify the influence of the non-Gaussianity of large-scale structure (LSS) lenses, arising from nonlinear structure formation, on CMB lensing measurements. In particular, evaluating the impact of the nonzero bispectrum of large-scale structure on the relevant CMB four-point correlation functions, we find that there is a bias to estimates of the CMB lensing power spectrum. For temperature-based lensing reconstruction with CMB stage III and stage IV experiments, we find that this lensing power spectrum bias is negative and is of order 1% of the signal. This corresponds to a shift of multiple standard deviations for these upcoming experiments. We caution, however, that our numerical calculation only evaluates two of the largest bias terms and, thus, only provides an approximate estimate of the full bias. We conclude that further investigation into lensing biases from nonlinear structure formation is required and that these biases should be accounted for in future lensing analyses.

  20. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  1. Relationship between Yield Components and Partial Resistance to Lecanicillium fungicola in the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, Assessed by Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Dry bubble, caused by Lecanicillium fungicola, is one of the most detrimental diseases affecting button mushroom cultivation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that breeding for resistance to this pathogen is quite challenging due to its quantitative inheritance. A second-generation hybrid progeny derived from an intervarietal cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar was characterized for L. fungicola resistance under artificial inoculation in three independent experiments. Analysis of quantitative trait loci (QTL) was used to determine the locations, numbers, and effects of genomic regions associated with dry-bubble resistance. Four traits related to resistance were analyzed. Two to four QTL were detected per trait, depending on the experiment. Two genomic regions, on linkage group X (LGX) and LGVIII, were consistently detected in the three experiments. The genomic region on LGX was detected for three of the four variables studied. The total phenotypic variance accounted for by all QTL ranged from 19.3% to 42.1% over all traits in all experiments. For most of the QTL, the favorable allele for resistance came from the wild parent, but for some QTL, the allele that contributed to a higher level of resistance was carried by the cultivar. Comparative mapping with QTL for yield-related traits revealed five colocations between resistance and yield component loci, suggesting that the resistance results from both genetic factors and fitness expression. The consequences for mushroom breeding programs are discussed. PMID:22247161

  2. Strain distribution across a partially molten middle crust: Insights from the AMS mapping of the Carlos Chagas Anatexite, Araçuaí belt (East Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavalcante, Geane C. G.; Egydio-Silva, Marcos; Vauchez, Alain; Camps, Pierre; Oliveira, Eurídice

    2013-10-01

    The easternmost part of the Neoproterozoic Araçuaí belt comprises an anatectic domain that involves anatexites (the Carlos Chagas unit), leucogranites and migmatitic granulites that display a well-developed fabric. Microstructural observations support that the deformation occurred in the magmatic to submagmatic state. Structural mapping integrating field and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) revealed a complex, 3D structure. The northern domain displays gently dipping foliations bearing a NW-trending lineation, southward, the lineation trend progressively rotates to EW then SW and the foliation is gently folded. The eastern domain displays E-W and NE-SW trending foliations with moderate to steeply dips bearing a dominantly NS trending lineation. Magnetic mineralogy investigation suggests biotite as the main carrier of the magnetic susceptibility in the anatexites and ferromagnetic minerals in the granulites. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique suggest that the magnetic fabric comes from the crystalline anisotropy of biotite and feldspar grains, especially. The delineation of several structural domains with contrasted flow fabric suggests a 3D flow field involving westward thrusting orthogonal to the belt, northwestward orogen-oblique escape tectonics and NS orogen-parallel flow. This complex deformation pattern may be due to interplay of collision-driven and gravity-driven deformations.

  3. The 'partial resonance' of the ring in the NLO crystal melaminium formate: study using vibrational spectra, DFT, HOMO-LUMO and MESP mapping.

    PubMed

    Binoy, J; Marchewka, M K; Jayakumar, V S

    2013-03-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium formate, a potential material known for toxicity and NLO activity, has been performed. The FT IR and FT Raman spectral investigations of melaminium formate is performed aided by the computed spectra of melaminium formate, triazine, melamine, melaminium and formate ion, along with bond orders and PED, computed using the density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set and XRD data, to reveal intermolecular interactions of amino groups with neighbor formula units in the crystal, intramolecular H⋯H repulsion of amino group hydrogen with protonating hydrogen, consequent loss of resonance in the melaminium ring, restriction of resonance to N(3)C(1)N(1) moiety leading to special type resonance of the ring and the resonance structure of CO(2) group of formate ion. The 3D matrix of hyperpolarizability tensor components has been computed to quantify NLO activity of melamine, melaminium and melaminium formate and the hyperpolarizability enhancement is analyzed using computed plots of HOMO and LUMO orbitals. A new mechanism of proton transfer responsible for NLO activity has been suggested, based on anomalous IR spectral bands in the high wavenumber region. The computed MEP contour maps have been used to analyze the interaction of melaminium and formate ions in the crystal.

  4. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannantonio, T.; Fosalba, P.; Cawthon, R.; Omori, Y.; Crocce, M.; Elsner, F.; Leistedt, B.; Dodelson, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Gaztañaga, E.; Holder, G.; Peiris, H. V.; Percival, W. J.; Kirk, D.; Bauer, A. H.; Benson, B. A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Carretero, J.; Crawford, T. M.; Crittenden, R.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Krause, E.; Reichardt, C. L.; Ross, A. J.; Simard, G.; Soergel, B.; Stark, A.; Story, K. T.; Vieira, J. D.; Weller, J.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Castander, F. J.; Chang, C. L.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; D'Andrea, C. B.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Fernandez, E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Wechsler, R. H.; Zuntz, J.

    2016-03-01

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck , respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of the signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the Λ cold dark matter Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.

  5. A Blackbody Microwave Source for CMB Polarimeter Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindman, Alec

    2014-03-01

    I present an evolved design for a thermally isolated blackbody source operating at 90 GHz and 120 GHz, frequencies of interest to Cosmic Microwave Background measurements. The NASA GSFC Experimental Cosmology lab is developing transition edge sensor bolometers for the CLASS and PIPER missions to measure CMB polarization; the source described here is for use in an existing 150 mK test package to quantify the detectors' properties. The design is optimized to minimize heat loading into the ADR and cryocoolers by employing a Kevlar kinematic suspension and additional thermal breaks. The blackbody light is coupled to a detector by means of an electroformed waveguide, which is mated to the source by an ultraprecise ring-centered flange design; this precision is critical to maintain the vacuum gap between the heated source and the cold waveguide, which is an order of magnitude smaller than the allowable misalignment of the standard military-spec microwave flange design. The source will provide at least 50% better thermal isolation than the existing 40 GHz source, as well as a smaller thermal time constant to enable faster measurement cycles. Special thanks to Dr. David Chuss at GSFC, and the Society of Physics Students.

  6. CMB lensing tomography with the DES Science Verification galaxies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Giannantonio, T.

    2016-01-07

    We measure the cross-correlation between the galaxy density in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data and the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as reconstructed with the Planck satellite and the South Pole Telescope (SPT). When using the DES main galaxy sample over the full redshift range 0.2 < zphot < 1.2, a cross-correlation signal is detected at 6σ and 4σ with SPT and Planck respectively. We then divide the DES galaxies into five photometric redshift bins, finding significant (>2σ) detections in all bins. Comparing to the fiducial Planck cosmology, we find the redshift evolution of themore » signal matches expectations, although the amplitude is consistently lower than predicted across redshift bins. We test for possible systematics that could affect our result and find no evidence for significant contamination. Finally, we demonstrate how these measurements can be used to constrain the growth of structure across cosmic time. We find the data are fit by a model in which the amplitude of structure in the z < 1.2 universe is 0.73 ± 0.16 times as large as predicted in the LCDM Planck cosmology, a 1.7σ deviation.« less

  7. The CMB and the measure of the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Michael P.

    2012-06-01

    In the context of eternal inflation, cosmological predictions depend on the choice of measure to regulate the diverging spacetime volume. The spectrum of inflationary perturbations is no exception, as we demonstrate by comparing the predictions of the fat geodesic and causal patch measures. To highlight the effect of the measure — as opposed to any effects related to a possible landscape of vacua — we take the cosmological model, including the model of inflation, to be fixed. We also condition on the average CMB temperature accompanying the measurement. Both measures predict a 1-point expectation value for the gauge-invariant Newtonian potential, which takes the form of a (scale-dependent) monopole, in addition to a related contribution to the 3-point correlation function, with the detailed form of these quantities differing between the measures. However, for both measures both effects are well within cosmic variance. Our results make clear the theoretical relevance of the measure, and at the same time validate the standard inflationary predictions in the context of eternal inflation.

  8. Extragalactic foreground contamination in temperature-based CMB lens reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Stephen J.; Hanson, Duncan; Doré, Olivier E-mail: dhanson@physics.mcgill.ca

    2014-03-01

    We discuss the effect of unresolved point source contamination on estimates of the CMB lensing potential, from components such as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, radio point sources, and the Cosmic Infrared Background. We classify the possible trispectra associated with such source populations, and construct estimators for the amplitude and scale-dependence of several of the major trispectra. We show how to propagate analytical models for these source trispectra to biases for lensing. We also construct a ''source-hardened'' lensing estimator which experiences significantly smaller biases when exposed to unresolved point sources than the standard quadratic lensing estimator. We demonstrate these ideas in practice using the sky simulations of Sehgal et al., for cosmic-variance limited experiments designed to mimic ACT, SPT, and Planck. We find that for radio sources and SZ the bias is significantly reduced, but for CIB it is essentially unchanged. However, by using the high-frequency, all-sky CIB measurements from Planck and Herschel it may be possible to suppress this contribution.

  9. Oscillations in the CMB from Axion Monodromy Inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Westphal, Alexander; Xu, Gang; /Cornell U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-12-01

    We study the CMB observables in axion monodromy inflation. These well-motivated scenarios for inflation in string theory have monomial potentials over super-Planckian field ranges, with superimposed sinusoidal modulations from instanton effects. Such periodic modulations of the potential can drive resonant enhancements of the correlation functions of cosmological perturbations, with characteristic modulations of the amplitude as a function of wavenumber. We give an analytical result for the scalar power spectrum in this class of models, and we determine the limits that present data places on the amplitude and frequency of modulations. Then, incorporating an improved understanding of the realization of axion monodromy inflation in string theory, we perform a careful study of microphysical constraints in this scenario. We find that detectable modulations of the scalar power spectrum are commonplace in well-controlled examples, while resonant contributions to the bispectrum are undetectable in some classes of examples and detectable in others. We conclude that resonant contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum are a characteristic signature of axion monodromy inflation that, in favorable cases, could be detected in near-future experiments.

  10. Model-independent cosmological constraints from the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Vonlanthen, Marc; Räsänen, Syksy; Durrer, Ruth E-mail: syksy.rasanen@iki.fi

    2010-08-01

    We analyse CMB data in a manner which is as independent as possible of the model of late-time cosmology. We encode the effects of late-time cosmology into a single parameter which determines the distance to the last scattering surface. We exclude low multipoles l < 40 from the analysis. We consider the WMAP5 and ACBAR data. We obtain the cosmological parameters 100ω{sub b} = 2.13±0.05, ω{sub c} = 0.124±0.007, n{sub s} = 0.93±0.02 and θ{sub A} = 0.593°±0.001° (68% C.L.). The last number is the angular scale subtended by the sound horizon at decoupling. There is a systematic shift in the parameters as more low l data are omitted, towards smaller values of ω{sub b} and n{sub s} and larger values of ω{sub c}. The scale θ{sub A} remains stable and very well determined.

  11. Oscillations in the CMB from axion monodromy inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Flauger, Raphael; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Xu, Gang; Westphal, Alexander E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu E-mail: awestpha@stanford.edu

    2010-06-01

    We study the CMB observables in axion monodromy inflation. These well-motivated scenarios for inflation in string theory have monomial potentials over super-Planckian field ranges, with superimposed sinusoidal modulations from instanton effects. Such periodic modulations of the potential can drive resonant enhancements of the correlation functions of cosmological perturbations, with characteristic modulations of the amplitude as a function of wavenumber. We give an analytical result for the scalar power spectrum in this class of models, and we determine the limits that present data places on the amplitude and frequency of modulations. Then, incorporating an improved understanding of the realization of axion monodromy inflation in string theory, we perform a careful study of microphysical constraints in this scenario. We find that detectable modulations of the scalar power spectrum are commonplace in well-controlled examples, while resonant contributions to the bispectrum are undetectable in some classes of examples and detectable in others. We conclude that resonant contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum are a characteristic signature of axion monodromy inflation that, in favorable cases, could be detected in near-future experiments.

  12. String theory clues for the low-ℓ CMB ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, N.; Sagnotti, A.

    2015-05-01

    "Brane Supersymmetry Breaking" is a peculiar string-scale mechanism that can unpair Bose and Fermi excitations in orientifold models. It results from the simultaneous presence, in the vacuum, of collections of D-branes and orientifolds that are not mutually BPS, and is closely tied to the scale of string excitations. It also leaves behind, for a mixing of dilaton and internal breathing mode, an exponential potential that is just too steep for a scalar to emerge from the initial singularity while descending it. As a result, in this class of models the scalar can generically bounce off the exponential wall, and this dynamics brings along, in the power spectrum, an infrared depression typically followed by a pre-inflationary peak. We elaborate on a possible link between this type of bounce and the low-ℓ end of the CMB angular power spectrum. For the first 32 multipoles, one can reach a 50% reduction in χ2 with respect to the standard ΛCDM setting.

  13. Optimal estimator for resonance bispectra in the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münchmeyer, Moritz; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2015-02-01

    We propose an (optimal) estimator for a CMB bispectrum containing logarithmically spaced oscillations. There is tremendous theoretical interest in such bispectra, and they are predicted by a plethora of models, including axion monodromy models of inflation and initial state modifications. The number of resolved logarithmical oscillations in the bispectrum is limited due to the discrete resolution of the multipole bispectrum. We derive a simple relation between the maximum number of resolved oscillations and the frequency. We investigate several ways to factorize the primordial bispectrum, and conclude that a one-dimensional expansion in the sum of the momenta ∑ki=kt is the most efficient and flexible approach. We compare the expansion to the exact result in multipole space and show for ωeff=100 that O (1 03) modes are sufficient for an accurate reconstruction. We compute the expected σfNL and find that within an effective field theory (EFT) the overall signal to noise scales as S /N ∝ω3 /2. Using only the temperature data we find S /N ˜O (1 - 1 02) for the frequency domain set by the EFT.

  14. Evidence for horizon-scale power from CMB polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Hu, Wayne

    2009-07-15

    The CMB temperature power spectrum offers ambiguous evidence for the existence of horizon-scale power in the primordial power spectrum due to uncertainties in spatial curvature and the physics of cosmic acceleration as well as the observed low quadrupole. Current polarization data from WMAP provide evidence for horizon-scale power that is robust to these uncertainties. Polarization on the largest scales arises mainly from scattering at z < or approx. 6 when the Universe is fully ionized, making the evidence robust to ionization history variations at higher redshifts as well. A cutoff in the power spectrum is limited to C=k{sub C}/10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -1}<5.2 (95% C.L.) by polarization, only slightly weaker than joint temperature and polarization constraints in flat {lambda}CDM (C<4.2). Planck should improve the polarization limit to C<3.6 for any model of the acceleration epoch and ionization history as well as provide tests for foreground and systematic contamination.

  15. On the significance of power asymmetries in Planck CMB data at all scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quartin, Miguel; Notari, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the CMB temperature data taken by the Planck satellite investigating if there is any significant deviation from cosmological isotropy. We look for differences in the spectrum between two opposite hemispheres and also for dipolar modulations. We propose a new way to avoid biases due to partial-sky coverage by producing a mask symmetrized in antipodal directions, in addition to the standard smoothing procedure. We also properly take into account both Doppler and aberration effects due to our peculiar velocity and the anisotropy of the noise, since these effects induce a significant hemispherical asymmetry. We are thus able to probe scales all the way to l = 2000. After such treatment we find no evidence for significant hemispherical anomalies along any of the analyzed directions (i.e. deviations are less than 1.5σ when summing over all scales). Although among the larger scales there are sometimes higher discrepancies, these are always less than 3σ. We also find results on a dipolar modulation of the power spectrum. Along the hemispheres aligned with the most asymmetric direction for 2 <= l <= 2000 we find a 3.3σ discrepancy when comparing to simulations. However, if we do not restrict ourselves to Planck's maximal asymmetry axis, which can only be known a posteriori, and compare Planck data with the modulation of simulations along their respective maximal asymmetry directions, the discrepancy goes down to less than 1σ (with, again, almost 3σ discrepancies in some low-l modes). We thus conclude that no significant power asymmetries seem to be present in the full data set. Interestingly, without proper removal of Doppler and aberration effects one would find spurious anomalies at high l, between 3σ and 5σ. Even when considering only l < 600 we find that the boost is non-negligible and alleviates the discrepancy by roughly half-σ.

  16. Do we care about the distance to the CMB? Clarifying the impact of second-order lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Bonvin, Camille; Clarkson, Chris; Durrer, Ruth; Maartens, Roy; Umeh, Obinna E-mail: chris.clarkson@gmail.com E-mail: roy.maartens@gmail.com

    2015-06-01

    It has recently been shown that second-order corrections to the background distance-redshift relation can build up significantly at large redshifts, due to an aggregation of gravitational lensing events. This shifts the expectation value of the distance to the CMB by 1%. In this paper we show that this shift is already properly accounted for in standard CMB analyses. We clarify the role that the area distance to the CMB plays in the presence of second-order lensing corrections.

  17. Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in an anisotropic CMB model: Measuring low multipoles of the CMB at higher redshifts using intensity and polarization spectral distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasini, Siavash; Pierpaoli, Elena

    2016-07-01

    We present a novel mathematical formalism that allows us to easily compute the expected kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ) signal in intensity and polarization due to an anisotropic primordial cosmic microwave background (CMB). We derive the expected intensity and polarization distortions in the direction of nonmoving galaxy clusters, and then we generalize our calculations for nonzero peculiar velocity. We show that, in the direction of moving clusters, low CMB multipoles impose intensity and polarization spectral distortions with different frequency dependences. The polarization signal primarily probes the quadrupole moment of the CMB, with a significant contribution from the primordial dipole and octupole moments. For a typical cluster velocity of 1000 km /s , corrections to the quadrupole-induced polarization of a nonmoving cluster are of the order of 2%-10% between 200-600 GHz, and depend on cluster's position on the sky, velocity magnitude, and direction of motion. We also find that the angular dependence of the signal varies with frequency of observation. The distinct frequency and angular dependences of the polarization induced by the primordial dipole and octupole can be exploited to measure them despite other physical effects and foregrounds. Contrary to polarization, intensity distortions are affected by all the CMB multipoles, so they cannot be readily used to probe the low multipoles at higher redshifts. However, correlations between intensity and polarization signals can be used to enhance the signal to noise ratio for the measurements of the primordial dipole, quadrupole, and octupole. The more general calculation of the aberration kernel presented in this work has applications reaching beyond the SZ cluster science addressed here. For example, it can be exploited to the deboost/deaberrate CMB multipoles as observed in our local frame.

  18. Observing the structure of the landscape with the CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ashoorioon, Amjad

    2010-04-01

    Assuming that inflation happened through a series of tunneling in the string theory landscape, it is argued that one can determine the structure of vacua using precise measurements of the scalar spectral index and tensor perturbations at large scales. It is shown that for a vacuum structure where the energy gap between the minima is constant, i.e. ε{sub i} = im{sub f}{sup 4}, one obtains the scalar spectral index, n{sub s}, to be ≅ 0.9687, for the modes that exit the horizon 60 e-folds before the end of inflation. Alternatively, for a vacuum structure in which the energy gap increases linearly with the vacuum index, i.e. ε{sub i} = ½i{sup 2}m{sub f}{sup 4}, n{sub s} turns out to be ≅ 0.9614. Both these two models are motivated within the string theory landscape using flux-compactification and their predictions for scalar spectral index are compatible with WMAP results. For both these two models, the results for the scalar spectral index turn out to be independent of m{sub f}. Nonetheless, assuming that inflation started at Planckian energies and that there had been successful thermalization at each step, one can constrain m{sub f} < 2.6069 × 10{sup −5}m{sub P} and m{sub f} < 6.5396 × 10{sup −7}m{sub P} in these two models, respectively. Violation of the single-field consistency relation between the tensor and scalar spectra is another prediction of chain inflation models. This corresponds to having a smaller tensor/scalar ratio at large scales in comparison with the slow-roll counterparts. Similar to slow-roll inflation, it is argued that one can reconstruct the vacuum structure using the CMB experiments.

  19. Modified gravity: the CMB, weak lensing and general parameterisations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Shaun A.; Appleby, Stephen A.; Weller, Jochen E-mail: stephen.appleby@ph.tum.de

    2011-03-01

    We examine general physical parameterisations for viable gravitational models in the f(R) framework. This is related to the mass of an additional scalar field, called the scalaron, that is introduced by the theories. Using a simple parameterisation for the scalaron mass M(a) we show there is an exact correspondence between the model and popular parameterisations of the modified Poisson equation μ(a,k) and the ratio of the Newtonian potentials η(a,k). We argue that although f(R) models are well described by the general [μ(a,k),η(a,k)] parameterization, specific functional forms of μ,η in the literature do not accurately represent f(R) behaviour, specifically at low redshift. We subsequently construct an improved description for the scalaron mass (and therefore μ(a,k) and η(a,k)) which captures their essential features and has benefits derived from a more physical origin. We study the scalaron's observational signatures and show the modification to the background Friedmann equation and CMB power spectrum to be small. We also investigate its effects in the linear and non linear matter power spectrum-where the signatures are evident-thus giving particular importance to weak lensing as a probe of these models. Using this new form, we demonstrate how the next generation Euclid survey will constrain these theories and its complementarity to current solar system tests. In the most optimistic case Euclid, together with a Planck prior, can constrain a fiducial scalaron mass M{sub 0} = 9.4 × 10{sup −30}eV at the ∼ 20% level. However, the decay rate of the scalaron mass, with fiducial value ν = 1.5, can be constrained to ∼ 3% uncertainty.

  20. Microfabrication of Arrays of Superconducting Transition Edge Sensors for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, Chrystian; Ding, Junjia; Bender, Amy; Khaire, Trupti; Lendinez, Sergi; Ciocys, Samuel; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Padin, Steve; Carlstrom, John; Chang, Clarence; Novosad, Valentine; Spt3G Collaboration

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides a unique window for exploring fundamental physics. Increasing the sensitivity of CMB experiments requires fabricating focal planes with orders of magnitude more detectors than current instruments. This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory for the fabrication of large arrays of dual-polarized multichroic detectors for CMB measurements. The detectors are composed of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip transmission line. In-line filters define the spectral response, allowing for individual measurement of three band-passes (95 GHz, 150GHz and 220 GHz). A Ti /Au termination resistor is used to couple the mm-wave signal to Ti/Au transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. There are six bolometers per pixel, for a total of 16,140 detectors in the CMB receiver being fabricated. The monolithic microfabrication of the detector arrays will be presented and discussed in detail. The SPT3G collaboration is developing the thrid-generation camera for CMB measurements with the South Pole Telescope. Additional information can be found in the following link: https://pole.uchicago.edu/spt/.

  1. Constraining stochastic gravitational wave background from weak lensing of CMB B-modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Shabbir; Mukherjee, Suvodip; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2016-09-01

    A stochastic gravitational wave background (SGWB) will affect the CMB anisotropies via weak lensing. Unlike weak lensing due to large scale structure which only deflects photon trajectories, a SGWB has an additional effect of rotating the polarization vector along the trajectory. We study the relative importance of these two effects, deflection & rotation, specifically in the context of E-mode to B-mode power transfer caused by weak lensing due to SGWB. Using weak lensing distortion of the CMB as a probe, we derive constraints on the spectral energy density (ΩGW) of the SGWB, sourced at different redshifts, without assuming any particular model for its origin. We present these bounds on ΩGW for different power-law models characterizing the SGWB, indicating the threshold above which observable imprints of SGWB must be present in CMB.

  2. CMB anisotropies generated by a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-zero helicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballardini, Mario

    2015-10-01

    We consider the impact of a stochastic background of primordial magnetic fields with non-vanishing helicity on CMB anisotropies in temperature and polarization. We compute the exact expressions for the scalar, vector and tensor part of the energy-momentum tensor including the helical contribution, by assuming a power-law dependence for the spectra and a comoving cutoff which mimics the damping due to viscosity. We also compute the parity-odd correlator between the helical and non-helical contribution which generate the TB and EB cross-correlation in the CMB pattern. We finally show the impact of including the helical term on the power spectra of CMB anisotropies up to multipoles with ℓ ∼ O(10{sup 3})

  3. Pearson's random walk in the space of the CMB phases: Evidence for parity asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, M.; Frejsel, A. M.; Kim, J.; Naselsky, P.; Nesti, F.

    2011-05-15

    The temperature fluctuations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are supposed to be distributed randomly in both magnitude and phase, following to the simplest model of inflation. In this paper, we look at the odd and even multipoles of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB, and the different characteristics of these, giving rise to a parity asymmetry. We compare the even and odd multipoles in the CMB power spectrum, and also the even and odd mean angles. We find for the multipoles of the power spectrum that there is power excess in odd multipoles, compared to even ones, meaning that we have a parity asymmetry. Further, for the phases, we present a random walk for the mean angles, and find a significant separation for even/odd mean angles, especially so for galactic coordinates. This is further tested and confirmed with a directional parity test, comparing the parity asymmetry in galactic and ecliptic coordinates.

