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Sample records for partial cranial cruciate

  1. Tibial plateau leveling osteotomy in a cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molter, Christine M; Jackson, Joshua; Clippinger, Tracy L; Sutherland-Smith, Meg

    2015-03-01

    A 13-yr-old female Cape clawless otter (Aonyx capensis) presented with an acute mild right pelvic limb lameness that progressed to a non-weight-bearing lameness. Diagnosis of a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) was made based on positive cranial drawer during physical examination and was supported by radiographs. A surgical repair with a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) and bone anchor with an OrthoFiber suture was performed. The tibial plateau angle was reduced from 30 to 5 degrees. The otter returned to normal function after 12 wk of exercise restriction. Twelve months after surgery, the left CCL ruptured and a TPLO was performed. No complications developed after either surgery, and the otter had an excellent return to function. This is the first report of a cranial cruciate ligament rupture and TPLO procedure in a mustelid, supporting its application to noncanid and felid species.

  2. Cranial cruciate ligament disease in dogs: biology versus biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Cook, James L

    2010-04-01

    The stifle joint of dogs is an organ comprised of multiple tissue types that must work in concert to maintain joint health and function. Cruciate disease in dogs is caused by a spectrum of causal and risk factors that result in a final common pathway of abnormal biomechanics and abnormal biology causing osteoarthritis, or organ failure, of the stifle and the clinical signs of lameness, pain, and limb dysfunction. It is vital to understand the components of the biologic and biomechanical pathologies to improve our understanding of cruciate disease in dogs so that we can improve preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic strategies for our canine patients.

  3. Evaluation of vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) is one of the most important stifle injuries and a common cause of lameness in dogs. Our objective was to measure the vertical forces in the pads of Pitbulls with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) using a pressure sensitive walkway. A pressure sensitive walkway was used to collect vertical force data from the pads of 10 Pitbulls affected with unilateral CCLR. Ten healthy Pitbulls were included in the study as controls. Velocity varied between 1.3 and 1.6 m/s and acceleration was kept below ± 0.1 m/s2. Differences between groups and between pads in the same limb within groups were investigated using ANOVA and the Tukey test. The paired Student t-test was employed to assess gait symmetry (p < 0.05). Results Peak vertical forces (PVF) were lower in the affected limb, particularly in the metatarsal pad. Increased PVF values in the forelimb and the contralateral hind limb pads of affected dogs suggest a compensatory effect. Conclusions A consistent pattern of vertical force distribution was observed in the pads of dogs with CCLR. These data are important for increased understanding of vertical force distribution in the limb of dogs with CCLR disease. Kinetic analysis using pressure sensitive walkways can be useful in follow-up assessment of surgically treated dogs regardless of the surgical technique employed. PMID:24581287

  4. Incidence of meniscal injury in cats with cranial cruciate ligament ruptures

    PubMed Central

    Ruthrauff, Cassandra M.; Glerum, Leigh E.; Gottfried, Sharon D.

    2011-01-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the incidence of meniscal injury in cats with cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) ruptures. Medical records for cats diagnosed with CCL ruptures treated by a lateral fabellotibial suture (LFS) were reviewed for signalment, history, physical examination and surgical findings. Ninety-five cats (98 stifles) met the inclusion criteria. The incidence of meniscal injuries in feline CCL deficient stifles was 67%. Isolated medial meniscal injuries were found in 55 stifles (56%), isolated lateral meniscal injuries were found in 5 stifles (5%), and lateral and medial meniscal injuries were found in 6 stifles (6%). There was no correlation between the presence of a meniscal injury and age, breed, sex, weight, duration of lameness, presence of concurrent medial patellar luxation, degree of degenerative joint disease, or presenting side of lameness. Given the high rate of meniscal pathology in cats with CCL ruptures, exploratory surgery for meniscal assessment and concurrent stifle stabilization should be considered in feline patients. PMID:22467966

  5. Radiographic Risk Factors for Contralateral Rupture in Dogs with Unilateral Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Connie; Ramaker, Megan A.; Kaur, Sirjaut; Csomos, Rebecca A.; Kroner, Kevin T.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Schaefer, Susan L.; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a common cause of pelvic limb lameness in dogs. Dogs with unilateral CR often develop contralateral CR over time. Although radiographic signs of contralateral stifle joint osteoarthritis (OA) influence risk of subsequent contralateral CR, this risk has not been studied in detail. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of client-owned dogs with unilateral CR to determine how severity of radiographic stifle synovial effusion and osteophytosis influence risk of contralateral CR over time. Detailed survival analysis was performed for a cohort of 85 dogs after case filtering of an initial sample population of 513 dogs. This population was stratified based on radiographic severity of synovial effusion (graded on a scale of 0, 1, and 2) and severity of osteophytosis (graded on a scale of 0, 1, 2, and 3) of both index and contralateral stifle joints using a reproducible scoring method. Severity of osteophytosis in the index and contralateral stifles was significantly correlated. Rupture of the contralateral cranial cruciate ligament was significantly influenced by radiographic OA in both the index and contralateral stifles at diagnosis. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral radiographic stifle effusion was 13.4 at one year after diagnosis and 11.4 at two years. Odds ratio for development of contralateral CR in dogs with severe contralateral osteophytosis was 9.9 at one year after diagnosis. These odds ratios were associated with decreased time to contralateral CR. Breed, age, body weight, gender, and tibial plateau angle did not significantly influence time to contralateral CR. Conclusion Subsequent contralateral CR is significantly influenced by severity of radiographic stifle effusion and osteophytosis in the contralateral stifle, suggesting that synovitis and arthritic joint degeneration are significant factors in the

  6. Arthroscopic assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Little, Jeffrey P; Bleedorn, Jason A; Sutherland, Brian J; Sullivan, Ruth; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Ramaker, Megan A; Schaefer, Susan L; Hao, Zhengling; Muir, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) is a degenerative condition in dogs that typically has a non-contact mechanism. Subsequent contralateral rupture often develops in dogs with unilateral CR. Synovitis severity is an important factor that promotes ligament degradation. Consequently, we wished to evaluate the utility of arthroscopy for assessment of stifle synovitis in dogs with CR. Herein, we report results of a prospective study of 27 dogs with unilateral CR and bilateral radiographic osteoarthritis. Arthroscopic images and synovial biopsies from the lateral and medial joint pouches were obtained bilaterally and graded for synovial hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis. Synovial tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive (TRAP+) macrophages, CD3(+) T lymphocytes, Factor VIII+ blood vessels, and synovial intima thickness were quantified histologically and related to arthroscopic observations. Risk of subsequent contralateral CR was examined using survival analysis. We found that arthroscopic scores were increased in the index stifle, compared with the contralateral stifle (p<0.05). Numbers of CD3+ T lymphocytes (SR = 0.50, p<0.05) and TRAP+ cells in joint pouches (SR = 0.59, p<0.01) were correlated between joint pairs. Arthroscopic grading of vascularity and synovitis was correlated with number density of Factor VIII+ vessels (SR>0.34, p<0.05). Arthroscopic grading of villus hypertrophy correlated with numbers of CD3(+) T lymphocytes (SR = 0.34, p<0.05). Synovial intima thickness was correlated with arthroscopic hypertrophy, vascularity, and synovitis (SR>0.31, p<0.05). Strong intra-observer and moderate inter-observer agreement for arthroscopic scoring was found. Dog age and arthroscopic vascularity significantly influenced risk of contralateral CR over time. We conclude that arthroscopic grading of synovitis is a precise tool that correlates with histologic synovitis. Arthroscopy is useful for assessment of stifle synovitis in client-owned dogs, and could

  7. Low-field magnetic resonance imaging of early subchondral cyst-like lesions in induced cranial cruciate ligament deficient dogs.

    PubMed

    Baird, D K; Hathcock, J T; Kincaid, S A; Rumph, P F; Kammermann, J; Widmer, W R; Visco, D; Sweet, D

    1998-01-01

    Six healthy adult male mongrel dogs underwent cranial cruciate ligament transection in the left stifle. Survey radiography of both stifles and low-field (0.064 T) MRI of the left stifle were performed preoperatively and at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postoperatively. Focal changes in signal intensity were seen with MRI in the subchondral bone of the medial tibial condyle at 2 and 6 weeks postoperatively. At 12 weeks postoperative, a cyst-like lesion was detected using MRI in the subchondral bone of the medial tibial condyle in 4 of 6 dogs and a less defined lesion at this site in the remaining 2 dogs. The cyst-like lesion was spherical in shape and showed typical characteristics of fluid with low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, high signal intensity on T2-weighted images and high signal intensity on inversion recovery images. The lesion was seen in the subchondral bone of the caudal medial and/or middle region of the tibial plateau slightly cranial to the insertion of the caudal cruciate ligament. No subchondral cysts were seen in the tibia on radiographs. Histopathologically, the tibia was characterized by a loose myxomatous phase of early subchondral cyst formation.

  8. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10–27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction. PMID:26229890

  9. Partial tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Temponi, Eduardo Frois; de Carvalho Júnior, Lúcio Honório; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand; Chambat, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Partial tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are common and represent 10-27% of the total. The main reasons for attending to cases of non-torn bundles are biomechanical, vascular and proprioceptive. Continued presence of the bundle also serves as protection during the healing process. There is controversy regarding the definition of these injuries, which is based on anatomy, clinical examination, translation measurements, imaging examinations and arthroscopy. The way in which it is treated will depend on the existing laxity and instability. Conservative treatment is optional for cases without instability, with a focus on motor rehabilitation. Surgical treatment is a challenge, since it requires correct positioning of the bone tunnels and conservation of the remnants of the torn bundle. The pivot shift test under anesthesia, the magnetic resonance findings, the previous level and type of sports activity and the arthroscopic appearance and mechanical properties of the remnants will aid the orthopedist in the decision-making process between conservative treatment, surgical treatment with strengthening of the native ACL (selective reconstruction) and classical (anatomical) reconstruction.

  10. Simple arthroscopic partial meniscectomy associated with anterior cruciate-deficient knees.

    PubMed

    Marshall, S; Levas, M G; Harrah, A

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with combined tears of the meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament in the same knee were evaluated for the results of a simple arthroscopic meniscectomy that preserved the meniscal rim. These patients, classified as "recreational athletes," were analyzed to determine their postoperative functional capabilities. Using the presence or absence of the pivot shift sign as the most important indicator of functional capability, we found that partial meniscectomy was effective in allowing patients to regain a high degree of normal functional ability and in permitting forward motion activities. However, all patients were left with an anterior cruciate-deficient knee that caused laxity in the anterior plane and frequently in the rotatory plane. Rotatory laxity markedly limits activities, and those patients unable to adjust to their instability are considering further surgery.

  11. Influence of biomechanical parameters on cranial cruciate ligament-deficient or -intact canine stifle joints assessed by use of a computer simulation model.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan P; Bertocci, Gina E; Marcellin-Little, Denis J

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the influence of 4 biomechanical parameters on canine cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-intact and -deficient stifle joints. SAMPLE Data for computer simulations of a healthy 5-year-old 33-kg neutered male Golden Retriever in a previously developed 3-D rigid body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase during walking. PROCEDURES Canine stifle joint biomechanics were assessed when biomechanical parameters (CrCL stiffness, CrCL prestrain, body weight, and stifle joint friction coefficient) were altered in the pelvic limb computer simulation model. Parameters were incrementally altered from baseline values to determine the influence on stifle joint outcome measures (ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation). Stifle joint outcome measures were compared between CrCL-intact and -deficient stifle joints for the range of parameters evaluated. RESULTS In the CrCL-intact stifle joint, ligament loads were most sensitive to CrCL prestrain. In the CrCL-deficient stifle joint, ligament loads were most sensitive to body weight. Relative tibial translation was most sensitive to body weight, whereas relative tibial rotation was most sensitive to CrCL prestrain. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, computer model sensitivity analyses predicted that CrCL prestrain and body weight influenced stifle joint biomechanics. Cranial cruciate ligament laxity may influence the likelihood of CrCL deficiency. Body weight could play an important role in management of dogs with a CrCL-deficient stifle joint.

  12. Fast presurgical magnetic resonance imaging of meniscal tears and concurrent subchondral bone marrow lesions. Study of dogs with naturally occurring cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

    PubMed

    Olive, J; d'Anjou, M-A; Cabassu, J; Chailleux, N; Blond, L

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal tears and subchondral bone marrow lesions have both been described in dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture, but their possible concurrence has not been evaluated. In a population of 14 dogs exhibiting signs of stifle pain with surgically confirmed cranial cruciate ligament rupture, a short presurgical 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging protocol including dorsal proton density, dorsal T1-weighted gradient recalled echo, and sagittal fat-saturated dual echo sequences was tested to further investigate these features and illustrate meniscal tears. Interobserver agreement for detection of medial meniscal tears (k=0.83) and bone marrow lesions (k=0.87) was excellent. Consensus MR reading allowed detection of nine out of 12 surgically confirmed medial meniscal tears and there was no false positive. All dogs had cruciate ligament enthesis-related bone marrow lesions in the tibia, femur or both bones. Additionally, among the 12 dogs with confirmed medial meniscal tears, subchondral bone marrow lesions were present in the caudomedial (9 dogs) and caudoaxial (11 dogs) regions of the tibial plateau, resulting in odds ratios (13.6, p=0.12, and 38.3, p=0.04, respectively) that had large confidence intervals due to the small group size of this study. The other two dogs had neither tibial bone marrow lesions in these locations nor medial meniscal tears. These encouraging preliminary results warrant further investigation using this clinically realistic preoperative MR protocol. As direct diagnosis of meniscal tears remained challenging in dogs even with high-field MR, identification of associated signs such as subchondral bone marrow lesions might indirectly allow suspicion of an otherwise unrecognized meniscal tear.

  13. Biologic Approaches for the Treatment of Partial Tears of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Dallo, Ignacio; Chahla, Jorge; Mitchell, Justin J.; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Feagin, John A.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) has been established as the gold standard for treatment of complete ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in active, symptomatic individuals. In contrast, treatment of partial tears of the ACL remains controversial. Biologically augmented ACL-repair techniques are expanding in an attempt to regenerate and improve healing and outcomes of both the native ACL and the reconstructed graft tissue. Purpose: To review the biologic treatment options for partial tears of the ACL. Study Design: Review. Methods: A literature review was performed that included searches of PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases using the following keywords: partial tear of the ACL, ACL repair, bone marrow concentrate, growth factors/healing enhancement, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), stem cell therapy. Results: The use of novel biologic ACL repair techniques, including growth factors, PRP, stem cells, and bioscaffolds, have been reported to result in promising preclinical and short-term clinical outcomes. Conclusion: The potential benefits of these biological augmentation approaches for partial ACL tears are improved healing, better proprioception, and a faster return to sport and activities of daily living when compared with standard reconstruction procedures. However, long-term studies with larger cohorts of patients and with technique validation are necessary to assess the real effect of these approaches. PMID:28210653

  14. Joint space narrowing after partial medial meniscectomy in the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K Donald; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2007-09-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is common after total medial meniscectomy. In anterior cruciate ligament-intact knees, the reported outcomes of partial medial meniscectomy are variable. Radiographic assessment using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view is a reliable tool for detecting minor medial joint space narrowing, which may be an early sign of osteoarthritis. Studies that assessed the effect of partial medial meniscectomy found a low percentage of patients with >50% joint narrowing at 10 to 15 years after surgery. Digital radiography, using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view, is a highly sensitive method for observing minor joint space narrowing in the involved knee. A recent study showed that 88% of patients who underwent partial medial meniscectomy had joint space narrowing of <2 mm, and none had narrowing >or=2 mm, at a mean follow-up of 12 years. Subjective results after partial medial meniscectomy are favorable, with 88% to 95% of patients reporting good to excellent results.

  15. Post-operative complications associated with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System in small- to medium-sized dogs: A retrospective analysis (2009–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Rappa, Nick S.; Radasch, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    This study classified and determined the post-operative complication rate associated with stabilization of cranial (CCL) ligament deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System (CCLRAS). Eighty-five medical records from 2009 to 2012 from 1 institution were evaluated. Complications were classified according to previously proposed definitions for orthopedic studies in veterinary medicine. Fifty-two owners were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after surgery and given a questionnaire to classify complications related to the implant. A visual analog scale was used to assess functionality and degree of pain. The overall complication rate was 30.3% with an inflammation-infection rate of 5.4% and a documented infection rate requiring implant removal of 1.8%. Owners reported full or acceptable function in 96% of cases with an average functional score of 86.5. Stabilization of CCL-deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine CCLRAS is reliable with acceptable complication rates. PMID:27493284

  16. Biomechanics of an orthosis-managed cranial cruciate ligament-deficient canine stifle joint predicted by use of a computer model.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina E; Brown, Nathan P; Mich, Patrice M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of an orthosis on biomechanics of a cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL)-deficient canine stifle joint by use of a 3-D quasistatic rigid-body pelvic limb computer model simulating the stance phase of gait and to investigate influences of orthosis hinge stiffness (durometer). SAMPLE A previously developed computer simulation model for a healthy 33-kg 5-year-old neutered Golden Retriever. PROCEDURES A custom stifle joint orthosis was implemented in the CrCL-deficient pelvic limb computer simulation model. Ligament loads, relative tibial translation, and relative tibial rotation in the orthosis-stabilized stifle joint (baseline scenario; high-durometer hinge]) were determined and compared with values for CrCL-intact and CrCL-deficient stifle joints. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the influence of orthosis hinge stiffness on model outcome measures. RESULTS The orthosis decreased loads placed on the caudal cruciate and lateral collateral ligaments and increased load placed on the medial collateral ligament, compared with loads for the CrCL-intact stifle joint. Ligament loads were decreased in the orthosis-managed CrCL-deficient stifle joint, compared with loads for the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Relative tibial translation and rotation decreased but were not eliminated after orthosis management. Increased orthosis hinge stiffness reduced tibial translation and rotation, whereas decreased hinge stiffness increased internal tibial rotation, compared with values for the baseline scenario. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Stifle joint biomechanics were improved following orthosis implementation, compared with biomechanics of the CrCL-deficient stifle joint. Orthosis hinge stiffness influenced stifle joint biomechanics. An orthosis may be a viable option to stabilize a CrCL-deficient canine stifle joint.

  17. Surgical treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament lesions: medium-term results

    PubMed Central

    BERRUTO, MASSIMO; GALA, LUCA; FERRUA, PAOLO; UBOLDI, FRANCESCO; FERRARA, FABRIZIO; PASQUALOTTO, STEFANO; MARELLI, BRUNO M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose this study was conducted to evaluate subjective and objective clinical outcomes of partial reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in comparison with complete ACL reconstruction. Methods three groups, each comprising 20 patients, were evaluated at a minimum follow-up of 12 months. The group 1 patients underwent partial ACL reconstruction, while those in group 2 and group 3 underwent complete ACL reconstruction, performed using either bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) or quadrupled hamstring tendon (HT) grafts, respectively. The subjective outcome was evaluated using the Lysholm knee scale and the subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scoring system. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used for pain assessment and sporting activity was rated using the Tegner activity scale. Objective evaluation was performed using the IKDC objective form, KT-1000 arthrometer and KiRA triaxial accelerometer. Results at the follow-up evaluation, the mean subjective IKDC score was 86.1±10.3 in group 1, 85.2±11.1 in group 2, and 82.7±7.8 in group 3. The Lysholm score was 91.3±7.3 in group 1, 91.7±9.6 in group 2, and 89.4±6.1 in group 3. KT-1000 tests showed a mean side-to-side difference of 1.1 mm ± 1.5 mm (range, 0–5 mm) in group 1; 0.79 mm ± 0.8 mm (range, 0–2mm) in group 2; and 1.45 mm ± 1 mm (range, 0–3 mm) in group 3. The differences between groups were not statistically significant. Conclusions both subjective and objective outcomes of partial ACL reconstruction were comparable to those of complete reconstruction, but partial reconstruction in the presence of a partial lesion of the ACL is considered by the authors to be more respectful of the native vascularization, innervation and anatomy of the ACL, conferring an advantage in terms of recovery of the complete function of the knee. Level of evidence Level III, retrospective comparative study. PMID:25750906

  18. Treadmill training with partial body-weight support after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    luo, Yuan; Shen, Weizhong; Jiang, Zhong; Sha, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the effects of treadmill training with partial body weight support (TTPBWS) and conventional physical therapy (PT) on subjects with anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 40 subjects were randomly allocated to either a treatment group or a control group. Subjects received either treadmill training with partial body weight support (treatment group) or conventional physical therapy (control group). The circumferences of the lower extremities, Holden classifications, 10-meter walking times and the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores were compared at 12 and 24 weeks post-operation. The knee joint stability was tested at 24 weeks post-operation using a KT-1000. [Results] Significant differences were found between the two groups at the 12 weeks post-operation. For most of the measures, there was no significant difference between the groups at 24 weeks post-operation. Interestingly, for most of the measures, there was no significant difference between their values in the treatment group at 12 weeks and their values in the control group at 24 weeks post-operation. [Conclusion] The function of a subject’s lower extremities can be improved and the improvement was clearly accelerated by the intervention of treadmill training with partial body weight support, without compromising the stability of the knee joints in a given follow-up period. PMID:28174445

  19. INDUCED REMODELING OF PORCINE TENDONS TO HUMAN ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENTS BY α-GAL EPITOPE REMOVAL AND PARTIAL CROSSLINKING.

