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Sample records for partial cranial cruciate

  1. Surgical treatment of a proximal diaphyseal tibial deformity associated with partial caudal and cranial cruciate ligament deficiency and patella baja.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, S; Knell, S; Pozzi, A

    2017-04-01

    Caudal cruciate ligament injury can be a complication following tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) (Slocum und Slocum, 1993) especially if the post-operative Tibial Plateau Angle (TPA) is less than 5 degree. We describe a case of negative TPA associated with partial cranial and caudal ligament rupture treated with a center of rotation of angulation (CORA) based cranial tibial opening wedge osteotomy and tibial tuberosity transposition. A 13 kg, mixed breed dog was presented for right pelvic limb lameness. Radiographically a bilateral patella baja and a malformed tibia tuberosity along with a bilateral TPA of -8 degree were detected. Arthroscopically a partial rupture of the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments were found. A cranial tibial opening wedge osteotomy of 23 degree and a fibular ostectomy were performed. The osteotomy was fixed with a 8 holes ALPS 9 (KYON, Switzerland) and a 3-holes 2.0mm UniLock plate (Synthes, Switzerland). Then a proximal tibial tuberosity transposition of 10mm was performed and fixed with a pin and tension band construct. The postoperative TPA was 15 degree. The radiographic controls at 6, 10 weeks, 6 months and 1 year after surgery revealed an unchanged position of the implants and progressive healing of the osteotomies. At the 6 and 12 months recheck evaluation the dog had no evidence of lameness or stifle pain and radiographs revealed complete healing of the osteotomy site and no implant failure. The diaphyseal CORA based osteotomy allowed accurate correction of a proximal tibial deformity associated with negative TPA.

  2. Aetiology and pathogenesis of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in cats by histological examination.

    PubMed

    Wessely, Marlis; Reese, Sven; Schnabl-Feichter, Eva

    2017-06-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine histologically intact and ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cats, in order to evaluate whether degeneration is a prerequisite for rupture. Methods We performed a histological examination of 50 intact and 19 ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments in cadaver or client-owned cats, respectively, using light microscopy. Cats with stifle pathology were further divided into five age groups in order to investigate the relationship of changes in the ligament with lifespan. Cats with ruptured cranial cruciate ligaments were divided into two groups according to medical history (with presumed history of trauma or without any known history of trauma) in order to investigate the relationship of ligament rupture with a traumatic event. Data from 200 healthy cats were selected randomly and reviewed to make a statistical comparison of cats with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture (reference group). Results On histological examination, the intact cranial cruciate ligaments showed basic parallel arrangement of the collagen fibres, with no relation to age. While cats of a more advanced age showed fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament - a likely physiological reaction to compression forces over the lifespan - degenerative changes within the fibrocartilage were absent in all cases, regardless of age or rupture status. Cats suffering from cranial cruciate ligament rupture without history of trauma were significantly older than cats in the reference group. Conclusions and relevance This study showed that differentiation of fibrocartilage in the middle of the cranial cruciate ligament is likely a physiological reaction to compressive forces and not a degenerative change associated with greater risk of rupture in advanced age. This finding in cats is distinct from the known decrease in differentiation of fibrocartilage in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. Furthermore, the histological examination

  3. Epidemiology of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs.

    PubMed

    Whitehair, J G; Vasseur, P B; Willits, N H

    1993-10-01

    Data from 10,769 dogs with rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) were compared with data from a control population of 591,548 dogs to determine whether age, breed, gender, or body weight was associated with prevalence of CCL rupture. Prevalence of CCL rupture increased as dogs became older, with peak prevalence in dogs 7 to 10 years old. Among breeds represented by > 1,000 individuals, Rottweilers, Newfoundlands, and Staffordshire Terriers had the highest prevalence of CCL rupture, whereas Dachshunds, Basset Hounds, and Old English Sheepdogs had the lowest. Neutered dogs, whether male or female, had a higher prevalence of CCL rupture than did sexually intact dogs. The dog's age at the time of ovariohysterectomy was not associated with prevalence of CCL rupture. Dogs weighing > 22 kg had a higher prevalence of CCL rupture, compared with dogs weighing < 22 kg, and tended to rupture their CCL at a younger age.

  4. Contralateral Cruciate Survival in Dogs with Unilateral Non-Contact Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Peter; Schwartz, Zeev; Malek, Sarah; Kreines, Abigail; Cabrera, Sady Y.; Buote, Nicole J.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Holzman, Gerianne; Hao, Zhengling

    2011-01-01

    Background Non-contact cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CrCLR) is an important cause of lameness in client-owned dogs and typically occurs without obvious injury. There is a high incidence of bilateral rupture at presentation or subsequent contralateral rupture in affected dogs. Although stifle synovitis increases risk of contralateral CrCLR, relatively little is known about risk factors for subsequent contralateral rupture, or whether therapeutic intervention may modify this risk. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a longitudinal study examining survival of the contralateral CrCL in client-owned dogs with unilateral CrCLR in a large baseline control population (n = 380), and a group of dogs that received disease-modifying therapy with arthroscopic lavage, intra-articular hyaluronic acid and oral doxycycline (n = 16), and were followed for one year. Follow-up in treated dogs included analysis of mobility, radiographic evaluation of stifle effusion and arthritis, and quantification of biomarkers of synovial inflammation. We found that median survival of the contralateral CrCL was 947 days. Increasing tibial plateau angle decreased contralateral ligament survival, whereas increasing age at diagnosis increased survival. Contralateral ligament survival was reduced in neutered dogs. Our disease-modifying therapy did not significantly influence contralateral ligament survival. Correlative analysis of clinical and biomarker variables with development of subsequent contralateral rupture revealed few significant results. However, increased expression of T lymphocyte-associated genes in the index unstable stifle at diagnosis was significantly related to development of subsequent non-contact contralateral CrCLR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CrCLR is common in client-owned dogs, with a median ligament survival time of 947 days. In this naturally occurring model of non-contact cruciate ligament rupture, cranial tibial translation is preceded by

  5. Radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging predicts severity of cruciate ligament fiber damage and synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Molly A.; Hans, Eric C.; Volstad, Nicola J.; Holzman, Gerianne; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Waller, Kenneth R.; Hao, Zhengling; Block, Walter F.

    2017-01-01

    Cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition in dogs. Dogs frequently develop a second contralateral CR. This study tested the hypothesis that the degree of stifle synovitis and cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) matrix damage in dogs with CR is correlated with non-invasive diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 29 client-owned dogs with an unstable stifle due to complete CR and stable contralateral stifle with partial CR. We evaluated correlation of stifle synovitis and CrCL fiber damage with diagnostic tests including bilateral stifle radiographs, 3.0 Tesla MR imaging, and bilateral stifle arthroscopy. Histologic grading and immunohistochemical staining for CD3+ T lymphocytes, TRAP+ activated macrophages and Factor VIII+ blood vessels in bilateral stifle synovial biopsies were also performed. Serum and synovial fluid concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and synovial total nucleated cell count were determined. Synovitis was increased in complete CR stifles relative to partial CR stifles (P<0.0001), although total nucleated cell count in synovial fluid was increased in partial CR stifles (P<0.01). In partial CR stifles, we found that 3D Fast Spin Echo Cube CrCL signal intensity was correlated with histologic synovitis (SR = 0.50, P<0.01) and that radiographic OA was correlated with CrCL fiber damage assessed arthroscopically (SR = 0.61, P<0.001). Taken together, results of this study show that clinical diagnostic tests predict severity of stifle synovitis and cruciate ligament matrix damage in stable partial CR stifles. These data support use of client-owned dogs with unilateral complete CR and contralateral partial CR as a clinical trial model for investigation of disease-modifying therapy for partial CR. PMID:28575001

  6. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in a cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Jackson, Joshua; Clippinger, Tracy L; Sutherland-Smith, Meg

    2015-03-01

    A 13-yr-old female Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) presented with an acute mild right pelvic limb lameness that progressed to a non-weight-bearing lameness. Diagnosis of a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) was made based on positive cranial drawer during physical examination and was supported by radiographs. A surgical repair with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and bone anchor with an OrthoFiber suture was performed. The tibial plateau angle was reduced from 30 to 5 degrees. The otter returned to normal function after 12 wk of exercise restriction. Twelve months after surgery, the left CCL ruptured and a TPLO was performed. No complications developed after either surgery, and the otter had an excellent return to function. This is the first report of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture and TPLO procedure in a mustelid, supporting its application to noncanid and felid species.

  7. Cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs: biology versus biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L

    2010-04-01

    The stifle joint of dogs is an organ comprised of multiple tissue types that must work in concert to maintain joint health and function. Cruciate disease in dogs is caused by a spectrum of causal and risk factors that result in a final common pathway of abnormal biomechanics and abnormal biology causing osteoarthritis, or organ failure, of the stifle and the clinical signs of lameness, pain, and limb dysfunction. It is vital to understand the components of the biologic and biomechanical pathologies to improve our understanding of cruciate disease in dogs so that we can improve preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies for our canine patients.

  8. Tibial plateau levelling osteotomy in eleven cats with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Mindner, Julia K; Bielecki, Malgorzata J; Scharvogel, Stefan; Meiler, Diane

    2016-11-23

    To report the surgical procedure, intra- and postoperative complications, and short-term follow-up of tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) in feline patients with cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) rupture using a 2.0 or 2.4 mm Synthes(®) TPLO plate. Prospective study. Eleven cats with a CrCL rupture were included in the study. Inspection of intra-articular structures was carried out via arthroscopy or arthrotomy. Each patient was re-examined one and 10 days after surgery. Orthopaedic examination and follow-up radiographs were obtained four to 12 weeks postoperatively. Two meniscopathies and one partial CrCL rupture were detected. Minor intra-operative complications occurred in five cats (suboptimal positioning of the plate [n = 3], proximal fibular fracture [n = 1], a visible osteotomy gap [n = 1]). Postoperatively, minor complications were detected in three cats (mild patellar desmitis [n = 2], superficial wound infection [n = 1]). No additional surgical reintervention, graded as major complication, was necessary. Four to eight weeks postoperatively, all cats showed no to mild intermittent lameness. Complete bone union was apparent within four to 12 weeks. Owners reported a high level of comfort and mobility during the last follow-up. The preliminary results of this study support the use of TPLO in cats, but larger case numbers are needed to evaluate its practicability, as well as long-term outcome (>1 year), especially evaluating the development and the clinical relevance of osteoarthritis.

  9. Preactivation of the quadriceps muscle could limit cranial tibial translation in a cranial cruciate ligament deficient canine stifle.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Juan M; Lefebvre, Michael; Böhme, Beatrice; Laurent, Cédric; Balligand, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness of the canine stifle. Application of tension in the quadriceps muscle could trigger cranial tibial translation in case of CrCL rupture. We replaced the quadriceps muscle and the gastrocnemius muscle by load cells and turn-buckles. First, eight canine limbs were placed in a servo-hydraulic testing machine, which applied 50% of body weight (BW). In a second phase, the CrCL was transected, and the limbs were tested in a similar manner. In a third phase, a quadriceps pretension of 15% BW was applied and limbs were again tested in a similar manner. Cranial tibial translation was significantly decreased in CrCL deficient stifles (p < 0.05) when quadriceps pretension was applied. These findings indicate that quadriceps pretension could play a role in the stability of a CrCL deficient stifle and should then be considered in rehabilitation programs and conservative treatment of CrCL rupture in dogs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of canine cranial cruciate ligament disease. A survey of ACVS Diplomates and primary care veterinarians.

    PubMed

    Duerr, F M; Martin, K W; Rishniw, M; Palmer, R H; Selmic, L E

    2014-01-01

    To describe veterinarians' treatment recommendations and decision-making factors for dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD). An online survey of American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS)-Diplomates (surgeon group) and primary care veterinarians (practitioner group) was performed. The survey included questions on treatment recommendations for common case scenarios (small or large breed dog with complete or partial CCLD), treatment decision factors, non-surgical treatment options, and actual treatment, if any, provided for a client-owned dog as well as one owned by their family or close friend. The response rate was 42% for the surgeon group (n = 305/723) and four percent for the practitioner group (n = 1145/ 27,771). Extracapsular stabilization (ES) was the most common treatment recommendation for CCLD in small (9.1 kg) breed dogs amongst surgeons and practitioners. Tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) was the most common treatment recommendation for CCLD in large (27.2 kg) breed dogs amongst both groups. The two most important treatment decision factors were dog size (78% of practitioners, 69% of surgeons) and activity level (63% of practitioners, 52% of surgeons). The most common treatment provided for a dog of their own or close relation in the surgeon group was TPLO (64%) followed by ES (15%), whereas in the practitioner group it was ES (38%) followed by TPLO (30%). Extracapsular stabilization and TPLO are the most commonly employed surgical procedures in the surveyed population; dog size and activity level (but not age) are the major factors influencing treatment decisions.

  11. Evaluation of vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most important stifle injuries and a common cause of lameness in dogs. Our objective was to measure the vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) using a pressure sensitive walkway. A pressure sensitive walkway was used to collect vertical force data from the pads of 10 Pitbulls affected with unilateral CCLR. Ten healthy Pitbulls were included in the study as controls. Velocity varied between 1.3 and 1.6 m/s and acceleration was kept below ± 0.1 m/s2. Differences between groups and between pads in the same limb within groups were investigated using ANOVA and the Tukey test. The paired Student t-test was employed to assess gait symmetry (p < 0.05). Results Peak vertical forces (PVF) were lower in the affected limb, particularly in the metatarsal pad. Increased PVF values in the forelimb and the contralateral hind limb pads of affected dogs suggest a compensatory effect. Conclusions A consistent pattern of vertical force distribution was observed in the pads of dogs with CCLR. These data are important for increased understanding of vertical force distribution in the limb of dogs with CCLR disease. Kinetic analysis using pressure sensitive walkways can be useful in follow-up assessment of surgically treated dogs regardless of the surgical technique employed. PMID:24581287

  12. Evaluation of vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre Navarro Alves; Tatarunas, Angelica Cecilia; Matera, Julia Maria

    2014-03-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most important stifle injuries and a common cause of lameness in dogs. Our objective was to measure the vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) using a pressure sensitive walkway. A pressure sensitive walkway was used to collect vertical force data from the pads of 10 Pitbulls affected with unilateral CCLR. Ten healthy Pitbulls were included in the study as controls. Velocity varied between 1.3 and 1.6 m/s and acceleration was kept below ± 0.1 m/s2. Differences between groups and between pads in the same limb within groups were investigated using ANOVA and the Tukey test. The paired Student t-test was employed to assess gait symmetry (p < 0.05). Peak vertical forces (PVF) were lower in the affected limb, particularly in the metatarsal pad. Increased PVF values in the forelimb and the contralateral hind limb pads of affected dogs suggest a compensatory effect. A consistent pattern of vertical force distribution was observed in the pads of dogs with CCLR. These data are important for increased understanding of vertical force distribution in the limb of dogs with CCLR disease. Kinetic analysis using pressure sensitive walkways can be useful in follow-up assessment of surgically treated dogs regardless of the surgical technique employed.

  13. Incidence of meniscal injury in cats with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Ruthrauff, Cassandra M.; Glerum, Leigh E.; Gottfried, Sharon D.

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the incidence of meniscal injury in cats with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) ruptures. Medical records for cats diagnosed with CCL ruptures treated by a lateral fabellotibial suture (LFS) were reviewed for signalment, history, physical examination and surgical findings. Ninety-five cats (98 stifles) met the inclusion criteria. The incidence of meniscal injuries in feline CCL deficient stifles was 67%. Isolated medial meniscal injuries were found in 55 stifles (56%), isolated lateral meniscal injuries were found in 5 stifles (5%), and lateral and medial meniscal injuries were found in 6 stifles (6%). There was no correlation between the presence of a meniscal injury and age, breed, sex, weight, duration of lameness, presence of concurrent medial patellar luxation, degree of degenerative joint disease, or presenting side of lameness. Given the high rate of meniscal pathology in cats with CCL ruptures, exploratory surgery for meniscal assessment and concurrent stifle stabilization should be considered in feline patients. PMID:22467966

  14. Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral Rupture in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the

  15. Modified cranial closing wedge osteotomy for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament insufficiency in dogs with excessive tibial plateau angles: Technique and complications in 19 cases.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Steven W; Cross, Alan R

    2017-04-01

    To describe short-term outcomes of a modified cranial closing wedge osteotomy (CCWO) for treatment of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease and excessive tibial plateau angle (eTPA). Retrospective clinical study. 18 client-owned dogs (19 stifles) with cranial cruciate ligament disease and eTPA (>34°). A modified CCWO was performed with Kirschner wires as osteotomy alignment aids. A juxta-articular neutral wedge osteotomy equal in angle to the preoperative TPA was performed. Fixation was achieved with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) plate and tension band wire apparatus (89%) or a TPLO plate (11%). Preoperative and postoperative, and recheck TPA, cranial tibial long axis shift, and major and minor complications were recorded. The mean preoperative TPA (49.5° ± 6.7°) was reduced postoperatively (8.3° ± 4.8°). Four of 19 joints (21%) developed 2 major and 3 minor complications during the intraoperative and follow-up period (577 day mean in-hospital recheck). Two cases were diagnosed with surgical site infections requiring implant removal for resolution. Fixation failure or implant complications were not observed in any dog during the limited radiographic follow-up period. All dogs were sound or recovering as expected, with 15/19 dogs (79%) showing complete radiographic osteotomy healing at their final in-hospital follow-up examination. Modified CCWO should be considered for the treatment of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs with eTPA. In this case series, the described technique was associated with uneventful osteotomy healing without implant failures in all dogs, although radiographic follow-up was limited in some cases. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Abnormal reflex activation of hamstring muscles in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Graham M; Granger, Nicolas; Langley-Hobbs, Sorrel J; Jeffery, Nick D

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms underlying cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs are poorly understood. In this study hamstring muscle reflexes in response to cranial tibial translation were analysed to determine whether these active stabilisers of the stifle joint are differently activated in dogs with CCLR compared to control dogs. In a prospective clinical study reflex muscle activity from the lateral and medial hamstring muscles (biceps femoris and semimembranosus) was recorded using surface electrodes in control dogs (n=21) and dogs with CCLR (n=22). These electromyographic recordings were analysed using an algorithm previously validated in humans. The hamstring reflex was reliably and reproducibly recorded in normal dogs. Both a short latency response (SLR, 17.6±2.1ms) and a medium latency response (MLR, 37.7±2.7ms) could be identified. In dogs with unilateral CCLR, the SLR and MLR were not significantly different between the affected and the unaffected limbs, but the MLR latency of both affected and unaffected limbs in CCLR dogs were significantly prolonged compared to controls. In conclusion, the hamstring reflex can be recorded in dogs and the MLR is prolonged in dogs with CCLR. Since both affected and unaffected limbs exhibit prolonged MLR, it is possible that abnormal hamstring reflex activation is a mechanism by which progressive CCL damage may occur. The methodology allows for further investigation of the relationship between neuromuscular imbalance and CCLR or limitations in functional recovery following surgical intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiographic location of the femoral footprint of the cranial cruciate ligament in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bolia, A; Winkels, P; Böttcher, P

    2015-01-01

    To describe the radiographic location of the center of the femoral footprint of the cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) in dogs. Using femora from 49 adult, orthopedically sound dogs (bodyweight≥20 kg), a radiopaque marker was placed on the cranial border of the femoral footprint of the CrCL. Computed tomography and threedimensional (3D) reconstruction of each femur was performed subsequently, followed by manual segmentation of the footprint on the 3D models and calculation of its center. Finally, virtual digital radiographs in two planes were produced and the location of the calculated center of the CrCL was expressed using three different methods (4x4 box grid method and percentage position for the medio-lateral projection; o'clock position for the disto-proximal projection). In the medio-lateral radiographs the center of the femoral footprint was consistently located in the second rectangle from the top of the most caudal column of the 4x4 grid. The mean percentage caudo-cranial and proximo-distal location was 20.2% (±2.2) and 33.8% (±3.7), respectively. In the disto-proximal radiograph, the o'clock position of the CrCL center was between 2 and 3 o'clock in 97.6% of cases. The radiographic location of the center of the femoral footprint can be consistently predicted in medio-lateral and disto-proximal stifle radiographs of dogs over 20 kg. The reported data can be used to plan and verify the placement of the femoral tunnel opening for intra-articular anatomic CrCL repair.

  18. An analysis of the quality of canine cranial cruciate ligament disease information available on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Taggart, Ryan; Wardlaw, Jennifer; Horstman, Christopher L; Mason, David R; Sidaway, Brian; Havas, Karyn

    2010-04-01

    To assess the quality of information available on the Internet pertaining to canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease. Survey Study. Three search phrases were entered separately into 5 search engines and the 1st page of websites from each search was analyzed. Unique websites were evaluated by 3 Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons using standardized scales for content and information value score (IVS). Websites were further categorized by veterinary or non-veterinary authorship. The readability of each website was scored using a proven literacy scale (Flesch-Kinkaid system). Fifty-four unique websites were evaluated. Websites located using anatomically correct veterinary terminology had significantly (P<.05) higher ratings for content and IVS compared with those found using lay terminology. Websites authored by veterinarians also had significantly (P<.05) higher IVS compared with those authored by non-veterinarians. Websites found using anatomically correct veterinary terminology, and those authored by veterinarians, had significantly (P<.05) lower readability scores, requiring a higher literacy level for comprehension. Information available on the Internet with respect to canine CCL disease is of highly variable quality. Use of anatomically correct veterinary terminology when conducting an Internet search detects sites with higher quality information; however, a higher literacy level is required to understand the material. Similarly, websites authored by veterinarians are more likely to present higher quality information, but require a more advanced literacy level for comprehension. CCL disease information on the Internet is of variable quality and can be misleading.

  19. Immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation of vascular distribution in intact canine cranial cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kei; Bhandal, Jitender; Kim, Sun Young; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Entwistle, Rachel; Naydan, Diane; Kapatkin, Amy; Stover, Susan M

    2011-02-01

    To (1) describe vascular distribution in the grossly intact canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) using immunohistochemical techniques specific to 2 components of blood vessels (factor VIII for endothelial cells, laminin for basement membrane); and (2) compare the vascularity in different areas of interest (craniomedial versus caudolateral bands; core versus epiligamentous regions; and proximal versus middle versus distal portions) in the intact normal canine CCL. In vitro study. Large, mature dogs (n=7) of breeds prone to CCL disease that were euthanatized for nonorthopedic conditions. Intact CCL were collected from fresh canine cadavers free from stifle pathology. CCL tissue was processed for immunohistochemistry and stained for factor VIII and laminin. Vascular density was determined by histomorphometric analysis. Specific vascular staining was sparsely identified throughout the CCL; however, the proximal portion of the CCL appears to have a greater number of vessels than the middle or distal portion of the ligament. The CCL is a hypovascular tissue and its vascular distribution is not homogeneous. © Copyright 2010 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  20. The effectiveness of 3D animations to enhance understanding of cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Clements, Dylan N; Broadhurst, Henry; Clarke, Stephen P; Farrell, Michael; Bennett, David; Mosley, John R; Mellanby, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most important orthopedic diseases taught to veterinary undergraduates. The complexity of the anatomy of the canine stifle joint combined with the plethora of different surgical interventions available for the treatment of the disease means that undergraduate veterinary students often have a poor understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of CCL rupture. We designed, developed, and tested a three dimensional (3D) animation to illustrate the pertinent clinical anatomy of the stifle joint, the effects of CCL rupture, and the mechanisms by which different surgical techniques can stabilize the joint with CCL rupture. When compared with a non-animated 3D presentation, students' short-term retention of functional anatomy improved although they could not impart a better explanation of how different surgical techniques worked. More students found the animation useful than those who viewed a comparable non-animated 3D presentation. Multiple peer-review testing is required to maximize the usefulness of 3D animations during development. Free and open access to such tools should improve student learning and client understanding through wide-spread uptake and use.

  1. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could

  2. Surgical management of partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Franceschi, Francesco; Zampogna, Biagio; Tecame, Andrea; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears involving the posterolateral (PL) bundle can lead to rotatory laxity of the knee, while tears involving the anteromedial (AM) bundle result in abnormal anteroposterior laxity of the knee. In this systematic review, we examine the best evidence on the management of partial tears of the ACL. A comprehensive search of several databases was performed from the inception of the database to December 2011, using various combinations of keywords focusing on clinical outcomes of human patients who had partial tears of ACL and who had undergone ACL augmentation. We evaluated the methodological quality of each article using the Coleman Methodology Score. Ten articles published in peer-reviewed journals were identified (392 males and 242 females), with a mean modified Coleman methodology of 66.1 ± 10.2. Only two studies compared standard ACL reconstruction and augmentation techniques. No study has a sample large enough to allow establishing guidelines. Validated and standardized proprioception assessment methods should be used to report outcomes. Imaging outcomes should be compared to functional outcomes, and a control group consisting of traditional complete ACL reconstruction should be present. There is a need to perform appropriately powered randomized controlled trials presenting clinical outcome with homogeneous score systems to allow accurate statistical analysis. ACL augmentation technique, preserving the intact AM or PL bundle of the ACL, is encouraging but currently available evidences are too weak to support his routine use in clinical practice.

  3. Low-field magnetic resonance imaging of early subchondral cyst-like lesions in induced cranial cruciate ligament deficient dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, D K; Hathcock, J T; Kincaid, S A; Rumph, P F; Kammermann, J; Widmer, W R; Visco, D; Sweet, D

    1998-01-01

    Six healthy adult male mongrel dogs underwent cranial cruciate ligament transection in the left stifle. Survey radiography of both stifles and low-field (0.064 T) MRI of the left stifle were performed preoperatively and at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Focal changes in signal intensity were seen with MRI in the subchondral bone of the medial tibial condyle at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. At 12 weeks postoperative, a cyst-like lesion was detected using MRI in the subchondral bone of the medial tibial condyle in 4 of 6 dogs and a less defined lesion at this site in the remaining 2 dogs. The cyst-like lesion was spherical in shape and showed typical characteristics of fluid with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and high signal intensity on inversion recovery images. The lesion was seen in the subchondral bone of the caudal medial and/or middle region of the tibial plateau slightly cranial to the insertion of the caudal cruciate ligament. No subchondral cysts were seen in the tibia on radiographs. Histopathologically, the tibia was characterized by a loose myxomatous phase of early subchondral cyst formation.

  4. The effectiveness of Pilates for partial anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Derya; Turkel, Nilgun

    2017-08-01

    This study explored the effects of Pilates on the muscle strength, function, and instability of patients with partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in situations in which a non-surgical treatment option is preferred. Fifty participants 20-45 years of age who were diagnosed with isolated ACL injuries were included in the study. The participants were randomly assigned to either the Pilates exercise group (n = 24) or the control group (n = 26). The subjects in the Pilates exercise group performed basic mat exercises that focused on the muscle strength and flexibility of the lower limbs and core muscles during each class session, which met three times per week for 12 weeks. The control group did not receive any treatment or home exercise programme. All patients were evaluated using the Lysholm Knee Scale, the Cincinnati Knee Rating System, and isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength. Patient satisfaction regarding improvement in knee stability was assessed using the Global Rating of Change scale. The Pilates group experienced significant improvement over the control group as measured by the difference in quadriceps strength at 12 weeks (p = 0.03). Both groups showed some clinical change over time, but the Pilates group improved for all outcome measurements at the 12-week follow-up, and the control group only improved for functional outcomes. Patient satisfaction with the level of knee stability based on the Global Rating of Change scale was higher in the Pilates group than in the control group. Although both groups exhibited improvements in knee strength and functional outcomes, the results suggest that Pilates is a superior management approach over a control treatment for increasing quadriceps strength in participants with partial ACL injury. Pilates may provide clinicians a novel option when choosing a treatment for a partial ACL injury. Further study is needed to determine whether certain subgroups of individuals might achieve an added

  5. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction.

  6. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of a short-duration 3 Tesla magnetic resonance protocol for diagnosing stifle joint lesions in dogs with non-traumatic cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the preferred diagnostic tool to evaluate internal disorders of many joints in humans; however, the usefulness of MR imaging in the context of osteoarthritis, and joint disease in general, has yet to be characterized in veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of short-duration 3 Tesla MR imaging for the evaluation of cranial and caudal cruciate ligament, meniscal and cartilage damage, as well as the degree of osteoarthritis, in dogs affected by non-traumatic, naturally-occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR). Diagnoses made from MR images were compared to those made during surgical exploration. Twenty-one client-owned dogs were included in this study, and one experienced evaluator assessed all images. Results All cranial cruciate ligaments were correctly identified as ruptured. With one exception, all caudal cruciate ligaments were correctly identified as intact. High sensitivities and specificities were obtained when diagnosing meniscal rupture. MR images revealed additional subclinical lesions in both the cranial and caudal cruciate ligaments and in the menisci. There was a “clear” statistical (kappa) agreement between the MR and the surgical findings for both cartilage damage and degree of osteoarthritis. However, the large 95% confidence intervals indicated that evaluation of cartilage damage and of degree of osteoarthritis is not clinically satisfactory. Conclusions The presence of cruciate ligament damage and meniscal tears could be accurately assessed using the MR images obtained with our protocol. However, in the case of meniscal evaluation, occasional misdiagnosis did occur. The presence of cartilage damage and the degree of osteoarthritis could not be properly evaluated. PMID:23448526

  8. Owner Evaluation of a CORA-Based Leveling Osteotomy for Treatment of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Injury in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Erin N; Hulse, Don

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate a center of rotation of angulation (CORA)-based leveling osteotomy for cranial cruciate ligament injury in dogs. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n=70). Medical records (March 2011 to March 2012) of dogs diagnosed with a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury treated with a CORA-based leveling osteotomy and stabilized using a bone plate and headless compression screw were reviewed. Radiographs were reviewed for tibial plateau angle and radiographic healing at final evaluation graded on a 5-point scale. Follow-up for a minimum of 6 months postoperatively was conducted by owner completion of a questionnaire regarding their dog's function after surgery. Based on owner responses, clinical outcomes were established. CORA-based leveling osteotomy was used for 70 stifles with CCL injury. The mean time to final radiographic recheck was 107 days (range, 32-424 days). Radiographic healing scores were 42 dogs (69%) with grade 4, 17 dogs (28%) with grade 3, and 2 dogs (3%) with grade 2. The mean time to follow-up was 11.9 months (range 6-18 months). Fifty-four of the 70 (77%) dogs had full function, 13 (19%) had acceptable function, and 3 (4%) had unacceptable function. Complications occurred in 11 stifles (16%), including 3 incisional, 6 late-onset meniscal tears, and 2 implant related. The described method of a CORA-based leveling osteotomy can be successfully performed for treatment of CCL injury in dogs. At the time of mid-term and long-term owner follow-up, most dogs in this case series had returned to full function. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. Effects of stifle flexion angle and scan plane on visibility of the normal canine cranial cruciate ligament using low-field magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Podadera, Juan; Gavin, Patrick; Saveraid, Travis; Hall, Evelyn; Chau, Jennifer; Makara, Mariano

    2014-01-01

    Low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used to evaluate dogs with suspected cranial cruciate ligament injury; however, effects of stifle positioning and scan plane on visualization of the ligament are incompletely understood. Six stifle joints (one pilot, five test) were collected from dogs that were scheduled for euthanasia due to reasons unrelated to the stifle joint. Each stifle joint was scanned in three angles of flexion (90°, 135°, 145°) and eight scan planes (three dorsal, three axial, two sagittal), using the same low-field MRI scanner and T2-weighted fast spin echo scan protocol. Two experienced observers who were unaware of scan technique independently scored visualization of the cranial cruciate ligament in each scan using a scale of 0-3. Visualization score rank sums were higher when the stifle was flexed at 90° compared to 145°, regardless of the scan plane. Visualization scores for the cranial cruciate ligament in the dorsal (H (2) = 19.620, P = 0.000), axial (H (2) = 14.633, P = 0.001), and sagittal (H (2) = 8.143, P = 0.017) planes were significantly affected by the angle of stifle flexion. Post hoc analysis showed that the ligament was best visualized at 90° compared to 145° in the dorsal (Z = -3.906, P = 0.000), axial (Z = -3.398, P = 0.001), and sagittal (Z = -2.530, P = 0.011) planes. Findings supported the use of a 90° flexed stifle position for maximizing visualization of the cranial cruciate ligament using low-field MRI in dogs. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  10. Outcome of Tibial Closing Wedge Osteotomy in 55 Cranial Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Stifles of Small Dogs (<15 kg).

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kathryn A; Payne, John T; Doornink, Michael T; Haggerty, Jamie

    2016-11-01

    To describe the outcome of cranial closing wedge osteotomy (CWO) of the tibia for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient stifles in dogs with a body weight of <15 kg. Retrospective case series. Forty-five client-owned dogs (n=55 stifles). Medical records (2005-2014), radiographs, and owner questionnaire were used to identify the surgical procedure performed, associated complications and outcome in 45 dogs undergoing CWO in 55 stifles. Data for 55 stifles from 45 dogs were included. Bichon Frise was the most frequent dog breed (n=11). Mean pre- and postoperative tibial plateau angle (TPA) were 36.3° (95% CI 35.1-37.5) and 7.5° (95% CI 6.7-8.2), respectively. Pin and tension bands were placed in 38/55 stifles (69%). The most frequent complication at short-term follow-up (2 weeks) was incisional complications in 8 stifles; all resolved with systemic antibiotic administration alone. Data were available for all stifles at 8 week follow-up with an overall complication occurrence in 16/55 stifles (28%); 1 dog required revision surgery. Tibial osteotomy healing was evident on radiographs at 8 weeks postoperative in 53 stifles (96%), considered complete in 27 stifles, and good in 26 stifles. Follow-up owner questionnaire was available for 36 dogs at a mean of 24 months and 34/36 owners (94%) were satisfied with the procedure and considered their dog had a good quality of life with minimal long-term complications. Dogs with a body weight <15 kg undergoing CWO for treatment of a CrCL-deficient stifle had a good outcome based on clinical status, radiographic evaluation, and owner questionnaire. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  11. Evaluation of an intra-articular synthetic ligament for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs: a six-month prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, Matthew D; Maritato, Karl; Schankereli, Kemal; Wotton, Harry; Naber, Steven

    2016-11-23

    Evaluate the short-term outcomes of a novel synthetic ligament for treatment of naturally occurring canine cranial cruciate ligament disease. Prospective clinical study. Dogs with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease (n = 50). Patient parameters evaluated included a five-point lameness score, evaluation of craniocaudal stifle instability, and radiographic findings over 24 weeks. Any postoperative complications were recorded. Thirty-four out of 42 dogs experienced significant improvements in lameness between the preoperative and 24 week time points. Lameness scores in those dogs improved significantly at all measured time intervals after postoperative week 2. Recurrence of stifle instability increased significantly over the study period from immediate postoperative measurements. Cranial drawer recurred in seven out of 42 of dogs by week 4 and 18/42 by week 24. Implant changes were not noted between the immediate and six-month postoperative radiographs except where complications occurred. Overall, 25 dogs experienced a total of 32 complications (22 major and 10 minor). Sixteen dogs had major complications, and nine had minor complications. The procedure was generally effective at improving lameness scores, but did not consistently maintain postoperative stifle stability and had an unacceptably high complication rate. This synthetic ligament procedure cannot be recommended for use in its current form.

  12. Complications and outcome of a new modified Maquet technique for treatment of cranial cruciate ligament rupture in 82 dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, J; Barthélémy, N; Noël, S; Claeys, S; Etchepareborde, S; Farnir, F; Balligand, M

    2015-01-01

    To describe the complications, short and long-term outcome and owner satisfaction of dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture treated with a recently described new osteotomy for the modified Maquet technique (N-MMT). Medical records and radiographs of 82 dogs (84 stifles) were reviewed. Details regarding short-term outcome and complications were recorded from the medical records. Long-term follow-up information was obtained by telephone interview. Historical data and complications were statistically analysed. Major complications occurred in 34/84 stifles. Intra-operative complications occurred in 26/84 stifles, all of which were fissures or fractures of the cortical hinge. Twenty-one of these fractures or fissures were repaired with a figure-of-eight wire. The second most common major complication was late meniscal tears in 3/84 stifles. One dog sustained a complete tibial fracture. Non-displaced fracture of the cortical hinge was the most common postoperative minor complication, which occurred in 5/84 stifles. The median preoperative lameness score was 3 out of 6. Final in-hospital re-evaluation of limb function was available in 58 dogs. The median lameness score at that time was 0 out of 6. Development of osteotomy related complications was not associated with a significant change in the postoperative lameness score. Subjectively assessed clinical outcome with the N-MMT was good to excellent in this cohort of dogs. However, a high rate of intra- and postoperative complications of the N-MMT procedure was also present in these dogs.

  13. Articular cartilage scores in cranial cruciate ligament-deficient dogs with or without bucket handle tears of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Kathryn; Beale, Brian S; Thames, Howard D; Saunders, W Brian

    2017-01-01

    To compare articular cartilage scores in cranial cruciate ligament (CCL)-deficient dogs with or without concurrent bucket handle tears (BHT) of the medial meniscus. Retrospective case series. Client-owned dogs treated with arthroscopy and tibial plateau leveling osteotomy or extracapsular repair for complete CCL rupture (290 stifles from 264 dogs). Medical records and arthroscopic images were reviewed. Medial femoral condyle (MFC) and medial tibial plateau (MTP) cartilage was scored using the modified Outerbridge scale. Periarticular osteophytosis (PAO) and injury to the medial meniscus were recorded. Data were analyzed using Student's t-tests, Wilcoxon rank-sum test, and Fisher's exact test for changes in the stifle based on meniscal condition, body weight, and duration of lameness. PAO, MFC, and MTP articular cartilage scores were not significantly different in dogs with or without BHT. There were no significant differences in MFC or MTP scores when dogs were evaluated based on bodyweight and the presence or absence of a BHT. However, PAO formation was significantly increased in dogs weighing >13.6 kg and concurrent meniscal injury vs. dogs weighing <13.6 kg and concurrent meniscal injury (P < .001). Significantly more stifles with chronic lameness (40 of 89; 44.9%) had the highest PAO score of 2 reported compared to only 42 of 182 stifles (23.1%) with acute lameness (P < .001). The presence of a BHT of the medial meniscus was not associated with more severe arthroscopic articular cartilage lesions in the medial joint compartment at the time of surgery. © 2016 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Epidemiology of Cranial Cruciate Ligament Disease Diagnosis in Dogs Attending Primary-Care Veterinary Practices in England.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Brown, Frances E; Meeson, Richard L; Brodbelt, Dave C; Church, David B; McGreevy, Paul D; Thomson, Peter C; O'Neill, Dan G

    2015-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence and risk factors for a diagnosis of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease in dogs and to describe the management of such cases attending primary-care veterinary practices. Historical cohort with a nested case-control study. Nine hundred and fifty-three dogs diagnosed with CCL disease from 171,522 dogs attending 97 primary-care practices in England. Medical records of dogs attending practices participating in the VetCompass project that met selection criteria were assessed. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression methods were used to evaluate association of possible risk factors with diagnosis of CCL disease. The prevalence of CCL disease diagnosis was estimated at 0.56% (95% confidence interval 0.52-0.59). Compared with crossbred dogs, Rottweilers, West Highland White Terriers, Golden Retrievers, Yorkshire Terriers, and Staffordshire Bull Terriers showed increased odds of CCL disease diagnosis while Cocker Spaniels showed reduced odds. Increasing bodyweight within breeds was associated with increased odds of diagnosis. Dogs aged over 3 years had increased odds of diagnosis compared with dogs aged less than 3 years. Neutered females had 2.1 times the odds of diagnosis compared with entire females. Insured dogs had 4 times the odds of diagnosis compared with uninsured dogs. Two-thirds of cases were managed surgically, with insured and heavier dogs more frequently undergoing surgery. Overall, 21% of cases were referred, with referral more frequent in heavier and insured dogs. Referred dogs more frequently had surgery and an osteotomy procedure. Breed predispositions and demographic factors associated with diagnosis and case management of CCL disease in dogs identified in this study can be used to help direct future research and management strategies. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. Simple arthroscopic partial meniscectomy associated with anterior cruciate-deficient knees.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S; Levas, M G; Harrah, A

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with combined tears of the meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament in the same knee were evaluated for the results of a simple arthroscopic meniscectomy that preserved the meniscal rim. These patients, classified as "recreational athletes," were analyzed to determine their postoperative functional capabilities. Using the presence or absence of the pivot shift sign as the most important indicator of functional capability, we found that partial meniscectomy was effective in allowing patients to regain a high degree of normal functional ability and in permitting forward motion activities. However, all patients were left with an anterior cruciate-deficient knee that caused laxity in the anterior plane and frequently in the rotatory plane. Rotatory laxity markedly limits activities, and those patients unable to adjust to their instability are considering further surgery.

  16. Rheological study of synovial fluid obtained from dogs: healthy, pathological, and post-surgery, after spontaneous rupture of cranial cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Goudoulas, Thomas B; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios G; Nychas, Stavros G; Papazoglou, Lysimachos G; Kazakos, George M; Kosmas, Panagiotis V

    2010-01-01

    In the present study synovial fluid (SF) obtained from the stifle joint of healthy adult dogs and of dogs after cranial cruciate ligament rupture was analyzed regarding its rheological characteristics according to the condition of the joint. The viscoelastic and shear flow properties were measured at 25 and 38 degrees C. The results showed that the healthy SF exhibits practically temperature independent viscosity curve and satisfactory viscoelastic characteristics, i.e. G' > G'', over frequencies of 0.05-5 Hz, and characteristic relaxation time lambda of the order of magnitude of 100 s. Creep measurements demonstrate that the zero shear viscosity was in the range of 10-100 Pa s. In shear flow viscosity measurements, by increasing gamma from 10(-4) s(-1) up to 10(3) s(-1), non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior was observed and the viscosity values were decreased from 10(3) to 0.1 Pa s. On the contrary, in pathological conditions of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR), the measured viscosity was found drastically reduced, i.e. between 100 and 10 mPa s. The CCLR synovial fluid, similar to healthy SF, exhibits insignificant temperature dependence. The present study showed also that about one week after a surgery for CCLR repair the SF exhibits non-Newtonian behavior of dilute polymers. After two weeks from the operation, however, the rheological behavior converges to the one of healthy SF.

  17. Influence of biomechanical parameters on cranial cruciate ligament-deficient or -intact canine stifle joints assessed by use of a computer simulation model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan P; Bertocci, Gina E; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the influence of 4 biomechanical parameters on canine cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-intact and -deficient stifle joints. SAMPLE Data for computer simulations of a healthy 5-year-old 33-kg neutered male Golden Retriever in a previously developed 3-D rigid body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase during walking. PROCEDURES Canine stifle joint biomechanics were assessed when biomechanical parameters (CrCL stiffness, CrCL prestrain, body weight, and stifle joint friction coefficient) were altered in the pelvic limb computer simulation model. Parameters were incrementally altered from baseline values to determine the influence on stifle joint outcome measures (ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation). Stifle joint outcome measures were compared between CrCL-intact and -deficient stifle joints for the range of parameters evaluated. RESULTS In the CrCL-intact stifle joint, ligament loads were most sensitive to CrCL prestrain. In the CrCL-deficient stifle joint, ligament loads were most sensitive to body weight. Relative tibial translation was most sensitive to body weight, whereas relative tibial rotation was most sensitive to CrCL prestrain. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, computer model sensitivity analyses predicted that CrCL prestrain and body weight influenced stifle joint biomechanics. Cranial cruciate ligament laxity may influence the likelihood of CrCL deficiency. Body weight could play an important role in management of dogs with a CrCL-deficient stifle joint.

  18. Biologic Approaches for the Treatment of Partial Tears of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Dallo, Ignacio; Chahla, Jorge; Mitchell, Justin J.; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Feagin, John A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) has been established as the gold standard for treatment of complete ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in active, symptomatic individuals. In contrast, treatment of partial tears of the ACL remains controversial. Biologically augmented ACL-repair techniques are expanding in an attempt to regenerate and improve healing and outcomes of both the native ACL and the reconstructed graft tissue. Purpose: To review the biologic treatment options for partial tears of the ACL. Study Design: Review. Methods: A literature review was performed that included searches of PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: partial tear of the ACL, ACL repair, bone marrow concentrate, growth factors/healing enhancement, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), stem cell therapy. Results: The use of novel biologic ACL repair techniques, including growth factors, PRP, stem cells, and bioscaffolds, have been reported to result in promising preclinical and short-term clinical outcomes. Conclusion: The potential benefits of these biological augmentation approaches for partial ACL tears are improved healing, better proprioception, and a faster return to sport and activities of daily living when compared with standard reconstruction procedures. However, long-term studies with larger cohorts of patients and with technique validation are necessary to assess the real effect of these approaches. PMID:28210653

  19. Joint space narrowing after partial medial meniscectomy in the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K Donald; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2007-09-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is common after total medial meniscectomy. In anterior cruciate ligament-intact knees, the reported outcomes of partial medial meniscectomy are variable. Radiographic assessment using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view is a reliable tool for detecting minor medial joint space narrowing, which may be an early sign of osteoarthritis. Studies that assessed the effect of partial medial meniscectomy found a low percentage of patients with >50% joint narrowing at 10 to 15 years after surgery. Digital radiography, using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view, is a highly sensitive method for observing minor joint space narrowing in the involved knee. A recent study showed that 88% of patients who underwent partial medial meniscectomy had joint space narrowing of <2 mm, and none had narrowing >or=2 mm, at a mean follow-up of 12 years. Subjective results after partial medial meniscectomy are favorable, with 88% to 95% of patients reporting good to excellent results.