  4. Full-sky lensing reconstruction of gradient and curl modes from CMB maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi E-mail: yamauchi@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-01-01

    We present a method of lensing reconstruction on the full sky, by extending the optimal quadratic estimator proposed by Okamoto and Hu (2003) to the case including the curl mode of deflection angle. The curl mode is induced by the vector and tensor metric perturbations, and the reconstruction of the curl mode would be a powerful tool to not only check systematics in the estimated gradient mode but also probe any vector and tensor sources. We find that the gradient and curl modes can be reconstructed separately, thanks to the distinctive feature in the parity symmetry between the gradient and curl modes. We compare our estimator with the flat-sky estimator proposed by Cooray et al (2005). Based on the new formalism, the expected signal-to-noise ratio of the curl mode produced by the primordial gravitational-waves and a specific model of cosmic strings are estimated, and prospects for future observations are discussed.

  5. Compensation for large tensor modes with iso-curvature perturbations in CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yokoyama, Shuichiro E-mail: shu@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-05-01

    Recently, BICEP2 has reported the large tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.2{sup +0.07}{sub −0.05} from the observation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode at degree-scales. Since tensor modes induce not only CMB B-mode but also the temperature fluctuations on large scales, to realize the consistent temperature fluctuations with the Planck result we should consider suppression of scalar perturbations on corresponding large scales. To realize such a suppression, we consider anti-correlated iso-curvature perturbations which could be realized in the simple curvaton model.

  6. Searching for signatures of cosmic superstrings in the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Danos, Rebecca J.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2010-02-01

    Because cosmic superstrings generically form junctions and gauge theoretic strings typically do not, junctions may provide a signature to distinguish between cosmic superstrings and gauge theoretic cosmic strings. In cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps, cosmic strings lead to distinctive line discontinuities. String junctions lead to junctions in these line discontinuities. In turn, edge detection algorithms such as the Canny algorithm can be used to search for signatures of strings in anisotropy maps. We apply the Canny algorithm to simulated maps which contain the effects of cosmic strings with and without string junctions. The Canny algorithm produces edge maps. To distinguish between edge maps from string simulations with and without junctions, we examine the density distribution of edges and pixels crossed by edges. We find that in string simulations without Gaussian noise (such as produced by the dominant inflationary fluctuations) our analysis of the output data from the Canny algorithm can clearly distinguish between simulations with and without string junctions. In the presence of Gaussian noise at the level expected from the current bounds on the contribution of cosmic strings to the total power spectrum of density fluctuations, the distinction between models with and without junctions is more difficult. However, by carefully analyzing the data the models can still be differentiated.

  7. Detecting cosmic strings in the CMB with the Canny algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Amsel, Stephen; Brandenberger, Robert H; Berger, Joshua E-mail: jb454@cornell.edu

    2008-04-15

    Line discontinuities in cosmic microwave background anisotropy maps are a distinctive prediction of models with cosmic strings. These signatures are visible in anisotropy maps with good angular resolution and should be identifiable using edge-detection algorithms. One such algorithm is the Canny algorithm. We study the potential of this algorithm to pick out the line discontinuities generated by cosmic strings. By applying the algorithm to small-scale microwave anisotropy maps generated from theoretical models with and without cosmic strings, we find that, given an angular resolution of several minutes of arc, cosmic strings can be detected down to a limit of the mass per unit length of the string which is one order of magnitude lower than the current upper bounds.

  8. A MAP OF THE INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE SIGNAL FROM LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, Benjamin R.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-08-10

    We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2{sigma} confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance {lambda}CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.

  9. Local analyses of Planck maps with Minkowski functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Bernui, A.; Marques, G. A.; Ferreira, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Minkowski functionals (MF) are excellent tools to investigate the statistical properties of the cosmic background radiation (CMB) maps. Between their notorious advantages is the possibility to use them efficiently in patches of the CMB sphere, which allow studies in masked skies, inclusive analyses of small sky regions. Then, possible deviations from Gaussianity are investigated by comparison with MF obtained from a set of Gaussian isotropic simulated CMB maps to which are applied the same cut-sky masks. These analyses are sensitive enough to detect contaminations of small intensity like primary and secondary CMB anisotropies. Our methodology uses the MF, widely employed to study non-Gaussianities in CMB data, and asserts Gaussian deviations only when all of them points out an exceptional χ2 value, at more than 2.2σ confidence level, in a given sky patch. Following this rigorous procedure, we find 13 regions in the foreground-cleaned Planck maps that evince such high levels of non-Gaussian deviations. According to our results, these non-Gaussian contributions show signatures that can be associated to the presence of hot or cold spots in such regions. Moreover, some of these non-Gaussian deviations signals suggest the presence of foreground residuals in those regions located near the Galactic plane. Additionally, we confirm that most of the regions revealed in our analyses, but not all, have been recently reported in studies done by the Planck collaboration. Furthermore, we also investigate whether these non-Gaussian deviations can be possibly sourced by systematics, like inhomogeneous noise and beam effect in the released Planck data, or perhaps due to residual Galactic foregrounds.

  10. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Likelihood for Small-Scale CMB Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunkley, J.; Calabrese, E.; Sievers, J.; Addison, G. E.; Battaglia, N.; Battistelli, E. S.; Bond, J. R.; Das, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunner, R.; Fowler, J. W.; Gralla, M.; Hajian, A.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hincks, A. D.; Hlozek, R.; Hughes, J. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Kosowsky, A.; Louis, T.; Marriage, T. A.; Marsden, D.; Menanteau, F.; Niemack, M.

    2013-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope has measured the angular power spectra of microwave fluctuations to arcminute scales at frequencies of 148 and 218 GHz, from three seasons of data. At small scales the fluctuations in the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) become increasingly obscured by extragalactic foregounds and secondary CMB signals. We present results from a nine-parameter model describing these secondary effects, including the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ and kSZ) power; the clustered and Poisson-like power from Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) sources, and their frequency scaling; the tSZ-CIB correlation coefficient; the extragalactic radio source power; and thermal dust emission from Galactic cirrus in two different regions of the sky. In order to extract cosmological parameters, we describe a likelihood function for the ACT data, fitting this model to the multi-frequency spectra in the multipole range 500 < l < 10000. We extend the likelihood to include spectra from the South Pole Telescope at frequencies of 95, 150, and 220 GHz. Accounting for different radio source levels and Galactic cirrus emission, the same model provides an excellent fit to both datasets simultaneously, with ?2/dof= 675/697 for ACT, and 96/107 for SPT. We then use the multi-frequency likelihood to estimate the CMB power spectrum from ACT in bandpowers, marginalizing over the secondary parameters. This provides a simplified 'CMB-only' likelihood in the range 500 < l < 3500 for use in cosmological parameter estimation

  11. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: likelihood for small-scale CMB data

    SciTech Connect

    Dunkley, J.; Calabrese, E.; Sievers, J.; Addison, G.E.; Halpern, M.; Battaglia, N.; Battistelli, E.S.; Bond, J.R.; Hajian, A.; Hincks, A.D.; Das, S.; Devlin, M.J.; Dünner, R.; Fowler, J.W.; Irwin, K.D.; Gralla, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hlozek, R.; Hughes, J.P.; Kosowsky, A.; and others

    2013-07-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope has measured the angular power spectra of microwave fluctuations to arcminute scales at frequencies of 148 and 218 GHz, from three seasons of data. At small scales the fluctuations in the primordial Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) become increasingly obscured by extragalactic foregounds and secondary CMB signals. We present results from a nine-parameter model describing these secondary effects, including the thermal and kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ and kSZ) power; the clustered and Poisson-like power from Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) sources, and their frequency scaling; the tSZ-CIB correlation coefficient; the extragalactic radio source power; and thermal dust emission from Galactic cirrus in two different regions of the sky. In order to extract cosmological parameters, we describe a likelihood function for the ACT data, fitting this model to the multi-frequency spectra in the multipole range 500 < l < 10000. We extend the likelihood to include spectra from the South Pole Telescope at frequencies of 95, 150, and 220 GHz. Accounting for different radio source levels and Galactic cirrus emission, the same model provides an excellent fit to both datasets simultaneously, with χ{sup 2}/dof= 675/697 for ACT, and 96/107 for SPT. We then use the multi-frequency likelihood to estimate the CMB power spectrum from ACT in bandpowers, marginalizing over the secondary parameters. This provides a simplified 'CMB-only' likelihood in the range 500 < l < 3500 for use in cosmological parameter estimation.

  12. Slab interaction with the PPV transition causes complex seismic structure near the CMB.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, A.; Yuen, D. A.; Christiansen, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    The recently discovered lower mantle phase transition from perovskite to the denser postperovskite (PPV) polymorph is thought to be the cause of detailed seismic structure in the D" layer which is currently the target of intensified seismological investigations. Recently the PPV phase boundary has been relocated in P,T space (Hirose and Sinmyo, 2006). In particular the newly determined Clapeyron slope of 11.5 MPa/K is related to strong lateral topography of the phase boundary which in turn is reflected in lateral variations of the seismic wave velocities. The temperature intercept at the core mantle boundary (CMB) of the PPV Clapeyron curve is estimated at 3500 K from the new mineral physics data. This relative positioning of this temperature intercept with respect to the temperature at the CMB is very important . This may imply that the PPV phase only exists in low temperature regions near the CMB especially around the cold downwellings. The latter implication is related to the thickness of the thermal boundary layer at the bottom of the mantle which depends strongly on the local thermal conductivity. We have used 2-D numerical models to study the interaction of cold highly viscous slabs interacting with the exothermic PPV phase boundary to investigate the potential of the PPV transion as a source of small-scale seismic heterogeneities near the CMB. We apply an Extended Boussinesq (EBA) formulation and include both the spinel to perovskite transition near 660 km depth and the PPV boundary next to the CMB. The model includes both latent heat effects and lateral variations of phase boundaries associated with PPV, controlled by the local temperature. A 2-D cylindrical (90 degree) model domain is applied, using finite element models with the element grid-size down to 5 km near CMB, which is sufficient for delineating the phase transition to well below the seismic resolution. Model runs are started from a cold slab-like temperature distribution in the upper mantle

  13. Human mitochondrial HMG CoA synthase: Liver cDNA and partial genomic cloning, chromosome mapping to 1p12-p13, and possible role in vertebrate evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-10-01

    Mitochondrial 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA synthase (mHS) is the first enzyme of ketogenesis, whereas the cytoplasmic HS isozyme (cHS) mediates an early step in cholersterol synthesis. We here report the sequence of human and mouse liver mHS cDNAs, the sequence of an HS-like cDNA from Caenorhabditis elegans, the structure of a partial human mHS genomic clone, and the mapping of the human mHS gene to chromosome 1p12-p13. the nucleotide sequence of the human mHS cDNA encodes a mature mHS peptide of 471 residues, with a mean amino acid identity of 66.5% with cHS from mammals and chicken. Comparative analysis of all known mHS and cHS protein and DNA sequences shows a high degree of conservation near the N-terminus that decreases progressively toward the C-terminus and suggests that the two isozymes arose from a common ancestor gene 400-900 million years ago. Comparison of the gene structure of mHS and cHS is also consistant with a recent duplication event. We hypothesize that the physiologic result of the HS gene duplication was the appearance of HS within the mitochondria around the time of emergence of early vertebrates, which linked preexisting pathways of beta oxidation and leucine catabolism and created the HMG CoA pathway of ketogenesis, thus providing a lipid-derived energy source for the vertebrate brain. 56 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ali Observatory in Tibet: a unique northern site for future CMB ground-based observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Meng

    2015-08-01

    Ground-based CMB observations have been performed at the South Pole and the Atacama desert in Chile. However, a significant fraction of the sky can not be observed from just these two sites. For a full sky coverage from the ground in the future, a northern site for CMB observation, in particular CMB polarization, is required. Besides the long-thought site in Greenland, the high altitude Tibet plateau provides another opportunity. I will describe the Ali Observatory in Tibet, located at N32°19', E80°01', as a potential site for ground-based CMB observations. The new site is located on almost 5100m mountain, near Gar town, where is an excellent site for both infrared and submillimeter observations. Study with the long-term database of ground weather stations and archival satellite data has been performed. The site has enough relative height on the plateau and is accessible by car. The Shiquanhe town is 40 mins away by driving, and a recently opened airport with 40 mins driving, the site also has road excess, electricity, and optical fiber with fast internet. Preliminary measurement of the Precipitable Water Vapor is ~one quarter less than 0.5mm per year and the long term monitoring is under development. In addition, surrounding higher sites are also available and could be further developed if necessary. Ali provides unique northern sky coverage and together with the South Pole and the Atacama desert, future CMB observations will be able to cover the full sky from ground.

  15. CMB aberration and Doppler effects as a source of hemispherical asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel; Catena, Riccardo E-mail: mquartin@if.ufrj.br

    2014-03-01

    Our peculiar motion with respect to the CMB rest frame represents a preferred direction in the observed CMB sky since it induces an apparent deflection of the observed CMB photons (aberration) and a shift in their frequency (Doppler). Both effects distort the multipoles a{sub ℓm}'s at all ℓ's. Such effects are real as it has been recently measured for the first time by Planck according to what was forecast in some recent papers. However, the common lore when estimating a power spectrum from CMB is to consider that Doppler affects only the ℓ = 1 multipole, neglecting any other corrections. In this work we use simulations of the CMB sky in a boosted frame with a peculiar velocity β≡v/c = 1.23 × 10{sup −3} in order to assess the impact of such effect on power spectrum estimations in different regions of the sky. We show that the boost induces a north-south asymmetry in the power spectrum which is highly significant and non-negligible, of about (0.58±0.10)% for half-sky cuts when going up to ℓ ≈ 2500. We suggest that these effects are relevant and may account for some of the north-south asymmetries seen in the Planck data, being especially important at small scales. Finally we analyze the particular case of the ACT experiment, which observed only a small fraction of the sky and show that it suffers a bias of about 1% on the power spectrum and of similar size on some cosmological parameters: for example the position of the peaks shifts by 0.5% and the overall amplitude of the spectrum is about 0.4% lower than a full-sky case.

  16. Analysing the Effect on CMB in a Parity and Charge Parity Violating Varying Alpha Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    In this paper we study in detail the effect of our recently proposed model of parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating varying alpha on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photon passing through the intra galaxy-cluster medium (ICM). The ICM is well known to be composed of magnetized plasma. According to our model, the polarization and intensity of the CMB would be affected when traversing through the ICM due to non-trivial scalar photon interactions. We have calculated the evolution of such polarization and intensity collectively, known as the stokes parameters of the CMB photon during its journey through the ICM and tested our results against the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) measurement on Coma galaxy cluster. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter, {beta}, and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. Using the derived constrained on the photon-to-scalar conversion probability, {bar P}{sub {gamma}{yields}{phi}}, for Coma cluster in ref.[34] we found a contour plot in the ({omega},{beta}) parameter plane. The {beta} = 0 line in this parameter space corresponds to well-studied Maxwell-dilaton type models which has lower bound on {omega} {approx}> 6.4 x 10{sup 9} GeV. In general, as the absolute value of {beta} increases, lower bound on {omega} also increases. Our model in general predicts the modification of the CMB polarization with a non-trivial dependence on the parity violating coupling parameter {beta}. However, it is unconstrained in this particular study. We show that this effect can in principle be detected in the future measurements on CMB polarization such that {beta} can also be constrained.

  17. Technical note: An improved estimate of uncertainty for source contribution from effective variance Chemical Mass Balance (EV-CMB) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guo-Liang; Zhou, Xiao-Yu; Feng, Yin-Chang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Liu, Gui-Rong; Zheng, Mei; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Yuan-Hang

    2015-01-01

    The CMB (Chemical Mass Balance) 8.2 model released by the USEPA is a commonly used receptor model that can determine estimated source contributions and their uncertainties (called default uncertainty). In this study, we propose an improved CMB uncertainty for the modeled contributions (called EV-LS uncertainty) by adding the difference between the modeled and measured values for ambient species concentrations to the default CMB uncertainty, based on the effective variance least squares (EV-LS) solution. This correction reconciles the uncertainty estimates for EV and OLS regression. To verify the formula for the EV-LS CMB uncertainty, the same ambient datasets were analyzed using the equation we developed for EV-LS CMB uncertainty and a standard statistical package, SPSS 16.0. The same results were obtained by both ways indicate that the equation for EV-LS CMB uncertainty proposed here is acceptable. In addition, four ambient datasets were studies by CMB 8.2 and the source contributions as well as the associated uncertainties were obtained accordingly.

  18. Reconstructing the integrated Sachs-Wolfe map with galaxy surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muir, Jessica; Huterer, Dragan

    2016-08-01

    The integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a large-angle modulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), generated when CMB photons traverse evolving potential wells associated with large scale structure (LSS). Recent efforts have been made to reconstruct maps of the ISW signal using information from surveys of galaxies and other LSS tracers, but investigation into how survey systematics affect their reliability has so far been limited. Using simulated ISW and LSS maps, we study the impact of galaxy survey properties and systematic errors on the accuracy of a reconstructed ISW signal. We find that systematics that affect the observed distribution of galaxies along the line of sight, such as photo-z and bias-evolution related errors, have a relatively minor impact on reconstruction quality. In contrast, however, we find that direction-dependent calibration errors can be very harmful. Specifically, we find that, in order to avoid significant degradation of our reconstruction quality statistics, direction-dependent number density fluctuations due to systematics must be controlled so that their variance is smaller than 10-6 (which corresponds to a 0.1% calibration). Additionally, we explore the implications of our results for attempts to use reconstructed ISW maps to shed light on the origin of large-angle CMB alignments. We find that there is only a weak correlation between the true and reconstructed angular momentum dispersion, which quantifies alignment, even for reconstructed ISW maps which are fairly accurate overall.

  19. Thermodynamics of SU(2) quantum Yang-Mills theory and CMB anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    A brief review of effective SU(2) Yang-Mills thermodynamics in the deconfining phase is given, including the construction of the thermal ground-state estimate in terms of an inert, adjoint scalar field φ, based on non-propagating (anti)selfdual field configurations of topological charge unity. We also discuss kinematic constraints on interacting propagating gauge fields implied by the according spatial coarse-graining, and we explain why the screening physics of an SU(2) photon is subject to an electric-magnetically dual interpretation. This argument relies on the fact that only (anti)calorons of scale parameter ρ ˜ |φ|-1 contribute to the coarse-graining required for thermal-ground-state emergence at temperature T. Thus, use of the effective gauge coupling e in the (anti)caloron action is justified, yielding the value ħ for the latter at almost all temperatures. As a consequence, the indeterministic transition of initial to final plane waves caused by an effective, pointlike vertex is fundamentally mediated in Euclidean time by a single (anti)caloron being part of the thermal ground state. Next, we elucidate how a low-frequency excess of line temperature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) determines the value of the critical temperature of the deconfining-preconfining phase transition of an SU(2) Yang-Mills theory postulated to describe photon propagation, and we describe how, starting at a redshift of about unity, SU(2) photons collectively work 3D temperature depressions into the CMB. Upon projection along a line of sight, a given depression influences the present CMB sky in a cosmologically local way, possibly explaining the large-angle anomalies confirmed recently by the Planck collaboration. Finally, six relativistic polarisations residing in the SU(2) vector modes roughly match the number of degrees of freedom in cosmic neutrinos (Planck) which would disqualify the latter as radiation. Indeed, if interpreted as single center-vortex loops in

  20. SPIDER: a balloon-borne large-scale CMB polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, B. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Battistelli, E. S.; Benton, S.; Bihary, R.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Brevik, J.; Bryan, S.; Contaldi, C. R.; Doré, O.; Farhang, M.; Fissel, L.; Golwala, S. R.; Halpern, M.; Hilton, G.; Holmes, W.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K.; Jones, W. C.; Kuo, C. L.; Lange, A. E.; Lawrie, C.; MacTavish, C. J.; Martin, T. G.; Mason, P.; Montroy, T. E.; Netterfield, C. B.; Pascale, E.; Riley, D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Turner, A.; Viero, M.; Wiebe, D.

    2008-07-01

    Spider is a balloon-borne experiment that will measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background over a large fraction of a sky at ~ 1° resolution. Six monochromatic refracting millimeter-wave telescopes with large arrays of antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting bolometers will provide system sensitivities of 4.2 and 3.1 μKcmb√s at 100 and 150 GHz, respectively. A rotating half-wave plate will modulate the polarization sensitivity of each telescope, controlling systematics. Bolometer arrays operating at 225 GHz and 275 GHz will allow removal of polarized galactic foregrounds. In a 2-6 day first flight from Alice Springs, Australia in 2010, Spider will map 50% of the sky to a depth necessary to improve our knowledge of the reionization optical depth by a large factor.

  1. Photon-axion conversion as a mechanism for supernova dimming: Limits from CMB spectral distortion

    SciTech Connect

    Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg G.; Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2005-07-15

    Axion-photon conversion induced by intergalactic magnetic fields has been proposed as an explanation for the dimming of distant supernovae of type Ia (SNe Ia) without cosmic acceleration. The effect depends on the intergalactic electron density n{sub e} as well as the B-field strength and domain size. We show that for n{sub e} < or approx. 10{sup -9} cm{sup -3} the same mechanism would cause excessive spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This small-n{sub e} parameter region had been left open by the most restrictive previous constraints based on the dispersion of quasar (QSO) spectra. The combination of CMB and QSO limits suggests that the photon-axion conversion mechanism can only play a subleading role for SN Ia dimming. A combined analysis of all the observables affected by the photon-axion oscillations would be required to give a final verdict on the viability of this model.

  2. A note on the birefringence angle estimation in CMB data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruppuso, A.; Maggio, G.; Molinari, D.; Natoli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Parity violating physics beyond the standard model of particle physics induces a rotation of the linear polarization of photons. This effect, also known as cosmological birefringence (CB), can be tested with the observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies which are linearly polarized at the level of 5-10%. In particular CB produces non-null CMB cross correlations between temperature and B mode-polarization, and between E- and B-mode polarization. Here we study the properties of the so called D-estimators, often used to constrain such an effect. After deriving the framework of both frequentist and Bayesian analysis, we discuss the interplay between birefringence and weak-lensing, which, albeit parity conserving, modifies pre-existing TB and EB cross correlation.

  3. Limits on decaying dark energy density models from the CMB temperature-redshift relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Tortora, Crescenzo

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the thermodynamic and dynamical properties of a variable dark energy model with density scaling as ρx propto (1 + z)m, z being the redshift. These models lead to the creation/disruption of matter and radiation, which affect the cosmic evolution of both matter and radiation components in the Universe. In particular, we have studied the temperature-redshift relation of radiation, which has been constrained using a recent collection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature measurements up to z ~ 3. We find that, within the uncertainties, the model is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant which does not exchange any particles with other components. Future observations, in particular measurements of CMB temperature at large redshift, will allow to give firmer bounds on the effective equation of state parameter weff for such types of dark energy models.

  4. The Samuel K. Allison Lecture: B^2FH, The CMB & Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burbidge, Geoffrey

    2007-04-01

    Some historical aspects of the development of the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis will be discussed. I shall then go on to describe the problems originally encountered by Gamow and his associates in trying to decide where the helium was made. This leads me to a modern discussion of the origin of ^2D, ^3He, ^4He and ^7Li, originally described by B^2FH as due to the x-process. While it is generally argued, following Gamow et al, that these isotopes were synthesized in a big bang I shall show that it is equally likely that they isotopes were made in active galactic nuclei, as was the CMB, in a cyclic universe model. The key piece of observational evidence is that the amount of energy released in the conversion of hydrogen to helium in the universe is very close to the energy carried by the CMB, namely about 4.5 x 10-13 erg cm-3.

  5. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-01

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z˜1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to ˜4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise (˜1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  6. Measuring distance ratios with CMB-galaxy lensing cross-correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.

    2009-02-15

    We propose a method for cosmographic measurements by combining gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with cosmic shear surveys. We cross-correlate the galaxy counts in the lens plane with two different source planes: the CMB at z{approx}1100 and galaxies at an intermediate redshift. The ratio of the galaxy count/CMB lensing cross-correlation to the galaxy count/galaxy lensing cross-correlation is shown to be a purely geometric quantity, depending only on the distribution function of the source galaxies. By combining Planck, the Advanced Dark Energy Physics Telescope, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, the ratio can be measured to {approx}4% accuracy, whereas a future polarization-based experiment like CMBPOL can make a more precise ({approx}1%) measurement. For cosmological models where the curvature and the equation of state parameter are allowed to vary, the direction of degeneracy defined by the measurement of this ratio is different from that traced out by baryon acoustic oscillation measurements. Combining this method with the stacked cluster mass reconstruction cosmography technique as proposed by Hu, Holz, and Vale (2007), the uncertainty in the ratio can be further reduced, improving the constraints on cosmological parameters. We also study the implications of the lensing-ratio measurement for early dark energy models, in the context of the parametrization proposed by Doran and Robbers (2006). For models which are degenerate with respect to the CMB, we find both baryon acoustic oscillation and lensing-ratio measurements to be insensitive to the early component of the dark energy density.