    PubMed

    Stone, Kevin Robert; Walgenbach, Ann; Galili, Uri

    2017-01-09

    This review describes a novel method developed for processing porcine tendon and other ligament implants which enables in situ remodeling into autologous ligaments in humans. The method differs from methods using extracellular matrices (ECM) which provide post-operative ortho-biologic support (i.e. augmentation grafts) for healing of injured ligaments, in that the porcine bone-patellar-tendon-bone itself serves as the graft replacing ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The method allows for gradual remodeling of porcine tendon into autologous human ACL while maintaining the biomechanical integrity. The method was first evaluated in a pre-clinical model of monkeys and subsequently in patients. The method overcomes detrimental effects of the natural anti-Gal antibody and harnesses anti-non gal antibodies for the remodeling process in two steps: Step 1. Elimination of α-gal epitopes- This epitope which is abundant in pigs (as in other non-primate mammals) binds the natural anti-Gal antibody which is the most abundant natural antibody in humans. This interaction, which can induce fast resorption of the porcine implant, is avoided by enzymatic elimination of α-gal epitopes from the implant with recombinant α-galactosidase. Step 2. Partial crosslinking of porcine tendon with glutaraldehyde- This crosslinking generates covalent bonds in the ECM which slow infiltration of macrophages into the implant. Anti-non gal antibodies are produced in recipients against the multiple porcine antigenic proteins and proteoglycans because of sequence differences between human and porcine homologous proteins. Anti-non gal antibodies bind to the implant ECM, recruit macrophages and induce the implant destruction by directing proteolytic activity of macrophages. Partial crosslinking of the tendon ECM decreases the extent of macrophage infiltration and degradation of the implant and enables concomitant infiltration of fibroblasts which follow the infiltrating macrophages. These

  20. [Is conservative treatment of partial or complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture still justified? An analysis of the recent literature and a recommendation for arriving at a decision].

    PubMed

    Rauch, G; Wirth, T; Dörner, P; Griss, P

    1991-01-01

    In a review of the recent literature after conservative treatment of the complete anterior cruciate ligament (acl) rupture good results were found in an average (av) of 56% (12-80%) of all cases. In comparison the conservative treatment of partial tears showed in 84% (60-100%) of all cases good results. 79% (32-100%) of the patients with complete acl ruptures and 90% (66-100%) of the cases with partial acl tears were able to continue their sport activities. Secondary acl replacement or meniscus surgery were later necessary in 20% and 14% of the cases (av) with complete acl ruptures and in only 6% and 5% (av) of the cases with partial tears. Most of the patients who were operated later were young and ambitiously engaged in sports. The results of the mostly retrospective studies display a high variability. For this reason it is necessary to perform more prospective, controlled and randomized studies to verify the preventive effect of an early operative treatment to protect the joint form osteoarthritis and progressive instability. Arthrocopy is essential for all cases of acute hemartrosis. Partial acl tears are predominantly treated conservatively, while complete acl ruptures should be treated following an individual decision regimen. A tree for decision making of the treatment of acute acl-injuries is proposed.

  1. A new osteophyte segmentation algorithm using partial shape model and its applications to rabbit femur anterior cruciate ligament transection via micro-CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Saha, P K; Liang, G; Elkins, J M; Coimbra, A; Duong, L T; Williams, D S; Sonka, M

    2011-08-01

    Osteophyte is an additional bony growth on a normal bone surface limiting or stopping motion at a deteriorating joint. Detection and quantification of osteophytes from CT images is helpful in assessing disease status as well as treatment and surgery planning. However, it is difficult to distinguish between osteophytes and healthy bones using simple thresholding or edge/texture features due to the similarity of their material composition. In this paper, we present a new method primarily based active shape model (ASM) to solve this problem and evaluate its application to anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) rabbit femur model via CT imaging. The common idea behind most ASM based segmentation methods is to first build a parametric shape model from a training dataset and apply the model to find a shape instance in a target image. A common challenge with such approaches is that a diseased bone shape is significantly altered at regions with osteophyte deposition misguiding an ASM method and eventually leading to suboptimum segmentations. This difficulty is overcome using a new partial ASM method that uses bone shape over healthy regions and extrapolates it over the diseased region according to the underlying shape model. Finally, osteophytes are segmented by subtracting partial-ASM derived shape from the overall diseased shape. Also, a new semi-automatic method is presented in this paper for efficiently building a 3D shape model for an anatomic region using manual reference of a few anatomically defined fiducial landmarks that are highly reproducible on individuals. Accuracy of the method has been examined on simulated phantoms while reproducibility and sensitivity have been evaluated on CT images of 2-, 4- and 8-week post-ACLT and sham-treated rabbit femurs. Experimental results have shown that the method is highly accurate ( R2 = 0.99), reproducible (ICC = 0.97), and sensitive in detecting disease progression (p-values: 0.065,0.001 and < 0.001 for 2- vs. 4, 4

  2. Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament: MRI evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Maria A; McGraw, Michael H; Wells, Lawrence; Jaramillo, Diego

    2014-09-01

    Bilateral agenesis of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is extremely rare. We describe a 13-year-old girl who presented with bilateral knee pain without history of trauma; she has two family members with knee instability. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral absence of the ACL, and medial posterior horn meniscal tears. Bilateral arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed.

  3. Cranial Neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, Zahid H; Smith, Sarah S; Khawaja, Shehryar N; Scrivani, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    Advances in diagnostic modalities have improved the understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropathic pain involving head and face. Recent updates in nomenclature of cranial neuralgias and facial pain have rationalized accurate diagnosis. Clear diagnosis and localization of pain generators are paramount, leading to better use of medical and targeted surgical treatments.

  4. Cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Hupp, Wendy S; Firriolo, F John

    2013-07-01

    This article describes the clinical findings of cranial neuralgias, such as trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, nervus intermedius neuralgia, and others, and postherpetic neuralgia. Pathophysiology of these neuralgias, diagnostic methods, and treatment are also discussed. This information will enable the dentist to diagnose patients who have these rare conditions.

  5. Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) ... and Recovery Coping With an ACL Injury About ACL Injuries A torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is ...

  6. Computed tomographic evaluation of the canine intercondylar notch in normal and cruciate deficient stifles.

    PubMed

    Lewis, B A; Allen, D A; Henrikson, T D; Lehenbauer, T W

    2008-01-01

    In the human and veterinary orthopaedic literature it has been implied that intercondylar notch stenosis is a mechanical factor in cranial cruciate ligament rupture and intraarticular graft failure. The patients in this study were classified as normal (32), unilateral cruciate rupture (23), or bilateral cruciate rupture (17). The dogs were placed under general anaesthesia and both stifles were scanned via computed tomography (CT) as previously described. Three CT slices at predetermined levels were evaluated within the notch. Measurements included opening notch angle, notch width and height, condyle width, and notch width index (notch width/condyle width) at two different heights within the notch. Intercondylar notch measurements at the most cranial extent were significantly more narrow in unilateral and bilaterally affected stifles when compared to the normal population. Significant differences were noted in the opening notch angle (ONA), notch width index (NWI), NWI at two thirds notch height (NWI2/3), and tibial slope index (TSI). No significant differences were noted between unilateral and bilateral affected stifles. Increased mechanical contact of the cranial cruciate ligament with a stenotic intercondylar notch may predispose the ligament to mechanical wear and structural weakening. Intercondylar notch measurements have been used as a tool to predict the risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury in young human athletes, and to assess the risk factors for intra-articular graft replacements. Our findings may be useful in developing similar predictive models using stifle CT scans.

  7. Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modulate Molecular Markers of Inflammation in Dogs with Cruciate Ligament Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Peter; Hans, Eric C.; Racette, Molly; Volstad, Nicola; Sample, Susannah J.; Heaton, Caitlin; Holzman, Gerianne; Schaefer, Susan L.; Bloom, Debra D.; Bleedorn, Jason A.; Hao, Zhengling; Amene, Ermias; Suresh, M.; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mid-substance rupture of the canine cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CR) and associated stifle osteoarthritis (OA) is an important veterinary health problem. CR causes stifle joint instability and contralateral CR often develops. The dog is an important model for human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture, where rupture of graft repair or the contralateral ACL is also common. This suggests that both genetic and environmental factors may increase ligament rupture risk. We investigated use of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) to reduce systemic and stifle joint inflammatory responses in dogs with CR. Twelve dogs with unilateral CR and contralateral stable partial CR were enrolled prospectively. BM-MSCs were collected during surgical treatment of the unstable CR stifle and culture-expanded. BM-MSCs were subsequently injected at a dose of 2x106 BM-MSCs/kg intravenously and 5x106 BM-MSCs by intra-articular injection of the partial CR stifle. Blood (entry, 4 and 8 weeks) and stifle synovial fluid (entry and 8 weeks) were obtained after BM-MSC injection. No adverse events after BM-MSC treatment were detected. Circulating CD8+ T lymphocytes were lower after BM-MSC injection. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was decreased at 4 weeks and serum CXCL8 was increased at 8 weeks. Synovial CRP in the complete CR stifle was decreased at 8 weeks. Synovial IFNγ was also lower in both stifles after BM-MSC injection. Synovial/serum CRP ratio at diagnosis in the partial CR stifle was significantly correlated with development of a second CR. Systemic and intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs in dogs with partial CR suppresses systemic and stifle joint inflammation, including CRP concentrations. Intra-articular injection of autologous BM-MSCs had profound effects on the correlation and conditional dependencies of cytokines using causal networks. Such treatment effects could ameliorate risk of a second CR by modifying the stifle joint inflammatory response

  8. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACL connect your thighbone (femur) to your shinbone (tibia). If either ligament is torn, it might cause ... ligaments connect the thighbone (femur) to the shinbone (tibia). The anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments form an " ...

  9. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  10. Occlusal cranial balancing technique.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerald H

    2007-01-01

    The acronym for Occlusal Cranial Balancing Technique is OCB. The OCB concept is based on the architectural principle of a level foundation. The principles of Occlusal Cranial Balancing are a monumental discovery and if applied will enhance total body function.

  11. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  12. [Intra-articular reinforcement of a partially torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using newly developed UHMWPE biomaterial in combination with Hexalon ACL/PCL screws: ex-vivo mechanical testing of an animal knee model].

    PubMed

    Fedorová, P; Srnec, R; Pěnčík, J; Dvořák, M; Krbec, M; Nečas, A

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY Recent trends in the experimental surgical management of a partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in animals show repair of an ACL lesion using novel biomaterials both for biomechanical reinforcement of a partially unstable knee and as suitable scaffolds for bone marrow stem cell therapy in a partial ACL tear. The study deals with mechanical testing of the newly developed ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) biomaterial anchored to bone with Hexalon biodegradable ACL/PCL screws, as a new possibility of intra-articular reinforcement of a partial ACL tear. MATERIAL AND METHODS Two groups of ex vivo pig knee models were prepared and tested as follows: the model of an ACL tear stabilised with UHMWPE biomaterial using a Hexalon ACL/PCL screw (group 1; n = 10) and the model of an ACL tear stabilised with the traditional, and in veterinary medicine used, extracapsular technique involving a monofilament nylon fibre, a clamp and a Securos bone anchor (group 2; n = 11). The models were loaded at a standing angle of 100° and the maximum load (N) and shift (mm) values were recorded. RESULTS In group 1 the average maximal peak force was 167.6 ± 21.7 N and the shift was on average 19.0 ± 4.0 mm. In all 10 specimens, the maximum load made the UHMWPE implant break close to its fixation to the femur but the construct/fixation never failed at the site where the material was anchored to the bone. In group 2, the average maximal peak force was 207.3 ± 49.2 N and the shift was on average 24.1 ± 9.5 mm. The Securos stabilisation failed by pullout of the anchor from the femoral bone in nine out of 11 cases; the monofilament fibre ruptured in two cases. CONCLUSIONS It can be concluded that a UHMWPE substitute used in ex-vivo pig knee models has mechanical properties comparable with clinically used extracapsular Securos stabilisation and, because of its potential to carry stem cells and bioactive substances, it can meet the requirements for

  13. Cranial mononeuropathy III

    MedlinePlus

    ... is one of the cranial nerves that control eye movement. Causes may include: Brain aneurysm Infections Abnormal blood ... show: Enlarged (dilated) pupil of the affected eye Eye movement abnormalities Eyes that are not aligned Your health ...

  14. Variations in cell morphology in the canine cruciate ligament complex.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Vaughan-Thomas, A; Spiller, D G; Clegg, P D; Innes, J F; Comerford, E J

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology may reflect the mechanical environment of tissues and influence tissue physiology and response to injury. Normal cruciate ligaments (CLs) from disease-free stifle joints were harvested from dog breeds with a high (Labrador retriever) and low (Greyhound) risk of cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture. Antibodies against the cytoskeletal components vimentin and alpha tubulin were used to analyse cell morphology; nuclei were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and images were collected using conventional and confocal microscopy. Both cranial and caudal CLs contained cells of heterogenous morphologies. Cells were arranged between collagen bundles and frequently had cytoplasmic processes. Some of these processes were long (type A cells), others were shorter, thicker and more branched (type B cells), and some had no processes (type C cells). Processes were frequently shown to contact other cells, extending longitudinally and transversely through the CLs. Cells with longer processes had fusiform nuclei, and those with no processes had rounded nuclei and were more frequent in the mid-substance of both CLs. Cells with long processes were more commonly noted in the CLs of the Greyhound. As contact between cells may facilitate direct communication, variances in cell morphology between breeds at a differing risk of CCL rupture may reflect differences in CL physiology.

  15. Relationship of cranial robusticity to cranial form, geography and climate in Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Baab, Karen L; Freidline, Sarah E; Wang, Steven L; Hanson, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Variation in cranial robusticity among modern human populations is widely acknowledged but not well-understood. While the use of "robust" cranial traits in hominin systematics and phylogeny suggests that these characters are strongly heritable, this hypothesis has not been tested. Alternatively, cranial robusticity may be a response to differences in diet/mastication or it may be an adaptation to cold, harsh environments. This study quantifies the distribution of cranial robusticity in 14 geographically widespread human populations, and correlates this variation with climatic variables, neutral genetic distances, cranial size, and cranial shape. With the exception of the occipital torus region, all traits were positively correlated with each other, suggesting that they should not be treated as individual characters. While males are more robust than females within each of the populations, among the independent variables (cranial shape, size, climate, and neutral genetic distances), only shape is significantly correlated with inter-population differences in robusticity. Two-block partial least-squares analysis was used to explore the relationship between cranial shape (captured by three-dimensional landmark data) and robusticity across individuals. Weak support was found for the hypothesis that robusticity was related to mastication as the shape associated with greater robusticity was similar to that described for groups that ate harder-to-process diets. Specifically, crania with more prognathic faces, expanded glabellar and occipital regions, and (slightly) longer skulls were more robust than those with rounder vaults and more orthognathic faces. However, groups with more mechanically demanding diets (hunter-gatherers) were not always more robust than groups practicing some form of agriculture.

  16. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  17. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  18. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  19. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  20. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  1. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  2. Neuromuscular Ultrasound of Cranial Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Eman A.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed. PMID:25851889

  3. Cranial mononeuropathy III - diabetic type

    MedlinePlus

    ... diabetic type of cranial mononeuropathy III is a complication of diabetes . It causes double vision and eyelid drooping . ... Cooper ME, Vinik AI, Plutzky J, Boulton AJM. Complications of diabetes mellitus. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, Kronenberg ...

  4. Overview of the Cranial Nerves

    MedlinePlus

    ... and toxins. Some cranial nerve disorders interfere with eye movement. Eye movement is controlled by 3 pairs of muscles. These ... be able to move their eyes normally. How eye movement is affected depends on which nerve is affected. ...

  5. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament calcification

    PubMed Central

    Koukoulias, Nikolaos E; Papastergiou, Stergios G

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of calcified posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A 61-year-old female presented in our department reporting 12 months history of knee pain that was getting worse during the night. The patient was under medication for epileptic seizure, osteoporosis and hyperthyroidism. X-rays demonstrated calcification of the PCL. CT and MRI excluded any other intra-articular and extra-articular pathology. Arthroscopic debridement of the calcium deposits was performed and the symptoms resolved immediately, while the postoperative x-rays were normal. Histological examination confirmed the calcium nature of the lesion. Two years postoperatively the patient remains asymptomatic. PMID:22669889

  6. Cruciate retaining and cruciate substituting ultra-congruent insert

    PubMed Central

    Deledda, Davide; Rosso, Federica; Ratto, Nicola; Bruzzone, Matteo; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) conservation and the polyethylene insert constraint in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still debated. The PCL is one of the primary stabilizers of the joint, but cruciate retaining (CR) implants have the disadvantage of a difficult balancing of the PCL. Postero-stabilized (PS) implants were introduced to reduce this problem. However, also the PS implants have some disadvantages, due to the cam-mechanism, such as high risk of cam-mechanism polyethylene wear. To minimize the polyethylene wear of the cam-mechanism and the bone sacrifice due to the intercondylar box, different types of inserts were developed, trying to increase the implant conformity and to reduce stresses on the bone-implant interface. In this scenario ultra-congruent (UC) inserts were developed. Those inserts are characterized by a high anterior wall and a deep-dished plate. This conformation should guarantee a good stability without the posterior cam. Few studies on both kinematic and clinical outcomes of UC inserts are available. Clinical and radiological outcomes, as well as kinematic data are similar between UC mobile bearing (MB) and standard PS MB inserts at short to mid-term follow-up. In this manuscript biomechanics and clinical outcomes of UC inserts will be described, and they will be compared to standard PS or CR inserts. PMID:26855938

  7. Cranial functional (psychogenic) movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Kaski, Diego; Bronstein, Adolfo M; Edwards, Mark J; Stone, Jon

    2015-12-01

    Functional (psychogenic) neurological symptoms are frequently encountered in neurological practice. Cranial movement disorders--affecting the eyes, face, jaw, tongue, or palate--are an under-recognised feature of patients with functional symptoms. They can present in isolation or in the context of other functional symptoms; in particular, for functional eye movements, positive clinical signs such as convergence spasms can be triggered by the clinical examination. Although the specialty of functional neurological disorders has expanded, appreciation of cranial functional movement disorders is still insufficient. Identification of the positive features of cranial functional movement disorders such as convergence and unilateral platysmal spasm might lend diagnostic weight to a suspected functional neurological disorder. Understanding of the differential diagnosis, which is broad and includes many organic causes (eg, stroke), is essential to make an early and accurate diagnosis to prevent complications and initiate appropriate management. Increased understanding of these disorders is also crucial to drive clinical trials and studies of individually tailored therapies.

  8. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Adib F, Curtis C, Bienkowski P Micheli LJ. Posterior cruciate ligament sprain. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, ...

  9. Anterior Cruciate: Methods of Physical Examination

    PubMed Central

    Grant, John; Kirby, R. Lee

    1982-01-01

    Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament is a common, serious injury. Since the long-range consequences of uncorrected anterior cruciate incompetence are better understood, and surgical and rehabilitative measures improved, early accurate diagnosis is increasingly important. Besides a careful history, diagnosis requires the use of specific physical examination methods to reproduce the symptomatic subluxation (anterior shift or internal rotation) and to assess functional performance of the knee. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:21286055

  10. Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medical News Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement By Michael Rubin, MDCM, Weill Cornell Medical College; ... Gaze Palsies Palsies of Cranial Nerves That Control Eye Movement Third Cranial Nerve (Oculomotor Nerve) Palsy Fourth Cranial ...

  11. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  12. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  16. 21 CFR 882.5970 - Cranial orthosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial orthosis. 882.5970 Section 882.5970 Food... DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5970 Cranial orthosis. (a) Identification. A cranial orthosis is a device that is intended for medical purposes to apply pressure...

  17. Cranial nerve palsies in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, C J; Godoy, F; ALQahtani, E

    2015-01-01

    We review ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in childhood and highlight many of the features that differentiate these from their occurrence in adulthood. The clinical characteristics of cranial nerve palsies in childhood are affected by the child's impressive ability to repair and regenerate after injury. Thus, aberrant regeneration is very common after congenital III palsy; Duane syndrome, the result of early repair after congenital VI palsy, is invariably associated with retraction of the globe in adduction related to the innervation of the lateral rectus by the III nerve causing co-contraction in adduction. Clinical features that may be of concern in adulthood may not be relevant in childhood; whereas the presence of mydriasis in III palsy suggests a compressive aetiology in adults, this is not the case in children. However, the frequency of associated CNS abnormalities in III palsy and the risk of tumour in VI palsy can be indications for early neuroimaging depending on presenting features elicited through a careful history and clinical examination. The latter should include the neighbouring cranial nerves. We discuss the impact of our evolving knowledge of congenital cranial dysinnervation syndromes on this field. PMID:25572578

  18. Inferior Lateral Genicular Artery Injury during Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lamo-Espinosa, J. M.; Llombart Blanco, R.; Valentí, J. R.