  20. Fast presurgical magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal tears and concurrent subchondral bone marrow lesions. Study of dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Olive, J; d'Anjou, M-A; Cabassu, J; Chailleux, N; Blond, L

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears and subchondral bone marrow lesions have both been described in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture, but their possible concurrence has not been evaluated. In a population of 14 dogs exhibiting signs of stifle pain with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate ligament rupture, a short presurgical 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol including dorsal proton density, dorsal T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, and sagittal fat-saturated dual echo sequences was tested to further investigate these features and illustrate meniscal tears. Interobserver agreement for detection of medial meniscal tears (k=0.83) and bone marrow lesions (k=0.87) was excellent. Consensus MR reading allowed detection of nine out of 12 surgically confirmed medial meniscal tears and there was no false positive. All dogs had cruciate ligament enthesis-related bone marrow lesions in the tibia, femur or both bones. Additionally, among the 12 dogs with confirmed medial meniscal tears, subchondral bone marrow lesions were present in the caudomedial (9 dogs) and caudoaxial (11 dogs) regions of the tibial plateau, resulting in odds ratios (13.6, p=0.12, and 38.3, p=0.04, respectively) that had large confidence intervals due to the small group size of this study. The other two dogs had neither tibial bone marrow lesions in these locations nor medial meniscal tears. These encouraging preliminary results warrant further investigation using this clinically realistic preoperative MR protocol. As direct diagnosis of meniscal tears remained challenging in dogs even with high-field MR, identification of associated signs such as subchondral bone marrow lesions might indirectly allow suspicion of an otherwise unrecognized meniscal tear.

  1. Factors contributing to the variability of a predictive score for cranial cruciate ligament deficiency in Labrador Retrievers.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Devin P; Mostafa, Ayman A; Gordan-Evans, Wanda J; Boudrieau, Randy J; Griffon, Dominique J

    2017-08-14

    We recently reported that a conformation score derived from the tibial plateau angle (TPA) and the femoral anteversion angle (FAA), best discriminates limbs predisposed to, or affected by cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD), from those that are at low risk for CCLD. The specificity and sensitivity of this score were high enough to support further investigations toward its use for large-scale screening of dogs by veterinarians. The next step, which is the objective of the current study, is to determine inter-observer variability of that CCLD score in a large population of Labrador Retrievers. A total of 167 Labradors were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Limbs of normal dogs over 6 years of age with no history of CCLD were considered at low risk for CCLD. Limbs of dogs with CCLD were considered at high risk for CCLD. Tibial plateau and femoral anteversion angles were measured independently by two investigators to calculate a CCLD score for each limb. Kappa statistics were used to determine the extent of agreement between investigators. Pearson's correlation and intraclass coefficients were calculated to evaluate the correlation between investigators and the relative contribution of each measurement to the variability of the CCLD score. The correlation between CCLD scores calculated by investigators was good (correlation coefficient = 0.68 p < 0.0001). However, interobserver agreement with regards to the predicted status of limbs was fair (kappa value = 0.28), with 37% of limbs being assigned divergent classifications. Variations in CCLD scores correlated best with those of TPA, which was the least consistent parameter between investigators. Absolute interobserver differences were two times greater for FAAs (4.19° ± 3.15) than TPAs (2.23° ± 1.91). The reproducibility of the CCLD score between investigators is fair, justifying caution when interpreting individual scores. Future studies should focus on improving the reproducibility

  2. Biomechanical evaluation of a newly devised model for the elongation-type anterior cruciate ligament injury with partial laceration and permanent elongation.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Yamanaka, Masanori; Minami, Akio; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2003-12-01

    To biomechanically evaluate a newly devised model for the elongation-type anterior cruciate ligament injury with partial laceration and permanent elongation. Thirty-six rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups of 9 animals each, after a quantitative injury was given to the right anterior cruciate ligament. The 4 groups were sacrificed at 0, 6, 12, and 24 weeks after surgery, respectively. Biomechanical and histological evaluations were performed at each period. No adequate animal models have been established for the elongation-type anterior cruciate ligament injury in which the mid-substance is permanently elongated with partial laceration. The anteromedial and posterolateral half of the anterior cruciate ligament was transected at the proximal and distal one-third levels, respectively. Then, the anterior cruciate ligament was stretched by applying an anterior drawer force to the tibia at 90 degrees of knee flexion. The treatment significantly increased the anterior translation of the knee into approximately 150-250% at each period after surgery. The maximum load and the stiffness of the femur-anterior cruciate ligament-tibia complex significantly decreased to 30% or less immediately after surgery, and then gradually increased to 50% at 12 weeks. In this model, this quantitative treatment created serious injuries with partial laceration and permanent elongation in the anterior cruciate ligament to similar degrees. Also, incomplete tissue healing occurred in the anterior cruciate ligament to similar degrees after the treatment. This model will be useful to study new therapeutic methods for the elongation-type anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  3. Post-operative complications associated with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System in small- to medium-sized dogs: A retrospective analysis (2009–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Rappa, Nick S.; Radasch, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    This study classified and determined the post-operative complication rate associated with stabilization of cranial (CCL) ligament deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System (CCLRAS). Eighty-five medical records from 2009 to 2012 from 1 institution were evaluated. Complications were classified according to previously proposed definitions for orthopedic studies in veterinary medicine. Fifty-two owners were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after surgery and given a questionnaire to classify complications related to the implant. A visual analog scale was used to assess functionality and degree of pain. The overall complication rate was 30.3% with an inflammation-infection rate of 5.4% and a documented infection rate requiring implant removal of 1.8%. Owners reported full or acceptable function in 96% of cases with an average functional score of 86.5. Stabilization of CCL-deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine CCLRAS is reliable with acceptable complication rates. PMID:27493284

  4. Validity of GNRB® arthrometer compared to Telos™ in the assessment of partial anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, N; Bohu, Y; Naouri, J F; Klouche, S; Herman, S

    2014-02-01

    The main goal of this study was to compare the results of the GNRB(®) arthrometer to those of Telos™ in the diagnosis of partial thickness tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). A prospective study performed January-December 2011 included all patients presenting with a partial or full-thickness ACL tears without ACL reconstruction and with a healthy contralateral knee. Anterior laxity was measured in all patients by the Telos™ and GNRB(®) devices. This series included 139 patients, mean age 30.7 ± 9.3 years. Arthroscopic reconstruction was performed in 109 patients, 97 for complete tears and 12 single bundle reconstructions for partial thickness tears. Conservative treatment was proposed in 30 patients with a partial thickness tear. The correlation between the two devices was evaluated by the Spearman coefficient. The optimal laxity thresholds were determined with ROC curves, and the diagnostic value of the tests was assessed by the area under the curve (AUC). The differential laxities of full and partial thickness tears were significantly different with the two tests. The correlation between the results of laxity measurement with the two devices was fair, with the strongest correlation between Telos™ 250 N and GNRB(®) 250 N (r = 0.46, p = 0.00001). Evaluation of the AUC showed that the informative value of all tests was fair with the best results with the GNRB(®) 250 N: AUC = 0.89 [95 % CI 0.83-0.94]. The optimal differential laxity threshold with the GNRB(®) 250 N was 2.5 mm (Se = 84 %, Sp = 81 %). The diagnostic value of GNRB(®) was better than Telos™ for ACL partial thickness tears.

  5. 3D FSE Cube and VIPR-aTR 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging predicts canine cranial cruciate ligament structural properties

    PubMed Central

    Racette, Molly; Alsaleh, Habib; Waller, Kenneth R.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; McCabe, Ronald P.; Vanderby, Ray; Markel, Mark D.; Brounts, Sabrina H.; Block, Walter F.; Muir, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Estimation of cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) structural properties in client-owned dogs with incipient cruciate rupture would be advantageous. The objective of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of normal CrCL volume in an ex-vivo canine model predicts structural properties. Stifles from eight dogs underwent 3.0 Tesla 3D MRI. CrCL volume and normalized median grayscale values were determined using 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) Cube and Vastly under-sampled Isotropic PRojection (VIPR)-alternative repetition time (aTR) sequences. Stifles were then mechanically tested. After joint laxity testing, CrCL structural properties were determined, including displacement at yield, yield load, load to failure, and stiffness. Yield load and load to failure (R2=0.56, P<0.01) were correlated with CrCL volume determined by VIPR-aTR. Yield load was also correlated with CrCL volume determined by 3D FSE Cube (R2=0.32, P<0.05). Structural properties were not related to median grayscale values. Joint laxity and CrCL stiffness were not related to MRI parameters, but displacement at yield load was related to CrCL volume for both sequences during testing (R2>0.57, P<0.005). In conclusion, 3D MRI offers a predictive method for estimating canine CrCL structural properties. 3D MRI may be useful for monitoring CrCL properties in clinical trials. PMID:26831152

  6. Biomechanics of an orthosis-managed cranial cruciate ligament-deficient canine stifle joint predicted by use of a computer model.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina E; Brown, Nathan P; Mich, Patrice M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of an orthosis on biomechanics of a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint by use of a 3-D quasistatic rigid-body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to investigate influences of orthosis hinge stiffness (durometer). SAMPLE A previously developed computer simulation model for a healthy 33-kg 5-year-old neutered Golden Retriever. PROCEDURES A custom stifle joint orthosis was implemented in the CrCL-deficient pelvic limb computer simulation model. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation in the orthosis-stabilized stifle joint (baseline scenario; high-durometer hinge]) were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of orthosis hinge stiffness on model outcome measures. RESULTS The orthosis decreased loads placed on the caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments and increased load placed on the medial collateral ligament, compared with loads for the CrCL-intact stifle joint. Ligament loads were decreased in the orthosis-managed CrCL-deficient stifle joint, compared with loads for the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial translation and rotation decreased but were not eliminated after orthosis management. Increased orthosis hinge stiffness reduced tibial translation and rotation, whereas decreased hinge stiffness increased internal tibial rotation, compared with values for the baseline scenario. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Stifle joint biomechanics were improved following orthosis implementation, compared with biomechanics of the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Orthosis hinge stiffness influenced stifle joint biomechanics. An orthosis may be a viable option to stabilize a CrCL-deficient canine stifle joint.

  7. In vivo evaluation of intra-articular protection in a novel model of canine cranial cruciate ligament mid-substance elongation injury.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Mandi J; Robinson, Sandra O; Quinn, Margaret M; Hosgood, Giselle; Markel, Mark D

    2006-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of intra-articular protection (IAP) on the canine cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) and stifle in a CrCL midsubstance elongation injury model. Experimental longitudinal cohort study. Skeletally mature female mixed breed hounds (n=12; mean+/-SEM weight, 25.6+/-0.7 kg). After CrCL elongation in 1 stifle of each dog, IAP was applied in 6 joints. In vivo assessment included radiographs, cranial-caudal joint translation, gait analysis, and synovial fluid levels of 3B3(-) (proteoglycan epitope) and C2C (collagen II neoepitope) up to 12 weeks after surgery. Joint translation and rotation were quantified at necropsy. CrCL midsubstance length was determined before and after elongation and at necropsy. CrCLs were subjectively assessed with light microscopy. Comparisons were made between stifles containing elongated CrCLs with and without IAP and unoperated controls. Four weeks after surgery, ground reaction forces were significantly decreased in operated limbs. Absolute C2C levels were significantly elevated in operated stifles 4 weeks post-surgery. C2C and 3B3(-) levels normalized to total protein were significantly elevated in IAP+ stifles 8 weeks after surgery. Protected CrCLs appeared to have decreased granulation tissue and better collagen fiber alignment. IAP has negligible effects on the canine stifle based on the response variables evaluated in this 12-week study. Protection of elongated CrCLs may promote reduced, organized scar formation. These results support the healing capacity of the canine CrCL midsubstance following elongation injury and IAP application to potentially reduce cicatrix formation in elongated CrCLs.

  8. Technical difficulties during the training phase for Tightrope® and percutaneous lateral fabellar suture techniques for cranial cruciate ligament repair.

    PubMed

    Biskup, Jeffery J; Griffon, Dominique J

    2014-03-01

    To compare level of difficulty, deviations from technical description and postoperative assessment during the training of veterinary students, small animal surgical residents, and a board certified surgeon for Tightrope® (TR) and percutaneous lateral fabella suture (pLFS) techniques for cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) repair. Prospective study. Cadaveric canine pelvic limbs (n = 32). Sixteen 3rd year veterinary students, 6 small animal surgical residents and a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons performed the TR and pLFS techniques on paired limbs. Perceived level of difficulty, duration of surgery, and technical deviations were assessed by questionnaire, radiographs, and dissection. Results were compared between techniques with McNemar's test. The TR procedure was perceived as more technically demanding than the pLFS by veterinary students and residents. Technical deviations were overall more common after TR than pLFS, and in limbs repaired by students, regardless of procedure. The most difficult aspect of the TR consists of the bone tunnels whereas for pLFS it was passing the suture around the femorofabellar ligament. The sensitivity of radiographs for detection of technical deviations was 39% after TR and 50% after pLFS. Technical deviations are more common during the training phase of TR than pLFS, and the sensitivity of radiographs to detect those is low. Repeated practice on cadavers followed by dissection is recommended before use in patients. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  9. An evaluation of the analgesic effects of meloxicam in addition to epidural morphine/mepivacaine in dogs undergoing cranial cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, David; Isakow, Kevin; Caulkett, Nigel; Waldner, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    The analgesic efficacy of an epidural morphine/mepivacaine combination alone versus epidural morphine/mepivacaine in combination with meloxicam administered prior to the onset of anesthesia was assessed in 20 dogs undergoing cranial cruciate ligament repair. Numerical and visual analog pain scores were performed prior to anesthesia and at 6, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hours after epidural administration by a trained observer, blinded to treatment. An analgesiometer was used to determine the amount of pressure required to produce an avoidance response at the incision site. Animals that received meloxicam demonstrated a trend toward decreased pain scores over all time periods. Visual analog pain scores tended to be lower in dogs receiving meloxicam across all time periods, with a significant interaction between time and visual analog score at 6 and 8 hours (P < 0.05). No dogs receiving meloxicam required rescue analgesia, while 3 of 10 dogs in the epidural only group required rescue analgesia. Administration of meloxicam in addition to epidural morphine plus mepivacaine conveys improved analgesia as compared with epidural alone. Postoperative analgesia is reliably maintained for 24 hours following administration. PMID:13677595

  10. Short-term comparison of tibial tuberosity advancement and tibial plateau levelling osteotomy in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament disease using kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Márcio P; Ferrigno, Cássio R A; de Souza, Alexandre N A; Caquias, Daniela F I; de Figueiredo, Adriana V

    2016-05-18

    This study set out to compare the outcomes of tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) and tibial plateau levelling osteotomy (TPLO) procedures in the treatment of dogs affected with unilateral cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCLD) based on subjective parameters and objective pressure platform analysis (baropodometry). Twenty-seven adult dogs weighing over 20 kg that were presented with unilateral CCLD and were treated by the TTA (12 dogs) or TPLO (15 dogs) surgical procedure. Patient allocation to either group was based on tibial plateau angle (TPA), according to clinical guidelines (indication for TTA for dogs was a TPA up to 25°, and indication for TPLO was any TPA). Pressure platform analysis was performed prior to surgery and at four different postoperative time points (14, 30, 60 and 90 days). Limb function significantly improved following TTA and TPLO, with no significant differences between groups. The TTA and TPLO surgical procedures were considered to be equally effective in promoting weight bearing capacity recovery in dogs affected with unilateral CCLD under the conditions of this trial.

  11. Surgical treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament lesions: medium-term results

    PubMed Central

    BERRUTO, MASSIMO; GALA, LUCA; FERRUA, PAOLO; UBOLDI, FRANCESCO; FERRARA, FABRIZIO; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; MARELLI, BRUNO M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate subjective and objective clinical outcomes of partial reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in comparison with complete ACL reconstruction. Methods three groups, each comprising 20 patients, were evaluated at a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The group 1 patients underwent partial ACL reconstruction, while those in group 2 and group 3 underwent complete ACL reconstruction, performed using either bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or quadrupled hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, respectively. The subjective outcome was evaluated using the Lysholm knee scale and the subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain assessment and sporting activity was rated using the Tegner activity scale. Objective evaluation was performed using the IKDC objective form, KT-1000 arthrometer and KiRA triaxial accelerometer. Results at the follow-up evaluation, the mean subjective IKDC score was 86.1±10.3 in group 1, 85.2±11.1 in group 2, and 82.7±7.8 in group 3. The Lysholm score was 91.3±7.3 in group 1, 91.7±9.6 in group 2, and 89.4±6.1 in group 3. KT-1000 tests showed a mean side-to-side difference of 1.1 mm ± 1.5 mm (range, 0–5 mm) in group 1; 0.79 mm ± 0.8 mm (range, 0–2mm) in group 2; and 1.45 mm ± 1 mm (range, 0–3 mm) in group 3. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions both subjective and objective outcomes of partial ACL reconstruction were comparable to those of complete reconstruction, but partial reconstruction in the presence of a partial lesion of the ACL is considered by the authors to be more respectful of the native vascularization, innervation and anatomy of the ACL, conferring an advantage in terms of recovery of the complete function of the knee. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25750906

  12. Promising short-term results following selective bundle reconstruction in partial anterior cruciate ligament tears.

    PubMed

    Abat, Ferran; Gelber, Pablo Eduardo; Erquicia, Juan I; Pelfort, Xavier; Tey, Marc; Monllau, Juan Carlos

    2013-10-01

    The different functions of the two anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) bundles have increased interest in tears of only one of these two bundles. The purpose of this study was to assess the outcome of selective reconstruction of an injured bundle of isolated anteromedial bundle (AMB) or posterolateral bundle (PLB) tears. Consecutive series of 147 ACL reconstructions was prospectively analyzed. Patients with partial ACL tears who underwent selective bundle reconstructions were studied. Stability was assessed with the Lachman, anterior-drawer and pivot-shift tests and KT-1000. Functional assessment was performed with Lysholm and Tegner questionnaires. The preoperative MRI was analyzed to detect differences from arthroscopic findings. Twenty-eight patients (19%) were included. The minimum follow-up period was 30months. Eighteen had AMB and 10 PLB tears. Only 19% of their MRI's were categorized as partial ACL tears. The Lysholm score improved from 66.1/65.5 to 96.6/95.2 in the AMB/PLB groups, respectively (p<0.001). The same or no more than one level lower Tegner score was restored. The pivot-shift, Lachman and anterior-drawer tests were negative in all cases (p<0.001). Two reconstructed AMBs developed extension loss due to Cyclops lesions and were resolved surgically. The technique provided excellent functional scores with normalized stability and a return to previous level of activity with a low rate of minor complications at a minimum 2.5years' follow-up. Arthroscopic examination was the most reliable tool for properly diagnosing and treating a condition observed in almost one out of every five ACL reconstructed knee in this series. Therapeutic case series; level 4. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Do cats with a cranial cruciate ligament injury and osteoarthritis demonstrate a different gait pattern and behaviour compared to sound cats?

    PubMed

    Stadig, Sarah; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Bergh, Anna

    2016-10-20

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of chronic pain and dysfunction in older cats. The majority of cats with OA do not show signs of overt lameness, yet cats with orthopaedic disease are known to redistribute their body weight from the affected limb. OA can cause changes in the cat's behaviour, which is often misinterpreted as signs of aging. The aim of the present study was to investigate if cats with a previous cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) injury perform differently on the pressure mat and exhibit different behaviour compared to sound cats according to the owner´s subjective assessment. Ten cats with a previous CCL injury were assessed with a pressure mat system and their owners were asked to complete an assessment questionnaire. The results were compared to those of 15 sound cats, matched to have the same weight and body condition score. The front/hind limb index for peak vertical force (PVF) was significantly higher for CCL cats, and there was a decreased PVF and vertical impulse (VI) on the affected hindlimb compared to the unaffected one. The results indicate that cats with a previous CCL injury put less weight, on the affected hindlimb but for a longer time. There was a significantly higher owner assessment questionnaire score for the group of cats with CCL injury compared to sound cats. Cats with a previous CCL injury have a different gait pattern compared to sound cats and a different behaviour according to owner subjective assessment. It is of great importance that further studies are performed to investigate the long term effects of CCL injury as a cause of pain and physical dysfunction, and its role in the development of OA in cats. Improved assessment tools for chronic pain caused by OA in cats are needed, both to facilitate diagnosis and to evaluate pain-relieving treatment.

  14. In Vivo Evaluation of Intra-Articular Protection in a Novel Model of Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Mid-Substance Elongation Injury

    PubMed Central

    LOPEZ, MANDI J.; ROBINSON, SANDRA O.; QUINN, MARGARET M.; HOSGOOD, GISELLE; MARKEL, MARK D.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effects of intra-articular protection (IAP) on the canine cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) and stifle in a CrCL midsubstance elongation injury model. Study Design Experimental longitudinal cohort study. Animals Skeletally mature female mixed breed hounds (n = 12; mean ± SEM weight, 25.6 ± 0.7 kg). Methods After CrCL elongation in 1 stifle of each dog, IAP was applied in 6 joints. In vivo assessment included radiographs, cranial–caudal joint translation, gait analysis, and synovial fluid levels of 3B3(−) (proteoglycan epitope) and C2C (collagen II neoepitope) up to 12 weeks after surgery. Joint translation and rotation were quantified at necropsy. CrCL midsubstance length was determined before and after elongation and at necropsy. CrCLs were subjectively assessed with light microscopy. Comparisons were made between stifles containing elongated CrCLs with and without IAP and unoperated controls. Results Four weeks after surgery, ground reaction forces were significantly decreased in operated limbs. Absolute C2C levels were significantly elevated in operated stifles 4 weeks post-surgery. C2C and 3B3(−) levels normalized to total protein were significantly elevated in IAP + stifles 8 weeks after surgery. Protected CrCLs appeared to have decreased granulation tissue and better collagen fiber alignment. Conclusions IAP has negligible effects on the canine stifle based on the response variables evaluated in this 12-week study. Protection of elongated CrCLs may promote reduced, organized scar formation. Clinical Relevance These results support the healing capacity of the canine CrCL midsubstance following elongation injury and IAP application to potentially reduce cicatrix formation in elongated CrCLs. PMID:17187633

  15. Comparison of the mechanical characteristics of polymerized caprolactam and monofilament nylon loops constructed in parallel strands or as braided ropes versus cranial cruciate ligaments of cattle.

    PubMed

    Niehaus, Andrew J; Anderson, David E; Johnson, Jed K; Lannutti, John J

    2013-03-01

    To compare the mechanical characteristics of polymerized caprolactam and monofilament nylon loops with those of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) in cattle. 6 femorotibial joints harvested from 3 cows and suture constructs made from No. 8 polymerized caprolactam, 80-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line, and 450-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line. Joints were cleared of soft tissue structures except the CCL, connected to a load frame, and loaded to failure while measuring force and elongation. Synthetic constructs tested in a similar manner included single-stranded and 3-stranded No. 8 polymerized caprolactam, 3- and 6-stranded 80-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line, and 3- and 6-stranded 450-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line. The CCL ruptured at a mean ± SD force of 4,541 ± 1,417 N with an elongation of 2.0 ± 0.3 cm. The tensile strength of 3-stranded 450-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line was similar to that of the CCL, rupturing at loads of 5,310 ± 369 N (braided strands) and 6,260 ± 239 N (parallel strands). Elongation was greater for braided constructs. The 3-stranded cords of 450-lb test monofilament nylon fishing line most closely approximated the strength of the CCL. Marked increases in elongation occur when large-sized materials are constructed in braided configurations, and this elongation would likely not provide stability in CCL-deficient stifle joints. Additional studies are needed to determine whether any of these materials are suitable CCL replacements in cattle.

  16. Treadmill training with partial body-weight support after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    luo, Yuan; Shen, Weizhong; Jiang, Zhong; Sha, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the effects of treadmill training with partial body weight support (TTPBWS) and conventional physical therapy (PT) on subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 subjects were randomly allocated to either a treatment group or a control group. Subjects received either treadmill training with partial body weight support (treatment group) or conventional physical therapy (control group). The circumferences of the lower extremities, Holden classifications, 10-meter walking times and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were compared at 12 and 24 weeks post-operation. The knee joint stability was tested at 24 weeks post-operation using a KT-1000. [Results] Significant differences were found between the two groups at the 12 weeks post-operation. For most of the measures, there was no significant difference between the groups at 24 weeks post-operation. Interestingly, for most of the measures, there was no significant difference between their values in the treatment group at 12 weeks and their values in the control group at 24 weeks post-operation. [Conclusion] The function of a subject’s lower extremities can be improved and the improvement was clearly accelerated by the intervention of treadmill training with partial body weight support, without compromising the stability of the knee joints in a given follow-up period. PMID:28174445

  17. INDUCED REMODELING OF PORCINE TENDONS TO HUMAN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENTS BY α-GAL EPITOPE REMOVAL AND PARTIAL CROSSLINKING.

    PubMed

    Stone, Kevin Robert; Walgenbach, Ann; Galili, Uri

    2017-01-09

    This review describes a novel method developed for processing porcine tendon and other ligament implants which enables in situ remodeling into autologous ligaments in humans. The method differs from methods using extracellular matrices (ECM) which provide post-operative ortho-biologic support (i.e. augmentation grafts) for healing of injured ligaments, in that the porcine bone-patellar-tendon-bone itself serves as the graft replacing ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The method allows for gradual remodeling of porcine tendon into autologous human ACL while maintaining the biomechanical integrity. The method was first evaluated in a pre-clinical model of monkeys and subsequently in patients. The method overcomes detrimental effects of the natural anti-Gal antibody and harnesses anti-non gal antibodies for the remodeling process in two steps: Step 1. Elimination of α-gal epitopes- This epitope which is abundant in pigs (as in other non-primate mammals) binds the natural anti-Gal antibody which is the most abundant natural antibody in humans. This interaction, which can induce fast resorption of the porcine implant, is avoided by enzymatic elimination of α-gal epitopes from the implant with recombinant α-galactosidase. Step 2. Partial crosslinking of porcine tendon with glutaraldehyde- This crosslinking generates covalent bonds in the ECM which slow infiltration of macrophages into the implant. Anti-non gal antibodies are produced in recipients against the multiple porcine antigenic proteins and proteoglycans because of sequence differences between human and porcine homologous proteins. Anti-non gal antibodies bind to the implant ECM, recruit macrophages and induce the implant destruction by directing proteolytic activity of macrophages. Partial crosslinking of the tendon ECM decreases the extent of macrophage infiltration and degradation of the implant and enables concomitant infiltration of fibroblasts which follow the infiltrating macrophages. These

  18. [Is conservative treatment of partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture still justified? An analysis of the recent literature and a recommendation for arriving at a decision].

    PubMed

    Rauch, G; Wirth, T; Dörner, P; Griss, P

    1991-01-01

    In a review of the recent literature after conservative treatment of the complete anterior cruciate ligament (acl) rupture good results were found in an average (av) of 56% (12-80%) of all cases. In comparison the conservative treatment of partial tears showed in 84% (60-100%) of all cases good results. 79% (32-100%) of the patients with complete acl ruptures and 90% (66-100%) of the cases with partial acl tears were able to continue their sport activities. Secondary acl replacement or meniscus surgery were later necessary in 20% and 14% of the cases (av) with complete acl ruptures and in only 6% and 5% (av) of the cases with partial tears. Most of the patients who were operated later were young and ambitiously engaged in sports. The results of the mostly retrospective studies display a high variability. For this reason it is necessary to perform more prospective, controlled and randomized studies to verify the preventive effect of an early operative treatment to protect the joint form osteoarthritis and progressive instability. Arthrocopy is essential for all cases of acute hemartrosis. Partial acl tears are predominantly treated conservatively, while complete acl ruptures should be treated following an individual decision regimen. A tree for decision making of the treatment of acute acl-injuries is proposed.

  19. Protective effects of calcium gluconate on osteoarthritis induced by anterior cruciate ligament transection and partial medial meniscectomy in Sprague–Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to determine whether calcium gluconate exerts protective effects on osteoarthritis (OA) induced by anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) transection and partial medial meniscectomy. Methods Calcium gluconate was administered by mouth daily for 84 days to male ACL transected and partial medial meniscectomized Sprague–Dawley rats 1 week after operation. Results Eighty-four days of treatment with 50 mg/kg calcium gluconate led to a lower degree of articular stiffness and cartilage damage compared to the OA control, possibly through inhibition of overexpressed cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and related chondrocyte apoptosis. Similar favorable effects on stiffness and cartilage were detected in calcium gluconate-administered rats. Additionally, calcium gluconate increased 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) uptake based on observation of BrdU-immunoreactive cells on both the femur and tibia articular surface cartilages 84 days after intra-joint treatment with calcium gluconate. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate that calcium gluconate has a protective effect against OA through inhibition of COX-2 and related chondrocyte apoptosis. PMID:24602500

  20. Effects of administration of exogenous growth factors on biomechanical properties of the elongation-type anterior cruciate ligament injury with partial laceration.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Yasuda, Kazunori; Yamanaka, Masanori; Minami, Akio; Tohyama, Harukazu

    2005-02-01

    No studies have been conducted to clarify the in vivo effect of growth factor application on healing in the injured anterior cruciate ligament. Administration of exogenous growth factors significantly increases the structural properties of the injured anterior cruciate ligament. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-six rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups of 9 animals each after an overstretched injury was made in the right anterior cruciate ligament. In group 1, no treatment was applied around the injured anterior cruciate ligament. In group 2, 0.2 mL fibrin sealant was applied around it. In group 3, 4 ng transforming growth factor-beta1 mixed with 0.2 mL fibrin sealant was applied. In group 4, 20 microg platelet-derived growth factor-BB mixed with 0.2 mL fibrin sealant was applied. Each rabbit was sacrificed at 12 weeks after the surgery. In addition, 9 knees randomly harvested from all the left knees were used to obtain normal control data. The femur-anterior cruciate ligament-tibia complex specimens were biomechanically and histologically evaluated. Concerning the maximum load and the stiffness, group 3 was significantly greater than groups 1 and 2, whereas there were no significant differences among groups 1, 2, and 4. Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were significantly lower than the control group. The application of 4 ng transforming growth factor-beta1 significantly enhances healing in the injured anterior cruciate ligament. Administration of certain growth factors is of value to be studied as one of the future therapeutic options for the overstretched anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  1. In vivo local administration of osteogenic protein-1 increases structural properties of the overstretched anterior cruciate ligament with partial midsubstance laceration: a biomechanical study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, R; Kondo, E; Tohyama, H; Saito, T; Yasuda, K

    2008-10-01

    We report the effects of local administration of osteogenic protein-1 on the biomechanical properties of the overstretched anterior cruciate ligament in an animal model. An injury in the anterior cruciate ligament was created in 45 rabbits. They were divided into three equal groups. In group 1, no treatment was applied, in group II, phosphate-buffered saline was applied around the injured ligament, and in group III, 12.5 microg of osteogenic protein-1 mixed with phosphate-buffered saline was applied around the injured ligament. A control group of 15 rabbits was assembled from randomly-selected injured knees from among the first three groups. Each rabbit was killed at 12 weeks. The maximum load and stiffness of the anterior cruciate ligament was found to be significantly greater in group III than either group 1 (p = 0.002, p = 0.014) or group II (p = 0.032, p = 0.025). The tensile strength and the tangent modulus of fascicles from the ligament were also significantly greater in group III than either group I (p = 0.002, p = 0.0174) or II (p = 0.005, p = 0.022). The application of osteogenic protein-1 enhanced the healing in the injured anterior cruciate ligament, but compared with the control group the treated ligament remained lengthened. The administration of osteogenic protein-1 may have a therapeutic role in treating the overstretched anterior cruciate ligament.

  2. A new osteophyte segmentation algorithm using partial shape model and its applications to rabbit femur anterior cruciate ligament transection via micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, P K; Liang, G; Elkins, J M; Coimbra, A; Duong, L T; Williams, D S; Sonka, M

    2011-08-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from CT images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) rabbit femur model via CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semi-automatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate ( R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p-values: 0.065,0.001 and < 0.001 for 2- vs. 4, 4

  3. *Induced Remodeling of Porcine Tendons to Human Anterior Cruciate Ligaments by α-GAL Epitope Removal and Partial Cross-Linking

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Kevin R.; Walgenbach, Ann

    2017-01-01

    This review describes a novel method developed for processing porcine tendon and other ligament implants that enables in situ remodeling into autologous ligaments in humans. The method differs from methods using extracellular matrices (ECMs) that provide postoperative orthobiological support (i.e., augmentation grafts) for healing of injured ligaments, in that the porcine bone-patellar-tendon-bone itself serves as the graft replacing ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The method allows for gradual remodeling of porcine tendon into autologous human ACL while maintaining the biomechanical integrity. The method was first evaluated in a preclinical model of monkeys and subsequently in patients. The method overcomes detrimental effects of the natural anti-Gal antibody and harnesses anti-non-gal antibodies for the remodeling process in two steps: Step 1. Elimination of α-gal epitopes—this epitope that is abundant in pigs (as in other nonprimate mammals) binds the natural anti-Gal antibody, which is the most abundant natural antibody in humans. This interaction, which can induce fast resorption of the porcine implant, is avoided by enzymatic elimination of α-gal epitopes from the implant with recombinant α-galactosidase. Step 2. Partial cross-linking of porcine tendon with glutaraldehyde—this cross-linking generates covalent bonds in the ECM, which slow infiltration of macrophages into the implant. Anti-non-gal antibodies are produced in recipients against the multiple porcine antigenic proteins and proteoglycans because of sequence differences between human and porcine homologous proteins. Anti-non-gal antibodies bind to the implant ECM, recruit macrophages, and induce the implant destruction by directing proteolytic activity of macrophages. Partial cross-linking of the tendon ECM decreases the extent of macrophage infiltration and degradation of the implant and enables concomitant infiltration of fibroblasts that follow the infiltrating macrophages. These

  4. A New Osteophyte Segmentation Algorithm Using the Partial Shape Model and Its Applications to Rabbit Femur Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection via Micro-CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, G.; Elkins, J. M.; Coimbra, A.; Duong, L. T.; Williams, D. S.; Sonka, M.

    2015-01-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from computed tomography (CT) images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based on the active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to the anterior cruciate ligament transaction (ACLT) rabbit femur model via micro-CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM-based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and then apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial-ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM-derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semiautomatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3-D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on micro-CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate (R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p

  5. Cranial Neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Zahid H; Smith, Sarah S; Khawaja, Shehryar N; Scrivani, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities have improved the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain involving head and face. Recent updates in nomenclature of cranial neuralgias and facial pain have rationalized accurate diagnosis. Clear diagnosis and localization of pain generators are paramount, leading to better use of medical and targeted surgical treatments.

  6. Cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Hupp, Wendy S; Firriolo, F John

    2013-07-01

    This article describes the clinical findings of cranial neuralgias, such as trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, nervus intermedius neuralgia, and others, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pathophysiology of these neuralgias, diagnostic methods, and treatment are also discussed. This information will enable the dentist to diagnose patients who have these rare conditions.

  7. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Maria A; McGraw, Michael H; Wells, Lawrence; Jaramillo, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed.

  8. Morphologic and functional features of the canine cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    de Rooster, Hilde; de Bruin, Tanya; van Bree, Henri

    2006-12-01

    To review the gross, microscopic, and functional anatomy of the cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) in dogs. Literature review. Reports of the anatomy and function of the cruciate ligaments in dogs were retrieved by search of the 1975-2005 PubMed database. The CCL has an important biomechanical function resisting cranial drawer, hyperextension, and internal rotation and acts to fine tune and guide the stifle through its rolling and sliding motion. It has a complex architecture, and distinct geographic regions within the ligament have different functional roles depending on the angle and loading conditions. Collagen type I is the main component of the extracellular matrix; the fibrils have a crimped structure. The cruciate ligaments are almost completely covered by synovium, protecting them from synovial fluid. Cruciate blood supply is mainly of soft tissue origin. The intraligamentous network is relatively limited whereas the core of the middle third of the CCL is even less well vascularized. Neurohistologic studies are very limited in the dog. Various mechanoreceptors and proprioceptive receptors have been identified within the substance of the cruciate ligaments. CCL structural characteristics play an important part in its complex behaviour with the crimped pattern of the collagen fibrils being an important determinant of its biomechanical properties. In contrast to reports of managing CCL rupture, there are few reports describing the microanatomy and neurovascular morphology of the cruciate ligaments. Cruciate disease is likely multi-factorial. Improved understanding of CCL degradation leading to CCL rupture is critical to development of new diagnostic tests for cruciate disease in dogs. Appropriate intervention during the early stages of disease process might preserve CCL structural properties by preventing further collagen degradation. Accurate knowledge of functional and fiber bundle anatomy is imperative for reconstruction and restoration of normal stifle joint

  9. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePlus

    Third cranial nerve palsy; Oculomotor palsy; Pupil-involving third cranial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy - compression type ... nerve is affected. This disorder affects the third cranial nerve in the skull. This is one of the ...

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    MedlinePlus

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... knee. It prevents the knee from bending out. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is in the middle of the knee. ...

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  12. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es una Parálisis ...

  13. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  14. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Molecular Markers of Inflammation in Dogs with Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Peter; Hans, Eric C.; Racette, Molly; Volstad, Nicola; Sample, Susannah J.; Heaton, Caitlin; Holzman, Gerianne; Schaefer, Susan L.; Bloom, Debra D.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Hao, Zhengling; Amene, Ermias; Suresh, M.; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mid-substance rupture of the canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is an important veterinary health problem. CR causes stifle joint instability and contralateral CR often develops. The dog is an important model for human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, where rupture of graft repair or the contralateral ACL is also common. This suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may increase ligament rupture risk. We investigated use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to reduce systemic and stifle joint inflammatory responses in dogs with CR. Twelve dogs with unilateral CR and contralateral stable partial CR were enrolled prospectively. BM-MSCs were collected during surgical treatment of the unstable CR stifle and culture-expanded. BM-MSCs were subsequently injected at a dose of 2x106 BM-MSCs/kg intravenously and 5x106 BM-MSCs by intra-articular injection of the partial CR stifle. Blood (entry, 4 and 8 weeks) and stifle synovial fluid (entry and 8 weeks) were obtained after BM-MSC injection. No adverse events after BM-MSC treatment were detected. Circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower after BM-MSC injection. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was decreased at 4 weeks and serum CXCL8 was increased at 8 weeks. Synovial CRP in the complete CR stifle was decreased at 8 weeks. Synovial IFNγ was also lower in both stifles after BM-MSC injection. Synovial/serum CRP ratio at diagnosis in the partial CR stifle was significantly correlated with development of a second CR. Systemic and intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs in dogs with partial CR suppresses systemic and stifle joint inflammation, including CRP concentrations. Intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs had profound effects on the correlation and conditional dependencies of cytokines using causal networks. Such treatment effects could ameliorate risk of a second CR by modifying the stifle joint inflammatory response

  15. Occlusal cranial balancing technique.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerald H

    2007-01-01

    The acronym for Occlusal Cranial Balancing Technique is OCB. The OCB concept is based on the architectural principle of a level foundation. The principles of Occlusal Cranial Balancing are a monumental discovery and if applied will enhance total body function.

  16. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the brain to the back). Viewing the Cranial Nerves Twelve pairs of cranial nerves emerge from the ... magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often needed. Testing Cranial Nerves Cranial Nerve Number Name Function Test 1st Olfactory ...

  17. Computed tomographic evaluation of the canine intercondylar notch in normal and cruciate deficient stifles.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A; Allen, D A; Henrikson, T D; Lehenbauer, T W

    2008-01-01

    In the human and veterinary orthopaedic literature it has been implied that intercondylar notch stenosis is a mechanical factor in cranial cruciate ligament rupture and intraarticular graft failure. The patients in this study were classified as normal (32), unilateral cruciate rupture (23), or bilateral cruciate rupture (17). The dogs were placed under general anaesthesia and both stifles were scanned via computed tomography (CT) as previously described. Three CT slices at predetermined levels were evaluated within the notch. Measurements included opening notch angle, notch width and height, condyle width, and notch width index (notch width/condyle width) at two different heights within the notch. Intercondylar notch measurements at the most cranial extent were significantly more narrow in unilateral and bilaterally affected stifles when compared to the normal population. Significant differences were noted in the opening notch angle (ONA), notch width index (NWI), NWI at two thirds notch height (NWI2/3), and tibial slope index (TSI). No significant differences were noted between unilateral and bilateral affected stifles. Increased mechanical contact of the cranial cruciate ligament with a stenotic intercondylar notch may predispose the ligament to mechanical wear and structural weakening. Intercondylar notch measurements have been used as a tool to predict the risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in young human athletes, and to assess the risk factors for intra-articular graft replacements. Our findings may be useful in developing similar predictive models using stifle CT scans.

  18. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  19. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... tear. Contact sports. Athletes in sports such as football and soccer can tear their posterior cruciate ligament ... vehicle accident and participating in sports such as football and soccer are the most common risk factors ...

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100230.htm Anterior cruciate ligament repair - Series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a ligament in the center of ...

  1. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Relationship of cranial robusticity to cranial form, geography and climate in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Freidline, Sarah E; Wang, Steven L; Hanson, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Variation in cranial robusticity among modern human populations is widely acknowledged but not well-understood. While the use of "robust" cranial traits in hominin systematics and phylogeny suggests that these characters are strongly heritable, this hypothesis has not been tested. Alternatively, cranial robusticity may be a response to differences in diet/mastication or it may be an adaptation to cold, harsh environments. This study quantifies the distribution of cranial robusticity in 14 geographically widespread human populations, and correlates this variation with climatic variables, neutral genetic distances, cranial size, and cranial shape. With the exception of the occipital torus region, all traits were positively correlated with each other, suggesting that they should not be treated as individual characters. While males are more robust than females within each of the populations, among the independent variables (cranial shape, size, climate, and neutral genetic distances), only shape is significantly correlated with inter-population differences in robusticity. Two-block partial least-squares analysis was used to explore the relationship between cranial shape (captured by three-dimensional landmark data) and robusticity across individuals. Weak support was found for the hypothesis that robusticity was related to mastication as the shape associated with greater robusticity was similar to that described for groups that ate harder-to-process diets. Specifically, crania with more prognathic faces, expanded glabellar and occipital regions, and (slightly) longer skulls were more robust than those with rounder vaults and more orthognathic faces. However, groups with more mechanically demanding diets (hunter-gatherers) were not always more robust than groups practicing some form of agriculture.

  3. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology.

  4. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  5. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  6. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  7. Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis following cranial surgery.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Dmitriy; Uohara, Michael Y; Ichord, Rebecca; Ali, Zarina; Jastrzab, Laura; Lang, Shih-Shan; Billinghurst, Lori

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT) is an important, though less common subtype of pediatric stroke. It has been linked to several risk factors, including cranial procedures, with few studies highlighting this relationship. The aim of this study was to characterize the diagnosis and treatment of CSVT after cranial surgery. An institutional pediatric stroke research database was used to identify all CSVT cases diagnosed within 30 days of cranial surgery from November 2004 to December 2014. Thirteen subjects were retrospectively analyzed for clinical presentation, surgical details, radiographic characteristics, laboratory study results, treatment, and outcome. Diagnostic testing and treatment adhered to a consensus-based institutional stroke protocol. Cranial vault reconstruction, subdural empyema evacuation, and tumor resection were each observed in three subjects. Eleven (85%) subjects had sinus exposure during surgery, and eight (73%) developed thrombus in a sinus within or adjacent to the operative field. Two (15%) had documented iatrogenic sinus injury. On post-operative testing, ten (77%) subjects had prothrombotic abnormalities. Seven (54%) were treated with anti-coagulation therapy (ACT) starting on a median of post-operative day (POD) 3 (IQR 1-3) for a median of 2.9 months (IQR 2.4-5.4). Median time to imaging evidence of partial or complete recanalization was 2.4 months (IQR 0.7-5.1). No symptomatic hemorrhagic complications were encountered. Pediatric CSVT may be encountered after cranial surgery, and decisions related to anti-coagulation are challenging. The risk of CSVT should be considered in pre-surgical planning and post-operative evaluation of cases with known risk factors. In our study, judicious use of ACT was safe in the post-operative period.