  7. Intrinsic alignment contamination to CMB lensing-galaxy weak lensing correlations from tidal torquing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Patricia; Challinor, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    Correlations of galaxy ellipticities with large-scale structure, due to galactic tidal interactions, provide a potentially significant contaminant to measurements of cosmic shear. However, these intrinsic alignments are still poorly understood for galaxies at the redshifts typically used in cosmic shear analyses. For spiral galaxies, it is thought that tidal torquing is significant in determining alignments resulting in zero correlation between the intrinsic ellipticity and the gravitational potential in linear theory. Here, we calculate the leading-order correction to this result in the tidal-torque model from non-linear evolution, using second-order perturbation theory, and relate this to the contamination from intrinsic alignments to the recently measured cross-correlation between galaxy ellipticities and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing potential. On the scales relevant for CMB lensing observations, the squeezed limit of the gravitational bispectrum dominates the correlation. Physically, the large-scale mode that sources CMB lensing modulates the small-scale power and hence the intrinsic ellipticity, due to non-linear evolution. We find that the angular cross-correlation from tidal torquing has a very similar scale dependence as in the linear alignment model, believed to be appropriate for elliptical galaxies. The amplitude of the cross-correlation is predicted to depend strongly on the formation redshift, being smaller for galaxies that formed at higher redshift when the bispectrum of the gravitational potential was smaller. Finally, we make simple forecasts for constraints on intrinsic alignments from the correlation of forthcoming cosmic shear measurements with current CMB lensing measurements. We note that cosmic variance can be significantly reduced in measurements of the difference in the intrinsic alignments for elliptical and spiral galaxies if these types can be separated (e.g. using colour).

  8. What we know and what we don't know about the CMB spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, John C.; COBE Team; PIXIE Team

    2014-01-01

    To a precision of 50 ppm, the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation has a blackbody spectrum with a temperature of 2.725 K, at wavelengths from 0.5 to 5 mm. This measurement by the COBE satellite team confirmed the concept of an expanding universe that was extremely hot and dense when it was young. In this picture, the CMB spectrum could be slightly distorted from the blackbody form by energy release or conversion after the universe was a few months old. At that time, the interaction of photons and electrons became weak enough that photons could no longer be easily created or destroyed, so that energy added or subtracted from the CMB would result in a spectrum with a chemical potential (mu distortion). Later, Compton scattering became incapable of equilibrating the spectrum to the chemical potential form, leading to a possibility of a mixture of blackbodies at different temperatures (y distortion). So far, there are only upper limits on the y and mu distortions, setting limits on possible sources of energy release such as the dissipation of acoustic modes at small scales, the decay of WIMPs, the action of primordial black holes, etc. On the other hand, the CMB spectrum is not expected to follow a blackbody to arbitrary precision. Energy releases associated with various astrophysical processes (recombination, reionization, and structure formation) will inevitably distort the CMB spectrum to create y or mu distortions at potentially observable amplitudes. Improved instrumentation capable of detecting such distortions could open a new window into the early universe, providing new constraints on processes ranging from inflation and the nature of the first stellar objects to exotic phenomena including primordial black holes, cosmic strings, and the decay or annihilation of dark matter.

  9. Creation of the CMB spectrum: precise analytic solutions for the blackbody photosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A. E-mail: sunyaev@mpa-Garching.mpg.de

    2012-06-01

    The blackbody spectrum of CMB was created in the blackbody photosphere at redshifts z∼>2 × 10{sup 6}. At these early times, the Universe was dense and hot enough that complete thermal equilibrium between baryonic matter (electrons and ions) and photons could be established on time scales much shorter than the age of the Universe. Any perturbation away from the blackbody spectrum was suppressed exponentially. New physics, for example annihilation and decay of dark matter, can add energy and photons to CMB at redshifts z∼>10{sup 5} and result in a Bose-Einstein spectrum with a non-zero chemical potential (μ). Precise evolution of the CMB spectrum around the critical redshift of z ≅ 2 × 10{sup 6} is required in order to calculate the μ-type spectral distortion and constrain the underlying new physics. Although numerical calculation of important processes involved (double Compton process, comptonization and bremsstrahlung) is not difficult with present day computers, analytic solutions are much faster and easier to calculate and provide valuable physical insights. We provide precise (better than 1%) analytic solutions for the decay of μ, created at an earlier epoch, including all three processes, double Compton, Compton scattering on thermal electrons and bremsstrahlung in the limit of small distortions. This is a significant improvement over the existing solutions with accuracy ∼ 10% or worse. We also give a census of important sources of energy injection into CMB in standard cosmology. In particular, calculations of distortions from electron-positron annihilation and primordial nucleosynthesis illustrate in a dramatic way the strength of the equilibrium restoring processes in the early Universe. Finally, we point out the triple degeneracy in standard cosmology, i.e., the μ and y distortions from adiabatic cooling of baryons and electrons, Silk damping and annihilation of thermally produced WIMP dark matter are of similar order of magnitude ( ∼ 10{sup

  10. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  11. CMB anisotropy due to filamentary gas: power spectrum and cosmological parameter bias

    SciTech Connect

    Shimon, Meir; Sadeh, Sharon; Rephaeli, Yoel E-mail: shrs@post.tau.ac.il

    2012-10-01

    Hot gas in filamentary structures induces CMB aniostropy through the SZ effect. Guided by results from N-body simulations, we model the morphology and gas properties of filamentary gas and determine the power spectrum of the anisotropy. Our treatment suggests that power levels can be an appreciable fraction of the cluster contribution at multipoles l∼<1500. Its spatially irregular morphology and larger characteristic angular scales can help to distinguish this SZ signature from that of clusters. In addition to intrinsic interest in this most extended SZ signal as a probe of filaments, its impact on cosmological parameter estimation should also be assessed. We find that filament 'noise' can potentially bias determination of A{sub s}, n{sub s}, and w (the normalization of the primordial power spectrum, the scalar index, and the dark energy equation of state parameter, respectively) by more than the nominal statistical uncertainty in Planck SZ survey data. More generally, when inferred from future optimal cosmic-variance-limited CMB experiments, we find that virtually all parameters will be biased by more than the nominal statistical uncertainty estimated for these next generation CMB experiments.

  12. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  13. Superconducting NbN Coplanar Switch Driven by DC Current for CMB Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordier, G.; Cammilleri, V. D.; Bélier, B.; Bleurvacq, N.; Ghribi, A.; Piat, M.; Tartari, A.; Zannoni, M.

    2014-09-01

    The next generations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) instruments will be dedicated to the detection and characterisation of CMB B-modes. To measure this tiny signal, instruments need to control and minimise systematics. Signal modulation is one way to achieve such a control. New generation of focal planes will include the entire detection chain on chip. In this context, we present a superconducting coplanar switch driven by DC current. It consists of a superconducting micro-bridge which commutes between its on (superconducting) and off (normal metal) states, depending on the amplitude of the current injection. To be effective, we have to use a high normal state resistivity superconducting material with a gap frequency higher than the frequencies of operation (millimeter waves). Several measurements were made at low temperature on NbN and yielded very high resistivities. Preliminary results of components dc behavior is shown. Thanks to its low power consumption, fast modulation and low weight, this component is a perfect candidate for future CMB space missions.

  14. Contamination of early-type galaxy alignments to galaxy lensing-CMB lensing cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Dunkley, Joanna; Miller, Lance; Allison, Rupert

    2015-10-01

    Galaxy shapes are subject to distortions due to the tidal field of the Universe. The cross-correlation of galaxy lensing with the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) cannot easily be separated from the cross-correlation of galaxy intrinsic shapes with CMB lensing. Previous work suggested that the intrinsic alignment contamination can be 15 per cent of this cross-spectrum for the CFHT Stripe 82 (CS82) and Atacama Cosmology Telescope surveys. Here we re-examine these estimates using up-to-date observational constraints of intrinsic alignments at a redshift more similar to that of CS82 galaxies. We find an ≈10 per cent contamination of the cross-spectrum from red galaxies, with ≈3 per cent uncertainty due to uncertainties in the redshift distribution of source galaxies and the modelling of the spectral energy distribution. Blue galaxies are consistent with being unaligned, but could contaminate the cross-spectrum by an additional 9.5 per cent within current 95 per cent confidence levels. While our fiducial estimate of alignment contamination is similar to previous work, our work suggests that the relevance of alignments for CMB lensing-galaxy lensing cross-correlation remains largely unconstrained. Little information is currently available about alignments at z > 1.2. We consider the upper limiting case where all z > 1.2 galaxies are aligned with the same strength as low-redshift luminous red galaxies, finding as much as ≈60 per cent contamination.

  15. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  16. INTRODUCING MEXICAN NEEDLETS FOR CMB ANALYSIS: ISSUES FOR PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS AND COMPARISON WITH STANDARD NEEDLETS

    SciTech Connect

    Scodeller, S.; Rudjord, Oe.; Hansen, F. K.; Marinucci, D.; Geller, D.; Mayeli, A.

    2011-06-01

    Over the last few years, needlets have emerged as a useful tool for the analysis of cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. Our aim in this paper is first to introduce into the CMB literature a different form of needlets, known as Mexican needlets, first discussed in the mathematical literature by Geller and Mayeli. We then proceed with an extensive study of the properties of both standard and Mexican needlets; these properties depend on some parameters which can be tuned in order to optimize the performance for a given application. Our second aim in this paper is then to give practical advice on how to adjust these parameters for WMAP and Planck data in order to achieve the best properties for a given problem in CMB data analysis. In particular, we investigate localization properties in real and harmonic space and propose a recipe for quantifying the influence of galactic and point-source masks on the needlet coefficients. We also show that for certain parameter values, the Mexican needlets provide a close approximation to the Spherical Mexican Hat Wavelets (whence their name), with some advantages concerning their numerical implementation and derivation of their statistical properties.

  17. A constraint on Planck-scale modifications to electrodynamics with CMB polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, Giulia; Pagano, Luca; Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Cooray, Asantha E-mail: luca.pagano@roma1.infn.it E-mail: alessandro.melchiorri@roma1.infn.it

    2009-08-01

    We show that the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization data gathered by the BOOMERanG 2003 flight and WMAP provide an opportunity to investigate in-vacuo birefringence, of a type expected in some quantum pictures of space-time, with a sensitivity that extends even beyond the desired Planck-scale energy. In order to render this constraint more transparent we rely on a well studied phenomenological model of quantum-gravity-induced birefringence, in which one easily establishes that effects introduced at the Planck scale would amount to values of a dimensionless parameter, denoted by ξ, with respect to the Planck energy which are roughly of order 1. By combining BOOMERanG and WMAP data we estimate ξ ≅ −0.110±0.075 at the 68% c.l. Moreover, we forecast on the sensitivity to ξ achievable by future CMB polarization experiments (PLANCK, Spider, EPIC), which, in the absence of systematics, will be at the 1-σ confidence of 8.5 × 10{sup −4} (PLANCK), 6.1 × 10{sup −3} (Spider), and 1.0 × 10{sup −5} (EPIC) respectively. The cosmic variance-limited sensitivity from CMB is 6.1 × 10{sup −6}.

  18. Improving CMB non-Gaussianity estimators using tracers of local structure

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, James M. G.; King, Lindsay; Lewis, Antony

    2011-01-15

    Local non-Gaussianity causes correlations between large-scale perturbation modes and the small-scale power. The large-scale CMB signal has contributions from the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, which does not correlate with the small-scale power. If this ISW contribution can be removed, the sensitivity to local non-Gaussianity is improved. Gravitational lensing and galaxy counts can be used to trace the ISW contribution; in particular, we show that the CMB lensing potential is highly correlated with the ISW signal. We construct a nearly optimal estimator for the local non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} and investigate to what extent we can use this to decrease the variance on f{sub NL}. We show that the variance can be decreased by up to 20% at Planck sensitivity using galaxy counts. CMB lensing is a good bias-independent ISW tracer for future more sensitive observations, though the fractional decrease in variance is small if good polarization data are also available.

  19. Construction of cosmic string induced temperature anisotropy maps with CMBFAST and statistical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simatos, N.; Perivolaropoulos, L.

    2001-01-01

    We use the publicly available code CMBFAST, as modified by Pogosian and Vachaspati, to simulate the effects of wiggly cosmic strings on the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the modified CMBFAST code, which takes into account vector modes and models wiggly cosmic strings by the one-scale model, we go beyond the angular power spectrum to construct CMB temperature maps with a resolution of a few degrees. The statistics of these maps are then studied using conventional and recently proposed statistical tests optimized for the detection of hidden temperature discontinuities induced by the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show, however, that these realistic maps cannot be distinguished in a statistically significant way from purely Gaussian maps with an identical power spectrum.

  20. Neutrino constraints: what large-scale structure and CMB data are telling us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzi, Matteo; Sartoris, Barbara; Viel, Matteo; Borgani, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the reliability of neutrino mass constraints, either active or sterile, from the combination of different low redshift Universe probes with measurements of CMB anisotropies. In our analyses we consider WMAP 9-year or Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data in combination with Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements from BOSS DR11, galaxy shear measurements from CFHTLenS, SDSS Ly α forest constraints and galaxy cluster mass function from Chandra observations. At odds with recent similar studies, to avoid model dependence of the constraints we perform a full likelihood analysis for all the datasets employed. As for the cluster data analysis we rely on to the most recent calibration of massive neutrino effects in the halo mass function and we explore the impact of the uncertainty in the mass bias and re-calibration of the halo mass function due to baryonic feedback processes on cosmological parameters. We find that none of the low redshift probes alone provide evidence for massive neutrino in combination with CMB measurements, while a larger than 2σ detection of non zero neutrino mass, either active or sterile, is achieved combining cluster or shear data with CMB and BAO measurements. Yet, the significance of the detection exceeds 3σ if we combine all four datasets. For a three active neutrino scenario, from the joint analysis of CMB, BAO, shear and cluster data including the uncertainty in the mass bias we obtain ∑ mν =0.29+0.18-0.21 eV and ∑ mν =0.22+0.17-0.18 eV 95%CL) using WMAP9 or Planck as CMB dataset, respectively. The preference for massive neutrino is even larger in the sterile neutrino scenario, for which we get mseff=0.44+0.28-0.26 eV and Δ Neff=0.78+0.60-0.59 95%CL) from the joint analysis of Planck, BAO, shear and cluster datasets. For this data combination the vanilla ΛCDM model is rejected at more than 3σ and a sterile neutrino mass as motivated by accelerator anomaly is within the 2σ errors. Conversely, the Ly

  1. Neutrino constraints: what large-scale structure and CMB data are telling us?

    SciTech Connect

    Costanzi, Matteo; Sartoris, Barbara; Borgani, Stefano; Viel, Matteo E-mail: sartoris@oats.inaf.it E-mail: borgani@oats.inaf.it

    2014-10-01

    We discuss the reliability of neutrino mass constraints, either active or sterile, from the combination of different low redshift Universe probes with measurements of CMB anisotropies. In our analyses we consider WMAP 9-year or Planck Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data in combination with Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) measurements from BOSS DR11, galaxy shear measurements from CFHTLenS, SDSS Ly α forest constraints and galaxy cluster mass function from Chandra observations. At odds with recent similar studies, to avoid model dependence of the constraints we perform a full likelihood analysis for all the datasets employed. As for the cluster data analysis we rely on to the most recent calibration of massive neutrino effects in the halo mass function and we explore the impact of the uncertainty in the mass bias and re-calibration of the halo mass function due to baryonic feedback processes on cosmological parameters. We find that none of the low redshift probes alone provide evidence for massive neutrino in combination with CMB measurements, while a larger than 2σ detection of non zero neutrino mass, either active or sterile, is achieved combining cluster or shear data with CMB and BAO measurements. Yet, the significance of the detection exceeds 3σ if we combine all four datasets. For a three active neutrino scenario, from the joint analysis of CMB, BAO, shear and cluster data including the uncertainty in the mass bias we obtain ∑ m{sub ν} =0.29{sup +0.18}{sub -0.21} eV and ∑ m{sub ν} =0.22{sup +0.17}{sub -0.18} eV 95%CL) using WMAP9 or Planck as CMB dataset, respectively. The preference for massive neutrino is even larger in the sterile neutrino scenario, for which we get m{sub s}{sup eff}=0.44{sup +0.28}{sub -0.26} eV and Δ N{sub eff}=0.78{sup +0.60}{sub -0.59} 95%CL) from the joint analysis of Planck, BAO, shear and cluster datasets. For this data combination the vanilla ΛCDM model is rejected at more than 3σ and a sterile neutrino mass

  2. Coherent diffractive imaging and partial coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Garth J.; Quiney, Harry M.; Peele, Andrew G.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2007-03-01

    We formulate coherent diffractive imaging in the framework of partially spatially coherent diffraction. We find that the reconstruction can be critically dependent on the degree of coherence in the illuminating field and that even a small departure from full coherence may invalidate the conventional assumption that a mapping exists between an exit surface wave of finite support and a far field diffraction pattern. We demonstrate that the introduction of sufficient phase curvature in the illumination can overcome the adverse effects of partial coherence.

  3. Class of positive partial transposition states

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2006-08-15

    We construct a class of quantum bipartite d(multiply-in-circle sign)d states which are positive under partial transposition (PPT states). This class is invariant under the maximal commutative subgroup of U(d) and contains as special cases many well-known examples of PPT states. States from our class provide criteria for testing the indecomposability of positive maps. Such maps are crucial for constructing entanglement witnesses.

  4. Circulant states with positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-09-15

    We construct a large class of quantum dxd states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure - that is why we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. This class contains many well-known examples of PPT states from the literature and gives rise to a huge family of completely new states.

  5. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  6. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  7. Precision epoch of reionization studies with next-generation CMB experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Calabrese, Erminia; Louis, Thibaut; Hložek, Renée; Hil, J. Colin; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Hajian, Amir; De Bernardis, Francesco; Henderson, Shawn; Niemack, Michael D.; Devlin, Mark J.; Kosowsky, Arthur; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Partridge, Bruce; Sehgal, Neelima E-mail: rhlozek@astro.princeton.edu; and others

    2014-08-01

    Future arcminute resolution polarization data from ground-based Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) observations can be used to estimate the contribution to the temperature power spectrum from the primary anisotropies and to uncover the signature of reionization near ℓ=1500 in the small angular-scale temperature measurements. Our projections are based on combining expected small-scale E-mode polarization measurements from Advanced ACTPol in the range 300<ℓ<3000 with simulated temperature data from the full Planck mission in the low and intermediate ℓ region, 2<ℓ<2000. We show that the six basic cosmological parameters determined from this combination of data will predict the underlying primordial temperature spectrum at high multipoles to better than 1% accuracy. Assuming an efficient cleaning from multi-frequency channels of most foregrounds in the temperature data, we investigate the sensitivity to the only residual secondary component, the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) term. The CMB polarization is used to break degeneracies between primordial and secondary terms present in temperature and, in effect, to remove from the temperature data all but the residual kSZ term. We estimate a 15σ detection of the diffuse homogeneous kSZ signal from expected AdvACT temperature data at ℓ>1500, leading to a measurement of the amplitude of matter density fluctuations, σ{sub 8}, at 1% precision. Alternatively, by exploring the reionization signal encoded in the patchy kSZ measurements, we bound the time and duration of the reionization with σ(z{sub re})=1.1 and σ(Δz{sub re})=0.2. We find that these constraints degrade rapidly with large beam sizes, which highlights the importance of arcminute-scale resolution for future CMB surveys.

  8. Characterization of Detectors and Instrument Systematics for the SPIDER CMB Polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Rebecca Suzanne

    We know from the CMB and observations of large-scale structure that the universe is extremely flat, homogenous, and isotropic. The current favored mechanism for generating these characteristics is inflation, a theorized period of exponential expansion of the universe that occurred shortly after the Big Bang. Most theories of inflation generically predict a background of stochastic gravitational waves. These gravitational waves should leave their unique imprint on the polarization of the CMB via Thompson scattering. Scalar perturbations of the metric will cause a pattern of polarization with no curl (E-mode). Tensor perturbations (gravitational waves) will cause a unique pattern of polarization on the CMB that includes a curl component (B-mode). A measurement of the ratio of the tensor to scalar perturbations (r ) tells us the energy scale of inflation. Recent measurements by the BICEP2 team detect the B-mode spectrum with a tensor-to-scalar ratio of r=0.2 (+0.05, -0.07). An independent confirmation of this result is the next step towards understanding the inflationary universe. This thesis describes my work on a balloon-borne polarimeter called SPIDER, which is designed to illuminate the physics of the early universe through measurements of the cosmic microwave background polarization. SPIDER consists of six single-frequency, on-axis refracting telescopes contained in a shared-vacuum liquid-helium cryostat. Its large format arrays of millimeter-wave detectors and tight control of systematics will give it unprecedented sensitivity. This thesis describes how the SPIDER detectors are characterized and calibrated for flight, as well as how the systematics requirements for the SPIDER system are simulated and measured.

  9. A large scale coherent magnetic field: interactions with free streaming particles and limits from the CMB

    SciTech Connect

    Adamek, Julian; Durrer, Ruth; Fenu, Elisa; Vonlanthen, Marc E-mail: ruth.durrer@unige.ch E-mail: marc.vonlanthen@unige.ch

    2011-06-01

    We study a homogeneous and nearly-isotropic Universe permeated by a homogeneous magnetic field. Together with an isotropic fluid, the homogeneous magnetic field, which is the primary source of anisotropy, leads to a plane-symmetric Bianchi I model of the Universe. However, when free-streaming relativistic particles are present, they generate an anisotropic pressure which counteracts the one from the magnetic field such that the Universe becomes isotropized. We show that due to this effect, the CMB temperature anisotropy from a homogeneous magnetic field is significantly suppressed if the neutrino masses are smaller than 0.3 eV.

  10. GroundBIRD Experiment: Detecting CMB Polarization Power in a Large Angular Scale from the Ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, S.; Choi, J.; Hazumi, M.; Kawai, M.; Tajima, O.; Won, E.; Yoshida, M.

    2014-09-01

    GroundBIRD is a ground-based experiment designed to detect large angular scale odd-parity patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization (-modes). We employ a high-speed rotation scan (20 rpm) instead of the usual left-right azimuthal scan; it allows a significant expansion of the scan range to without any effect from the detector noise. We use microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs) arrays with a small telescope; our target multipole () range is . We plan to start the test observation in Japan in 2014; these will then be moved to the Atacama highland in Chile for scientific observations.

  11. Excess B-modes extracted from the Planck polarization maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.

    2016-07-01

    One of the main obstacles for extracting the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from mm/submm observations is the pollution from the main Galactic components: synchrotron, free-free and thermal dust emission. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract CMB has been demonstrated on both temperature and polarization data obtained by the WMAP satellite. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of neural networks for extracting the CMB signal from the Planck polarization data with high precision. Both auto-correlation and cross-correlation power spectra within a mask covering about 63 % of the sky have been used together with a ``high pass filter'' in order to minimize the influence of the remaining systematic errors in the Planck Q and U maps. Using the Planck 2015 released polarization maps, a BB power spectrum have been extracted by Multilayer Perceptron neural networks. This spectrum contains a bright feature with signal to noise ratios ≃ 4.5 within 200 ≤ l ≤ 250. The spectrum is significantly brighter than the BICEP2 2015 spectrum, with a spectral behaviour quite different from the ``canonical'' models (weak lensing plus B-modes spectra with different tensor to scalar ratios). The feasibility of the neural network to remove the residual systematics from the available Planck polarization data to a high level has been demonstrated.

  12. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yamazaki, Dai G.; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2010-01-01

    Mmore » agnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF) would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude B λ and the power spectral index n B which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.« less

  13. Cosmological constraint on the light gravitino mass from CMB lensing and cosmic shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osato, Ken; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Shirasaki, Masato; Kamada, Ayuki; Yoshida, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Light gravitinos of mass lesssim O (10) eV are of particular interest in cosmology, offering various baryogenesis scenarios without suffering from the cosmological gravitino problem. The gravitino may contribute considerably to the total matter content of the Universe and affect structure formation from early to present epochs. After the gravitinos decouple from other particles in the early Universe, they free-stream and consequently suppress density fluctuations of (sub-)galactic length scales. Observations of structure at the relevant length-scales can be used to infer or constrain the mass and the abundance of light gravitinos. We derive constraints on the light gravitino mass using the data of cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing from Planck and of cosmic shear from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey survey, combined with analyses of the primary CMB anisotropies and the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations in galaxy distributions. The obtained constraint on the gravitino mass is m3/2 < 4.7 eV (95 % C.L.), which is substantially tighter than the previous constraint from clustering analysis of Ly-α forests.

  14. Including birefringence into time evolution of CMB: current and future constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Gubitosi, G.; Pagano, L.; Martinelli, M. E-mail: martinelli@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2014-12-01

    We introduce birefringence effects within the propagation history of CMB, considering the two cases of a constant effect and of an effect that increases linearly in time, as the rotation of polarization induced by birefringence accumulates during photon propagation. Both cases result into a mixing of E and B modes before lensing effects take place, thus leading to the fact that lensing is acting on spectra that are already mixed because of birefringence. Moreover, if the polarization rotation angle increases during propagation, birefringence affects more the large scales that the small scales. We put constraints on the two cases using data from WMAP 9yr and BICEP 2013 and compare these results with the constraints obtained when the usual procedure of rotating the final power spectra is adopted, finding that this dataset combination is unable to distinguish between effects, but it nevertheless hints for a non vanishing value of the polarization rotation angle. We also forecast the sensitivity that will be obtained using data from Planck and PolarBear, highlighting how this combination is capable to rule out a vanishing birefringence angle, but still unable to distinguish the different scenarios. Nevertheless, we find that the combination of Planck and PolarBear is sensitive enough to highlight the existence of degeneracies between birefringence rotation and gravitational lensing of CMB photons, possibly leading to false detection of non standard lensing effects if birefringence is neglected.

  15. WMAP 7 year constraints on CPT violation from large angle CMB anisotropies

    SciTech Connect

    Gruppuso, A.; Mandolesi, N.; Rosa, A. De; Finelli, F.; Paci, F. E-mail: paolo.natoli@gmail.com E-mail: derosa@iasfbo.inaf.it E-mail: fpaci@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2012-02-01

    We constrain the rotation angle α of the linear polarization of CMB photons using the large angular scale (up to ∼ 4°) signal in WMAP 7 year data. At these scales, the CMB polarization pattern probes mostly the reionization era. A genuine rotation may be interpreted as cosmological birefringence, which is a well known tracer of new physics, through the breakdown of fundamental symmetries. Our analysis provides α = −1.6°±1.7° (3.4°) at 68% (95%) C.L. for the multipoles range Δl = 2−47 not including an instrumental systematic uncertainty that the WMAP team estimates at ±1.5°. This improves the bound obtained by WMAP team (Komatsu et al., 2010). Moreover we show, for the first time at low multipoles, the angular power spectrum α{sub l} in search of a possible scale dependence of the birefringence effect. Our findings are compatible with no detection at all angular scales probed here. We finally forecast the capabilities of Planck in tightening the present constraints.