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of inferior lateral genicular artery (ILG) injury during anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery with lateral partial meniscectomy. This is a rare arthroscopy complication. A review of the literature has been made with the aim to define the anatomy of ILG across the lateral articular line and the risk of lesion during knee arthroscopy. We propose embolization as a good treatment option for this type of injuries. PMID:22957293

  19. The controversy of cranial bone motion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J S; Witt, P L

    1997-08-01

    Cranial bone motion continues to stimulate controversy. This controversy affects the general acceptance of some intervention methods used by physical therapists, namely, cranial osteopathic and craniosacral therapy techniques. Core to these intervention techniques is the belief that cranial bone mobility provides a compliant system where somatic dysfunction can occur and therapeutic techniques can be applied. Diversity of opinion over the truth of this concept characterizes differing viewpoints on the anatomy and physiology of the cranial complex. Literature on cranial bone motion was reviewed for the purpose of better understanding this topic. Published research overall was scant and inconclusive. Animal and human studies demonstrate a potential for small magnitude motion. Physical therapists should carefully scrutinize the literature presented as evidence for cranial bone motion. Further research is needed to resolve this controversy. Outcomes research, however, is needed to validate cranial bone mobilization as an effective treatment.

  20. Cranial kinesis in palaeognathous birds.

    PubMed

    Gussekloo, Sander W S; Bout, Ron G

    2005-09-01

    Cranial kinesis in birds is induced by muscles located caudal on the cranium. These forces are transferred onto the moveable parts of the skull via the Pterygoid-Palatinum Complex (PPC). This bony structure therefore plays an essential role in cranial kinesis. In palaeognathous birds the morphology of the PPC is remarkably different from that of neognathous birds and is thought to be related to the specific type of cranial kinesis in palaeognaths known as central rhynchokinesis. We determined whether clear bending zones as found in neognaths are present in the upper bill of paleognaths, and measured bending forces opposing elevation of the upper bill. A static force model was used to calculate the opening forces that can be produced by some of the palaeognathous species. We found that no clear bending zones are present in the upper bill, and bending is expected to occur over the whole length of the upper bill. Muscle forces are more than sufficient to overcome bending forces and to elevate the upper bill. The resistance against bending by the bony elements alone is very low, which might indicate that bending of bony elements can occur during food handling when muscles are not used to stabilise the upper bill. Model calculations suggest that the large processi basipterygoidei play a role in stabilizing the skull elements, when birds have to resist external opening forces on the upper bill as might occur during tearing leafs from plants. We conclude that the specific morphology of the palaeognathous upper bill and PPC are not designed for active cranial kinesis, but are adapted to resist external forces that might cause unwanted elevation of the upper bill during feeding.

  1. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  2. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Choices

    PubMed Central

    Macaulay, Alec A.; Perfetti, Dean C.; Levine, William N.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a common surgical procedure; however, there is no consensus to what the best graft option is to replace the injured ACL. The main options available consist of allografts and autografts, which include patellar tendon, hamstring tendon, and quadriceps tendon autografts. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in August 2010 for English-language articles pertaining to ACL grafts. Results: Postoperative outcome variables were analyzed to determine similarities and differences among the different graft options. These variables include stability, strength, function, return to sports, patient satisfaction, complications, and cost. Conclusions: Both allografts and the 3 main options for autografts can provide excellent results in ACL reconstruction and lead to a high percentage of satisfied patients. However, differences exist among the graft choices. Both the similarities and the differences are important to discuss with a patient who will be undergoing ACL reconstruction so that he or she has the best information available when making a choice of graft. PMID:23016071

  3. Cranial kinesis in the amphibia: a review.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiĭ, N N

    2000-01-01

    All extant orders of amphibians are characterized by kinetic skulls. Main type of intracranial movability in amphibians is pleurokinetism, that is supplemented in different amphibian groups by various types of rhyncho- and prokinetism. The most primitive pattern of cranial kinesis is revealed in the stegocrotaphic gymnophions. More paedomorphic species retain general cranial flexibility that is characteristic of larval skull. That is unfavourable for evolution of well-regulated (adult) cranial kinesis and related feeding adaptations. Kinetism is also reduced in the species with heavily ossified skulls. Adaptive role and evolution of cranial kinesis in amphibians are discussed.

  4. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk: A 3D Tutorial of Cranial Nerves in a Virtual Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways…

  5. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  6. Biomaterials for reconstruction of cranial defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tao; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of cranial defect is commonly performed in neurosurgical operations. Many materials have been employed for repairing cranial defects. In this paper, materials used for cranioplasty, including autografts, allografts, and synthetic biomaterials are comprehensively reviewed. This paper also gives future perspective of the materials and development trend of manufacturing process for cranioplasty implants.

  7. Cranial base evolution within the hominin clade

    PubMed Central

    Nevell, L; Wood, B

    2008-01-01

    The base of the cranium (i.e. the basioccipital, the sphenoid and the temporal bones) is of particular interest because it undergoes significant morphological change within the hominin clade, and because basicranial morphology features in several hominin species diagnoses. We use a parsimony analysis of published cranial and dental data to predict the cranial base morphology expected in the hypothetical last common ancestor of the Pan–Homo clade. We also predict the primitive condition of the cranial base for the hominin clade, and document the evolution of the cranial base within the major subclades within the hominin clade. This analysis suggests that cranial base morphology has continued to evolve in the hominin clade, both before and after the emergence of the genus Homo. PMID:18380865

  8. Surgical treatment of cranial neuralgias.

    PubMed

    Franzini, Angelo; Ferroli, Paolo; Messina, Giuseppe; Broggi, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    The most common types of cranial neuralgias amenable to surgical therapeutic options are trigeminal neuralgia and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, the former having an approximate incidence of 5/100000 cases per year and the latter of 0.05/100000 cases per year. Surgical therapy of these pathological conditions encompasses several strategies, going from ablative procedures to neurovascular decompression, to radiosurgery. The choice of the most appropriate surgical option (which must be taken into account when all conservative treatments have proven to be unsuccessful) has to take into account many factors, the most important ones being neuroradiological evidence of a neurovascular conflict, severity of symptoms, the age and clinical history of the patient, and the patient's overall medical condition. In this chapter we report our experience with the treatment of trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia, describing the surgical procedures performed and reviewing the most recent aspects on this subject in the past literature.

  9. Visual biofeedback exercises for improving body balance control after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Molka, Alicja Zyta; Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of balance training after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients (mean 33 ± 8 years old) who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction three months prior to participating in a one-month rehabilitation program. The control group included 15 people aged 34 ± 4 years. Patients’ functional level was evaluated according to the Lysholm knee score, and balance quality was ascertained by static and dynamic tests. A balance platform was used to measure the center of foot pressure deflection. Two dynamic balance tests evaluated time of task execution. [Results] Lysholm knee score improved significantly after rehabilitation. Balance in the sagittal plane with eyes closed improved significantly after rehabilitation. The average velocity of center of foot pressure swing in both the frontal and sagittal planes with eyes closed differed significantly from those of controls. Execution time required for the two dynamic tests decreased significantly after rehabilitation and were significantly better than those in the controls. [Conclusion] Maintaining static balance with eyes closed is very challenging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Maintaining balance in the sagittal plane is particularly difficult. A one-month rehabilitation program partially improves static and dynamic balance. PMID:26311983

  10. Bilateral ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments: a case report.

    PubMed

    Willis-Owen, Charles A; Konyves, Arpad; Martin, David K

    2010-08-01

    Symptomatic ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments are rare, and bilateral cases are extremely rare, with only one reported case in the literature. We report a case of bilateral cruciate ligament ganglion cysts successfully treated with arthroscopic resection, and review the literature regarding aetiology, diagnosis and management.

  11. CT measurments of cranial growth: normal subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.J.; Chu, W.K.; Cheung, J.Y.

    1984-06-01

    Growth patterns of the cranium measured directly as head circumference have been well documented. With the availability of computed tomography (CT) , cranial dimensions can be obtained easily. The objective of this project was to establish the mean values and their normal variance of CT cranial area of subjects at different ages. Cranial area and its long and short axes were measured on CT scans for 215 neurologic patients of a wide age range who presented no evidence of abnormal growth of head size. Growth patterns of the cranial area as well as the numeric product of it linear dimensions were determined via a curve fitting process. The patterns resemble that of the head circumference growth chart, with the most rapid growth observed in the first 12 months of age and reaching full size during adolescence.

  12. Intra cranial complications of tuberculous otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, M.; Johnny, J. Carlton

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infections in the world. It is seen that tuberculous otitis media (TOM) is almost secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis. In this review we have tried to deal with all the aspects of the intra cranial complications of TOM such as tuberculoma, otitic hydrocephalus, brain abscess and tuberculous meningitis. The aspects covered in this review are the pathology, clinical features, and investigations of the intra cranial manifestations. PMID:26015748

  13. Cranial kinesis in gekkonid lizards

    PubMed

    Herrel; De Vree F; Delheusy; Gans

    1999-12-01

    Cranial kinesis was studied in two species of gekkonid lizard, Gekko gecko and Phelsuma madagascariensis, using cineradiography and electromyography. The skull of these geckoes showed the three types of kinesis described by Versluys at the beginning of this century: streptostyly, mesokinesis and metakinesis. In accordance with the later model of Frazzetta, the skull of these animals can be modelled by a quadratic crank system: when the mouth opens during feeding, the quadrate rotates forward, the palato-maxillary unit is lifted and the occipital unit swings forward. During jaw closing, the inverse movements are observed; during crushing, the system is retracted beyond its resting position. The data gathered here indicate that the coupled kinesis (streptostyly + mesokinesis) is most prominently present during the capture and crushing cycles of feeding and is largely absent during late intraoral transport, swallowing, drinking and breathing. The electromyographic data indicate a consistent pattern of muscular activation, with the jaw opener and pterygoid protractor always active during the fast opening phase, and the jaw closers active during closing and crushing. Our data generally support the model of Frazzetta. Although the data gathered here do not allow speculation on the functional significance of the kinesis, they clearly provide some key elements required for a further investigation of the functional and adaptive basis of the system.

  14. [Computed tomography and cranial paleoanthropology].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain; Badawi-Fayad, Jackie; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Istoc, Adrian; de Lumley, Henry; de Lumley, Marie-Antoinette; Coppens, Yves

    2007-06-01

    Since its invention in 1972, computed tomography (C.T.) has significantly evolved. With the advent of multi-slice detectors (500 times more sensitive than conventional radiography) and high-powered computer programs, medical applications have also improved. CT is now contributing to paleoanthropological research. Its non-destructive nature is the biggest advantage for studying fossil skulls. The second advantage is the possibility of image analysis, storage, and transmission. Potential disadvantages include the possible loss of files and the need to keep up with rapid technological advances. Our experience since the late 1970s, and a recent PhD thesis, led us to describe routine applications of this method. The main contributions of CT to cranial paleoanthropology are five-fold: --Numerical anatomy with rapid acquisition and high spatial resolution (helicoidal and multidetector CT) offering digital storage and stereolithography (3D printing). --Numerical biometry (2D and 3D) can be used to create "normograms" such as the 3D craniofacial reference model used in maxillofacial surgery. --Numerical analysis offers thorough characterization of the specimen and its state of conservation and/or restoration. --From "surrealism" to virtual imaging, anatomical structures can be reconstructed, providing access to hidden or dangerous zones. --The time dimension (4D imaging) confers movement and the possibility for endoscopic simulation and internal navigation (see Iconography). New technical developments will focus on data processing and networking. It remains our duty to deal respectfully with human fossils.

  15. Giant-cell arteritis without cranial manifestations

    PubMed Central

    de Boysson, Hubert; Lambert, Marc; Liozon, Eric; Boutemy, Jonathan; Maigné, Gwénola; Ollivier, Yann; Ly, Kim; Manrique, Alain; Bienvenu, Boris; Aouba, Achille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diagnosis of giant-cell arteritis (GCA) is challenging in the absence of cardinal cranial symptoms/signs. We aimed to describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic process, and disease course of GCA patients without cranial symptoms, and to compare them to those of patients with typical cranial presentation. In this retrospective multicenter study, we enrolled patients with GCA who satisfied at least 3 of the 5 American College of Rheumatology criteria for GCA, or 2 criteria associated with contributory vascular biopsy other than temporal artery biopsy or with demonstration of large-vessel involvement; underwent iconographic evaluation of large arterial vessels (aortic CT scan or a positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan or cardiac echography combined with a large-vessel Doppler) at diagnosis. We divided the cohort into 2 groups, distinguishing between patients without cranial symptoms/signs (i.e., headaches, clinical temporal artery anomaly, jaw claudication, ophthalmologic symptoms) and those with cranial symptoms/signs. In the entire cohort of 143 patients, all of whom underwent vascular biopsy and vascular imaging, we detected 31 (22%) patients with no cranial symptoms/signs. In the latter, diagnosis was biopsy proven in an arterial sample in 23 cases (74% of patients, on a temporal site in 20 cases and on an extratemporal site in 3). One-third of these 31 patients displayed extracranial symptoms/signs whereas the remaining two-thirds presented only with constitutional symptoms and/or inflammatory laboratory test results. Compared to the 112 patients with cardinal cranial clinical symptoms/signs, patients without cranial manifestations displayed lower levels of inflammatory laboratory parameters (C-reactive level: 68 [9–250] mg/L vs 120 [3–120] mg/L; P < 0.01), highest rate of aorta and aortic branch involvement identified (19/31 (61%) vs 42/112 (38%); P = 0.02) and also

  16. Concurrent cranial mediastinal Blastomyces granuloma and carcinoma with cranial vena caval syndrome in a dog.

    PubMed

    Evans, Natashia A; Viviano, Katrina R

    2015-11-01

    This report describes an unusual progression of blastomycosis in a dog with concurrent mediastinal carcinoma. The dog was evaluated for respiratory distress. Diagnostic results revealed chylothorax and a cranial vena caval thrombus. Histopathology of the cranial mediastinal mass diagnosed mediastinal carcinoma and fungal granuloma. Intercurrent disease may complicate the clinical presentation and clinical course of blastomycosis.

  17. The cranial endoskeleton of Tiktaalik roseae.

    PubMed

    Downs, Jason P; Daeschler, Edward B; Jenkins, Farish A; Shubin, Neil H

    2008-10-16

    Among the morphological changes that occurred during the 'fish-to-tetrapod' transition was a marked reorganization of the cranial endoskeleton. Details of this transition, including the sequence of character acquisition, have not been evident from the fossil record. Here we describe the braincase, palatoquadrate and branchial skeleton of Tiktaalik roseae, the Late Devonian sarcopterygian fish most closely related to tetrapods. Although retaining a primitive configuration in many respects, the cranial endoskeleton of T. roseae shares derived features with tetrapods such as a large basal articulation and a flat, horizontally oriented entopterygoid. Other features in T. roseae, like the short, straight hyomandibula, show morphology intermediate between the condition observed in more primitive fish and that observed in tetrapods. The combination of characters in T. roseae helps to resolve the relative timing of modifications in the cranial endoskeleton. The sequence of modifications suggests changes in head mobility and intracranial kinesis that have ramifications for the origin of vertebrate terrestriality.

  18. Pediatric neuroradiology: Cerebral and cranial diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Diebler, C.; Dulac, O.

    1987-01-01

    In this book, a neuroradiologist and a neuropediatrician have combined forces to provide the widest possible knowledge in investigating cranial and cerebral disorders in infancy and childhood. Based on more than 20,000 pediatric CT examinations, with a follow-up time often exceeding ten years, the book aims to bridge interdisciplinary gaps and help radiologists, pediatricians and neurosurgeons solve the various problems of pediatric neuroradiology that frequently confront them. For each disease, the etiology, clinical manifestation, pathological lesions and radiological presentations are discussed, supported by extensive illustrations. Malformative, vascular, traumatic, tumoral, infectious and metabolic diseases are reviewed. Miscellaneous conditions presenting particular symptoms or syndromes are also studied, such as hydrocephalus and neurological complications of leukemia. Contents: Cerebral and cranial malformations; neurocutaneous syndromes; inherited metabolic diseases; infectious diseases - vascular disorders; intracranial tumors; cranial trauma - miscellaneous and subject index.

  19. The cranial nerve skywalk: A 3D tutorial of cranial nerves in a virtual platform.

    PubMed

    Richardson-Hatcher, April; Hazzard, Matthew; Ramirez-Yanez, German

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of the complex courses of the cranial nerves by students in the health-related professions is challenging through either diagrams in books or plastic models in the gross laboratory. Furthermore, dissection of the cranial nerves in the gross laboratory is an extremely meticulous task. Teaching and learning the cranial nerve pathways is difficult using two-dimensional (2D) illustrations alone. Three-dimensional (3D) models aid the teacher in describing intricate and complex anatomical structures and help students visualize them. The study of the cranial nerves can be supplemented with 3D, which permits the students to fully visualize their distribution within the craniofacial complex. This article describes the construction and usage of a virtual anatomy platform in Second Life™, which contains 3D models of the cranial nerves III, V, VII, and IX. The Cranial Nerve Skywalk features select cranial nerves and the associated autonomic pathways in an immersive online environment. This teaching supplement was introduced to groups of pre-healthcare professional students in gross anatomy courses at both institutions and student feedback is included.

  20. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlke, Julia M.; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  1. Cranial symmetry in baleen whales (Cetacea, Mysticeti) and the occurrence of cranial asymmetry throughout cetacean evolution.

    PubMed

    Fahlke, Julia M; Hampe, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Odontoceti and Mysticeti (toothed and baleen whales) originated from Eocene archaeocetes that had evolved from terrestrial artiodactyls. Cranial asymmetry is known in odontocetes that can hear ultrasound (>20,000 Hz) and has been linked to the split function of the nasal passage in breathing and vocalization. Recent results indicate that archaeocetes also had asymmetric crania. Their asymmetry has been linked to directional hearing in water, although hearing frequencies are still under debate. Mysticetes capable of low-frequency and infrasonic hearing (<20 Hz) are assumed to have symmetric crania. This study aims to resolve whether mysticete crania are indeed symmetric and whether mysticete cranial symmetry is plesiomorphic or secondary. Cranial shape was analyzed applying geometric morphometrics to three-dimensional (3D) cranial models of fossil and modern mysticetes, Eocene archaeocetes, modern artiodactyls, and modern odontocetes. Statistical tests include analysis of variance, principal components analysis, and discriminant function analysis. Results suggest that symmetric shape difference reflects general trends in cetacean evolution. Asymmetry includes significant fluctuating and directional asymmetry, the latter being very small. Mysticete crania are as symmetric as those of terrestrial artiodactyls and archaeocetes, without significant differences within Mysticeti. Odontocete crania are more asymmetric. These results indicate that (1) all mysticetes have symmetric crania, (2) archaeocete cranial asymmetry is not conspicuous in most of the skull but may yet be conspicuous in the rostrum, (3) directional cranial asymmetry is an odontocete specialization, and (4) directional cranial asymmetry is more likely related to echolocation than hearing.

  2. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra; Beynnon, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are immediately disabling and are associated with long-term consequences, such as posttraumatic osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 2 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors for ACL injury. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in parts 1 and 2. Twenty-one focused on hormonal, genetic, cognitive function, previous injury, and extrinsic risk factors. Conclusions: Several risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex, prior reconstruction of the ACL, and familial predisposition. These risk factors most likely act in combination with the anatomic factors reviewed in part 1 of this series to influence the risk of suffering ACL injury. PMID:23016083

  3. Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Gautam M; Nha, Kyung Wook; Patil, Sachin P; Chae, Dong Ju; Kang, Ki Hoon; Yoon, Jung Ro; Choo, Suk Kyu; Yi, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Baek, Jong Ryoon

    2008-08-01

    Ganglion cysts of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) are uncommon lesions found incidentally on MRI and arthroscopy. Twenty patients (11 males and nine females) with the mean age of 35 years presenting with a variety of knee signs and symptoms were found to have PCL cysts on MRI. Out of these, thirteen patients (65%) had isolated symptomatic PCL cysts and seven patients had associated chondral and meniscal lesions. Eight out of the 20 patients (40%) gave a history of antecedent trauma. On arthroscopy, the majority of the cysts were situated at the midsubstance of the ligament with inter-cruciate distension and no involvement of the substance of the ligament. The content of the cysts varied with the majority having yellowish viscous fluid and three containing serous and bloody fluid. All cysts were successfully treated arthroscopically through standard anterior, posteromedial and posterolateral portals with no signs of recurrence on MRI at a mean followup of 24 months. PCL cysts may clinically mimic meniscal or chondral lesions and preoperatively, MRI is essential for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts arising from the PCL. Ganglion cysts of the PCL can be successfully treated arthroscopically using standard portals.