  8. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  9. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  11. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  12. Nitric oxide induces cell death in canine cruciate ligament cells by activation of tyrosine kinase and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence suggesting that development of progressive canine cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture involves a gradual degeneration of the CCL itself, initiated by a combination of factors, ranging from mechanical to biochemical. To date, knowledge is lacking to what extent cruciate disease results from abnormal biomechanics on a normal ligament or contrary how far preliminary alterations of the ligament due to biochemical factors provoke abnormal biomechanics. This study is focused on nitric oxide (NO), one of the potential biochemical factors. The NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) has been used to study NO-dependent cell death in canine cranial and caudal cruciate ligament cells and to characterize signaling mechanisms during NO-stimulation. Results Sodium nitroprusside increased apoptotic cell death dose- and time-dependently in cruciate ligamentocytes. Cells from the CCL were more susceptible to apoptosis than CaCL cells. Caspase-3 processing in response to SNP was not detected. Testing major upstream and signal transducing pathways, NO-induced cruciate ligament cell death seemed to be mediated on different levels. Specific inhibition of tyrosine kinase significantly decreased SNP-induced cell death. Mitogen activated protein kinase ERK1 and 2 are activated upon NO and provide anti-apoptotic signals whereas p38 kinase and protein kinase C are not involved. Moreover, data showed that the inhibition reactive oxygen species (ROS) significantly reduced the level of cruciate ligament cell death. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that canine cruciate ligamentocytes, independently from their origin (CCL or CaCL) follow crucial signaling pathways involved in NO-induced cell death. However, the difference on susceptibility upon NO-mediated apoptosis seems to be dependent on other pathways than on these tested in the present study. In both, CCL and CaCL, the activation of the tyrosine kinase and the generation of ROS reveal

  13. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  14. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  15. Effects of Oral Contraceptive Use on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Gray, Aaron M; Gugala, Zbigniew; Baillargeon, Jacques G

    2016-04-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injuries often incur major consequences for athletes. Elevated estrogen levels are likely increase the risk for injury. This risk may be partially or fully mitigated by the use of oral contraceptives. The purpose of this study was to determine if women undergoing anterior cruciate ligament surgical reconstruction were less likely to use oral contraceptives than matched noninjured population. This is a case-control study utilizing national insurance claims data from 2002 TO 2012. Participants included women age 15-39 yr. Cases were defined as those receiving surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament between 2002 and 2012. Controls were matched 3/1 to cases. Exposure to oral contraceptives was defined as the presence of any prescription fill for oral contraceptives during the previous 12 months to index date. Conditional multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for the use of oral contraceptives. Women age 15-19 yr undergoing surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament were 18% less likely to use oral contraceptives than matched controls (adjusted odds ratio, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.75-0.91; P < 0.0001). Cases among two older age groups, 25-29 and 30-34 yr, were more likely to use oral contraceptives than controls with adjusted odds ratios of 1.15 (95% CI, 1.02-1.30; P < 0.05) and 1.16 (95% CI, 1.04-1.31; P < 0.05), respectively. The use of oral contraceptives potentially modifies anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in young women. Despite reports that athletes, who are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament injury, use oral contraceptives at about twice the rate of nonathletes, these data suggest that women ages 15-19 yr undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction used oral contraceptives at a lower rate than the general population.

  16. Arthroscopy of the normal cadaveric ovine femorotibial joint: a systematic approach to the cranial and caudal compartments.

    PubMed

    Modesto, R B; Mansmann, K A; Schaer, T P

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical studies using large animal models play an intergral part in translational research. For this study, our objectives were: to develop and validate arthroscopic approaches to four compartments of the stifle joint as determined via the gross and arthroscopic anatomy of the cranial and caudal aspects of the joint. Cadaveric hindlimbs (n = 39) were harvested from mature ewes. The anatomy was examined by tissue dissection (n = 6), transverse sections (n = 4), and computed tomography (n = 4). The joint was arthroscopically explored in 25 hindlimbs. A cranio-medial portal was created medial to the patellar ligament. The cranio-lateral portal was made medial to the extensor digitorum longus tendon. The medial femoral condyle was visible, as well as the cranial cruciate ligament, caudal cruciate ligament and both menisci with the intermeniscal ligament. Valgus stress improved visibility of the caudal horn of the medial meniscus and tibial plateau. To explore the caudal compartments, a portal was created 1 cm proximal to the most caudal aspect of the tibial condyle. Both femoral condyles, menisci, caudal cruciate ligament, the popliteal tendon and the menisco-femoral ligament were visible. The common peroneal nerve and popliteal artery and vein are vulnerable structures to injury during arthroscopy. The arthroscopic approach developed in this research is ideal to evaluate the ovine stifle joint.

  17. Precraniate origin of cranial motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    Dufour, Héloïse D.; Chettouh, Zoubida; Deyts, Carole; de Rosa, Renaud; Goridis, Christo; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Brunet, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    The craniate head is innervated by cranial sensory and motor neurons. Cranial sensory neurons stem from the neurogenic placodes and neural crest and are seen as evolutionary innovations crucial in fulfilling the feeding and respiratory needs of the craniate “new head.” In contrast, cranial motoneurons that are located in the hindbrain and motorize the head have an unclear phylogenetic status. Here we show that these motoneurons are in fact homologous to the motoneurons of the sessile postmetamorphic form of ascidians. The motoneurons of adult Ciona intestinalis, located in the cerebral ganglion and innervating muscles associated with the huge “branchial basket,” express the transcription factors CiPhox2 and CiTbx20, whose vertebrate orthologues collectively define cranial motoneurons of the branchiovisceral class. Moreover, Ciona's postmetamorphic motoneurons arise from a hindbrain set aside during larval life and defined as such by its position (caudal to the prosensephalic sensory vesicle) and coexpression of CiPhox2 and CiHox1, whose orthologues collectively mark the vertebrate hindbrain. These data unveil that the postmetamorphic ascidian brain, assumed to be a derived feature, in fact corresponds to the vertebrate hindbrain and push back the evolutionary origin of cranial nerves to before the origin of craniates. PMID:16735475

  18. Management of cranial base chondrosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Wanebo, John E; Bristol, Ruth E; Porter, Randall R; Coons, Stephen W; Spetzler, Robert F

    2006-02-01

    Chondrosarcomas are rare, infiltrative, progressive lesions that occur at the cranial base. Their intimate association with cranial nerves and major vessels of the head and neck often precludes complete surgical resection. Between 1983 and 2003, 23 patients (14 females, 9 males) were treated at our institution with the diagnosis of chondrosarcoma of the cranial base (mean age at presentation, 43 yr). A retrospective chart review was performed to evaluate presentation, management, and adjunctive treatment. All living patients were contacted for a current examination and disease status. The 23 patients underwent 43 surgical resections. Follow-up ranged from 8 months to 25 years (mean, 97 mo). Ten patients underwent various adjuvant radiation therapies. Five patients have died. Four patients have no evidence of disease, and 13 have residual tumor. One was lost to follow-up. Of 14 patients with 5 years of follow-up, 13 are living. Therefore, the absolute 5 year survival rate is 93%. The 10 year survival rate is 71%. Because of the intricate nature of the cranial base, a team approach is preferable for managing these challenging lesions. Maximum cytoreductive surgery should be pursued as an initial strategy to minimize neurological injury. Adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery can be used to treat residual disease or small recurrences. This cohort also illustrates that patients with chondrosarcomas have better long-term survival rates than patients with chordomas of the cranial base.

  19. Evaluation of a collagenase generated osteoarthritis biomarker in naturally occurring canine cruciate disease.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kei; Kim, Sun-Young; Lansdowne, Jennifer L; Kapatkin, Amy; Déjardin, Loïc M

    2009-01-01

    To determine the clinical value of a novel osteoarthritis (OA) biomarker in detecting canine cruciate disease. Cross sectional clinical study. Dogs (n=22) with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture and 12 control dogs. Concentrations of collagenase-generated cleavage epitope of type II collagen (Col2-3/4C(long mono), or C2C) in serum, urine, and joint fluid were compared between a group of dogs with CCL rupture and a control group. Correlation of C2C concentrations to the clinical stage of stifle OA was also evaluated. There were no significant differences in C2C concentrations in serum, urine, and joint fluid between groups (P>.05). Subjective scores of lameness, joint effusion, osteophytosis were significantly more severe in the CCL rupture group compared with the control group (P<.05). There was no significant correlation of C2C concentrations with clinical stage of stifle OA (P>.05). This OA biomarker did not detect pathology associated with CCL rupture. Our results suggest that collagenase-specific degradation of type II collagen in articular cartilage may not be involved in the early stage of naturally occurring canine cruciate disease, and that pathology associated with naturally occurring CCL rupture is different from that of experimental OA model. C2C is not clinically useful in detecting CCL rupture in dogs.

  20. Benign cranial mediastinal lesions in three cats.

    PubMed

    Malik, R; Gabor, L; Hunt, G B; Church, D B; Barrs, V R; Churcher, R; Dixon, R T; Huxley, C; Canfield, P J

    1997-03-01

    Cranial mediastinal lesions were detected in three cats, associated with respiratory impairment (case one), spontaneous pneumothorax (case two) and myasthenia gravis (case three), respectively. On gross and histological examination, the first case was considered either a lymphangioma or a branchial cystic mass of the thymic region of the mediastinum; a cystic lesion was suggested by sonographic detection of multiple anechoic cavitations within a circumscribed mass, while fine needle aspiration cytology excluded lymphosarcoma. The second case was diagnosed histologically as a cystic thymoma, but the third case was not examined microscopically. The masses were amenable to surgical excision in the first two cats, while this proved unnecessary in the third case because of resolution following treatment with dexamethasone. Corticosteroid responsiveness was unhelpful in distinguishing between these benign lesions and lymphosarcoma, as in two cases there was a partial or complete response to dosing with prednisolone or dexamethasone. These cases are presented to emphasise that conditions other than lymphosarcoma can produce cranial mediastinal lesions in cats, and that the prognosis for surgical treatment of lymphangiomas, multilocular thymic cysts and cystic thymomas can be excellent.

  1. Lyme borreliosis and cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Kindstrand, E

    1995-10-01

    In a 2-year study of 37 consecutive adult patients with isolated cranial nerve affection of primarily unknown origin, seen at a neurological clinic, borrelia infection was identified as the cause in six cases. Four patients had a peripheral facial palsy and two had a sixth nerve palsy. The patients with borreliosis had headaches or other pain considerably more often than patients with other or unknown aetiology. All six patients had accompanying symptoms and/or signs; in five cases these were obvious, and pointed to a borrelia infection. This study indicates that a careful history to elicit other symptoms of Lyme borreliosis will usually identify the cranial nerve affections with borrelial aetiology in adult patients. To verify the diagnosis, both serum and CSF analysis should be performed. Routine testing for borrelia serology in all patients with cranial neuropathy is generally not indicated.

  2. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies.

  3. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  4. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  5. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  6. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  7. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  10. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  12. Cranial trauma and the assessment of posttraumatic survival time.

    PubMed

    Steyn, M; De Boer, H H; Van der Merwe, A E

    2014-11-01

    Assessment of trauma on skeletal remains can be very difficult, especially when it comes to the estimation of posttraumatic survival time in partially healed lesions. The ability to reliably estimate the time an individual has survived after sustaining an injury is especially important in cases of child abuse and torture, but can also aid in determining the association between an injury and eventual death. Here a case from South Africa is reported, where the skeletal remains of an unknown individual were found with cranial and scapular fractures. These fractures all presented with macroscopic features indicative of healing. Using recently published data on the timing of fractures by De Boer et al., the two sets of cranial trauma and the scapular fracture were assessed by means of radiology, histology and microCT scanning. This was primarily done in order to obtain more information on the events surrounding the death of this individual, but also to assess the usability of the published methods on cranial fractures. It was found that the initial trauma was most likely sustained at least two weeks before death, whilst a neurosurgical procedure was performed at least one week before death. It seems that cranial fractures, especially if stable, may show some different healing features than postcranial fractures. The individual has since been identified, but unfortunately as is often the case in South Africa, limited information is available and the medical records could not be found. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACL injury - aftercare References Amy E, Micheo W. Anterior cruciate ligament tear. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO: ...

  14. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Adib F, Curtis C, Bienkowski P Micheli LJ. Posterior cruciate ligament sprain. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, ...

  15. The controversy of cranial bone motion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J S; Witt, P L

    1997-08-01

    Cranial bone motion continues to stimulate controversy. This controversy affects the general acceptance of some intervention methods used by physical therapists, namely, cranial osteopathic and craniosacral therapy techniques. Core to these intervention techniques is the belief that cranial bone mobility provides a compliant system where somatic dysfunction can occur and therapeutic techniques can be applied. Diversity of opinion over the truth of this concept characterizes differing viewpoints on the anatomy and physiology of the cranial complex. Literature on cranial bone motion was reviewed for the purpose of better understanding this topic. Published research overall was scant and inconclusive. Animal and human studies demonstrate a potential for small magnitude motion. Physical therapists should carefully scrutinize the literature presented as evidence for cranial bone motion. Further research is needed to resolve this controversy. Outcomes research, however, is needed to validate cranial bone mobilization as an effective treatment.

  16. Anterior Cruciate: Methods of Physical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Grant, John; Kirby, R. Lee

    1982-01-01

    Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament is a common, serious injury. Since the long-range consequences of uncorrected anterior cruciate incompetence are better understood, and surgical and rehabilitative measures improved, early accurate diagnosis is increasingly important. Besides a careful history, diagnosis requires the use of specific physical examination methods to reproduce the symptomatic subluxation (anterior shift or internal rotation) and to assess functional performance of the knee. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21286055

  17. Prosthetic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repairs: Current Status.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    patellar tendon was (dev eloped to augment or reconstruct the repaired anteriormenu cruciate ligamnent.’ The purpose of this app~roach was to provide an...intercondvlar niotch in the manner of Eriksson. ’ Thus the transfe~rred patellar tendon lay adjacent to the repairedI anterior cruciate ligament and supportedl...splint.’ B y using a hiode- hinli(tionl).ly gradable ligament. autogenous tissue grafts. such ats at portion of the, patella tendon . at asfied with would

  18. Cranial kinesis in palaeognathous birds.

    PubMed

    Gussekloo, Sander W S; Bout, Ron G

    2005-09-01

    Cranial kinesis in birds is induced by muscles located caudal on the cranium. These forces are transferred onto the moveable parts of the skull via the Pterygoid-Palatinum Complex (PPC). This bony structure therefore plays an essential role in cranial kinesis. In palaeognathous birds the morphology of the PPC is remarkably different from that of neognathous birds and is thought to be related to the specific type of cranial kinesis in palaeognaths known as central rhynchokinesis. We determined whether clear bending zones as found in neognaths are present in the upper bill of paleognaths, and measured bending forces opposing elevation of the upper bill. A static force model was used to calculate the opening forces that can be produced by some of the palaeognathous species. We found that no clear bending zones are present in the upper bill, and bending is expected to occur over the whole length of the upper bill. Muscle forces are more than sufficient to overcome bending forces and to elevate the upper bill. The resistance against bending by the bony elements alone is very low, which might indicate that bending of bony elements can occur during food handling when muscles are not used to stabilise the upper bill. Model calculations suggest that the large processi basipterygoidei play a role in stabilizing the skull elements, when birds have to resist external opening forces on the upper bill as might occur during tearing leafs from plants. We conclude that the specific morphology of the palaeognathous upper bill and PPC are not designed for active cranial kinesis, but are adapted to resist external forces that might cause unwanted elevation of the upper bill during feeding.

  19. Cranial computed tomography and MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book appears to be a hybrid between an atlas and a text. The second edition attempts to depict the current status of both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in neuroradiology. Although only the final chapter of the book is completely devoted to cranial MR imaging, MR images are scattered throughout various other chapters. There is coverage of the major anatomic and pathophysiologic entities. There are 17 chapters with images, tables, and diagrams.

  20. Inferior Lateral Genicular Artery Injury during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lamo-Espinosa, J. M.; Llombart Blanco, R.; Valentí, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of inferior lateral genicular artery (ILG) injury during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery with lateral partial meniscectomy. This is a rare arthroscopy complication. A review of the literature has been made with the aim to define the anatomy of ILG across the lateral articular line and the risk of lesion during knee arthroscopy. We propose embolization as a good treatment option for this type of injuries. PMID:22957293

  1. Madurella mycetoma--a rare case with cranial extension.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Shradha; Figueiredo, Antonio; Narurkar, Swati; Goel, Atul

    2010-01-01

    Madurella species of fungus causes chronic subcutaneous infection of lower extremities; the infection is commonly labeled as Madura foot. We report a case of Madurella infection involving the cranial cavity. Such an involvement by Madurella fungal infection is not recorded in the literature. A 31-year-old non-immunocompromised male patient presented with complaints of left hemifacial pain for 1 year and diplopia on looking toward left side for a period of 2 weeks. On examination, he had ipsilateral sixth nerve paresis. Investigations revealed a large paranasal sinus lesion that extended in the cavernous sinus. The lesion was partially resected. Histologic examination revealed that the lesion was a fungus Madurella mycetomi. A rare cranial extension of Madurella fungal infection is reported. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of lower cranial nerve deficits.

    PubMed

    Syms, M J; Singson, M T; Burgess, L P

    1997-10-01

    Patients with cranial base tumors often present with cranial neuropathies or develop cranial deficits as a consequence of skull base surgery. Deficits involving cranial nerves IX, X, XI, and XII can lead to significant morbidity for patients. A standard evaluation of a patient with a suspected skull base lesion or a postsurgical patient would consist of a complete history and physical examination, including a bedside examination and videofluoroscopy. Other modalities, including fiberoptic endoscopic examination of swallowing safety, ultrasound, and manofluorography, are used less frequently.

  3. Cranial kinesis in the amphibia: a review.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    All extant orders of amphibians are characterized by kinetic skulls. Main type of intracranial movability in amphibians is pleurokinetism, that is supplemented in different amphibian groups by various types of rhyncho- and prokinetism. The most primitive pattern of cranial kinesis is revealed in the stegocrotaphic gymnophions. More paedomorphic species retain general cranial flexibility that is characteristic of larval skull. That is unfavourable for evolution of well-regulated (adult) cranial kinesis and related feeding adaptations. Kinetism is also reduced in the species with heavily ossified skulls. Adaptive role and evolution of cranial kinesis in amphibians are discussed.

  4. The Cruciate Ligaments in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Parcells, Bertrand W; Tria, Alfred J

    2016-01-01

    The early knee replacements were hinge designs that ignored the ligaments of the knee and resurfaced the joint, allowing freedom of motion in a single plane. Advances in implant fixation paved the way for modern designs, including the posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that sacrifices both cruciate ligaments while substituting for the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and the cruciate-retaining (CR) TKA designs that sacrifice the anterior cruciate ligament but retain the PCL. The early bicruciate retaining (BCR) TKA designs suffered from loosening and early failures. Townley and Cartier designed BCR knees that had better clinical results but the surgical techniques were challenging.Kinematic studies suggest that normal motion relies on preservation of both cruciate ligaments. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty retains all knee ligaments and closely matches normal motion, while PS and CR TKA deviate further from normal. The 15% to 20% dissatisfaction rate with current TKA has renewed interest in the BCR design. Replication of normal knee kinematics and proprioception may address some of the dissatisfaction.

  5. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  6. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  7. [Cranial trepanation in primitive cultures].

    PubMed

    González-Darder, José Manuel

    A review is presented on cranial trepanations performed by primitive cultures. The scientific interest in this topic began after the discovery in 1965 by Ephraim G. Squier of a pre-Columbian trepanated skull, and studied by Paul Broca in Paris. Pseudotrepanation and other types of cranial manipulation are reviewed. The techniques, technology, and instruments for every type of trepanation are well known. There are a surprisingly high percentage of cases showing signs of post-trepanation survival. Indications for trepanation are speculative, perhaps magic. Although trepanation in primitive cultures is widespread around the world, and throughout time, the main fields of interest are the Neolithic Period in Europe, the pre-Columbian Period in Andean South America, and some contemporaneous Pacific and African tribes. This particular trepanation procedure has no relationship with modern Neurosurgery, or with trepanations with therapeutic purposes performed since the Greco-Roman period in Europe, and afterwards around the world. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  9. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  10. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  11. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Perfetti, Dean C.; Levine, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common surgical procedure; however, there is no consensus to what the best graft option is to replace the injured ACL. The main options available consist of allografts and autografts, which include patellar tendon, hamstring tendon, and quadriceps tendon autografts. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in August 2010 for English-language articles pertaining to ACL grafts. Results: Postoperative outcome variables were analyzed to determine similarities and differences among the different graft options. These variables include stability, strength, function, return to sports, patient satisfaction, complications, and cost. Conclusions: Both allografts and the 3 main options for autografts can provide excellent results in ACL reconstruction and lead to a high percentage of satisfied patients. However, differences exist among the graft choices. Both the similarities and the differences are important to discuss with a patient who will be undergoing ACL reconstruction so that he or she has the best information available when making a choice of graft. PMID:23016071

  12. Cranial base evolution within the hominin clade

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, L; Wood, B

    2008-01-01

    The base of the cranium (i.e. the basioccipital, the sphenoid and the temporal bones) is of particular interest because it undergoes significant morphological change within the hominin clade, and because basicranial morphology features in several hominin species diagnoses. We use a parsimony analysis of published cranial and dental data to predict the cranial base morphology expected in the hypothetical last common ancestor of the Pan–Homo clade. We also predict the primitive condition of the cranial base for the hominin clade, and document the evolution of the cranial base within the major subclades within the hominin clade. This analysis suggests that cranial base morphology has continued to evolve in the hominin clade, both before and after the emergence of the genus Homo. PMID:18380865

  13. Cranial nerve injury after minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Coello, Alejandro Fernández; Canals, Andreu Gabarrós; Gonzalez, Juan Martino; Martín, Juan José Acebes

    2010-09-01

    There are no specific studies about cranial nerve (CN) injury following mild head trauma (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) in the literature. The aim of this analysis was to document the incidence of CN injury after mild head trauma and to correlate the initial CT findings with the final outcome 1 year after injury. The authors studied 49 consecutive patients affected by minor head trauma and CN lesions between January 2000 and January 2006. Detailed clinical and neurological examinations as well as CT studies using brain and bone windows were performed in all patients. Based on the CT findings the authors distinguished 3 types of traumatic injury: no lesion, skull base fracture, and other CT abnormalities. Patients were followed up for 1 year after head injury. The authors distinguished 3 grades of clinical recovery from CN palsy: no recovery, partial recovery, and complete recovery. Posttraumatic single nerve palsy was observed in 38 patients (77.6%), and multiple nerve injuries were observed in 11 (22.4%). Cranial nerves were affected in 62 cases. The most affected CN was the olfactory nerve (CN I), followed by the facial nerve (CN VII) and the oculomotor nerves (CNs III, IV, and VI). When more than 1 CN was involved, the most frequent association was between CNs VII and VIII. One year after head trauma, a CN deficit was present in 26 (81.2%) of the 32 cases with a skull base fracture, 12 (60%) of 20 cases with other CT abnormalities, and 3 (30%) of 10 cases without CT abnormalities. Trivial head trauma that causes a minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale Score 14-15) can result in CN palsies with a similar distribution to moderate or severe head injuries. The CNs associated with the highest incidence of palsy in this study were the olfactory, facial, and oculomotor nerves. The trigeminal and lower CNs were rarely damaged. Oculomotor nerve injury can have a good prognosis, with a greater chance of recovery if no lesion is demonstrated on the initial CT scan.

  14. Surgical treatment of cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Angelo; Ferroli, Paolo; Messina, Giuseppe; Broggi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The most common types of cranial neuralgias amenable to surgical therapeutic options are trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, the former having an approximate incidence of 5/100000 cases per year and the latter of 0.05/100000 cases per year. Surgical therapy of these pathological conditions encompasses several strategies, going from ablative procedures to neurovascular decompression, to radiosurgery. The choice of the most appropriate surgical option (which must be taken into account when all conservative treatments have proven to be unsuccessful) has to take into account many factors, the most important ones being neuroradiological evidence of a neurovascular conflict, severity of symptoms, the age and clinical history of the patient, and the patient's overall medical condition. In this chapter we report our experience with the treatment of trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, describing the surgical procedures performed and reviewing the most recent aspects on this subject in the past literature.

  15. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  16. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  17. Imaging of Cranial Nerves III, IV, VI in Congenital Cranial Dysinnervation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Hwang, Jeong Min

    2017-06-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders are a group of diseases caused by abnormal development of cranial nerve nuclei or their axonal connections, resulting in aberrant innervation of the ocular and facial musculature. Its diagnosis could be facilitated by the development of high resolution thin-section magnetic resonance imaging. The purpose of this review is to describe the method to visualize cranial nerves III, IV, and VI and to present the imaging findings of congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders including congenital oculomotor nerve palsy, congenital trochlear nerve palsy, Duane retraction syndrome, Möbius syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles, synergistic divergence, and synergistic convergence. © 2017 The Korean Ophthalmological Society.

  18. Posterior tibial slope and femoral sizing affect posterior cruciate ligament tension in posterior cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Shinichi; Ishikawa, Masahiro; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Furu, Moritoshi; Ito, Hiromu; Matsuda, Shuichi

    2015-08-01

    During cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty, surgeons sometimes encounter increased tension of the posterior cruciate ligament. This study investigated the effects of femoral size, posterior tibial slope, and rotational alignment of the femoral and tibial components on forces at the posterior cruciate ligament in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty using a musculoskeletal computer simulation. Forces at the posterior cruciate ligament were assessed with the standard femoral component, as well as with 2-mm upsizing and 2-mm downsizing in the anterior-posterior dimension. These forces were also determined with posterior tibial slope angles of 5°, 7°, and 9°, and lastly, were measured in 5° increments when the femoral (tibial) components were positioned from 5° (15°) of internal rotation to 5° (15°) of external rotation. Forces at the posterior cruciate ligament increased by up to 718N with the standard procedure during squatting. The 2-mm downsizing of the femoral component decreased the force at the posterior cruciate ligament by up to 47%. The 2° increment in posterior tibial slope decreased the force at the posterior cruciate ligament by up to 41%. In addition, posterior cruciate ligament tension increased by 11% during internal rotation of the femoral component, and increased by 18% during external rotation of the tibial component. These findings suggest that accurate sizing and bone preparation are very important to maintain posterior cruciate ligament forces in cruciate-retaining total knee arthroplasty. Care should also be taken regarding malrotation of the femoral and tibial components because this increases posterior cruciate ligament tension. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cranial trepanation in The Egyptian.

    PubMed

    Collado-Vázquez, S; Carrillo, J M

    2014-09-01

    Medicine and literature have been linked from ancient times; proof of this shown by the many doctors who have made contributions to literature and the many writers who have described medical activities and illnesses in their works. An example is The Egyptian, the book by Mika Waltari that provides a masterly narration of the protagonist's medical activity and describes the trepanation technique. The present work begins with the analysis of trepanations since prehistory and illustrates the practice of the trepanation in The Egyptian. The book mentions trepanation frequently and illustrates how to practice it and which instruments are required to perform it. Trepanation is one of the oldest surgical interventions carried out as treatment for cranial trauma and neurological diseases, but it also had the magical and religious purpose of expelling the evil spirits which caused the mental illness, epilepsy, or migraine symptoms. Trepanation is a surgical practice that has been carried out since prehistory to treat post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric illness. The Egyptian is a book that illustrates the trepan, the trepanation technique, and the required set of instruments in full detail. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  1. Cranial kinesis in gekkonid lizards

    PubMed

    Herrel; De Vree F; Delheusy; Gans

    1999-12-01

    Cranial kinesis was studied in two species of gekkonid lizard, Gekko gecko and Phelsuma madagascariensis, using cineradiography and electromyography. The skull of these geckoes showed the three types of kinesis described by Versluys at the beginning of this century: streptostyly, mesokinesis and metakinesis. In accordance with the later model of Frazzetta, the skull of these animals can be modelled by a quadratic crank system: when the mouth opens during feeding, the quadrate rotates forward, the palato-maxillary unit is lifted and the occipital unit swings forward. During jaw closing, the inverse movements are observed; during crushing, the system is retracted beyond its resting position. The data gathered here indicate that the coupled kinesis (streptostyly + mesokinesis) is most prominently present during the capture and crushing cycles of feeding and is largely absent during late intraoral transport, swallowing, drinking and breathing. The electromyographic data indicate a consistent pattern of muscular activation, with the jaw opener and pterygoid protractor always active during the fast opening phase, and the jaw closers active during closing and crushing. Our data generally support the model of Frazzetta. Although the data gathered here do not allow speculation on the functional significance of the kinesis, they clearly provide some key elements required for a further investigation of the functional and adaptive basis of the system.

  2. Visual biofeedback exercises for improving body balance control after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Molka, Alicja Zyta; Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of balance training after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients (mean 33 ± 8 years old) who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction three months prior to participating in a one-month rehabilitation program. The control group included 15 people aged 34 ± 4 years. Patients’ functional level was evaluated according to the Lysholm knee score, and balance quality was ascertained by static and dynamic tests. A balance platform was used to measure the center of foot pressure deflection. Two dynamic balance tests evaluated time of task execution. [Results] Lysholm knee score improved significantly after rehabilitation. Balance in the sagittal plane with eyes closed improved significantly after rehabilitation. The average velocity of center of foot pressure swing in both the frontal and sagittal planes with eyes closed differed significantly from those of controls. Execution time required for the two dynamic tests decreased significantly after rehabilitation and were significantly better than those in the controls. [Conclusion] Maintaining static balance with eyes closed is very challenging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Maintaining balance in the sagittal plane is particularly difficult. A one-month rehabilitation program partially improves static and dynamic balance. PMID:26311983

  3. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  4. [Anterior cruciate ligament injuries in children].

    PubMed

    Tercier, S; Zambelli, P-Y

    2013-07-17

    An increasing number of anterior cruciate ligament injuries are now seen in children and girls seem to be equally affected. Such neglected or untreated lesions could be the cause of early degenerative changes. Recently, many authors support the trend toward early surgical management in skeletally immature patients with complex meniscal tear or recurrent knee instability after proper rehabilitation. Improvement in pediatric knowledge and surgical techniques tend to support a tendency for more surgical treatment in children. The type of management is choosing according to history and physical examination. Magnetic resonance imaging is a useful tool not only for diagnosis but also for surgical treatment planning. We usually recommend anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in children with knee instability or with further damages to the joint.

  5. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation and fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Gilula, Marshall F

    2007-07-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) is a well-documented neuroelectrical modality that has been proven effective in some good studies of fibromyalgia (FM) patients. CES is no panacea but, for some FM patients, the modality can be valuable. This article discusses aspects of both CES and FM and how they relate to the individual with the condition. FM frequently has many comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, insomnia and a great variety of different rheumatologic and neurological symptoms that often resemble multiple sclerosis, dysautonomias, chronic fatigue syndrome and others. However, despite long-standing criteria from the American College of Rheumatology for FM, some physicians believe there is probably no single homogeneous condition that can be labeled as FM. Whether it is a disease, a syndrome or something else, sufferers feel like they are living one disaster after another. Active self-involvement in care usually enhances the therapeutic results of various treatments and also improves the patient's sense of being in control of the condition. D-ribose supplementation may prove to significantly enhance energy, sleep, mental clarity, pain control and well-being in FM patients. A form of evoked potential biofeedback, the EPFX, is a powerful stress reduction technique which assesses the chief stressors and risk factors for illness that can impede the FM patient's built-in healing abilities. Future healthcare will likely expand the diagnostic criteria of FM and/or illuminate a group of related conditions and the ways in which the conditions relate to each other. Future medicine for FM and related conditions may increasingly involve multimodality treatment that features CES as one significant part of the therapeutic regimen. Future medicine may also include CES as an invaluable, cost-effective add-on to many facets of clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics.

  6. Imaging of the anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wing Hung Alex; Griffith, James Francis; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee; Paunipagar, Bhawan; Law, Billy Kan Yip; Yung, Patrick Shu Hang

    2011-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is an important structure in maintaining the normal biomechanics of the knee and is the most commonly injured knee ligament. However, the oblique course of the ACL within the intercondylar fossa limits the visualization and assessment of the pathology of the ligament. This pictorial essay provides a comprehensive and illustrative review of the anatomy and biomechanics as well as updated information on different modalities of radiological investigation of ACL, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:22474639

  7. Mechanisms of Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shimokochi, Yohei; Shultz, Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine and summarize previous retrospective and observational studies assessing noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanisms and to examine such reported ACL injury mechanisms based on ACL loading patterns due to knee loadings reported in in vivo, in vitro, and computer simulation studies. Data Sources: We searched MEDLINE from 1950 through 2007 using the key words anterior cruciate ligament + injury + mechanisms; anterior cruciate ligament + injury + mechanisms + retrospective; and anterior cruciate ligament + injury + mechanisms + video analysis. Study Selection: We selected retrospective studies and observational studies that specifically examined the noncontact ACL injury mechanisms (n  =  7) and assessed ACL loading patterns in vivo, in vitro, and using computer simulations (n  =  33). Data Extraction: The motion patterns reported as noncontact ACL injury mechanisms in retrospective and observational studies were assessed and critically compared with ACL loading patterns measured during applied external or internal (or both) forces or moments to the knee. Data Synthesis: Noncontact ACL injuries are likely to happen during deceleration and acceleration motions with excessive quadriceps contraction and reduced hamstrings co-contraction at or near full knee extension. Higher ACL loading during the application of a quadriceps force when combined with a knee internal rotation moment compared with an external rotation moment was noted. The ACL loading was also higher when a valgus load was combined with internal rotation as compared with external rotation. However, because the combination of knee valgus and external rotation motions may lead to ACL impingement, these combined motions cannot be excluded from the noncontact ACL injury mechanisms. Further, excessive valgus knee loads applied during weight-bearing, decelerating activities also increased ACL loading. Conclusions: The findings from this review lend support to ACL

  8. Concurrent cranial mediastinal Blastomyces granuloma and carcinoma with cranial vena caval syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, Natashia A; Viviano, Katrina R

    2015-11-01

    This report describes an unusual progression of blastomycosis in a dog with concurrent mediastinal carcinoma. The dog was evaluated for respiratory distress. Diagnostic results revealed chylothorax and a cranial vena caval thrombus. Histopathology of the cranial mediastinal mass diagnosed mediastinal carcinoma and fungal granuloma. Intercurrent disease may complicate the clinical presentation and clinical course of blastomycosis.

  9. Bilateral ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Willis-Owen, Charles A; Konyves, Arpad; Martin, David K

    2010-08-01

    Symptomatic ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments are rare, and bilateral cases are extremely rare, with only one reported case in the literature. We report a case of bilateral cruciate ligament ganglion cysts successfully treated with arthroscopic resection, and review the literature regarding aetiology, diagnosis and management.

  10. Treatment of cranial base meningiomas with linear accelerator radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Chang, S D; Adler, J R

    1997-11-01

    Radiosurgery is increasingly being used to treat cranial base tumors. Since 1989, 55 patients with cranial base meningiomas were treated at Stanford University Medical Center with linear accelerator radiosurgery. An analysis of the clinical and radiographic results of this patient population was the focus of this study. The mean patient age was 55.1 years (range, 28-82 yr). The mean tumor volume was 7.33 cm3 (range, 0.45-27.65 cm3). The radiation dose averaged 18.3 Gy (range, 12-25 Gy), delivered with an average of 2.2 isocenters (range, 1-5). Patients were evaluated retrospectively through clinic notes from follow-up examinations, and residual tumor volume was measured during follow-up imaging studies. The length of follow-up averaged 48.4 months (range, 17-81 mo). Tumor stabilization after radiosurgery was noted in 38 patients (69%), shrinkage in 16 patients (29%), and enlargement in only 1 patient (2%). The results of follow-up magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated decreased central contrast uptake in 11 meningiomas (20%), possibly indicating evidence of central tumor necrosis or tumor vessel obliteration. Neurological status was improved in 15 patients in the series (27%) and unchanged in 34 patients (62%). Three patients (5%) died during the follow-up period, all as a result of causes other than tumor progression. Three patients (5%) developed new permanent symptoms (one patient with seizures, one patient with mild right hemiparesis, and one patient with both vagal and hypoglossal nerve palsy). All other complications were transient, including partial trigeminal nerve palsy in seven patients and diplopia in three patients. The 2-year actuarial tumor control rate was 98%. Although our follow-up period is short, this experience corroborates previous reports that radiosurgery can be used to ablate selected small cranial base meningiomas, with good clinical results and modest morbidity.

  11. [Melorheostosis and anterior cruciate ligament tear in a 15-year-old female].

    PubMed

    Glard, Y; Launay, F; Edgard-Rosa, G; Viehweger, E; Jouve, J-L; Bollini, G

    2008-10-01

    We report the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered an indirect knee trauma. The standard X-rays revealed a tract of ivory-like bone partially obstructing the medullary canal of the femur and the tibia. Magnetic resonance imaging produced a hypointense signal on the T1 and T2 sequences. The radiographic diagnosis was melorheostosis which was confirmed on the biopsy specimen which ruled out other diagnoses. The MRI also revealed a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament, treated conservatively. Clinical and radiological surveillance were proposed for the melorheostosis.

  12. Impact biomechanics of lateral knee bracing. The anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Paulos, L E; Cawley, P W; France, E P

    1991-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of six different prophylactic braces on ACL ligament strain under dynamic valgus loads using a mechanical surrogate limb validated against human cadaveric specimens. Medical collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament peak forces, medial collateral ligament and anterior cruciate ligament tension initiation times, and impact safety factors were calculated for both braced and unbraced conditions. These tests were conducted to determine whether or not application of a prophylactic brace might provide protection to the anterior cruciate ligament under valgus loading conditions. The results of this study indicate that those braces that increased impact duration appear to differentially protect the anterior cruciate ligament more than the medial collateral ligament, and that most of the braces tested appear to provide some degree of protection to the anterior cruciate ligament under direct lateral impacts. These findings should be confirmed clinically.

  13. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  14. The cranial endoskeleton of Tiktaalik roseae.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jason P; Daeschler, Edward B; Jenkins, Farish A; Shubin, Neil H

    2008-10-16

    Among the morphological changes that occurred during the 'fish-to-tetrapod' transition was a marked reorganization of the cranial endoskeleton. Details of this transition, including the sequence of character acquisition, have not been evident from the fossil record. Here we describe the braincase, palatoquadrate and branchial skeleton of Tiktaalik roseae, the Late Devonian sarcopterygian fish most closely related to tetrapods. Although retaining a primitive configuration in many respects, the cranial endoskeleton of T. roseae shares derived features with tetrapods such as a large basal articulation and a flat, horizontally oriented entopterygoid. Other features in T. roseae, like the short, straight hyomandibula, show morphology intermediate between the condition observed in more primitive fish and that observed in tetrapods. The combination of characters in T. roseae helps to resolve the relative timing of modifications in the cranial endoskeleton. The sequence of modifications suggests changes in head mobility and intracranial kinesis that have ramifications for the origin of vertebrate terrestriality.

  15. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    PubMed

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included. © 2014 American Association of Anatomists.

  16. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  17. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  18. Restoration of large cranial defect for cranioplasty with alloplastic cranial implant material: a case report.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Shelly; Goyal, Mukesh Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Cranial defects result either from trauma or after intentional osteocraniotomies or external decompression craniectomies. These defects occur most frequently during wartime, but their incidence during peacetime, as a result of accident or disease, makes knowledge of cranioplasty useful to the interested practitioner. Most cranial defects will have some variable proportion of cosmetic and mechanical aspects, and the decision regarding cranioplasty must be influenced by the patient's age, prognosis, activity level and the specific conditions of the scalp and calvarium. This case report is oriented towards post-traumatic restoration of large cranial defect with alloplastic heat-cure poly methyl methacrylate resin material.

  19. Detecting interregionally diversifying natural selection on modern human cranial form by using matched molecular and morphometric data

    PubMed Central

    Roseman, Charles C.

    2004-01-01

    This comparison of morphological and neutral genetic variation in 10 human populations was designed to test a neutral hypothesis of cranial evolution in living and recent humans and to explain deviations from neutrality where detected. Overall, among-population differences in extant Homo sapiens cranial morphology are proportional to among-population differences in neutral molecular characteristics. For most of the populations studied, cranial morphology varies among regions in a manner consistent with neutral expectations. Removal of the effects of shared population history and structure by using the partial Mantel's test, however, does not remove the correlation between some aspects of cranial morphology and a measure of coldness of climate. The excess differentiation is most apparent in those population comparisons that involve a Siberian population living in an extremely cold environment. This finding suggests the action of natural selection, associated with regional variation in temperature, leading to among-population differentiation in excess of neutral expectations for some cranial dimensions. Those dimensions reflect the breadth of the skull, cranial vault size and shape, and aspects of nasal morphology. Although morphology for most of the world appears to vary among populations in accordance with neutral expectations in the context of population structure and history, morphology of the Siberian population appears to have undergone adaptation by natural selection. PMID:15326305

  20. Detection of concussion using cranial accelerometry.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Paul S; Baine, Jennifer G; Schott, Megan L; Greenhaw, Amy; Acharya, Monika G; Smith, Wade S

    2015-03-01

    To determine whether skull motion produced by pulsatile cerebral blood flow, as measured by cranial accelerometry, is altered during concussion. In phase 1, to identify a specific pattern indicative of concussion, cranial accelerometry of subjects who sustained a concussion underwent analysis of waveforms, which was compared with accelerometry from subjects without a concussion (baseline). In phase 2, this concussion pattern was tested against prospectively acquired, blinded data. High school tackle football practice and game play. Eighty-four football players. Subjects had accelerometry measurements and concurrent 2-lead electrocardiograms. In players with a concussion, multiple sequential measurements were obtained. Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 was used to assist clinical determination of concussion. Whether a characteristic waveform pattern of cranial accelerometry occurs in subjects with concussion. Phase 1 demonstrated a consistent pattern correlated to concussion. Phase 2 found this pattern in 10 of 13 subjects with concussion (76.9% sensitivity). Seventy-nine of 82 baseline plus nine postseason (total = 91) recordings from nonconcussed subjects did not show the concussion pattern (87% specificity). In subjects with concussion, we observed a unique pattern determined by cranial accelerometry. This may provide a method to noninvasively detect and longitudinally observe concussion. There is no objective, real-time, noninvasive, and easily accessible measure for concussion. If accelerometry is validated, it could provide a critical diagnostic tool for sports medicine physicians.

  1. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  2. Cranial computed tomography and MRI. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.; Rao, K.C.V.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physics and Instrumentation: CT and MRI; Normal Cranial CT and MRI Anatomy; The Orbit; The ventricles and Subarachnoid Spaces in Children; Primary Tumors in Children; Trauma: Craniocerebral and Craniofacial; Infectious Disease; and Stroke.

  3. How common are cranial sesamoids among squamates?

    PubMed

    Montero, Ricardo; Daza, Juan D; Bauer, Aaron M; Abdala, Virginia

    2017-10-01

    Sesamoids are elements that originate as intratendinous structures due to genetic and epigenetic factors. These elements have been reported frequently in vertebrates, although cranial sesamoids have been recorded almost exclusively in non-tetrapod Osteichthyes. The only tetrapod cranial sesamoids reported until now have been the transiliens cartilage (of crocodiles and turtles), and another one located in the quadrate-mandibular joint of birds. Here, we examined seven squamate species using histological sections, dissections of preserved specimens, dry skeletons, cleared and stained specimens, computed tomographies (CT), and report the presence of other cranial sesamoids. One is attached to the cephalic condyle of the quadrate, embedded in the bodenaponeurosis and jaw adductor muscles of Ophiodes intermedius (Anguidae). The other sesamoid is found at the base of the basicranium of several squamates, capping the sphenoccipital tubercle, on the lateral side of the basioccipital-basisphenoid suture. This bone has previously been reported as "element X." We reinterpret it as a basicranial sesamoid, as it is associated with tendons of the cranio-cervical muscles. This bone seems to have the function of resisting tension-compression forces generated by the muscle during flexion the head. This element was previously known in several squamates, and we confirmed its presence in three additional squamate families: Gymnophthalmidae, Gekkonidae, and Pygopodidae. The evidence suggests that cranial sesamoids are a widespread character in squamates, and it is possible that this feature has been present since the origin of the group. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Post-operative cranial pressure monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fager, C. A., Jr.; Long, L. E.; Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    System for monitoring of fluidic pressures in cranial cavity uses a miniaturized pressure sensing transducer, combined with suitable amplification means, a meter with scale calibrated in terms of pressures between minus 100 and plus 900 millimeters of water, and a miniaturized chart recorder covering similar range of pressures.

  5. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment.

  6. Brainstem vascular accidents and cranial arteritis.

    PubMed

    Dick, A D; Millar, A; Johnson, N

    1991-06-01

    Cranial Arteritis (Giant Cell Arteritis) is a clinical diagnosis supported by a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and if required confirmed by a temporal artery biopsy. This case reports on an unusual presentation where a delay in the diagnosis resulted in visual impairment, illustrating the need for awareness of diagnosis in acute strokes in the elderly.

  7. Miniature piezoelectric triaxial accelerometer measures cranial accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deboo, G. J.; Rogallo, V. L.

    1966-01-01

    Tiny triaxial accelerometer whose sensing elements are piezoelectric ceramic beams measures human cranial accelerations when a subject is exposed to a centrifuge or other simulators of g environments. This device could be considered for application in dental, medical, and automotive safety research.

  8. Cranial kinesis in geckoes: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; Aerts, P; De Vree, F

    2000-05-01

    Although it is generally assumed that cranial kinesis is a plesiomorphic characteristic in squamates, experimental data tend to contradict this hypothesis. In particular, coupled kinesis (i.e. streptostyly and mesokinesis) presumably arose independently in only a limited number of highly specialised groups. In this study, we investigated cranial kinesis in one of the most specialised of these groups: geckoes. On the basis of cineradiographic and electromyographic data, the fast opening and the slow closing/power stroke phases were modelled to elucidate possible functions of the observed kinesis. The results of these analyses show that the retraction of the muzzle unit during crushing is a self-reinforcing system that increases bite force and reduces the joint forces; the active protraction of the kinetic system during jaw opening, in contrast, enhances opening speed through the coupling of the intracranial units. It can be argued that cranial kinesis in geckoes is probably not an adaptive trait as such but, instead, a consequence of the 'Bauplan' of the cranial system in these animals. Presumably as a result of constructional constraints on the size of the jaw musculature and eyes, the supratemporal and postorbital bars were lost, which resulted in enormous mobility in the skull. To counteract the potential negative factors associated with this (decrease in bite force, skull damage), the kinetic system may have become coupled, and thus functional.

  9. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source used...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  15. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is used...

  16. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  17. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  18. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  19. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  20. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  1. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  2. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  3. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  4. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  5. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  6. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  7. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  8. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on the...

  9. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe, incomplete...