  16. Cosmological parameter estimation from CMB and X-ray cluster after Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian-Wei; Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Hu, Bin E-mail: cairg@itp.ac.cn E-mail: hu@lorentz.leidenuniv.nl

    2014-05-01

    We investigate constraints on cosmological parameters in three 8-parameter models with the summed neutrino mass as a free parameter, by a joint analysis of CCCP X-ray cluster data, the newly released Planck CMB data as well as some external data sets including baryon acoustic oscillation measurements from the 6dFGS, SDSS DR7 and BOSS DR9 surveys, and Hubble Space Telescope H{sub 0} measurement. We find that the combined data strongly favor a non-zero neutrino masses at more than 3σ confidence level in these non-vanilla models. Allowing the CMB lensing amplitude A{sub L} to vary, we find A{sub L} > 1 at 3σ confidence level. For dark energy with a constant equation of state w, we obtain w < −1 at 3σ confidence level. The estimate of the matter power spectrum amplitude σ{sub 8} is discrepant with the Planck value at 2σ confidence level, which reflects some tension between X-ray cluster data and Planck data in these non-vanilla models. The tension can be alleviated by adding a 9% systematic shift in the cluster mass function.

  17. Analytical model for CMB temperature angular power spectrum from cosmic (super-)strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Yoo, Chul-Moon; Sasaki, Misao; Takahashi, Keitaro; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2010-09-15

    We present a new analytical method to calculate the small angle cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature angular power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)string segments. In particular, using our method, we clarify the dependence on the intercommuting probability P. We find that the power spectrum is dominated by Poisson-distributed string segments. The power spectrum for a general value of P has a plateau on large angular scales and shows a power-law decrease on small angular scales. The resulting spectrum in the case of conventional cosmic strings is in very good agreement with the numerical result obtained by Fraisse et al.. Then we estimate the upper bound on the dimensionless tension of the string for various values of P by assuming that the fraction of the CMB power spectrum due to cosmic (super-)strings is less than ten percent at various angular scales up to l=2000. We find that the amplitude of the spectrum increases as the intercommuting probability. As a consequence, strings with smaller intercommuting probabilities are found to be more tightly constrained.

  18. Measuring the CMB temperature in the classroom with a low-cost antenna and radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karkare, Kirit S; Bowens-Rubin, Rachel; Connors, Jake; Dame, Thomas M.; Gao, Ryan; Harrison, Samuel; Kimberk, Robert S; Kovac, John M; Law-Smith, Jamie; Robins, Derek; Sansone, Steve; Wilson, Robert W.; Yermakova, Anya; Zeng, Lingzhen

    2014-06-01

    Estimation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature through a skydip is an ambitious undergraduate laboratory exercise in which care must be taken to understand and account for systematic errors. It is an ideal environment for learning about careful experimental design. We present two versions of a low-cost antenna and radiometer system replicating the CMB discovery measurement (Penzias and Wilson, 1965), operating at 11 and 19 GHz. We describe two small-aperture (8") antenna designs: an HDPE lens-coupled corrugated horn, and a single-groove Potter horn, both of which are simple and inexpensive to fabricate. They have been designed to minimize far sidelobe pickup from the ground in conjunction with a straight-walled or Winston cone. The radiometers are based on low-cost commercial satellite TV receivers, read out with standard laboratory equipment. We describe the design of aperture-filling calibration loads necessary to characterize the radiometer performance. Several iterations of this experiment have been run in the advanced undergraduate astrophysics laboratory course (Ay 191) at Harvard University, with the students building the apparatus starting from scratch and finishing in about 6 weeks. Positive detections of background radiation have been achieved with typical uncertainties of 0.3 K.

  19. Cosmological parameter estimation from CMB and X-ray cluster after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian-Wei; Cai, Rong-Gen; Guo, Zong-Kuan; Hu, Bin

    2014-05-01

    We investigate constraints on cosmological parameters in three 8-parameter models with the summed neutrino mass as a free parameter, by a joint analysis of CCCP X-ray cluster data, the newly released Planck CMB data as well as some external data sets including baryon acoustic oscillation measurements from the 6dFGS, SDSS DR7 and BOSS DR9 surveys, and Hubble Space Telescope H0 measurement. We find that the combined data strongly favor a non-zero neutrino masses at more than 3σ confidence level in these non-vanilla models. Allowing the CMB lensing amplitude AL to vary, we find AL > 1 at 3σ confidence level. For dark energy with a constant equation of state w, we obtain w < -1 at 3σ confidence level. The estimate of the matter power spectrum amplitude σ8 is discrepant with the Planck value at 2σ confidence level, which reflects some tension between X-ray cluster data and Planck data in these non-vanilla models. The tension can be alleviated by adding a 9% systematic shift in the cluster mass function.

  20. Quantum fluctuations and CMB anisotropies in one-bubble open inflation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Misao; Tanaka, Takahiro

    1996-10-01

    We first develop a method to calculate a complete set of mode functions that describe the quantum fluctuations generated in one-bubble open inflation models. We consider two classes of models. One is a single scalar field model proposed by Bucher, Goldhaber, and Turok and by us as an example of the open inflation scenario, and the other is a two-field model such as the ``supernatural'' inflation proposed by Linde and Mezhlumian. In both cases we assume the difference in the vacuum energy density between inside and outside the bubble is negligible. There are two kinds of mode functions. One kind has the usual continuous spectrum and the other has a discrete spectrum with characteristic wavelengths exceeding the spatial curvature scale. The latter can be further divided into two classes in terms of its origin. One is called the de Sitter supercurvature mode, which arises due to the global spacetime structure of de Sitter space, and the other is due to fluctuations of the bubble wall. We calculate the spectrum of quantum fluctuations in these models and evaluate the resulting large angular scale CMB anisotropies. We find there are ranges of model parameters that are consistent with observed CMB anisotropies.

  1. Lenses in the forest: cross--correlation of the Lyman-alpha flux with CMB lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N.; Viel, Matteo; /Trieste Observ. /INFN, Trieste

    2009-03-01

    We present a theoretical estimate for a new observable: the cross-correlation between the Lyman-{alpha}-flux fluctuations in quasar (QSO) spectra and the convergence of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as measured along the same line-of-sight. As a first step toward the assessment of its detectability, we estimate the signal-to-noise ratio using linear theory. Although the signal-to-noise is small for a single line-of-sight and peaks at somewhat smaller redshifts than those probed by the Lyman-{alpha} forest, we estimate a total signal-to-noise of 9 for cross-correlating QSO spectra of SDSSIII with Planck and 20 for cross-correlating with a future polarization based CMB experiment. The detection of this effect would be a direct measure of the neutral hydrogen-matter cross-correlation and could provide important information on the growth of structures at large scales in a redshift range which is still poorly probed by observations.

  2. MuSE: a novel experiment for CMB polarization measurement using highly multimoded bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Akito; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2012-09-01

    One of the most exciting targets for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization measurements is the faint signal from the primordial gravity waves predicted by inflationary models. Currently existing experiments and those under construction would constrain or detect such a signal at around r = 0.01, where r is the tensor to scalar ratio. In order to further improve the measurement, experiments for the next generation have to combine the following three: 1) excellent sensitivity, 2) multi-frequency measurement for the removal of galactic foregrounds, and 3) well-controlled systematics. We propose the Multimoded Survey Experiment (MuSE), which uses highly multimoded polarization-sensitive bolometers developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). MuSE, consisting of 69 pixels, will achieve a sensitivity equivalent to several thousand single-moded bolometers. Each pixel can be configured to be sensitive to a different frequency band, allowing very wide frequency coverage by a single focal plane. This enables us to clean galactic synchrotron and dust components with our data alone. MuSE achieves an effective array sensitivity to the CMB of 8 μK√s even after accounting for the sensitivity degradation from foreground removal and reaches a 2-σ error on r of 0.009 with two years of operation.

  3. CMB power spectra from cosmic strings: Predictions for the Planck satellite and beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Urrestilla, Jon

    2010-09-15

    We present a significant improvement over our previous calculations of the cosmic string contribution to cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra, with particular focus on sub-WMAP angular scales. These smaller scales are relevant for the now-operational Planck satellite and additional suborbital CMB projects that have even finer resolutions. We employ larger Abelian Higgs string simulations than before and we additionally model and extrapolate the statistical measures from our simulations to smaller length scales. We then use an efficient means of including the extrapolations into our Einstein-Boltzmann calculations in order to yield accurate results over the multipole range 2{<=}l{<=}4000. Our results suggest that power-law behavior cuts in for l > or approx. 3000 in the case of the temperature power spectrum, which then allows cautious extrapolation to even smaller scales. We find that a string contribution to the temperature power spectrum making up 10% of power at l=10 would be larger than the Silk-damped primary adiabatic contribution for l > or approx. 3500. Astrophysical contributions such as the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect also become important at these scales and will reduce the sensitivity to strings, but these are potentially distinguishable by their frequency-dependence.

  4. Multilocus half-tetrad analysis and centromere mapping in citrus: evidence of SDR mechanism for 2n megagametophyte production and partial chiasma interference in mandarin cv ‘Fortune'

    PubMed Central

    Cuenca, J; Froelicher, Y; Aleza, P; Juárez, J; Navarro, L; Ollitrault, P

    2011-01-01

    The genetic structure of 2n gametes and, particularly, the parental heterozygosity restitution at each locus depends on the meiotic process by which they originated, with first-division restitution and second-division restitution (SDR) being the two major mechanisms. The origin of 2n gametes in citrus is still controversial, although sexual polyploidisation is widely used for triploid seedless cultivar development. In this study, we report the analysis of 2n gametes of mandarin cv ‘Fortune' by genotyping 171 triploid hybrids with 35 simple sequence repeat markers. The microsatellite DNA allele counting-peak ratios method for allele-dosage evaluation proved highly efficient in segregating triploid progenies and allowed half-tetrad analysis (HTA) by inferring the 2n gamete allelic configuration. All 2n gametes arose from the female genitor. The observed maternal heterozygosity restitution varied between 10 and 82%, depending on the locus, thus SDR appears to be the mechanism underlying 2n gamete production in mandarin cv ‘Fortune'. A new method to locate the centromere, based on the best fit between observed heterozygosity restitution within a linkage group and theoretical functions under either partial or no chiasmata interference hypotheses was successfully applied to linkage group II. The maximum value of heterozygosity restitution and the pattern of restitution along this linkage group would suggest there is partial chiasma interference. The implications of such a restitution mechanism for citrus breeding are discussed. PMID:21587302

  5. Constraints from the CMB temperature and other common observational data sets on variable dark energy density models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetzer, Philippe; Tortora, Crescenzo

    2011-08-01

    The thermodynamic and dynamical properties of a variable dark energy model with density scaling as ρx∝(1+z)m, z being the redshift, are discussed following the outline of Jetzer et al. [P. Jetzer, D. Puy, M. Signore, and C. Tortora, Gen. Relativ. Gravit. 43, 1083 (2011).GRGVA80001-770110.1007/s10714-010-1091-4]. These kinds of models are proven to lead to the creation/disruption of matter and radiation, which affect the cosmic evolution of both matter and radiation components in the Universe. In particular, we have concentrated on the temperature-redshift relation of radiation, which has been constrained using a very recent collection of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature measurements up to z˜3. For the first time, we have combined this observational probe with a set of independent measurements (Supernovae Ia distance moduli, CMB anisotropy, large-scale structure and observational data for the Hubble parameter), which are commonly adopted to constrain dark energy models. We find that, within the uncertainties, the model is indistinguishable from a cosmological constant which does not exchange any particles with other components. Anyway, while temperature measurements and Supernovae Ia tend to predict slightly decaying models, the contrary happens if CMB data are included. Future observations, in particular, measurements of CMB temperature at large redshift, will allow to give firmer bounds on the effective equation of state parameter weff of this kind of dark energy model.

  6. Smoothing methods comparison for CMB E- and B-mode separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Fan; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Wen

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropies of the B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background radiation play a crucial role in the study of the very early Universe. However, in real observations, a mixture of the E-mode and B-mode can be caused by partial sky surveys, which must be separated before being applied to a cosmological explanation. The separation method developed by Smith (2006) has been widely adopted, where the edge of the top-hat mask should be smoothed to avoid numerical errors. In this paper, we compare three different smoothing methods and investigate leakage residuals of the E-B mixture. We find that, if less information loss is needed and a smaller region is smoothed in the analysis, the sin- and cos-smoothing methods are better. However, if we need a cleanly constructed B-mode map, the larger region around the mask edge should be smoothed. In this case, the Gaussian-smoothing method becomes much better. In addition, we find that the leakage caused by numerical errors in the Gaussian-smoothing method is mostly concentrated in two bands, which is quite easy to reduce for further E-B separations.

  7. Final Results from the BIMA CMB Anisotropy Survey and Search for Signature of the SZ Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, K. S.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Joy, M.; LaRoque, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report the final results of our study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with the BIMA array. Over 1000 hours of observation were dedicated to this project exploring CMB anisotropy on scales between 1' and 2' in eighteen 6'.6 FWHM fields. In the analysis of the CMB power spectrum, the visibility data is divided into two bins corresponding to different angular scales. Modeling the observed excess power as a flat band of average multipole l(sub eff)= 5237, we find deltaT(sup 2)(sub 1) = 220(sup +140)(sub -120) mu K(sup 2) at 68% confidence and deltaT(sup 2)(sub 1) greater than 0 muK(sup 2) with 94.7% confidence. In a second band with average multipole of l(sub eff) = 8748, we find deltaT(sup 2)(sub 2) consistent with zero, and an upper limit 880 muK(sup 2) at 95% confidence. An extensive series of tests and supplemental observations with the VLA provide strong evidence against systematic errors or radio point sources being the source of the observed excess power. The dominant source of anisotropy on these scales is expected to arise from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in a population of distant galaxy clusters. If the excess power is due to the SZ effect, we can place constraints on the normalization of the matter power spectrum sigma(sub 8) = 1.03(sup +0.20)(sub -0.29) at 68% confidence. The distribution of pixel fluxes in the BIMA images are found to be consistent with simulated observations of the expected SZ background and rule out instrumental noise or radio sources as the source of the observed excess power with similar confidence to the detection of excess power. Follow-up optical observations to search for galaxy over-densities anti-correlated with flux in the BIMA images, as might be expected from the SZ effect, proved to be inconclusive.

  8. Conformal Visualization for Partially-Immersive Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhang, Min; Kaufman, Arie E.; Gu, Xianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Current immersive VR systems such as the CAVE provide an effective platform for the immersive exploration of large 3D data. A major limitation is that in most cases at least one display surface is missing due to space, access or cost constraints. This partially-immersive visualization results in a substantial loss of visual information that may be acceptable for some applications, however it becomes a major obstacle for critical tasks, such as the analysis of medical data. We propose a conformal deformation rendering pipeline for the visualization of datasets on partially-immersive platforms. The angle-preserving conformal mapping approach is used to map the 360°3D view volume to arbitrary display configurations. It has the desirable property of preserving shapes under distortion, which is important for identifying features, especially in medical data. The conformal mapping is used for rasterization, realtime raytracing and volume rendering of the datasets. Since the technique is applied during the rendering, we can construct stereoscopic images from the data, which is usually not true for image-based distortion approaches. We demonstrate the stereo conformal mapping rendering pipeline in the partially-immersive 5-wall Immersive Cabin (IC) for virtual colonoscopy and architectural review. PMID:26279083

  9. GeV excess electrons upscattering the CMB: a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daylan, Tansu; Portillo, Stephen K. N.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.

    2015-01-01

    Recently a gamma-ray excess has been identified in the inner Milky Way, which may be associated with the final state photon shower following DM annihilation to standard model final states. In this scenario ~ GeV electrons are also produced and, given their long energy loss timescale (~ Gyr), they can diffuse and escape the galaxy before losing too much energy. If such an electron population exists in the IGM, one observable consequence would be inverse Compton scattering on the CMB, which would produce UV photons that can efficiently ionize the IGM. This may be a possible resolution to the "Photon Underproduction Crisis", recently pointed out by Kollmeier et al. (2014). Regardless of the relevance to this crisis, the existence of a ~ GeV electron population in the IGM can put constraints on DM annihilation parameters considering the known X-ray backgrounds.

  10. Fast and accurate CMB computations in non-flat FLRW universes

    SciTech Connect

    Lesgourgues, Julien; Tram, Thomas E-mail: thomas.tram@epfl.ch

    2014-09-01

    We present a new method for calculating CMB anisotropies in a non-flat Friedmann universe, relying on a very stable algorithm for the calculation of hyperspherical Bessel functions, that can be pushed to arbitrary precision levels. We also introduce a new approximation scheme which gradually takes over in the flat space limit and leads to significant reductions of the computation time. Our method is implemented in the Boltzmann code class. It can be used to benchmark the accuracy of the camb code in curved space, which is found to match expectations. For default precision settings, corresponding to 0.1% for scalar temperature spectra and 0.2% for scalar polarisation spectra, our code is two to three times faster, depending on curvature. We also simplify the temperature and polarisation source terms significantly, so the different contributions to the C{sub ℓ} 's are easy to identify inside the code.

  11. Multichroic Antenna-Coupled Bolometers for CMB Polarization and Sub-mm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Adrian

    We propose to develop planar antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer arrays for observations at sub-millimeter to millimeter wavelengths. Our pixel architecture features a dual-polarization log-periodic antenna with a 4:1-bandwidth ratio, followed by a filter bank that divides the total bandwidth into several broad photometric bands. The advantages of this approach, compared with those using conventional single-color pixels, include a combination of greatly reduced focal-plane mass, higher array sensitivity, and a larger number of spectral bands. These advantages have the potential to greatly reduce the cost and/or increase the performance of NASA missions in the sub-millimeter to millimeter bands. For CMB polarization measurements, a wide frequency range of roughly 30 to 300 GHz is required to subtract galactic foregrounds. The multichroic architecture we propose enables a relatively low-cost 30-cm aperture space mission to have sufficient sensitivity to probe below the tensor-to-scalar ratio r = 0.01. For a larger aperture mission, such as the EPIC-IM concept, the proposed technology could reduce the focal-plane mass by a factor of 2-3, with great savings in required cryocooler performance and therefore cost. We have demonstrated the lens-coupled antenna concept in the POLARBEAR ground-based CMB polarization experiment now operating in Chile. That experiment uses a single-band planar antenna and produces excellent beam properties and optical efficiency. In the laboratory, we have measured two octaves of total bandwidth in the log-periodic sinuous antenna. We have built filter banks of 2, 3, and 7 bands with 4, 6, and 14 bolometers per pixel for two linear polarizations. Building on these accomplishments, the deliverables for the proposed work include: *Two pixel types that together cover the range from 30 to 300 GHz. The low-frequency pixel will have bands centered at 35, 50, and 80 GHz and the high frequency pixel will have bands centered at 120, 180, and 270

  12. Planetary maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1992-01-01

    An important goal of the USGS planetary mapping program is to systematically map the geology of the Moon, Mars, Venus, and Mercury, and the satellites of the outer planets. These geologic maps are published in the USGS Miscellaneous Investigations (I) Series. Planetary maps on sale at the USGS include shaded-relief maps, topographic maps, geologic maps, and controlled photomosaics. Controlled photomosaics are assembled from two or more photographs or images using a network of points of known latitude and longitude. The images used for most of these planetary maps are electronic images, obtained from orbiting television cameras, various optical-mechanical systems. Photographic film was only used to map Earth's Moon.

  13. Optimal cosmic microwave background map-making in the presence of cross-correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Gasperis, G.; Buzzelli, A.; Cabella, P.; de Bernardis, P.; Vittorio, N.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We present an extension of the ROMA map-making algorithm for the generation of optimal cosmic microwave background polarization maps. The new code allows for a possible cross-correlated noise component among the detectors of a CMB experiment. A promising application is the forthcoming LSPE balloon-borne experiment, which is devoted to the accurate observation of CMB polarization at large angular scales. Methods: We generalized the noise covariance matrix in time domain to account for all the off-diagonal terms due to the detector cross-talk. Hence, we performed preliminary forecasts of the LSPE-SWIPE instrument. Results: We found that considering the noise cross-correlation among the detectors results in a more realistic estimate of the angular power spectra. In particular, the extended ROMA algorithm has provided a considerable reduction of the spectra error bars. We expect that this improvement could be crucial in constraining the B-mode polarization at the largest scales.

  14. Testing the origin of the CMB large-angle correlation deficit with a galaxy imaging survey

    SciTech Connect

    Hearin, Andrew P.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Gibelyou, Cameron E-mail: gibelyou@umich.edu

    2011-10-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature distribution measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) exhibits anomalously low correlation at large angles. Quantifying the degree to which this feature in the temperature data is in conflict with standard ΛCDM cosmology is somewhat ambiguous because of the a posteriori nature of the observation. One physical mechanism that has been proposed as a possible explanation for the deficit in the large-angle temperature correlations is a suppression of primordial power on ∼ Gpc scales. To distinguish whether the anomaly is a signal of new physics, such as suppressed primordial power, it would be invaluable to perform experimental tests of the authenticity of this signal in data sets which are independent of the WMAP temperature measurements or even other CMB measurements. We explore the possibility of testing models of power suppression with large-scale structure observations, and compare the ability of planned photometric and spectroscopic surveys to constrain the power spectrum. Of the surveys planned for the next decade, a spectroscopic redshift survey such as BigBOSS will have a greater number of radial modes available for study, but we find that this advantage is outweighed by the greater surface density of high-redshift sources that will be observed by photometric surveys such as LSST or Euclid. We also find that the ability to constrain primordial power suppression is insensitive to the precision of the calibration of photometric redshifts. We conclude that very-wide-area imaging surveys have the potential to probe viable models for the missing power but that it will be difficult to use such surveys to conclusively rule out primordial power suppression as the mechanism behind the observed anomaly.

  15. Analytic approach to the CMB polarization generated by relic gravitational waves

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Wen; Zhang Yang

    2006-10-15

    By Polnarev's method we analytically calculate the polarization spectra of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) generated by cosmic relic gravitational waves (RGW). In this analytic approach the physics involved in this generating process is more transparent. Consequently, the effects due to various elements of physics can be isolated easily. In solving the equation for evolution of RGW in the expanding universe, both the sudden transition and the WKB approximation for the scale factor during the radiation-matter transition have been taken. To describe more precisely the decoupling process, we have introduced an analytic expression for the visibility function, consisting of two pieces of half-Gaussian curves. We also include the damping on polarizations due to the photon diffusion up to the second order of the tight coupling. Analytic polarization spectra C{sub l}{sup XX} have been obtained with the following several improvements over the previous results. 1. The approximate analytic result is quite close to the numerical one evaluated from the cmbfast code, especially, for the first three peaks of the spectrum that are observable. By using the analytic exact solution of RGW in the sudden transition approximation, we have demonstrated the dependence of C{sub l}{sup XX} on the dark energy and the baryons. 2. Our analytic half-Gaussian approximation of the visibility function fits better than the usual Gaussian model, and its time integration yields an analytic damping factor, which is parameter-dependent. This improves the spectra by {approx}30% around the second and third peaks. 3. The second order of tight coupling reduces the overall amplitude of C{sub l}{sup XX} by 58%, comparing with the tight-coupling limit. 4. The influences of inflation on RGW and on CMB polarization are explicitly demonstrated.

  16. Testing statistics of the CMB B -mode polarization toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of the vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Hikage, Chiaki; Namba, Ryo; Namikawa, Toshiya; Hazumi, Masashi

    2016-08-01

    The B -mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies at large angular scales provides compelling evidence for the primordial gravitational waves (GWs). It is often stated that a discovery of the GWs establishes the quantum fluctuation of vacuum during the cosmic inflation. Since the GWs could also be generated by source fields, however, we need to check if a sizable signal exists due to such source fields before reaching a firm conclusion when the B mode is discovered. Source fields of particular types can generate non-Gaussianity (NG) in the GWs. Testing statistics of the B mode is a powerful way of detecting such NG. As a concrete example, we show a model in which gauge field sources chiral GWs via a pseudoscalar coupling and forecast the detection significance at the future CMB satellite LiteBIRD. Effects of residual foregrounds and lensing B mode are both taken into account. We find the B -mode bispectrum "BBB" is in particular sensitive to the source-field NG, which is detectable at LiteBIRD with a >3 σ significance. Therefore the search for the BBB will be indispensable toward unambiguously establishing quantum fluctuation of vacuum when the B mode is discovered. We also introduced the Minkowski functional to detect the NGs. While we find that the Minkowski functional is less efficient than the harmonic-space bispectrum estimator, it still serves as a useful cross-check. Finally, we also discuss the possibility of extracting clean information on parity violation of GWs and new types of parity-violating observables induced by lensing.