  4. Biologic agents for anterior cruciate ligament healing: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Loibl, Markus; Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Zellner, Johannes; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIM To systematically review the currently available literature concerning the application of biologic agents such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells to promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed on the use of biologic agents (i.e., PRP or stem cells) to favor ACL healing during reconstruction or repair. The following inclusion criteria for relevant articles were used: Clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English language, on the use of PRP or stem cells during ACL reconstruction/repair. Exclusion criteria were articles written in other languages, reviews, or studies analyzing other applications of PRP/stem cells in knee surgery not related to promoting ACL healing. RESULTS The database search identified 394 records that were screened. A total of 23 studies were included in the final analysis: In one paper stem cells were applied for ACL healing, in one paper there was a concomitant application of PRP and stem cells, whereas in the remaining 21 papers PRP was used. Based on the ACL injury pattern, two papers investigated biologic agents in ACL partial tears whereas 21 papers in ACL reconstruction. Looking at the quality of the available literature, 17 out of 21 studies dealing with ACL reconstruction were randomized controlled trials. Both studies on ACL repair were case series. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of clinical trials investigating the role of stem cells in promoting ACL healing both in case of partial and complete tears. The role of PRP is still controversial and the only advantage emerging from the literature is related to a better graft maturation over time, without documenting beneficial effects in terms of clinical outcome, bone-graft integration and prevention of bony tunnel enlargement. PMID:27672573

  5. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base.

  6. Messenger ribonucleic acid levels in disrupted human anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Lo, Ian K Y; Marchuk, Linda; Hart, David A; Frank, Cyril B

    2003-02-01

    Thirty patients had anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction for ongoing instability. Two groups were defined according to gross morphologic features identified during reconstruction: anterior cruciate ligament disruptions with scars attached to a structure in the joint and disruptions without reattachments. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for a subset of extracellular matrix molecules, proteinases, and proteinase inhibitors was done on samples of scarred anterior cruciate ligament tissue removed during reconstructive surgery. Results of the nonattached scar group showed significantly increased mRNA levels for Type I collagen, and an increased Type I to Type III collagen ratio compared with that for the attached scar group. In the first year after injury, decorin mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group also were significantly higher than in the attached scar group. Biglycan mRNA levels in the nonattached scar group correlated closely with Type I collagen mRNA levels. These results suggest differences in cellular expression in torn anterior cruciate ligaments that attach to structures in the joint versus those which do not. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for these differences have not been delineated, different molecular signals may influence the gross morphologic features of anterior cruciate ligament disruptions or alternatively, differing gross morphologic features may be subject to different mechanical loads leading to altered molecular expression. However, the finding of endogenous cellular activity in injured anterior cruciate ligaments raises the possibility that this activity may be enhanced to improve outcomes.

  7. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  8. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4325 - Cranial drill handpiece (brace).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial drill handpiece (brace). 882.4325 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4325 Cranial drill handpiece (brace). (a) Identification. A cranial drill handpiece (brace) is a hand holder, which is...

  15. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  16. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  17. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  18. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  19. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  20. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  1. 38 CFR 4.123 - Neuritis, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Neuritis, cranial or....123 Neuritis, cranial or peripheral. Neuritis, cranial or peripheral, characterized by loss of... the scale provided for injury of the nerve involved, with a maximum equal to severe,...

  2. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  3. [From anatomy to image: the cranial nerves at MRI].

    PubMed

    Conforti, Renata; Marrone, Valeria; Sardaro, Angela; Faella, Pierluigi; Grassi, Roberta; Cappabianca, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review the expected course of each of the 12 cranial nerves. Traditional magnetic resonance imaging depicts only the larger cranial nerves but SSFP sequences of magnetic resonance imaging are capable of depicting the cisternal segments of 12 cranial nerves and also provide submillimetric spatial resolution.

  4. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  5. 38 CFR 4.124 - Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Neuralgia, cranial or....124 Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral. Neuralgia, cranial or peripheral, characterized usually by a dull and intermittent pain, of typical distribution so as to identify the nerve, is to be rated on...

  6. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  7. 21 CFR 882.4360 - Electric cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electric cranial drill motor. 882.4360 Section 882...) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices § 882.4360 Electric cranial drill motor. (a) Identification. An electric cranial drill motor is an electrically operated power source...

  8. Cranial kinesis in geckoes: functional implications.

    PubMed

    Herrel, A; Aerts, P; De Vree, F

    2000-05-01

    Although it is generally assumed that cranial kinesis is a plesiomorphic characteristic in squamates, experimental data tend to contradict this hypothesis. In particular, coupled kinesis (i.e. streptostyly and mesokinesis) presumably arose independently in only a limited number of highly specialised groups. In this study, we investigated cranial kinesis in one of the most specialised of these groups: geckoes. On the basis of cineradiographic and electromyographic data, the fast opening and the slow closing/power stroke phases were modelled to elucidate possible functions of the observed kinesis. The results of these analyses show that the retraction of the muzzle unit during crushing is a self-reinforcing system that increases bite force and reduces the joint forces; the active protraction of the kinetic system during jaw opening, in contrast, enhances opening speed through the coupling of the intracranial units. It can be argued that cranial kinesis in geckoes is probably not an adaptive trait as such but, instead, a consequence of the 'Bauplan' of the cranial system in these animals. Presumably as a result of constructional constraints on the size of the jaw musculature and eyes, the supratemporal and postorbital bars were lost, which resulted in enormous mobility in the skull. To counteract the potential negative factors associated with this (decrease in bite force, skull damage), the kinetic system may have become coupled, and thus functional.

  9. Entrainment and the cranial rhythmic impulse.

    PubMed

    McPartland, J M; Mein, E A

    1997-01-01

    Entrainment is the integration or harmonization of oscillators. All organisms pulsate with myriad electrical and mechanical rhythms. Many of these rhythms emanate from synchronized pulsating cells (eg, pacemaker cells, cortical neurons). The cranial rhythmic impulse is an oscillation recognized by many bodywork practitioners, but the functional origin of this impulse remains uncertain. We propose that the cranial rhythmic impulse is the palpable perception of entrainment, a harmonic frequency that incorporates the rhythms of multiple biological oscillators. It is derived primarily from signals between the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. Entrainment also arises between organisms. The harmonizing of coupled oscillators into a single, dominant frequency is called frequency-selective entrainment. We propose that this phenomenon is the modus operandi of practitioners who use the cranial rhythmic impulse in craniosacral treatment. Dominant entrainment is enhanced by "centering," a technique practiced by many healers, for example, practitioners of Chinese, Tibetan, and Ayurvedic medicine. We explore the connections between centering, the cranial rhythmic impulse, and craniosacral treatment.

  10. [Third cranial nerve palsy in sphenoid sinusitis].

    PubMed

    Dores, Luís Almeida; Simão, Marco Alveirinho; Marques, Marta Canas; Dias, Éscar

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus disease is particular not only for its clinical presentation, as well as their complications. Although rare, these may present as cranial nerve deficits, so it is important to have a high index of suspicion and be familiar with its diagnosis and management. Symptoms are often nonspecific, but the most common are headache, changes in visual acuity and diplopia due to dysfunction of one or more ocular motor nerves. The authors report a case of a 59 years-old male, who was referred to the ENT emergency department with frontal headaches for one week which had progressively worsened and were associated, since the last 12 hours, with diplopia caused by left third cranial nerve palsy. Neurologic examination was normal aside from the left third cranial nerve palsy. Anterior and posterior rhinoscopy excluded the presence of nasal masses and purulent rhinorrhea. The CT scan revealed a soft tissue component and erosion of the roof of the left sphenoid sinus. Patient was admitted for intravenous antibiotics and steroids treatment without any benefit after 48 hours. He was submitted to endoscopic sinus surgery with resolution of the symptoms 10 days after surgery. The authors present this case for its rarity focusing on the importance of differential diagnosis in patients with headaches and cranial nerves palsies.

  11. Late cranial MRI after cranial irradiation in survivors of childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Pääkkö, E; Talvensaari, K; Pyhtinen, J; Lanning, M

    1994-11-01

    We carried out MRI on 43 survivors of childhood cancer after different treatment protocols with or without cranial radiotherapy. They were free of disease, therapy having been discontinued 2-20 years earlier. Treatment had been for various malignancies, excluding brain tumours; 27 had received cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) or lymphoma. Two asymptomatic young women treated for ALL had falx meningiomas. White matter changes, low intensity foci (representing calcification or old haemorrhage) and heterogeneous intensity focic old haemorrhages) were seen only in patients who had undergone radiotherapy. Because of the possibility of benign, potentially curable brain tumours occurring after cranial irradiation, it may be wise to carry out occasional cranial imaging in the follow-up of these patients. No routine imaging follow-up is needed after chemotherapy alone.

  12. Cranial Bosses of Choerosaurus dejageri (Therapsida, Therocephalia): Earliest Evidence of Cranial Display Structures in Eutheriodonts

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Julien; Manger, Paul R.; Fernandez, Vincent; Rubidge, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Choerosaurus dejageri, a non-mammalian eutheriodont therapsid from the South African late Permian (~259 Ma), has conspicuous hemispheric cranial bosses on the maxilla and the mandible. These bosses, the earliest of this nature in a eutheriodont, potentially make C. dejageri a key species for understanding the evolutionary origins of sexually selective behaviours (intraspecific competition, ritualized sexual and intimidation displays) associated with cranial outgrowths at the root of the clade that eventually led to extant mammals. Comparison with the tapinocephalid dinocephalian Moschops capensis, a therapsid in which head butting is strongly supported, shows that the delicate structure of the cranial bosses and the gracile structure of the skull of Choerosaurus would be more suitable for display and low energy combat than vigorous head butting. Thus, despite the fact that Choerosaurus is represented by only one skull (which makes it impossible to address the question of sexual dimorphism), its cranial bosses are better interpreted as structures involved in intraspecific selection, i.e. low-energy fighting or display. Display structures, such as enlarged canines and cranial bosses, are widespread among basal therapsid clades and are also present in the putative basal therapsid Tetraceratops insignis. This suggests that sexual selection may have played a more important role in the distant origin and evolution of mammals earlier than previously thought. Sexual selection may explain the subsequent independent evolution of cranial outgrowths and pachyostosis in different therapsid lineages (Biarmosuchia, Dinocephalia, Gorgonopsia and Dicynodontia). PMID:27548428

  13. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Paschos, Nikolaos K

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a traumatic event that can lead to significant functional impairment and inability to participate in high-level sports-related activities. ACL reconstruction is considered the treatment of choice for symptomatic ACL-deficient patients and can assist in full functional recovery. Furthermore, ACL reconstruction restores ligamentous stability to normal, and, therefore, can potentially fully reinstate kinematics of the knee joint. As a consequence, the natural history of ACL injury could be potentially reversed via ACL reconstruction. Evidence from the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of ACL reconstruction in preventing the development of knee cartilage degeneration. This editorial aims to present recent high-level evidence in an attempt to answer whether ACL injury inevitably leads to osteoarthritis and whether ACL reconstruction can prevent this development or not. PMID:28361013

  14. Infections in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Stucken, Charlton; Garras, David N.; Shaner, Julie L.; Cohen, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a safe, common, and effective method of restoring stability to the knee after injury, but evolving techniques of reconstruction carry inherent risk. Infection after ACL reconstruction, while rare, carries a high morbidity, potentially resulting in a poor clinical outcome. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from previously published peer-reviewed literature through a search of the entire PubMed database (up to December 2012) as well as from textbook chapters. Results: Treatment with culture-specific antibiotics and debridement with graft retention is recommended as initial treatment, but with persistent infection, consideration should be given to graft removal. Graft type likely has no effect on infection rates. Conclusion: The early diagnosis of infection and appropriate treatment are necessary to avoid the complications of articular cartilage damage and arthrofibrosis. PMID:24427432

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Growing Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    AlHarby, Saleh W.

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the adult patients are thoroughly studied and published in orthopedic literature. Until recently, little was known about similar injuries in skeletally growing patients. The more frequent involvement of this age group in various athletic activities and the improved diagnostic modalities have increased the awareness and interest of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients. ACL reconstruction in growing skeleton is controversial and carries some risks to the tibial and femoral growth plate. A guarded approach to ACL reconstruction is recommended in skeletally immature patients. Modification of activity of ACL injured young patient, proper rehabilitation and prudent planning of adolescent age ACL reconstruction carries the least risks of growth plate violation. PMID:21475528

  16. Postoperative Infection After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gobbi, Alberto; Karnatzikos, Georgios; Chaurasia, Sanyam; Abhishek, Mudhigere; Bulgherhoni, Erica; Lane, John

    2015-01-01

    Context: Infection after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is uncommon; if it occurs, it can lead to disastrous complications. Objective: To analyze post-ACLR infections and identify related complications to provide the most effective treatment protocol. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Among approximately 1850 ACLRs performed by a single surgeon over the past 20 years, 7 cases of post-ACLR infection were identified (incidence, 0.37%). Five patients presenting with low-severity infection were successfully treated without any complication or residual functional disability. The remaining 2 patients, although successfully treated, presented with minor residual limitations. From a literature review, 16 studies including 246 cases of infection were reported among 35,795 ACLRs, making the rate of infection 0.68% (range, 0.14%-2.6%). Conclusion: With proper treatment protocols, post-ACLR infection is rare but can compromise outcomes. PMID:26603553

  17. Risk Factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Helen C.; Vacek, Pamela; Johnson, Robert J.; Slauterbeck, James R.; Hashemi, Javad; Shultz, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of the knee are immediately debilitating and can cause long-term consequences, including the early onset of osteoarthritis. It is important to have a comprehensive understanding of all possible risk factors for ACL injury to identify individuals who are at risk for future injuries and to provide an appropriate level of counseling and programs for prevention. Objective: This review, part 1 of a 2-part series, highlights what is known and still unknown regarding anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors for injury to the ACL from the current peer-reviewed literature. Data Sources: Studies were identified from MEDLINE (1951–March 2011) using the MeSH terms anterior cruciate ligament, knee injury, and risk factors. The bibliographies of relevant articles and reviews were cross-referenced to complete the search. Study Selection: Prognostic studies that utilized the case-control and prospective cohort study designs to evaluate risk factors for ACL injury were included in this review. Results: A total of 50 case-control and prospective cohort articles were included in the review, and 30 of these studies focused on neuromuscular and anatomic risk factors. Conclusions: Several anatomic and neuromuscular risk factors are associated with increased risk of suffering ACL injury—such as female sex and specific measures of bony geometry of the knee joint, including decreased intercondylar femoral notch size, decreased depth of concavity of the medial tibial plateau, increased slope of the tibial plateaus, and increased anterior-posterior knee laxity. These risk factors most likely act in combination to influence the risk of ACL injury; however, multivariate risk models that consider all the aforementioned risk factors in combination have not been established to explore this interaction. PMID:23016072

  18. [Visualization of the lower cranial nerves by 3D-FIESTA].

    PubMed

    Okumura, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takemura, Akihiro; Tsujii, Hideo; Kawahara, Kazuhiro; Matsuura, Yukihiro; Takada, Tadanori

    2005-02-20

    MR cisternography has been introduced for use in neuroradiology. This method is capable of visualizing tiny structures such as blood vessels and cranial nerves in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space because of its superior contrast resolution. The cranial nerves and small vessels are shown as structures of low intensity surrounded by marked hyperintensity of the CSF. In the present study, we evaluated visualization of the lower cranial nerves (glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory) by the three-dimensional fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (3D-FIESTA) sequence and multiplanar reformation (MPR) technique. The subjects were 8 men and 3 women, ranging in age from 21 to 76 years (average, 54 years). We examined the visualization of a total of 66 nerves in 11 subjects by 3D-FIESTA. The results were classified into four categories ranging from good visualization to non-visualization. In all cases, all glossopharyngeal and vagus nerves were identified to some extent, while accessory nerves were visualized either partially or entirely in only 16 cases. The total visualization rate was about 91%. In conclusion, 3D-FIESTA may be a useful method for visualization of the lower cranial nerves.

  19. Paedogenesis in european newts (Triturus: salamandridae): cranial morphology during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Djorović, A; Kalezić, M L

    2000-02-01

    A cross-sectional analysis using different ontogenetic stages (larvae, juveniles, paedotypic, and metamorphic adults) of the smooth newt, Triturus vulgaris, and the alpine newt, T.alpestris, revealed a broad spectrum of perennibranchiation influences on cranial ontogeny in European newts, more pronounced than previously thought. These influences included marked variation in ossification levels, pronounced morphometric variability of many cranial elements, and considerable skull shape changes in the transition from larvae to the adult stage. In comparison with metamorphosed individuals, paedotypic newts had a higher level of variability in both individual cranial traits and cranial shape changes. Sexual size difference of the skull traits was mostly negligible, especially in comparison to the influence of paedogenesis. The main changes in cranial shape of the European newts occurred during metamorphosis. Cranial morphological organization in the majority of examined paedotypes corresponds to cranial organization at late larval stages prior to metamorphosis or at the onset of metamorphosis.

  20. Cranial Nerve Disorders in Children: MR Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Yoon, Hee Mang; Jung, Ah Young; Cho, Young Ah; Lee, Jin Seong; Yoon, Chong Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cranial nerve disorders are uncommon disease conditions encountered in pediatric patients, and can be categorized as congenital, inflammatory, traumatic, or tumorous conditions that involve the cranial nerve itself or propagation of the disorder from adjacent organs. However, determination of the normal course, as well as abnormalities, of cranial nerves in pediatric patients is challenging because of the small caliber of the cranial nerve, as well as the small intracranial and skull base structures. With the help of recently developed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging techniques that provide higher spatial resolution and fast imaging techniques including three-dimensional MR images with or without the use of gadolinium contrast agent, radiologists can more easily diagnose disease conditions that involve the small cranial nerves, such as the oculomotor, abducens, facial, and hypoglossal nerves, as well as normal radiologic anatomy, even in very young children. If cranial nerve involvement is suspected, careful evaluation of the cranial nerves should include specific MR imaging protocols. Localization is an important consideration in cranial nerve imaging, and should cover entire pathways and target organs as much as possible. Therefore, radiologists should be familiar not only with the various diseases that cause cranial nerve dysfunction, and the entire course of each cranial nerve including the intra-axial nuclei and fibers, but also the technical considerations for optimal imaging of pediatric cranial nerves. In this article, we briefly review normal cranial nerve anatomy and imaging findings of various pediatric cranial nerve dysfunctions, as well as the technical considerations of pediatric cranial nerve imaging. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  1. Cranial neuralgias: from physiopathology to pharmacological treatment.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Roberto; Ranieri, Angelo; Bilo, Leonilda; Fiorillo, Chiara; Bonavita, Vincenzo

    2008-05-01

    Cranial neuralgias are paroxysmal painful disorders of the head characterised by some shared features such as unilaterality of symptoms, transience and recurrence of attacks, superficial and "shock-like" quality of pain and the presence of triggering factors. Although rare, these disorders must be promptly recognised as they harbour a relatively high risk for underlying compressive or inflammatory disease. Nevertheless, misdiagnosis is frequent. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias are sustained in most cases by a neurovascular conflict in the posterior fossa resulting in a hyperexcitability state of the trigeminal circuitry. If the aetiology of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and other typical neuralgias must be brought back to the peripheral injury, their pathogenesis could involve central allodynic mechanisms, which, in patients with inter-critical pain, also engage the nociceptive neurons at the thalamic-cortical level. Currently available medical treatments for TN and other cranial neuralgias are reviewed.

  2. Facial Translocation Approach to the Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Moises A.; Janecka, Ivo P.

    1991-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the nasopharyngeal region of the cranial base is difficult because of its proximity to key anatomic structures. Our laboratory study outlines the anatomic basis for a new approach to this complex topography. Dissections were performed on eight cadaver halves and two fresh specimens injected with intravascular silicone rubber compound. By utilizing facial soft tissue translocation combined with craniofacial osteotomies; a wide surgical field can be obtained at the skull base. The accessible surgical field extends from the contralateral custachian tube to the ipsilateral geniculate ganglion, including the nasopharyax; clivus, sphonoid, and cavernous sinuses, the entire infratemporal fossa, and superior orbital fissure. The facial translocation approach offers previously unavailable wide and direct exposure, with a potential for immediate reconstruction, of this complex region of the cranial base. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17170817

  3. The Morphogenesis of Cranial Sutures in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Topczewska, Jolanta M.; Shoela, Ramy A.; Tomaszewski, Joanna P.; Mirmira, Rupa B.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    Using morphological, histological, and TEM analyses of the cranium, we provide a detailed description of bone and suture growth in zebrafish. Based on expression patterns and localization, we identified osteoblasts at different degrees of maturation. Our data confirm that, unlike in humans, zebrafish cranial sutures maintain lifelong patency to sustain skull growth. The cranial vault develops in a coordinated manner resulting in a structure that protects the brain. The zebrafish cranial roof parallels that of higher vertebrates and contains five major bones: one pair of frontal bones, one pair of parietal bones, and the supraoccipital bone. Parietal and frontal bones are formed by intramembranous ossification within a layer of mesenchyme positioned between the dermal mesenchyme and meninges surrounding the brain. The supraoccipital bone has an endochondral origin. Cranial bones are separated by connective tissue with a distinctive architecture of osteogenic cells and collagen fibrils. Here we show RNA in situ hybridization for col1a1a, col2a1a, col10a1, bglap/osteocalcin, fgfr1a, fgfr1b, fgfr2, fgfr3, foxq1, twist2, twist3, runx2a, runx2b, sp7/osterix, and spp1/ osteopontin, indicating that the expression of genes involved in suture development in mammals is preserved in zebrafish. We also present methods for examining the cranium and its sutures, which permit the study of the mechanisms involved in suture patency as well as their pathological obliteration. The model we develop has implications for the study of human disorders, including craniosynostosis, which affects 1 in 2,500 live births. PMID:27829009

  4. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Cranial Vault

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Geetha; Sreelesh, K. P.; Somanathan, Thara; Soman, Lali V.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Ewing's sarcoma (EWS) arising from cranial bones is rare and accounts for only 1%–4% of all EWS. We report the case of a 15-year-old girl with EWS of the frontoparietal region of the skull. She underwent excision following which she received combination chemotherapy with vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide alternating with ifosfamide, and VP16 and local radiation of 45 Gy. She is alive in complete remission at 40 months. PMID:28163522

  5. Cranial Osteology of Meiglyptini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae)

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    The Meiglyptini comprise eight species grouped into three genera: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species. PMID:22567317

  6. Studing cranial vault modifications in ancient Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Tiesler, Vera

    2012-01-01

    The artificial modification of infant cranial vaults through massages or by means of constriction and compression devices constitutes a readily visible, permanent body modification that has been employed cross-culturally to express identity, ethnicity, beauty, status and gender. For those ancient societies that staged head shaping, these cultural correlates may be ascertained by examining cranial shapes together with other data sets from the archaeological record. Studies of skulls modified for cultural reasons also provide important clues for understanding principles in neural growth and physiopathological variation in cranial expansion. This paper focuses on head shaping techniques in Mesoamerica, where the practice was deeply rooted and widespread before the European conquest. It provides a comprehensive review of the Mesoamericanistic research on shaping techniques, implements and taxonomies. An up-dated, interdisciplinary examination of the physiological implications and the cultural meanings of artificially produced head shapes in different times and culture areas within Mesoamerica leads to a discussion of the scope, caveats, and future directions involved in this kind of research in the region and beyond.