  10. Late cranial MRI after cranial irradiation in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, E; Talvensaari, K; Pyhtinen, J; Lanning, M

    1994-11-01

    We carried out MRI on 43 survivors of childhood cancer after different treatment protocols with or without cranial radiotherapy. They were free of disease, therapy having been discontinued 2-20 years earlier. Treatment had been for various malignancies, excluding brain tumours; 27 had received cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Two asymptomatic young women treated for ALL had falx meningiomas. White matter changes, low intensity foci (representing calcification or old haemorrhage) and heterogeneous intensity focic old haemorrhages) were seen only in patients who had undergone radiotherapy. Because of the possibility of benign, potentially curable brain tumours occurring after cranial irradiation, it may be wise to carry out occasional cranial imaging in the follow-up of these patients. No routine imaging follow-up is needed after chemotherapy alone.

  11. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R.; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia). PMID:27548428

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K.; Howell, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is one of the most common procedures in sports medicine. Several areas of controversy exist in ACL tear management which have engaged surgeons and researchers in debates towards identifying an ideal approach for these patients. This instructional review discusses the principles of ACL reconstruction in an attempt to provide guidelines and initiate a critical thinking approach on the most common areas of controversy regarding ACL reconstruction. Using high-level evidence from the literature, as presented in randomised controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, operative versus conservative treatment, timing of surgery, and rehabilitation are discussed. Also, the advantages and disadvantages of the most common types of autografts, such as patellar tendon and hamstrings as well as allografts are presented. Key considerations for the anatomical, histological, biomechanical and clinical data (‘IDEAL’) graft positioning are reviewed. Cite this article: Paschos NK, Howell SM. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: principles of treatment. EFORT Open Rev 2016;398-408. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160032. PMID:28461919

  13. Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Gautam M; Nha, Kyung Wook; Patil, Sachin P; Chae, Dong Ju; Kang, Ki Hoon; Yoon, Jung Ro; Choo, Suk Kyu; Yi, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Baek, Jong Ryoon

    2008-08-01

    Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are uncommon lesions found incidentally on MRI and arthroscopy. Twenty patients (11 males and nine females) with the mean age of 35 years presenting with a variety of knee signs and symptoms were found to have PCL cysts on MRI. Out of these, thirteen patients (65%) had isolated symptomatic PCL cysts and seven patients had associated chondral and meniscal lesions. Eight out of the 20 patients (40%) gave a history of antecedent trauma. On arthroscopy, the majority of the cysts were situated at the midsubstance of the ligament with inter-cruciate distension and no involvement of the substance of the ligament. The content of the cysts varied with the majority having yellowish viscous fluid and three containing serous and bloody fluid. All cysts were successfully treated arthroscopically through standard anterior, posteromedial and posterolateral portals with no signs of recurrence on MRI at a mean followup of 24 months. PCL cysts may clinically mimic meniscal or chondral lesions and preoperatively, MRI is essential for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts arising from the PCL. Ganglion cysts of the PCL can be successfully treated arthroscopically using standard portals.

  14. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  15. [Visualization of the lower cranial nerves by 3D-FIESTA].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Takada, Tadanori

    2005-02-20

    MR cisternography has been introduced for use in neuroradiology. This method is capable of visualizing tiny structures such as blood vessels and cranial nerves in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space because of its superior contrast resolution. The cranial nerves and small vessels are shown as structures of low intensity surrounded by marked hyperintensity of the CSF. In the present study, we evaluated visualization of the lower cranial nerves (glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory) by the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence and multiplanar reformation (MPR) technique. The subjects were 8 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 21 to 76 years (average, 54 years). We examined the visualization of a total of 66 nerves in 11 subjects by 3D-FIESTA. The results were classified into four categories ranging from good visualization to non-visualization. In all cases, all glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were identified to some extent, while accessory nerves were visualized either partially or entirely in only 16 cases. The total visualization rate was about 91%. In conclusion, 3D-FIESTA may be a useful method for visualization of the lower cranial nerves.

  16. Biologic agents for anterior cruciate ligament healing: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Loibl, Markus; Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Zellner, Johannes; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIM To systematically review the currently available literature concerning the application of biologic agents such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells to promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed on the use of biologic agents (i.e., PRP or stem cells) to favor ACL healing during reconstruction or repair. The following inclusion criteria for relevant articles were used: Clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English language, on the use of PRP or stem cells during ACL reconstruction/repair. Exclusion criteria were articles written in other languages, reviews, or studies analyzing other applications of PRP/stem cells in knee surgery not related to promoting ACL healing. RESULTS The database search identified 394 records that were screened. A total of 23 studies were included in the final analysis: In one paper stem cells were applied for ACL healing, in one paper there was a concomitant application of PRP and stem cells, whereas in the remaining 21 papers PRP was used. Based on the ACL injury pattern, two papers investigated biologic agents in ACL partial tears whereas 21 papers in ACL reconstruction. Looking at the quality of the available literature, 17 out of 21 studies dealing with ACL reconstruction were randomized controlled trials. Both studies on ACL repair were case series. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of clinical trials investigating the role of stem cells in promoting ACL healing both in case of partial and complete tears. The role of PRP is still controversial and the only advantage emerging from the literature is related to a better graft maturation over time, without documenting beneficial effects in terms of clinical outcome, bone-graft integration and prevention of bony tunnel enlargement. PMID:27672573

  17. Digital infrared thermal imaging following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Barker, Lauren E; Markowski, Alycia M; Henneman, Kimberly

    2012-03-01

    This case describes the selective use of digital infrared thermal imaging for a 48-year-old woman who was being treated by a physical therapist following left anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with a semitendinosus autograft.

  18. Paedogenesis in european newts (Triturus: salamandridae): cranial morphology during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Djorović, A; Kalezić, M L

    2000-02-01

    A cross-sectional analysis using different ontogenetic stages (larvae, juveniles, paedotypic, and metamorphic adults) of the smooth newt, Triturus vulgaris, and the alpine newt, T.alpestris, revealed a broad spectrum of perennibranchiation influences on cranial ontogeny in European newts, more pronounced than previously thought. These influences included marked variation in ossification levels, pronounced morphometric variability of many cranial elements, and considerable skull shape changes in the transition from larvae to the adult stage. In comparison with metamorphosed individuals, paedotypic newts had a higher level of variability in both individual cranial traits and cranial shape changes. Sexual size difference of the skull traits was mostly negligible, especially in comparison to the influence of paedogenesis. The main changes in cranial shape of the European newts occurred during metamorphosis. Cranial morphological organization in the majority of examined paedotypes corresponds to cranial organization at late larval stages prior to metamorphosis or at the onset of metamorphosis.

  19. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  20. Features extraction in anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarychta, P

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of this research is finding the feature vectors of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments (ACL and PCL). These feature vectors have to clearly define the ligaments structure and make it easier to diagnose them. Extraction of feature vectors is obtained by analysis of both anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. This procedure is performed after the extraction process of both ligaments. In the first stage in order to reduce the area of analysis a region of interest including cruciate ligaments (CL) is outlined in order to reduce the area of analysis. In this case, the fuzzy C-means algorithm with median modification helping to reduce blurred edges has been implemented. After finding the region of interest (ROI), the fuzzy connectedness procedure is performed. This procedure permits to extract the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures. In the last stage, on the basis of the extracted anterior and posterior cruciate ligament structures, 3-dimensional models of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligament are built and the feature vectors created. This methodology has been implemented in MATLAB and tested on clinical T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices of the knee joint. The 3D display is based on the Visualization Toolkit (VTK). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  2. Cranial neuralgias: from physiopathology to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Roberto; Ranieri, Angelo; Bilo, Leonilda; Fiorillo, Chiara; Bonavita, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Cranial neuralgias are paroxysmal painful disorders of the head characterised by some shared features such as unilaterality of symptoms, transience and recurrence of attacks, superficial and "shock-like" quality of pain and the presence of triggering factors. Although rare, these disorders must be promptly recognised as they harbour a relatively high risk for underlying compressive or inflammatory disease. Nevertheless, misdiagnosis is frequent. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias are sustained in most cases by a neurovascular conflict in the posterior fossa resulting in a hyperexcitability state of the trigeminal circuitry. If the aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and other typical neuralgias must be brought back to the peripheral injury, their pathogenesis could involve central allodynic mechanisms, which, in patients with inter-critical pain, also engage the nociceptive neurons at the thalamic-cortical level. Currently available medical treatments for TN and other cranial neuralgias are reviewed.

  3. Facial Translocation Approach to the Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Moises A.; Janecka, Ivo P.

    1991-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the nasopharyngeal region of the cranial base is difficult because of its proximity to key anatomic structures. Our laboratory study outlines the anatomic basis for a new approach to this complex topography. Dissections were performed on eight cadaver halves and two fresh specimens injected with intravascular silicone rubber compound. By utilizing facial soft tissue translocation combined with craniofacial osteotomies; a wide surgical field can be obtained at the skull base. The accessible surgical field extends from the contralateral custachian tube to the ipsilateral geniculate ganglion, including the nasopharyax; clivus, sphonoid, and cavernous sinuses, the entire infratemporal fossa, and superior orbital fissure. The facial translocation approach offers previously unavailable wide and direct exposure, with a potential for immediate reconstruction, of this complex region of the cranial base. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17170817

  4. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Cranial Vault

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Geetha; Sreelesh, K. P.; Somanathan, Thara; Soman, Lali V.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) arising from cranial bones is rare and accounts for only 1%–4% of all EWS. We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with EWS of the frontoparietal region of the skull. She underwent excision following which she received combination chemotherapy with vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide, and VP16 and local radiation of 45 Gy. She is alive in complete remission at 40 months. PMID:28163522

  5. The Morphogenesis of Cranial Sutures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Shoela, Ramy A.; Tomaszewski, Joanna P.; Mirmira, Rupa B.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    Using morphological, histological, and TEM analyses of the cranium, we provide a detailed description of bone and suture growth in zebrafish. Based on expression patterns and localization, we identified osteoblasts at different degrees of maturation. Our data confirm that, unlike in humans, zebrafish cranial sutures maintain lifelong patency to sustain skull growth. The cranial vault develops in a coordinated manner resulting in a structure that protects the brain. The zebrafish cranial roof parallels that of higher vertebrates and contains five major bones: one pair of frontal bones, one pair of parietal bones, and the supraoccipital bone. Parietal and frontal bones are formed by intramembranous ossification within a layer of mesenchyme positioned between the dermal mesenchyme and meninges surrounding the brain. The supraoccipital bone has an endochondral origin. Cranial bones are separated by connective tissue with a distinctive architecture of osteogenic cells and collagen fibrils. Here we show RNA in situ hybridization for col1a1a, col2a1a, col10a1, bglap/osteocalcin, fgfr1a, fgfr1b, fgfr2, fgfr3, foxq1, twist2, twist3, runx2a, runx2b, sp7/osterix, and spp1/ osteopontin, indicating that the expression of genes involved in suture development in mammals is preserved in zebrafish. We also present methods for examining the cranium and its sutures, which permit the study of the mechanisms involved in suture patency as well as their pathological obliteration. The model we develop has implications for the study of human disorders, including craniosynostosis, which affects 1 in 2,500 live births. PMID:27829009

  6. Laryngeal zoster with multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Van Den Bossche, Paul; Van Den Bossche, Karolien; Vanpoucke, Hilde

    2008-03-01

    A young immunocompetent patient is presented with a very rare presentation of a common viral illness: herpes zoster of the left hemilarynx with sensorial and motoric neuropathy of three ipsilateral lower cranial nerves: IX, X and XI. The mucosal lesions were discovered during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. PCR of erosional exsudate confirmed the clinical diagnosis. Antiviral therapy and corticosteroids possibly contributed to the prosperous evolution with complete healing.

  7. Disorders of Cranial Nerves IX and X

    PubMed Central

    Erman, Audrey B.; Kejner, Alexandra E.; Hogikyan, Norman D.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. This review will broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X. PMID:19214937

  8. Disorders of cranial nerves IX and X.

    PubMed

    Erman, Audrey B; Kejner, Alexandra E; Hogikyan, Norman D; Feldman, Eva L

    2009-02-01

    The glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves mediate the complex interplay between the many functions of the upper aerodigestive tract. Defects may occur anywhere from the brainstem to the peripheral nerve and can result in significant impairment in speech, swallowing, and breathing. Multiple etiologies can produce symptoms. In this review, the authors broadly examine the normal functions, clinical examination, and various pathologies of cranial nerves IX and X.

  9. Blepharoptosis Associated With Third Cranial Nerve Palsy.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Abbas; Borhani, Morteza; Salehirad, Shahram; Yazdani, Shahin; Tavakoli, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the demographics and outcomes of management for blepharoptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy at a tertiary eye center. This retrospective cross-sectional and interventional study was performed on hospital records of patients with ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy who were referred to Labbafinejad Medical Center from January 1999 to January 2009. The authors evaluated age, sex, laterality, severity of involvement, etiology, clinical findings, and treatment modalities and outcomes in patients with blepharoptosis due to third cranial nerve palsy over a 10-year period. Of a total of 45 subjects, 25 cases (55.6%) were males and 20 subjects (44.4%) were females. Mean age of enrolled subjects was 21.1 ± 15.5 years. Etiologies included trauma in 21 (46.7%), congenital in 16 (35.6%), and other causes in 8 (17.7%) cases. Overall, 18 of 45 patients (40%) underwent ptosis surgery: of these, 15 (83.3%) subjects improved with one procedure, whereas 3 (16.7%) subjects required more than one operation. For initial ptosis surgery, 5 (27.7%) patients underwent levator resection and 13 (72.3%) cases underwent frontalis sling; all second and third procedures were frontalis sling. One-step, 2-step, and 3-step ptosis surgery was accomplished in 15 (83.3%), 1 (5.6%), and 2 (11.1%) patients, respectively. Eventually, an open visual axis was attained in all cases following 1-3 operations. Trauma was the most common cause of ptosis associated with third cranial nerve palsy in the current series. Surgical management of ptosis in patients with third nerve palsy may be challenging but most subjects achieve good results following appropriate and stepwise surgical plans.

  10. Cranial osteology of meiglyptini (aves: piciformes: picidae).

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    THE MEIGLYPTINI COMPRISE EIGHT SPECIES GROUPED INTO THREE GENERA: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species.

  11. Studing cranial vault modifications in ancient Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Tiesler, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The artificial modification of infant cranial vaults through massages or by means of constriction and compression devices constitutes a readily visible, permanent body modification that has been employed cross-culturally to express identity, ethnicity, beauty, status and gender. For those ancient societies that staged head shaping, these cultural correlates may be ascertained by examining cranial shapes together with other data sets from the archaeological record. Studies of skulls modified for cultural reasons also provide important clues for understanding principles in neural growth and physiopathological variation in cranial expansion. This paper focuses on head shaping techniques in Mesoamerica, where the practice was deeply rooted and widespread before the European conquest. It provides a comprehensive review of the Mesoamericanistic research on shaping techniques, implements and taxonomies. An up-dated, interdisciplinary examination of the physiological implications and the cultural meanings of artificially produced head shapes in different times and culture areas within Mesoamerica leads to a discussion of the scope, caveats, and future directions involved in this kind of research in the region and beyond.

  12. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  13. Considerations in the management of congenital cranial dermoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Syed; Ruge, John

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Congenital dermoid cysts (CDCs) develop from the entrapment of the surface ectoderm along the lines of embryonic fusion and have a capacity to grow. Given this capacity for continual expansion, the timing of removal and anticipation of possible epidural extension is important. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed records of patients with the diagnosis of dermoid cyst presenting over a period of 10 years. Baseline characteristics, histological reports, and surgical records were collected and analyzed. Only those patients with histological confirmation of dermoid cyst were included in the study. RESULTS One hundred fifty-nine (64 male and 95 female) patients were studied. The average age at the time of surgery ranged from 1 month to 63 years (mean 3.55 ± 9.58 years, median 11 months). Eighteen (11.3%) CDCs were in the midline anterior fontanelle, 52 (32.7%) were frontozygomatic, 14 (8.8%) occurred along the coronal sutures, and 75 (47.2%) occurred along the lambdoid sutures. In 74 (46.5%) cases the cysts were found to insignificantly erode the cranium, 30 (18.9%) eroded through a partial thickness of the cranium, 47 (29.6%) eroded through the full thickness of the cranium, and 8 (5.0%) eroded through the full thickness of the cranium and demonstrated epidural extension. The study population showed female predominance (n = 95, 59.7%). Although cyst location and patient sex were not found to vary significantly with cranial involvement (p = 0.196 and p = 0.066, respectively), delay in time to surgery did vary significantly (p < 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS Congenital cranial dermoid cysts found in infants and children are best removed early.

  14. Postnatal maturation of tendon, cruciate ligament, meniscus and articular cartilage: a histological study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Meller, Rupert; Schiborra, Frederike; Brandes, Gudrun; Knobloch, Karsten; Tschernig, Thomas; Hankemeier, Stefan; Haasper, Carl; Schmiedl, Andreas; Jagodzinski, Michael; Krettek, Christian; Willbold, Elmar

    2009-12-01

    Orthopaedic basic science data on immature skeletons are rare in the literature. Since the number of knee injuries in young humans is steadily increasing, studies on immature animals such as sheep, which can be used as model systems are becoming more and more important. However, no baseline data are available on physiologic and morphologic changes during growth in the relevant tissues. In the present study, histomorphometric changes in the tendon of the musculus flexor digitalis superficialis, the cranial cruciate ligament, the medial meniscus and the articular cartilage of the medial femoral condyle were identified in sheep between the ages of 1 and 40 weeks postnatally. Profound changes in tissue composition during growth could be observed. A high cellularity in the early postnatal period decreases to a constant lower level after 18 weeks. Similar changes during postnatal growth could be observed for blood vessel density. Also, staining of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) steadily decreased. In contrast, the number of components of extracellular matrix steadily increased in all tissues. The age of 18 weeks seems to be a threshold after which the tissue composition of the observed structures remains constant in this species. 2009 Elsevier GmbH.

  15. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Essentials of anterior cruciate ligament rupture management.

    PubMed

    Klinge, Stephen A; Sawyer, Gregory A; Hulstyn, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture is a common knee injury and an understanding of current medical knowledge regarding its management is essential. Accurate and prompt diagnosis requires an awareness of injury mechanisms and risk factors, common symptoms and physical/radiologic findings. Early mobilization and physical therapy improves outcomes regardless of treatment modality. Many older patients regain sufficient stability and function after non-operative rehabilitation. Early ACL reconstruction is appropriate for younger patients and those who engage in activities requiring frequent pivoting and rapid direction changes. ACL surgery involves reconstruction of the torn ligament tissue with various replacement graft options, each with advantages and disadvantages. The guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced therapist is required throughout an intensive and prolonged rehabilitation course. Generally excellent outcomes and low complication rates are expected, but treatment does not prevent late osteoarthritis.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a traumatic event that can lead to significant functional impairment and inability to participate in high-level sports-related activities. ACL reconstruction is considered the treatment of choice for symptomatic ACL-deficient patients and can assist in full functional recovery. Furthermore, ACL reconstruction restores ligamentous stability to normal, and, therefore, can potentially fully reinstate kinematics of the knee joint. As a consequence, the natural history of ACL injury could be potentially reversed via ACL reconstruction. Evidence from the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of ACL reconstruction in preventing the development of knee cartilage degeneration. This editorial aims to present recent high-level evidence in an attempt to answer whether ACL injury inevitably leads to osteoarthritis and whether ACL reconstruction can prevent this development or not. PMID:28361013

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction without drill holes.

    PubMed

    Brief, L P

    1991-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in adolescents with open physes remains a difficult problem for the orthopedic surgeon, especially in view of growing teenage participation in contact sports. Traditionally, treatment of ACL tears in adolescents has been conservative; the patient is advised to delay surgery up to several years for fear of damaging physes by drilling holes across them. Unfortunately, this waiting period may inflict irreparable knee damage. This paper suggests an ACL reconstruction technique that utilizes no drill holes, thus causing no harm to physes or other essential knee structures. A graft consisting of semitendinosus and gracilis (SG) tendons is passed under the anterior horn of the medial meniscus through the knee joint, then brought out through the posterior capsule and secured to the lateral femoral metaphysis. The graft is augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Designed primarily but not exclusively for teenagers with open physes, the procedure has produced encouraging results thus far in a small series.

  19. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  20. Postoperative Infection After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Chaurasia, Sanyam; Abhishek, Mudhigere; Bulgherhoni, Erica; Lane, John

    2015-01-01

    Context: Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is uncommon; if it occurs, it can lead to disastrous complications. Objective: To analyze post-ACLR infections and identify related complications to provide the most effective treatment protocol. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Among approximately 1850 ACLRs performed by a single surgeon over the past 20 years, 7 cases of post-ACLR infection were identified (incidence, 0.37%). Five patients presenting with low-severity infection were successfully treated without any complication or residual functional disability. The remaining 2 patients, although successfully treated, presented with minor residual limitations. From a literature review, 16 studies including 246 cases of infection were reported among 35,795 ACLRs, making the rate of infection 0.68% (range, 0.14%-2.6%). Conclusion: With proper treatment protocols, post-ACLR infection is rare but can compromise outcomes. PMID:26603553

  1. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Growing Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    AlHarby, Saleh W.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the adult patients are thoroughly studied and published in orthopedic literature. Until recently, little was known about similar injuries in skeletally growing patients. The more frequent involvement of this age group in various athletic activities and the improved diagnostic modalities have increased the awareness and interest of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients. ACL reconstruction in growing skeleton is controversial and carries some risks to the tibial and femoral growth plate. A guarded approach to ACL reconstruction is recommended in skeletally immature patients. Modification of activity of ACL injured young patient, proper rehabilitation and prudent planning of adolescent age ACL reconstruction carries the least risks of growth plate violation. PMID:21475528

  2. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  3. Migraine with cranial autonomic features following surgically induced post-ganglionic sympathetic lesion.

    PubMed

    Royce, J S; Goadsby, P J

    2014-02-01

    Although not typically considered as part of the clinical phenotype of migraine, cranial autonomic symptoms, such as lacrimation or conjunctival injection, can certainly occur. Their appearance can lead to the common misdiagnosis of sinus headache in clinical practice. The patient presented developed post-ganglionic sympathetic denervation at the level of the superior cervical ganglion/carotid plexus. Her subsequent partial Horner's syndrome symptoms intensified during subsequent migraine attacks indicating increasing sympathetic autonomic dysfunction. At the time of the pain, recruitment and activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex were demonstrated by lacrimation. The clinical picture suggests peripheral unmasking of the underlying central trigeminal autonomic reflex that is active in migraine. Recognition of cranial autonomic symptoms in migraine is a key to confident differential diagnosis from trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and from sinus-related headache disorders. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups.

  5. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  6. Biomechanical evaluation of a novel dynamic posterior cruciate ligament brace.

    PubMed

    Heinrichs, Christian H; Schmoelz, Werner; Mayr, Raul; Keiler, Alexander; Schöttle, Philip B; Attal, René

    2016-03-01

    Use of a rigid brace or cast immobilization is recommended in conservative treatment or postoperative rehabilitation after a posterior cruciate ligament injury. To prevent the loss of knee joint function and muscle activity often associated with this, a flexible knee brace has been developed that allows an adjustable anteriorly directed force to be applied to the calf in order to prevent posterior tibial translation. The purpose of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the impact of this novel dynamic brace on posterior tibial translation after posterior cruciate ligament injury and reconstruction. A Telos stress device was used to provoke posterior tibial translation in seven human lower limb specimens, and stress radiographs were taken at 90° of knee flexion. Posterior tibial translation was measured in the native knees with an intact posterior cruciate ligament; after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament dissection with and without a brace; and after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with and without a brace. The force applied with the brace was measured using a pressure sensor. Posterior tibial translation was significantly reduced (P=0.032) after application of the brace with an anteriorly directed force of 50N to the knees with the dissected posterior cruciate ligament. The brace also significantly reduced posterior tibial translation after posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in comparison with reconstructed knees without a brace (P=0.005). Posterior tibial translation was reduced to physiological values using this dynamic brace system that allows an anteriorly directed force to be applied to the calf. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  9. Sex comparison of familial predisposition to anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Robert S.; Waits, Chad; Finck, Samuel; Stanfield, Denver; Posthumus, Michael; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose In an effort to identify risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, many potential risk factors have been proposed, including familial predisposition. However, no study has evaluated familial predisposition in male or females separately. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a familial predisposition to ACL injury exists in both males and females. Methods One hundred and twenty (78 males and 42 females) patients who had undergone surgical ACL reconstruction were recruited as the ACL group, and 107 patients (67 males and 40 females) that had undergone arthroscopic partial menisectomy, with no previous history of ACL injury, were recruited as the referent control group. A familial ACL injury and subject particulars questionnaire was completed. Results When all subjects were combined, the ACL group (20.0 %, 24 of 120) did not demonstrate a higher familial (first-degree relative) prevalence (n.s.) of ACL injury compared to the referent control group (15.0 %; 16 of 107 patients). When the data were stratified by sex, the male ACL group (19.2 %, 15 of 78) demonstrated a significantly higher familial (first-degree relative) prevalence (P = 0.02) of ACL injury compared to the male referent control group (7.5 %; 5 of 67 patients). There were no differences among the females (n.s.). Discussion The results of this study show that male patients with ACL tears are more likely to have a first-degree relative with an ACL tear compared to male referent control subjects. Future research is warranted to better delineate sex-specific risk factors for ACL injuries could help guide intervention programs aimed at preventative treatment strategies, especially in high-risk families. PMID:24402048

  10. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  11. [Cranial nerves - spectrum of inflammatory and tumorous changes].

    PubMed

    Nemec, S F; Kasprian, G; Nemec, U; Czerny, C

    2009-07-01

    Inflammatory processes as well as primary and secondary tumorous changes may involve cranial nerves causing neurological deficits. In addition to neurologists, ENT physicians, ophthalmologists and maxillofacial surgeons, radiologists play an important role in the investigation of patients with cranial nerve symptoms. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and particularly magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow the depiction of the cranial nerve anatomy and pathological neural changes. This article briefly describes the imaging techniques in MDCT and MRI and is dedicated to the radiological presentation of inflammatory and tumorous cranial nerve pathologies.

  12. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cranial radiation exposure during cerebral catheter angiography.

    PubMed

    Chohan, Muhammad Omar; Sandoval, Daniel; Buchan, Andrew; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Taylor, Christopher L

    2014-10-01

    Radiation exposure to patients and personnel remains a major concern in the practice of interventional radiology, with minimal literature available on exposure to the forehead and cranium. In this study, we measured cranial radiation exposure to the patient, operating interventional neuroradiologist, and circulating nurse during neuroangiographic procedures. We also report the effectiveness of wearing a 0.5 mm lead equivalent cap as protection against radiation scatter. 24 consecutive adult interventional neuroradiology procedures (six interventional, 18 diagnostic) were prospectively studied for cranial radiation exposures in the patient and personnel. Data were collected using electronic detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Mean fluoroscopy time for diagnostic and interventional procedures was 8.48 (SD 2.79) min and 26.80 (SD 6.57) min, respectively. Mean radiation exposure to the operator's head was 0.08 mSv, as measured on the outside of the 0.5 mm lead equivalent protective headgear. This amounts to around 150 mSv/year, far exceeding the current deterministic threshold for the lens of the eye (ie, 20 mSv/year) in high volume centers performing up to five procedures a day. When compared with doses measured on the inside of the protective skullcap, there was a statistically significant reduction in the amount of radiation received by the operator's skull. Our study suggests that a modern neurointerventional suite is safe when equipped with proper protective shields and personal gear. However, cranial exposure is not completely eliminated with existing protective devices and the addition of a protective skullcap eliminates this exposure to both the operator and support staff. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Psychological Aspects of Recovery Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Christino, Melissa A; Fantry, Amanda J; Vopat, Bryan G

    2015-08-01

    Recovery following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is an arduous process that requires a significant mental and physical commitment to rehabilitation. Orthopaedic research in recent years has focused on optimizing anterior cruciate ligament surgical techniques; however, despite stable anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions, many athletes still never achieve their preinjury ability or even return to sport. Psychological factors associated with patient perceptions and functional outcomes following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction are important to acknowledge and understand. Issues related to emotional disturbance, motivation, self-esteem, locus of control, and self-efficacy can have profound effects on patients' compliance, athletic identity, and readiness to return to sport. The psychological aspects of recovery play a critical role in functional outcomes, and a better understanding of these concepts is essential to optimize the treatment of patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, particularly those who plan to return to sport. Identifying at-risk patients, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, and providing early referral to a sports psychologist may improve patient outcomes and increase return-to-play rates among athletes.

  16. Gross, Arthroscopic, and Radiographic Anatomies of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Foundations for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery.

    PubMed

    Irarrázaval, Sebastián; Albers, Marcio; Chao, Tom; Fu, Freddie H

    2017-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the more studied structures in the knee joint. It is not a tubular structure, but is much narrower in its midsubstance and broader at its ends, producing an hourglass shape. The ACL is composed of 2 functional bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles, that are named for their location of insertion on the anterior surface of the tibial plateau. Although the relative contribution in terms of total cross-sectional area of the ACL has been noted to be equal in regards to each bundle, dynamically these bundles demonstrate different properties for knee function.

  17. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  18. The role of cranial kinesis in birds.

    PubMed

    Bout, R G; Zweers, G A

    2001-12-01

    In birds, the ability to move the upper beak relative to the braincase has been the subject of many functional morphological investigations, but in many instances the adaptive significance of cranial kinesis remains unclear. Alternatively, cranial kinesis may be considered a consequence of the general design of the skull, rather than an adaptive trait as such. The present study reviews some results related to the mechanism and functional significance of cranial kinesis in birds. Quantitative three-dimensional X-ray has shown that in skulls morphologically as divers as paleognaths and neognaths the mechanism for elevation of the upper beak is very similar. One of the mechanisms proposed for avian jaw movement is a mechanical coupling of the upper and the lower jaw movement by the postorbital ligament. Such a mechanical coupling would necessitate upper beak elevation. However, independent control of upper and lower jaw has been shown to occur during beak movements in birds. Moreover, kinematic modeling and force measurements suggests that the maximum extensibility of collagen, in combination with the short distance of the insertion of the postorbital ligament to the quadrato-mandibular articulation do not constitute a block to lower jaw depression. The lower jaw ligaments serve to limit the maximal extension of the mandibula. It is suggested here that cranial kinesis in avian feeding may have evolved as a consequence of an increase in eye size. This increase in size led to a reduction of bony bars in the lateral aspect of the skull enabling the transfer of quadrate movement to the upper jaw. The selective forces favoring the development of a kinetic upper beak in birds may be subtle and act in different ecological contexts. Simultaneous movement of the upper and lower jaw not only increases the velocity of beak movements, but with elevated upper beak also less force is required to open the lower jaw. However, the penalty of increased mobility of elements in a

  19. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  20. Mechanical comparison of loop and crimp configurations for extracapsular stabilization of the cranial cruciate ligament-deficient stifle.

    PubMed

    Aisa, Josep; Calvo, Ignacio; Buckley, Conor T; Kirby, Barbara M

    2015-01-01

    To biomechanically compare different loop and crimp configurations used for extracapsular suture stabilization of the CCL-deficient stifle. In vitro study. Crimped loop constructs of 100 lb Ande type nylon leader line in 7 different configurations comprising single and double loops, single and double crimps, and the interlocking loop configuration. Constructs premade on external skeletal fixator bars 60 mm apart and tested in tension with a custom-made split circular arm mounted on a table-top materials testing machine. Data were derived from force/displacement plots. In "load to failure" test (10/group) constructs were loaded to failure with distraction rates of 10 mm/min; ultimate load, tension at 2 mm elongation and failure were recorded. In "staircase" test (5/group) constructs cycled at 100 N/s from 75 N with incremental increases of 50 N/cycle; ultimate load, maximum tension before elongation at rest over 2 mm and failure were recorded. In "cycling and jumping" test (10/group) 3 of 7 constructs cycled at 100 N/s 100 times from 50 to 100 N, then 5 times from 50 to 600 N; failure and elongation at cycles 1, 50 and 100 and at jumps 1 to 5 recorded. Double-loop double-crimp configurations were statistically superior to all other configurations in ultimate load, and to single-loop and interlocking loop configurations in elongation in "load to failure" and "staircase" tests. In "cycling and jumping" test the interlocking loop configuration specimens elongated significantly more than the others and only in the double-loop double-crimp group did all constructs complete the test. Double-loop double-crimp configurations are mechanically superior to other previously described configurations. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty.

  2. Kinematic analysis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hua-Wei; Ni, Ming; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Li, Xiang; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Chai, Wei; Zhou, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Ying; Liu, Yu-Liang; Cheng, Cheng-Kung; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aims to retain normal knee kinematics after knee replacement surgeries by reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament during total knee arthroplasty. Method: We use computational simulation tools to establish four dynamic knee models, including normal knee model, posterior cruciate ligament retaining knee model, posterior cruciate ligament substituting knee model, and anterior cruciate ligament reconstructing knee model. Our proposed method utilizes magnetic resonance images to reconstruct solid bones and attachments of ligaments, and assemble femoral and tibial components according representative literatures and operational specifications. Dynamic data of axial tibial rotation and femoral translation from full-extension to 135 were measured for analyzing the motion of knee models. Findings: The computational simulation results show that comparing with the posterior cruciate ligament retained knee model and the posterior cruciate ligament substituted knee model, reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament improves the posterior movement of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation through a full range of flexion. The maximum posterior translations of the lateral condyle, medial condyle and tibial internal rotation of the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee are 15.3 mm, 4.6 mm and 20.6 at 135 of flexion. Interpretation: Reconstructing anterior cruciate ligament in total knee arthroplasty has been approved to be an more efficient way of maintaining normal knee kinematics comparing to posterior cruciate ligament retained and posterior cruciate ligament substituted total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27347334

  3. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals.

  4. Roentgen stereophotogrammetry for analysis of cranial growth.

    PubMed

    Selvik, G; Alberius, P; Fahlman, M

    1986-04-01

    A system of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA) has been developed and its value in studies of cranial growth in both man and the experimental animal (rabbit) has been delineated. This method is based on measurements from metal bone marker images on roentgenograms. Two roentgen tubes simultaneously expose the object, which is placed in one of two types of calibration cages. The object position does not need to be identical from one examination to the next. The cage, holding indicators of predetermined internal positions (in two or four planes), defines a laboratory coordinate system. Two-dimensional image coordinates are obtained by means of a highly accurate cartographic instrument. By computer reconstruction of the x-ray beams through the markers, 3-D object coordinates are calculated. For subsequent analysis of growth processes, extensive software is necessary. To control intrasegmental stability (routinely performed at each examination), a minimum of two markers is required, whereas three markers are needed in each skeletal segment for kinematic analysis using the rigid-body concept. Careful planning of marker placement before implantation minimizes implant loss and instability that otherwise might be a problem. Complications other than bone marker loosening have been nonexistent. The technical accuracy is high. Consequently, roentgen stereophotogrammetry, with the aid of metallic implants, is a superior means to obtain biometric information on cranial growth with relative ease.

  5. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed Central

    Rayfield, Emily J.

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals. PMID:15306316

  6. Obelionic cranial deformation in the Puebloan Southwest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Greg C; Madimenos, Felicia C

    2010-11-01

    As a form of cranial deformation, obelionic flattening is rare. Originally named and described by Stewart (J Wash Acad Sci 29 (1939) 460-465), based on a small sample from Florida, it has been little noted since. Previously [Nelson and Madimenos, Paper presented at the Paleopathology Association annual meeting (2007)], we reported the discovery of two individuals from the Pueblo III Gallina site of Cañada Simon I who exhibit flattening of this type. Although technically undescribed in the Southwest before now, there are tantalizing clues in the literature that it occurred in low frequencies throughout the Ancestral Pueblo world. To determine whether the obelionic flattening found at Cañada Simon I was isolated or an indication of a more widespread phenomenon, we undertook a survey of crania from other Gallina sites, Chaco Canyon, and the literature (type of deformation can be determined on lateral photographs of crania properly positioned along the Frankfort Horizontal). We examined 146 crania (78 firsthand) of which seven exhibit obelionic flattening. Our results indicate that obelionic flattening should be added to the suite of cranial deformations that occur in the Southwest. Here, we propose parameters by which obelionic flattening can be described and differentiated from the more common lambdoidal and occipital forms and suggest that the three types of flattening form a continuum of cradleboard induced deformation, although the exact mechanism for obelionic flattening remains elusive. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Vasopressin function in familial cranial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, P. H.; Robertson, G. L.

    1981-01-01

    A family suffering from cranial diabetes insipidus, that extends over 4 generations, is described. Inheritance of polyuria was autosomal dominant. Vasopressin function was studied in members of the last 2 generations, 4 of whom had polyuria. Osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion was assessed by infusion of hypertonic saline. Plasma vasopressin remained undetectable in one patient, while 2 others had very blunted vasopressin responses to osmotic stimulation. Three non-osmotic stimuli were applied. Controlled hypotension produced by trimetaphan infusion and insulin-induced hypoglycaemia did not increase plasma vasopressin but apomorphine-induced nausea caused a minimal rise in plasma vasopressin to 0.7 pg/ml. Polyuria and thirst resolved with antidiuretic therapy in all patients studied. Congenital absence of vasopressin as in Brattleboro rats is unlikely to account for diabetes insipidus in this disorder since small increases in vasopressin have been demonstrated in these patients. In view of previous post-mortem findings, familial cranial diabetes insipidus is most likely to be due to degeneration of vasopressin-synthesizing neurones. PMID:7279821

  8. Cranial remains of an Eocene tarsier

    PubMed Central

    Rossie, James B.; Ni, Xijun; Beard, K. Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The phylogenetic position of tarsiers relative to anthropoids and Paleogene omomyids remains a subject of lively debate that lies at the center of research into anthropoid origins. Omomyids have long been regarded as the nearest relatives of tarsiers, but a sister group relationship between anthropoids and tarsiers has also been proposed. These conflicting phylogenetic reconstructions rely heavily on comparisons of cranial anatomy, but until now, the fossil record of tarsiers has been limited to a single jaw and several isolated teeth. In this article, we describe cranial material of a fossil tarsiid from the middle-Eocene Shanghuang fissure-fillings in southern Jiangsu Province, China. This facial fragment, which is allocated to Tarsius eocaenus, is virtually identical to the corresponding anatomy in living tarsiers and differs substantially from that of early anthropoids such as Bahinia, Phenacopithecus, and Parapithecus. This new specimen indicates that tarsiers already possessed greatly enlarged orbits and a haplorhine oronasal configuration by the time they are first documented in the fossil record during the middle Eocene. PMID:16537385

  9. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required.

  10. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  11. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Murao, T; Sumen, Y; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, N

    1999-04-01

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.

  12. Reducing time to surgery after anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Sapsford, H; Sutherland, A G

    2016-05-01

    Recent work suggests that reconstruction of the ruptured anterior cruciate ligament within 12 months of injury results in better outcomes. We present a complete audit cycle examining the effect of establishment of an Acute Knee Clinic on time to surgery. Records of 20 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions undertaken by the senior author between June 2003 and May 2004 were examined to identify the time to surgery. The Acute Knee Clinic was established in December 2004. Prospectively collected data on patients attending the Acute Knee Clinic between May 2005 and July 2007 and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction from September 2006 to 2007 were reviewed with respect to referral route, time from injury to specialist review and time to surgery. Mean time from injury to surgery of the initial cohort was 14 months (range 3-56). After establishment of the Acute Knee Clinic, 90% of referrals from Accident and Emergency (A&E) were seen by a specialist within four weeks. Between September 2006 and September 2007, 49 patients underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: 21 came via the Acute Knee Clinic, with a mean time from injury to surgery of 6 months; 28 patients from the elective clinic had a mean time to surgery of 25 months. 95% of Acute Knee Clinic patients and 53 % of elective clinic patients had surgery within 12 months of injury. The Acute Knee Clinic has been shown to reduce the time from injury to anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The Acute Knee Clinic only accounts for the referral of 40% of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions in this series: Further education work is required with A&E staff and GPs regarding the referral of knee injuries. Access to the Acute Knee Clinic could be extended to GPs, although this could create service overload. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  14. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  15. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  17. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  18. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  19. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... electrotherapy stimulator. (a) Identification. A cranial electrotherapy stimulator is a device that applies...

  20. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    PubMed

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  1. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  2. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  3. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull. (b...

  4. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  5. Cranial nerve assessment: a concise guide to clinical examination.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Omprakash; Rizk, Elias; Rodriguez, Julian; Lee, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Examination of the cranial nerves is an integral and important part of a complete neurological examination. Historically, these skills were crucial for diagnosing specific lesions. With the development of modern imaging modalities, the significance of clinical examination techniques has perhaps been undermined. The authors present an overview of each cranial nerve with a concise summary of examination techniques.

  6. Asymmetric Type F Botulism with Cranial Nerve Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Kattan, Jessica A.; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C. Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N.; Fagan, Ryan P.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients. PMID:22257488

  7. The contribution of subsistence to global human cranial variation.

    PubMed

    Noback, Marlijn L; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    Diet-related cranial variation in modern humans is well documented on a regional scale, with ample examples of cranial changes related to the agricultural transition. However, the influence of subsistence strategy on global cranial variation is less clear, having been confirmed only for the mandible, and dietary effects beyond agriculture are often neglected. Here we identify global patterns of subsistence-related human cranial shape variation. We analysed a worldwide sample of 15 populations (n = 255) with known subsistence strategies using 3-D landmark datasets designed to capture the shape of different units of the cranium. Results show significant correlations between global cranial shape and diet, especially for temporalis muscle shape and general cranial shape. Importantly, the differences between populations with either a plant- or an animal-based diet are more pronounced than those between agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, suggesting that the influence of diet as driver of cranial variation is not limited to Holocene transitions to agricultural subsistence. Dental arch shape did not correlate with subsistence pattern, possibly indicating the high plasticity of this region of the face in relation to age, disease and individual use of the dentition. Our results highlight the importance of subsistence strategy as one of the factors underlying the evolution of human geographic cranial variation.

  8. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  10. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in professional dancers.

    PubMed

    Meuffels, Duncan E; Verhaar, Jan A N

    2008-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) is a common sport injury; however, there are no data concerning dance and ACL injury. We report the incidence, injury mechanism, and clinical follow-up of ACL injury in professional dancers. In a retrospective cohort study involving the three major dance companies in the Netherlands, by interviewing all 253 dancers who had had a full-time contract during 1991-2002, dancers with symptomatic ACL injury or past ACL reconstruction were identified and examined. 6 dancers (2 of whom were women) had had a symptomatic ACL rupture and reconstruction. Interestingly, all had been on the left side and had had a similar trauma mechanism: while dancing a classical variation they landed, after a jump, on their left leg, in the turned out position with a valgus force on their knee. There was a higher risk of ACL injury in the classical company than in the two contemporary companies. The risk of dancers having a rupture of the left ACL during a 10-year career in this classical company was 7%. ACL injuries are not an infrequently seen type of injury in professional classical dancers, with a very specific mechanism of injury--a landing on the left leg in exorotation. More attention and prophylactic measures should be given to this specific injury mechanism.

  11. Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Geib, Timothy M

    2007-03-01

    Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination is a rare but potentially devastating occurrence for any surgeon to encounter. Most instances in our experience have happened when a surgeon first enters practice or is operating in a new environment with new staff. Based on the currently available literature and the senior author's personal experience with 3 cases, intraoperative cleansing of the graft followed by implantation is a reasonable option. The protocol used successfully in these 3 cases includes getting the graft off of the floor immediately, removing any suture material in the graft, cleansing the graft for 15 to 30 minutes each in chlorohexidine and triple antibiotic solution, followed by a normal saline rinse. All graft sutures should then be replaced. The graft should then be resized and the tibial and femoral tunnels adjusted if needed. After implantation of the graft, additional intraoperative and postoperative intravenous antibiotic and/or oral antibiotic administration is also recommended for the first 1 to 2 weeks. Close clinical follow-up is also very important the first 6 weeks postoperatively and should include candid communication with the patient and family.