  17. Broad-bandwidth Metamaterial Antireflection Coatings for Sub-Millimeter Astronomy and CMB Foreground Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Jeff

    Sub-millimeter observations are crucial for answering questions about star and galaxy formation; understanding galactic dust foregrounds; and for removing these foregrounds to detect the faint signature of inflationary gravitational waves in the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Achieving these goals requires improved, broad-band antireflection coated lenses and half-wave plates (HWPs). These optical elements will significantly boost the sensitivity and capability of future sub-millimeter and CMB missions. We propose to develop wide-bandwidth metamaterial antireflection coatings for silicon lenses and sapphire HWPs with 3:1 ratio bandwidth that are scalable across the sub-millimeter band from 300 GHz to 3 THz. This is an extension of our successful work on saw cut metamaterial AR coatings for silicon optics at millimeter wave lengths. These, and the proposed coatings consist of arrays of sub-wavelength scale features cut into optical surfaces that behave like simple dielectrics. We have demonstrated saw cut 3:1 bandwidth coatings on silicon lenses, but these coatings are limited to the millimeter wave band by the limitations of dicing saw machining. The crucial advance needed to extend these broad band coatings throughout the sub-millimeter band is the development of laser cut graded index metamaterial coatings. The proposed work includes developing the capability to fabricate these coatings, optimizing the design of these metamaterials, fabricating and testing prototype lenses and HWPs, and working with the PIPER collaboration to achieve a sub-orbital demonstration of this technology. The proposed work will develop potentially revolutionary new high performance coatings for the sub-millimeter bands, and cary this technology to TRL 7 paving the way for its use in space. We anticipate that there will be a wide range of applications for these coatings on future NASA balloons and satellites.

  18. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. |

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  19. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  20. Implications for Long-Term Mantle History of the Restricted Distribution of Large Igneous Province (LIP) Plume Sources at the Core-Mantle Boundary (CMB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, K.; Steinberger, B.; Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    We have found, by rotation of LIPs of the past 300 My to their eruption sites in a paleomagnetic reference frame corrected for true polar wander, that those sites concentrate vertically above the margins at the CMB of the two Large Low Shear Wave Velocity Provinces(LLSVPs) of the deep mantle (Torsvik et al. 2006). This surprising discovery of narrow (< 200 wide) Plume Generation Zones stable for at least 300 My on the CMB at the LLSVP margins is consistent with the idea that the LLSVPs are compositionally (and probably also thermally) distinct dense bodies (each making up ca. 1 percent of mantle mass) rather than thermally buoyant "superplumes". The "centers of mass" of the two LLSVPs are antipodally disposed close to the equator, an intriguing possible further indication of long-term stability because the positively elevated part of the residual geoid, which matches the LLSVPs and therefore also appears also to have been stable for at least 300 My finds an analog in the aeroid of Mars of which the elevated regions are themselves antipodal on the equator. Because some volcanoes of Mars perhaps > 3.8 My in age are concentrated on the rims of the elevated aeroid it is worth considering the implications of the possible isolation of the LLSVPs from the rest of the mantle through most of Earth history. If the 2 percent of mantle mass that makes the LLSVPs has escaped being involved in making ocean floor it will be more Fe rich and denser than the average mantle. If it has also escaped being involved in making continent it will be richer in U,Th and K and hotter. It will have distinctive noble gas concentrations and could be the source (by diffusion) of the Earth's current 3He flux (Burke et al. 2008). If a velocity change attributable to a perovskite/post-perovskite transition can be mapped consistently both within and outside the LLSVPs it will help in testing the idea that the interiors of LLSVPs are hotter than the rest of the deep mantle.

  1. Map accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1981-01-01

    An inaccurate map is not a reliable map. "X" may mark the spot where the treasure is buried, but unless the seeker can locate "X" in relation to known landmarks or positions, the map is not very useful.

  2. A COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING MASS MAP AND ITS CORRELATION WITH THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J.; Viero, M. P.; Bock, J.; Zahn, O.; Aird, K. A.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H-M.; Conley, A.; George, E. M.; Halverson, N. W.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We use a temperature map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) obtained using the South Pole Telescope at 150 GHz to construct a map of the gravitational convergence to z {approx} 1100, revealing the fluctuations in the projected mass density. This map shows individual features that are significant at the {approx}4{sigma} level, providing the first image of CMB lensing convergence. We cross-correlate this map with Herschel/SPIRE maps covering 90 deg{sup 2} at wavelengths of 500, 350, and 250 {mu}m. We show that these submillimeter (submm) wavelength maps are strongly correlated with the lensing convergence map, with detection significances in each of the three submm bands ranging from 6.7{sigma} to 8.8{sigma}. We fit the measurement of the cross power spectrum assuming a simple constant bias model and infer bias factors of b = 1.3-1.8, with a statistical uncertainty of 15%, depending on the assumed model for the redshift distribution of the dusty galaxies that are contributing to the Herschel/SPIRE maps.

  3. Physical mapping and microsynteny of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis genome corresponding to a 222 kbp gene-rich region of Arabidopsis chromosome 4 and partially duplicated on chromosome 5.

    PubMed

    Park, J Y; Koo, D H; Hong, C P; Lee, S J; Jeon, J W; Lee, S H; Yun, P Y; Park, B S; Kim, H R; Bang, J W; Plaha, P; Bancroft, I; Lim, Y P

    2005-12-01

    We constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, designated as KBrH, from high molecular weight genomic DNA of Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis (Chinese cabbage). This library, which was constructed using HindIII-cleaved genomic DNA, consists of 56,592 clones with average insert size of 115 kbp. Using a partially duplicated DNA sequence of Arabidopsis, represented by 19 and 9 predicted genes on chromosome 4 and 5, respectively, and BAC clones from the KBrH library, we studied conservation and microsynteny corresponding to the Arabidopsis regions in B. rapa ssp. pekinensis. The BAC contigs assembled according to the Arabidopsis homoeologues revealed triplication and rearrangements in the Chinese cabbage. In general, collinearity of genes in the paralogous segments was maintained, but gene contents were highly variable with interstitial losses. We also used representative BAC clones, from the assembled contigs, as probes and hybridized them on mitotic (metaphase) and/or meiotic (leptotene/pachytene/metaphase I) chromosomes of Chinese cabbage using bicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. The hybridization pattern physically identified the paralogous segments of the Arabidopsis homoeologues on B. rapa ssp. pekinensis chromosomes. The homoeologous segments corresponding to chromosome 4 of Arabidopsis were located on chromosomes 2, 8 and 7, whereas those of chromosome 5 were present on chromosomes 6, 1 and 4 of B. rapa ssp. pekinensis.

  4. Exploring maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    Exploring Maps is an interdisciplinary set of materials on mapping for grades 7-12. Students will learn basic mapmaking and map reading skills and will see how maps can answer fundamental geographic questions: "Where am I?" "What else is here?" "Where am I going?"

  5. Variance Components: Partialled vs. Common.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ervin W.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to partialling components is used. Like conventional partialling, this approach orthogonalizes variables by partitioning the scores or observations. Unlike conventional partialling, it yields a common component and two unique components. (Author/GDC)

  6. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  7. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  8. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  9. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. On the Duration of Mantle Control of the Magnetic Flux Pattern at the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    The observation of long-lived persistent features of the geomagnetic field suggests a strong influence by the lower-most mantle on the configuration of dynamo-generated flux emanating from the outer core. The question we explore here is whether available data can place some limit on the lifetime of this mantle control. We argue that data associated with times of a weakened axial dipole field (AD-field) offer the best opportunity for such an analysis. First we consider the present geomagnetic field, both its structure and secular variation, and then work backwards into the realm of paleomagnetic data: Secular variation of the modern-day, non-axial dipole field (NAD-field) reveals the existence of a region of significant size centered on Australasia---spanning some 80° of longitude from the southwest Indian Ocean through the southwest Pacific--for which there has been negligible directional change over the last century. This result indicates that this portion of the globe is strongly influenced by a stationary concentration of flux at the CMB known to reside beneath western Australia, a situation that further explains the clustering of NAD-field virtual poles over this locale. In addition, groupings of transitional VGPs near western Australia have been reported for a number of paleomagnetic reversals and events. These data primarily come from transitional field recordings on Tahiti that extend back to the Pliocene as well as from composite global analyses of Matuyama-Brunhes reversal data. Such behavior not only implicates mantle control since about 3 Ma over the pattern of magnetic flux at the CMB, but also suggests that the NAD-field has a dominating effect on the global field during attempts by the dynamo to reverse polarity. We have since analyzed transitional field behavior from recordings in lavas at several sites within the region dominated today by the flux feature beneath Australia, data spanning from the Eocene into the Brunhes chron. The sites include

  13. Contour Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1990s, the Ohio State University Center for Mapping, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), developed a system for mobile mapping called the GPSVan. While driving, the users can map an area from the sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. George J. Igel and Company and the Ohio State University Center for Mapping advanced the technology for use in determining the contours of a construction site. The new system reduces the time required for mapping and staking, and can monitor the amount of soil moved.

  14. Dynamics of partial control.

    PubMed

    Sabuco, Juan; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Yorke, James A

    2012-12-01

    Safe sets are a basic ingredient in the strategy of partial control of chaotic systems. Recently we have found an algorithm, the sculpting algorithm, which allows us to construct them, when they exist. Here we define another type of set, an asymptotic safe set, to which trajectories are attracted asymptotically when the partial control strategy is applied. We apply all these ideas to a specific example of a Duffing oscillator showing the geometry of these sets in phase space. The software for creating all the figures appearing in this paper is available as supplementary material. PMID:23278093

  15. Estimation of inflation parameters for Perturbed Power Law model using recent CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Das, Santanu; Souradeep, Tarun; Joy, Minu E-mail: santanud@iucaa.ernet.in E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is an important probe for understanding the inflationary era of the Universe. We consider the Perturbed Power Law (PPL) model of inflation which is a soft deviation from Power Law (PL) inflationary model. This model captures the effect of higher order derivative of Hubble parameter during inflation, which in turn leads to a non-zero effective mass m{sub eff} for the inflaton field. The higher order derivatives of Hubble parameter at leading order sources constant difference in the spectral index for scalar and tensor perturbation going beyond PL model of inflation. PPL model have two observable independent parameters, namely spectral index for tensor perturbation ν{sub t} and change in spectral index for scalar perturbation ν{sub st} to explain the observed features in the scalar and tensor power spectrum of perturbation. From the recent measurements of CMB power spectra by WMAP, Planck and BICEP-2 for temperature and polarization, we estimate the feasibility of PPL model with standard ΛCDM model. Although BICEP-2 claimed a detection of r=0.2, estimates of dust contamination provided by Planck have left open the possibility that only upper bound on r will be expected in a joint analysis. As a result we consider different upper bounds on the value of r and show that PPL model can explain a lower value of tensor to scalar ratio (r<0.1 or r<0.01) for a scalar spectral index of n{sub s}=0.96 by having a non-zero value of effective mass of the inflaton field m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2}. The analysis with WP + Planck likelihood shows a non-zero detection of m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2} with 5.7 σ and 8.1 σ respectively for r<0.1 and r<0.01. Whereas, with BICEP-2 likelihood m{sup 2}{sub eff}/H{sup 2} = −0.0237 ± 0.0135 which is consistent with zero.

  16. Galaxy clustering, CMB and supernova data constraints on ϕCDM model with massive neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Xu, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a scalar field dark energy model (i.e., ϕCDM model) with massive neutrinos, where the scalar field possesses an inverse power-law potential, i.e., V (ϕ) ∝ϕ-α (α > 0). We find that the sum of neutrino masses Σmν has significant impacts on the CMB temperature power spectrum and on the matter power spectrum. In addition, the parameter α also has slight impacts on the spectra. A joint sample, including CMB data from Planck 2013 and WMAP9, galaxy clustering data from WiggleZ and BOSS DR11, and JLA compilation of Type Ia supernova observations, is adopted to confine the parameters. Within the context of the ϕCDM model under consideration, the joint sample determines the cosmological parameters to high precision: the angular size of the sound horizon at recombination, the Thomson scattering optical depth due to reionization, the physical densities of baryons and cold dark matter, and the scalar spectral index are estimated to be θ* = (1.0415-0.0011+0.0012) ×10-2, τ =0.0914-0.0242+0.0266, Ωbh2 = 0.0222 ± 0.0005, Ωch2 = 0.1177 ± 0.0036, and ns =0.9644-0.0119+0.0118, respectively, at 95% confidence level (CL). It turns out that α < 4.995 at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model. And yet, the ΛCDM scenario corresponding to α = 0 is not ruled out at 95% CL. Moreover, we get Σmν < 0.262 eV at 95% CL for the ϕCDM model, while the corresponding one for the ΛCDM model is Σmν < 0.293 eV. The allowed scale of Σmν in the ϕCDM model is a bit smaller than that in the ΛCDM model. It is consistent with the qualitative analysis, which reveals that the increases of α and Σmν both can result in the suppression of the matter power spectrum. As a consequence, when α is larger, in order to avoid suppressing the matter power spectrum too much, the value of Σmν should be smaller.

  17. Second Season QUIET Observations: Measurements of the CMB Polarization Power Spectrum at 95 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, D.; Bischoff, C.; Brizius, A.; Buder, I.; Chinone, Y.; Cleary, K.; Dumoulin, R.N.; Kusaka, A.; Monsalve, R.; ss, S.K.N\\ae; Newburgh, L.B.; /Columbia U., CBA /Princeton U. /Caltech

    2012-07-01

    The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT (QUIET) has observed the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 43 and 95GHz. The 43-GHz results have been published in QUIET Collaboration et al. (2011), and here we report the measurement of CMB polarization power spectra using the 95-GHz data. This data set comprises 5337 hours of observations recorded by an array of 84 polarized coherent receivers with a total array sensitivity of 87 {mu}K{radical}s. Four low-foreground fields were observed, covering a total of {approx} 1000 square degrees with an effective angular resolution of 12'.8, allowing for constraints on primordial gravitational waves and high-signal-to-noise measurements of the E-modes across three acoustic peaks. The data reduction was performed using two independent analysis pipelines, one based on a pseudo-C{ell} (PCL) cross-correlation approach, and the other on a maximum-likelihood (ML) approach. All data selection criteria and filters were modified until a predefined set of null tests had been satisfied before inspecting any non-null power spectrum. The results derived by the two pipelines are in good agreement. We characterize the EE, EB and BB power spectra between {ell} = 25 and 975 and find that the EE spectrum is consistent with {Lambda}CDM, while the BB power spectrum is consistent with zero. Based on these measurements, we constrain the tensor-to-scalar ratio to r = 1.1{sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.8 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the ML pipeline, and r = {sup +0.9}{sub -0.8} (r < 2.7 at 95% C.L.) as derived by the PCL pipeline. In one of the fields, we find a correlation with the dust component of the Planck Sky Model, though the corresponding excess power is small compared to statistical errors. Finally, we derive limits on all known systematic errors, and demonstrate that these correspond to a tensor-to-scalar ratio smaller than r = 0.01, the lowest level yet reported in the literature.

  18. The Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey: observations and CMB polarization foreground analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carretti, E.; Haverkorn, M.; McConnell, D.; Bernardi, G.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Cortiglioni, S.; Poppi, S.

    2010-07-01

    We present observations and cosmic microwave background (CMB) foreground analysis of the Parkes Galactic Meridian Survey, an investigation of the Galactic latitude behaviour of the polarized synchrotron emission at 2.3GHz with the Parkes Radio Telescope. The survey consists of a 5° wide strip along the Galactic meridian l = 254° extending from the Galactic plane to the South Galactic pole. We identify three zones distinguished by polarized emission properties: the disc, the halo and a transition region connecting them. The halo section lies at latitudes |b| > 40° and has weak and smooth polarized emission mostly at large scale with steep angular power spectra of median slope βmed ~ -2.6. The disc region covers the latitudes |b| < 20° and has a brighter, more complex emission dominated by the small scales with flatter spectra of median slope βmed = -1.8. The transition region has steep spectra as in the halo, but the emission increases towards the Galactic plane from halo to disc levels. The change of slope and emission structure at b ~ -20° is sudden, indicating a sharp disc-halo transition. The whole halo section is just one environment extended over 50° with very low emission which, once scaled to 70GHz, is equivalent to the CMB B-mode emission for a tensor-to-scalar perturbation power ratio rhalo = (3.3 +/- 0.4) × 10-3. Applying a conservative cleaning procedure, we estimate an r detection limit of δr ~ 2 × 10-3 at 70GHz (3σ confidence limit) and, assuming a dust polarization fraction of <12per cent, δr ~ 1 × 10-2 at 150GHz. The 150-GHz limit matches the goals of planned sub-orbital experiments, which can therefore be conducted at this high frequency. The 70-GHz limit is close to the goal of proposed next-generation space missions, which thus might not strictly require space-based platforms.

  19. Degree-2 in the Transition Zone and Near the CMB: Bottom up Tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalo, R.; Ghosh, A.; Lekic, V.; Tsai, V. C.; Dziewonski, A. M.; Kellogg, L. H.; Matas, J.; Panero, W. R.; Romanowicz, B.

    2008-12-01

    The 2008 Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research (CIDER) program facilitated collaboration between researchers from seismology, geodynamics, mineral physics, and geochemistry to study, model and better understand the interior of the Earth. Through this multidisciplinary approach, we have developed a self- consistent paradigm of mantle structure and dynamics. Geochemical studies necessitate multiple mantle components, a requirement that can be met by a layered mantle structure with the 660-km discontinuity serving as a boundary between a depleted upper mantle and undepleted lower mantle. Seismological studies show strong evidence for reorganization of flow at the 660 km discontinuity, but some tomographic models also suggest a significant mass flux across this depth. We investigate the possibility that the large low-velocity seismic anomalies beneath south Africa and the central Pacific are thermochemical reservoirs that may serve as the undepleted, undegassed mantle end-member commonly seen in intraplate volcanics. These superplumes may represent an extension of the degree-2 heterogeneity dominating the deepest 500-1000 km of the lower mantle, and may comprise >20% of the mantle by volume. A comparison of S-velocity anomalies in the mantle with the slab reconstruction model of Lithgow-Bertelloni and Richards (1998) reveals a high degree-2 correlation between these models; in general, the slab model has much more power in higher harmonics. However, for degree-2, the slab density anomaly integrated over the upper mantle has the same pattern as the velocity anomalies at the bottom of the transition zone, but not at other depths in the upper mantle, suggesting that the transition zone acts as a low-pass filter, preferentially removing shorter wavelengths of mantle flow. The degree-2 velocity anomaly just above the core-mantle boundary (CMB) parallels the last 120 Ma of slab signal integrated over the entire mantle, indicating a long-lived origin of this boundary

  20. Testing chirality of primordial gravitational waves with Planck and future CMB data: no hope from angular power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbino, Martina; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    We use the 2015 Planck likelihood in combination with the Bicep2/Keck likelihood (BKP and BK14) to constrain the chirality, χ, of primordial gravitational waves in a scale-invariant scenario. In this framework, the parameter χ enters theory always coupled to the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r, e.g. in combination of the form χ ṡ r. Thus, the capability to detect χ critically depends on the value of r. We find that with present data sets χ is de facto unconstrained. We also provide forecasts for χ from future CMB experiments, including COrE+, exploring several fiducial values of r. We find that the current limit on r is tight enough to disfavor a neat detection of χ. For example, in the unlikely case in which r~0.1(0.05), the maximal chirality case, i.e. χ = ±1, could be detected with a significance of ~2.5(1.5)σ at best. We conclude that the two-point statistics at the basis of CMB likelihood functions is currently unable to constrain chirality and may only provide weak limits on χ in the most optimistic scenarios. Hence, it is crucial to investigate the use of other observables, e.g. provided by higher order statistics, to constrain these kinds of parity violating theories with the CMB.

  1. Effect of width, amplitude and position of a CMB hot spot on core convection and dynamo action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W.; Wicht, J.; Hori, K.

    2015-10-01

    Within the fluid iron cores of terrestrial planets, convection and hence the generation of global magnetic fields are controlled by the overlying rocky mantle. The thermal structure of the lower mantle determines how much heat is allowed to escape the core. Hot lower mantle features, like the thermal footprint of a giant impact or hot mantle plumes will reduce locally the heat flux through the core mantle boundary (CMB) and thereby weaken core convection and affect the magnetic field generation process. In this study, we numerically investigate how parametrised hot spots at the CMB with arbitrary size, amplitude and position affect core convection and hence the dynamo. The effect of the heat flux anomaly is quantified by changes in global flow symmetry properties, such as the emergence of equatorial antisymmetric and axisymmetric (EAA) zonal flows. For pure hydrodynamic models the EAA symmetry scales almost linearly with its respective amplitude and size, whereas self-consistent dynamo simulations typically either suppress or drastically enhance EAA depending mainly on the length scale of the heat flux anomaly. Our results suggest, that the horizontal extent of the anomaly should be on the order of the outer core radius to significantly affect flow and field symmetries. As an implication to Mars, the study concludes that an ancient core field modified by a CMB heat flux anomaly is not able to heteroge- neously magnetise the crust to the present-day level of north-south asymmetry.

  2. Oxygen Pumping. II. Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High-Frequency CMB Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Monteagudo, Carlos; Haiman, Zoltán; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2008-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift intergalactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 μm fine-structure line of O I is pumped by the ~1300 Å soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen in which metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and the cosmic epoch when the O I pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak [(δy)rms <~ 10-7 roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of ~1 nK], it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able to set useful constraints on the heavy-element enrichment history of the IGM.

  3. Partial hue-matching.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Beattie, Lesley L

    2011-01-01

    It is widely believed that color can be decomposed into a small number of component colors. Particularly, each hue can be described as a combination of a restricted set of component hues. Methods, such as color naming and hue scaling, aim at describing color in terms of the relative amount of the component hues. However, there is no consensus on the nomenclature of component hues. Moreover, the very notion of hue (not to mention component hue) is usually defined verbally rather than perceptually. In this paper, we make an attempt to operationalize such a fundamental attribute of color as hue without the use of verbal terms. Specifically, we put forth a new method--partial hue-matching--that is based on judgments of whether two colors have some hue in common. It allows a set of component hues to be established objectively, without resorting to verbal definitions. Specifically, the largest sets of color stimuli, all of which partially match each other (referred to as chromaticity classes), can be derived from the observer's partial hue-matches. A chromaticity class proves to consist of all color stimuli that contain a particular component hue. Thus, the chromaticity classes fully define the set of component hues. Using samples of Munsell papers, a few experiments on partial hue-matching were carried out with twelve inexperienced normal trichromatic observers. The results reinforce the classical notion of four component hues (yellow, blue, red, and green). Black and white (but not gray) were also found to be component colors. PMID:21742961

  4. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  5. Relic density and CMB constraints on dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Zavala, Jesus; White, Simon D. M.; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2010-04-15

    We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the {mu}-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |{mu}|{<=}9.0x10{sup -5} found by the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) instrument on the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite.

  6. Statistical anisotropy of CMB as a probe of conformal rolling scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, S.R.; Rubtsov, G.I. E-mail: grisha@ms2.inr.ac.ru

    2012-05-01

    Search for the statistical anisotropy in the CMB data is a powerful tool for constraining models of the early Universe. In this paper we focus on the recently proposed cosmological scenario with conformal rolling. We consider two sub-scenarios, one of which involves a long intermediate stage between conformal rolling and conventional hot epoch. Primordial scalar perturbations generated within these sub-scenarios have different direction-dependent power spectra, both characterized by a single parameter h{sup 2}. We search for the signatures of this anisotropy in the seven-year WMAP data using quadratic maximum likelihood method, first applied for similar purposes by Hanson and Lewis. We confirm the large quadrupole anisotropy detected in V and W bands, which has been argued to originate from systematic effects rather than from cosmology. We construct an estimator for the parameter h{sup 2}. In the case of the sub-scenario with the intermediate stage we set an upper limit h{sup 2} < 0.045 at the 95% confidence level. The constraint on h{sup 2} is much weaker in the case of another sub-scenario, where the intermediate stage is absent.

  7. Interaction Between Dark Energy and Dark Matter: Observational Constraints from Ohd, BAO, CMB and SNe Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuo; Liang, Nan

    2013-12-01

    In order to test if there is energy transfer between dark energy (DE) and dark matter (DM), we investigate cosmological constraints on two forms of nontrivial interaction between the DM sector and the sector responsible for the acceleration of the universe, in light of the newly revised observations including OHD, CMB, BAO and SNe Ia. More precisely, we find the same tendencies for both phenomenological forms of the interaction term Q = 3γHρ, i.e. the parameter γ to be a small number, |γ| ≈ 10-2. However, concerning the sign of the interaction parameter, we observe that γ > 0 when the interaction between dark sectors is proportional to the energy density of dust matter, whereas the negative coupling (γ < 0) is preferred by observations when the interaction term is proportional to DE density. We further discuss two possible explanations to this incompatibility and apply a quantitative criteria to judge the severity of the coincidence problem. Results suggest that the γmIDE model with a positive coupling may alleviate the coincidence problem, since its coincidence index C is smaller than that for the γdIDE model, the interacting quintessence and phantom models by four orders of magnitude.

  8. CMB-galaxy correlation in Unified Dark Matter scalar field cosmologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertacca, Daniele; Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Raccanelli, Alvise; Piattella, Oliver F.; Pietrobon, Davide; Giannantonio, Tommaso E-mail: alvise.raccanelli@port.ac.uk E-mail: davide.pietrobon@jpl.nasa.gov E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it

    2011-03-01

    We present an analysis of the cross-correlation between the CMB and the large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe in Unified Dark Matter (UDM) scalar field cosmologies. We work out the predicted cross-correlation function in UDM models, which depends on the speed of sound of the unified component, and compare it with observations from six galaxy catalogues (NVSS, HEAO, 2MASS, and SDSS main galaxies, luminous red galaxies, and quasars). We sample the value of the speed of sound and perform a likelihood analysis, finding that the UDM model is as likely as the ΛCDM, and is compatible with observations for a range of values of c{sub ∞} (the value of the sound speed at late times) on which structure formation depends. In particular, we obtain an upper bound of c{sub ∞}{sup 2} ≤ 0.009 at 95% confidence level, meaning that the ΛCDM model, for which c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 0, is a good fit to the data, while the posterior probability distribution peaks at the value c{sub ∞}{sup 2} = 10{sup −4} . Finally, we study the time dependence of the deviation from ΛCDM via a tomographic analysis using a mock redshift distribution and we find that the largest deviation is for low-redshift sources, suggesting that future low-z surveys will be best suited to constrain UDM models.