  7. Cranial osteology of meiglyptini (aves: piciformes: picidae).

    PubMed

    Donatelli, Reginaldo José

    2012-01-01

    THE MEIGLYPTINI COMPRISE EIGHT SPECIES GROUPED INTO THREE GENERA: Meiglyptes and Mulleripicus, with three species each, and Hemicircus, with two species. The aim of the present study was to describe the cranial osteology of six species and three genera of Meiglyptini and to compare them to each other, as well as with other species of woodpeckers and other bird groups. The cranial osteology varied among the investigated species, but the most markedly distinct characteristics were: (1) a frontal overhang is only observed in the middle portion of the frontale of H. concretus; (2) the Proc. zygomaticus and suprameaticus are thick and long in species of the genus Mulleripicus, but short in other species; (3) the Pes pterygoidei is relatively larger in species of the genus Mulleripicus, while it is narrow, thin and relatively smaller in species of the genus Meiglyptes and indistinct in H. concretus; (4) the bony projection of the ectethmoidale is relatively short and thin in species of Mulleripicus and more developed in H. concretus. It appears that the greatest structural complexity of the cranial osteology is associated with the birds' diet, with the frugivorous H. concretus being markedly different from the insectivorous species.

  8. Gross, Arthroscopic, and Radiographic Anatomies of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament: Foundations for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery.

    PubMed

    Irarrázaval, Sebastián; Albers, Marcio; Chao, Tom; Fu, Freddie H

    2017-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the more studied structures in the knee joint. It is not a tubular structure, but is much narrower in its midsubstance and broader at its ends, producing an hourglass shape. The ACL is composed of 2 functional bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles, that are named for their location of insertion on the anterior surface of the tibial plateau. Although the relative contribution in terms of total cross-sectional area of the ACL has been noted to be equal in regards to each bundle, dynamically these bundles demonstrate different properties for knee function.

  9. Water excitation MPRAGE MRI of VII and VIII cranial nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Litt, A.W.; Licata, P.; Knopp, E.A.; Thomasson, D.M.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to compare magnetization prepared rapid gradient echo-water excitation (MPR-AGE-WE) with conventional spin echo (CSE) in the evaluation of the VII and VIII cranial nerves. One hundred three consecutive patients with symptoms referable to the VII/VIII nerves were studied with CSE T1 and MPRAGE-WE following intravenous gadolinium, contrast agent. Each right and left nerve pair was independently evaluated for the presence of an enhancing mass and for visualization of the nerves. On the CSE images, 26 definite and 2 possible lesions were identified, whereas 28 definite and 2 possible abnormalities were seen on the MPRAGE-WE. Four cases were better identified on the MPRAGE-WE and one better seen on the CSE. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0. 19). CSE demonstrated the nerves partially in 23 instances and completely in 6; MPRAGE-WE showed the nerves partially in 35 and completely in 73. This was highly significant (p < 0.001). With equivalent or slightly improved lesion detection and better visualization of the nerves, MPRAGE-WE may replace CSE in studying the VII/VIII nerves. 14 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups.

  11. Neurocranium versus Face: A Morphometric Approach with Classical Anthropometric Variables for Characterizing Patterns of Cranial Integration in Extant Hominoids and Extinct Hominins

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Claros, Juan Antonio; Jiménez-Arenas, Juan Manuel; Palmqvist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The relative importance of the two main cranial complexes, the neurocranium and the splanchnocranium, has been examined in the five species of extant hominoids and in a huge sample of extinct hominins using six standard craniometric variables that measure the length, width and height of each cranial module. Factor analysis and two-block partial least squares were used for establishing the major patterns of developmental and evolutionary integration between both cranial modules. The results obtained show that all extant hominoids (including the anatomically modern humans) share a conserved pattern of developmental integration, a result that agrees with previous studies. The pattern of evolutionary integration between both cranial modules in australopiths runs in parallel to developmental integration. In contrast, the pattern of evolutionary and developmental integration of the species of the genus Homo is the opposite, which is probably the consequence of distinctive selective regimes for both hominin groups. PMID:26177535

  12. Isolated posterior cruciate ligament insufficiency induces morphological changes of anterior cruciate ligament collagen fibrils.

    PubMed

    Ochi, M; Murao, T; Sumen, Y; Kobayashi, K; Adachi, N

    1999-04-01

    We studied the ultrastructural changes of the human anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with transmission electron micrograph cross-sections following isolated posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injury. Biopsy specimens were obtained from the proximal third and anteromedial aspect of the ACL. Fourteen patients with PCL-deficient knees at a mean of 22.1 months from injury to surgery and 5 normal knees amputated secondary to malignant tumors or traumatic injuries were used as controls. A significant difference was found in the number of collagen fibrils per 1 microm2 between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. There was a significant difference found in the collagen fibril diameter between the PCL-deficient knee group and the control group. The collagen packing density (the percentage of sampled area occupied by collagen fibrils) was also significantly different between the PCL-deficient knee and the control group. The current study shows that an isolated PCL insufficiency can induce morphological changes in ACL collagen fibrils, suggesting that a PCL insufficiency can have adverse effects on other ligamentous structures in the knee joint.

  13. Familial Idiopathic Cranial Neuropathy in a Chinese Family.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liang, Jianfeng; Yu, Yanbing

    Cranial neuropathy is usually idiopathic and familial cases are uncommon. We describe a family with 5 members with cranial neuropathy over 3 generations. All affected patients were women, indicating an X-linked dominant or an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Our cases and a review of the literature suggest that familial idiopathic cranial neuropathy is a rare condition which may be related to autosomal dominant vascular disorders (e.g. vascular tortuosity, sclerosis, elongation or extension), small posterior cranial fossas, anatomical variations of the posterior circulation, hypersensitivity of cranial nerves and other abnormalities. Moreover, microvascular decompression is the treatment of choice because vascular compression is the main factor in the pathogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of familial cranial neuropathy in China.

  14. The naming of the cranial nerves: a historical review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Matthew C; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Bosmia, Anand N; Tubbs, R Shane; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2014-01-01

    The giants of medicine and anatomy have each left their mark on the history of the cranial nerves, and much of the history of anatomic study can be viewed through the lens of how the cranial nerves were identified and named. A comprehensive literature review on the classification of the cranial names was performed. The identification of the cranial nerves began with Galen in the 2nd century AD and evolved up through the mid-20th century. In 1778, Samuel Sömmerring, a German anatomist, classified the 12 cranial nerves as we recognize them today. This review expands on the excellent investigations of Flamm, Shaw, and Simon et al., with discussion of the historical identification as well as the process of naming the human cranial nerves.

  15. Failure of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Samitier, Gonzalo; Marcano, Alejandro I.; Alentorn-Geli, Eduard; Cugat, Ramon; Farmer, Kevin W; Moser, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    The present review classifies and describes the multifactorial causes of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgery failure, concentrating on preventing and resolving such situations. The article particularly focuses on those causes that require ACL revision due to recurrent instability, without neglecting those that affect function or produce persistent pain. Although primary ACL reconstruction has satisfactory outcome rates as high as 97%, it is important to identify the causes of failure, because satisfactory outcomes in revision surgery can drop to as much as 76%. It is often possible to identify a primary or secondary cause of ACL surgery failure; even the most meticulous planning can give rise to unexpected findings during the intervention. The adopted protocol should therefore be sufficiently flexible to adapt to the course of surgery. Preoperative patient counseling is essential. The surgeon should limit the patient’s expectations for the outcome by explaining the complexity of this kind of procedure. With adequate preoperative planning, close attention to details and realistic patient expectations, ACL revision surgery may offer beneficial and satisfactory results for the patient. PMID:26550585

  16. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament surgery in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various methods regarding allograft knee replacements have been described. The animal models, which are generally used for this purpose include sheep, dogs, goats, and pigs, and accrue significant costs for study protocols. The authors herein describe an efficient and cost-effective model to study either native or tissue-engineered allografts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in a New Zealand rabbit model with the potential for transgenic and cell migration studies. Methods ACL reconstructions were performed in rabbits under general anesthesia. For fresh allograft implantations, two animals were operated in parallel. Each right extensor digitorum longus tendon was harvested and prepared for implantation. After excision of the ACL, tibial and femoral bone tunnels were created to implant each graft in the native ACL position. Results During a 2-year period, the authors have successfully undertaken this surgery in 61 rabbits and have not noticed any major complications attributed to this surgical technique. In addition, the authors have observed fast recovery in the animals postoperatively. Conclusion The authors recommend this surgical procedure as an excellent model for the study of knee surgery. PMID:23957941

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament replacement: a review.

    PubMed

    Silver, F H; Tria, A J; Zawadsky, J P; Dunn, M G

    1991-01-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the major intra-articular mechanical element that limits motion of the tibia with respect to the femur. It is a multi-fasciculated structure composed of crimped aligned collagen fibers. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on ACL structure and mechanical properties in an effort to stimulate the development of a new generation of more effective replacement devices. Replacement of the ACL is achieved using biologic and synthetic grafts. Biologic grafts include illiotibial band, semitendinosus and gracilis tendons, patellar tendon, and meniscus. Bone-patellar-bone complexes used to replace the ACL are revascularized and ultimately replaced by neo-ligament. Synthetic implants including the Integraft, Leads-Keio ligament, Gore-Tex¿ ligament and Kennedy Ligament Augmentation Device (LAD) have either not been approved or approved by the FDA for limited use as a replacement for the ACL. The Kennedy LAD has been found to increase the strength of autogenous tissue during revascularization. Based on the success of autografts and the Kennedy LAD, we conclude that the next generation of ACL replacement devices will consist of a scaffold and a biodegradable augmentation device. The scaffold will have a structure that mimics the normal ACL as well as stimulates revascularization and healing. A biodegradable augmentation device will be employed to mechanically reinforce the scaffold without stress shielding the neo-ligament. By combining the advantages of autografts and a biodegradable augmentation device, a new generation of ACL replacements will be achieved.

  19. Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination.

    PubMed

    Pasque, Charles B; Geib, Timothy M

    2007-03-01

    Intraoperative anterior cruciate ligament graft contamination is a rare but potentially devastating occurrence for any surgeon to encounter. Most instances in our experience have happened when a surgeon first enters practice or is operating in a new environment with new staff. Based on the currently available literature and the senior author's personal experience with 3 cases, intraoperative cleansing of the graft followed by implantation is a reasonable option. The protocol used successfully in these 3 cases includes getting the graft off of the floor immediately, removing any suture material in the graft, cleansing the graft for 15 to 30 minutes each in chlorohexidine and triple antibiotic solution, followed by a normal saline rinse. All graft sutures should then be replaced. The graft should then be resized and the tibial and femoral tunnels adjusted if needed. After implantation of the graft, additional intraoperative and postoperative intravenous antibiotic and/or oral antibiotic administration is also recommended for the first 1 to 2 weeks. Close clinical follow-up is also very important the first 6 weeks postoperatively and should include candid communication with the patient and family.

  20. Twelfth cranial nerve involvement in Guillian Barre syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Subrat Kumar; Jayalakshmi, Sita; Ruikar, Devashish; Surath, Mohandas

    2013-07-01

    Guillian Barre Syndrome (GBS) is associated with cranial nerve involvement. Commonest cranial nerves involved were the facial and bulbar (IXth and Xth). Involvement of twelfth cranial nerve is rare in GBS. We present a case of GBS in a thirteen years old boy who developed severe tongue weakness and wasting at two weeks after the onset of GBS. The wasting and weakness of tongue improved at three months of follow up. Brief review of the literature about XIIth cranial nerve involvement in GBS is discussed.

  1. Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Loukas, Marios; Fisher, Winfield S; Rizk, Elias; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-01-01

    The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery.

  2. The role of cranial kinesis in birds.

    PubMed

    Bout, R G; Zweers, G A

    2001-12-01

    In birds, the ability to move the upper beak relative to the braincase has been the subject of many functional morphological investigations, but in many instances the adaptive significance of cranial kinesis remains unclear. Alternatively, cranial kinesis may be considered a consequence of the general design of the skull, rather than an adaptive trait as such. The present study reviews some results related to the mechanism and functional significance of cranial kinesis in birds. Quantitative three-dimensional X-ray has shown that in skulls morphologically as divers as paleognaths and neognaths the mechanism for elevation of the upper beak is very similar. One of the mechanisms proposed for avian jaw movement is a mechanical coupling of the upper and the lower jaw movement by the postorbital ligament. Such a mechanical coupling would necessitate upper beak elevation. However, independent control of upper and lower jaw has been shown to occur during beak movements in birds. Moreover, kinematic modeling and force measurements suggests that the maximum extensibility of collagen, in combination with the short distance of the insertion of the postorbital ligament to the quadrato-mandibular articulation do not constitute a block to lower jaw depression. The lower jaw ligaments serve to limit the maximal extension of the mandibula. It is suggested here that cranial kinesis in avian feeding may have evolved as a consequence of an increase in eye size. This increase in size led to a reduction of bony bars in the lateral aspect of the skull enabling the transfer of quadrate movement to the upper jaw. The selective forces favoring the development of a kinetic upper beak in birds may be subtle and act in different ecological contexts. Simultaneous movement of the upper and lower jaw not only increases the velocity of beak movements, but with elevated upper beak also less force is required to open the lower jaw. However, the penalty of increased mobility of elements in a

  3. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  4. An innovative transparent cranial window based on skull optical clearing An innovative transparent cranial window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, T. H.; Luo, Q. M.; Zhu, D.

    2012-06-01

    Noninvasive optical methods for viewing the structural and functional organization of cortex have been playing important roles in brain research, which usually suffer from turbid skull. Various cranial window models based on surgical operation have been proposed, but have respective limitations. Here, an innovative transparent cranial window of mouse was established by topically treatment with a skull optical clearing solution (SOCS), rather than by craniotomy. Based on the experiment of optical clearing efficacy of skull in vitro, we found that the turbid skull became transparent within 25 min after application of SOCS. The USAF target is visible through the treated skull, and the calculated resolution can achieve 8.4 μm. After the in vivo skull was topically treated with SOCS, the cortical micro-vessels can be visible clearly. The quantitative analysis indicated that the minimum resolution diameter of micro-vessels in 14.4±0.8 μm through the transparent cranial window closed to that in 12.8±0.9 μm of the exposed cortical micro-vessels. Further, preliminary results from Laser Speckle Imaging demonstrated that there was no influence on cortical blood flow distribution of mouse after topically treatment with SOCS on skull. This transparent cranial window will provide a convenient model for cortex imaging in vivo, which is very significant for neuroscience research.

  5. Cruciate Retaining Versus Cruciate Stabilising Total Knee Arthroplasty – A Prospective Randomised Kinematic Study

    PubMed Central

    Godwin, T L; Bayan, A

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While there is a large body of research in regards to cruciate retaining(CR) and cruciate sacrificing total condylar knee replacement, the literature is spars in regards to highly conforming polyetheylene such as the triatholon cruciate stabilising tibial insert (CS).The aim was to determine whether there is a difference in the range of motion, kinematics as well as the functional outcome for Triathlon CS and CR TKJR. Methods: A single hospital consecutive series of one surgeon between 2011 and 2013 were enrolled. Kinematic data recorded prospectively at the time of surgery utilizing imageless navigation included preoperative and post-replacement extension, gravity flexion, passive flexion and rotation. Intraoperative femoral and tibial cuts and definitive implants were also recorded. Statistically analysis performed to compare CS and CR TKJR range of motion, deformity correction, and rotation pre and post-operatively. Oxford functional scores were obtained at the final follow up. 124 patients were randomised to 71 CS and 53 CR TKJR. The demographics were comparable between the two groups. Results: No significant difference was found between the groups’ preoperative range of motion. The net gain in extension for the CS group was 5.65 degrees (4.14-7.17) and for CR 5.64 degrees (4.24-7.04, p=0.99) with no significant difference shown. Post-operative gravity flexion significantly increased in CS TKJR with 129.01 degrees (127.37130.66) compared with 126.35 degrees (124.39-128.30, p =0.04) for CR. A weak positive correlation was shown between the size of distal femoral cut and post-operative extension for both CS and CR TKJR. A weak positive correlation was also shown for the difference between the intraoperative cuts (tibial and femoral) and the size of the implants used, in relation to post-operative extension. Post-operative oxford scores at average of 3.4 year follow up comparable between groups. Conclusion: The kinematics of CS and CR TKJR are

  6. Cranial mechanics and feeding in Tyrannosaurus rex.

    PubMed

    Rayfield, Emily J

    2004-07-22

    It has been suggested that the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex was capable of producing extremely powerful bite forces and resisting multi-directional loading generated during feeding. Contrary to this suggestion is the observation that the cranium is composed of often loosely articulated facial bones, although these bones may have performed a shock-absorption role. The structural analysis technique finite element analysis (FEA) is employed here to investigate the functional morphology and cranial mechanics of the T. rex skull. In particular, I test whether the skull is optimized for the resistance of large bi-directional feeding loads, whether mobile joints are adapted for the localized resistance of feeding-induced stress and strain, and whether mobile joints act to weaken or strengthen the skull overall. The results demonstrate that the cranium is equally adapted to resist biting or tearing forces and therefore the 'puncture-pull' feeding hypothesis is well supported. Finite-element-generated stress-strain patterns are consistent with T. rex cranial morphology: the maxilla-jugal suture provides a tensile shock-absorbing function that reduces localized tension yet 'weakens' the skull overall. Furthermore, peak compressive and shear stresses localize in the nasals rather than the fronto-parietal region as seen in Allosaurus, offering a reason why robusticity is commonplace in tyrannosaurid nasals.

  7. Obelionic cranial deformation in the Puebloan Southwest.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Greg C; Madimenos, Felicia C

    2010-11-01

    As a form of cranial deformation, obelionic flattening is rare. Originally named and described by Stewart (J Wash Acad Sci 29 (1939) 460-465), based on a small sample from Florida, it has been little noted since. Previously [Nelson and Madimenos, Paper presented at the Paleopathology Association annual meeting (2007)], we reported the discovery of two individuals from the Pueblo III Gallina site of Cañada Simon I who exhibit flattening of this type. Although technically undescribed in the Southwest before now, there are tantalizing clues in the literature that it occurred in low frequencies throughout the Ancestral Pueblo world. To determine whether the obelionic flattening found at Cañada Simon I was isolated or an indication of a more widespread phenomenon, we undertook a survey of crania from other Gallina sites, Chaco Canyon, and the literature (type of deformation can be determined on lateral photographs of crania properly positioned along the Frankfort Horizontal). We examined 146 crania (78 firsthand) of which seven exhibit obelionic flattening. Our results indicate that obelionic flattening should be added to the suite of cranial deformations that occur in the Southwest. Here, we propose parameters by which obelionic flattening can be described and differentiated from the more common lambdoidal and occipital forms and suggest that the three types of flattening form a continuum of cradleboard induced deformation, although the exact mechanism for obelionic flattening remains elusive. Am J Phys Anthropol, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required. PMID:26167022

  9. Disorders of the lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) are due to numerous causes, which need to be differentiated to optimize management and outcome. This review aims at summarizing and discussing diseases affecting LCN. Review of publications dealing with disorders of the LCN in humans. Affection of multiple LCN is much more frequent than the affection of a single LCN. LCN may be affected solely or together with more proximal cranial nerves, with central nervous system disease, or with nonneurological disorders. LCN lesions have to be suspected if there are typical symptoms or signs attributable to a LCN. Causes of LCN lesions can be classified as genetic, vascular, traumatic, iatrogenic, infectious, immunologic, metabolic, nutritional, degenerative, or neoplastic. Treatment of LCN lesions depends on the underlying cause. An effective treatment is available in the majority of the cases, but a prerequisite for complete recovery is the prompt and correct diagnosis. LCN lesions need to be considered in case of disturbed speech, swallowing, coughing, deglutition, sensory functions, taste, or autonomic functions, neuralgic pain, dysphagia, head, pharyngeal, or neck pain, cardiac or gastrointestinal compromise, or weakness of the trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, or the tongue muscles. To correctly assess manifestations of LCN lesions, precise knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the area is required.