  12. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament surgery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various methods regarding allograft knee replacements have been described. The animal models, which are generally used for this purpose include sheep, dogs, goats, and pigs, and accrue significant costs for study protocols. The authors herein describe an efficient and cost-effective model to study either native or tissue-engineered allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in a New Zealand rabbit model with the potential for transgenic and cell migration studies. Methods ACL reconstructions were performed in rabbits under general anesthesia. For fresh allograft implantations, two animals were operated in parallel. Each right extensor digitorum longus tendon was harvested and prepared for implantation. After excision of the ACL, tibial and femoral bone tunnels were created to implant each graft in the native ACL position. Results During a 2-year period, the authors have successfully undertaken this surgery in 61 rabbits and have not noticed any major complications attributed to this surgical technique. In addition, the authors have observed fast recovery in the animals postoperatively. Conclusion The authors recommend this surgical procedure as an excellent model for the study of knee surgery. PMID:23957941

  14. Guideline on anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Orthopaedic Association has a long tradition of development of practical clinical guidelines. Here we present the recommendations from the multidisciplinary clinical guideline working group for anterior cruciate ligament injury. The following 8 clinical questions were formulated by a steering group of the Dutch Orthopaedic Association. What is the role of physical examination and additional diagnostic tools? Which patient-related outcome measures should be used? What are the relevant parameters that influence the indication for an ACL reconstruction? Which findings or complaints are predictive of a bad result of an ACL injury treatment? What is the optimal timing for surgery for an ACL injury? What is the outcome of different conservative treatment modalities? Which kind of graft gives the best result in an ACL reconstruction? What is the optimal postoperative treatment concerning rehabilitation, resumption of sports, and physiotherapy? These 8 questions were answered and recommendations were made, using the “Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation” instrument. This instrument seeks to improve the quality and effectiveness of clinical practical guidelines by establishing a shared framework to develop, report, and assess. The steering group has also developed 7 internal indicators to aid in measuring and enhancing the quality of the treatment of patients with an ACL injury, for use in a hospital or practice. PMID:22900914

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Silver, F H; Tria, A J; Zawadsky, J P; Dunn, M G

    1991-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the major intra-articular mechanical element that limits motion of the tibia with respect to the femur. It is a multi-fasciculated structure composed of crimped aligned collagen fibers. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on ACL structure and mechanical properties in an effort to stimulate the development of a new generation of more effective replacement devices. Replacement of the ACL is achieved using biologic and synthetic grafts. Biologic grafts include illiotibial band, semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, patellar tendon, and meniscus. Bone-patellar-bone complexes used to replace the ACL are revascularized and ultimately replaced by neo-ligament. Synthetic implants including the Integraft, Leads-Keio ligament, Gore-Tex¿ ligament and Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD) have either not been approved or approved by the FDA for limited use as a replacement for the ACL. The Kennedy LAD has been found to increase the strength of autogenous tissue during revascularization. Based on the success of autografts and the Kennedy LAD, we conclude that the next generation of ACL replacement devices will consist of a scaffold and a biodegradable augmentation device. The scaffold will have a structure that mimics the normal ACL as well as stimulates revascularization and healing. A biodegradable augmentation device will be employed to mechanically reinforce the scaffold without stress shielding the neo-ligament. By combining the advantages of autografts and a biodegradable augmentation device, a new generation of ACL replacements will be achieved.

  16. MRI of anterior cruciate ligament healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ihara, Hidetoshi; Miwa, Megumi; Deya, Keizo; Torisu, Kenji

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate using MRI the natural healing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) when treated conservatively by early protective motion. Consecutive acute complete intraligamentous ruptures of the ACL in 50 cases that were allowed to heal without surgery were evaluated before and after 3 month treatment by MRI, arthroscopy, and stress radiographs. Twenty-nine of the 50 patients were also reevaluated 11 months from the initial injury, of which 7 were reevaluated again 24 months from the initial injury by MRI. The MR appearance of the treated ACL was categorized into four grades depending on homogeneity, straight band, and size. MR assessment of the ACL after 3 month treatment demonstrated a well defined normal-sized straight band in 37 cases (74%). There was a significant relationship between the 3 and 11 month MR evaluations (r. = 0.801, p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between the MR and arthroscopic evaluations (r, = 0.455, p < 0.005) and between the MR and stress radiographic evaluations (r, = 0.348, p < 0.025) after the 3 month treatment. MRI can demonstrate ACL healing when treated conservatively with early protective mobilization. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  18. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  19. Cranial joint histology in the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos): new insights on avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of avian cranial kinesis is a phenomenon in part responsible for the remarkable diversity of avian feeding adaptations observable today. Although osteological, developmental and behavioral features of the feeding system are frequently studied, comparatively little is known about cranial joint skeletal tissue composition and morphology from a microscopic perspective. These data are key to understanding the developmental, biomechanical and evolutionary underpinnings of kinesis. Therefore, here we investigated joint microstructure in juvenile and adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos; Anseriformes). Ducks belong to a diverse clade of galloanseriform birds, have derived adaptations for herbivory and kinesis, and are model organisms in developmental biology. Thus, new insights into their cranial functional morphology will refine our understanding of avian cranial evolution. A total of five specimens (two ducklings and three adults) were histologically sampled, and two additional specimens (a duckling and an adult) were subjected to micro-computed tomographic scanning. Five intracranial joints were sampled: the jaw joint (quadrate-articular); otic joint (quadrate-squamosal); palatobasal joint (parasphenoid-pterygoid); the mandibular symphysis (dentary-dentary); and the craniofacial hinge (a complex flexion zone involving four different pairs of skeletal elements). In both the ducklings and adults, the jaw, otic and palatobasal joints are all synovial, with a synovial cavity and articular cartilage on each surface (i.e. bichondral joints) ensheathed in a fibrous capsule. The craniofacial hinge begins as an ensemble of patent sutures in the duckling, but in the adult it becomes more complex: laterally it is synovial; whereas medially, it is synostosed by a bridge of chondroid bone. We hypothesize that it is chondroid bone that provides some of the flexible properties of this joint. The heavily innervated mandibular symphysis is already fused in the

  20. Scalp Tissue Expansion Above a Custom-Made Hydroxyapatite Cranial Implant to Correct Sequelar Alopecia on a Transposition Flap.

    PubMed

    Carloni, Raphael; Herlin, Christian; Chaput, Benoit; De Runz, Antoine; Watier, E; Bertheuil, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Resection of cranial tumors involving both bone and scalp tissue may require the recruitment of soft tissue using a flap above the bone reconstruction. When a transposition flap has been chosen, the alopecia zone on the donor site may be difficult to treat afterward. Scalp expansion is the gold standard in these situations, but this has never been described above cranial implants. We report the first case of a patient who underwent a scalp tissue expansion above a custom-made hydroxyapatite cranial implant to correct sequelar alopecia. A 30-year-old man presented with a dermatofibrosarcoma of the scalp with bone invasion. A cranioplasty with a custom-made hydroxyapatite implant and a transposition flap were performed. Although healing was achieved, the donor site of the transposition flap left a 9 × 13 cm sequelar alopecia area on the vertex. To correct it, a rectangular 340-cm(3) expander was partially placed above the cranial implant and under the transposition flap. A second 120-cm(3) expander was put on the contralateral temporal region. The expansion was successful. No expander infection, cranial implant displacement, or fracture on imaging performed during the follow-up period was detected. The alopecia zone was entirely excised. The patient was very satisfied with the cosmetic result. Tissue expansion above hydroxyapatite implants may be of concern to the physician because of the risk of infection and rupture of the cranial implant. With this clinical case, we emphasize some precautions to prevent these issues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  2. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  3. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  4. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  5. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used without...

  7. Quantitative computed tomography and cranial burr holes: a model to evaluate the quality of cranial reconstruction in humans.

    PubMed

    Worm, Paulo Valdeci; Ferreira, Nelson Pires; Ferreira, Marcelo Paglioli; Kraemer, Jorge Luiz; Lenhardt, Rene; Alves, Ronnie Peterson Marcondes; Wunderlich, Ricardo Castilho; Collares, Marcus Vinicius Martins

    2012-05-01

    Current methods to evaluate the biologic development of bone grafts in human beings do not quantify results accurately. Cranial burr holes are standardized critical bone defects, and the differences between bone powder and bone grafts have been determined in numerous experimental studies. This study evaluated quantitative computed tomography (QCT) as a method to objectively measure cranial bone density after cranial reconstruction with autografts. In each of 8 patients, 2 of 4 surgical burr holes were reconstructed with autogenous wet bone powder collected during skull trephination, and the other 2 holes, with a circular cortical bone fragment removed from the inner table of the cranial bone flap. After 12 months, the reconstructed areas and a sample of normal bone were studied using three-dimensional QCT; bone density was measured in Hounsfield units (HU). Mean (SD) bone density was 1535.89 (141) HU for normal bone (P < 0.0001), 964 (176) HU for bone fragments, and 453 (241) HU for bone powder (P < 0.001). As expected, the density of the bone fragment graft was consistently greater than that of bone powder. Results confirm the accuracy and reproducibility of QCT, already demonstrated for bone in other locations, and suggest that it is an adequate tool to evaluate cranial reconstructions. The combination of QCT and cranial burr holes is an excellent model to accurately measure the quality of new bone in cranial reconstructions and also seems to be an appropriate choice of experimental model to clinically test any cranial bone or bone substitute reconstruction.

  8. Cranial base topology and basic trends in the facial evolution of Homo.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Facial prognathism and projection are important characteristics in human evolution but their three-dimensional (3D) architectonic relationships to basicranial morphology are not clear. We used geometric morphometrics and measured 51 3D-landmarks in a comparative sample of modern humans (N = 78) and fossil Pleistocene hominins (N = 10) to investigate the spatial features of covariation between basicranial and facial elements. The study reveals complex morphological integration patterns in craniofacial evolution of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominins. A downwards-orientated cranial base correlates with alveolar maxillary prognathism, relatively larger faces, and relatively larger distances between the anterior cranial base and the frontal bone (projection). This upper facial projection correlates with increased overall relative size of the maxillary alveolar process. Vertical facial height is associated with tall nasal cavities and is accommodated by an elevated anterior cranial base, possibly because of relations between the cribriform and the nasal cavity in relation to body size and energetics. Variation in upper- and mid-facial projection can further be produced by basicranial topology in which the midline base and nasal cavity are shifted anteriorly relative to retracted lateral parts of the base and the face. The zygomatics and the middle cranial fossae act together as bilateral vertical systems that are either projected or retracted relative to the midline facial elements, causing either midfacial flatness or midfacial projection correspondingly. We propose that facial flatness and facial projection reflect classical principles of craniofacial growth counterparts, while facial orientation relative to the basicranium as well as facial proportions reflect the complex interplay of head-body integration in the light of encephalization and body size decrease in Middle to Late Pleistocene hominin evolution. Developmental and evolutionary patterns of integration may

  9. The effect of dietary adaption on cranial morphological integration in capuchins (order Primates, genus Cebus).

    PubMed

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W; Strait, David S

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C. apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C. albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  10. The Effect of Dietary Adaption on Cranial Morphological Integration in Capuchins (Order Primates, Genus Cebus)

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W.; Strait, David S.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C.apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C.albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  11. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  12. On the terminology of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Simon, František; Marečková-Štolcová, Elena; Páč, Libor

    2011-10-20

    The present contribution adopts various points of view to discuss the terminology of the twelve nervi craniales. These are paired nerves and have dual names, terms with Roman ordinal numerals, i.e., the nerves are numbered in the top-to-bottom direction, and descriptive historical names. The time of origin and motivation behind the investigated terms are determined. The majority of terms come from the 17th and 18th centuries. The motivation behind most of them is (a) nerve localization, as this is in conformity with anatomical nomenclature in general, (b) nerve function, and rarely (c) nerve appearance. The occurrence of synonymous names and variants is also a focus of attention. In several cases, reference is made to the process called terminologization, meaning when a certain expression acquires technical meaning and the characteristic/feature of the term. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Retained garden fork following cranial stab injury.

    PubMed

    Gonya, Sonwabile; Mbatha, Andile; Moyeni, Nondabula; Enicker, Basil

    2016-01-07

    Retained garden fork is a rare complication of penetrating cranial trauma. Retained knife blade is the most commonly reported presentation. We report an unusual case of a 30-year-old male patient treated at our institution, who presented with a retained garden fork following a stab to the head, with no associated neurological deficits. Computerized tomographic scan of the brain was performed preoperatively to assess the trajectory of the weapon and parenchymal injury. A craniectomy was performed to facilitate removal of the weapon in the operating theatre under general anaesthesia. Intravenous prophylactic antibiotics were administered pre- and postoperatively to prevent septic complications. The patient recovered well and was discharged home. Published by Oxford University Press and JSCR Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016.

  14. Spatial Change of Cruciate Ligaments in Rat Embryo Knee Joint by Three-Dimensional Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangkai; Aoyama, Tomoki; Takaishi, Ryota; Higuchi, Shinya; Yamada, Shigehito; Kuroki, Hiroshi; Takakuwa, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the spatial developmental changes of rat cruciate ligaments by three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction using episcopic fluorescence image capture (EFIC). Cruciate ligaments of Wister rat embryos between embryonic day (E) 16 and E20 were analyzed. Samples were sectioned and visualized using EFIC. 3D reconstructions were generated using Amira software. The length of the cruciate ligaments, distances between attachment points to femur and tibia, angles of the cruciate ligaments and the cross angle of the cruciate ligaments were measured. The shape of cruciate ligaments was clearly visible at E17. The lengths of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) increased gradually from E17 to E19 and drastically at E20. Distances between attachment points to the femur and tibia gradually increased. The ACL angle and PCL angle gradually decreased. The cross angle of the cruciate ligaments changed in three planes. The primordium of the 3D structure of rat cruciate ligaments was constructed from the early stage, with the completion of the development of the structures occurring just before birth. PMID:26098761

  15. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  16. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: allograft versus autograft.

    PubMed

    Chang, Spencer K Y; Egami, Darren K; Shaieb, Mark D; Kan, Darryl M; Richardson, Allen B

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the minimal 2-year outcome of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) allografts versus autografts, both augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis. Retrospective review. Forty-six of 52 BPTB ACL reconstructions using allografts and 33 of 37 BPTB ACL reconstructions using autografts were followed up at a mean of 2.75 and 3.36 years, respectively. All patients had an iliotibial band tenodesis. Evaluations included the Lysholm II scale, a questionnaire, physical examination findings, and KT-1000 arthrometry. No statistically significant differences were seen between groups in Lysholm II scores or in any subjective category. Most patients (91% allograft; 97% autograft) had good to excellent Lysholm II scores. Sixty-five percent of allograft patients and 73% of autograft patients returned to their preinjury activity level. More allograft patients complained of retropatellar pain (16% v 9% for autograft patients). Fifty-three percent of allograft patients versus 23% of autograft patients had a flexion deficit of 5 degrees or more when compared with the normal contralateral side. When comparing KT-1000 side-to-side differences, we found no significant differences between groups. Ninety-one percent of both groups had maximum side-to-side differences less than 5 mm. Three allograft patients (6.5%) had traumatic ruptures at 12, 19, and 43 months postoperatively versus none in the autograft group. All three allograft patients who sustained postoperative traumatic ruptures had received fresh frozen, nonirradiated allografts. Results of ACL reconstruction using allografts or autografts augmented with an iliotibial band tenodesis were comparable. The BPTB autograft should remain the gold standard, although the BPTB allograft in ACL reconstruction is a reasonable alternative.

  18. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, L.M.; Gray, B.; Wright, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rigorous rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is necessary for a successful surgical outcome. A large number of clinical trials continue to assess aspects of this rehabilitation process. Prior systematic reviews evaluated fifty-four Level-I and II clinical trials published through 2005. Methods: Eighty-five articles from 2006 to 2010 were identified utilizing multiple search engines. Twenty-nine Level-I or II studies met inclusion criteria and were evaluated with use of the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) criteria. Topics included in this review are postoperative bracing, accelerated strengthening, home-based rehabilitation, proprioception and neuromuscular training, and six miscellaneous topics investigated in single trials. Results: Bracing following ACL reconstruction remains neither necessary nor beneficial and adds to the cost of the procedure. Early return to sports needs further research. Home-based rehabilitation can be successful. Although neuromuscular interventions are not likely to be harmful to patients, they are also not likely to yield large improvements in outcomes or help patients return to sports faster. Thus, they should not be performed to the exclusion of strengthening and range-of-motion exercises. Vibration training may lead to faster and more complete proprioceptive recovery but further evidence is needed. Conclusions: Several new modalities for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction may be helpful but should not be performed to the exclusion of range-of-motion, strengthening, and functional exercises. Accelerated rehabilitation does not appear to be harmful but further investigation of rehabilitation timing is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:23032584

  19. Cranial computed tomography in purulent meningitis of childhood.

    PubMed

    Tuncer, Oguz; Caksen, Hüseyin; Arslan, Sükrü; Atas, Bülent; Uner, Abdurrahman; Oner, Ahmet Faik; Odabas, Dursun

    2004-02-01

    The cranial computed tomography (CT) findings of 48 children with purulent meningitis were examined, prospectively, to determine the importance of cranial CT findings on the prognosis of childhood meningitis, in a developing country. The age of children ranged from 2 months to 13 years. Of 48 patients, 29 (60.5%) survived without sequelae, 13 (27%) survived with sequelae, and six (12.5%) died. Cranial CT was normal in 21 (43%) patients of 48 children with meningitis at admission. Abnormal CT findings were detected in 10, 11, and 6 children in the groups of survived without sequelae, survived with sequelae, and deaths, respectively, at admission (p <.05) We found that CT scan results were correlated with neurological signs (p <.05). At least one or more cranial CTs were was re-taken in children in whom the first CT revealed abnormal findings; we did not find a statistically significant difference for the follow-up CT findings between the groups (p >.05). Hydrocephalus and subdural effusion were the commonest abnormal CT findings. In conclusion, our findings showed that cranial CT may safely be used to detect intracranial complications of meningitis in childhood and the ratio of sequelae and death were more common in children with abnormal cranial CT than those of normal cranial CT findings. Additionally, there was a positive correlation between CT scan results and neurological signs.

  20. A pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Walter T; Richards, Kirsten; Redhed, James; Papay, Frank A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was o determine the efficacy of a newly developed pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly. The design was retrospective and the setting was a tertiary care center. Subjects were all patients in whom positional plagiocephaly has been diagnosed and who have been fitted by the Orthotics and Prosthetics Department for the helmet. Diagonal cranial lengths and widths were measured at each visit. Analysis included the calculation of the ratio change in oblique diameters compared with time, patient's age, and head circumference. Seventy-five patients met inclusion criteria (50 boys, 25 girls). Patients with pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet therapy had significantly improved outcomes as compared with pretreatment measurements (P < or = 0.0001). The helmet did not limit cranial growth as evidenced by significant normalization of the oblique measurement ratio when compared with increasing cranial circumference and age (P = 0.0003, P < or = 0.0001, respectively). The pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet successfully corrects positional plagiocephaly and does not hinder cranial growth.

  1. Concomitant cranial and ocular combat injuries during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

    PubMed

    Cho, Raymond I; Bakken, Hans E; Reynolds, Mark E; Schlifka, Brett A; Powers, David B

    2009-09-01

    Concomitant cranial and ocular injuries were frequently seen in combat casualties during Operation Iraqi Freedom. The incidence of these injuries is reported along with an interventional case series. A retrospective review was conducted of all surgical patients treated by U.S. Army neurosurgeons and ophthalmologists in Iraq from December 2005 to April 2006. Out of 104 patients with cranial trauma and 158 patients with ocular trauma, 34 had both cranial and ocular injuries (32.7 and 21.5% of patients with cranial and ocular injuries, respectively). Neurosurgical procedures included exploratory craniotomy, decompressive craniectomy, and frontal sinus surgery. Ophthalmologic surgical procedures included globe exploration, open globe repair, primary enucleation, orbital fracture repair, lateral canthotomy and cantholysis, and repair of lid and periocular lacerations. Patients with cranial trauma had a higher incidence of orbital fracture, orbital compartment syndrome, and multiple ocular injuries compared with patients without cranial trauma (odds ratio 6.4, 3.9, and 3.3, respectively). A strong association exists between cranial and ocular trauma in combat casualties treated during Operation Iraqi Freedom. Combat health support personnel should maintain a high level of suspicion for one of these injuries when the other is present. Co-locating neurosurgeons and ophthalmologists in support of combat operations facilitates the optimal treatment of patients with these combined injuries.

  2. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  3. Revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery: experience from Miami.

    PubMed

    Uribe, J W; Hechtman, K S; Zvijac, J E; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W

    1996-04-01

    Failed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as defined by recurrent patholaxity is increasingly commonplace. This report presents the findings of 54 patients who had unsuccessful intraarticular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to correct persistent instability and who subsequently underwent revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery. Before revision, patients were evaluated by clinical examination, KT-1000 arthrometer, radiographs, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity scale, and subjective questionnaire. The results were compared at a mean of 32 months following revision surgery. There was an average of 16 months from index procedure to the time of revision. Autogenous patellar tendon grafts were used in 61% of the cases with 30% of these harvested from the contralateral knee. Fresh frozen patellar tendon was used in 35% and autogenous hamstring tendons in 4%. Revision was successful in objectively improving stability in all patients with an average KT-000 of 2.8 mm. Autogenous tissue grafts provided greater objective stability when compared with allograft tissue with average KT-1000 of 2.2 and 3.3, respectively. Functionally, however, there was no significant difference in outcome between the 2 groups. Harvesting of the contralateral patellar tendon was found to have no adverse long term effect. Subjectively, the results were significantly worse depending on the degree of articular cartilage degeneration. Only 54% of patients returned to their preanterior cruciate ligament injury activity level. Competence in various anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques will facilitate revision surgery especially in avoiding preexisting tunnels and hardware. Correct graft placement and addressing the secondary restraints are critical to successful revision surgery.

  4. Activity progression for anterior cruciate ligament injured individuals☆

    PubMed Central

    Button, Kate; Roos, Paulien E.; van Deursen, Robert W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Functional exercises are important in the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament deficient and reconstructed individuals but movement compensations and incomplete recovery persist. This study aimed to identify how tasks pose different challenges; and evaluate if different activities challenge patient groups differently compared to controls. Methods Motion and force data were collected during distance hop, squatting and gait for 20 anterior cruciate ligament deficient, 21 reconstructed and 21 controls. Findings Knee range of motion was greatest during squatting, intermediate during hopping and smallest during gait (P < 0.01). Peak internal knee extensor moments were greatest during distance hop (P < 0.01). The mean value of peak knee moments was reduced in squatting and gait (P < 0.01) compared to hop. Peak internal extensor moments were significantly larger during squatting than gait and peak external adductor moments during gait compared to squatting (P < 0.01). Fluency was highest during squatting (P < 0.01). All patients demonstrated good recovery of gait but anterior cruciate ligament deficient adopted a strategy of increased fluency (P < 0.01). During squatting knee range of motion and peak internal knee extensor moment were reduced in all patients (P < 0.01). Both anterior cruciate ligament groups hopped a shorter distance (P < 0.01) and had reduced knee range of motion (P < 0.025). Anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed had reduced fluency (P < 0.01). Interpretation Distance hop was most challenging; squatting and gait were of similar difficulty but challenged patients in different ways. Despite squatting being an early, less challenging exercise, numerous compensation strategies were identified, indicating that this may be more challenging than gait. PMID:24447417

  5. Two Helpful MRI Signs for Evaluation of Posterolateral Bundle Tears of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Volokhina, Yulia V.; Syed, Hasan M.; Pham, Peter H.; Blackburn, Allie K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is difficult on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the isolated tears of the posterolateral bundle. Purpose: To describe 2 MRI signs of partial ACL tear involving the posterolateral bundle on conventional knee MRI sequences, specifically, the “gap” and “footprint” signs. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the MRI appearance of the ACL in 11 patients with arthroscopically proven partial ACL tears isolated to the posterolateral bundle, as well as in 10 patients with arthroscopically proven intact ACLs, and evaluated for the presence of gap and/or footprint signs. Results: There was high degree of sensitivity and specificity associated with the MRI findings of “gap” and “footprint” signs with arthroscopically proven isolated posterolateral bundle tears. Conclusion: Gap and footprint signs are suggestive of posterolateral bundle tear of the ACL, and the presence of 1 or both of these imaging findings should alert the radiologist to the possibility of a posterolateral bundle tear. PMID:26535387

  6. Cranial bone regeneration via BMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vural, Altugan Cahit; Odabas, Sedat; Korkusuz, Petek; Yar Sağlam, Atiye Seda; Bilgiç, Elif; Çavuşoğlu, Tarık; Piskin, Erhan; Vargel, İbrahim

    2017-05-01

    Cranial bone repair and regeneration via tissue engineering principles has attracted a great deal of interest from researchers during last decade. Here, within this study, 6 mm critical-sized bone defect regeneration via genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) were monitored up to 4 months. Cranial bone repair and new bone formations were evaluated by histological staining and real time PCR analysis in five different groups including autograft and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) transfected MSC groups. Results presented here indicate a proper cranial regeneration in autograft groups and a prospering regeneration for hBMP-2 encoding mesenchymal stem cells.

  7. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  8. Intra-cranial Toxoplasmosis in an Immunocompetent Female.

    PubMed

    Hoti, Yaser Ud Din; Aziz, Amir; Ishaque, Khurram; Abbas, Sadia; Ud Din, Tariq Salah

    2016-06-01

    Intra-cranial toxoplasmosis is a rare entity occurring mostly in immunosuppressed individuals. It is extremely rare in an immune competent patient. Toxoplasmosis is the third leading cause of food borne illness. Depending upon the site, degree of inflammation and local damage, toxoplasmosis encephalitis and cranial abscess can cause long lasting neurologic sequel. With modern imaging techniques, toxoplasmosis antibody titers, slit lamp examination and brain biopsy, there is improvement in diagnosis along with reduction in the mortality rate. We present a case illustrating the radiological manifestations, complications, potential pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment of intra-cranial toxoplasmosis in immunocompetent patient.

  9. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jessica M.; Cohen, Yale E.; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  10. Botulinum toxin physiology in focal hand and cranial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-11-20

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders.

  11. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-05-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates.

  12. Incidence of Major Tendon Ruptures and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in US Army Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Incidence of major tendon ruptures and anterior cruciate ligament tears in US Army soldiers 5a. CONTRACT...we have also reviewed the ACL reconstructions dur- ing the same period. Anterior cruciate ligament tears occur during participation in similar high... Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury During this same period, 325 patients underwent ACL reconstruction at WAMC, of whom 289 (89%) were male and 246 (76

  13. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    2009 to 00-00-2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...2009 The Author(s) Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs Daniel K. Park,* MD...4-stranded allografts are used for soft tissue anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; however, the fixation properties of fixation devices are

  14. Cranial irradiation in childhood decreases likelihood of marriage.

    PubMed

    2009-11-18

    Adults who have survived childhood cancer are less likely to get married than their peers. Those who had central nervous system tumours, cranial irradiation, impaired processing efficiency and short stature were least likely to marry.

  15. Intellectual, educational, and behavioural sequelae after cranial irradiation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, V; Smibert, E; Ekert, H; Godber, T

    1994-01-01

    Cognitive and educational sequelae are inconsistently reported in children treated with cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This study investigated differences in these skills after cranial irradiation, controlling the effects of chemotherapy and psychosocial factors. Three groups were evaluated: 100 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and treated with cranial irradiation and chemotherapy; 50 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or other cancers and treated with chemotherapy alone; and a healthy control group of 100 children. Children in the clinical groups stopped treatment at least two years before evaluation and had no history of relapse. Children were aged between 7 and 16 at the time of assessment. Evaluation included cognitive, educational, and behavioural measures. Analyses found that children receiving cranial irradiation and chemotherapy performed more poorly than non-irradiated groups on intellectual and educational tests, with verbal and attentional deficits most pronounced. Children receiving chemotherapy alone performed similarly to controls, suggesting such treatment is not associated with adverse neurobehavioural sequelae. PMID:8048815

  16. "Moya-moya' disease caused by cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Pineda, M; Royo, C; Manzanares, R

    1979-01-01

    A case of "moya-moya" disease of a 12-year-old boy is reported. The clinical history started at 3 years 2 months after cranial trauma. The patient developed mental retardation, hemiparesis and seizures.

  17. Pain Assessment After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi R.; Keller, Robert A.; Jung, Edward K.; Khalil, Lafi; Marshall, Nathan; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common outpatient procedure that is accompanied by significant postoperative pain. Purpose: To determine differences in acute pain levels between patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) versus hamstring tendon (HS) autograft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 70 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction using either BTB or HS autografts consented to participate. The primary outcome of the study was postoperative pain levels (visual analog scale), which were collected immediately after surgery and for 3 days postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included opioid consumption (intravenous morphine equivalents), hours slept, patient satisfaction, reported breakthrough pain, and calls to the physician. Results: Patients treated with BTB had increased pain when compared with those treated with HS in the acute postoperative period (mean ± SD: day 0, 6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.2 ± 2.0 [P = .066]; day 1, 5.9 ± 1.7 vs 4.9 ±1.7 [P = .024]; day 2, 5.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.1 ± 2.0 [P = .032]; day 3, 4.8 ± 2.1 vs 3.9 ± 2.3 [P = .151]). There were also significant increases in reported breakthrough pain (day 0, 76% vs 43% [P = .009]; day 1, 64% vs 35% [P = .003]) and calls to the physician due to pain (day 1, 19% vs 0% [P = .041]) in the BTB group. There were no significant differences in narcotic requirements or sleep disturbances. Overall, the BTB group reported significantly less satisfaction with pain management on days 0 and 1 (P = .024 and .027, respectively). Conclusion: A significant increase in acute postoperative pain was found when performing ACL reconstruction with BTB compared with HS. Patients treated with BTB were more likely to have breakthrough pain, decreased satisfaction with their pain management, and to contact their physician due to pain. These findings suggest a difference in early postoperative pain between the 2 most

  18. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jeffrey R; Bedford, Benjamin B; Andrachuk, John S; Scillia, Anthony J; Aune, Kyle T; Cain, E Lyle; Andrews, James R; Fleisig, Glenn S

    2016-11-01

    To determine common mechanisms of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in baseball players and to quantify the rate of return to play after primary surgical reconstruction and review intermediate clinical outcomes. Surgical injuries involving the ACL in youth, high school, collegiate, and professional baseball players were queried for an 11-year period (2001 to 2011). Over the study period, 42 baseball players were identified who had undergone arthroscopically assisted primary ACL reconstruction by 1 of 3 attending surgeons. Retrospective chart review was performed for all 42 patients to evaluate variables of age, level of competition, position, mechanism of injury, graft choice, and associated meniscal injuries. Twenty-six patients were reached for telephone survey and International Knee Documentation Committee questionnaire and they answered questions about their original injury and playing history. The most common mechanism of injury was fielding, followed by base running. Infielders and outfielders (32% each) were the most commonly injured position, followed by pitchers (29%). Among the 32 players for whom it could be determined, 30 (94%) were able to return to playing baseball at a mean follow-up of 4.2 years (range 1.0 to 9.9 years). The mean International Knee Documentation Committee score was 84.0 (range 63 to 91). Among the 26 patients contacted for telephone interview, no one required revision ACL surgery, but 3 required a subsequent procedure for meniscal tear. Twenty-five patients (96%) denied any episodes of instability in the knee after reconstruction. The overwhelming majority of baseball players that sustain ACL injuries do so while fielding or base running. Outfielders are significantly more likely than infielders to suffer ACL injuries while fielding versus base running. The results with respect to return to play are promising, as nearly all patients were able to return to baseball and none required a revision ACL surgery at a mean follow

  19. 3D Reconstruction For The Detection Of Cranial Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettner, B.; Shalev, S.; Lavelle, C.

    1986-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the use of three-dimensional (3D) cranial reconstruction from CT scans for surgical planning. A low-cost imaging system has been developed, which provides pseudo-3D images which may be manipulated to reveal the craniofacial skeleton as a whole or any particular component region. The contrast between congenital (hydrocephalic), normocephalic and acquired (carcinoma of the maxillary sinus) anomalous cranial forms demonstrates the potential of this system.

  20. Short course prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Feld, R.; Clamon, G.H.; Blum, R.; Moran, E.; Weiner, R.; Kramer, B.; Evans, W.K.; Herman, J.G.; Hoffman, F.; Burmeister, L.

    1985-10-01

    Ninety-one patients with small cell carcinoma of the lung were given a shortened, intensive course of prophylactic cranial irradiation consisting of 2,000 rad in five fractions. The CNS relapse rate was 21%, but in only one of 91 patients was the brain the first and only site of relapse. Acute toxicities consisting of headache (16%) and nausea and vomiting (15%) were observed. Results are compared with previous results from other studies of cranial irradiation.

  1. Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ARL-RP-0552 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by...presented at: 20th International Conference on Composite Materials; 2015 Jul 19–24; Copenhagen, Denmark. Approved for public release...US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone by Thomas A Plaisted Weapons and Materials

  2. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  3. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  4. Multiscale analysis of anterior cruciate ruptures: Prospective study of 49 cases.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, A; Carnesecchi, O; Philippot, R; Farizon, F

    2014-11-01

    Partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures are common. The ability to distinguish between various types of ACL ruptures preoperatively would allow surgeons to choose the most appropriate surgical treatment. A partial ACL rupture can be diagnosed preoperatively. The goal of this single-center, prospective study was to establish correlations between various macroscopic types of ACL ruptures determined by arthroscopy with data from clinical examination, knee laxity measurements (GnRB(®)) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 49 patients included over a six-month period had a diagnosis of ACL rupture based on the clinical examination. Four arthroscopy categories were defined based on the French Arthroscopy Society (SFA) classification. Each patient had their knee laxity measured, a preoperative MRI performed and a clinical exam done in the operating room before the procedure. During arthroscopy, the ACL was described as "Complete tear" in 23 of 49 patients, "Healed onto PCL" in 12, "Posterolateral bundle preserved" in 14 and "Healed into notch" in none of the patients. The clinical exam alone could not discriminate between the various types of ruptures (P>0.05). With MRI, the sensitivity was 84% and the specificity was 92% for partial ACL rupture. There was a strong correlation between MRI and the various arthroscopy groups (P<0.05). There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between partial and complete ruptures in terms of knee laxity. This study helped define the relationships between arthroscopy findings, MRI findings and knee laxity measurements. It is feasible to make a preoperative diagnosis of partial ACL rupture. Level IV, prospective cohort study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Cranial suture morphology and its relationship to diet in Cebus.

    PubMed

    Byron, Craig D

    2009-12-01

    Cranial sutures are complex morphological structures. Four Cebus species (C. albifrons, C. apella, C. capucinus, C. olivaceus) are used here to test the hypothesis that sagittal suture complexity is enhanced in animals that eat materially challenging foods. These primates are ideal for such comparative studies because they are closely related and some are known to exhibit differences in the material properties of the foods they ingest and masticate. Specifically, Cebus apella is notable among members of this genus for ingesting food items of high toughness as well as consistently demonstrating a relatively robust cranial morphology. Consistent with previous studies, C. apella demonstrates significantly more robust mandibular and temporal fossa morphology. Also, C. apella possesses sagittal sutures that are more complex than congenerics. These data are used to support the hypothesis that cranial suture complexity is increased in response to consuming diets with more obdurate material properties. One interpretation of this hypothesis is that, compared to non-apelloids, total strain in the apelloid cranial suture connective tissue environment is elevated due to increased jaw muscle activity by increases in either force magnitudes or the number of chewing events. It is argued that greater masticatory function enhances the growth and modeling of cranial suture interdigitation. These data show that cranial suture complexity is one more hard tissue feature from the skull that might be used to inform hypotheses of dietary functional morphology.

  6. Biomechanical Measures During Landing and Postural Stability Predict Second Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Return to Sport

    PubMed Central

    Paterno, Mark V.; Schmitt, Laura C.; Ford, Kevin R.; Rauh, Mitchell J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Huang, Bin; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Athletes who return to sport participation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) have a higher risk of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury (either reinjury or contralateral injury) compared with non–anterior cruciate ligament–injured athletes. Hypotheses Prospective measures of neuromuscular control and postural stability after ACLR will predict relative increased risk for a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Fifty-six athletes underwent a prospective biomechanical screening after ACLR using 3-dimensional motion analysis during a drop vertical jump maneuver and postural stability assessment before return to pivoting and cutting sports. After the initial test session, each subject was followed for 12 months for occurrence of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Lower extremity joint kinematics, kinetics, and postural stability were assessed and analyzed. Analysis of variance and logistic regression were used to identify predictors of a second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Results Thirteen athletes suffered a subsequent second anterior cruciate ligament injury. Transverse plane hip kinetics and frontal plane knee kinematics during landing, sagittal plane knee moments at landing, and deficits in postural stability predicted a second injury in this population (C statistic = 0.94) with excellent sensitivity (0.92) and specificity (0.88). Specific predictive parameters included an increase in total frontal plane (valgus) movement, greater asymmetry in internal knee extensor moment at initial contact, and a deficit in single-leg postural stability of the involved limb, as measured by the Biodex stability system. Hip rotation moment independently predicted second anterior cruciate ligament injury (C = 0.81) with high sensitivity (0.77) and specificity (0.81). Conclusion Altered neuromuscular control of the hip and knee during a dynamic landing task

  7. Current Rehabilitation Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Malempati, Chaitu; Jurjans, John; Noehren, Brian; Ireland, Mary L; Johnson, Darren L

    2015-11-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament is the most commonly disrupted ligament in the knee in high-performance athletes. Most recently, advancements in surgical technique and graft fixation have enabled athletes to participate in early postoperative rehabilitation, focusing on range of motion and progressing to patellar mobilization, strengthening, and neuromuscular control. Several rehabilitation protocols exist with variations in specific exercises, progression through phases, and key components. The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to return the athlete to preinjury performance level, including motion and strength, without injuring or elongating the graft. Each athlete is unique; thus, safe return to play should be individualized rather than follow a particular postoperative month or time line. This article provides an overview of the application and the scientific basis for formulating a rehabilitation protocol prior to and following anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  8. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury, Reconstruction, and the Optimization of Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, James Philip

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) provides an established surgical intervention to control pathological tibiofemoral translational and rotational movement. ACLR is a safe and reproducible intervention, but there remains an underlying rate of failure to return to preinjury sporting activity levels. Postoperative pathological laxity and graft reinjury remain concerns. Previously, unrecognized meniscal lesions, disruption of the lateral capsule, and extracapsular structures offer potential avenues to treat and to therefore improve kinematic outcome and functional results, following reconstruction. Addressing laterally based injuries may also improve the durability of intraarticular ACLR. Improving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft replication of the normal ACL attachment points on the femur and the tibia, using either double bundle or anatomical single bundle techniques, improves kinematics, which may benefit outcome and functionality, following reconstruction. PMID:28966384

  9. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children.

  10. Recent advances in the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Wilk, Kevin E; Macrina, Leonard C; Cain, E Lyle; Dugas, Jeffrey R; Andrews, James R

    2012-03-01

    Rehabilitation following anterior cruciate ligament surgery continues to change, with the current emphasis being on immediate weight bearing and range of motion, and progressive muscular strengthening, proprioception, dynamic stability, and neuromuscular control drills. The rehabilitation program should be based on scientific and clinical research and focus on specific drills and exercises designed to return the patient to the desired functional goals. The goal is to return the patient's knee to homeostasis and the patient to his or her sport or activity as safely as possible. Unique rehabilitation techniques and special considerations for the female athlete will also be discussed. The purpose of this article is to provide the reader with a thorough scientific basis for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation based on graft selection, patient population, and concomitant injuries.

  11. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  12. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in skeletally immature patients: an individualized approach☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Saggin, Paulo Renato; Matos do Nascimento, Gilberto; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; Inácio, André Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate a series of skeletally immature patients who underwent three surgical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction according to each patient's growth potential. Methods a series of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery at ages ranging from 7 to 15 years was evaluated prospectively. The surgical technique was individualized according to the Tanner sexual maturity score. The surgical techniques used were transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction and extraphyseal reconstruction. Four patients underwent the extraphyseal technique, seven the partial transphyseal technique and twelve the full transphyseal technique, on the ACL. The postoperative evaluation was based on the Lysholm score, clinical analysis on the knee and the presence of angular deformity or dysmetria of the lower limb. Results the mean Lysholm score was 96.34 (±2.53). None of the patients presented differences in length and/or clinical or radiographic misalignment abnormality of the lower limbs. Conclusion ACL reconstruction using flexor tendon grafts in skeletally immature patients provided satisfactory functional results. Use of individualized surgical techniques according to growth potential did not give rise to physeal lesions capable of causing length discrepancies or misalignments of the lower limbs, even in patients with high growth potential. PMID:26229809

  13. Controversies in knee rehabilitation: anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Failla, Mathew J; Arundale, Amelia J H; Logerstedt, David S; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Controversy in management of athletes exists after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and reconstruction. Consensus criteria for evaluating successful outcomes following ACL injury include no reinjury or recurrent giving way, no joint effusion, quadriceps strength symmetry, restored activity level and function, and returning to preinjury sports. Using these criteria, the success rates of current management strategies after ACL injury are reviewed and recommendations are provided for the counseling of athletes after ACL injury.

  14. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  15. [Injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament in athletes].

    PubMed

    Shafizadeh, S; Schneider, M M; Bouillon, B

    2014-10-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament ruptures represent serious injuries for athletes which are often associated with accompanying injuries and lead to relevant kinematic alterations in the femorotibial roll-glide mechanism of the knee joint. Instability resulting in recurrent giving way events, as well as instability-related meniscal and cartilage lesions can cause functional long-term impairment that may limit the athlete's career. Anterior cruciate ligament replacement is therefore considered to be the gold standard for recovery of physical performance and to prevent secondary meniscal and cartilage damage. Continuous changes in the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament have led to a variety of different methods, including graft choice, fixation devices and surgical techniques, which support the consideration of individual requirements of the athlete as well as sport-specific aspects. One of the main factors for restoring stability and the physiological kinematic roll-glide mechanism of the knee is an anatomical tunnel placement as well as a stable graft fixation in the tibia and femur. By achieving of these fundamental technical requirements an early functional rehabilitation and accelerated recovery of neuromuscular skills, strength and coordination can be achieved, so that an early return to sport activities is possible.

  16. Ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Jaclyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the diagnostic and clinical features of a ganglion cyst located on the posterior cruciate ligament and create awareness amongst clinicians of this uncommon diagnosis. Clinical Features: A 24-year old woman complaining of intermittent left knee pain brought on by an increase in mileage during her training for a half-marathon. A diagnosis of mild chondromalacia patella and a ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament was made via diagnostic imaging. Intervention and outcome: Patient was followed up with imaging. The patient chose to withdraw a surgical consult due to patient preference. No conservative treatment was provided. Conclusion: Although chondromalacia patella is the more probable, a secondary diagnostic consideration in this patient could be a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament is an uncommon diagnosis and the clinical manifestations are variable and non-specific. It is important to be aware of its clinical features and to obtain appropriate methods of imaging to generate the diagnosis promptly. PMID:20037698

  17. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  18. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Function Following Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Emodi, George J; Callaghan, John J; Pedersen, Douglas R; Brown, Thomas D

    1999-01-01

    One of the most commonly cited reasons for retaining the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) during total knee arthroplasty is to preserve femoral rollback and theoretically improve extensor mechanism efficiency (lengthening the moment arm). This study was undertaken to assess PCL function in this regard and to delineate the effects of joint line elevation that can be manipulated intraoperatively by the surgeon. The anterior movement of tibiofemoral contact following PCL resection at flexion angles 60 degrees demonstrated the beneficial effect of the PCL on extensor function. This anterior translation and the concomitant increases in quadriceps tendon load and patellofemoral contact pressures were consistently observed. This study demonstrated that small changes of the joint line position significantly influenced PCL strain and knee kinematics. In order to preserve the desired functions that would be lost with an overly lax PCL and to avoid the potential adverse effects of an overly tight PCL (posterior edge loading and increased tibiofemoral contact), the surgeon should make every effort to restore the preoperative joint line. If this is not possible, consideration should be given to posterior cruciate recession or use of a posterior cruciate substituting design. PMID:10847521

  19. Tubular woven narrow fabrics for replacement of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Gloy, Yves-Simon; Loehrer, M; Lang, B; Rongen, L; Gries, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-09-01

    The human knee is one of the most frequently injured joints. More than half of these injuries are related to a failure of the anterior cruciate ligament. Current treatments (allogeneic and autologous) bear several disadvantages which can be overcome through the use of synthetic structures. Within the scope of this paper the potential of tubular woven fabrics for the use as artificial ligaments has been evaluated. Twelve fabrics made of polyethylene terephthalate and polytetrafluoroethylene were produced using shuttle weaving technology. Mechanical and biological properties of the fabrics were assessed using static tensile testing and cytotoxicity assays. The results obtained within this study show that woven tubular fabrics can be potentially used as artificial ligament structures as they can provide the desired medical and mechanical properties for cruciate ligament replacements. Through the choice of material and weaving parameters the fabrics' tensile properties can imitate the stress-strain characteristic of the human cruciate ligament. Further assessments in terms of cyclic loading behavior and abrasion resistance of the material are needed to evaluate the success in long term implantation.