  9. Interpreting the CMB aberration and Doppler measurements: boost or intrinsic dipole?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldan, Omar; Notari, Alessio; Quartin, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    The aberration and Doppler coupling effects of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) were recently measured by the Planck satellite. The most straightforward interpretation leads to a direct detection of our peculiar velocity β, consistent with the measurement of the well-known dipole. In this paper we discuss the assumptions behind such interpretation. We show that Doppler-like couplings appear from two effects: our peculiar velocity and a second order large-scale effect due to the dipolar part of the gravitational potential. We find that the two effects are exactly degenerate but only if we assume second-order initial conditions from single-field Inflation. Thus, detecting a discrepancy in the value of β from the dipole and the Doppler couplings implies the presence of a primordial non-Gaussianity. We also show that aberration-like signals likewise arise from two independent effects: our peculiar velocity and lensing due to a first order large-scale dipolar gravitational potential, independently on Gaussianity of the initial conditions. In general such effects are not degenerate and so a discrepancy between the measured β from the dipole and aberration could be accounted for by a dipolar gravitational potential. Only through a fine-tuning of the radial profile of the potential it is possible to have a complete degeneracy with a boost effect. Finally we discuss that we also expect other signatures due to integrated second order terms, which may be further used to disentangle this scenario from a simple boost.

  10. Impact of beam deconvolution on noise properties in CMB measurements: Application to Planck LFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Lindholm, V.; Reinecke, M.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.

    2016-03-01

    We present an analysis of the effects of beam deconvolution on noise properties in CMB measurements. The analysis is built around the artDeco beam deconvolver code. We derive a low-resolution noise covariance matrix that describes the residual noise in deconvolution products, both in harmonic and pixel space. The matrix models the residual correlated noise that remains in time-ordered data after destriping, and the effect of deconvolution on this noise. To validate the results, we generate noise simulations that mimic the data from the Planck LFI instrument. A χ2 test for the full 70 GHz covariance in multipole range ℓ = 0 - 50 yields a mean reduced χ2 of 1.0037. We compare two destriping options, full and independent destriping, when deconvolving subsets of available data. Full destriping leaves substantially less residual noise, but leaves data sets intercorrelated. We also derive a white noise covariance matrix that provides an approximation of the full noise at high multipoles, and study the properties on high-resolution noise in pixel space through simulations.

  11. Covariance mapping techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasinski, Leszek J.

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances in the generation of intense femtosecond pulses have made covariance mapping an attractive analytical technique. The laser pulses available are so intense that often thousands of ionisation and Coulomb explosion events will occur within each pulse. To understand the physics of these processes the photoelectrons and photoions need to be correlated, and covariance mapping is well suited for operating at the high counting rates of these laser sources. Partial covariance is particularly useful in experiments with x-ray free electron lasers, because it is capable of suppressing pulse fluctuation effects. A variety of covariance mapping methods is described: simple, partial (single- and multi-parameter), sliced, contingent and multi-dimensional. The relationship to coincidence techniques is discussed. Covariance mapping has been used in many areas of science and technology: inner-shell excitation and Auger decay, multiphoton and multielectron ionisation, time-of-flight and angle-resolved spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance imaging, stimulated Raman scattering, directional gamma ray sensing, welding diagnostics and brain connectivity studies (connectomics). This review gives practical advice for implementing the technique and interpreting the results, including its limitations and instrumental constraints. It also summarises recent theoretical studies, highlights unsolved problems and outlines a personal view on the most promising research directions.

  12. Genetic map construction with constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.A.; Rawlings, C.J.; Soursenot, S.

    1994-12-31

    A pilot program, CME, is described for generating a physical genetic map from hybridization fingerprinting data. CME is implemented in the parallel constraint logic programming language ElipSys. The features of constraint logic programming are used to enable the integration of preexisting mapping information (partial probe orders from cytogenetic maps and local physical maps) into the global map generation process, while parallelism enables the search space to be traversed more efficiently. CME was tested using data from chromosome 2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe and was found able to generate maps as well as (and sometimes better than) a more traditional method. This paper illustrates the practical benefits of using a symbolic logic programming language and shows that the features of constraint handling and parallel execution bring the development of practical systems based on Al programming technologies nearer to being a reality.

  13. RICH MAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Michael Goodchild recently gave eight reasons why traditional maps are limited as communication devices, and how interactive internet mapping can overcome these limitations. In the past, many authorities in cartography, from Jenks to Bertin, have emphasized the importance of sim...

  14. Map adventures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    1994-01-01

    Map Adventures, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for grades K-3. Students will learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand /and use maps.

  15. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  16. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  17. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  18. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  19. Historical Mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    Maps become out of date over time. Maps that are out of date, however, can be useful to historians, attorneys, environmentalists, genealogists, and others interested in researching the background of a particular area. Local historians can compare a series of maps of the same area compiled over a long period of time to learn how the area developed. A succession of such maps can provide a vivid picture of how a place changed over time.

  20. The role of partial knowledge in statistical word learning.

    PubMed

    Yurovsky, Daniel; Fricker, Damian C; Yu, Chen; Smith, Linda B

    2014-02-01

    A critical question about the nature of human learning is whether it is an all-or-none or a gradual, accumulative process. Associative and statistical theories of word learning rely critically on the later assumption: that the process of learning a word's meaning unfolds over time. That is, learning the correct referent for a word involves the accumulation of partial knowledge across multiple instances. Some theories also make an even stronger claim: partial knowledge of one word-object mapping can speed up the acquisition of other word-object mappings. We present three experiments that test and verify these claims by exposing learners to two consecutive blocks of cross-situational learning, in which half of the words and objects in the second block were those that participants failed to learn in Block 1. In line with an accumulative account, Re-exposure to these mis-mapped items accelerated the acquisition of both previously experienced mappings and wholly new word-object mappings. But how does partial knowledge of some words speed the acquisition of others? We consider two hypotheses. First, partial knowledge of a word could reduce the amount of information required for it to reach threshold, and the supra-threshold mapping could subsequently aid in the acquisition of new mappings. Alternatively, partial knowledge of a word's meaning could be useful for disambiguating the meanings of other words even before the threshold of learning is reached. We construct and compare computational models embodying each of these hypotheses and show that the latter provides a better explanation of the empirical data.

  1. The role of partial knowledge in statistical word learning

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, Damian C.; Yu, Chen; Smith, Linda B.

    2013-01-01

    A critical question about the nature of human learning is whether it is an all-or-none or a gradual, accumulative process. Associative and statistical theories of word learning rely critically on the later assumption: that the process of learning a word's meaning unfolds over time. That is, learning the correct referent for a word involves the accumulation of partial knowledge across multiple instances. Some theories also make an even stronger claim: Partial knowledge of one word–object mapping can speed up the acquisition of other word–object mappings. We present three experiments that test and verify these claims by exposing learners to two consecutive blocks of cross-situational learning, in which half of the words and objects in the second block were those that participants failed to learn in Block 1. In line with an accumulative account, Re-exposure to these mis-mapped items accelerated the acquisition of both previously experienced mappings and wholly new word–object mappings. But how does partial knowledge of some words speed the acquisition of others? We consider two hypotheses. First, partial knowledge of a word could reduce the amount of information required for it to reach threshold, and the supra-threshold mapping could subsequently aid in the acquisition of new mappings. Alternatively, partial knowledge of a word's meaning could be useful for disambiguating the meanings of other words even before the threshold of learning is reached. We construct and compare computational models embodying each of these hypotheses and show that the latter provides a better explanation of the empirical data. PMID:23702980

  2. The role of partial knowledge in statistical word learning.

    PubMed

    Yurovsky, Daniel; Fricker, Damian C; Yu, Chen; Smith, Linda B

    2014-02-01

    A critical question about the nature of human learning is whether it is an all-or-none or a gradual, accumulative process. Associative and statistical theories of word learning rely critically on the later assumption: that the process of learning a word's meaning unfolds over time. That is, learning the correct referent for a word involves the accumulation of partial knowledge across multiple instances. Some theories also make an even stronger claim: partial knowledge of one word-object mapping can speed up the acquisition of other word-object mappings. We present three experiments that test and verify these claims by exposing learners to two consecutive blocks of cross-situational learning, in which half of the words and objects in the second block were those that participants failed to learn in Block 1. In line with an accumulative account, Re-exposure to these mis-mapped items accelerated the acquisition of both previously experienced mappings and wholly new word-object mappings. But how does partial knowledge of some words speed the acquisition of others? We consider two hypotheses. First, partial knowledge of a word could reduce the amount of information required for it to reach threshold, and the supra-threshold mapping could subsequently aid in the acquisition of new mappings. Alternatively, partial knowledge of a word's meaning could be useful for disambiguating the meanings of other words even before the threshold of learning is reached. We construct and compare computational models embodying each of these hypotheses and show that the latter provides a better explanation of the empirical data. PMID:23702980

  3. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.´5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100-353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature

  4. Topographic mapping

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) produced its first topographic map in 1879, the same year it was established. Today, more than 100 years and millions of map copies later, topographic mapping is still a central activity for the USGS. The topographic map remains an indispensable tool for government, science, industry, and leisure. Much has changed since early topographers traveled the unsettled West and carefully plotted the first USGS maps by hand. Advances in survey techniques, instrumentation, and design and printing technologies, as well as the use of aerial photography and satellite data, have dramatically improved mapping coverage, accuracy, and efficiency. Yet cartography, the art and science of mapping, may never before have undergone change more profound than today.

  5. Nonparametric test of consistency between cosmological models and multiband CMB measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Shafieloo, Arman E-mail: shafieloo@kasi.re.kr

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel approach to test the consistency of the cosmological models with multiband CMB data using a nonparametric approach. In our analysis we calibrate the REACT (Risk Estimation and Adaptation after Coordinate Transformation) confidence levels associated with distances in function space (confidence distances) based on the Monte Carlo simulations in order to test the consistency of an assumed cosmological model with observation. To show the applicability of our algorithm, we confront Planck 2013 temperature data with concordance model of cosmology considering two different Planck spectra combination. In order to have an accurate quantitative statistical measure to compare between the data and the theoretical expectations, we calibrate REACT confidence distances and perform a bias control using many realizations of the data. Our results in this work using Planck 2013 temperature data put the best fit ΛCDM model at 95% (∼ 2σ) confidence distance from the center of the nonparametric confidence set while repeating the analysis excluding the Planck 217 × 217 GHz spectrum data, the best fit ΛCDM model shifts to 70% (∼ 1σ) confidence distance. The most prominent features in the data deviating from the best fit ΛCDM model seems to be at low multipoles  18 < ℓ < 26 at greater than 2σ, ℓ ∼ 750 at ∼1 to 2σ and ℓ ∼ 1800 at greater than 2σ level. Excluding the 217×217 GHz spectrum the feature at ℓ ∼ 1800 becomes substantially less significance at ∼1 to 2σ confidence level. Results of our analysis based on the new approach we propose in this work are in agreement with other analysis done using alternative methods.

  6. Constraints on CDM cosmology from galaxy power spectrum, CMB and SNIa evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferramacho, L. D.; Blanchard, A.; Zolnierowski, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Aims: We examine the constraints that can be obtained on standard cold dark matter models from the most currently used data set: CMB anisotropies, type Ia supernovae and the SDSS luminous red galaxies. We also examine how these constraints are widened when the equation of state parameter w and the curvature parameter Ωk are left as free parameters. Finally, we investigate the impact on these constraints of a possible form of evolution in SNIa intrinsic luminosity. Methods: We obtained our results from MCMC analysis using the full likelihood of each data set. Results: For the ΛCDM model, our “vanilla” model, cosmological parameters are tightly constrained and consistent with current estimates from various methods. When the dark energy parameter w is free we find that the constraints remain mostly unchanged, i.e. changes are smaller than the 1 sigma uncertainties. Similarly, relaxing the assumption of a flat universe leads to nearly identical constraints on the dark energy density parameter of the universe Ω_Λ , baryon density of the universe Ω_b, the optical depth τ, the index of the power spectrum of primordial fluctuations n_S, with most one sigma uncertainties better than 5%. More significant changes appear on other parameters: while preferred values are almost unchanged, uncertainties for the physical dark matter density Ω_ch^2, Hubble constant H0 and σ8 are typically twice as large. The constraint on the age of the Universe, which is very accurate for the vanilla model, is the most degraded. We found that different methodological approaches on large scale structure estimates lead to appreciable differences in preferred values and uncertainty widths. We found that possible evolution in SNIa intrinsic luminosity does not alter these constraints by much, except for w, for which the uncertainty is twice as large. At the same time, this possible evolution is severely constrained. Conclusions: We conclude that systematic uncertainties for some estimated

  7. A LEKID-based CMB instrument design for large-scale observations in Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, D. C.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bond, J. R.; Bradford, K. J.; Chapman, D.; Che, G.; Day, P. K.; Didier, J.; Doyle, S.; Eriksen, H. K.; Flanigan, D.; Groppi, C. E.; Hillbrand, Seth N.; Johnson, B. R.; Jones, G.; Limon, Michele; Miller, A. D.; Mauskopf, P.; McCarrick, H.; Mroczkowski, T.; Reichborn-Kjennerud, B.; Smiley, B.; Sobrin, Joshua; Wehus, I. K.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2014-08-01

    We present the results of a feasibility study, which examined deployment of a ground-based millimeter-wave polarimeter, tailored for observing the cosmic microwave background (CMB), to Isi Station in Greenland. The instrument for this study is based on lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors (LEKIDs) and an F/2.4 catoptric, crossed-Dragone telescope with a 500 mm aperture. The telescope is mounted inside the receiver and cooled to < 4 K by a closed-cycle 4He refrigerator to reduce background loading on the detectors. Linearly polarized signals from the sky are modulated with a metal-mesh half-wave plate that is rotated at the aperture stop of the telescope with a hollow-shaft motor based on a superconducting magnetic bearing. The modular detector array design includes at least 2300 LEKIDs, and it can be configured for spectral bands centered on 150 GHz or greater. Our study considered configurations for observing in spectral bands centered on 150, 210 and 267 GHz. The entire polarimeter is mounted on a commercial precision rotary air bearing, which allows fast azimuth scan speeds with negligible vibration and mechanical wear over time. A slip ring provides power to the instrument, enabling circular scans (360 degrees of continuous rotation). This mount, when combined with sky rotation and the latitude of the observation site, produces a hypotrochoid scan pattern, which yields excellent cross-linking and enables 34% of the sky to be observed using a range of constant elevation scans. This scan pattern and sky coverage combined with the beam size (15 arcmin at 150 GHz) makes the instrument sensitive to 5 < ` < 1000 in the angular power spectra.

  8. Cosmic bandits: Exploration versus exploitation in CMB B-mode experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-02-01

    A preferred method to detect the curl-component, or B-mode, signature of inflationary gravitational waves (IGWs) in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, in the absence of foregrounds and lensing, is a prolonged integration over a single patch of sky of a few square degrees. In practice, however, foregrounds abound and the sensitivity to B modes can be improved considerably by finding the region of sky cleanest of foregrounds. The best strategy to detect B modes thus involves a tradeoff between exploration (to find lower-foreground patches) and exploitation (through prolonged integration). This problem is akin to the multi-armed bandit (MAB) problem in probability theory, wherein a gambler faces a series of slot machines with unknown winning odds and must develop a strategy to maximize his/her winnings with some finite number of pulls. While the optimal MAB strategy remains to be determined, a number of algorithms have been developed in an effort to maximize the winnings. Here, based on this resemblance, we tackle the search for IGW B modes with single frequency experiments in the presence of spatially varying foregrounds by developing adaptive survey strategies to optimize the sensitivity to IGW B modes. We demonstrate, using realistic foreground models and taking lensing-induced B modes into account, that adaptive experiments can substantially improve the upper bound on the tensor-to-scalar ratio (by factors of 2 and 3 in single frequency experiments, and possibly even more). Similar techniques can be applied to other surveys, including 21-cm measurements of signatures of the epoch of reionization, searches for a stochastic primordial gravitational wave background, deep-field imaging by the James Webb Space Telescope or various radio interferometers, and transient follow-up searches.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Maps from the HACME Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angélica; Staren, John W.; Meinhold, Peter R.; Lubin, Philip M.; Childers, Jeffrey D.; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd; Lim, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Villela, Thyrso; Wuensche, C. Alexandre

    2000-10-01

    We present cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps from the Santa Barbara HACME balloon experiment (Staren et al.), covering about 1150 square degrees split between two regions in the northern sky, near the stars γ Ursae Minoris and α Leonis, respectively. The FWHM of the beam is ~0.77d in three frequency bands centered on 39, 41, and 43 GHz. The results demonstrate that the thoroughly interconnected scan strategy employed allows efficient removal of 1/f-noise and slightly variable scan-synchronous offsets. The maps display no striping, and the noise correlations are found to be virtually isotropic, decaying on an angular scale ~1°. The noise performance of the experiment resulted in an upper limit on CMB anisotropy. However, our results demonstrate that atmospheric contamination and other systematics resulting from the circular scanning strategy can be accurately controlled and bode well for the planned follow-up experiments BEAST and ACE, since they show that even with the overly cautious assumption that 1/f-noise and offsets will be as dominant as for HACME, the problems they pose can be readily overcome with the mapmaking algorithm discussed. Our prewhitened notch-filter algorithm for destriping and offset removal is proving useful also for other balloon- and ground-based experiments whose scan strategies involve substantial interleaving, e.g., Boomerang.

  10. Melancholia and partial insanity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S W

    1983-04-01

    In the medical literature of the eighteenth century melancholia came to be defined as partial insanity. Seventeenth-century English law introduced the term and influenced later forensic concerns about the concept. But the history of melancholia reveals a gradual development of such a concept of limited derangement associated with the delusions usually cited in accounts of this disease. In the early nineteenth century the relationship of melancholia and this concept weakened and was gradually abandoned, the content of the syndrome of melancholia was reduced, and out of this complex process emerged the notion of monomania.

  11. Esthetic removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Ancowitz, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This article provides information regarding the many ways that removable partial dentures (RPDs) may be used to solve restorative problems in the esthetic zone without displaying metal components or conspicuous acrylic resin flanges. The esthetic zone is defined and described, as are methods for recording it. Six dental categories are presented that assist the dentist in choosing a variety of RPD design concepts that may be used to avoid metal display while still satisfying basic principles of RPDs. New materials that may be utilized for optimal esthetics are presented and techniques for contouring acrylic resin bases and tinting denture bases are described.

  12. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  13. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Partial Triceps Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, David M.; Galloway, Marc T.

    2011-01-01

    Partial triceps tendon disruptions are a rare injury that can lead to debilitating outcomes if misdiagnosed or managed inappropriately. The clinician should have a high index of suspicion when the mechanism involves a fall onto an outstretched arm and there is resultant elbow extension weakness along with pain and swelling. The most common location of rupture is at the tendon-osseous junction. This case report illustrates a partial triceps tendon disruption with involvement of, primarily, the medial head and the superficial expansion. Physical examination displayed weakness with resisted elbow extension in a flexed position over 90°. Radiographs revealed a tiny fleck of bone proximal to the olecranon, but this drastically underestimated the extent of injury upon surgical exploration. Magnetic resonance imaging is essential to ascertain the percentage involvement of the tendon; it can be used for patient education and subsequently to determine treatment recommendations. Although excellent at finding associated pathology, it may misjudge the size of the tear. As such, physicians must consider associated comorbidities and patient characteristics when formulating treatment plans. PMID:23016005

  15. Models of the Cosmological 21 cm Signal from the Epoch of Reionization Calibrated with Lyα and CMB Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Choudhury, Tirthankar Roy; Puchwein, Ewald; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2016-08-01

    We present here 21 cm predictions from high dynamic range simulations for a range of reionization histories that have been tested against available Lyα and CMB data. We assess the observability of the predicted spatial 21 cm fluctuations by ongoing and upcoming experiments in the late stages of reionization in the limit in which the hydrogen spin temperature is significantly larger than the CMB temperature. Models consistent with the available Lyα data and CMB measurement of the Thomson optical depth predict typical values of 10-20 mK2 for the variance of the 21 cm brightness temperature at redshifts z = 7-10 at scales accessible to ongoing and upcoming experiments (k ≲ 1 cMpc-1h). This is within a factor of a few magnitude of the sensitivity claimed to have been already reached by ongoing experiments in the signal rms value. Our different models for the reionization history make markedly different predictions for the redshift evolution and thus frequency dependence of the 21 cm power spectrum and should be easily discernible by LOFAR (and later HERA and SKA1) at their design sensitivity. Our simulations have sufficient resolution to assess the effect of high-density Lyman limit systems that can self-shield against ionizing radiation and stay 21 cm bright even if the hydrogen in their surroundings is highly ionized. Our simulations predict that including the effect of the self-shielded gas in highly ionized regions reduces the large scale 21 cm power by about 30%.

  16. Constraints on the running of the running of the scalar tilt from CMB anisotropies and spectral distortions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabass, Giovanni; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Pajer, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We use the recent observations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature and polarization anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite experiment to place constraints on the running αs=d ns/d log k and the running of the running βs=d αs/d log k of the spectral index ns of primordial scalar fluctuations. We find αs=0.011 ±0.010 and βs=0.027 ±0.013 at 68% C.L., suggesting the presence of a running of the running at the level of two standard deviations. We find no significant correlation between βs and foregrounds parameters, with the exception of the point sources amplitude at 143 GHz, A143PS , which shifts by a half-sigma when the running of the running is considered. We further study the cosmological implications of such a preference for αs,βs˜0.01 by including in the analysis the lensing amplitude AL, the curvature parameter Ωk, and the sum of neutrino masses ∑mν. We find that when the running of the running is considered Planck data are more compatible with the standard expectations of AL=1 and Ωk=0 but still hint at possible deviations. The indication for βs>0 survives at two standard deviations when external data sets such as baryon acoustic oscillation surverys and CFHTLenS are included in the analysis and persists at ˜1.7 standard deviations when CMB lensing is considered. We discuss the possibility of constraining βs with current and future measurements of CMB spectral distortions, showing that an experiment like PIXIE could provide strong constraints on αs and βs.

  17. Development of the Next Generation of Multi-chroic Antenna-Coupled Transition Edge Sensor Detectors for CMB Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westbrook, B.; Cukierman, A.; Lee, A.; Suzuki, A.; Raum, C.; Holzapfel, W.

    2016-07-01

    We present the development of the next generation of multi-chroic sinuous antenna-coupled transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers optimized for precision measurements of polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and cosmic foreground. These devices employ a polarization sensitive broadband self-complementary sinuous antenna to feed on-chip band defining filters before delivering the power to load resistors coupled to a TES on a released bolometer island. This technology was originally developed by UC Berkeley and will be deployed by POLARBEAR-2 and SPT-3G in the next year and half. In addition, it is a candidate detector for the LiteBIRD mission which will make all sky CMB and cosmic foreground polarization observations from a satellite platform in the early 2020's. This works focuses on expanding both the bandwidth and band count per pixel of this technology in order to meet the needs of future CMB missions. This work demonstrates that these devices are well suited for observations between 20 and 380 GHz. This proceeding describes the design, fabrication, and the characterization of three new pixel types: a low-frequency triplexing pixel (LFTP) with bands centered on 40, 60, and 90 GHz, a high-frequency triplexing pixel (HFTP) with bands centered on 220, 280, and 350 GHz, and a mid-frequency tetraplexing pixel with bands (MFTP) centered on 90, 150, 220, and 280 GHz. The average fractional bandwidth of these pixels designs was 36.7, 34.5, and 31.4 % respectively. In addition we found that the polarization modulation efficiency of each band was between 1 and 3 % which is consistent with the polarization efficiency of the wire grid used to take the measurement. Finally, we find that the beams have {˜ }1 % ellipticity for each pixel type. The thermal properties of the bolometers where tuned for characterization in our lab so we do not report on G and noise values as they would be unsuitable for modern CMB experiments.