  10. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, L.M.; Gray, B.; Wright, R.W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rigorous rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is necessary for a successful surgical outcome. A large number of clinical trials continue to assess aspects of this rehabilitation process. Prior systematic reviews evaluated fifty-four Level-I and II clinical trials published through 2005. Methods: Eighty-five articles from 2006 to 2010 were identified utilizing multiple search engines. Twenty-nine Level-I or II studies met inclusion criteria and were evaluated with use of the CONSORT (Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials) criteria. Topics included in this review are postoperative bracing, accelerated strengthening, home-based rehabilitation, proprioception and neuromuscular training, and six miscellaneous topics investigated in single trials. Results: Bracing following ACL reconstruction remains neither necessary nor beneficial and adds to the cost of the procedure. Early return to sports needs further research. Home-based rehabilitation can be successful. Although neuromuscular interventions are not likely to be harmful to patients, they are also not likely to yield large improvements in outcomes or help patients return to sports faster. Thus, they should not be performed to the exclusion of strengthening and range-of-motion exercises. Vibration training may lead to faster and more complete proprioceptive recovery but further evidence is needed. Conclusions: Several new modalities for rehabilitation after ACL reconstruction may be helpful but should not be performed to the exclusion of range-of-motion, strengthening, and functional exercises. Accelerated rehabilitation does not appear to be harmful but further investigation of rehabilitation timing is warranted. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:23032584

  11. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  12. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  13. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  14. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated power source used with removable rotating surgical cutting tools or drill bits on a patient's skull....

  15. The contribution of subsistence to global human cranial variation.

    PubMed

    Noback, Marlijn L; Harvati, Katerina

    2015-03-01

    Diet-related cranial variation in modern humans is well documented on a regional scale, with ample examples of cranial changes related to the agricultural transition. However, the influence of subsistence strategy on global cranial variation is less clear, having been confirmed only for the mandible, and dietary effects beyond agriculture are often neglected. Here we identify global patterns of subsistence-related human cranial shape variation. We analysed a worldwide sample of 15 populations (n = 255) with known subsistence strategies using 3-D landmark datasets designed to capture the shape of different units of the cranium. Results show significant correlations between global cranial shape and diet, especially for temporalis muscle shape and general cranial shape. Importantly, the differences between populations with either a plant- or an animal-based diet are more pronounced than those between agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers, suggesting that the influence of diet as driver of cranial variation is not limited to Holocene transitions to agricultural subsistence. Dental arch shape did not correlate with subsistence pattern, possibly indicating the high plasticity of this region of the face in relation to age, disease and individual use of the dentition. Our results highlight the importance of subsistence strategy as one of the factors underlying the evolution of human geographic cranial variation.

  16. [Rapidly progressive compromise of cranial pairs as neurosyphilis manifestation].

    PubMed

    Baccaro, Fernando; Moldes, Sofía; Novelli Poisson, Paola; Arduin, Julieta; Valerga, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Syphilis remains a common disease throughout the world, being neurosyphilis a relatively common manifestation. A case of a 34 years old male with HIV and neurosyphilis is presented, characterized by a clinical course evidenced by progressive palsy of cranial nerves. This case is unusual and a rare presentation of progressive cranial involvement with swallowing deficit, have found no similar data in the literature.

  17. Asymmetric type F botulism with cranial nerve demyelination.

    PubMed

    Filozov, Alina; Kattan, Jessica A; Jitendranath, Lavanya; Smith, C Gregory; Lúquez, Carolina; Phan, Quyen N; Fagan, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of type F botulism in a patient with bilateral but asymmetric neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve demyelination was found during autopsy. Bilateral, asymmetric clinical signs, although rare, do not rule out botulism. Demyelination of cranial nerves might be underrecognized during autopsy of botulism patients.

  18. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  19. 21 CFR 882.4370 - Pneumatic cranial drill motor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pneumatic cranial drill motor. 882.4370 Section 882.4370 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... drill motor. (a) Identification. A pneumatic cranial drill motor is a pneumatically operated...

  20. Revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery: experience from Miami.

    PubMed

    Uribe, J W; Hechtman, K S; Zvijac, J E; Tjin-A-Tsoi, E W

    1996-04-01

    Failed anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction as defined by recurrent patholaxity is increasingly commonplace. This report presents the findings of 54 patients who had unsuccessful intraarticular anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to correct persistent instability and who subsequently underwent revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery. Before revision, patients were evaluated by clinical examination, KT-1000 arthrometer, radiographs, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity scale, and subjective questionnaire. The results were compared at a mean of 32 months following revision surgery. There was an average of 16 months from index procedure to the time of revision. Autogenous patellar tendon grafts were used in 61% of the cases with 30% of these harvested from the contralateral knee. Fresh frozen patellar tendon was used in 35% and autogenous hamstring tendons in 4%. Revision was successful in objectively improving stability in all patients with an average KT-000 of 2.8 mm. Autogenous tissue grafts provided greater objective stability when compared with allograft tissue with average KT-1000 of 2.2 and 3.3, respectively. Functionally, however, there was no significant difference in outcome between the 2 groups. Harvesting of the contralateral patellar tendon was found to have no adverse long term effect. Subjectively, the results were significantly worse depending on the degree of articular cartilage degeneration. Only 54% of patients returned to their preanterior cruciate ligament injury activity level. Competence in various anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction techniques will facilitate revision surgery especially in avoiding preexisting tunnels and hardware. Correct graft placement and addressing the secondary restraints are critical to successful revision surgery.

  1. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  2. Cranial joint histology in the mallard duck (Anas platyrhynchos): new insights on avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Witmer, Lawrence M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of avian cranial kinesis is a phenomenon in part responsible for the remarkable diversity of avian feeding adaptations observable today. Although osteological, developmental and behavioral features of the feeding system are frequently studied, comparatively little is known about cranial joint skeletal tissue composition and morphology from a microscopic perspective. These data are key to understanding the developmental, biomechanical and evolutionary underpinnings of kinesis. Therefore, here we investigated joint microstructure in juvenile and adult mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos; Anseriformes). Ducks belong to a diverse clade of galloanseriform birds, have derived adaptations for herbivory and kinesis, and are model organisms in developmental biology. Thus, new insights into their cranial functional morphology will refine our understanding of avian cranial evolution. A total of five specimens (two ducklings and three adults) were histologically sampled, and two additional specimens (a duckling and an adult) were subjected to micro-computed tomographic scanning. Five intracranial joints were sampled: the jaw joint (quadrate-articular); otic joint (quadrate-squamosal); palatobasal joint (parasphenoid-pterygoid); the mandibular symphysis (dentary-dentary); and the craniofacial hinge (a complex flexion zone involving four different pairs of skeletal elements). In both the ducklings and adults, the jaw, otic and palatobasal joints are all synovial, with a synovial cavity and articular cartilage on each surface (i.e. bichondral joints) ensheathed in a fibrous capsule. The craniofacial hinge begins as an ensemble of patent sutures in the duckling, but in the adult it becomes more complex: laterally it is synovial; whereas medially, it is synostosed by a bridge of chondroid bone. We hypothesize that it is chondroid bone that provides some of the flexible properties of this joint. The heavily innervated mandibular symphysis is already fused in the

  3. Neonatal cranial sonography: A concise review for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh; Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-01-01

    Cranial sonography continues to hold an important place in neonatal care. Attributes favorable to sonography that make it almost indispensable for routine care of the newborn includes easy access, low cost, portability, lack of ionizing radiations and exemption from sedation or anaesthesia. Cranial sonography has highest impact in neonates suspected to have meningitis and its complications; perinatal ischemia particularly periventricular leukomalacia (PVL); hydrocephalus resulting from multitude of causes and hemorrhage. Not withstanding this, cranial sonography has yielded results for a repertoire of indications. Approach to cranial sonography involves knowledge of the normal developmental anatomy of brain parenchyma for correct interpretation. Correct technique, taking advantage of multiple sonographic windows and variable frequencies of the ultrasound probes allows a detailed and comprehensive examination of brain parenchyma. In this review, we discuss the technique, normal and variant anatomy as well as disease entities of neonatal cranial sonography. PMID:27195026

  4. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  5. Two Helpful MRI Signs for Evaluation of Posterolateral Bundle Tears of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Volokhina, Yulia V.; Syed, Hasan M.; Pham, Peter H.; Blackburn, Allie K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears is difficult on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), particularly the isolated tears of the posterolateral bundle. Purpose: To describe 2 MRI signs of partial ACL tear involving the posterolateral bundle on conventional knee MRI sequences, specifically, the “gap” and “footprint” signs. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the MRI appearance of the ACL in 11 patients with arthroscopically proven partial ACL tears isolated to the posterolateral bundle, as well as in 10 patients with arthroscopically proven intact ACLs, and evaluated for the presence of gap and/or footprint signs. Results: There was high degree of sensitivity and specificity associated with the MRI findings of “gap” and “footprint” signs with arthroscopically proven isolated posterolateral bundle tears. Conclusion: Gap and footprint signs are suggestive of posterolateral bundle tear of the ACL, and the presence of 1 or both of these imaging findings should alert the radiologist to the possibility of a posterolateral bundle tear. PMID:26535387

  6. Cranial base topology and basic trends in the facial evolution of Homo.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Rosas, Antonio

    2016-02-01

    Facial prognathism and projection are important characteristics in human evolution but their three-dimensional (3D) architectonic relationships to basicranial morphology are not clear. We used geometric morphometrics and measured 51 3D-landmarks in a comparative sample of modern humans (N = 78) and fossil Pleistocene hominins (N = 10) to investigate the spatial features of covariation between basicranial and facial elements. The study reveals complex morphological integration patterns in craniofacial evolution of Middle and Late Pleistocene hominins. A downwards-orientated cranial base correlates with alveolar maxillary prognathism, relatively larger faces, and relatively larger distances between the anterior cranial base and the frontal bone (projection). This upper facial projection correlates with increased overall relative size of the maxillary alveolar process. Vertical facial height is associated with tall nasal cavities and is accommodated by an elevated anterior cranial base, possibly because of relations between the cribriform and the nasal cavity in relation to body size and energetics. Variation in upper- and mid-facial projection can further be produced by basicranial topology in which the midline base and nasal cavity are shifted anteriorly relative to retracted lateral parts of the base and the face. The zygomatics and the middle cranial fossae act together as bilateral vertical systems that are either projected or retracted relative to the midline facial elements, causing either midfacial flatness or midfacial projection correspondingly. We propose that facial flatness and facial projection reflect classical principles of craniofacial growth counterparts, while facial orientation relative to the basicranium as well as facial proportions reflect the complex interplay of head-body integration in the light of encephalization and body size decrease in Middle to Late Pleistocene hominin evolution. Developmental and evolutionary patterns of integration may

  7. The Effect of Dietary Adaption on Cranial Morphological Integration in Capuchins (Order Primates, Genus Cebus)

    PubMed Central

    Makedonska, Jana; Wright, Barth W.; Strait, David S.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental challenge of morphology is to identify the underlying evolutionary and developmental mechanisms leading to correlated phenotypic characters. Patterns and magnitudes of morphological integration and their association with environmental variables are essential for understanding the evolution of complex phenotypes, yet the nature of the relevant selective pressures remains poorly understood. In this study, the adaptive significance of morphological integration was evaluated through the association between feeding mechanics, ingestive behavior and craniofacial variation. Five capuchin species were examined, Cebus apella sensu stricto, Cebus libidinosus, Cebus nigritus, Cebus olivaceus and Cebus albifrons. Twenty three-dimensional landmarks were chosen to sample facial regions experiencing high strains during feeding, characteristics affecting muscular mechanical advantage and basicranial regions. Integration structure and magnitude between and within the oral and zygomatic subunits, between and within blocks maximizing modularity and within the face, the basicranium and the cranium were examined using partial-least squares, eigenvalue variance, integration indices compared inter-specifically at a common level of sampled population variance and cluster analyses. Results are consistent with previous findings reporting a relative constancy of facial and cranial correlation patterns across mammals, while covariance magnitudes vary. Results further suggest that food material properties structure integration among functionally-linked facial elements and possibly integration between the face and the basicranium. Hard-object-feeding capuchins, especially C.apella s.s., whose faces experience particularly high biomechanical loads are characterized by higher facial and cranial integration especially compared to C.albifrons, likely because morphotypes compromising feeding performance are selected against in species relying on obdurate fallback foods. This is the

  8. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  9. On the terminology of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Simon, František; Marečková-Štolcová, Elena; Páč, Libor

    2011-10-20

    The present contribution adopts various points of view to discuss the terminology of the twelve nervi craniales. These are paired nerves and have dual names, terms with Roman ordinal numerals, i.e., the nerves are numbered in the top-to-bottom direction, and descriptive historical names. The time of origin and motivation behind the investigated terms are determined. The majority of terms come from the 17th and 18th centuries. The motivation behind most of them is (a) nerve localization, as this is in conformity with anatomical nomenclature in general, (b) nerve function, and rarely (c) nerve appearance. The occurrence of synonymous names and variants is also a focus of attention. In several cases, reference is made to the process called terminologization, meaning when a certain expression acquires technical meaning and the characteristic/feature of the term.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  11. Pain Assessment After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Okoroha, Kelechi R.; Keller, Robert A.; Jung, Edward K.; Khalil, Lafi; Marshall, Nathan; Kolowich, Patricia A.; Moutzouros, Vasilios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a common outpatient procedure that is accompanied by significant postoperative pain. Purpose: To determine differences in acute pain levels between patients undergoing ACL reconstruction with bone–patellar tendon–bone (BTB) versus hamstring tendon (HS) autograft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 70 patients who underwent primary ACL reconstruction using either BTB or HS autografts consented to participate. The primary outcome of the study was postoperative pain levels (visual analog scale), which were collected immediately after surgery and for 3 days postoperatively. Secondary outcome measures included opioid consumption (intravenous morphine equivalents), hours slept, patient satisfaction, reported breakthrough pain, and calls to the physician. Results: Patients treated with BTB had increased pain when compared with those treated with HS in the acute postoperative period (mean ± SD: day 0, 6.0 ± 1.7 vs 5.2 ± 2.0 [P = .066]; day 1, 5.9 ± 1.7 vs 4.9 ±1.7 [P = .024]; day 2, 5.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.1 ± 2.0 [P = .032]; day 3, 4.8 ± 2.1 vs 3.9 ± 2.3 [P = .151]). There were also significant increases in reported breakthrough pain (day 0, 76% vs 43% [P = .009]; day 1, 64% vs 35% [P = .003]) and calls to the physician due to pain (day 1, 19% vs 0% [P = .041]) in the BTB group. There were no significant differences in narcotic requirements or sleep disturbances. Overall, the BTB group reported significantly less satisfaction with pain management on days 0 and 1 (P = .024 and .027, respectively). Conclusion: A significant increase in acute postoperative pain was found when performing ACL reconstruction with BTB compared with HS. Patients treated with BTB were more likely to have breakthrough pain, decreased satisfaction with their pain management, and to contact their physician due to pain. These findings suggest a difference in early postoperative pain between the 2 most

  12. A pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Walter T; Richards, Kirsten; Redhed, James; Papay, Frank A

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was o determine the efficacy of a newly developed pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet for correcting positional plagiocephaly. The design was retrospective and the setting was a tertiary care center. Subjects were all patients in whom positional plagiocephaly has been diagnosed and who have been fitted by the Orthotics and Prosthetics Department for the helmet. Diagonal cranial lengths and widths were measured at each visit. Analysis included the calculation of the ratio change in oblique diameters compared with time, patient's age, and head circumference. Seventy-five patients met inclusion criteria (50 boys, 25 girls). Patients with pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet therapy had significantly improved outcomes as compared with pretreatment measurements (P < or = 0.0001). The helmet did not limit cranial growth as evidenced by significant normalization of the oblique measurement ratio when compared with increasing cranial circumference and age (P = 0.0003, P < or = 0.0001, respectively). The pneumatic orthotic cranial molding helmet successfully corrects positional plagiocephaly and does not hinder cranial growth.

  13. The evolution and development of cranial form in Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Daniel E.; McBratney, Brandeis M.; Krovitz, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Despite much data, there is no unanimity over how to define Homo sapiens in the fossil record. Here, we examine cranial variation among Pleistocene and recent human fossils by using a model of cranial growth to identify unique derived features (autapomorphies) that reliably distinguish fossils attributed to “anatomically modern” H. sapiens (AMHS) from those attributed to various taxa of “archaic” Homo spp. (AH) and to test hypotheses about the changes in cranial development that underlie the origin of modern human cranial form. In terms of pattern, AMHS crania are uniquely characterized by two general structural autapomorphies: facial retraction and neurocranial globularity. Morphometric analysis of the ontogeny of these autapomorphies indicates that the developmental changes that led to modern human cranial form derive from a combination of shifts in cranial base angle, cranial fossae length and width, and facial length. These morphological changes, some of which may have occurred because of relative size increases in the temporal and possibly the frontal lobes, occur early in ontogeny, and their effects on facial retraction and neurocranial globularity discriminate AMHS from AH crania. The existence of these autapomorphies supports the hypothesis that AMHS is a distinct species from taxa of “archaic” Homo (e.g., Homo neanderthalensis). PMID:11805284

  14. Botulinum toxin physiology in focal hand and cranial dystonia.

    PubMed

    Karp, Barbara Illowsky

    2012-11-20

    The safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin for the treatment of focal hand and cranial dystonias are well-established. Studies of these adult-onset focal dystonias reveal both shared features, such as the dystonic phenotype of muscle hyperactivity and overflow muscle contraction and divergent features, such as task specificity in focal hand dystonia which is not a common feature of cranial dystonia. The physiologic effects of botulinum toxin in these 2 disorders also show both similarities and differences. This paper compares and contrasts the physiology of focal hand and cranial dystonias and of botulinum toxin in the management of these disorders.

  15. Familial idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects in children

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, A.J.; Schiapachasse, V.; Guerrero, R.

    1982-05-01

    Three children with idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy and cranial suture defects are reported. The syndrome was recognized after birth and in the two oldest siblings, the cranial defects and subperiosteal bone formation resolved almost completely by age 4 and 6 years. The joint swelling and clubbing persisted and mild bone reabsorption of the distal phalanges became apparent at an older age. Two siblings and both parents had normal bone X-rays and no clubbing. This study confirms the association of cranial sutural defects and familial idopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

  16. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-05-01

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates.

  17. Ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament in a child.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Shamsi Abdul; Sujir, Premjit; Naik, Monappa A; Rao, Sharath K

    2012-04-01

    Ganglion cysts are more commonly associated with the anterior cruciate ligament than the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). A literature review showed that all reported cases of ganglion cysts to date involved adults. We report a rare case of ganglion cyst in the PCL of a four-year-old boy, and discuss its aetiology, clinical presentation, imaging features and management. Ganglion cysts of the PCL may be confused with meniscal cysts arising from tears of the posterior horn of the medial meniscus on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hence, the posterior horn of the medial meniscus has to be carefully evaluated to rule out a tear. MR imaging is the method of choice to confirm diagnosis, and arthroscopic resection is a safe treatment modality even in children.

  18. Popliteal artery injury during posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cenni, Marcos Henrique Frauendorf; do Nascimento, Bruno Fajardo; Carneiro, Guilherme Galvão Barreto; de Andrade, Rodrigo Cristiano; Pinheiro Júnior, Lúcio Flávio Biondi; Nicolai, Oscar Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a case of popliteal artery injury during arthroscopic reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. The evolution of the injury is described and comments are made regarding the anatomy of this artery and potential risks of this surgical technique. This study had the aims of alerting the medical community, especially knee surgeons, regarding a severe surgical complication and discussing the ways of preventing it.

  19. Tubular woven narrow fabrics for replacement of cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Gloy, Yves-Simon; Loehrer, M; Lang, B; Rongen, L; Gries, T; Jockenhoevel, S

    2013-09-01

    The human knee is one of the most frequently injured joints. More than half of these injuries are related to a failure of the anterior cruciate ligament. Current treatments (allogeneic and autologous) bear several disadvantages which can be overcome through the use of synthetic structures. Within the scope of this paper the potential of tubular woven fabrics for the use as artificial ligaments has been evaluated. Twelve fabrics made of polyethylene terephthalate and polytetrafluoroethylene were produced using shuttle weaving technology. Mechanical and biological properties of the fabrics were assessed using static tensile testing and cytotoxicity assays. The results obtained within this study show that woven tubular fabrics can be potentially used as artificial ligament structures as they can provide the desired medical and mechanical properties for cruciate ligament replacements. Through the choice of material and weaving parameters the fabrics' tensile properties can imitate the stress-strain characteristic of the human cruciate ligament. Further assessments in terms of cyclic loading behavior and abrasion resistance of the material are needed to evaluate the success in long term implantation.