  20. Revisiting cruciate paralysis: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Benjamin; Khanna, Ryan; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cruciate paralysis is a rare, poorly understood condition of the upper craniovertebral junction that allows for selective paralysis of the upper extremities while sparing the lower extremities. Reported cases are few and best treatment practices remain up for debate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systemic literature review in an attempt to identify prognostic predictors and outcome trends associated with cases previously reported in the literature. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review for all cases using the term “Cruciate Paralysis,” reviewing a total of 37 reported cases. All outcomes were assigned a numerical value based on examination at the last follow-up. These numerical values were further analyzed and tested for statistical significance. Results: Of the 37 cases, 78.4% were of traumatic causes. Of these, there were considerably worse outcomes associated with patients over the age of 65 years (P < 0.001). Those patients undergoing surgical treatment showed potentially worse outcomes, with a P value approaching significance at P = 0.08. Conclusion: Numerous cases of trauma-associated cruciate paralysis have been reported in the literature; however, there remains a strong need for further study of the condition. While certain risk factors can be elicited from currently reported studies, insignificant data exist to make any sound conclusion concerning whether surgical intervention is always the best method of treatment. PMID:27891037

  1. Tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Papalia, Rocco; Osti, Leonardo; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-08-01

    Although no consensus has been reached regarding the management of PCL deficiency, in vitro and in vivo studies have investigated whether the tibial inlay technique restores the anatomical site of insertion of the PCL, prevents elongation, stretching, graft failure, and improves long-term PCL stability. A systematic search using PubMed, Ovid, the Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases using 'posterior cruciate ligament tear', 'Tibial inlay technique' and 'posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction' as keywords identified 71 publications, of which 10 were relevant to the topic, and included a total of 255 patients. The tibial inlay technique restores the anatomic insertion site of the PCL, eliminates the killer turn effect, and places the graft at lower potential risk for abrasion and subsequent rupture. It has the disadvantages of increased operating time and risk to the posterior neurovascular structures. There was no evidence of an association between outcome results and Coleman methodology score, but the Coleman methodology scores correlated positively with the level-of-evidence rating. The methodological quality of the studies included has not improved over the years. Given the few reported published findings, we cannot ascertain whether this procedure may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies. The lack of published randomized clinical trials and few reported findings did not allow to ascertain whether the tibial inlay for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction may provide a consistent alternative to commonly used PCL surgical strategies and to demonstrate procedure efficacy. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Comparison of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligament Laxity Between Female and Male Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weesner, Carol L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament laxity of 90 uninjured male and female high school players were measured. No significant differences were found, indicating that the greater female injury rate may be due to inadequate conditioning, not greater knee ligament laxity. (Author/MT)

  3. Therapeutic strategy and long-term outcome of meningiomas located in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and surgical findings of 41 consecutive cases of posterior cranial fossa meningiomas operated on between January 1987 and December 2011 at Saitama Medical Center/Saitama Medical University were reviewed. The 31 female and 10 male patients were aged from 19 to 74 years (mean 54 years). The tumors were located in the petroclival (N=15), craniovertebral junction (N=6), lateral tentorial (N=12), and cerebellopontine angle (N=8) regions. Mean tumor equivalent diameter was 4.3 cm (range 2-9 cm). Head pain (46.3%) and gait disturbance (26.8%) were the most common presenting symptoms, and cranial neuropathies were the most common neurological signs on admission. Mean preoperative performance status (Karnofsky scale) was 83% (range 40-100%). Surgical approaches to these tumors included presigmoidal transpetrosal, retrosigmoidal, transcondylar, and combined approaches. In 4 cases, a staged procedure was performed. Gross total resection was achieved in 85.4% of patients, and subtotal/partial resection in 12.2%. Surgical mortality was 2.4% and complications were encountered in 11 patients (26.8%) including temporary neurological deficits in 4 patients. The mean follow-up period was 8.2 years, ranging from 1 to 24 years, and the mean performance status of patients at 12 months after the last surgery was 92% (range 0-100%). Recurrence or progression of disease was found in 9.8% of cases. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in 6 cases. My experience suggests that although posterior cranial fossa meningiomas represent a continuing challenge for contemporary neurosurgeons, such tumors may be completely or subtotally removed with low rate of mortality and acceptable morbidity, allowing most of these patients to achieve good outcome in long-term follow up.

  4. Partial Tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin; Levi, Jessica R

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the content and readability of health information regarding partial tonsillectomy. A web search was performed using the term partial tonsillectomy in Google, Yahoo!, and Bing. The first 50 websites from each search were evaluated using HONcode standards for quality and content. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning-Fog Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and SMOG score. The Freeman-Halton extension of Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical differences between engines. Less than half of the websites mentioned patient eligibility criteria (43.3%), referenced peer-reviewed literature (43.3%), or provided a procedure description (46.7%). Twenty-two websites (14.7%) were unrelated to partial tonsillectomy, and over half contained advertisements (52%). These finding were consistent across search engines and search terms. The mean FKGL was 11.6 ± 0.11, Gunning-Fog Index was 15.1 ± 0.13, Coleman-Liau Index was 14.6 ± 0.11, ARI was 12.9 ± 0.13, and SMOG grade was 14.0 ± 0.1. All readability levels exceeded the abilities of the average American adult. Current online information regarding partial tonsillectomy may not provide adequate information and may be written at a level too difficult for the average adult reader.

  5. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction Osteogenesis: Evolution of Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Juling; Harshbarger, Raymond J.; Kelley, Patrick; George, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the brain in the first few years of life drives the expansion of the cranial vault. This expansion occurs primarily at the cranial sutures; premature fusion of these results in growth restriction perpendicular to the axis of the suture. The result of this is physical deformation of the cranial and facial skeleton, as well as the distortion of the underling brain and its physiology. These patients can present with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, neurodevelopmental delay, as well as the morphological features of craniosynostosis. Acquired conditions such as the slit ventricle syndrome may also result in cephalocranial disproportion with these clinical features. Traditional vault remodeling surgery is able to correct the physical abnormalities as well as correcting cephalocranial disproportion. Its limitations include the degree of scalp expansion achievable as well as resulting defects in the bone. The use of distraction osteogenesis of the cranial vault permits a controlled expansion in a predetermined vector in a gradual manner. When used in the calvarium, this combines the benefits of tissue expansion on the scalp, as well as stimulating the production of new bone, reducing the defects resulting from expansion. In this review, the authors describe some of the surgical considerations important to the use of this technique. This includes the relevant anatomy and technical aspects illustrated with the use of clinical cases. Finally, they present a summary of their experience and discuss the complications associated with cranial vault distraction osteogenesis. PMID:25383052

  6. An osteological and histological investigation of cranial joints in geckos.

    PubMed

    Payne, Samantha L; Holliday, Casey M; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2011-03-01

    Cranial kinesis is a widespread feature of gekkotan lizards. Previous studies of kinesis in lizards often described the relevant, mobile joints as synovial, thus characterized by the presence of a synovial cavity lined with articular cartilage. To date however, detailed investigations of cranial joint histology are lacking. We examined eight cranial joints (quadrate-articular, quadrate-pterygoid, quadrate-otooccipital, quadrate-squamosal, epipterygoid-prootic, epipterygoid-pterygoid, basisphenoid-pterygoid, and frontal-parietal) in five gekkotan species (Oedura lesueuerii, Eublepharis macularius, Hemitheconyx caudicinctus, Tarentola annularis, and Chondrodactylous bibronii) using microcomputed tomography and serial histology. Particular focus was given to the relationship between the bony and soft-tissue components of the joint. Our results demonstrate that only three of these joints are synovial: the quadrate-articular, epipterygoid-pterygoid, and basisphenoid-pterygoid joints. The frontal-parietal and quadrate-pterygoid joints are syndesmosis (fibrous), the epipterygoid-prootic and quadrate-otooccipital joints are synchondroses (cartilaginous without a synovial cavity) and the quadrate-squamosal joint was not present. Based on previous descriptions, we determine that the structure of some cranial joints is variable among lizard taxa. We caution that osteology does not necessarily predict cranial joint histology. Although the functional implications of these findings remain to be explored we note that the development of synovial joints appears to be associated with a neural crest origin for the elements involved. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. FGF9 can induce endochondral ossification in cranial mesenchyme.

    PubMed

    Govindarajan, Venkatesh; Overbeek, Paul A

    2006-02-20

    The flat bones of the skull (i.e., the frontal and parietal bones) normally form through intramembranous ossification. At these sites cranial mesenchymal cells directly differentiate into osteoblasts without the formation of a cartilage intermediate. This type of ossification is distinct from endochondral ossification, a process that involves initial formation of cartilage and later replacement by bone. We have analyzed a line of transgenic mice that expresses FGF9, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family (FGF), in cranial mesenchymal cells. The parietal bones in these mice show a switch from intramembranous to endochondral ossification. Cranial cartilage precursors are induced to proliferate, then hypertrophy and are later replaced by bone. These changes are accompanied by upregulation of Sox9, Ihh, Col2a1, Col10a1 and downregulation of CbfaI and Osteocalcin. Fate mapping studies show that the cranial mesenchymal cells in the parietal region that show a switch in cell fate are likely to be derived from the mesoderm. These results demonstrate that FGF9 expression is sufficient to convert the differentiation program of (at least a subset of) mesoderm-derived cranial mesenchyme cells from intramembranous to endochondral ossification.

  8. FGF9 can induce endochondral ossification in cranial mesenchyme

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Venkatesh; Overbeek, Paul A

    2006-01-01

    Background The flat bones of the skull (i.e., the frontal and parietal bones) normally form through intramembranous ossification. At these sites cranial mesenchymal cells directly differentiate into osteoblasts without the formation of a cartilage intermediate. This type of ossification is distinct from endochondral ossification, a process that involves initial formation of cartilage and later replacement by bone. Results We have analyzed a line of transgenic mice that expresses FGF9, a member of the fibroblast growth factor family (FGF), in cranial mesenchymal cells. The parietal bones in these mice show a switch from intramembranous to endochondral ossification. Cranial cartilage precursors are induced to proliferate, then hypertrophy and are later replaced by bone. These changes are accompanied by upregulation of Sox9, Ihh, Col2a1, Col10a1 and downregulation of CbfaI and Osteocalcin. Fate mapping studies show that the cranial mesenchymal cells in the parietal region that show a switch in cell fate are likely to be derived from the mesoderm. Conclusion These results demonstrate that FGF9 expression is sufficient to convert the differentiation program of (at least a subset of) mesoderm-derived cranial mesenchyme cells from intramembranous to endochondral ossification. PMID:16504022

  9. Cranial injuries secondary to assault with a machete.

    PubMed

    Enicker, Basil; Madiba, Thandinkosi E

    2014-09-01

    Assaults with a machete cause compound skull fractures which present as a neurosurgical emergency. We aimed to profile cranial injuries caused by a machete over a 10 year period in a single neurosurgical unit. Retrospective data analysis of cranial injuries following assault with a machete, admitted to the neurosurgery ward, from January 2003 to December 2012 was performed. Medical records were analyzed for demographics, clinical presentation, CT scan findings, surgical treatment and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) at discharge. Management involved wound debridement with antibiotic cover. Of 185 patients treated 172 (93%) were male. Mean age was 31±11.4 years. Mean GCS on admission was 13±2. Presenting features were focal neurological deficit (48%), brain matter oozing from wounds (20%), and post traumatic seizures (12%). Depressed skull fractures were found in 162 (88%) patients. Findings on CT brain scan were intra-cranial haematoma (88%), pneumocephalus (39%) and features of raised intra-cranial pressure (37%). Thirty-one patients (17%) presented with septic head wounds. One hundred and fifty seven patients (85%) were treated surgically. The median hospital stay was 8 days (range 1-145). The median GOS at discharge was 5 (range 1-5). Twelve patients died within the same admission (6.5%). Machetes cause complex cranial injuries with associated neurological deficit and should be treated as neurosurgical emergency. Timeous intervention and good surgical principles are advocated to prevent secondary infection and further neurological deterioration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calvarial reconstruction using high-density porous polyethylene cranial hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    Mokal, Nitin J.; Desai, Mahinoor F.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: Cranial vault reconstruction can be performed with a variety of autologous or alloplastic materials. We describe our experience using high-density porous polyethylene (HDPE) cranial hemisphere for cosmetic and functional restoration of skull defects. The porous nature of the implant allows soft tissue ingrowth, which decreases the incidence of infection. Hence, it can be used in proximity to paranasal sinuses and where previous alloplastic cranioplasties have failed due to implant infection. Materials and Methods: We used the HDPE implant in seven patients over a three-year period for reconstruction of moderate to large cranial defects. Two patients had composite defects, which required additional soft tissue in the form of free flap and tissue expansion. Results: In our series, decompressive craniectomy following trauma was the commonest aetiology and all defects were located in the fronto-parieto-temporal region. The defect size was 10 cm on average in the largest diameter. All patients had good post-operative cranial contour and we encountered no infections, implant exposure or implant migration. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the biocompatibility and flexibility of the HDPE cranial hemisphere implant make it an excellent alternative to existing methods of calvarial reconstruction. PMID:22279274

  11. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar dislocation into the middle cranial fossa: A case report.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, G M; Nuñez, L F; Alvarez, L A; Otayza, F A; Fernández, M A; Donoso-Hofer, F

    2016-11-01

    Dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa after a trauma is a rare event. The lack of appropriate treatment can lead to ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We report about a case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle through the roof of the articular fossa. A 9-year-old patient was referred for a severe limitation of mouth opening that began progressively one year before. A history of chin injury due to an accidental fall was found. Preoperative CT scan showed a TMJ ankylosis on the right side combined with a dislocation of the mandibular condyle into the middle cranial fossa. Treatment consisted in an intracranial resection of the mandibular condyle, partial removal of the ankylosis block and TMJ arthroplasty. Our case is the second case of TMJ ankylosis following intracranial dislocation of the mandibular condyle and treated with arthroplasty alone published in the English literature. There is no consensus regarding the pathophysiology of TMJ ankylosis and regarding the attitude towards the ankylosis block. In our case, no recurrence was noticed after a one-year follow-up. An interdisciplinary approach is needed, including maxillofacial surgeon, neurosurgeon, physiotherapist and orthodontist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  13. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  14. Moyamoya Syndrome: Post Cranial Irradiation of Pineal Gland Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Chiewvit, P.; Janyavanich, V.; Soonthonpong, N.; Churoj, A.; Chawalparit, O.; Suthipongchai, S.

    2001-01-01

    Summary A right-handed eight-year-old boy, with headache, vomiting and positive parinaud (s sign was diagnosed as having a pineal gland tumor which histopathological section from surgical biopsy revealed to be a germinoma. The patient underwent ventriculoperitoneal shunt for obstructive hydrocephalus. Thereafter; he received cranial irradiation as definitive treatment. He was well and went back to school until five years later he developed a transient ischemic attack. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed a complete cure of the pineal tumor without any other specific abnormality. Eight months later he had an episode of stroke which was demonstrated by cranial computed tomography as acute left cerebral infarction in the middle cerebral artery territory. Cerebral angiography showed Moyamoya syndrome. PMID:20663345

  15. Idiopathic cranial polyneuropathy. A fifteen-year experience.

    PubMed

    Juncos, J L; Beal, M F

    1987-02-01

    Fourteen cases of idiopathic multiple cranial neuropathy seen over fifteen years are reviewed and contrasted with 6 cases of the Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, the closest and better known clinical entity. The syndrome consists of subacute onset of facial pain preceding the onset of cranial nerve palsies. There were 5 men and 9 women aged 21 to 83 years. Eight of the 9 patients treated with corticosteroids showed improvement, with pain usually receding within 48 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid was abnormal in 7 of 12 cases, with either a mild pleocytosis or raised protein content. The cranial nerves most frequently involved were the third and sixth. Motor nerves were affected more than sensory. Corticosteroid therapy appeared to hasten recovery of function. Clinical features are shared by both syndromes, the resulting spectrum of illness probably reflecting diverse aetiologies. Historical perspectives, differential diagnosis and aetiological considerations are discussed so that a coherent prospective clinical approach to the problem can be developed.

  16. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti.

  17. The Biomechanics of Cranial Forces During Figure Skating Spinning Elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, David H; Kostyun, Regina O; Solomito, Matthew J

    2015-03-01

    Several facets of figure skating, such as the forces associated with jumping and landing, have been evaluated, but a comprehensive biomechanical understanding of the cranial forces associated with spinning has yet to be explored. The purpose of this case study was to quantify the cranial rotational acceleration forces generated during spinning elements. This case report was an observational, biomechanical analysis of a healthy, senior-level, female figure skating athlete who is part of an on-going study. A triaxial accelerometer recorded the gravitational forces (G) during seven different spinning elements. Our results found that the layback spin generated significant cranial force and these forces were greater than any of the other spin elements recorded. These forces led to physical findings of ruptured capillaries, dizziness, and headaches in our participant.

  18. A test for paedomorphism in domestic pig cranial morphology

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Joseph; Vidarsdottir, Una Strand; Dobney, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Domestic animals are often described as paedomorphic, meaning that they retain juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Through a three-dimensional landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis of cranial morphology at three growth stages, we demonstrate that wild boar (n = 138) and domestic pigs (n = 106) (Sus scrofa) follow distinct ontogenetic trajectories. With the exception of the size ratio between facial and neurocranial regions, paedomorphism does not appear to be the primary pattern describing the observed differences between wild and domestic pig cranial morphologies. The cranial phenotype of domestic pigs instead involves developmental innovation during domestication. This result questions the long-standing assumption that domestic animal phenotypes are paedomorphic forms of their wild counterparts. PMID:28794276

  19. A test for paedomorphism in domestic pig cranial morphology.

    PubMed

    Evin, Allowen; Owen, Joseph; Larson, Greger; Debiais-Thibaud, Mélanie; Cucchi, Thomas; Vidarsdottir, Una Strand; Dobney, Keith

    2017-08-01

    Domestic animals are often described as paedomorphic, meaning that they retain juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Through a three-dimensional landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis of cranial morphology at three growth stages, we demonstrate that wild boar (n = 138) and domestic pigs (n = 106) (Sus scrofa) follow distinct ontogenetic trajectories. With the exception of the size ratio between facial and neurocranial regions, paedomorphism does not appear to be the primary pattern describing the observed differences between wild and domestic pig cranial morphologies. The cranial phenotype of domestic pigs instead involves developmental innovation during domestication. This result questions the long-standing assumption that domestic animal phenotypes are paedomorphic forms of their wild counterparts. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Combined chronic anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: functional and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Denti, Matteo; Tornese, Davide; Melegati, Gianluca; Schonhuber, Herbert; Quaglia, Alessandro; Volpi, Piero

    2015-10-01

    Multiligamentous injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) is an uncommon but debilitating event. Patients with combined ligament injuries typically complain of painful, debilitating knee instability that restricts their sports and daily activities. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate functional and clinical outcomes of patients with chronic ACL and PCL deficiency who underwent simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction of the central pivot. Medical records of 20 consecutive patients with chronic ACL and PCL deficiency who underwent simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction of the central pivot were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had received either an allograft (group A) or a semitendinosus-gracilis graft for ACL repair and a bone-patellar tibial-bone graft for PCL repair (group B). Functional outcomes, after the initial follow-up period at 24-month FU, were assessed with concentric isokinetic knee extensor-flexor testing at 60 and 180°/s. The secondary aim was to compare long-term clinical recovery by the administration of the IKDC (International Knee Document Committee) Knee Ligament Evaluation Form, the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and the Cincinnati Knee Rating Scale. The mean per cent quadriceps strength deficit in the operated as compared to the healthy knee was 13.5 % in group A and 15 % in group B (angular velocity 60°/s) and 13.5 % in group A and 9.4 % in group B (angular velocity 180°/s). The mean per cent flexor strength deficit in the operated as compared to the healthy knee was 10.4 % in group A and 12.3 % in group B (angular velocity 60°/s) and 12.2 % in group A and 9 % in group B (angular velocity of 180°/s). The flexor-quadriceps ratio was 49.4 % in group A and 48.8 % in group B in the healthy knee and 53.2 % in group A and 53.8 % in group B in the operated knee (angular velocity 60°/s) and 63.9 % in group A and 60.7 % in group B in

  1. Clinical Outcome of Cranial Neuropathy in Patients with Pituitary Apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hyun-Jin; Hwang, Sung-Kyoo; Park, Yun-Mook

    2010-01-01

    Objective Pituitary apoplexy (PA) is described as a clinical syndrome characterized by sudden headache, vomiting, visual impairment, and meningismus caused by rapid enlargement of a pituitary adenoma. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical presentation and surgical outcome in PA presenting with cranial neuropathy. Methods Twelve cases (3.3%) of PA were retrospectively reviewed among 359 patients diagnosed with pituitary adenoma. The study included 6 males and 6 females. Mean age of patients was 49.0 years, with a range of 16 to 74 years. Follow-up duration ranged from 3 to 20 months, with an average of 12 months. All patients were submitted to surgery, using the transsphenoidal approach (TSA). Results Symptoms included abrupt headache (11/12), decreased visual acuity (12/12), visual field defect (11/12), and cranial nerve palsy of the third (5/12) and sixth (2/12). Mean height of the mass was 29.0 mm (range 15-46). Duration between the ictus and operation ranged from 1 to 15 days (mean 7.0). The symptom duration before operation and the recovery period of cranial neuropathy correlated significantly (p = 0.0286). TSA resulted in improvement of decreased visual acuity in 91.6%, visual field defect in 54.5%, and cranial neuropathy in 100% at 3 months after surgery. Conclusion PA is a rare event, complicating 3.3% in our series. Even in blindness following pituitary apoplexy cases, improvement of cranial neuropathy is possible if adequate management is initiated in time. Surgical decompression must be considered as soon as possible in cases with severe visual impairment or cranial neuropathy. PMID:21082047

  2. Survival and regeneration of deep-freeze preserved autologous cranial bones after cranioplasty.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Hui, Guozhen; Liu, Fengqiang; Wang, Zhengan; Tang, Yuming; Gao, Shuxing

    2012-04-01

    After decompressive craniectomy, a deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone graft can be used for cranioplasty to avoid immunoreaction against an artificial patch material. Autologous cranial bone grafts not only have better physical properties, such as heat conduction, compared to artificial patch materials, but they also have the advantages of a lower medical cost and satisfactory physical flexibility. The discussion over (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT static cranial bone tomography in the diagnosis of survival and regeneration in deep-freeze preservation autologous cranial bones after cranioplasty is valuable. Objective. To investigate whether deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone grafts could survive and regenerate after autologous reimplantation. The method of cranial bone preservation involved removing the cranial graft and sealing it in a double-layer sterile plastic bag under sterile surgical conditions. On the day of the cranioplasty operation, the cranial bone graft was disinfected by immersing it in 3% povidone-iodine for 30 minutes. At short-term (2 weeks), medium-term (3 months), and long-term (12 months) postoperative follow-up visits, (99)Tc(m)-MDP SPECT static cranial bone tomography was used to examine the reimplanted cranial bone. Results. There were no postoperative infections or seromas in all 16 cases. Two weeks following cranial bone graft reimplantation, the SPECT tomography showed some radioactivity uptake in the reimplanted cranial bone graft, which was lower than that in the cranial bone on the healthy side. At 3 months and 12 months after the operation, the radioactivity uptake in the reimplanted cranial bone graft was the same as that in the cranial bone on the healthy side. X-ray films showed blurred sutures in the reimplanted cranial bone graft at 12 months after surgery. Reimplanted deep-freeze-preserved autologous cranial bone can survive in the short term and regenerate in the medium and long terms.

  3. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, Daniel L; Nichols, Francine

    2013-03-01

    Cranial electrotherapy stimulation is a prescriptive medical device that delivers a mild form of electrical stimulation to the brain for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. It is supported by more than 40 years of research demonstrating its effectiveness in several mechanistic studies and greater than 100 clinical studies. Adverse effects are rare (<1%), mild, and self-limiting, consisting mainly of skin irritation under the electrodes and headaches. Often used as a stand-alone therapy, because results are usually seen from the first treatment, cranial electrotherapy stimulation may also be used as an adjunctive therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intraventricular meningioma after cranial irradiation for childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Huse, Jason T; Dunkel, Ira J; Steinherz, Peter G; Haque, Sofia; Khakoo, Yasmin

    2010-10-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common brain tumors in adults. They are most commonly located over the cerebral convexities and are infrequently found in an intraventricular location. Ionizing cranial radiation is a risk factor for late occurrence of meningiomas within the radiation field. While pathologic grading of meningiomas is straightforward, significant variability often exists between pathologists in applying standard grading criteria. This has implications for prognosis. Radiation-induced meningiomas may also have predilection to recur. The authors describe a case of an intraventricular meningioma occurring 23 years after cranial irradiation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jack C; Merkle, Andrew C; Carneal, Catherine M; Voo, Liming M; Johannes, Matthew S; Paulson, Jeff M; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  6. An annotated history of craniofacial surgery and intentional cranial deformation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, J T; Tutino, M

    2001-01-01

    The history of craniofacial surgery and the use of intentional cranial deformation is a long and varied one. Researching some of the earliest medical writings and reviews of early terracotta and stone figures from throughout the world clearly revealed that these two forms of treatment were widely extant. Intentional cranial deformation was used for a number of reasons including beautification, tribal identification, and social stature. The development of craniofacial surgery is a more modern practice and its historical evolution is reviewed in the context of techniques and the personalities involved.

  7. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  8. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests. PMID:25023222

  9. Development of a Generic Tubular Tree Structure for the Modeling of Orbital Cranial Nerves.

    PubMed

    Kaltofen, Thomas; Ivcevic, Sara; Kogler, Mathias; Priglinger, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    We developed a generic approach for modeling tubular tree structures as triangle meshes for the extension of our biomechanical eye model SEE-KID with a visualization of the orbital cranial nerves. Since three of the orbital nerves innervate extraocular eye muscles and move together with them, the structure must also support the partial translation and rotation of the nerves. For the SEE-KID model, this extension allows a better parameterization as well as an easier simulation of innervational disorders. Moreover, it makes the model even more useful for education and training purposes in contrast to other anatomical models. Due to its generic nature, the developed data structure and the associated algorithms can be used for any tubular tree structures, even in non-medical application areas.

  10. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  11. Tiludronate treatment improves structural changes and symptoms of osteoarthritis in the canine anterior cruciate ligament model

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study was to evaluate the effects of tiludronate (TLN), a bisphosphonate, on structural, biochemical and molecular changes and function in an experimental dog model of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Baseline values were established the week preceding surgical transection of the right cranial/anterior cruciate ligament, with eight dogs serving as OA placebo controls and eight others receiving four TLN injections (2 mg/kg subcutaneously) at two-week intervals starting the day of surgery for eight weeks. At baseline, Week 4 and Week 8, the functional outcome was evaluated using kinetic gait analysis, telemetered locomotor actimetry and video-automated behaviour capture. Pain impairment was assessed using a composite numerical rating scale (NRS), a visual analog scale, and electrodermal activity (EDA). At necropsy (Week 8), macroscopic and histomorphological analyses of synovium, cartilage and subchondral bone of the femoral condyles and tibial plateaus were assessed. Immunohistochemistry of cartilage (matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-13, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS5)) and subchondral bone (cathepsin K) was performed. Synovial fluid was analyzed for inflammatory (PGE2 and nitrite/nitrate levels) biomarkers. Statistical analyses (mixed and generalized linear models) were performed with an α-threshold of 0.05. Results A better functional outcome was observed in TLN dogs than OA placebo controls. Hence, TLN dogs had lower gait disability (P = 0.04 at Week 8) and NRS score (P = 0.03, group effect), and demonstrated behaviours of painless condition with the video-capture (P < 0.04). Dogs treated with TLN demonstrated a trend toward improved actimetry and less pain according to EDA. Macroscopically, both groups had similar level of morphometric lesions, TLN-treated dogs having less joint effusion (P = 0.01), reduced synovial fluid levels of

  12. Arthroscopy Up to Date: Anterior Cruciate Ligament Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Schillhammer, Carl K; Reid, John B; Rister, Jamie; Jani, Sunil S; Marvil, Sean C; Chen, Austin W; Anderson, Chris G; D'Agostino, Sophia; Lubowitz, James H

    2016-01-01

    To categorize and summarize up-to-date anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) research published in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine and systematically review each subcategory, beginning with ACL anatomy. After searching for "anterior cruciate ligament" OR "ACL" in Arthroscopy and The American Journal of Sports Medicine from January 2012 through December 2014, we excluded articles more pertinent to ACL augmentation; open growth plates; and meniscal, chondral, or multiligamentous pathology. Studies were subcategorized for data extraction. We included 212 studies that were classified into 8 categories: anatomy; basic science and biomechanics; tunnel position; graft selection; graft fixation; injury risk and rehabilitation; practice patterns and outcomes; and complications. Anatomic risk factors for ACL injury and post-reconstruction graft failure include a narrow intercondylar notch, low native ACL volume, and increased posterior slope. Regarding anatomic footprints, the femoral attachment is 43% of the proximal-to-distal lateral femoral condylar length whereas the posterior border of the tendon is 2.5 mm from the articular margin. The tibial attachment of the ACL is two-fifths of the medial-to-lateral interspinous distance and 15 mm anterior to the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic research using radiology and computed tomography to evaluate ACL graft placement shows poor interobserver and intraobserver reliability. With a mind to improving outcomes, surgeons should be aware of anatomic risk factors (stenotic femoral notch, low ligament volume, and increased posterior slope) for ACL graft failure, have a precise understanding of arthroscopic landmarks identifying femoral and tibial footprint locations, and understand that imaging to evaluate graft placement is unreliable. Level III, systematic review of Level III evidence. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fractionated external beam radiotherapy of skull base metastases with cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Dröge, L H; Hinsche, T; Canis, M; Alt-Epping, B; Hess, C F; Wolff, H A

    2014-02-01

    Skull base metastases frequently appear in a late stage of various tumor entities and cause pain and neurological disorders which strongly impair patient quality of life. This study retrospectively analyzed fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a palliative treatment approach with special respect to neurological outcome, feasibility and acute toxicity. A total of 30 patients with skull base metastases and cranial nerve disorders underwent EBRT with a mean total dose of 31.6 Gy. Neurological status was assessed before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy and 2 weeks afterwards categorizing orbital, parasellar, middle fossa, jugular foramen and occipital condyle involvement and associated clinical syndromes. Neurological outcome was scored as persistence of symptoms, partial response, good response and complete remission. Treatment-related toxicity and overall survival were assessed. Before EBRT 37 skull base involvement syndromes were determined with 4 patients showing more than 1 syndrome. Of the patients 81.1 % responded to radiotherapy with 10.8 % in complete remission, 48.6 % with good response and 21.6 % with partial response. Grade 1 toxicity of the skin occurred in two patients and grade 1 hematological toxicity in 1 patient under concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Median overall survival was 3.9 months with a median follow-up of 45 months. The use of EBRT for skull base metastases with symptomatic involvement of cranial nerves is marked by good therapeutic success in terms of neurological outcome, high feasibility and low toxicity rates. These findings underline EBRT as the standard therapeutic approach in the palliative setting.

  14. [Anterior cruciate ligament-plasty using the "U-dos" technique].

    PubMed

    Morales-Trevizo, C; Paz-García, M; Leal-Berumen, I; Leal-Contreras, C; Berumen-Nafarrate, E

    2013-01-01

    The knee is a compound diarthrodial joint, vulnerable to serious injuries such as ligament injuries of: medial collateral ligament, lateral collateral ligament, anterior cruciate ligament and posterior cruciate ligament, as cruciate ligaments limit rotation movement in the joint. The purpose of our study was to create a new technique to treat injuries of the anterior cruciate ligament, which is composed of two bundles--anteromedial and posterolateral--trying to achieve an anatomical reconstruction that allows for a normal biomechanical recovery. This technique reduces the use of fixation material and costs. The diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injuries was made with the pivot shift test. There are currently two repair methods for anterior cruciate ligament injuries: single bundle or double bundle repair; none of these techniques is considered as the gold standard, as their results are very similar. This paper describes a technique used for the treatment of anterior cruciate ligament injuries, known as "U-dos", and its clinical results. Cross-sectional, observational study that enrolled 20 patients with total anterior cruciate ligament injuries who underwent anterior cruciate ligament plasty using the "U-dos" technique between June 2009 and June 2010. The technique requires the use of bone bank allograft, in this case of the anterior tibial ligament. Patients were assessed using the Lysholm scale and the pivot shift test. Our results show that all the pivot shift tests were negative and assessments according to the Lysholm scale were from normal to excellent in 95% of cases (19/20). Only one failure was reported, with avulsion of the graft attachment which required a surgical intervention.

  15. Trunk position modulates anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat.

    PubMed

    Kulas, Anthony S; Hortobágyi, Tibor; DeVita, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Although the squat exercise and its variations are commonly prescribed for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation, whether trunk position affects these ligament forces and strains during the squat is unclear. Our purpose was to evaluate the effects of trunk position on anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during a single-leg squat. While instrumented for biomechanical analysis, twelve recreationally active subjects performed single-leg squats with minimal and moderate amounts of forward trunk lean. A combination of inverse dynamics, Hill-type muscle modeling, and mathematical computations estimated anterior cruciate ligament forces, strains and quadriceps, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius forces. The moderate forward trunk lean condition vs. minimal forward trunk lean condition had lower peak anterior cruciate ligament forces (↓24%), strains (↓16%), and average anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains during knee flexion ranges of motion of 25-55°(descent) and 35-55°(ascent). A moderate vs. minimal forward trunk lean also produced 35% higher hamstring forces throughout the majority of the squat, but lower quadriceps forces only at knee flexion angles greater than 65°. Single-leg squats performed with a moderate forward trunk lean (~40°) can minimize anterior cruciate ligament loads. Mechanistically, trunk lean reduced anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains through concomitant modulations in hip flexion angle and biarticular thigh muscle forces. These findings are clinically relevant for anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation as a common goal is to minimize anterior cruciate ligament forces and strains through enhancing hamstring and quadriceps co-contractions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Williams, John; Hutt, Jonathan; Rickman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This report details the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in an 18-year-old man with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The reduced mechanical properties of the tissue in EDS can pose a challenge to the orthopaedic surgeon. In this case, we describe the use of a hamstring autograft combined with a Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS). There was a good radiographical, clinical, and functional outcome after two years. This technique gave a successful outcome in the reconstruction of the ACL in a patient with EDS and therefore may help surgeons faced with the same clinical scenario. PMID:26221555

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Kocher, Mininder S

    2016-10-01

    Dramatic increases in youth competitive athletic activity, early sport specialization, and year-round training and competition, along with increased awareness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children, have led to a commensurate increase in the frequency of ACL tears in the skeletally immature. Recent understanding of the risks of nonoperative treatment and surgical delay have supported a trend toward early operative treatment. This article discusses treatment strategies for ACL injuries in children and adolescents, and offers our preferred treatment strategy for skeletally immature youth athletes with ACL tears.

  18. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  19. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach.

    PubMed

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  20. Prevention of anterior cruciate ligament injury in the female athlete

    PubMed Central

    Silvers, Holly Jacinda; Mandelbaum, Bert R

    2007-01-01

    The relationships of gender, age and training to the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are pivotal to developing a comprehensive neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programme to decrease ACL injuries in female athletes. A prophylactic neuromuscular and proprioceptive training programme may have direct benefit in decreasing the number of ACL injuries in female athletes. This research foundation endorses further epidemiological and biomechanical studies to determine the exact mechanism of ACL injury and the most effective intervention for decreasing ACL injuries in this high‐risk population. PMID:17609222

  1. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity.

    PubMed

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-06-10

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy.

  3. Combined single-strand distal semitendinosus-iliotibial band tenodesis (Puddu) for anterior cruciate ligament augmentation.

    PubMed

    Barrett, G R; Miller, C; Richardson, K

    1995-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon has seen renewed interest recently. Puddu described a procedure in which the tendon is harvested at its insertion on the tibia with a bone plug. This study evaluates the efficacy of this approach and examines the long-term results. Between 1982 and 1986, 77 patients underwent this type of procedure; 51 (66%) patients who were reexamined comprised the study group. Thirty-five patients had acute tears, and 16 patients had chronic tears. Follow-up was both objective and subjective with an average follow-up of 7 years and 3 months (range: 5.8 to 9.2 years). In the acute group, six patients (17%) had a 2+ Lachman and seven (22%) had a 1+ Lachman. Pivot shift was 2+ to 3+ in three patients (8.6%) and 1+ in seven patients (22%). KT-100 results were > 5 mm in eight patients (23.3%). In the chronic group, four patients (25%) had 2+ and four had a 1+ Lachman. Seven patients (44%) had a positive pivot shift test. Five patients had > 5 mm difference. Using regression analysis, the KT-1000 results correlated well with the Lachman and pivot shift tests. Chronicity and partial meniscectomy were associated with a poor result. Although this technique has undergone an evolution and improvement to a four-strand reconstruction in recent years, the results of this review indicate satisfactory results can be obtained, especially in the acute setting.

  4. Proprioceptive deficit in patients with complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Pedro; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Cossich, Victor; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Velasques, Bruna; Salles, José Inácio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of proprioceptive deficits between the injured limb and the uninjured (i.e. contralateral normal) limb, in individuals who suffered complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using a strength reproduction test. Methods Sixteen patients with complete tearing of the ACL participated in the study. A voluntary maximum isometric strength test was performed, with reproduction of the muscle strength in the limb with complete tearing of the ACL and the healthy contralateral limb, with the knee flexed at 60°. The meta-intensity was used for the procedure of 20% of the voluntary maximum isometric strength. The proprioceptive performance was determined by means of absolute error, variable error and constant error values. Results Significant differences were found between the control group and ACL group for the variables of absolute error (p = 0.05) and constant error (p = 0.01). No difference was found in relation to variable error (p = 0.83). Conclusion Our data corroborate the hypothesis that there is a proprioceptive deficit in subjects with complete tearing of the ACL in an injured limb, in comparison with the uninjured limb, during evaluation of the sense of strength. This deficit can be explained in terms of partial or total loss of the mechanoreceptors of the ACL. PMID:26229870

  5. Differences in knee joint kinematics and forces after posterior cruciate retaining and stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wünschel, Markus; Leasure, Jeremi M; Dalheimer, Philipp; Kraft, Nicole; Wülker, Nikolaus; Müller, Otto

    2013-12-01

    Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining (CR) and -sacrificing (PS) total knee arthroplasties (TKA) are widely-used to treat osteoarthritis of the knee joint. The PS design substitutes the function of the PCL with a cam-spine mechanism which may produce adverse changes to joint kinematics and kinetics. CR- and PS-TKA were performed on 11 human knee specimens. Joint kinematics were measured with a dynamic knee simulator and motion tracking equipment. In-situ loads of the PCL and cam-spine were measured with a robotic force sensor system. Partial weight bearing flexions were simulated and external forces were applied. The PS-TKA rotated significantly less throughout the whole flexion range compared to the CR-TKA. Femoral roll back was greater in the PS-TKA; however, this was not correlated with lower quadriceps forces. Application of external loads produced significantly different in-situ force profiles between the TKA systems. Our data demonstrate that the PS-design significantly alters kinematics of the knee joint. Our data also suggest the cam-spine mechanism may have little influence on high flexion kinematics (such as femoral rollback) with most of the load burden shared by supporting implant and soft-tissue structures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction combined with valgus tibial osteotomy (combined procedure).

    PubMed

    Boss, A; Stutz, G; Oursin, C; Gächter, A

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the patients who were operated on in a combined procedure from 1980 to 1992 with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, cartilaginous lesions of the medial compartment, lesion of medial meniscus and varus malalignment. The combined operative procedure was autologous intra-articular ACL reconstruction with the middle third of the patellar ligament--partially augmented with Kennedy-ligament augmentation device (LAD) in hot dog technique--and high tibial osteotomy. The patients were examined according to the criteria of IKDC including testing of anterior stability with the KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiographically we checked axis and arthritis according to a modified score of Kannus. Twenty-seven of 34 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria could be followed up in three categories (2-5 years post-operatively, 5-10 years postoperatively, over 10 years post-operatively). Total qualification was good in 37%; there were no perioperative complications. Rehabilitation was not prolonged. Eighty-nine percent practised their preoperative job, over 50% had a higher level of sports activities than preoperatively, and more than 25% regained their pretraumatic sports capacity. Two-thirds had no giving way and less than 3 mm translation difference in comparison to the contralateral knee. Seventy-five percent of patients would accept the operation again. Radiological findings had no correlation to overall qualification. The encouraging results with respect to many of the criteria suggest using the combined procedure in a young patient with ACL insufficiency, varus malalignment and medial compartment damage including medial meniscus lesion.

  7. Increased cranial capacity in hominid evolution and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chaline, Jean

    2003-08-01

    One of the major trends in primate evolution generally and hominid evolution in particular, is cranio-facial contraction accompanied by an increase in cranial capacity. Landmark-based morphometric methods are applied to adult skulls of great apes (Gorilla, Pan), australopithecines (Australopithecus and Paranthropus), and humans (Homo eragster, erectus, neanderthalensis, and sapiens). Morphological changes quantified by vector fields (Procrustes methods) indicate that these skull plans are characterized by distinctive degrees of cranio-facial contraction. These suggest the existence of three discrete skull organization plans: "great ape", "australopithecine" and "Homo". This paper focuses on the "Homo" skull bauplan and discusses the possible relationships between greatly increased cranial capacity and preeclampsia. The earliest species of the human lineage exhibit less cranio-facial contraction and smaller cranial capacity than Homo neanderthalensis and modern Homo sapiens. Neandertalization introduces a posterior elongation of the skull and leads to a large increase in cranial capacity in the last Neandertals, with values as large as in present-day H. sapiens. Consequently, a new biological hypothesis is proposed to account for the unexplained disappearance of H. neanderthalensis some 30000 years ago related to the possible appearance of preeclampsia as a factor affecting the survival of the species.

  8. Accounting for cranial vault growth in experimental design.

    PubMed

    Power, Stephanie M; Matic, Damir B; Holdsworth, David W

    2014-05-01

    Earlier studies have not accounted for continued growth when using the rat calvarial defect model to evaluate bone healing in vivo. The purpose of this study was: 1) to calculate rat cranial vault growth over time; and 2) to determine the effects of accounting for growth on defect healing. Bilateral parietal defects were created in 10 adult Wistar rats. Serial microscopic computerized tomography scans were performed. Bone mineral content (BMC) measured according to standard technique and repeated accounting for cranial growth over time was compared with the use of parametric and nonparametric tests. Cranial vault growth continued through 22 weeks of age, increasing 7.5% in width and 9.1% in length, and calvarial defects expanded proportionately. BMC was greater within defects accounting for growth 2-12 weeks postoperatively (P < .003). BMC was underestimated through standard analysis, which demonstrates the importance of accounting for cranial growth given advances in serial imaging techniques. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Corey S.; Jantz, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  10. Cranial arterial patterns of the alpaca (Camelidae: Vicugna pacos)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artiodactyl cranial arterial patterns deviate significantly from the standard mammalian pattern, most notably in the possession of a structure called the carotid rete (CR)—a subdural arterial meshwork that is housed within the cavernous venous sinus, replacing the internal carotid artery (ICA). This relationship between the CR and the cavernous sinus facilitates a suite of unique physiologies, including selective brain cooling. The CR has been studied in a number of artiodactyls; however, to my knowledge, only a single study to date documents a subset of the cranial arteries of New World camelids (llamas, alpacas, vicugñas and guanacoes). This study is the first complete description of the cranial arteries of a New World camelid species, the alpaca (Vicugna pacos), and the first description of near-parturition cranial arterial morphology within New World camelids. This study finds that the carotid arterial system is conserved between developmental stages in the alpaca, and differs significantly from the pattern emphasized in other long-necked ruminant artiodactyls in that a patent, homologous ICA persists through the animal's life. PMID:28405385

  11. Cranial arterial patterns of the alpaca (Camelidae: Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D

    2017-03-01

    Artiodactyl cranial arterial patterns deviate significantly from the standard mammalian pattern, most notably in the possession of a structure called the carotid rete (CR)-a subdural arterial meshwork that is housed within the cavernous venous sinus, replacing the internal carotid artery (ICA). This relationship between the CR and the cavernous sinus facilitates a suite of unique physiologies, including selective brain cooling. The CR has been studied in a number of artiodactyls; however, to my knowledge, only a single study to date documents a subset of the cranial arteries of New World camelids (llamas, alpacas, vicugñas and guanacoes). This study is the first complete description of the cranial arteries of a New World camelid species, the alpaca (Vicugna pacos), and the first description of near-parturition cranial arterial morphology within New World camelids. This study finds that the carotid arterial system is conserved between developmental stages in the alpaca, and differs significantly from the pattern emphasized in other long-necked ruminant artiodactyls in that a patent, homologous ICA persists through the animal's life.

  12. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  13. Testing the cranial evolutionary allometric 'rule' in Galliformes.

    PubMed

    Linde-Medina, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent comparative studies have indicated the existence of a common cranial evolutionary allometric (CREA) pattern in mammals and birds, in which smaller species have relatively smaller faces and bigger braincases than larger species. In these studies, cranial allometry was tested using a multivariate regression between shape (described using landmarks coordinates) and size (i.e. centroid size), after accounting for phylogenetic relatedness. Alternatively, cranial allometry can be determined by comparing the sizes of two anatomical parts using a bivariate regression analysis. In this analysis, a slope higher or lower than one indicates the existence of positive or negative allometry, respectively. Thus, in those species that support the CREA 'rule', positive allometry is expected for the association between face size and braincase size, which would indicate that larger species have disproportionally larger faces. In this study, I applied these two approaches to explore cranial allometry in 83 Galliformes (Aves, Galloanserae), ranging in mean body weight from 30 g to 2.5 kg. The multivariate regression between shape and centroid size revealed the existence of a significant allometric pattern resembling CREA, whereas the second analysis revealed a negative allometry for beak size and braincase size (i.e. contrary to the CREA 'rule', larger galliform species have disproportionally shorter beaks than smaller galliform species). This study suggests that the presence of CREA may be overestimated when using cranium size as the standard measurement. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis: clinical features and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Lorenzo; Annunziata, Pasquale

    2012-02-01

    In multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain is a frequent condition, negatively influencing the overall quality of life. Cranial neuralgias, including trigeminal, glossopharyngeal neuralgias, as well as occipital neuralgia, are typical expression of neuropathic pain. Neuralgias are characterised by paroxysmal painful attacks of electric shock-like sensation, occurring spontaneously or evoked by innocuous stimuli in specific trigger areas. In multiple sclerosis, demyelination in the centrally myelinated part of the cranial nerve roots plays an important role in the origin of neuralgic pain. These painful syndromes arising in multiple sclerosis are therefore considered "symptomatic", in contrast to classic cranial neuralgias, in which no cause other than a neurovascular contact is identified. At this time, the evidence on the management of symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis is fragmentary and a comprehensive review addressing this topic is still lacking. For that reason, treatment is often based on personal clinical experience as well as on anecdotal reports. The aim of this review is to critically summarise the latest findings regarding the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, the instrumental evaluation and the medical as well as neurosurgical treatment of symptomatic trigeminal, glossopharyngeal and occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis, providing useful insights for neurologists and neurosurgeons and a broad range of specialists potentially involved in the treatment of these painful syndromes.