  18. Regional modeling of lateral heterogeneity near the CMB from central America to the eastern part of the Pacific LLSVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Lateral structure variations at the base of the mantle are not precisely known. There is currently an active debate on the wavelengths of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography, the lateral variations on Vp and Vs, anisotropy and the trade-offs between them. Most seismological studies compare 1D or 3D global models to local observations of relatively-weak seismic phases but with strong CMB interaction, such as PcP, ScS, PcS and Sdiff. To reduce upper Mantle contamination these observations are conventionally measured relative to much strong reference phases, such as P and S. The two major observations are travel-times differences and amplitude ratios. Current major challenges in extracting clean observations are low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of CMB phases, and interference with a plethora of mantle phases. Low SNR hinders the extraction of accurate observations in low-magnitude events. While, PcP and ScS is frequently hidden in the coda of P and S, respectively, especially at large distance. Additional, s and p depth phases from P and S overlap precious portions of PcP and ScS phases for intermediate depth events. We face these problems using high-density seismic networks. We introduce seismic data-processing techniques that use dense arrays to create filters that separate locally signals in slowness, without compromising resolution. We specifically use the local slant-stack transform in the time-scale domain (Ventosa et al., EUSIPCO, 2011) to decompose each seismogram in slowness in a scale-smart way, merging the wavelet and local slant-stack transforms. In the particular case of PcP-P, we are able to extract accurate observations for events with magnitude of mW>5.4 and maximum distances up to 80 degrees. We conduct a regional study of the CMB structure from central America to the edge of the Pacific large-low shear-velocity provinces (LLSVP). Our approach allows us to sample regions of the eastern Pacific LLSVP boundary with unprecedented resolution, and

  19. Making maps from Planck LFI 30 GHz data with asymmetric beams and cooler noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashdown, M. A. J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bartlett, J. G.; Borrill, J.; Cantalupo, C.; de Gasperis, G.; de Troia, G.; Górski, K. M.; Hivon, E.; Huffenberger, K.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Natoli, P.; Poutanen, T.; Prézeau, G.; Reinecke, M.; Rocha, G.; Sandri, M.; Stompor, R.; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B.; Planck Ctp Working Group

    2009-01-01

    The Planck satellite will observe the full sky at nine frequencies from 30 to 857 GHz. Temperature and polarization frequency maps made from these observations are prime deliverables of the Planck mission. The goal of this paper is to examine the effects of four realistic instrument systematics in the 30 GHz frequency maps: non-axially-symmetric beams, sample integration, sorption cooler noise, and pointing errors. We simulated one-year long observations of four 30 GHz detectors. The simulated timestreams contained cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal, foreground components (both galactic and extra-galactic), instrument noise (correlated and white), and the four instrument systematic effects. We made maps from the timelines and examined the magnitudes of the systematics effects in the maps and their angular power spectra. We also compared the maps of different mapmaking codes to see how they performed. We used five mapmaking codes (two destripers and three optimal codes). None of our mapmaking codes makes any attempt to deconvolve the beam from its output map. Therefore all our maps had similar smoothing due to beams and sample integration. This is a complicated smoothing, because each map pixel has its own effective beam. Temperature to polarization cross-coupling due to beam mismatch causes a detectable bias in the TE spectrum of the CMB map. The effects of cooler noise and pointing errors did not appear to be major concerns for the 30 GHz channel. The only essential difference found so far between mapmaking codes that affects accuracy (in terms of residual root-mean-square) is baseline length. All optimal codes give essentially indistinguishable results. A destriper gives the same result as the optimal codes when the baseline is set short enough (Madam). For longer baselines destripers (Springtide and Madam) require less computing resources but deliver a noisier map.

  20. Making Maps from Planck LFI 30GHz Data with Asymmetric Beams and Cooler Noise

    SciTech Connect

    The Planck CTP Working Group; Ashdown, M.A.J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Bartlett, J.G.; Borrill, J.; Cantalupo, C.; de Gasperis, G.; Gorski, K.M.; Hivon, E.; Huffenberger, K.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.; Hurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C.R.; Natoli, P.; Poutanen, T.; Prezeau, G.; Reinecke, M.; Rocha, G.; Sandri, M.; Stompor, R..; Villa, F.; Wandelt, B.; de Troia, G.

    2008-06-19

    The Planck satellite will observe the full sky at nine frequencies from 30 to 857 GHz. Temperature and polarization frequency maps made from these observations are prime deliverables of the Planck mission. The goal of this paper is to examine the effects of four realistic instrument systematics in the 30 GHz frequency maps: non-axially-symmetric beams, sample integration, sorption cooler noise, and pointing errors. They simulated one year long observations of four 30 GHz detectors. The simulated timestreams contained CMB, foreground component (both galactic and extra-galactic), instrument nolise (correlated and white), and the four instrument systematic effects. They made maps from the timelines and examined the magnitudes of the systematics effects in the maps and their angular power spectra. They also compared the maps of different mapmaking codes to see how they performed. They used five mapmaking codes (two destripers and three optimal codes). None of their mapmaking codes makes an attempt to deconvolve the beam from its output map. Therefore all our maps had similar smoothing due to beams and sample integration. This is a complicated smoothing, because every map pixel has its own effective beam. Temperature to polarization cross-coupling due to beam mismatch causes a detectable bias in the TE spectrum of the CMB map. The effects of cooler noise and pointing errors did not appear to be major concerns for the 30 GHz channel. The only essential difference found so far between mapmaking codes that affects accuracy (in terms of residual RMS) is baseline length. All optimal codes give essentially indistiguishable results. A destriper gives the same result as the optimal codes when the baseline is set short enough (Madam). For longer baselines destripers (Springtide and Madam) require less computing resources but deliver a noisier map.

  1. Mapping Van

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) - developed system for satellite mapping has been commercialized for the first time. Global Visions, Inc. maps an area while driving along a road in a sophisticated mapping van equipped with satellite signal receivers, video cameras and computer systems for collecting and storing mapping data. Data is fed into a computerized geographic information system (GIS). The resulting amps can be used for tax assessment purposes, emergency dispatch vehicles and fleet delivery companies as well as other applications.

  2. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  3. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  4. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  5. DMR 'Map of the Early Universe.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    DMR 'Map of the Early Universe.' This false-color image shows tiny variations in the intensity of the cosmic microwave background measured in four years of observations by the Differential Microwave Radiometers on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). The cosmic microwave background is widely believed to be a remnant of the Big Bang; the blue and red spots correspond to regions of greater or lesser density in the early Universe. These 'fossilized' relics record the distribution of matter and energy in the early Universe before the matter became organized into stars and galaxies. While the initial discovery of variations in the intensity of the CMB (made by COBE in 1992) was based on a mathematical examination of the data, this picture of the sky from the full four-year mission gives an accurate visual impression of the data. The features traced in this map stretch across the visible Universe: the largest features seen by optical telescopes, such as the 'Great Wall' of galaxies, would fit neatly within the smallest feature in this map. (See Bennett et al. 1996, ApJ, 464, L1 and references therein for details.)

  6. CMB and the elementary particles structure deduced from QFT of non-dot model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    In my paper ‘Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle —Uncertainty Principle Caused by Collision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons (H05-0036-10)’ the absolute velocity is decided by CMB which as a mark of the vacuum. CMB come from the thermal radiation of stars via gravitational redshift about 10 (13) year (E14- 0032-08). In my paper ‘Quanta turn-advance ism, China Science && Technology Overview 131 192-210 (2011)’, QFT four-dimensional uncertainty principle and momentum-energy conservation law had been generalized as a five-dimensional equations: de Broglie wavelength as a position vector \\underline{q}= (i c t, r, s), momentum \\underline{P} = (i E / c, P, U c), \\underline{q} = i h / \\underline{P}, \\underline{q} \\underline{q} = 0, \\underline{P} \\underline{P} = 0, Sigma∑ \\underline{P} = \\underline{P} (0) . The five-dimensional time-space-spin had been quantized as a non-dot model basic cell, the lowest energy state vertical polarized left spin 1/2 neutrino and right spin 1/2 antineutrino are just the left, right advance unit quanta _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0} and left, right back unit quanta (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , it again compose into spin 1 unit advance photons _{0}nuυnuυ _{0} and back (0) nuυnuυ (0) , spin 0 unit rest mass nuυ _{0}nuυ (0) and anti-mass _{0}nuυ (0) nuυ, spin 0 unit positive charge _{0}nuυnuυ (0) and negative charge nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ. It accord to the high energy physics experimental results of the transformation among the photons, masses quanta and charges quanta. The physical vacuum is the even collocation of non-combinational nuυ _{0} or _{0}nuυ. QFT is no longer with divergence difficulty by the non-dot model. It is mathematically easy that from five-dimensional equations deduce out the Dirac, Klein-Gordan, Maxwell equations and Lorentz force formula, but appear some new results. The interactions between _{0}nuυ, nuυ _{0}, (0) nuυ, nuυ (0) , i.e., force f

  7. Testing gravity at large scales with H I intensity mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the possibility of testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR) and the standard cosmological model via the EG statistic using neutral hydrogen (H I) intensity mapping. We generalize the Fourier space estimator for EG to include H I as a biased tracer of matter and forecast statistical errors using H I clustering and lensing surveys that can be performed in the near future, in combination with ongoing and forthcoming optical galaxy and cosmic microwave background (CMB) surveys. We find that fractional errors <1 per cent in the EG measurement can be achieved in a number of cases and compare the ability of various survey combinations to differentiate between GR and specific modified gravity models. Measuring EG with intensity mapping and the Square Kilometre Array can provide exquisite tests of gravity at cosmological scales.

  8. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  9. Question Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Josh

    2012-01-01

    After accepting the principal position at Farmersville (TX) Junior High, the author decided to increase instructional rigor through question mapping because of the success he saw using this instructional practice at his prior campus. Teachers are the number one influence on student achievement (Marzano, 2003), so question mapping provides a…

  10. Concept Mapping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology & Learning, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Concept maps are graphical ways of working with ideas and presenting information. They reveal patterns and relationships and help students to clarify their thinking, and to process, organize and prioritize. Displaying information visually--in concept maps, word webs, or diagrams--stimulates creativity. Being able to think logically teaches…

  11. Map Adventures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geological Survey (Dept. of Interior), Reston, VA.

    This curriculum packet about maps, with seven accompanying lessons, is appropriate for students in grades K-3. Students learn basic concepts for visualizing objects from different perspectives and how to understand and use maps. Lessons in the packet center on a story about a little girl, Nikki, who rides in a hot-air balloon that gives her, and…

  12. Fabrication of large dual-polarized multichroic TES bolometer arrays for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Ciocys, S. T.; Cliche, J. F.; Crawford, T. M.; Cukierman, A.; Czaplewski, D.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O.; Keisler, R.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lendinez, S.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Myers, M.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Smecher, G.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirokoff, E.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Sobrin, J.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Ziegler, K. E.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory to fabricate large arrays of multichroic transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. These detectors will be assembled into the focal plane for the SPT-3G camera, the third generation CMB camera to be installed in the South Pole Telescope. The complete SPT-3G camera will have approximately 2690 pixels, for a total of 16 140 TES bolometric detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip line. In-line filters are used to define the different bands before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES bolometers. There are six TES bolometer detectors per pixel, which allow for measurements of three band-passes (95, 150 and 220 GHz) and two polarizations. The steps involved in the monolithic fabrication of these detector arrays are presented here in detail. Patterns are defined using a combination of stepper and contact lithography. The misalignment between layers is kept below 200 nm. The overall fabrication involves a total of 16 processes, including reactive and magnetron sputtering, reactive ion etching, inductively coupled plasma etching and chemical etching.

  13. GroundBIRD: an experiment for CMB polarization measurements at a large angular scale from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, Osamu; Choi, Jhoon; Hazumi, Masashi; Ishitsuka, Hikaru; Kawai, Masanori; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro

    2012-09-01

    Odd-parity patterns in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization, B-modes, could provide important cosmological information. Detection of the primordial B-mode power at a large angular scale would be a smoking gun signature of the inflationary universe. In particular, detecting a reionization bump (at a multipole of <= 10) should be a clear evidence of it. GroundBIRD is designed to detect the B-mode signal at this large angular scale from the ground. We will use superconducting detector arrays with small telescope that will also be cooled down to 4K. Therefore, the basic design can be extended to a satellite experiment. GroundBIRD employs a high-speed (20 rpm) rotation scan instead of the usual left-right azimuthal scan; this allows us to maintain a high-speed scan without any deceleration, resulting in a significant expansion of the scan range to 60° without any effect of the detector 1/f noise. Our target is measuring the CMB polarization power in a multipole (l) range of 6 <= l <= 300. We plan to start commissioning the instruments in Japan in early 2014; they will then be moved to the Atacama Desert in Chile for scientific observations.

  14. CMB power spectrum contribution from cosmic strings using field-evolution simulations of the Abelian Higgs model

    SciTech Connect

    Bevis, Neil; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Urrestilla, Jon

    2007-03-15

    We present the first field-theoretic calculations of the contribution made by cosmic strings to the temperature power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Unlike previous work, in which strings were modeled as idealized one-dimensional objects, we evolve the simplest example of an underlying field theory containing local U(1) strings, the Abelian Higgs model. Limitations imposed by finite computational volumes are overcome using the scaling property of string networks and a further extrapolation related to the lessening of the string width in comoving coordinates. The strings and their decay products, which are automatically included in the field theory approach, source metric perturbations via their energy-momentum tensor, the unequal-time correlation functions of which are used as input into the CMB calculation phase. These calculations involve the use of a modified version of CMBEASY, with results provided over the full range of relevant scales. We find that the string tension {mu} required to normalize to the WMAP 3-year data at multipole l=10 is G{mu}=[2.04{+-}0.06(stat.){+-}0.12(sys.)]x10{sup -6}, where we have quoted statistical and systematic errors separately, and G is Newton's constant. This is a factor 2-3 higher than values in current circulation.

  15. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  16. Distinguishing between direct and indirect directional couplings in large oscillator networks: Partial or non-partial phase analyses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rings, Thorsten; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the relative merit of phase-based methods for inferring directional couplings in complex networks of weakly interacting dynamical systems from multivariate time-series data. We compare the evolution map approach and its partialized extension to each other with respect to their ability to correctly infer the network topology in the presence of indirect directional couplings for various simulated experimental situations using coupled model systems. In addition, we investigate whether the partialized approach allows for additional or complementary indications of directional interactions in evolving epileptic brain networks using intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from an epilepsy patient. For such networks, both direct and indirect directional couplings can be expected, given the brain's connection structure and effects that may arise from limitations inherent to the recording technique. Our findings indicate that particularly in larger networks (number of nodes ≫10 ), the partialized approach does not provide information about directional couplings extending the information gained with the evolution map approach.

  17. Lensing reconstruction from a patchwork of polarization maps

    SciTech Connect

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Nagata, Ryo E-mail: rnagata@post.kek.jp

    2014-09-01

    The lensing signals involved in CMB polarization maps have already been measured with ground-based experiments such as SPTpol and POLARBEAR, and would become important as a probe of cosmological and astrophysical issues in the near future. Sizes of polarization maps from ground-based experiments are, however, limited by contamination of long wavelength modes of observational noise. To further extract the lensing signals, we explore feasibility of measuring lensing signals from a collection of small sky maps each of which is observed separately by a ground-based large telescope, i.e., lensing reconstruction from a patchwork map of large sky coverage organized from small sky patches. We show that, although the B-mode power spectrum obtained from the patchwork map is biased due to baseline uncertainty, bias on the lensing potential would be negligible if the B-mode on scales larger than the blowup scale of 1/f noise is removed in the lensing reconstruction. As examples of cosmological applications, we also show 1) the cross-correlations between the reconstructed lensing potential and full-sky temperature/polarization maps from satellite missions such as PLANCK and LiteBIRD, and 2) the use of the reconstructed potential for delensing B-mode polarization of LiteBIRD observation.

  18. Mapping racism.

    PubMed

    Moss, Donald B

    2006-01-01

    The author uses the metaphor of mapping to illuminate a structural feature of racist thought, locating the degraded object along vertical and horizontal axes. These axes establish coordinates of hierarchy and of distance. With the coordinates in place, racist thought begins to seem grounded in natural processes. The other's identity becomes consolidated, and parochialism results. The use of this kind of mapping is illustrated via two patient vignettes. The author presents Freud's (1905, 1927) views in relation to such a "mapping" process, as well as Adorno's (1951) and Baldwin's (1965). Finally, the author conceptualizes the crucial status of primitivity in the workings of racist thought.

  19. MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore; Stompor, Radoslaw

    2009-06-09

    MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

  20. MADmap: A MASSIVELY PARALLEL MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND MAP-MAKER

    SciTech Connect

    Cantalupo, C. M.; Borrill, J. D.; Kisner, T. S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Stompor, R. E-mail: jdborrill@lbl.gov E-mail: a.jaffe@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-03-01

    MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne, and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(10{sup 11}) time samples, O(10{sup 8}) pixels, and O(10{sup 4}) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms, and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analyzing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

  1. Simulated cosmic microwave background maps at 0.5 deg resolution: Basic results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have simulated full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy expected from cold dark matter (CDM) models at 0.5 deg and 1.0 deg angular resolution. Statistical properties of the maps are presented as a function of sky coverage, angular resolution, and instrument noise, and the implications of these results for observability of the Doppler peak are discussed. The rms fluctuations in a map are not a particularly robust probe of the existence of a Doppler peak; however, a full correlation analysis can provide reasonable sensitivity. We find that sensitivity to the Doppler peak depends primarily on the fraction of sky covered, and only secondarily on the angular resolution and noise level. Color plates of the simulated maps are presented to illustrate the anisotropies.

  2. Large-scale Inference Problems in Astronomy: Building a 3D Galactic Dust Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The term ''Big Data'' has become trite, as modern technology has made data sets of terabytes or even petabytes easy to store. Such data sets provide a sandbox in which to develop new statistical inference techniques that can extract interesting results from increasingly rich (and large) databases. I will give an example from my work on mapping the interstellar dust of the Milky Way. 2D emission-based maps have been used for decades to estimate the reddening and emission from interstellar dust, with applications from CMB foregrounds to surveys of large-scale structure. For studies within the Milky Way, however, the third dimension is required. I will present our work on a 3D dust map based on Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS over 3/4 of the sky (http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.01005), assess its usefulness relative to other dust maps, and discuss future work. Supported by the NSF.

  3. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  4. Mapping Biodiversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Wildlife Fund, Washington, DC.

    This document features a lesson plan that examines how maps help scientists protect biodiversity and how plants and animals are adapted to specific ecoregions by comparing biome, ecoregion, and habitat. Samples of instruction and assessment are included. (KHR)

  5. The Effective Theory of Inflation in the Standard Model of the Universe and the CMB+LSS Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Destri, C.; de Vega, H. J.; Sanchez, N. G.

    Inflation is today a part of the Standard Model of the Universe supported by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large scale structure (LSS) datasets. Inflation solves the horizon and flatness problems and naturally generates density fluctuations that seed LSS and CMB anisotropies, and tensor perturbations (primordial gravitational waves). Inflation theory is based on a scalar field φ (the inflaton) whose potential is fairly flat, leading to a slow-roll evolution. This review focuses on the following new aspects of inflation. We present the effective theory of inflation à la Ginsburg and Landau, in which the inflaton potential is a polynomial in the field φ and has the universal form V(\\varrphi) = NM4w(\\varrphi/[√ {N} MPl]), where w = { O}(1), M ≪ MPl is the scale of inflation and N 60 is the number of e-folds since the cosmologically relevant modes exit the horizon till inflation ends. The slow-roll expansion becomes a systematic 1/N expansion and the inflaton couplings become naturally small as powers of the ratio (M/MPl)2. The spectral index and the ratio of tensor/scalar fluctuations are ns - 1 = { O}(1/N), r = { O}(1/N), while the running index turns out to be dns/d ln k = { O}(1/N2) and therefore can be neglected. The energy scale of inflation M 0.7 × 1016 GeV is completely determined by the amplitude of the scalar adiabatic fluctuations. A complete analytic study plus the Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) analysis of the available CMB+LSS data (including WMAP5) with fourth degree trinomial potentials showed: (a) the spontaneous breaking of the φ → - φ symmetry of the inflaton potential; (b) a lower bound for r in new inflation: r > 0.023 (95% CL) and r > 0.046 (68 CL); (c) the preferred inflation potential is a double-well, even function of the field with a moderate quartic coupling yielding as the most probable values ns ≃ 0.964, r ≃ 0.051. This value for r is within reach of forthcoming CMB observations. The present data in the

  6. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  7. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@ipmu.jp

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling L = f(φ) ( − 1/4 F{sup 2} + γ/4 F ∼F ) between the inflaton φ and a vector field with vacuum expectation value  A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρ{sub A} does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, P{sub ζ}(k) = P(k)[1+g{sub *}( k-circumflex ⋅Â){sup 2}], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, B{sub ζ}(k{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}) = ∑{sub L} c{sub L} P{sub L} ( k-circumflex {sub 1} ⋅  k-circumflex {sub 2}) P(k{sub 1}) P(k{sub 2}) + 2 perms , with c{sub 0}:c{sub 1}:c{sub 2}=2-3:1 (c{sub 1}≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c{sub 1} contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to (a{sub ℓ1m1}a{sup *}{sub ℓ2m2}), with |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g{sub *}, c{sub 0}, c{sub 1} and c{sub 2}), translate into the upper limit ρ{sub A} / ρ{sub φ} ∼< 10{sup −9} at 0γ=. We find that the upper

  8. Planetary Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Batson, Raymond M.

    2007-02-01

    Preface; List of contributors; 1. Introduction R. Greeley and R. M. Batson; 2. History of planetary cartography R. M. Batson, E. A. Whitaker and D. E. Wilhelms; 3. Cartography R. M. Batson; 4. Planetary nomenclature M. E. Strobell and H. Masursky; 5. Geodetic control M. E. Davies; 6. Topographic mapping S. S. C. Wu and F. J. Doyle; 7. Geologic mapping D. E. Wilhelms; Appendices R. M. Batson and J. L. Inge; Index.

  9. Map Separates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2001-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) topographic maps are printed using up to six colors (black, blue, green, red, brown, and purple). To prepare your own maps or artwork based on maps, you can order separate black-and-white film positives or negatives for any color printed on a USGS topographic map, or for one or more of the groups of related features printed in the same color on the map (such as drainage and drainage names from the blue plate.) In this document, examples are shown with appropriate ink color to illustrate the various separates. When purchased, separates are black-and-white film negatives or positives. After you receive a film separate or composite from the USGS, you can crop, enlarge or reduce, and edit to add or remove details to suit your special needs. For example, you can adapt the separates for making regional and local planning maps or for doing many kinds of studies or promotions by using the features you select and then printing them in colors of your choice.

  10. Venus mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batson, R. M.; Morgan, H. F.; Sucharski, Robert

    1991-01-01

    Semicontrolled image mosaics of Venus, based on Magellan data, are being compiled at 1:50,000,000, 1:10,000,000, 1:5,000,000, and 1:1,000,000 scales to support the Magellan Radar Investigator (RADIG) team. The mosaics are semicontrolled in the sense that data gaps were not filled and significant cosmetic inconsistencies exist. Contours are based on preliminary radar altimetry data that is subjected to revision and improvement. Final maps to support geologic mapping and other scientific investigations, to be compiled as the dataset becomes complete, will be sponsored by the Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program and/or the Venus Data Analysis Program. All maps, both semicontrolled and final, will be published as I-maps by the United States Geological Survey. All of the mapping is based on existing knowledge of the spacecraft orbit; photogrammetric triangulation, a traditional basis for geodetic control on planets where framing cameras were used, is not feasible with the radar images of Venus, although an eventual shift of coordinate system to a revised spin-axis location is anticipated. This is expected to be small enough that it will affect only large-scale maps.

  11. EVIDENCE OF CROSS-CORRELATION BETWEEN THE CMB LENSING AND THE γ-RAY SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Fornengo, Nicolao; Regis, Marco; Perotto, Laurence

    2015-03-01

    We report the measurement of the angular power spectrum of cross-correlation between the unresolved component of the Fermi-LAT γ-ray sky maps and the cosmic microwave background lensing potential map reconstructed by the Planck satellite. The matter distribution in the universe determines the bending of light coming from the last scattering surface. At the same time, the matter density drives the growth history of astrophysical objects, including their capability at generating non-thermal phenomena, which in turn give rise to γ-ray emissions. The Planck lensing map provides information on the integrated distribution of matter, while the integrated history of γ-ray emitters is imprinted in the Fermi-LAT sky maps. We report here the first evidence of their correlation. We find that the multipole dependence of the cross-correlation measurement is in agreement with current models of the γ-ray luminosity function for active galactic nuclei and star-forming galaxies, with a statistical evidence of 3.0σ. Moreover, its amplitude can in general be matched only assuming that these extragalactic emitters are also the bulk contribution of the measured isotopic γ-ray background (IGRB) intensity. This leaves little room for a big contribution from galactic sources to the IGRB measured by Fermi-LAT, pointing toward direct evidence of the extragalactic origin of the IGRB.

  12. Isolation, characterization, and bioinformatic analysis of calmodulin-binding protein cmbB reveals a novel tandem IP22 repeat common to many Dictyostelium and Mimivirus proteins.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Suhre, Karsten; Myre, Michael A; Chatterjee-Chakraborty, Munmun; Chavez, Sara E

    2006-08-01

    A novel calmodulin-binding protein cmbB from Dictyostelium discoideum is encoded in a single gene. Northern analysis reveals two cmbB transcripts first detectable at 4 h during multicellular development. Western blotting detects an approximately 46.6 kDa protein. Sequence analysis and calmodulin-agarose binding studies identified a "classic" calcium-dependent calmodulin-binding domain (179IPKSLRSLFLGKGYNQPLEF198) but structural analyses suggest binding may not involve classic alpha-helical calmodulin-binding. The cmbB protein is comprised of tandem repeats of a newly identified IP22 motif ([I,L]Pxxhxxhxhxxxhxxxhxxxx; where h = any hydrophobic amino acid) that is highly conserved and a more precise representation of the FNIP repeat. At least eight Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus proteins and over 100 Dictyostelium proteins contain tandem arrays of the IP22 motif and its variants. cmbB also shares structural homology to YopM, from the plague bacterium Yersenia pestis. PMID:16777069

  13. A COMPARISON OF THE UCD/CIT AIR QUALITY MODEL AND THE CMB SOURCE-RECEPTOR MODEL FOR PRIMARY AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER. (R831082)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source contributions to primary airborne particulate matter calculated using the source-oriented UCD/CIT air quality model and the receptor-oriented chemical mass balance (CMB) model are compared for two air quality episodes in different parts of California. The first episode ...

  14. EVALUATION OF THE CMB AND PMF MODELS USING ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN FINE PARTICULATE MATTER COLLECTED DURING THE PITTSBURGH AIR QUALITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research investigated different strategies for source apportionment of airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected as part of the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study. Two source receptor models were used, the EPA Chemical Mass Balance 8.2 (CMB) and EPA Positive Matrix Facto...