  20. Revisiting cruciate paralysis: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Benjamin; Khanna, Ryan; Dahdaleh, Nader S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cruciate paralysis is a rare, poorly understood condition of the upper craniovertebral junction that allows for selective paralysis of the upper extremities while sparing the lower extremities. Reported cases are few and best treatment practices remain up for debate. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systemic literature review in an attempt to identify prognostic predictors and outcome trends associated with cases previously reported in the literature. Materials and Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review for all cases using the term “Cruciate Paralysis,” reviewing a total of 37 reported cases. All outcomes were assigned a numerical value based on examination at the last follow-up. These numerical values were further analyzed and tested for statistical significance. Results: Of the 37 cases, 78.4% were of traumatic causes. Of these, there were considerably worse outcomes associated with patients over the age of 65 years (P < 0.001). Those patients undergoing surgical treatment showed potentially worse outcomes, with a P value approaching significance at P = 0.08. Conclusion: Numerous cases of trauma-associated cruciate paralysis have been reported in the literature; however, there remains a strong need for further study of the condition. While certain risk factors can be elicited from currently reported studies, insignificant data exist to make any sound conclusion concerning whether surgical intervention is always the best method of treatment. PMID:27891037

  1. Bone tunnel enlargement on anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Leonardi, Adriano Barros de Aguiar; Duarte, Aires; Severino, Nilson Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the presence of tibial bone tunnel enlargement after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament using quadruple graft of the flexor tendons and correlate the functional results in their presence. Methods: The studied lasted six months and included 25 patients, with ages ranging from 18 to 43 years old. Assessment was based on radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the third and sixth month of follow up in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Reconstruction of ligaments was performed with tendon grafts of the semitendinosus and gracilis muscle fixated in the femur with transverse metal screw and in the tibia with interference screws. Patients were evaluated objectively by tests ligament, graded from zero to four crosses and subjectively by the Lysholm method preoperative and after sixth month follow up. Results: Significant increase in the tunnels diameters were observed, 20.56% for radiographs in the anteroposterior view, 26.48% in profile view and 23.22% in computed tomography. Descriptive statistics showed significant improvement in subjective and objective clinical parameters. Conclusions: The bone tunnel enlargement is a phenomenon found in the first months after surgical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament and it has no implications on clinical outcomes in the short term. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Study. PMID:25328430

  2. Ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Durante, Jaclyn A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To present the diagnostic and clinical features of a ganglion cyst located on the posterior cruciate ligament and create awareness amongst clinicians of this uncommon diagnosis. Clinical Features: A 24-year old woman complaining of intermittent left knee pain brought on by an increase in mileage during her training for a half-marathon. A diagnosis of mild chondromalacia patella and a ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament was made via diagnostic imaging. Intervention and outcome: Patient was followed up with imaging. The patient chose to withdraw a surgical consult due to patient preference. No conservative treatment was provided. Conclusion: Although chondromalacia patella is the more probable, a secondary diagnostic consideration in this patient could be a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst on the posterior cruciate ligament is an uncommon diagnosis and the clinical manifestations are variable and non-specific. It is important to be aware of its clinical features and to obtain appropriate methods of imaging to generate the diagnosis promptly. PMID:20037698

  3. Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament in skeletally immature patients: an individualized approach☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Júnior, Osmar Valadão; Saggin, Paulo Renato; Matos do Nascimento, Gilberto; Kuhn, André; Saggin, José; Inácio, André Manoel

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate a series of skeletally immature patients who underwent three surgical techniques for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction according to each patient's growth potential. Methods a series of 23 skeletally immature patients who underwent ACL reconstruction surgery at ages ranging from 7 to 15 years was evaluated prospectively. The surgical technique was individualized according to the Tanner sexual maturity score. The surgical techniques used were transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction and extraphyseal reconstruction. Four patients underwent the extraphyseal technique, seven the partial transphyseal technique and twelve the full transphyseal technique, on the ACL. The postoperative evaluation was based on the Lysholm score, clinical analysis on the knee and the presence of angular deformity or dysmetria of the lower limb. Results the mean Lysholm score was 96.34 (±2.53). None of the patients presented differences in length and/or clinical or radiographic misalignment abnormality of the lower limbs. Conclusion ACL reconstruction using flexor tendon grafts in skeletally immature patients provided satisfactory functional results. Use of individualized surgical techniques according to growth potential did not give rise to physeal lesions capable of causing length discrepancies or misalignments of the lower limbs, even in patients with high growth potential. PMID:26229809

  4. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction With Autologous Hamstring

    PubMed Central

    Grawe, Brian M.; Williams, Phillip N.; Burge, Alissa; Voigt, Marcia; Altchek, David W.; Hannafin, Jo A.; Allen, Answorth A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent clinical investigations have identified inadequate autograft hamstring graft diameter (<8 mm) to be predictive of failure after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Purpose/Hypothesis: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables of the hamstring tendons for the prediction of graft diameter at the time of surgery. The hypothesis was that cross-sectional area (CSA) of the hamstring tendon measured on MRI could accurately predict graft diameter, and threshold measurements could be established to predict graft diameter at the time of surgery. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 84 consecutive skeletally mature patients prospectively enrolled in our ACL reconstruction patient registry were identified for study purposes. Patients were included if they underwent an MRI of the affected knee at our institution prior to ACL reconstruction with hamstring (HT) autograft. Graft preparation was performed via a standard quadrupled hamstring technique after harvesting both the gracilis and semitendinosus (4-GST). The smallest diameter end of the HT autograft was then utilized for measurement analysis. Total CSA was calculated for both hamstring tendons using the “region of interest tool” on the corresponding proton density–weighted axial image of the knee at the widest condylar dimension. Three independent reviewers measured the MRI scans so that intra- and interrater reliability of the measurements could be determined. A trend analysis was then undertaken to establish correlations between the MRI CSA and graft diameter. Predictive analysis was then performed to establish threshold MRI measurement values for specific graft diameters and determine whether any patient-specific factors would affect graft diameter (age, sex, and body mass index). Results: Mean patient age at the time of surgery was 36 years (range, 11

  5. Cranial irradiation in childhood decreases likelihood of marriage.

    PubMed

    2009-11-18

    Adults who have survived childhood cancer are less likely to get married than their peers. Those who had central nervous system tumours, cranial irradiation, impaired processing efficiency and short stature were least likely to marry.

  6. "Moya-moya' disease caused by cranial trauma.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Alvarez, E; Pineda, M; Royo, C; Manzanares, R

    1979-01-01

    A case of "moya-moya" disease of a 12-year-old boy is reported. The clinical history started at 3 years 2 months after cranial trauma. The patient developed mental retardation, hemiparesis and seizures.

  7. Intellectual, educational, and behavioural sequelae after cranial irradiation and chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, V; Smibert, E; Ekert, H; Godber, T

    1994-01-01

    Cognitive and educational sequelae are inconsistently reported in children treated with cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. This study investigated differences in these skills after cranial irradiation, controlling the effects of chemotherapy and psychosocial factors. Three groups were evaluated: 100 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and treated with cranial irradiation and chemotherapy; 50 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia or other cancers and treated with chemotherapy alone; and a healthy control group of 100 children. Children in the clinical groups stopped treatment at least two years before evaluation and had no history of relapse. Children were aged between 7 and 16 at the time of assessment. Evaluation included cognitive, educational, and behavioural measures. Analyses found that children receiving cranial irradiation and chemotherapy performed more poorly than non-irradiated groups on intellectual and educational tests, with verbal and attentional deficits most pronounced. Children receiving chemotherapy alone performed similarly to controls, suggesting such treatment is not associated with adverse neurobehavioural sequelae. PMID:8048815

  8. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles. PMID:26716007

  9. Estimating cranial musculoskeletal constraints in theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, Stephan

    2015-11-01

    Many inferences on the biology, behaviour and ecology of extinct vertebrates are based on the reconstruction of the musculature and rely considerably on its accuracy. Although the advent of digital reconstruction techniques has facilitated the creation and testing of musculoskeletal hypotheses in recent years, muscle strain capabilities have rarely been considered. Here, a digital modelling approach using the freely available visualization and animation software Blender is applied to estimate cranial muscle length changes and optimal and maximal possible gape in different theropod dinosaurs. Models of living archosaur taxa (Alligator mississippiensis, Buteo buteo) were used in an extant phylogenetically bracketed framework to validate the method. Results of this study demonstrate that Tyrannosaurus rex, Allosaurus fragilis and Erlikosaurus andrewsi show distinct differences in the recruitment of the jaw adductor musculature and resulting gape, confirming previous dietary and ecological assumptions. While the carnivorous taxa T. rex and Allo. fragilis were capable of a wide gape and sustained muscle force, the herbivorous therizinosaurian E. andrewsi was constrained to small gape angles.

  10. Intracranial Carotid Calcification on Cranial Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Deepak; Zishan, Umme Sara; Chappell, Francesca; Gregoriades, Maria-Lena; Sudlow, Cathie; Sellar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification is associated with cerebrovascular risk factors and stroke, but few quantification methods are available. We tested the reliability of visual scoring, semiautomated Agatston score, and calcium volume measurement in patients with recent stroke. Methods— We used scans from a prospective hospital stroke registry and included patients with anterior circulation ischemic stroke or transient ischemic stroke whose noncontrast cranial computed tomographic scans were available electronically. Two raters measured semiautomatic quantitative Agatston score, and calcium volume, and performed qualitative visual scoring using the original 4-point Woodcock score and a modified Woodcock score, where each image on which the internal carotid arteries appeared was scored and the slice scores summed. Results— Intra- and interobserver coefficient of variations were 8.8% and 16.5% for Agatston, 8.8% and 15.5% for calcium volume, and 5.7% and 5.4% for the modified Woodcock visual score, respectively. The modified Woodcock visual score correlated strongly with both Agatston and calcium volume quantitative measures (both R2=0.84; P<0.0001); calcium volume increased by 0.47-mm/point increase in modified Woodcock visual score. Intracranial internal carotid artery calcification increased with age by all measures (eg, visual score, Spearman ρ=0.4; P=0.005). Conclusions— Visual scores correlate highly with quantitative intracranial internal carotid artery calcification measures, with excellent observer agreements. Visual intracranial internal carotid artery scores could be a rapid and practical method for epidemiological studies. PMID:26251250

  11. Therapeutic strategy and long-term outcome of meningiomas located in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The clinical and surgical findings of 41 consecutive cases of posterior cranial fossa meningiomas operated on between January 1987 and December 2011 at Saitama Medical Center/Saitama Medical University were reviewed. The 31 female and 10 male patients were aged from 19 to 74 years (mean 54 years). The tumors were located in the petroclival (N=15), craniovertebral junction (N=6), lateral tentorial (N=12), and cerebellopontine angle (N=8) regions. Mean tumor equivalent diameter was 4.3 cm (range 2-9 cm). Head pain (46.3%) and gait disturbance (26.8%) were the most common presenting symptoms, and cranial neuropathies were the most common neurological signs on admission. Mean preoperative performance status (Karnofsky scale) was 83% (range 40-100%). Surgical approaches to these tumors included presigmoidal transpetrosal, retrosigmoidal, transcondylar, and combined approaches. In 4 cases, a staged procedure was performed. Gross total resection was achieved in 85.4% of patients, and subtotal/partial resection in 12.2%. Surgical mortality was 2.4% and complications were encountered in 11 patients (26.8%) including temporary neurological deficits in 4 patients. The mean follow-up period was 8.2 years, ranging from 1 to 24 years, and the mean performance status of patients at 12 months after the last surgery was 92% (range 0-100%). Recurrence or progression of disease was found in 9.8% of cases. Postoperative adjuvant therapy was performed in 6 cases. My experience suggests that although posterior cranial fossa meningiomas represent a continuing challenge for contemporary neurosurgeons, such tumors may be completely or subtotally removed with low rate of mortality and acceptable morbidity, allowing most of these patients to achieve good outcome in long-term follow up.

  12. Posterior cruciate ligament removal contributes to abnormal knee motion during posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Cromie, Melinda J; Siston, Robert A; Giori, Nicholas J; Delp, Scott L

    2008-11-01

    Abnormal anterior translation of the femur on the tibia has been observed in mid flexion (20-60 degrees ) following posterior stabilized total knee arthroplasty. The underlying biomechanical causes of this abnormal motion remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to isolate the effects of posterior cruciate ligament removal on knee motion after total knee arthroplasty. We posed two questions: Does removing the posterior cruciate ligament introduce abnormal anterior femoral translation? Does implanting a posterior stabilized prosthesis change the kinematics from the cruciate deficient case? Using a navigation system, we measured passive knee kinematics of ten male osteoarthritic patients during surgery after initial exposure, after removing the anterior cruciate ligament, after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and after implanting the prosthesis. Passively flexing and extending the knee, we calculated anterior femoral translation and the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Removing the posterior cruciate ligament doubled anterior translation (from 5.1 +/- 4.3 mm to 10.4 +/- 5.1 mm) and increased the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began (from 31.2 +/- 9.6 degrees to 49.3 +/- 7.3 degrees). Implanting the prosthesis increased the amount of anterior translation (to 16.1 +/- 4.4 mm), and did not change the flexion angle at which femoral rollback began. Abnormal anterior translation was observed in low and mid flexion (0-60 degrees) after removing the posterior cruciate ligament, and normal motion was not restored by the posterior stabilized prosthesis.

  13. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction Osteogenesis: Evolution of Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Juling; Harshbarger, Raymond J.; Kelley, Patrick; George, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    The rapid growth of the brain in the first few years of life drives the expansion of the cranial vault. This expansion occurs primarily at the cranial sutures; premature fusion of these results in growth restriction perpendicular to the axis of the suture. The result of this is physical deformation of the cranial and facial skeleton, as well as the distortion of the underling brain and its physiology. These patients can present with symptoms of raised intracranial pressure, neurodevelopmental delay, as well as the morphological features of craniosynostosis. Acquired conditions such as the slit ventricle syndrome may also result in cephalocranial disproportion with these clinical features. Traditional vault remodeling surgery is able to correct the physical abnormalities as well as correcting cephalocranial disproportion. Its limitations include the degree of scalp expansion achievable as well as resulting defects in the bone. The use of distraction osteogenesis of the cranial vault permits a controlled expansion in a predetermined vector in a gradual manner. When used in the calvarium, this combines the benefits of tissue expansion on the scalp, as well as stimulating the production of new bone, reducing the defects resulting from expansion. In this review, the authors describe some of the surgical considerations important to the use of this technique. This includes the relevant anatomy and technical aspects illustrated with the use of clinical cases. Finally, they present a summary of their experience and discuss the complications associated with cranial vault distraction osteogenesis. PMID:25383052

  14. An osteological and histological investigation of cranial joints in geckos.

    PubMed

    Payne, Samantha L; Holliday, Casey M; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2011-03-01

    Cranial kinesis is a widespread feature of gekkotan lizards. Previous studies of kinesis in lizards often described the relevant, mobile joints as synovial, thus characterized by the presence of a synovial cavity lined with articular cartilage. To date however, detailed investigations of cranial joint histology are lacking. We examined eight cranial joints (quadrate-articular, quadrate-pterygoid, quadrate-otooccipital, quadrate-squamosal, epipterygoid-prootic, epipterygoid-pterygoid, basisphenoid-pterygoid, and frontal-parietal) in five gekkotan species (Oedura lesueuerii, Eublepharis macularius, Hemitheconyx caudicinctus, Tarentola annularis, and Chondrodactylous bibronii) using microcomputed tomography and serial histology. Particular focus was given to the relationship between the bony and soft-tissue components of the joint. Our results demonstrate that only three of these joints are synovial: the quadrate-articular, epipterygoid-pterygoid, and basisphenoid-pterygoid joints. The frontal-parietal and quadrate-pterygoid joints are syndesmosis (fibrous), the epipterygoid-prootic and quadrate-otooccipital joints are synchondroses (cartilaginous without a synovial cavity) and the quadrate-squamosal joint was not present. Based on previous descriptions, we determine that the structure of some cranial joints is variable among lizard taxa. We caution that osteology does not necessarily predict cranial joint histology. Although the functional implications of these findings remain to be explored we note that the development of synovial joints appears to be associated with a neural crest origin for the elements involved.

  15. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach.

    PubMed

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction.

  16. Anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: a logical approach

    PubMed Central

    Gali, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    We describe the surgical approach that we have used over the last years for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, highlighting the importance of arthroscopic viewing through the anteromedial portal (AMP) and femoral tunnel drilling through an accessory anteromedial portal (AMP). The AMP allows direct view of the ACL femoral insertion site on the medial aspect of the lateral femoral condyle, does not require guides for anatomic femoral tunnel reaming, prevents an additional lateral incision in the distal third of the thigh (as would be unavoidable when the outside-in technique is used) and also can be used for double-bundle ACL reconstruction. PMID:26417571

  17. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fabricant, Peter D; Kocher, Mininder S

    2016-10-01

    Dramatic increases in youth competitive athletic activity, early sport specialization, and year-round training and competition, along with increased awareness of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in children, have led to a commensurate increase in the frequency of ACL tears in the skeletally immature. Recent understanding of the risks of nonoperative treatment and surgical delay have supported a trend toward early operative treatment. This article discusses treatment strategies for ACL injuries in children and adolescents, and offers our preferred treatment strategy for skeletally immature youth athletes with ACL tears.

  18. Posterior Wall Blowout in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Justin J.; Dean, Chase S.; Chahla, Jorge; Menge, Travis J.; Cram, Tyler R.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Violation of the posterior femoral cortex, commonly referred to as posterior wall blowout, can be a devastating intraoperative complication in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction and lead to loss of graft fixation or early graft failure. If cortical blowout occurs despite careful planning and adherence to proper surgical technique, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and alternative fixation techniques is imperative to ensure optimal patient outcomes. This article highlights anatomic considerations for femoral tunnel placement in ACL reconstruction and techniques for avoidance and salvage of a posterior wall blowout. PMID:27335885

  19. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury: Compensation during Gait using Hamstring Muscle Activity.

    PubMed

    Catalfamo, Paola Formento; Aguiar, Gerardo; Curi, Jorge; Braidot, Ariel

    2010-06-10

    Previous research has shown that an increase in hamstring activation may compensate for anterior tibial transalation (ATT) in patients with anterior cruciate ligament deficient knee (ACLd); however, the effects of this compensation still remain unclear. The goals of this study were to quantify the activation of the hamstring muscles needed to compensate the ATT in ACLd knee during the complete gait cycle and to evaluate the effect of this compensation on quadriceps activation and joint contact forces. A two dimensional model of the knee was used, which included the tibiofemoral and patellofemoral joints, knee ligaments, the medial capsule and two muscles units. Simulations were conducted to determine the ATT in healthy and ACLd knee and the hamstring activation needed to correct the abnormal ATT to normal levels (100% compensation) and to 50% compensation. Then, the quadriceps activation and the joint contact forces were calculated. Results showed that 100% compensation would require hamstring and quadriceps activations larger than their maximum isometric force, and would generate an increment in the peak contact force at the tibiofemoral (115%) and patellofemoral (48%) joint with respect to the healthy knee. On the other hand, 50% compensation would require less force generated by the muscles (less than 0.85 of maximum isometric force) and smaller contact forces (peak tibiofemoral contact force increased 23% and peak patellofemoral contact force decreased 7.5% with respect to the healthy knee). Total compensation of ATT by means of increased hamstring activity is possible; however, partial compensation represents a less deleterious strategy.

  20. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction combined with valgus tibial osteotomy (combined procedure).

    PubMed

    Boss, A; Stutz, G; Oursin, C; Gächter, A

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the patients who were operated on in a combined procedure from 1980 to 1992 with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency, cartilaginous lesions of the medial compartment, lesion of medial meniscus and varus malalignment. The combined operative procedure was autologous intra-articular ACL reconstruction with the middle third of the patellar ligament--partially augmented with Kennedy-ligament augmentation device (LAD) in hot dog technique--and high tibial osteotomy. The patients were examined according to the criteria of IKDC including testing of anterior stability with the KT-1000 arthrometer. Radiographically we checked axis and arthritis according to a modified score of Kannus. Twenty-seven of 34 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria could be followed up in three categories (2-5 years post-operatively, 5-10 years postoperatively, over 10 years post-operatively). Total qualification was good in 37%; there were no perioperative complications. Rehabilitation was not prolonged. Eighty-nine percent practised their preoperative job, over 50% had a higher level of sports activities than preoperatively, and more than 25% regained their pretraumatic sports capacity. Two-thirds had no giving way and less than 3 mm translation difference in comparison to the contralateral knee. Seventy-five percent of patients would accept the operation again. Radiological findings had no correlation to overall qualification. The encouraging results with respect to many of the criteria suggest using the combined procedure in a young patient with ACL insufficiency, varus malalignment and medial compartment damage including medial meniscus lesion.