  15. Phylogeny, phylogenetic inference, and cranial evolution in pitheciids and Aotus.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Alexander; Soligo, Christophe; Elton, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Pitheciids, one of the major radiations of New World monkeys endemic to South and Central America, are distributed in the Amazon and Orinoco basins, and include Callicebus, Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia. Molecular phylogenetics strongly support pitheciid monophyly, whereas morphological analyses infer a range of phylogenies including a sister relationship between Aotus and Callicebus. We collected geometric morphometric cranial data from pitheciids and Aotus, and used cranial data for distance-based phylogenetic analysis and tests of phylogenetic signal. Phylogenetic analyses of pitheciids were repeated with Lagothrix, Callimico, and Saimiri outgroups for Procrustes shape with and without Aotus based on the whole cranium and six anatomical regions. All phylogenetic signal tests were significant, and tree lengths were shortest and had the least morphological change over the phylogeny for Procrustes residuals from the cranial base and palate. The majority of phylogenetic analyses of Procrustes shape for pitheciids without Aotus supported the molecular phylogeny, and with Aotus included the majority inferred an Aotus-Callicebus clade, although three analyses with Callimico as outgroup supported the molecular phylogeny. The morphological similarity of Aotus and Callicebus is likely a mix of plesiomorphy, allometry, and homoplasy, and future phylogenetic inference of living and extinct platyrrhine taxa should consider the impact of these factors alongside outgroup selection and cranial region.

  16. Cranial helminths of Mustela vison Schreber, 1777 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Miquel, J; Mañas, S; Asensio, V; Eira, C; Palazón, S

    2006-04-30

    A survey was carried out to investigate the presence of cranial helminths in 337 American minks (Mustela vison) from Spain. This information was obtained partly in order to evaluate potential conservation problems and sanitary risks to the congeneric European mink (Mustela lutreola), one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. Skulls and rectal faeces of each specimen were simultaneously analysed. Troglotrema acutum and Skrjabingylus nasicola were found in 5.6% of the M. vison analysed. No cranial lesions were seen in any of the examined skulls. The finding of both helminths in Spanish free-living M. vison specimens enlarges their natural definitive host spectrum in Western Europe. One relatively important focus of T. acutum in M. vison was detected (30.4%) in the Spanish Alava province while S. nasicola was found to be very infrequent. The suitability of both analytical methods was assessed in order to know to what degree coprological analysis reflects the real prevalence of cranial helminths in this host. It is possible to conclude that coprological analysis can be used instead of necropsies to analyse the possible incidence of pathogenic cranial helminths in mustelids. This aspect is very important and useful when trying to analyse the helminthological status of endangered species such as the native mink (M. lutreola) particularly in areas where both congeneric species are present and strict competition occurs.

  17. Nanostructural and nanomechanical properties of synostosed postnatal human cranial sutures.

    PubMed

    Grau, Nayra; Daw, Joseph L; Patel, Rupal; Evans, Carla; Lewis, Naama; Mao, Jeremy J

    2006-01-01

    Craniosynostosis represents a heterogeneous cluster of congenital disorders and manifests as premature ossification of one or more cranial sutures. Cranial sutures serve to enable calvarial growth and function as joints between skull bones. The mechanical properties of synostosed cranial sutures are of vital importance to their function and yet are poorly understood. The present study was designed to characterize the nanostructural and nanomechanical properties of synostosed postnatal sagittal and metopic sutures. Synostosed postnatal sagittal sutures (n = 5) and metopic sutures (n = 5) were obtained from craniosynostosis patients (aged 9.1 +/- 2.8 months). The synostosed sutural samples were prepared for imaging and indentation on both the endocranial and ectocranial surfaces with the cantilever probe of an atomic force microscopy. Analysis of the nanotopographic images indicated robust variations in sutural surface characteristics with localized peaks and valleys. In 5 x 5 mum scan sizes, the surface roughness of the synostosed metopic suture was significantly greater (223.6 +/- 93.3 nm) than the synostosed sagittal suture (142.9 +/- 80.3 nm) (P < 0.01). The Young's modulus of the synostosed sagittal suture at 0.7 +/- 0.2 MPa was significantly higher than the synostosed metopic suture at 0.5 +/- 0.1 MPa (P < 0.01). These data suggest that various synostosed cranial sutures may have different structural and mechanical characteristics.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid shunt operations without cranial bandaging. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ken R; Trinidad, Elizabeth; Wilkinson, C Corbett; McBride, Lori A

    2009-06-01

    Cranial bandages are commonly applied over scalp incisions immediately after cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt surgery, putatively to prevent complications, particularly infection. These bandages require resources, consume the time of healthcare workers, and incur non-negligible expenses. It is therefore both reasonable and important to examine the efficacy of cranial bandaging. The combined experience of 3 neurosurgeons over 6.75 years with using no cranial bandaging after operations for implantation or revision of CSF shunts is the basis of this report. These data were prospectively accrued and retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate was 4.2% (95% CI 3.1-5.6%) for 1064 operations performed without postoperative cranial bandaging after either shunt insertion or revision surgery through clean or clean-contaminated wounds. The age distribution extended from premature infants through adults 77 years of age. The results of this investigation support the position that bandaging scalp wounds after CSF shunt implantation or revision surgery adds no benefit beyond the easier, simpler, faster, and cheaper practice of using antibiotic ointment as a dressing without bandaging.

  19. Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Rereddy, Shruthi K; Mattox, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and the posterior cranial fossa are exceedingly rare. Patients with these lesions may have a lower BMI compared to those with middle cranial fossa encephaloceles, but are otherwise demographically similar. This study recommends repair via a transtemporal approach to allow for examination of the entire posterior face of the temporal bone. Objective To describe cases of spontaneous posterior cranial fossa defects. Methods This study reviewed all cases of spontaneous posterior fossa defects presenting to a tertiary referral center over the last decade and described clinical presentation, imaging, operative findings, and outcomes. We also compared these lesions to those previously reported in the literature as well as the more common spontaneous encephaloceles of the middle cranial fossa. Results This study identified five cases with a mean age of 61.4 years, female-to-male ratio of 4:1, and a mean BMI of 31. Three cases presented with spontaneous pneumocephalus, one with CSF otorrhea, and one as an incidental imaging finding. Four defects were found medial to the sigmoid sinus and one was in the lateral retrosigmoid air cells.

  20. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  1. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Corey S; Jantz, Richard L

    2002-11-12

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology.

  2. Tumors of the cranial base: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, L.N.; Schramm, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of this book highlights the differences and similarities in the pathology and biology of the various types of neoplasms of the cranial base. The second section covers improvements in radiological diagnosis with the advent of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and a better knowledge of radiological anatomy. It also examines the significance and proper evaluation of minor symptoms to enable earlier diagnosis, as well as the advances in interventional radiology that have produced the balloon occlusion text and tumor embolization. Section three is on advanced neuroanesthetic techniques and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Section four describes specialized treatment modalities including microsurgical resection with the laser, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Section five reviews the latest techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base following resection, as well as the preservation and reconstruction of cranial nerves and cerebral blood vessels exposed during the surgery. The final three sections examine the lesions and surgical techniques specific to the different anatomical regions, i.e, the anterior, middle and posterior cranial base.

  3. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  4. 21 CFR 882.4310 - Powered simple cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered simple cranial drills, burrs, trephines... Surgical Devices § 882.4310 Powered simple cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories. (a) Identification. Powered simple cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and...

  5. [Cranial analysis for early treatment and the biodynamic concept of cranio-facial morphogenesis].

    PubMed

    Deshayes, M J; Desvignes, M; Romaniuk, B; Robialle, J; Revenu, M; Deshayes, B

    2002-12-01

    The understanding of the background of a malocclusion is essential especially in the cranial field. Statistics reinforce the choice of our cranial landmarks and the main lines of our cranial biometry which is really 3D. It marks the relationships between the cranium and the face. It expresses the relevance of diagnosing and treating under 6 years of age.

  6. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used...

  7. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1Wig/ Wig mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  8. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001). Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with the South American

  9. Risks, benefits, and evidence-based recommendations for improving anterior cruciate ligament outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H; Verma, Nikhil N; Tokish, John M; Goradia, Vipool K; McNeil, John W; Provencher, Matthew T

    2014-01-01

    Recently, injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament and subsequent surgical reconstructions have seen a great increase in interest from the perspectives of basic science, anatomy, mechanics, and clinical outcomes. Over the past few years, an emerging body of evidence has shown the importance of a more anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, which uses sound anatomic and surgical principles, identifies an ideal graft for the patient, and ensures that all aspects of care (including postoperative rehabilitation) are fully addressed. It is helpful for orthopaedic surgeons to review the surgically relevant anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament, graft choices, fixation techniques and constructs, and rehabilitation guidelines to optimize outcomes for their patients.

  10. Comparative evaluation of different anchoring techniques for synthetic cruciate ligaments. A biomechanical and animal investigation.

    PubMed

    Letsch, R

    1994-01-01

    Under certain well-defined indications alloplastic material may be used in cruciate ligament surgery. The stability and survival of such a synthetic ligament is to a great extent dependent on the anchorage with which it is fastened to the bone. Most fixation methods have proved to be too weak or have revealed other essential drawbacks, resulting in clinical and experimental failure. A new ligament fixation device (LFD) was developed and tested biomechanically and in animal experiments. In the biomechanic investigation the new LFD was compared to single staples, double staples in the belt-buckle technique, and ligament guidance through additional bone tunnels (Z-technique). The tests were carried out on human cadaver knees, plastic bones, and dog stifle joints. The evaluated parameters were linear and maximum load, stiffness, and elongation. In addition, hysteresis tests were performed to assay the long-term resistance of the fixation. The tests showed a significant superiority of the LFD in all measured variables compared to the other anchorages. The pull-out strength, at 1866 +/- 43 N (cadaver knee), was about four times that for the single staple, and about twice as high as that for the double staple and Z-technique. The animal experiments were performed on German shepherd cross-breed dogs. In six animals the anterior cruciate ligaments were excised bilaterally and replaced by a 6-mm Trevira ligament, on one side anchored with staples in the Z-technique, on the other with the LFD. Postoperatively the dogs were allowed to move freely; no additional protection was employed. After 6 months the animals were sacrificed and the knees examined macroscopically, radiologically, microscopically, and by biomechanical testing. After half a year of implantation, the pull-out strength of the alloplastic ligament was 662 +/- 62 N for the LFD and 531 +/- 67 N for the staples. Three ligaments in the staple group and one in the LFD group had ruptured completely, and two ligaments

  11. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations.

  12. Cranial base deviation in hemifacial microsomia by craniometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Paliga, James Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Wink, Jason; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2015-01-01

    Although facial asymmetry in hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is well documented in the literature, no studies have concentrated on the morphology of the cranial base. This study aimed to evaluate the endocranial morphology in patients with HFM. Consecutive patients with unilateral HFM treated at a craniofacial center from 2000 to 2012 were included. The patients were grouped according to severity on the basis of the Kaban-Pruzansky classification: mild (0-1), moderate (2a), and severe (2b-3). Skull base angulation and transverse craniometric measures were recorded and then compared with those of age-matched controls. A total of 30 patients (14 males, 16 females) averaging 7.5 years of age (range, 1.1-15.7 y) were included. Four patients were classified as mild; 12, as moderate; and 14, as severe. The mean cranial base angle was found to be between 179 and 181 degrees with no significant difference between the severity groups (P = 0.57). The mean cranial base angle did not differ significantly in the patients compared with the controls(179.6 vs 180.0; P = 0.51) No significant differences between the affected and unaffected sides in the patients were found in distances from the midline to hypoglossal canal, internal acoustic meatus, lateral carotid canal, medial carotid canal, foramen ovale, and rotundum. There were no significant differences in transverse measurements between the severity classes using the same landmarks (P = 0.46, P = 0.30, P = 0.40, P = 0.25, P = 0.57, and P = 0.76, respectively). The cranial base axis is not deviated in the patients with HFM compared with the age-matched controls, and there exists little difference in endocranial morphologic measurements with increasing severity of HFM. These data are interesting, given the role of the cranial base in facial growth and the varying hypotheses regarding the mechanism of disease in HFM.

  13. Myological variability in a decoupled skeletal system: batoid cranial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N; Grubbs, R Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chondrichthyans (sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) have simple feeding mechanisms owing to their relatively few cranial skeletal elements. However, the indirect association of the jaws to the cranium (euhyostylic jaw suspension) has resulted in myriad cranial muscle rearrangements of both the hyoid and mandibular elements. We examined the cranial musculature of an abbreviated phylogenetic representation of batoid fishes, including skates, guitarfishes and with a particular focus on stingrays. We identified homologous muscle groups across these taxa and describe changes in gross morphology across developmental and functional muscle groups, with the goal of exploring how decoupling of the jaws from the skull has effected muscular arrangement. In particular, we focus on the cranial anatomy of durophagous and nondurophagous batoids, as the former display marked differences in morphology compared to the latter. Durophagous stingrays are characterized by hypertrophied jaw adductors, reliance on pennate versus fusiform muscle fiber architecture, tendinous rather than aponeurotic muscle insertions, and an overall reduction in mandibular kinesis. Nondurophagous stingrays have muscles that rely on aponeurotic insertions onto the skeletal structure, and display musculoskeletal specialization for jaw protrusion and independent lower jaw kinesis, relative to durophagous stingrays. We find that among extant chondrichthyans, considerable variation exists in the hyoid and mandibular muscles, slightly less so in hypaxial muscles, whereas branchial muscles are overwhelmingly conserved. As chondrichthyans occupy a position sister to all other living gnathostomes, our understanding of the structure and function of early vertebrate feeding systems rests heavily on understanding chondrichthyan cranial anatomy. Our findings highlight the incredible variation in muscular complexity across chondrichthyans in general and batoids in particular. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cranial sexual dimorphism in the Kinda baboon (Papio hamadryas kindae).

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michelle; Seitelman, Brielle C; Krecioch, Joseph R; Frost, Stephen R

    2017-09-06

    The smallest extant member of genus Papio, the Kinda baboon exhibits low sexual dimorphism and a distinctive cranial shape. Ontogenetic scaling accounts for most cranial-shape differences within Papio, but studies have shown that the Kinda follows a separate ontogenetic trajectory. If so, its cranial-dimorphism pattern should differ from other subspecies. To evaluate this hypothesis, morphometric analysis was used to investigate cranial dimorphism in Papio. Three-dimensional landmarks were digitized on 434 adult crania representing six Papio subspecies. Size- and shape-dimorphism magnitudes were quantified using centroid size and Procrustes distances. Patterns of sex- and size-related variation were explored using MAN(C)OVA, multivariate regression, and form-space PCA. Canine dimorphism was investigated using dental metrics. Kinda size and shape dimorphism are significantly lower than in other Papio subspecies. The relative magnitude of Kinda shape dimorphism is similar to other southern baboons; Kinda canine dimorphism is unremarkable. MAN(C)OVA results support subspecies differences in cranial dimorphism and scaling. Allometric and dimorphism vectors differ significantly in some subspecies, and their vector-angle matrices are strongly correlated. The Kinda's allometric vector angles are divergent. Form-space PC3, summarizing size-independent dimorphism, separates the Kinda from other subspecies. The Kinda baboon exhibits significantly lower size and shape dimorphism than other baboons, but its relative dimorphism levels are unexceptional. The Kinda differs from other subspecies in patterns of allometry, size-related shape dimorphism, and residual shape dimorphism. Kinda facial shape is "masculinized" relative to size, especially in females, suggesting female sexual selection contributed to the evolution of Kinda dimorphism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus)

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Rosa M.; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Dickson, Kathryn A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic–mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1±7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (±s.e.m.) of 2.1±0.3°C and a maximum of 6.3°C above myotomal muscle temperature (Tm), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with Tm and temperature elevation was greater at lower Tm. The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  16. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS): Longitudinal MRI-based whole joint assessment of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Roemer, Frank W; Frobell, Richard; Lohmander, L Stefan; Niu, Jingbo; Guermazi, Ali

    2014-05-01

    To develop a whole joint scoring system, the Anterior Cruciate Ligament OsteoArthritis Score (ACLOAS), for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based assessment of acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and follow-up of structural sequelae, and to assess its reliability. Baseline and follow-up 1.5 T MRI examinations from 20 patients of the KANON study, a randomized controlled study comparing a surgical and non-surgical treatment strategy, were assessed for up to six longitudinal visits using a novel MRI scoring system incorporating acute structural tissue damage and longitudinal changes including osteoarthritis (OA) features. Joint features assessed were acute osteochondral injury, traumatic and degenerative bone marrow lesions (BMLs), meniscus morphology and extrusion, osteophytes, collateral and cruciate ligaments including ACL graft, Hoffa-synovitis and effusion-synovitis. Cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal (all time points and change) intra- and inter-observer reliability was calculated using weighted (w) kappa statistics and overall percent agreement on a compartmental basis (medial tibio-femoral, lateral tibio-femoral, patello-femoral). Altogether 87 time points were evaluated. Intra-observer reliability ranged between 0.52 (baseline, Hoffa-synovitis) and 1.00 (several features), percent agreement between 52% (all time points, Hoffa-synovitis) and 100% (several features). Inter-observer reliability ranged between 0.00 and 1.00, which is explained by low frequency of some of the features. Altogether, 73% of all assessed 142 parameters showed w-kappa values between 0.80 and 1.00 and 92% showed agreement above 80%. ACLOAS allows reliable scoring of acute ACL injury and longitudinal changes. This novel scoring system incorporates features that may be relevant for structural outcome not covered by established OA scoring instruments. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Single-Stage Reconstruction of Both Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Mauro; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL), or central pivot lesions are rare. These are frequently associated with collateral ligaments injuries. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and functional outcomes of 4 patients with acute ACL and PCL injury who underwent a simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction. Methods: The inclusion criteria were patients with isolated ACL and PCL injuries, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. We evaluated the type of graft used, the surgical technique and postoperative complications. The scales used for clinical evaluation were the Knee Society Score (KSS), IKDC, Lysholm and Tegner. Knee stability was assessed using the KT-1000 arthrometer. Results: Three men and one woman, with an average age of 48 years (45 to 56 years) were evaluated. Three presented a sport injury and one a car accident. Mean follow-up was 8 years. In all patients allograft was used for ligament reconstruction. Average postoperative results were: KSS 74-82, Lysholm 76, IKDC 63 and Tegner 6. KT-1000 arthrometer showed an average difference of 4mm compared to the contralateral knee. One patient underwent reintervention due to meniscal injury. Conclusion: ACL and PCL simultaneous single-stage reconstruction is a really demanding surgery. We achieved good results using allograft for both ligaments reconstruction. No clinical or functional postoperative complications were recorded.

  19. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  20. Healing Potential of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Remnant Stump.

    PubMed

    Trocan, Ilie; Ceausu, Raluca A; Jitariu, Andreea A; Haragus, Horia; Damian, Gratian; Raica, Marius

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the microstructural architecture and cellular differentiation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stumps in different stages after injury, as this could augment graft biointegration. The histological appearance and immunoreaction for cluster of differentiation 34 antigen (CD34) of 54 biopsies from 27 remnants were compared to 10 biopsies from 5 normal cruciate ligaments. CD34 reaction in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and fibrocytes was consistently positive in small synovial vessels. Remnants also exhibited CD34(+) cells among collagen fibers. Blood vessel density varied between specimens. The mean vascular microdensity was 43 per ×200 field in remnants compared to 15.2 in controls. A total of 94.44% of remnant ACL samples had significant hyperplasia of stellate and fusiform stromal cells, CD34(+); 22.4% had developed capillary vessels inside the ligament; 33% exhibited ongoing angiogenesis. Significant differences exist between torn and intact ACL regarding microvascularization. The remnants contain stellate stromal cells and CD34(+) fibrocytes, and display angiogenesis both at synovia as well as in the ligament itself. These findings underline the potential contribution to neoligament healing when remnants are preserved. Copyright © 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Application of a 3D printed customized implant for canine cruciate ligament treatment by tibial tuberosity advancement.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Armés, Henrique; Pires, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Fabrication of customized implants based on patient bone defect characteristics is required for successful clinical application of bone tissue engineering. Recently a new surgical procedure, tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA), has been used to treat cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficient stifle joints in dogs, which involves an osteotomy and the use of substitutes to restore the bone. However, limitations in the use of non-biodegradable implants have been reported. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development of a bioceramic customized cage to treat a large domestic dog assigned for TTA treatment. A cage was designed using a suitable topology optimization methodology in order to maximize its permeability whilst maintaining the structural integrity, and was manufactured using low temperature 3D printing and implanted in a dog. The cage material and structure was adequately characterized prior to implantation and the in vivo response was carefully monitored regarding the biological response and patient limb function. The manufacturing process resulted in a cage composed of brushite, monetite and tricalcium phosphate, and a highly permeable porous morphology. An overall porosity of 59.2% was achieved by the combination of a microporosity of approximately 40% and a designed interconnected macropore network with pore sizes of 845 μm. The mechanical properties were in the range of the trabecular bone although limitations in the cage's reliability and capacity to absorb energy were identified. The dog's limb function was completely restored without patient lameness or any adverse complications and also the local biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were improved. Based on these observations it was possible to conclude that the successful design, fabrication and application of a customized cage for a dog CrCL treatment using a modified TTA technique is a promising method for the future fabrication of patient-specific bone implants, although

  2. Repair of a complete anterior cruciate tear using prolotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Grote, Walter; Delucia, Rosa; Waxman, Robert; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Wilson, John; Rabago, David

    2009-12-01

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Surgical reconstruction is considered definitive treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears but precise surgical indications are debated. Some patients are reluctant or inappropriate surgical candidates. Prolotherapy is a non-surgical injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain and instability. This case report documents the non-surgical repair of a torn ACL using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. CLINICAL PRESENTATION AND INTERVENTION: The 18 year old female patient sustained a right knee injury during a downhill skiing accident. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a high-grade partial versus complete rupture; Lachman exam findings suggested a complete rupture. She deferred surgical treatment. At 21 weeks post-injury, with unstable gait, inability to climb stairs and more than 1 cm anterior drawer test, she consented to undergo prolotherapy injections. She received 7 prolotherapy sessions over a 15 week period. At-home exercises were initiated at the 3(rd) prolotherapy session. RESULTS: The patient improved. Walking on flat ground improved 4 weeks after initiation of prolotherapy; she could ride a stationary bicycle for 30 minutes by 12 weeks. By 15 weeks, the patient had no instability climbing and descending stairs, the anterior drawer test was negative and MRI showed an intact ACL with fibrosis. Subsequently, she returned to full sport activity. CONCLUSIONS: We document the non-surgical repair of a high-grade partial or complete ACL tear using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. Prolotherapy may be an alternative to surgery in carefully selected patients. This report is consistent with findings of recent pilot-level studies and suggests the need for rigorous clinical trials assessing prolotherapy as treatment for ligament and tendon injury in selected patients.

  3. Repair of a complete anterior cruciate tear using prolotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Walter; Delucia, Rosa; Waxman, Robert; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Wilson, John; Rabago, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective and Importance Surgical reconstruction is considered definitive treatment for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears but precise surgical indications are debated. Some patients are reluctant or inappropriate surgical candidates. Prolotherapy is a non-surgical injection therapy for chronic musculoskeletal pain and instability. This case report documents the non-surgical repair of a torn ACL using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. Clinical Presentation and Intervention The 18 year old female patient sustained a right knee injury during a downhill skiing accident. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) revealed a high-grade partial versus complete rupture; Lachman exam findings suggested a complete rupture. She deferred surgical treatment. At 21 weeks post-injury, with unstable gait, inability to climb stairs and more than 1 cm anterior drawer test, she consented to undergo prolotherapy injections. She received 7 prolotherapy sessions over a 15 week period. At-home exercises were initiated at the 3rd prolotherapy session. Results The patient improved. Walking on flat ground improved 4 weeks after initiation of prolotherapy; she could ride a stationary bicycle for 30 minutes by 12 weeks. By 15 weeks, the patient had no instability climbing and descending stairs, the anterior drawer test was negative and MRI showed an intact ACL with fibrosis. Subsequently, she returned to full sport activity. Conclusions We document the non-surgical repair of a high-grade partial or complete ACL tear using prolotherapy and at-home exercise. Prolotherapy may be an alternative to surgery in carefully selected patients. This report is consistent with findings of recent pilot-level studies and suggests the need for rigorous clinical trials assessing prolotherapy as treatment for ligament and tendon injury in selected patients. PMID:20802815

  4. The biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament rupture on the medial tibial plateau.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Lin, Zhangyuan; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Ruibo

    2017-03-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomechanical and histological effects of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) on the medial tibial plateau. A total of 12 cadaveric human knee specimens were collected and grouped as follows: the PCL intact group (n = 12), the anterolateral bundle rupture group (n = 6), the postmedial bundle rupture group (n = 6), and the PCL rupture group (n = 12). The strain on the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the medial tibial plateau with an axial loading force at different flexion angles was measured and analyzed, respectively. Forty-eight rabbits were chosen for animal study: surgery was performed on the one side of each rabbit randomly (experimental group), while the other side was taken as control (control group). Every 12 rabbits were culled at each of the four selected time points to collect the medial tibial plateau for morphological and histological observation. The PCL rupture, either partial or complete, may generate an abnormal load on all the parts of the medial tibial plateau with axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the medial tibial plateau were observed in the rabbit models of PCL rupture. Compared with the control group, all the PCL rupture groups exhibited a higher expression of the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) at all the time points. Either partial or complete PCL rupture may generate an abnormal load on all the parts of the medial tibial plateau with axial loading at all the positions and may cause cartilage degeneration on the medial tibial plateau.

  5. Walking Speed As a Potential Indicator of Cartilage Breakdown Following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pietrosimone, Brian; Troy Blackburn, J; Harkey, Matthew S; Luc, Brittney A; Hackney, Anthony C; Padua, Darin A; Driban, Jeffrey B; Spang, Jeffrey T; Jordan, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    To determine whether or not self-selected walking speed associates with serum biomarkers of cartilage (collagen and proteoglycan) breakdown in anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed (ACLR) individuals. Twenty individuals with a history of a primary unilateral ACLR participated in this cross-sectional study. Resting blood was collected from each participant prior to completing 5 walking gait trials at a self-selected comfortable speed. Walking speed was evaluated in a 3-dimensional motion capture laboratory and determined from the velocity of the pelvic center of mass. Sera were assessed for collagen type II cleavage product (C2C) and proteoglycan (aggrecan) concentrations using commercially available specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Pearson's product-moment (r) and Spearman's (ρ) correlations were used to evaluate associations between walking speed and biomarkers of cartilage breakdown metabolism. Partial correlations were used to determine whether covariates influenced associations between walking speed and biomarkers of cartilage breakdown. ACLR individuals with a slower walking speed demonstrated higher concentrations of serum C2C (r = -0.52, P = 0.02), while there was no significant association between walking speed and aggrecan concentrations (ρ = -0.29, P = 0.31). After accounting for the variance associated with stance phase duration, ACLR individuals with a slower walking speed still demonstrated greater serum C2C concentrations (partial r = -0.53, P = 0.02). ACLR individuals who habitually walk slower may experience a greater degree of collagen breakdown, suggesting that walking speed may be a future useful clinical indicator for identifying individuals with higher levels of cartilage breakdown and preradiographic osteoarthritic joint changes. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Prospective correlation between serum relaxin concentration and anterior cruciate ligament tears among elite collegiate female athletes.

    PubMed

    Dragoo, Jason L; Castillo, Tiffany N; Braun, Hillary J; Ridley, Bethany A; Kennedy, Ashleigh C; Golish, S Raymond

    2011-10-01

    The female anterior cruciate ligament may be more susceptible to injury than the male anterior cruciate ligament because of the gender-specific expression of receptors for relaxin, a collagenolytic hormone that promotes remodeling of the anterior cruciate ligament. This study was undertaken to investigate whether collegiate female athletes with elevated serum relaxin concentrations (SRC) sustain anterior cruciate ligament tears at an increased rate compared with those with lower SRC. Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. From 2005 to 2010, 143 Division I female athletes from 2 universities participating in sports at high risk for anterior cruciate ligament tears (basketball, lacrosse, field hockey, soccer, gymnastics, and volleyball) were recruited to participate. Questionnaires and urine luteinizing hormone (LH) tests were used to determine participants' anterior cruciate ligament injury and menstrual history and to identify their mid-luteal phase or projected cycle days 21 to 24. Serum samples were obtained for progesterone and relaxin ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) analysis. Participants were monitored for anterior cruciate ligament injury over their 4-year National Collegiate Athletic Association athletic career. A total of 128 participants completed the study and were eligible for data analysis. The cumulative incidence of complete anterior cruciate ligament tear over the 4-year study period was 21.9%, and varied significantly by sport (P < .001). The mean SRC for athletes with anterior cruciate ligament tears (6.0 ± 8.1 pg/mL) was significantly higher than that for those without anterior cruciate ligament tears (1.8 ± 3.4 pg/mL; P = .013). In subgroup analysis of the 46 athletes who had detectable SRC, the cumulative incidence of anterior cruciate ligament tear was 14 of 46 (30.4%); the mean SRC among athletes with anterior cruciate ligament tears (14 of 46) was 12.1 ± 7.7 pg/mL and without anterior cruciate ligament tears (32 of 46

  7. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  8. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome.

  9. [Cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. Case report].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; da Costa, M D; Leal, A B; dos Reis, F R; de Queiroz, R B

    1996-12-01

    The authors report a case of cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. The neuroanatomical controversy, the surgical treatment and the good outcome of the patient are discussed.

  10. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834

  11. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Glastonbury, Christine M.; Mamlouk, Mark D.; Punch, Gregory E.; Solomon, David A.; Cha, Soonmee

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare with only eleven cases reported in the literature prior to 2014, including eight with imaging. We present eight additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion as compared to the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature to recognize direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerve(s). PMID:25857757

  12. Moyamoya syndrome after cranial irradiation for bone marrow transplantation in a patient with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, N; Tajima, G; Yofune, N; Nishimura, S; Kobayashi, M

    2006-12-01

    It is well known that radiation-induced vasculopathy and arteritis are two of the complications of whole brain radiation therapy. Moyamoya syndromes after cranial irradiation among patients with brain tumors were previously reported. However, we could find only three cases of prophylactic cranial irradiation for hematological disorders and no case of cranial irradiation before bone marrow transplantation in patients with acute leukemia. We recently treated a boy who developed moyamoya vessels 1.5 years after cranial irradiation for bone marrow transplantation for acute leukemia. This is the first report of moyamoya syndrome after cranial irradiation for bone marrow transplantation. The mechanism and incidence of vasculopathy after cranial irradiation are unclear. It would be useful to accumulate data and reveal the etiology of moyamoya vessels formation after cranial irradiation.

  13. Heritability of human cranial dimensions: comparing the evolvability of different cranial regions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative craniometrical traits have been successfully incorporated into population genetic methods to provide insight into human population structure. However, little is known about the degree of genetic and non-genetic influences on the phenotypic expression of functionally based traits. Many studies have assessed the heritability of craniofacial traits, but complex patterns of correlation among traits have been disregarded. This is a pitfall as the human skull is strongly integrated. Here we reconsider the evolutionary potential of craniometric traits by assessing their heritability values as well as their patterns of genetic and phenotypic correlation using a large pedigree-structured skull series from Hallstatt (Austria). The sample includes 355 complete adult skulls that have been analysed using 3D geometric morphometric techniques. Heritability estimates for 58 cranial linear distances were computed using maximum likelihood methods. These distances were assigned to the main functional and developmental regions of the skull. Results showed that the human skull has substantial amounts of genetic variation, and a t-test showed that there are no statistically significant differences among the heritabilities of facial, neurocranial and basal dimensions. However, skull evolvability is limited by complex patterns of genetic correlation. Phenotypic and genetic patterns of correlation are consistent but do not support traditional hypotheses of integration of the human shape, showing that the classification between brachy- and dolicephalic skulls is not grounded on the genetic level. Here we support previous findings in the mouse cranium and provide empirical evidence that covariation between the maximum widths of the main developmental regions of the skull is the dominant factor of integration in the human skull. PMID:19166470

  14. Cranial and mandibular morphometry in Leontopithecus Lesson, 1840 (Callitrichidae, primates).

    PubMed

    Burity, C H; Mandarim-De-Lacerda, C A; Pissinatti, A

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a craniometric analysis comparing the species of lion tamarins, Leontopithecus Lesson, 1840. Seventeen cranial and mandibular measures were taken on skulls of 59 adult crania: 20 L. rosalia (14 females and 6 males); 13 L. chrysomelas (6 females and 7 males); 23 L. chrysopygus (8 females and 15 males), and 3 L. caissara (1 female and 2 males). All specimens were from the Rio de Janeiro Primate Center (CPRJ-FEEMA, Brazil), except the specimens of L. caissara. Statistical treatment involved a one-way analysis of variance (the Bonferroni test) and discriminant analysis, comparing cranium and mandibles separately to determine variables which best distinguished groups and to group the specimens, using size corrected methods. The Mahalanobis distance was computed from the centroids of each group. Seven measures distinguished females of L. chrysopygus with L. rosalia, six to L. rosalia with L. chrysomelas, and L. chrysopygus with L. chrysomelas. In males, the numbers of measures statistically different were 5, 4, and 3 of the pairwise comparisons above mentioned. Cranial base length and orbital breadth were the only measures that were significantly different in all three dyads, considering both sexes. For the cranium, function 1 of the Discriminant Analysis accounted for 52.4% of the variance and function 2 accounted for 40.3%. Both functions exhibited a significant value for Wilks' lambda (P<0.0001) and 96.6% of specimens were correctly classified. For the mandible, the first two functions provided a significant discrimination 51.1% and 44.9%, respectively, and 69.5% of the correct classification. Orbital breadth and cranial base length contributed most in the cranial analysis, while mandibular length and mandibular body height to mandibular ones. The analyses performed in this study (univariate and multivariate) demonstrated that cranial and mandibular morphology is significantly different among species of Leontopithecus. Despite of sample

  15. Initial evaluation of posterior cruciate ligament injuries: history, physical examination, imaging studies, surgical and nonsurgical indications.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vidriero, Emilio; Simon, David A; Johnson, Donald H

    2010-12-01

    Compared with anterior cruciate ligament injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries are a rare event. The mechanisms are predictable and a thorough physical examination is mandatory to rule out or define combined injury patterns. Stress radiography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are very helpful adjuncts. Acute and chronic injuries require slightly different approaches. As our understanding of normal and pathologic knee joint kinematics develops, nonoperative rehabilitation goals and operative techniques continue to evolve.

  16. Anterior cruciate ligament injury in the athlete--an update in prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Judith R; Peterson, Erik D

    2012-11-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are a common athletic injury. Athletes with this injury experience significant acute morbidity. These athletes are predisposed to the development of knee osteoarthritis with decreased knee quality of life. The public health implications of these injuries are profound. This article reviews the epidemiology of and risk factors for anterior cruciate ligament injuries in sports. The economic impact of these injuries is discussed. Effective strategies to prevent these significant knee injuries are presented.

  17. [Temporary postoperative protection of the anterior cruciate ligament with transarticular wire rope].

    PubMed

    Weigand, H; Storm, H; Birne, F U

    1990-04-01

    This article describes an operational method for the temporary protection of the anterior cruciate ligament after acute or late ligament reconstruction. In line with the course of the anterior cruciate ligament a wire rope is transarticularly implanted and fixed with a screw each at the femur (proximally) and at the tibia bone (distally). This easily performed method permits both the healing of the ligament lesion while preserving the original ligament length and the execution of an early functional exercise therapy.

  18. [Simultaneous rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament and the patellar tendon: a case report].

    PubMed

    Achkoun, Abdessalam; Houjairi, Khalid; Quahtan, Omar; Hassoun, Jalal; Arssi, Mohamed; Rahmi, Mohamed; Garch, Abdelhak

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous rupture of both the patellar tendon and the anterior cruciate ligament is a relatively rare injury. Its diagnosis can easily be missed during the initial examination. Treatment options include immediate repair of the patellar tendon with either simultaneous or delayed reconstruction of the ACL. We present the case of a combined rupture of the patellar tendon, the anterior cruciate ligament in a 22-year old footballer. A two-stage treatment approach was performed with an excellent functional outcome.

  19. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury. PMID:28174432

  20. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R; Cho, Eunok

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury.

  1. Isokinetic torque peak and hamstrings/quadriceps ratios in endurance athletes with anterior cruciate ligament laxity.

    PubMed

    Portes, Eliane Magaieski; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Botelho, Viviane Gomes; Souza Pinto, Sérgio de

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate torque and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio of the knee of athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament laxity. Twenty-eight male athletes, 19 without anterior cruciate ligament laxity and 9 with anterior cruciate ligament laxity, were evaluated with an isokinetic machine model Cybex 770. The peak torque of quadriceps and hamstrings was compared, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio on the constant angular speed of 60 masculine per second were also compared. In athletes with anterior cruciate ligament laxity, the peak torque values (right and left knees) of flexors (120 +/- 15 and 116 +/- 15 Nm) and of extensors (218 +/- 36 Nm and 207 +/- 26 Nm) were not different than those of athletes without laxity (109 +/- 21 Nm and 111 +/- 22 Nm; 191 +/- 5 Nm and 188 +/- 35 Nm). The hamstring/quadriceps ratio of athletes with laxity (right: 57 +/- 6% and left: 56 +/- 8%) did not differ from those without anterior cruciate ligament laxity (right: 58 +/- 9% and left: 58 +/- 7%). The anterior cruciate ligament laxity of long distances running athletes did not significantly alter the peak torque of flexors and of extensors or the hamstring/quadriceps ratio.

  2. The relationship between posterior tibial slope and anterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Ristić, Vladimir; Maljanović, Mirsad C; Pericin, Branislav; Harhaji, Vladimir; Milankov, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify an increased posterior tibial slope as a possible risk factor for anterior cruciate ligament injury. Sixty patients were divided into two groups (with and without anterior cruciate ligament rupture). The posterior tibial slope on the lateral and medial condyles was measured by sagittal magnetic resonance imaging slices by means of computerized method using circles to determine tibial axis. The patients with anterior cruciate ligament rupture had a statistically significantly (p = 0.06) greater posterior tibial slope on the lateral tibial condyle than the control group (6.68 degrees:5.64 degrees), and a greater slope on the medial condyle (5.49 degrees:4.67 degrees) in comparison to the patients with the intact anterior cruciate ligament. No significant difference in the average values of angles was observed between males and females with anterior cruciate ligament rupture, the average value being 6.23 degrees in men and 5.84 degrees in women on the lateral condyle, and 4.53 degrees in men and 4.53 degrees in women on the medial condyle. A statistically significant difference between the values of posterior tibial slope was observed between the groups with and without anterior cruciate ligament rupture, the sex having no affect on the value of the posterior tibial slope. The method of measuring angles should be unique.

  3. Psychic stress in cranial-cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Rotarescu, Virginia; Ciurea, Vlad Alexandru

    2009-01-01

    From a historical point of view, medicine (in modem society) has set its mission as to cure diseases--medical-type issues--and to ignore patient's condition--illness endurance. By accepting this point of view with reference to their problem, patients have entered some sort of conspiracy of silence and started ignoring the emotional reaction to their medical problems (or to cancel these reactions), regarding them as irrelevant to the problem itself. This approach is also reinforced by the medical pattern that absolutely contests the idea that mind influences the body in a very important way. Another equally unproductive ideology is the idea that people could cure themselves alone even of the most serious illnesses by feeling happy or by thinking in a positive manner, or the idea that people are guilty of getting sick. This attitude resulted in creating a widespread confusion and in significant misunderstandings regarding the extent to which illness can be influenced by mind, at times even blaming someone for having got ill. In the world of illness, emotions have supremacy and fear is the only "thought". We can be so fragile emotionally speaking when we suffer from some illness because part of our mental good-humor is partially based on the illusion of invulnerability. Illness--especially a severe one--destroys this illusion and cancels the premise that our world is one in which existence is completely secure. All of a sudden, we feel thick with weaknesses, we feel helpless and vulnerable (Dixon, 1992). There is a problem when the medical personnel ignore the way patients react from an emotional point of view, even though they should exclusively take care of our physical state. This lack of interest in the emotional reality of an illness neglects something obvious which shows that the emotional state of people can play a significant role as to their vulnerability towards illness and during the recovery process (Ciofu et al., 1978). There is already a scientific basis

  4. Cranial electrotherapy stimulation for the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Gunther, Mary; Phillips, Kenneth D

    2010-11-01

    More prevalent in women than men, clinical depression affects approximately 15 million American adults in a given year. Psychopharmaceutical therapy accompanied by psychotherapy and wellness interventions (e.g., nutrition, exercise, counseling) is effective in 80% of diagnosed cases. A lesser known adjunctive therapy is that of cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES). The major hypothesis for the use of CES in depression is that it may reset the brain to pre-stress homeostasis levels. It is conjectured that the pulsed electrical currents emitted by cranial electrical stimulators affect changes in the limbic system, the reticular activating system, and/or the hypothalamus that result in neurotransmitter secretion and downstream hormone production. While evidence is good for applied research, basic research about the mechanisms of action for CES remains in its infancy. A review of the literature provides an overview of current research findings and implications for clinical mental health practice.

  5. Distraction Osteogenesis Update: Introduction of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Ataru; Kamochi, Hideaki; Oguma, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we discuss in detail our current procedure for treating craniosynostosis using multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO). The MCDO method allows all phenotypes of skull deformity to be reshaped by distraction osteogenesis, except in patients who are 5 months of age or younger and patients with posterior cranial vault problems. We report the results of clinical data of 36 children with craniosynostosis who underwent MCDO between 2005 and 2014 in our institute. This method has the following benefits, such as a high flexibility of reshaping, shorter treatment period and less invasive secondary intervention. We also discuss the other distraction osteogenesis techniques that are used to treat craniosynostosis and compare them with MCDO. The preferred procedure for correction of craniosynostosis may depend on the patient's age, the extent of deformity, and the extent of correction achievable by surgery. We can arrange the combinations of various methods according to the advantage and disadvantage of each technique. PMID:27226854

  6. Distraction Osteogenesis Update: Introduction of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Akira; Sunaga, Ataru; Kamochi, Hideaki; Oguma, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2016-05-01

    In this review, we discuss in detail our current procedure for treating craniosynostosis using multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO). The MCDO method allows all phenotypes of skull deformity to be reshaped by distraction osteogenesis, except in patients who are 5 months of age or younger and patients with posterior cranial vault problems. We report the results of clinical data of 36 children with craniosynostosis who underwent MCDO between 2005 and 2014 in our institute. This method has the following benefits, such as a high flexibility of reshaping, shorter treatment period and less invasive secondary intervention. We also discuss the other distraction osteogenesis techniques that are used to treat craniosynostosis and compare them with MCDO. The preferred procedure for correction of craniosynostosis may depend on the patient's age, the extent of deformity, and the extent of correction achievable by surgery. We can arrange the combinations of various methods according to the advantage and disadvantage of each technique.

  7. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact. PMID:27833101

  8. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  9. Long-term results after lateral cranial base surgery.

    PubMed

    Poe, D S; Jackson, G; Glasscock, M E; Johnson, G D

    1991-04-01

    The surgical management of patients with slow-growing benign temporal bone neoplasms has been criticized because of its significant morbidity and mortality compared with results after radiation therapy, but long-term control by irradiation remains unproved. Long-term surgical results have not been studied previously. One hundred twenty-nine skull base operations were performed in 126 patients at the Otology Group, Nashville, Tenn., from January 1970 through May 1987. Fifty-eight patients responded to questionnaires focusing on recovery from loss of cranial nerves. All patients regained some degree of facial function (class V or better), no alimentary tubes or tracheotomies were in use, and no patients had debilitating aspiration. Long-term compensation from the cranial nerve deficits of lateral skull base surgery can be expected in most patients and should not be used as an argument for irradiation in patients with a long life expectancy at time of diagnosis.

  10. Blunt force cranial trauma in the Cambodian killing fields.

    PubMed

    Ta'ala, Sabrina C; Berg, Gregory E; Haden, Kathryn

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present a unique pattern of blunt force cranial trauma that was observed in 10 of a sample of 85 crania from a Cambodian skeletal collection comprised of Khmer Rouge victims. Initial examination of the trauma, which presents as substantial damage to the occipital with fractures extending to the cranial base, suggested the pattern was classifiable as a basilar or ring fracture. However, further investigation, including trauma analysis and historical research, revealed that this fracture type is distinctive from basilar and ring fractures. Historical data indicate that a particular execution method was the likely source of the trauma. Recognition of this trauma pattern is significant because it exemplifies the distinct fracture configuration resulting from an apparently categorical and methodical execution technique. Identification of this fracture type could potentially assist forensic investigators in the recognition of specific methods of murder or execution.

  11. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  12. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  13. [Chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa].

    PubMed

    Kachkov, I A; Rusinov, A I; Stashuk, G A

    1999-01-01

    The 41-year-old patient experienced a trauma in childhood. Her examination revealed the hypertensive syndrome, truncal and cerebellar symptoms, suboccipital pain. Computed tomography indicated that in the posterior cranial fossa was a 48 x 78 x 37-mm spreading from the tentorium of the cerebellum to the foramen magnum and descending along the clivus. At surgery, chronic subdural hematoma of the posterior cranial fossa was totally removed, the total volume of liquid and dense fractions was as high as 100 ml. After surgery, the patient recovered working capacity. The interest of this clinical case is due to a rare traumatic pathology, long disease, problematic preoperative diagnosis of chronic hematoma, a large formation, fair postoperative outcome.

  14. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-11-11

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact.