  15. [The insula in partial epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Isnard, J; Mauguière, F

    2005-01-01

    The role of the insular lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) has often been suggested but never directly demonstrated. In this article, we review data from recent literature and from our stereo-electroencephalographic (SEEG) recordings in patients referred for temporal lobe epilepsy surgery (TLE). Our description of the clinical features of insular lobe seizures is based on data from video and SEEG ictal recordings and direct electric cortical stimulation in a population of 50 consecutive patients whose seizures, on the basis of scalp video EEG recordings, were suspected to originate from, or to rapidly propagate to, the peri-sylvian cortex. A total of 144 intra-insular electrodes have been implanted in this series of patients. In six patients a stereotyped sequence of ictal symptoms could be identified on the basis of electro-clinical correlations. The clinical presentation of insular lobe seizures was that of simple partial seizures occurring in full consciousness, beginning with a sensation of laryngeal constriction followed by paresthesiae that were often unpleasant affecting large cutaneous territories. These initial symptoms were eventually followed by dysarthric speech and/or elementary auditory hallucinations, and seizures often ended with focal dystonic postures. The insular origin of these symptoms was supported by the data from functional cortical mapping of the insula using direct cortical stimulations. We were able to reproduce several of the spontaneous ictal symptoms in the six patients with insular seizures. Moreover, from the whole set of insular stimulations that we performed it could be concluded that the insular cortex is involved in somatic, vegetative and visceral functions to which spontaneous ictal insular symptoms are related. The observation of the insular symptoms sequence at the onset of seizures in patients who are candidates for TLE surgery strongly suggests that the epileptic focus is located in the insular lobe. It entails the risk

  16. Receptor modelling of fine particles in southern England using CMB including comparison with AMS-PMF factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, J.; Cumberland, S. A.; Harrison, R. M.; Allan, J.; Young, D. E.; Williams, P. I.; Coe, H.

    2015-02-01

    PM2.5 was collected during a winter campaign at two southern England sites, urban background North Kensington (NK) and rural Harwell (HAR), in January-February 2012. Multiple organic and inorganic source tracers were analysed and used in a Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model, which apportioned seven separate primary sources, that explained on average 53% (NK) and 56% (HAR) of the organic carbon (OC), including traffic, woodsmoke, food cooking, coal combustion, vegetative detritus, natural gas and dust/soil. With the addition of source tracers for secondary biogenic aerosol at the NK site, 79% of organic carbon was accounted for. Secondary biogenic sources were represented by oxidation products of α-pinene and isoprene, but only the former made a substantial contribution to OC. Particle source contribution estimates for PM2.5 mass were obtained by the conversion of the OC estimates and combining with inorganic components ammonium nitrate, ammonium sulfate and sea salt. Good mass closure was achieved with 81% (92% with the addition of the secondary biogenic source) and 83% of the PM2.5 mass explained at NK and HAR respectively, with the remainder being secondary organic matter. While the most important sources of OC are vehicle exhaust (21 and 16%) and woodsmoke (15 and 28%) at NK and HAR respectively, food cooking emissions are also significant, particularly at the urban NK site (11% of OC), in addition to the secondary biogenic source, only measured at NK, which represented about 26%. In comparison, the major source components for PM2.5 at NK and HAR are inorganic ammonium salts (51 and 56%), vehicle exhaust emissions (8 and 6%), secondary biogenic (10% measured at NK only), woodsmoke (4 and 7%) and sea salt (7 and 8%), whereas food cooking (4 and 1%) showed relatively smaller contributions to PM2.5. Results from the CMB model were compared with source contribution estimates derived from the AMS-PMF method. The overall mass of organic matter accounted for is rather

  17. Gravity at the horizon: on relativistic effects, CMB-LSS correlations and ultra-large scales in Horndeski's theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, Janina; Zumalacárregui, Miguel; Montanari, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We address the impact of consistent modifications of gravity on the largest observable scales, focusing on relativistic effects in galaxy number counts and the cross-correlation between the matter large scale structure (LSS) distribution and the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Our analysis applies to a very broad class of general scalar-tensor theories encoded in the Horndeski Lagrangian and is fully consistent on linear scales, retaining the full dynamics of the scalar field and not assuming quasi-static evolution. As particular examples we consider self-accelerating Covariant Galileons, Brans-Dicke theory and parameterizations based on the effective field theory of dark energy, using the hi class code to address the impact of these models on relativistic corrections to LSS observables. We find that especially effects which involve integrals along the line of sight (lensing convergence, time delay and the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect—ISW) can be considerably modified, and even lead to O(1000%) deviations from General Relativity in the case of the ISW effect for Galileon models, for which standard probes such as the growth function only vary by O(10%). These effects become dominant when correlating galaxy number counts at different redshifts and can lead to ~ 50% deviations in the total signal that might be observable by future LSS surveys. Because of their integrated nature, these deep-redshift cross-correlations are sensitive to modifications of gravity even when probing eras much before dark energy domination. We further isolate the ISW effect using the cross-correlation between LSS and CMB temperature anisotropies and use current data to further constrain Horndeski models. Forthcoming large-volume galaxy surveys using multiple-tracers will search for all these effects, opening a new window to probe gravity and cosmic acceleration at the largest scales available in our universe.

  18. Fermat Potentials of Embedded Lensing, the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect, and Weak-Lensing of CMB by Cosmic Voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, R.; Dai, X.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an accurate gravitational lens theory for an inhomogeneity embedded in an otherwise homogeneous universe, which to the lowest order is applicable to any mass distribution. We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a FLRW cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) caused by individual large scale inhomogeneities, in particular, cosmic voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the CMB temperature fluctuation across such a lens as the derivative of the lens Fermat potential. Our formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. Our results are particularly useful for modeling ISW effects extracted through stacking large numbers of cosmic voids and clusters (that is, the aperture photometry method). For structures co-expanding with the background cosmology, i.e., for time-independent density contrasts, we find that the gravitational lensing time delay alone can produce fluctuations of the order of seen in recent observations by WMAP and Planck. We revisit the possibility of explaining the non-Gaussian cold spot on the south hemisphere via the Rees-Sciama effect of a large cosmic void using constraints obtained from the most recent void catalogs and our new void-lensing formalism, and compare it with other explanations such as a collapsing cosmic texture. We also study the remapping of primordial CMB anisotropies, the weak-lensing shear, and magnification caused by void lensing.

  19. Unveiling acoustic physics of the CMB using nonparametric estimation of the temperature angular power spectrum for Planck

    SciTech Connect

    Aghamousa, Amir; Shafieloo, Arman; Arjunwadkar, Mihir; Souradeep, Tarun E-mail: shafieloo@kasi.re.kr E-mail: tarun@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-02-01

    Estimation of the angular power spectrum is one of the important steps in Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data analysis. Here, we present a nonparametric estimate of the temperature angular power spectrum for the Planck 2013 CMB data. The method implemented in this work is model-independent, and allows the data, rather than the model, to dictate the fit. Since one of the main targets of our analysis is to test the consistency of the ΛCDM model with Planck 2013 data, we use the nuisance parameters associated with the best-fit ΛCDM angular power spectrum to remove foreground contributions from the data at multipoles ℓ ≥50. We thus obtain a combined angular power spectrum data set together with the full covariance matrix, appropriately weighted over frequency channels. Our subsequent nonparametric analysis resolves six peaks (and five dips) up to ℓ ∼1850 in the temperature angular power spectrum. We present uncertainties in the peak/dip locations and heights at the 95% confidence level. We further show how these reflect the harmonicity of acoustic peaks, and can be used for acoustic scale estimation. Based on this nonparametric formalism, we found the best-fit ΛCDM model to be at 36% confidence distance from the center of the nonparametric confidence set—this is considerably larger than the confidence distance (9%) derived earlier from a similar analysis of the WMAP 7-year data. Another interesting result of our analysis is that at low multipoles, the Planck data do not suggest any upturn, contrary to the expectation based on the integrated Sachs-Wolfe contribution in the best-fit ΛCDM cosmology.

  20. The topology and size of the universe from CMB temperature and polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanyan, Grigor; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P. S.

    2013-08-01

    We analyze seven year and nine year WMAP temperature maps for signatures of three finite flat topologies Script M0 = Bbb T3, Script M1 = Bbb T2 × Bbb R1, and Script M2 = S1 × Bbb R2. We use Monte-Carlo simulations with the Feldman-Cousins method to obtain confidence intervals for the size of the topologies considered. We analyze the V, W, and Q frequency bands along with the ILC map and find no significant difference in the results. The 95.5% confidence level lower bound on the size of the topology is 1.5L0 for Script M0, 1.4L0 for Script M1, and 1.1L0 for Script M2, where L0 is the radius of the last scattering surface. Our results agree very well with the recently released results from the Planck temperature data. We show that the likelihood function is not Gaussian in the size, and therefore simulations are important for obtaining accurate bounds on the size. We then introduce the formalism for including polarization data in the analysis. The improvement that we find from WMAP polarization maps is small because of the high level of instrumental noise, but our forecast for Planck maps shows a much better improvement on the lower bound for L. For the Script M0 topology we expect an improvement on the lower bound of L from 1.7L0 to 1.9L0 at 95.5% confidence level. Using both polarization and temperature data is important because it tests the hypothesis that deviations in the TT spectrum at small l originate in the primordial perturbation spectrum.

  1. A Map of the Cosmic Microwave Background from the BEAST Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, Peter R.; Bersanelli, Marco; Childers, Jeffrey; Figueiredo, Newton; Gaier, Todd C.; Halevi, Doron; Huey, Gregory G.; Kangas, Miikka; Lawrence, Charles R.; Levy, Alan; Lubin, Philip M.; Malaspina, Marco; Mandolesi, Nazzareno; Marvil, Joshua; Mejía, Jorge; Natoli, Paolo; O'Dwyer, Ian; O'Neill, Hugh; Parendo, Shane; Pina, Agenor; Seiffert, Michael D.; Stebor, Nathan C.; Tello, Camilo; Villa, Fabrizio; Villela, Thyrso; Wade, Lawrence A.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.; Williams, Brian; Wuensche, Carlos Alexandre

    2005-05-01

    We present the first sky maps from the BEAST (Background Emission Anisotropy Scanning Telescope) experiment. BEAST consists of a 2.2 m off-axis Gregorian telescope fed by a cryogenic millimeter wavelength focal plane currently consisting of six Q band (40 GHz) and two Ka band (30 GHz) scalar feed horns feeding cryogenic HEMT amplifiers. Data were collected from two balloon-borne flights in 2000, followed by a lengthy ground observing campaign from the 3.8 km altitude University of California White Mountain Research Station. This paper reports the initial results from the ground-based observations. The instrument produced an annular map covering the sky over 33deg<δ<42deg. The maps cover an area of 2470 deg2 with an effective resolution of 23' FWHM at 40 GHz and 30' at 30 GHz. The map rms (smoothed to 30' and excluding Galactic foregrounds) is 57+/-5 μK (Rayleigh-Jeans) at 40 GHz. Comparison with the instrument noise and correcting for 5% atmospheric attenuation gives a cosmic signal rms contribution of 29+/-3 μK (R-J) or 30+/-3 μK relative to a Planck blackbody of 2.7 K. An estimate of the actual cosmic microwave background (CMB) sky signal requires taking into account the l space filter function of our experiment and analysis techniques, carried out in a companion paper. In addition to the robust detection of CMB anisotropies, we find a strong correlation between small portions of our maps and features in recent Hα maps. In this work we describe the data set and analysis techniques leading to the maps, including data selection, filtering, pointing reconstruction, mapmaking algorithms, and systematic effects.

  2. Performance of Velicer's Minimum Average Partial Factor Retention Method with Categorical Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Luis E.; Abad, Francisco J.; Ponsoda, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Despite strong evidence supporting the use of Velicer's minimum average partial (MAP) method to establish the dimensionality of continuous variables, little is known about its performance with categorical data. Seeking to fill this void, the current study takes an in-depth look at the performance of the MAP procedure in the presence of…

  3. Partial confinement photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, S.; Hong, C.-Y.; Pfaff, N.; Kimerling, L. C.; Michel, J.

    2008-12-29

    One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides with an incomplete photonic band gap are modeled and proposed for an integration application that exploits their property of partial angular confinement. Planar apodized photonic crystal structures are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by reflectivity as a function of angle and polarization, validating a partial confinement design for light at 850 nm wavelength. Partial confinement identifies an approach for tailoring waveguide properties by the exploitation of conformal film deposition over a substrate with angularly dependent topology. An application for an optoelectronic transceiver is demonstrated.

  4. Vehicle detection using partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Kembhavi, Aniruddha; Harwood, David; Davis, Larry S

    2011-06-01

    Detecting vehicles in aerial images has a wide range of applications, from urban planning to visual surveillance. We describe a vehicle detector that improves upon previous approaches by incorporating a very large and rich set of image descriptors. A new feature set called Color Probability Maps is used to capture the color statistics of vehicles and their surroundings, along with the Histograms of Oriented Gradients feature and a simple yet powerful image descriptor that captures the structural characteristics of objects named Pairs of Pixels. The combination of these features leads to an extremely high-dimensional feature set (approximately 70,000 elements). Partial Least Squares is first used to project the data onto a much lower dimensional sub-space. Then, a powerful feature selection analysis is employed to improve the performance while vastly reducing the number of features that must be calculated. We compare our system to previous approaches on two challenging data sets and show superior performance.

  5. Genotype–phenotype correlations in Down syndrome identified by array CGH in 30 cases of partial trisomy and partial monosomy chromosome 21

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Robert; Béna, Frédérique; Gagos, Sarantis; Gehrig, Corinne; Lopez, Gipsy; Schinzel, Albert; Lespinasse, James; Bottani, Armand; Dahoun, Sophie; Taine, Laurence; Doco-Fenzy, Martine; Cornillet-Lefèbvre, Pascale; Pelet, Anna; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Toutain, Annick; Colleaux, Laurence; Horst, Jürgen; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Wakamatsu, Nobuaki; Descartes, Maria; Franklin, Judy C; Florentin-Arar, Lina; Kitsiou, Sophia; Aït Yahya-Graison, Emilie; Costantine, Maher; Sinet, Pierre-Marie; Delabar, Jean M; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most frequent congenital birth defects, and the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. In most cases, DS results from the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. DS has a complex phenotype, and a major goal of DS research is to identify genotype–phenotype correlations. Cases of partial trisomy 21 and other HSA21 rearrangements associated with DS features could identify genomic regions associated with specific phenotypes. We have developed a BAC array spanning HSA21q and used array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) to enable high-resolution mapping of pathogenic partial aneuploidies and unbalanced translocations involving HSA21. We report the identification and mapping of 30 pathogenic chromosomal aberrations of HSA21 consisting of 19 partial trisomies and 11 partial monosomies for different segments of HSA21. The breakpoints have been mapped to within ∼85 kb. The majority of the breakpoints (26 of 30) for the partial aneuploidies map within a 10-Mb region. Our data argue against a single DS critical region. We identify susceptibility regions for 25 phenotypes for DS and 27 regions for monosomy 21. However, most of these regions are still broad, and more cases are needed to narrow down the phenotypic maps to a reasonable number of candidate genomic elements per phenotype. PMID:19002211

  6. Mole Mapping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crippen, Kent J.; Curtright, Robert D.; Brooks, David W.

    2000-01-01

    The abstract nature of the mole and its applications to problem solving make learning the concept difficult for students, and teaching the concept challenging for teachers. Presents activities that use concept maps and graphing calculators as tools for solving mole problems. (ASK)

  7. Memphis Maps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Stanley; Cox, David; Martin, Cindy

    1998-01-01

    The Memphis Maps program, a collaborative effort of Memphis (Tennessee) educational institutions, public agencies, a bank, and community programs, trains local students in Geographic Information Systems technology and provides the community with valuable demographic and assessment information. The program is described, and factors contributing to…

  8. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  9. Complex partial status and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Gómez, J

    1988-04-01

    Three cases of complex partial status which were diagnosed as psychotic episodes are presented. The scans of two of these cases show structural abnormalities in the left temporal lobe. It is proposed that there are similar neurophysiological mechanisms in primary schizophrenia and in the perceptual, affective and cognitive phenomena apparent is some complex and psychic partial seizures. The hippocampal-amygdaline system plays a central role in both cases.

  10. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  11. Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Final Maps and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Jaorsik, N.; Hinshaw, G.; Odegard, N.; Smith, K. M.; Hill, R. S.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E.; Dunkley, J.; Kogut, A.; Limon,, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail.We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground reduced are presented.We nowimplement an optimal C(exp -1)1 weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained Lambda-CDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N(sub eff) = 3.84 +/- 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is (sub 0) = 13.772 +/- 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H(sub 0) = 69.32 +/- 0.80 km/s/ Mpc. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n(sub s) = 0.9608+/-0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Omega = -0.0027+0.0039/-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six

  12. Identification of galaxy clusters in cosmic microwave background maps using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novaes, C. P.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The Planck satellite was launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency to study the properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). An expected result of the Planck data analysis is the distinction of the various contaminants of the CMB signal. Among these contaminants is the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, which is caused by the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons by high energy electrons in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters. Aims: We modify a public version of the JADE (Joint Approximate Diagonalization of Eigenmatrices) algorithm, to deal with noisy data, and then use this algorithm as a tool to search for SZ clusters in two simulated datasets. Methods: The first dataset is composed of simple "homemade" simulations and the second of full sky simulations of high angular resolution, available at the LAMBDA (Legacy Archive for Microwave Background Data Analysis) website. The process of component separation can be summarized in four main steps: (1) pre-processing based on wavelet analysis, which performs an initial cleaning (denoising) of data to minimize the noise level; (2) the separation of the components (emissions) by JADE; (3) the calibration of the recovered SZ map; and (4) the identification of the positions and intensities of the clusters using the SExtractor software. Results: The results show that our JADE-based algorithm is effective in identifying the position and intensity of the SZ clusters, with the purities being higher then 90% for the extracted "catalogues". This value changes slightly according to the characteristics of noise and the number of components included in the input maps. Conclusions: The main highlight of our developed work is the effective recovery rate of SZ sources from noisy data, with no a priori assumptions. This powerful algorithm can be easily implemented and become an interesting complementary option to the "matched filter" algorithm (hereafter MF) widely used in SZ data analysis.

  13. Accelerating the cosmic microwave background map-making procedure through preconditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szydlarski, M.; Grigori, L.; Stompor, R.

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the sky signal from sequences of time ordered data is one of the key steps in cosmic microwave background (CMB) data analysis, commonly referred to as the map-making problem. Some of the most popular and general methods proposed for this problem involve solving generalised least-squares (GLS) equations with non-diagonal noise weights given by a block-diagonal matrix with Toeplitz blocks. In this work, we study new map-making solvers potentially suitable for applications to the largest anticipated data sets. They are based on iterative conjugate gradient (CG) approaches enhanced with novel, parallel, two-level preconditioners. We apply the proposed solvers to examples of simulated non-polarised and polarised CMB observations and a set of idealised scanning strategies with sky coverage ranging from a nearly full sky down to small sky patches. We discuss their implementation for massively parallel computational platforms and their performance for a broad range of parameters that characterise the simulated data sets in detail. We find that our best new solver can outperform carefully optimised standard solvers used today by a factor of as much as five in terms of the convergence rate and a factor of up to four in terms of the time to solution, without significantly increasing the memory consumption and the volume of inter-processor communication. The performance of the new algorithms is also found to be more stable and robust and less dependent on specific characteristics of the analysed data set. We therefore conclude that the proposed approaches are well suited to address successfully challenges posed by new and forthcoming CMB data sets.

  14. Map projections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    A map projection is used to portray all or part of the round Earth on a flat surface. This cannot be done without some distortion. Every projection has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. There is no "best" projection. The mapmaker must select the one best suited to the needs, reducing distortion of the most important features. Mapmakers and mathematicians have devised almost limitless ways to project the image of the globe onto paper. Scientists at the U. S. Geological Survey have designed projections for their specific needs—such as the Space Oblique Mercator, which allows mapping from satellites with little or no distortion. This document gives the key properties, characteristics, and preferred uses of many historically important projections and of those frequently used by mapmakers today.

  15. A CMB B-mode Search with Three Years of BICEP Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Colin; BICEP Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The search for B-mode, or curl-type, polarization in the Cosmic Microwave Background is the most promising technique to constrain or detect primordial gravitational waves predicted by the theory of inflation. The Bicep telescope, which observed from the South Pole for three years from 2006 through 2008, is the first experiment specifically designed to target this signal. We review the observational motivations for inflation, the advantages of B-mode observations as a technique for detecting the gravitational wave background, and the design features of Bicep that optimize it for this search. The final analysis of all three seasons of Bicep data is in progress, representing a 50% increase in integration time compared to the result from Chiang et al. (2010). A preview of the three year result includes E-mode and B-mode maps, as well as the projected constraint on r, the tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  16. Reasonable partiality in professional relationships.

    PubMed

    Almond, Brenda

    2005-04-01

    First, two aspects of the partiality issue are identified: (1) Is it right/reasonable for professionals to favour their clients' interests over either those of other individuals or those of society in general? (2) Are special non-universalisable obligations attached to certain professional roles? Second, some comments are made on the notions of partiality and reasonableness. On partiality, the assumption that only two positions are possible--a detached universalism or a partialist egoism--is challenged and it is suggested that partiality, e.g. to family members, lies between these two positions, being neither a form of egoism, nor of impersonal detachment. On reasonableness, it is pointed out that 'reasonable' is an ambiguous concept, eliding the notions of the 'morally right' and the 'rational.' Third, a series of practical examples are taken from counselling, medicine, law, education and religious practice and some common principles are abstracted from the cases and discussed. These include truth-telling, confidentiality, conflicts of interest between clients and particular others and between clients and society. It is concluded that while partiality can be justified as a useful tool in standard cases, particular circumstances can affect the final verdict.

  17. Analytic spectra of CMB anisotropies and polarization generated by relic gravitational waves with modification due to neutrino free-streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, T. Y.; Zhang, Y.

    2008-12-15

    We present an analytical calculation of the spectra of CMB anisotropies and polarizations generated by relic gravitational waves (RGWs). As a substantial extension to the previous studies, three new ingredients are included in this work. First, the analytic C{sub l}{sup TT} and C{sub l}{sup TE} are given; especially the latter can be useful to extract signal of RGWs from the observed data in the zero-multipole method. Second, a fitting formula of the decaying factor on small scales is given, coming from the visibility function around the photon decoupling. Third, the impacts by the neutrino free-streaming (NFS) is examined, a process that occurred in the early universe and leaves observable imprints on CMB via RGWs. It is found that the analytic C{sub l}{sup TT} and C{sub l}{sup TE} have profiles agreeing with the numeric ones, except that C{sub l}{sup TT} in a range l{<=}10 and the first trough of C{sub l}{sup TE} around l{approx}75 have some deviations. With the new damping factor, the analytic C{sub l}{sup EE} and C{sub l}{sup BB} match with the numeric ones with the maximum errors only {approx}3% up to the first three peaks for l{<=}600, improving the previous studies substantially. The correspondence of the positions of peaks of C{sub l}{sup XX} and those of RGWs are also demonstrated explicitly. We also find that NFS reduces the amplitudes of C{sub l}{sup XX} by (20%{approx}35%) for l{approx_equal}(100{approx}600) and shifts slightly their peaks to smaller angles. Detailed analyses show that the zero multipoles l{sub 0}, where C{sub l}{sup TE} crosses 0, are shifted to larger values by NFS. This shifting effect is as important as those caused by different inflation models and different baryon fractions.

  18. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Lu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials.

  19. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Planck Constant Deduced from Metrical Results of Doppler Effect of Moving Particle— Uncertainty Principle Caused byCollision of a Particle with CMB Photons and Virtual Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    Put two counters at origin O and particle P respectively, the wave-number difference counted by two counters at same moment is the length x between P and O (as a rod). The metrical result of known Doppler effect is: x(θ) = x0 (1+ β cos θ) (1). β= v/c, v is the velocity of counter to light-source, c = c+ = c -is the metrical one-way velocity of light, v • n = v cos θ, θ is the angle between v and unit-vector n of light-beam pointing to counter from light-source, x0 is the metrical length when v = 0. The result counted by a counter in one second is the light-wave frequency: f(θ) = f0 (1 -β cos θ) (2). f0 is the metrical frequency when v = 0. From Eq.(1) and Eq (2): x 2 (θ) = x0 2 (1+2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ); f 2 (θ) = f 0 2 (1-2 β cos θ + β 2 cos2 θ). Define the square-difference root of the metrical results in two contrary directions: ∆x = (x 2 (0) -x 2 (π)) 1/2 = 2 x0 β 1/2 (3); ∆f = (f 2 (0) -f 2 (π))1/2 = i 2 f0 β 1/2 (4); ∆x • ∆f = i 4 x0 f0 β (5). From p = m v and the variance in absolute average value of Eq.(2) ∆f= 2 f0 ∆v/π c, Eq.(5) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π x0 p (6). Once a particle collides with CMB photon, its velocity will change as in a quasi-Brownian motion. Let S be the average space-distance between CMB photons, the time-interval between two collisions is S / v, v is the velocity of particle. Because x0 is the length of an imaginary resting rod, i.e., after every collision the origin O must be reset jumpily at a new position and the jumpy distance (S/v) • ∆v is just the displacement of particle x0 , ∆v is the variance in velocity caused by each collision. The variance in momentum of particle ∆p in each collision is the average momentum p0 of CMB photon, then we obtain: x0 = S ∆v / v = S ∆p /p = S p0 /p and Eq.(6) changes into: ∆x•∆p= 2 π p0 S (7). The average energy and average momentum of CMB photon in 2.7K are: e0 = k T= 3.72•10-16 erg; p0 = e0 /c =1.24•10 -26 g cm s -1 . The