  15. Cranial injuries as evidence of violence in prehistoric southern California.

    PubMed

    Walker, P L

    1989-11-01

    Crania from the Channel Island area of southern California were examined for evidence of traumatic injuries. Well-healed depressed fractures in the outer table of the cranial vault are common in skeletal remains from the northern Channel Islands (18.56% n = 598) but rare in those from the mainland coast (7.5% n = 146). This prevalence of traumatic injuries among the islanders may be a result of intense competition over resources in a geographically circumscribed environment. The frequency of cranial injuries increases significantly between the early and late prehistoric periods on the Channel Islands. This temporal variation appears to reflect changes in patterns of violence associated with population growth and environmental instability.

  16. Neanderthal cranial ontogeny and its implications for late hominid diversity.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, M S; Zollikofer, C P

    2001-08-02

    Homo neanderthalensis has a unique combination of craniofacial features that are distinct from fossil and extant 'anatomically modern' Homo sapiens (modern humans). Morphological evidence, direct isotopic dates and fossil mitochondrial DNA from three Neanderthals indicate that the Neanderthals were a separate evolutionary lineage for at least 500,000 yr. However, it is unknown when and how Neanderthal craniofacial autapomorphies (unique, derived characters) emerged during ontogeny. Here we use computerized fossil reconstruction and geometric morphometrics to show that characteristic differences in cranial and mandibular shape between Neanderthals and modern humans arose very early during development, possibly prenatally, and were maintained throughout postnatal ontogeny. Postnatal differences in cranial ontogeny between the two taxa are characterized primarily by heterochronic modifications of a common spatial pattern of development. Evidence for early ontogenetic divergence together with evolutionary stasis of taxon-specific patterns of ontogeny is consistent with separation of Neanderthals and modern humans at the species level.

  17. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Surgical treatment of acute and chronic anterior and posterior cruciate ligament and lateral side injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Levy, Bruce A; Boyd, Joel L; Stuart, Michael J

    2011-06-01

    Combined anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, and lateral-sided injuries of the knee most often occurs secondary to a forced varus moment or after knee dislocation. Management controversies include the optimal timing of surgery, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation. Recent systematic literature reviews have demonstrated higher rates of failure with repair of the lateral and posterolateral corner structures, as opposed to reconstruction. However, the ideal ligament reconstruction techniques remain unclear. This chapter will review the combined anterior cruciate ligament/posterior cruciate ligament/lateral-sided injury pattern, including the physical examination findings, imaging, timing of surgery, graft selection, operative techniques, and postoperative rehabilitation protocols.

  19. Potential Therapeutic Use of Relaxin in Healing Cranial Bone Defects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    calvarial defect model in mice by promoting angiogenesis/vasculogenesis and osteogenesis, at least in part through incorporation of bone marrow -derived...successful production of chimeric mice after irradiation and GFP+ bone marrow transplantation; reproducible implementation of uniform cranial lesions of ~1.5...incorporation of bone marrow -derived angio- and osteogenic progenitor cells into the lesion. This hormone/growth factor has numerous biological

  20. Severe cranial neuropathies caused by falls from heights in children.

    PubMed

    Zahavi, A; Luckman, J; Yassur, I; Michowiz, S; Goldenberg-Cohen, N

    2016-04-01

    Falls from heights are the most common traumatic event associated with emergency department visits in children. This study investigated the incidence and clinical course of cranial neuropathies caused by falls from heights in children. The computerized records of a tertiary pediatric medical center were searched for all patients admitted to the emergency department in 2004-2014 with a head injury caused by falling from a height. Those with cranial neuropathies involving optic and eye-motility disturbances were identified, and their clinical, imaging, and outcome data were evaluated. Of the estimated 61,968 patients who presented to the emergency department during the study period because of a fall, 18,758 (30.3 %) had head trauma. Only 12 (seven boys, five girls, average age 6.7 years) had a visual disturbance. Eight were diagnosed with traumatic optic neuropathy, one after a 6-month delay, including two with accompanying cranial nerve (CN) III injuries. Five patients had anisocoria or an abnormal pupillary response to light at presentation, one patient had CN VI paralysis and temporary vision loss, and one patient had an isolated CN III injury diagnosed on follow-up. Visual improvement varied among the patients. Cranial neuropathies due to falls from heights are rare in children and are associated with high visual morbidity. Vision or ocular motility impairment, especially monocular vision loss, may be missed during acute intake to the emergency department, and a high index of suspicion is needed. Assessment of the pupillary response to light is essential.

  1. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Osteichthyan-like cranial conditions in an Early Devonian stem gnathostome

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Sam; Friedman, Matt; Brazeau, Martin D.

    2015-01-01

    The phylogeny of Silurian and Devonian (443-358 million years ago [Ma]) fishes remains the foremost problem in the study of the origin of modern gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). A central question concerns the morphology of the last common ancestor of living jawed vertebrates, with competing hypotheses advancing either a chondrichthyan-1-3 or osteichthyan-like4,5 model. Here we present Janusiscus schultzei gen. et sp. nov., an Early Devonian (ca. 415 Ma) gnathostome from Siberia previously interpreted as a ray-finned fish6, which provides important new information about cranial anatomy near the last common ancestor of chondrichthyans and osteichthyans. The skull roof of Janusiscus resembles that of early osteichthyans, with large plates bearing vermiform ridges and partially enclosed sensory canals. High-resolution computed tomography reveals a braincase bearing characters typically associated with either chondrichthyans (large hypophyseal opening accommodating the internal carotid arteries) or osteichthyans (facial nerve exiting through jugular canal, endolymphatic ducts exiting posterior to the skull roof) and lacking a ventral cranial fissure, the presence of which is considered a derived feature of crown gnathostomes7,8. A conjunction of well-developed cranial processes in Janusiscus helps unify the comparative anatomy of early jawed vertebrate neurocrania, suggesting primary homologies in ‘placoderms’, osteichthyans and chondrichthyans. Phylogenetic analysis further supports the chondrichthyan affinities of ‘acanthodians’, and places Janusiscus and the enigmatic Ramirosuarezia9 in a polytomy with crown gnathostomes. The close correspondence between the skull roof of Janusiscus and that of osteichthyans strongly suggests an extensive dermal skeleton was present in the last common ancestor of jawed vertebrates4, but ambiguities arise from uncertainties in the anatomy of Ramirosuarezia. The unexpected contrast between endoskeletal structure in Janusiscus

  3. The management of cranial injuries in antiquity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mindea, Stefan A; Batjer, H Hunt

    2007-01-01

    Cranial injuries were among the earliest neurosurgical problems faced by ancient physicians and surgeons. In this review, the authors trace the development of neurosurgical theory and practice for the treatment of cranial injuries beginning from the earliest ancient evidence available to the collapse of the Greco-Roman civilizations. The earliest neurosurgical procedure was trephination, which modern scientists believe was used to treat skull fractures in some civilizations. The Egyptian papyri of Edwin Smith provide a thorough description of 27 head injuries with astute observations of clinical signs and symptoms, but little information on the treatment of these injuries. Hippocrates offered the first classification of skull fractures and discussion of which types required trephining, in addition to refining this technique. Hippocrates was also the first to understand the basis of increased intracranial pressure. After Hippocrates, the physicians of the Alexandrian school provided further insight into the clinical evaluation of patients with head trauma, including the rudiments of a Glasgow Coma Scale. Finally, Galen of Pergamon, a physician to fallen gladiators, substantially contributed to the understanding of the neuroanatomy and physiology. He also described his own classification system for skull fractures and further refined the surgical technique of trephination. From the study of these important ancient figures, it is clearly evident that the knowledge and experience gained from the management of cranial injuries has laid the foundation not only for how these injuries are managed today, but also for the development of the field of neurosurgery.

  4. Phylogeny, Diet, and Cranial Integration in Australodelphian Marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anjali

    2007-01-01

    Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials. PMID:17912372

  5. Craniometric measurements of artificial cranial deformations in Eastern European skulls.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Fedorischeva, Victoria A; Naumova, Ella A; Yabluchansky, Nikolay I

    2008-06-01

    Standardized lateral cephalograms of eleven skulls with artificial cranial deformations from Eastern Europe and twenty normal skulls from the same population were made, digitized and imported into the AutoCAD 2005 computer program. The x- and y-coordinates of defined measuring points were determined and angle measurements were made. The form difference of the skulls was tested with the Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) and the difference of the angle measurements were compared statistically using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. All deformed skulls belonged to the tabular fronto-occipital type of deformation. The results of the EDMA and the angle measurements indicated significant differences for the neurocranium and the facial cranium in height between the normal and the deformed skulls, but not in the cranial length. It can be concluded that in Eastern Europe one method of cranial molding was used. The deformation of the neurocranium also affected the development of the facial cranium regarding facial height. This may indicate a dependency of the developmental fields of the neurocranium and facial cranium.

  6. A method for whole protein isolation from human cranial bone.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Sarah M; Mayampurath, Anoop; Rogers, M Rose; Wolfgeher, Donald J; Fisher, Sean M; Volchenboum, Samuel L; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2016-12-15

    The presence of the dense hydroxyapatite matrix within human bone limits the applicability of conventional protocols for protein extraction. This has hindered the complete and accurate characterization of the human bone proteome thus far, leaving many bone-related disorders poorly understood. We sought to refine an existing method of protein extraction from mouse bone to extract whole proteins of varying molecular weights from human cranial bone. Whole protein was extracted from human cranial suture by mechanically processing samples using a method that limits protein degradation by minimizing heat introduction to proteins. The presence of whole protein was confirmed by western blotting. Mass spectrometry was used to sequence peptides and identify isolated proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003215. Extracted proteins were characterized as both intra- and extracellular and had molecular weights ranging from 9.4 to 629 kDa. High correlation scores among suture protein spectral counts support the reproducibility of the method. Ontology analytics revealed proteins of myriad functions including mediators of metabolic processes and cell organelles. These results demonstrate a reproducible method for isolation of whole protein from human cranial bone, representing a large range of molecular weights, origins and functions.

  7. Morphology and variation in porpoise (Cetacea: Phocoenidae) cranial endocasts.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Rachel A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of endocranial anatomy in cetaceans is important from the perspective of echolocation ability, intelligence, social structure, and alternate pathways for circulation to the brain. Apart from the importance of studying brain shape and asymmetries as they relate to aspects of behavior and intelligence, cranial endocasts can show a close correspondence to the hydrostatic shape of the brain in life, and canals and grooves can preserve features of the circulatory system. Multiple samples are rarely available for studies of individual variation, especially in fossils, thus a first step in quantifying variation and making comparisons with fossils is made possible with CT scans of osteological specimens. This study presents a series of high-resolution X-ray CT-derived cranial endocasts of six extant species of Phocoenidae, a clade including some of the smallest and one of the rarest cetaceans. Degree of gyrification varies interspecifically and intraspecifically, possibly resulting from variation in preservation of the ossified meninges. Computed tomographic data show that visually assessed asymmetry in the cranial endocasts is not correlated with volumetric measurements, but nonetheless may reflect torsion in the skull's shape such that the right cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres extend rostrally and laterally more than the left. Vasculature and canals are similar to other described cetacean species, but the hypophyseal casts are unusual. Similarities between brain shape and volume measurements in the different species can be attributed to paedomorphism and concomitant variation in ecological preferences. This may explain similarities Neophocaena phocaenoides and Phocoena sinus share with the juvenile Phocoena phocoena specimen studied.

  8. The evolution of hominoid cranial diversity: A quantitative genetic approach.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Lauren; von Cramon-Taubadel, Noreen

    2017-09-12

    Hominoid cranial evolution is characterized by substantial phenotypic diversity, yet the cause of this variability has rarely been explored. Quantitative genetic techniques for investigating evolutionary processes underlying morphological divergence are dependent on the availability of good ancestral models, a problem in hominoids where the fossil record is fragmentary and poorly understood. Here, we use a maximum likelihood approach based on a Brownian motion model of evolutionary change to estimate nested hypothetical ancestral forms from 15 extant hominoid taxa. These ancestors were then used to calculate rates of evolution along each branch of a phylogenetic tree using Lande's generalized genetic distance. Our results show that hominoid cranial evolution is characterized by strong stabilizing selection. Only two instances of directional selection were detected; the divergence of Homo from its last common ancestor with Pan, and the divergence of the lesser apes from their last common ancestor with the great apes. In these two cases, selection gradients reconstructed to identify the specific traits undergoing selection indicated that selection on basicranial flexion, cranial vault expansion and facial retraction characterizes the divergence of Homo, whereas the divergence of the lesser apes was defined by selection on neurocranial size reduction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Successful endovascular management of brain aneurysms presenting with mass effect and cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer; Hamimi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms presented with mass effect are traditionally treated by surgical clipping to decompress their mass effect. The aim of this work is to discuss the efficiency of endovascular techniques in treating 47 patients with variable sizes of intracranial aneurysms presented with mass effect and/or cranial nerve palsy. There were 47 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms. Group I includes 28 giant aneurysms; all are treated by parent vessel occlusion with or without intra-aneurysmal occlusion depending on anatomical locations. Group II includes 19 small and large aneurysms; all are treated by selective endosaccular occlusion with coils. Clinical presentations were ocular cranial nerve dysfunction (82.9%), optic nerve or chiasmatic dysfunction (21.2%), brain stem compression (8.5%), embolic (6%), epistaksis (4%), proptosis (2%), and bleeding per ear (2%). Out of 47 patients, symptoms were resolved in 31 cases (66%), improved in 10 cases (21%), and unchanged in six cases (13%). Out of 28 giant aneurysms, symptoms were resolved in 19 (68%), improved in four (14%), and unchanged in five (18%). Only four (14%) patients out of the 19 giant aneurysms with complete symptoms resolution showed significant mass reduction in MRI. Out of 19 non-giant aneurysm cases treated by selective endovascular occlusion with coils, symptoms were resolved in 12 cases (63%), improved in six (32%), and unchanged in one (5%). No complications from the treatment were observed. The longer the duration of symptoms before endovascular treatment is, the longer the duration till improvement or resolution postoperative in both groups. Recovery of aneurysm-induced mass effect occurs in most patients both after parent vessel occlusion and after selective coiling, and is comparable to results after surgical clipping. The improvement starts independent of aneurysmal shrinkage in postoperative MRI follow-ups. The arrest of pulsations and partial shrinkage within the aneurysms after endovascular treatment may

  10. Carotid artery pseudoaneurysm after orthognathic surgery causing lower cranial nerve palsies: endovascular repair.

    PubMed

    Hacein-Bey, Lotfi; Blazun, Judith M; Jackson, Richard F

    2013-11-01

    Reported complications following Le Fort osteotomies are rare but can include epistaxis from disruptions or pseudo-aneurysms of the maxillary artery or its distal branches the descending palatine and sphenopalatine arteries, aseptic necrosis of the maxilla, ophthalmic injuries including blindness, ophthalmoplegia, and keratitis sicca, and arteriovenous fistulas or false aneurysms of the carotid arteries (external and/or internal). The mechanism of injury to neurovascular structures can be the result of direct or indirect trauma, such as injuries from surgical instruments, traction injuries during manipulation of the osteotomized bone segments or during inadvertent manipulations of the head and neck, or from fractures extending to the base of the skull, orbit, or pterygopalatine fossa associated with the pterygomandibular dysjunction or maxillary downfracture. An 18 year-old male with facial bone dysplasia, apertognathia, maxillary hypoplasia and mandibular hyperplasia was treated with maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy with internal fixation and elastic intermaxillary fixation. Following surgery, the patient developed palsies of the vagus and accessory nerves manifesting as dysphagia, cough, vocal cord paralysis and trapezius muscle atrophy. Cross sectional imaging revealed a small, laterally pointing pseudoaneurysm of the high cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) at the skull base, exerting pulsatile mass effect on adjacent lower cranial nerves. The patient was treated with carotid artery stent reconstruction and pseudoaneurysm coil obliteration, and kept on dual antiplatelet therapy for two months. Partial recovery from cranial nerve palsies was observed within a year. A small, broad-based, laterally-pointing ICA pseudoaneurysm at the exit of the carotid canal without surrounding hematoma was clearly demonstrated on CTA, which visualization was difficult on MRA due to considerable metallic artifact from surgical hardware. Angiography exquisitely demonstrated the

  11. Video Telescope Operating Monitor (VITOM) 3D: preliminary experience in cranial surgery. Technical Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Zefferino; Cardia, Andrea; Milani, Davide; Lasio, Giovanni Battista; Fornari, Maurizio; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2017-08-23

    Optimal vision and ergonomics are important factors contributing to achieve good results during neurosurgical interventions. The operating microscope and the endoscope have partially filled the gap between the need for good surgical vision and maintenance of a comfortable posture during surgery. Recently, a new technology called video assisted telescope operating monitor (VITOM) or exoscope has been used in cranial surgery. The main drawback with previous prototypes was lack of stereopsis. We present the first case report of cranial surgery performed using the VITOM 3D, an exoscope conjugating 4K view and 3D technology, and discuss about advantages and disadvantages compared with the operating microscope. A 50-years-old patient with vertigo and headache linked to a petrous ridge meningioma was operated using the VITOM 3D. Complete removal of the tumor and resolution of symptoms were achieved. The telescope was maintained over the surgical field for all the duration of the procedure, a video monitor was placed at 2 meters from the surgeons and a Control Unit allowed focusing, magnification and repositioning of the camera. VITOM 3D is a video system that has overcome the lack of stereopsis, a major drawback of the previous exoscope models. It has many advantages regarding ergonomics, versatility and depth of field compared with the operating microscope, but the Holder Arm and the mechanism of repositioning, refocusing and magnification need to be ameliorated. Therefore, surgeons should continue to use the technology they feel confident with, unless a distinct advantage with newer technologies can be demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple Primary Recurrent Basaliomas (mPR-BCCs) of the Scalp with Cranial Bone Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Tchernev, Georgi; Patterson, James W.; Lotti, Torello; Gianfaldoni, Serena; Lotti, Jacopo; França, Katlein; Batashki, Atanas; Wollina, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    We present a 68-year-old patient with multiple primary infiltrative BCCs in the scalp area, initially treated 14 years ago with superficial contact X-ray therapy, end dose 60 greys, followed by electrocautery (x2) several years later. He presented in the dermatologic policlinic for diagnosis and therapy of two additional, newly-formed pigmented lesions, and because of an uncomfortable, itchy, burning sensation in the area where lesions had been treated years before. Screening cranial computer-tomography (CT) examination revealed two deformities in the form of tumor-mediated osteolysis, affecting the diploe of the tabula externa on the left parietal and parasagittal areas. Complete excision with removal of periosteum and partial removal of the tabula externa was planned with neurosurgeons at a later stage. BCC is one of the most common malignant skin tumours of the head and neck region (about 90% of cases) and is characterised by a significant potential for local infiltration and destructive growth. Recurrent, invasive BCC of the scalp and calvarium is a difficult problem for which universally accepted treatment protocols had not been established. The primary treatment of aggressive BCCs is surgical, with a thorough examination of excision margins to ensure complete resection. Procedural-based options include standard excision, curettage, curettage with electrodessication, and Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS), with MMS being the gold standard for the definitive treatment of BCC. Improper removal or electrocautery (as in our case) of the several aggressive forms of BCC seems to be a particular problem, and not only for dermatologic surgeons. The risk of subsequent invasion and destruction of the cranium, underlying dura, and cranial nerves by basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is extremely low, with an estimated incidence of 0.03%, but is a potential complication over time. Computed tomography is the modality of choice for detecting tumour invasion into bone, which commonly

  13. Morphological relationship between the cranial and supraorbital regions in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Nowaczewska, Wioletta; Kuźmiński, Łukasz; Biecek, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    Although some hypotheses that attempt to explain the variation in supraorbital region morphology in modern humans have been proposed, this issue is still not well understood. In this study, the craniofacial size and spatial models were tested using a sample of modern human crania from geographically diverse populations, and the co-occurrence of the degrees of glabella (GL) and superciliary arch (ST) expression were analyzed. The two supraorbital structures were examined by visual assessment, and eight quantitative variables were included in the three-way ANOVA, canonical variates analysis and partial rank correlation. The influences of sex and the region of origin of the cranial samples on the relationships between the examined variables and the degrees of supraorbital structures expression were also considered. The results only partially supported the craniofacial size and spatial models and suggested that GL and ST experienced separate influences during development. In the sample of all crania, the neurocranial size more strongly influenced the morphological variation of the ST than of the GL, and sex influenced both of these structures the most. The results suggest that sex may be the main factor (having an influence independent of the other traits) on the morphological variation of the GL and ST. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cranial nerve injuries are associated with specific craniofacial fractures after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Kampshoff, Jesse L; Cogbill, Thomas H; Mathiason, Michelle A; Kallies, Kara J; Martin, Lynn T

    2010-11-01

    Identification of cranial nerve (CN) injuries after blunt trauma is often delayed due to concomitant life-threatening trauma, altered mental status, and associated bony or soft tissue injuries. We hypothesized that specific craniofacial fracture (FX) patterns are associated with CN injuries, permitting earlier diagnosis. The trauma registry at a single institution was queried for all CN injuries and craniofacial FXs. Associations were determined by Fisher's exact test. Ninety CN injuries were identified in 59 patients. CN injuries were diagnosed on the day of admission in 24 (41%) patients. The most frequently injured CNs were CN VII (22), CN I (16), and CN VI (14). Occipital FXs were associated with CN I injury (P = 0.001). Sphenoid and ethmoid FXs were correlated with CN III trauma (P = 0.019 and 0.04). Temporal bone FXs were associated with CN VII injuries (P = 0.025). Maxillary FXs were associated with CN V injuries (P = 0.041). Complete or partial recovery was documented after 17 per cent and 39 per cent of CN injuries, respectively. Diagnostic delay was documented in 59 per cent of patients. Specific craniofacial FXs were correlated with certain CN injuries. Partial or complete recovery of function occurred after 56 per cent of CN injuries.

  15. Filling the gap. Human cranial remains from Gombore II (Melka Kunture, Ethiopia; ca. 850 ka) and the origin of Homo heidelbergensis.

    PubMed

    Profico, Antonio; Di Vincenzo, Fabio; Gagliardi, Lorenza; Piperno, Marcello; Manzi, Giorgio

    2016-06-20

    African archaic humans dated to around 1,0 Ma share morphological affinities with Homo ergaster and appear distinct in cranio-dental morphology from those of the Middle Pleistocene that are referred to Homo heidelbergensis. This observation suggests a taxonomic and phylogenetic discontinuity in Africa that ranges across the Matuyama/Brunhes reversal (780 ka). Yet, the fossil record between roughly 900 and 600 ka is notoriously poor. In this context, the Early Stone Age site of Gombore II, in the Melka Kunture formation (Upper Awash, Ethiopia), provides a privileged case-study. In the Acheulean layer of Gombore II, somewhat more recent than 875 ±10 ka, two large cranial fragments were discovered in 1973 and 1975 respectively: a partial left parietal (Melka Kunture 1) and a right portion of the frontal bone (Melka Kunture 2), which probably belonged to the same cranium. We present here the first detailed description and computer-assisted reconstruction of the morphology of the cranial vault pertaining to these fossil fragments. Our analysis suggest that the human fossil specimen from Gombore II fills a phenetic gap between Homo ergaster and Homo heidelbergensis. This appears in agreement with the chronology of such a partial cranial vault, which therefore represents at present one of the best available candidates (if any) for the origin of Homo heidelbergensis in Africa.

  16. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001) and an increased 30-day morbidity rate of 25.9% versus 14.14% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001). The 30-day morbidity rates for all patients undergoing cranial procedures were stratified by diagnosis: 26.5% aneurysm, 24.7% sellar tumor, 19.7% extra-axial tumor, 14.8% intra-axial tumor, 14.4% arteriovenous malformation, and 5.6% pain. Following multivariable regression, the 30-day mortality in anemic patients was threefold higher than in non-anemic patients (4.1% vs 1.3%; OR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.65-4.66). The odds of postoperative morbidity in anemic patients were significantly higher than in non-anemic patients (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). There was a significant difference in postoperative morbidity event odds with a hematocrit level above (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.78-1.48) and below (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.55-3.42) 33% [hemoglobin (Hgb) 11 g/dl]. Conclusions: Preoperative anemia in elective cranial neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID

  17. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens.

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  19. Compartment pressure monitoring during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Faber, K; Willits, K; Miniaci, A; Labib, S; Fowler, P

    1999-09-01

    A prospective double blind randomized study was carried out using 20 healthy males with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency undergoing bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction. The subjects were randomized into either water or saline irrigation and then underwent identical reconstructive procedures using an arthroscopic pump. Continuous preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pressures were monitored using the slit catheter technique. Blood pressure and compartment pressure measurements were continuously recorded and noted at all stages of the procedure. Mean preoperative anterior and posterior compartment pressures were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted between the anterior and posterior compartments of each group. No difference between water and saline irrigation was identified throughout the procedure. In both groups, postoperative pressures were slightly lower in the anterior and posterior compartments compared with preoperative pressures, but not significantly.

  20. Popliteal pseudoaneurysm after arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan J M; Driessen, Marcel J M

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature.

  1. Popliteal Pseudoaneurysm after Arthroscopic Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Breugem, Stefan J.M.; Driessen, Marcel J.M.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents the case of a 30-year-old motocross (BMX) cyclist with a third-degree posterior cruciate ligament rupture. The technique used for reconstruction was the transtibial single-bundle autologous hamstring technique. Unfortunately, the procedure was complicated by a popliteal pseudoaneurysm, which was located in line with the tibial canal. The pseudoaneurysm was treated with an end-to-end anastomosis and the patient recovered without further complaints. In this case, the popliteal artery was damaged most probably by the edge of the reamer or the guide wire during removal. Vascular complications can be limb- and life-threatening. This case report aims to increase the awareness of this serious complication with a review of the literature. PMID:25229050

  2. Neuromuscular disorder in response to anterior cruciate ligament creep.

    PubMed

    Chu, Derrick; LeBlanc, Robby; D'Ambrosia, Peter; D'Ambrosia, Renee; Baratta, Richard V; Solomonow, Moshe

    2003-03-01

    To determine the effect of creep developed in the anterior cruciate ligament and other viscoelastic knee structures on the function of the flexor and extensor muscles of males and females. Static load applied to the proximal tibia of young healthy male and female subjects in a laboratory setting with maximal voluntary knee flexion and extension performed before and after the load application. Static loads applied to various joints during occupational and sports activities are epidemiologically linked to higher than normal rates of disability reports. The physiological and biomechanical processes active in the development of such a neuromuscular disorder are not known. We hypothesize that creep developed in the anterior cruciate ligament due to prolonged static load will have pronounced impact on the reflexive activation of the associated musculature in a manner that may increase the risk of injury. Females are expected to be exposed to higher risk than males. Male and female groups performed maximal voluntary knee flexion and extension before and after applying 200 and 150 N, respectively, to the proximal tibia for a 10 min period. Flexion and extension forces as well as electromyograph from agonist and antagonist muscles were measured at 35 degrees and 90 degrees knee flexion. Data was analyzed through repeated measures of analysis of variance. It was found that in extension, quadriceps electromyographic activity increased significantly after anterior cruciate ligament creep while hamstrings co-activation did not change. There was also a trend towards increased extension force after creep was developed, with significant effect of gender (larger increase in females). Similarly, significant increase in hamstrings electromyographic activity and a trend towards increased force during knee flexion was observed but with no effect of gender. Electromyographic spasms from the flexors and extensors were recorded in 30% of the subjects during the 10 min static loading

  3. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  4. Mechanism of anterior cruciate ligament injuries in soccer.

    PubMed

    Faunø, P; Wulff Jakobsen, B

    2006-01-01

    One hundred and thirteen patients, consecutively admitted to our clinic with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture sustained while playing soccer, were surveyed and the mechanism behind their injury analyzed. The diagnosis was made arthroscopically or by instrumented laxity testing. The findings showed that the vast majority of the injuries were of the non-contact type and that very few were associated with foul play. No player positions were over- or underrepresented and goal keepers are apparently just as prone to ACL injury as their teammates. The findings of this study have helped our understanding of the mechanism behind ACL injuries in soccer and could be an aid to establishing future prophylactic measures. The findings also emphasize that certain injury mechanisms on the soccer field should alert the physician and draw his attention to a possible ACL injury.

  5. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL.

  6. Two-Stage Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Cvetanovich, Gregory; Waliullah, Khalid; Khair, Michael; Smith, Patrick; Bach, Bernard; Sherman, Seth

    2016-05-01

    The number of primary anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is rapidly increasing. In patients who wish to return to their preoperative level of function, specifically as it pertains to participation in sports, the gold standard of treatment following an ACL tear remains an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Despite a majority of good/excellent results following primary ACL reconstruction, there is a growing subset of patients with persistent or recurrent functional instability who require revision ACL reconstruction. Preoperative planning for revision ACL reconstruction requires a careful understanding of the root cause of ACL failure, including possible technical causes of primary ACL failure and the presence of combined knee pathology that was not addressed at the index ACL reconstruction. The decision to perform 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction is multifactorial and is reached by technical considerations that may make a 1-stage revision less optimal, including tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, active infection, and others. Concomitant knee pathology such as meniscal deficiency, malalignment (including an increase in posterior tibial slope), chondral lesions, and other ligamentous laxity may also require a staged approach to treatment. This evidence-based review covers the indications for 2-stage revision ACL reconstruction, surgical techniques, evidence for and technique of bone grafting prior ACL tunnels, and outcomes of 2-stage revision stratified by initial cause of ACL reconstruction failure. With proper preoperative planning and an understanding of the cause of failure following the primary ACL reconstruction, revision ACL reconstruction can offer excellent outcomes in the motivated patient. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e456-e464.].

  7. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Strain In Vivo: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Luque-Seron, Juan Antonio; Medina-Porqueres, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Distinct exercises have been proposed for knee rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. There is a need to understand ACL strain behavior during different rehabilitation exercises to protect the graft from excessive strain that could interfere with its healing process. To critically review studies that directly measured normal ACL strain in vivo during different movements, conditions, or exercises to gain insight into which of them may produce more strain on the ligament or the ligament graft in the case of reconstructed knees. A literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro databases was conducted. Keywords included anterior cruciate ligament, strain, stress, deformation, transducer, rehabilitation, rehabilitation exercise, physical therapy, and physiotherapy. Inclusion criteria were (1) peer-reviewed studies published in English or Spanish, (2) research conducted on adult human subjects with normal ACLs and healthy knees, and (3) ACL strain directly measured during different movements, conditions, or exercises by using a transducer. Systematic review. Level 4. Specific data were abstracted from the selected studies, including isometric quadriceps and hamstrings activity, active and passive flexion-extension of the knee, closed kinetic chain exercises, and application of joint compressive load. A total of 10 studies met all criteria and were included in the final analysis. The strain values produced by closed kinetic chain and open kinetic chain exercises were similar. However, closed kinetic chain exercises appear to attenuate the strain increase that occurs in open kinetic chain exercises when increasing resistance. These data may be relevant to develop rehabilitation exercises or programs that do not endanger the healing ACL graft and to provide a basis for future clinical trials. © 2016 The Author(s).

  8. Registration rate in the Norwegian Cruciate Ligament Register

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose The Norwegian Cruciate Ligament Register (NCLR) was founded in 2004. The purpose of the NCLR is to provide representative and reliable data for future research. In this study we evaluated the development of the registration rate in the NCLR. Methods The Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) and the electronic patient charts (EPCs) were used as reference data for public and private hospitals, respectively. Data were retrieved for all primary and revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery during 2008–2009 in public hospitals and during 2008 in private hospitals. The NOMESCO classification of surgical procedures was used for identification of ACL surgeries. Public hospitals were divided into subgroups according to the annual number of operations in the NPR: small hospitals (< 30 operations) and large hospitals (≥ 30 operations). Results For the 2-year data extracted from public hospitals, 2,781 and 2,393 operations met the inclusion criteria according to the NPR and the NCLR, respectively, giving an average registration rate of 86% (95% CI: 0.85–0.87). The registration rate for small public hospitals was 69% (CI: 0.65–0.73), which was significantly less than for large public hospitals (89%, CI: 0.88–0.90; p < 0.001). In 2008, private hospitals reported 548 operations to the NCLR while 637 were found in the EPCs, giving a registration rate of 86% (CI: 0.83–0.89). In that year, the registration rate for public hospitals was 86%, which was similar to that for private hospitals. Interpretation The NCLR registration rate for the period 2008–09 was similar in both 2008 and 2009, and is satisfactory for research. There is room for improvement of registration rates, particularly in hospitals with a small volume of ACL operations. PMID:22489890

  9. Sonographically Guided Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injection: Technique and Validation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jay; Hackel, Joshua G; Khan, Umar; Pawlina, Wojciech; Sellon, Jacob L

    2015-07-01

    To describe and validate a practical technique for sonographically guided anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injections. Prospective, cadaveric laboratory investigation. Procedural skills laboratory in a tertiary medical center. Ten unembalmed, cadaveric mid-thigh-knee-ankle foot specimens (5 left knees and 5 right knees; 5 male and 5 female) from 10 donors aged 76 to 93 years (mean 85.6 years) with body mass indices of 17.6 to 42.2 kg/m(2) (mean 28.8 kg/m(2)). A single, experienced operator used a 22-gauge, 63.5-mm stainless steel needle and a 12-3-MHz linear transducer to inject 1.5 mL of diluted colored latex into the ACLs of 10 unembalmed cadaveric specimens via an in-plane, caudad-to-cephalad approach, long axis to the ACL. At a minimum of 24 hours postinjection, specimens were dissected, and the presence and distribution of latex within the ACL assessed by a study co-investigator. Presence and distribution of latex within the ACL. All 10 injections accurately delivered latex into the proximal (femoral), midsubstance, and distal (tibial) portions of the ACL. No specimens exhibited evidence of needle injury or latex infiltration with respect to the menisci, hyaline cartilage, or posterior cruciate ligament. Sonographically guided intra-ligamentous ACL injections are technically feasible and can be performed with a high degree of accuracy. Sonographically guided ACL injections could be considered for research and clinical purposes to directly deliver injectable agents into the healing ACL postinjury or postreconstruction. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sonographically Guided Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injections: Technique and Validation.

    PubMed

    Hackel, Joshua G; Khan, Umar; Loveland, Dustin M; Smith, Jay

    2016-03-01

    To describe and validate a technique for sonographically guided posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injections. Prospective, cadaveric laboratory investigation. Procedural skills laboratory. Eight unembalmed, cadaveric, mid-thigh-knee specimens (4 left knees and 4 right knees) obtained from 4 male and 4 female donors aged 57 to 64 years (mean 60.8 years) with body mass indices of 27.7 to 36.5 kg/m(2) (mean 32 kg/m(2)). A 5-2-MHz curvilinear probe and a 22-gauge, 78-mm stainless steel needle was used to inject 2 mL of diluted blue latex into the PCL of each specimen using an in-plane, caudad-to-cephalad approach. At a minimum of 24 hours postinjection, each specimen was dissected to assess the presence and distribution of latex within the PCL. Presence and distribution of latex within the PCL. All 8 injections accurately delivered latex throughout the PCL, including the tibial and femoral footprints. In 2 of 8 specimens (25%), a small amount of latex was noted to extend beyond the PCL and into the joint space. No specimens exhibited evidence of needle injury of latex infiltration with respect to the popliteal neurovascular bundle, menisci, hyaline cartilage, or anterior cruciate ligament. Sonographically guided intraligamentous PCL injections are technically feasible and can be performed with a high degree of accuracy. Sonographically guided PCL injections should be considered for research and clinical purposes to deliver therapeutic agents into the PCL postinjury or postreconstruction. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries: anatomy, physiology, biomechanics, and management.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Leon; Vandenakker-Albanese, Carol; Siegel, David

    2012-07-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are the most common ligament injury in the United States. These injuries can be career ending for athletes and severely disabling for all individuals. Our objectives are to review the epidemiology of these injuries, as well as ACL biomechanics, anatomy, and nonsurgical and surgical management so that generalists as well as sports medicine physicians, orthopedists, and others will have a better understanding of this serious injury as well as choices in its management. PubMed was used to identify relevant articles. These articles were then used to identify other sources. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries occur more commonly in women than in men due to a variety of anatomical factors. The ACL consists of 2 major bundles, the posterolateral and the anteromedial bundles. Forces transmitted through these bundles vary with knee-joint position. Some patients with ACL injuries may not be candidates for surgery because of serious comorbid medical conditions. However, without surgical repair, the knee generally remains unstable and prone to further injury. There are a variety of surgical decisions that can influence outcomes. Single-bundle versus double-bundle repair, whether to leave the ruptured ACL remnant in the knee, the selection of the graft tissue, graft placement, and whether to use the transtibial, far anteromedial portal, or tibial tunnel-independent technique are choices that must be made. With a sound knowledge of the anatomy and kinetics of the knee, newer improved surgical techniques have been developed that can restore proper knee function and have allowed many athletes to resume their careers. These new techniques have also limited the disability in nonathletes.

  12. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Removal Contributes to Abnormal Knee Motion during Posterior Stabilized Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cromie, Melinda J.; Siston, Robert A.; Giori, Nicholas J.; Delp, Scott L.

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20–60°) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1±4.3 mm to 10.4±5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2±9.6° to 49.3±7.3°). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1±4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0–60°) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis. PMID:18464260

  13. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury - A controlled study.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália Ms; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes.

  14. Increasing posterior tibial slope does not raise anterior cruciate ligament strain but decreases tibial rotation ability.

    PubMed

    Nelitz, Manfred; Seitz, Andreas M; Bauer, Jasmin; Reichel, Heiko; Ignatius, Anita; Dürselen, Lutz

    2013-03-01

    It was investigated whether the strain of the anterior cruciate ligament and tibial kinematics are affected by increasing posterior tibial slope. 9 human cadaveric knee joints were passively moved between full extension and 120° flexion in a motion and loading simulator under various loading conditions and at 0°, 5°, 10° and 15° posterior tibial slope angles. The anterior cruciate ligament strain and the tibial rotation angle were registered. To assess the influence of posterior tibial slope on the anterior cruciate ligament strain at a fixed flexion angle the anterior cruciate ligament strain was recorded at three different flexion angles of 0°, 30° and 90° while continuously increasing the osteotomy angle from 5° to 15°. The anterior cruciate ligament strain was either not affected by the posterior tibial slope angle or, in some load cases, was decreased for increasing posterior tibial slope (P<0.05). There was a significant decrease of tibial rotation when the posterior tibial slope was increased to 15° for many of the load cases tested (P<0.05). The mean maximum decrease was from 17.4° (SD 5.7°) to 11.2° (SD 4.7°) observed for flexion-extension motion under 30N axial load in combination with an internal rotation moment. The hypothesis that increasing posterior tibial slope results in higher anterior cruciate ligament strain was not confirmed. However, knee kinematics were affected in terms of a reduced tibial rotation. From a biomechanical point of view the data do not support the efficacy of sagittal osteotomies as performed to stabilize anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo posterior cruciate ligament elongation in running activity after anatomic and non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Thorhauer, Eric; Bowman, Karl; Fu, Freddie H; Tashman, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The goals of this study were to (1) investigate the in vivo elongation behaviour of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) during running in the uninjured knee and (2) evaluate changes in PCL elongation during running after anatomic or non-anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Seventeen unilateral ACL-injured subjects were recruited after undergoing anatomic (n = 9) or non-anatomic (n = 8) ACL reconstruction. Bilateral high-resolution CT scans were obtained to produce 3D models. Anterolateral (AL) and posteromedial (PM) bundles insertion sites of the PCL were identified on the 3D CT scan reconstructions. Dynamic knee function was assessed during running using a dynamic stereo X-ray (DSX) system. The lengths of the AL and PM bundles were estimated from late swing through mid-stance. The contralateral knees served as normal controls. Control knees demonstrated a slight decrease in AL bundle and a significant decrease in PM bundle length following foot strike. Length and elongation patterns of the both bundles of the PCL in the anatomic ACL reconstruction group were similar to the controls. However, the change in dynamic PCL length was significantly greater in the non-anatomic group than in the anatomic reconstruction group after foot strike (p < 0.05). The AL bundle length decreased slightly, and the PM bundle length significantly decreased after foot strike during running in uninjured knees. Anatomic ACL reconstruction maintained normal PCL elongation patterns more effectively than non-anatomic ACL reconstruction during high-demand, functional loading. These results support the use of anatomic ACL reconstruction to achieve normal knee function in high-demand activities. Case-control study, Level III.

  16. Quadriceps Strength and Endurance After Posterior Cruciate Ligament Tears Versus Matched Group With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Hee; Han, Seung-Beom; Lee, Jin-Hyuck; Lee, Seok-Joo; Suh, Dong-Won; Jeong, Hye-Jin

    2015-06-01

    This study was designed to compare the preoperative strengths and endurances of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) versus posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) tears. Quadriceps and hamstring muscle strength and endurance were compared between 20 prospectively enrolled patients with isolated PCL tears and a retrospective, matched control group of 20 patients with isolated ACL tears. The maximal torque (60°/s) and total work (180°/s) of the quadriceps and hamstring were evaluated with an isokinetic testing device. Total work (1,094.4 ± 505.8 J v 797.5 ± 332.7 J, P = .035) and peak torque (129.9 ± 56.2 N ∙ m v 98.2 ± 37.4 N ∙ m, P = .046) of the quadriceps muscle on the involved side were higher in the PCL tear group than in the ACL tear group. However, there were no significant differences between the PCL tear group and ACL tear group in hamstring muscle strength (45.8 ± 42.3 N ∙ m and 46.0 ± 24.4 N ∙ m, respectively; P = .940) and endurance (429.3 ± 238.9 J and 382.4 ± 256.1 J, respectively; P = .574) on the involved side. The strength and endurance of the quadriceps muscle of the injured limb were greater after PCL tears than after ACL tears. However, there were no significant between-group differences in hamstring muscle strength and endurance on the involved side. Level III, retrospective comparative study. Copyright © 2015 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  18. MR T1ρ and T2 of Meniscus after Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Amy; Pedoia, Valentina; Su, Favian; Abramson, Elijah; Kretzschmar, Martin; Nardo, Lorenzo; Link, Thomas M.; McCulloch, Charles E.; Jin, Chengshi; Ma, C. Benjamin; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate differences in meniscal T1ρ and T2 quantification in patients with acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and to determine correlations of these differences with MR morphological grading and patient-reported outcomes. Design Bilateral knees of 52 patients with acute ACL injury and 20 healthy controls were scanned using 3T MRI T1ρ and T2 mapping in this prospective study. Quantitative analysis of the meniscus was performed in anterior and posterior horns of the lateral and medial menisci. Morphological meniscal damage was assessed using modified whole-organ MRI scores (WORMS). Measurements were compared between injured, uninjured contralateral, and control knees using a mixed-effects regression model. Correlations between meniscal T1ρ/T2, WORMS and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Scores (KOOS) were examined using partial correlation analysis. Results Mean meniscal T1ρ and T2 values were significantly higher in ACL-injured knees compared to control and contralateral knees. Menisci of ACL-injured knees without tears, including those limited to modified meniscal WORMS grade 0, also had significantly higher T1ρ and T2 values compared to menisci of uninjured knees. Within ACL-injured knees, T1ρ and T2 values showed significant positive associations with meniscal WORMS and significant negative associations with KOOS. Conclusion Acute ACL injuries are associated with significantly increased meniscal T1ρ and T2 values in both patients with and without meniscal lesions or tears, suggesting quantitative MRI provides more sensitive measures of meniscal differences compared to traditional morphological MRI sequences. Correlation between meniscal T1ρ/T2 and KOOS suggest that quantitative MRI is reflective of the extent of patients’ clinical symptoms. PMID:26620091

  19. Effect of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture on Biomechanical and Histological Features of Lateral Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Kanghua; Lei, Guanghua; Lu, Bangbao

    2016-11-15

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and the biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture on the lateral femoral condyle. MATERIAL AND METHODS Strain on different parts of the lateral femoral condyle from specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle, 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle, and 12 complete ruptures, was tested when loaded with different loads on the knee at various flexion angles. Lateral femoral condyles were also collected randomly from both the experimental side in which the PCLs were transected and the control side from 4 sets of 12 matched-mode pairs of rabbits at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, and their BMD and morphological and histological changes were observed. RESULTS Partial and complete rupture of the PCL may cause an abnormal load on all parts of the lateral femoral condyle with any axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the lateral femoral condyle were observed in the rabbit model of PCL rupture. All of the PCL rupture groups had a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and collagen type II than the control group at all time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference in BMD (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Rupture of the PCL may trigger a coordinated response of lateral femoral condyle degeneration in a time-dependent manner, to which the high level of expression of MMP-7 and collagen type II could contribute.

  20. Effect of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture on Biomechanical and Histological Features of Lateral Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Kanghua; Lei, Guanghua; Lu, Bangbao

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and the biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture on the lateral femoral condyle. Material/Methods Strain on different parts of the lateral femoral condyle from specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle, 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle, and 12 complete ruptures, was tested when loaded with different loads on the knee at various flexion angles. Lateral femoral condyles were also collected randomly from both the experimental side in which the PCLs were transected and the control side from 4 sets of 12 matched-mode pairs of rabbits at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, and their BMD and morphological and histological changes were observed. Results Partial and complete rupture of the PCL may cause an abnormal load on all parts of the lateral femoral condyle with any axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the lateral femoral condyle were observed in the rabbit model of PCL rupture. All of the PCL rupture groups had a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and collagen type II than the control group at all time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference in BMD (P>0.05). Conclusions Rupture of the PCL may trigger a coordinated response of lateral femoral condyle degeneration in a time-dependent manner, to which the high level of expression of MMP-7 and collagen type II could contribute. PMID:27843134