  1. Proprioceptive deficit in patients with complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Pedro; Nicoliche, Eduardo; Cossich, Victor; de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Velasques, Bruna; Salles, José Inácio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the existence of proprioceptive deficits between the injured limb and the uninjured (i.e. contralateral normal) limb, in individuals who suffered complete tearing of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), using a strength reproduction test. Methods Sixteen patients with complete tearing of the ACL participated in the study. A voluntary maximum isometric strength test was performed, with reproduction of the muscle strength in the limb with complete tearing of the ACL and the healthy contralateral limb, with the knee flexed at 60°. The meta-intensity was used for the procedure of 20% of the voluntary maximum isometric strength. The proprioceptive performance was determined by means of absolute error, variable error and constant error values. Results Significant differences were found between the control group and ACL group for the variables of absolute error (p = 0.05) and constant error (p = 0.01). No difference was found in relation to variable error (p = 0.83). Conclusion Our data corroborate the hypothesis that there is a proprioceptive deficit in subjects with complete tearing of the ACL in an injured limb, in comparison with the uninjured limb, during evaluation of the sense of strength. This deficit can be explained in terms of partial or total loss of the mechanoreceptors of the ACL. PMID:26229870

  2. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  3. Idiopathic cranial polyneuropathy. A fifteen-year experience.

    PubMed

    Juncos, J L; Beal, M F

    1987-02-01

    Fourteen cases of idiopathic multiple cranial neuropathy seen over fifteen years are reviewed and contrasted with 6 cases of the Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, the closest and better known clinical entity. The syndrome consists of subacute onset of facial pain preceding the onset of cranial nerve palsies. There were 5 men and 9 women aged 21 to 83 years. Eight of the 9 patients treated with corticosteroids showed improvement, with pain usually receding within 48 hours. The cerebrospinal fluid was abnormal in 7 of 12 cases, with either a mild pleocytosis or raised protein content. The cranial nerves most frequently involved were the third and sixth. Motor nerves were affected more than sensory. Corticosteroid therapy appeared to hasten recovery of function. Clinical features are shared by both syndromes, the resulting spectrum of illness probably reflecting diverse aetiologies. Historical perspectives, differential diagnosis and aetiological considerations are discussed so that a coherent prospective clinical approach to the problem can be developed.

  4. 3D Printed, Customized Cranial Implant for Surgical Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogu, Venkata Phanindra; Ravi Kumar, Yennam; Asit Kumar, Khanra

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of the present work is to model cranial implant and printed in FDM machine (printer model used: mojo). Actually this is peculiar case and the skull has been damaged in frontal, parietal and temporal regions and a small portion of frontal region damaged away from saggital plane, complexity is to fill this frontal region with proper curvature. The Patient CT-data (Number of slices was 381 and thickness of each slice is 0.488 mm) was processed in mimics14.1 software, mimics file was sent to 3-matic software and calculated thickness of skull at different sections where cranial implant is needed then corrected the edges of cranial implant to overcome CSF (cerebrospinal fluid) leakage and proper fitting. Finally the implant average thickness is decided as 2.5 mm and printed in FDM machine with ABS plastic.

  5. Mass stranding of Odontoceti caused by parasitogenic eighth cranial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Morimitsu, T; Nagai, T; Ide, M; Kawano, H; Naichuu, A; Koono, M; Ishii, A

    1987-10-01

    Hearing organs of the Odontoceti from two mass strandings in 1983 and 1986 were examined histopathologically. In the 1983 stranding, two of three pilot whales (Globicephala macrorhynchus) were necropsied and numerous Nasitrema sp. were found close to the eighth cranial nerve (nervus vistibulo cochlearis) in both animals. Patchy degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve in and out of the modiolus of the cochlea was observed. In the 1986 stranding, five of 125 false killer whales (Pseudorca crassiclens) were examined and numerous trematodes (Nasitrema gondo) were found in the tympanic cavities. Severe degeneration of the eighth cranial nerve was discovered and there were many trematode eggs in the nervous and surrounding tissues. Parasitogenic eighth neuropathy is proposed again as the cause of mass stranding of the Odontoceti.

  6. Comparative evaluation of different anchoring techniques for synthetic cruciate ligaments. A biomechanical and animal investigation.

    PubMed

    Letsch, R

    1994-01-01

    Under certain well-defined indications alloplastic material may be used in cruciate ligament surgery. The stability and survival of such a synthetic ligament is to a great extent dependent on the anchorage with which it is fastened to the bone. Most fixation methods have proved to be too weak or have revealed other essential drawbacks, resulting in clinical and experimental failure. A new ligament fixation device (LFD) was developed and tested biomechanically and in animal experiments. In the biomechanic investigation the new LFD was compared to single staples, double staples in the belt-buckle technique, and ligament guidance through additional bone tunnels (Z-technique). The tests were carried out on human cadaver knees, plastic bones, and dog stifle joints. The evaluated parameters were linear and maximum load, stiffness, and elongation. In addition, hysteresis tests were performed to assay the long-term resistance of the fixation. The tests showed a significant superiority of the LFD in all measured variables compared to the other anchorages. The pull-out strength, at 1866 +/- 43 N (cadaver knee), was about four times that for the single staple, and about twice as high as that for the double staple and Z-technique. The animal experiments were performed on German shepherd cross-breed dogs. In six animals the anterior cruciate ligaments were excised bilaterally and replaced by a 6-mm Trevira ligament, on one side anchored with staples in the Z-technique, on the other with the LFD. Postoperatively the dogs were allowed to move freely; no additional protection was employed. After 6 months the animals were sacrificed and the knees examined macroscopically, radiologically, microscopically, and by biomechanical testing. After half a year of implantation, the pull-out strength of the alloplastic ligament was 662 +/- 62 N for the LFD and 531 +/- 67 N for the staples. Three ligaments in the staple group and one in the LFD group had ruptured completely, and two ligaments

  7. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jack C; Merkle, Andrew C; Carneal, Catherine M; Voo, Liming M; Johannes, Matthew S; Paulson, Jeff M; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests.

  8. An annotated history of craniofacial surgery and intentional cranial deformation.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, J T; Tutino, M

    2001-01-01

    The history of craniofacial surgery and the use of intentional cranial deformation is a long and varied one. Researching some of the earliest medical writings and reviews of early terracotta and stone figures from throughout the world clearly revealed that these two forms of treatment were widely extant. Intentional cranial deformation was used for a number of reasons including beautification, tribal identification, and social stature. The development of craniofacial surgery is a more modern practice and its historical evolution is reviewed in the context of techniques and the personalities involved.

  9. Cranial and spinal magnetic resonance imaging: A guide and atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1987-01-01

    This atlas provides a clinical guide to interpreting cranial and spinal magnetic resonance images. The book includes coverage of the cerebrum, temporal bone, and cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, with more than 400 scan images depicting both normal anatomy and pathologic findings. Introductory chapters review the practical physics of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, offer guidelines for interpreting cranial MR scans, and provide coverage of each anatomic region of the cranium and spine. For each region, scans accompanied by captions, show normal anatomic sections matched with MR images. These are followed by MR scans depicting various disease states.

  10. Intraventricular meningioma after cranial irradiation for childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ney, Douglas E; Huse, Jason T; Dunkel, Ira J; Steinherz, Peter G; Haque, Sofia; Khakoo, Yasmin

    2010-10-01

    Meningiomas are among the most common brain tumors in adults. They are most commonly located over the cerebral convexities and are infrequently found in an intraventricular location. Ionizing cranial radiation is a risk factor for late occurrence of meningiomas within the radiation field. While pathologic grading of meningiomas is straightforward, significant variability often exists between pathologists in applying standard grading criteria. This has implications for prognosis. Radiation-induced meningiomas may also have predilection to recur. The authors describe a case of an intraventricular meningioma occurring 23 years after cranial irradiation for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  11. Development of a Human Cranial Bone Surrogate for Impact Studies

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jack C.; Merkle, Andrew C.; Carneal, Catherine M.; Voo, Liming M.; Johannes, Matthew S.; Paulson, Jeff M.; Tankard, Sara; Uy, O. Manny

    2013-01-01

    In order to replicate the fracture behavior of the intact human skull under impact it becomes necessary to develop a material having the mechanical properties of cranial bone. The most important properties to replicate in a surrogate human skull were found to be the fracture toughness and tensile strength of the cranial tables as well as the bending strength of the three-layer (inner table-diplöe-outer table) architecture of the human skull. The materials selected to represent the surrogate cranial tables consisted of two different epoxy resins systems with random milled glass fiber to enhance the strength and stiffness and the materials to represent the surrogate diplöe consisted of three low density foams. Forty-one three-point bending fracture toughness tests were performed on nine material combinations. The materials that best represented the fracture toughness of cranial tables were then selected and formed into tensile samples and tested. These materials were then used with the two surrogate diplöe foam materials to create the three-layer surrogate cranial bone samples for three-point bending tests. Drop tower tests were performed on flat samples created from these materials and the fracture patterns were very similar to the linear fractures in pendulum impacts of intact human skulls, previously reported in the literature. The surrogate cranial tables had the quasi-static fracture toughness and tensile strength of 2.5 MPa√ m and 53 ± 4.9 MPa, respectively, while the same properties of human compact bone were 3.1 ± 1.8 MPa√ m and 68 ± 18 MPa, respectively. The cranial surrogate had a quasi-static bending strength of 68 ± 5.7 MPa, while that of cranial bone was 82 ± 26 MPa. This material/design is currently being used to construct spherical shell samples for drop tower and ballistic tests. PMID:25023222

  12. REHABILITATION PROTOCOL AFTER ISOLATED POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Kiyomoto, Henry Dan; Rosal, Gustavo Fogolin; Bryk, Flávio Fernandes; de Oliveira, Victor Marques; de Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix

    2015-01-01

    To create a rehabilitation protocol following reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), through a literature review. The literature review was conducted in the Medline and Embase databases, to search for data on biomechanical concepts and analyses relating to the posterior cruciate ligament of the knee. The search strategy was set up using the following rules: problem or injury in association with anatomical location terms; or surgical intervention procedure in association with rehabilitation terms. We began the process in this manner and subsequently introduced restrictions on certain terms to improve the search specificity. To design the protocol, a table was created for better data assessment, based on the time that elapsed between surgery and the start of physiotherapy. A rehabilitation protocol was created to improve weight-bearing control in the initial weeks after surgery, with the aid of a knee brace. Our aim was to achieve gains in total range of motion of the knee, which should be attained by the third month, thereby avoiding contractures resulting from the tissue healing process. Strengthening exercises and sensory-motor training were guided accordingly, thus avoiding overload on the graft and respecting the healing phases. The protocol proposed through this review was based on the current evidence relating to this subject. PMID:27047844

  13. Single-Stage Reconstruction of Both Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Mauro; Zicaro, Juan Pablo; Yacuzzi, Carlos; Costa-Paz, Matias

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Isolated Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) and Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL), or central pivot lesions are rare. These are frequently associated with collateral ligaments injuries. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate clinical and functional outcomes of 4 patients with acute ACL and PCL injury who underwent a simultaneous single-stage arthroscopic reconstruction. Methods: The inclusion criteria were patients with isolated ACL and PCL injuries, with a minimum follow-up of 2 years. We evaluated the type of graft used, the surgical technique and postoperative complications. The scales used for clinical evaluation were the Knee Society Score (KSS), IKDC, Lysholm and Tegner. Knee stability was assessed using the KT-1000 arthrometer. Results: Three men and one woman, with an average age of 48 years (45 to 56 years) were evaluated. Three presented a sport injury and one a car accident. Mean follow-up was 8 years. In all patients allograft was used for ligament reconstruction. Average postoperative results were: KSS 74-82, Lysholm 76, IKDC 63 and Tegner 6. KT-1000 arthrometer showed an average difference of 4mm compared to the contralateral knee. One patient underwent reintervention due to meniscal injury. Conclusion: ACL and PCL simultaneous single-stage reconstruction is a really demanding surgery. We achieved good results using allograft for both ligaments reconstruction. No clinical or functional postoperative complications were recorded.

  14. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT.

    PubMed

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome.

  15. [Cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Arnold-Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. Case report].

    PubMed

    da Silva, J A; da Costa, M D; Leal, A B; dos Reis, F R; de Queiroz, R B

    1996-12-01

    The authors report a case of cruciate hemiplegia associated with basilar impression, Chiari malformation and syringomyelia. The neuroanatomical controversy, the surgical treatment and the good outcome of the patient are discussed.

  16. Surgical Treatment of a Rare Isolated Bilateral Agenesis of Anterior and Posterior Cruciate Ligaments

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The isolated bilateral agenesis of both cruciate ligaments is a rare congenital disorder. A 17-year-old male came to our attention due to an alteration in gait pattern, pain, and tendency to walk on the forefoot with his knee flexed. The patient did not recall previous injuries. Upon physical examination anterior and posterior chronic instability were observed. Radiographic examination of both knees showed hypoplasia of the tibial eminence, a hypoplastic lateral femoral condyle, and a narrow intercondylar notch. MRI brought to light a bilateral agenesis of both posterior cruciate ligaments. Arthroscopic evaluation confirmed bilateral isolated agenesis of both cruciate ligaments. We recommended a rehabilitation program to prepare the patient for the arthroscopic construction of both cruciate ligaments. PMID:25197599

  17. LEG'S COMPARTMENT SYNDROME AFTER RECONSTRUCTION OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Jorge Sayum; Ramos, Leonardo Adeo; Sayum, Jorge; de Carvalho, Rogério Teixeira; Ejnisman, Benno; Matsuda, Marcelo Mitsuro; Nicolini, Alexandre; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The authors report a case of a patient that was submitted to a surgery of reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and collateral medial ligament repair of the left knee that complicated to a compartment syndrome. PMID:27047834

  18. Application of a 3D printed customized implant for canine cruciate ligament treatment by tibial tuberosity advancement.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Miguel; Dias, Marta; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe; Fernandes, Paulo; Pires, Inês; Gouveia, Barbara; Armés, Henrique; Pires, Eduardo; Rodrigues, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Fabrication of customized implants based on patient bone defect characteristics is required for successful clinical application of bone tissue engineering. Recently a new surgical procedure, tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA), has been used to treat cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) deficient stifle joints in dogs, which involves an osteotomy and the use of substitutes to restore the bone. However, limitations in the use of non-biodegradable implants have been reported. To overcome these limitations, this study presents the development of a bioceramic customized cage to treat a large domestic dog assigned for TTA treatment. A cage was designed using a suitable topology optimization methodology in order to maximize its permeability whilst maintaining the structural integrity, and was manufactured using low temperature 3D printing and implanted in a dog. The cage material and structure was adequately characterized prior to implantation and the in vivo response was carefully monitored regarding the biological response and patient limb function. The manufacturing process resulted in a cage composed of brushite, monetite and tricalcium phosphate, and a highly permeable porous morphology. An overall porosity of 59.2% was achieved by the combination of a microporosity of approximately 40% and a designed interconnected macropore network with pore sizes of 845 μm. The mechanical properties were in the range of the trabecular bone although limitations in the cage's reliability and capacity to absorb energy were identified. The dog's limb function was completely restored without patient lameness or any adverse complications and also the local biocompatibility and osteoconductivity were improved. Based on these observations it was possible to conclude that the successful design, fabrication and application of a customized cage for a dog CrCL treatment using a modified TTA technique is a promising method for the future fabrication of patient-specific bone implants, although

  19. Evaluating simulant materials for understanding cranial backspatter from a ballistic projectile.

    PubMed

    Das, Raj; Collins, Alistair; Verma, Anurag; Fernandez, Justin; Taylor, Michael

    2015-05-01

    In cranial wounds resulting from a gunshot, the study of backspatter patterns can provide information about the actual incidents by linking material to surrounding objects. This study investigates the physics of backspatter from a high-speed projectile impact and evaluates a range of simulant materials using impact tests. Next, we evaluate a mesh-free method called smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) to model the splashing mechanism during backspatter. The study has shown that a projectile impact causes fragmentation at the impact site, while transferring momentum to fragmented particles. The particles travel along the path of least resistance, leading to partial material movement in the reverse direction of the projectile motion causing backspatter. Medium-density fiberboard is a better simulant for a human skull than polycarbonate, and lorica leather is a better simulant for a human skin than natural rubber. SPH is an effective numerical method for modeling the high-speed impact fracture and fragmentations.

  20. Development of a Generic Tubular Tree Structure for the Modeling of Orbital Cranial Nerves.

    PubMed

    Kaltofen, Thomas; Ivcevic, Sara; Kogler, Mathias; Priglinger, Siegfried

    2016-01-01

    We developed a generic approach for modeling tubular tree structures as triangle meshes for the extension of our biomechanical eye model SEE-KID with a visualization of the orbital cranial nerves. Since three of the orbital nerves innervate extraocular eye muscles and move together with them, the structure must also support the partial translation and rotation of the nerves. For the SEE-KID model, this extension allows a better parameterization as well as an easier simulation of innervational disorders. Moreover, it makes the model even more useful for education and training purposes in contrast to other anatomical models. Due to its generic nature, the developed data structure and the associated algorithms can be used for any tubular tree structures, even in non-medical application areas.

  1. [Temporary postoperative protection of the anterior cruciate ligament with transarticular wire rope].

    PubMed

    Weigand, H; Storm, H; Birne, F U

    1990-04-01

    This article describes an operational method for the temporary protection of the anterior cruciate ligament after acute or late ligament reconstruction. In line with the course of the anterior cruciate ligament a wire rope is transarticularly implanted and fixed with a screw each at the femur (proximally) and at the tibia bone (distally). This easily performed method permits both the healing of the ligament lesion while preserving the original ligament length and the execution of an early functional exercise therapy.

  2. Initial evaluation of posterior cruciate ligament injuries: history, physical examination, imaging studies, surgical and nonsurgical indications.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vidriero, Emilio; Simon, David A; Johnson, Donald H

    2010-12-01

    Compared with anterior cruciate ligament injuries, posterior cruciate ligament injuries are a rare event. The mechanisms are predictable and a thorough physical examination is mandatory to rule out or define combined injury patterns. Stress radiography and magnetic resonance imaging studies are very helpful adjuncts. Acute and chronic injuries require slightly different approaches. As our understanding of normal and pathologic knee joint kinematics develops, nonoperative rehabilitation goals and operative techniques continue to evolve.

  3. Cranial Nerve Development Requires Co-Ordinated Shh and Canonical Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Trainor, Paul A.; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Iulianella, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerves govern sensory and motor information exchange between the brain and tissues of the head and neck. The cranial nerves are derived from two specialized populations of cells, cranial neural crest cells and ectodermal placode cells. Defects in either cell type can result in cranial nerve developmental defects. Although several signaling pathways are known to regulate cranial nerve formation our understanding of how intercellular signaling between neural crest cells and placode cells is coordinated during cranial ganglia morphogenesis is poorly understood. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling is one key pathway that regulates multiple aspects of craniofacial development, but whether it co-ordinates cranial neural crest cell and placodal cell interactions during cranial ganglia formation remains unclear. In this study we examined a new Patched1 (Ptch1) loss-of-function mouse mutant and characterized the role of Ptch1 in regulating Shh signaling during cranial ganglia development. Ptch1Wig/ Wig mutants exhibit elevated Shh signaling in concert with disorganization of the trigeminal and facial nerves. Importantly, we discovered that enhanced Shh signaling suppressed canonical Wnt signaling in the cranial nerve region. This critically affected the survival and migration of cranial neural crest cells and the development of placodal cells as well as the integration between neural crest and placodes. Collectively, our findings highlight a novel and critical role for Shh signaling in cranial nerve development via the cross regulation of canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:25799573

  4. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their... Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories (a) Identification. Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories are bone cutting and drilling instruments that are used...

  5. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  6. A reassessment of human cranial plasticity: Boas revisited

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Corey S.; Jantz, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    In 1912, Franz Boas published a study demonstrating the plastic nature of the human body in response to changes in the environment. The results of this study have been cited for the past 90 years as evidence of cranial plasticity. These findings, however, have never been critiqued thoroughly for their statistical and biological validity. This study presents a reassessment of Boas' data within a modern statistical and quantitative genetic framework. The data used here consist of head and face measurements on over 8,000 individuals of various European ethnic groups. By using pedigree information contained in Boas' data, narrow sense heritabilities are estimated by the method of maximum likelihood. In addition, a series of t tests and regression analyses are performed to determine the statistical validity of Boas' original findings on differentiation between American and European-born children and the prolonged effect of the environment on cranial form. Results indicate the relatively high genetic component of the head and face diameters despite the environmental differences during development. Results point to very small and insignificant differences between European- and American-born offspring, and no effect of exposure to the American environment on the cranial index in children. These results contradict Boas' original findings and demonstrate that they may no longer be used to support arguments of plasticity in cranial morphology. PMID:12374854

  7. Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Rereddy, Shruthi K; Mattox, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions Spontaneous defects between the mastoid and the posterior cranial fossa are exceedingly rare. Patients with these lesions may have a lower BMI compared to those with middle cranial fossa encephaloceles, but are otherwise demographically similar. This study recommends repair via a transtemporal approach to allow for examination of the entire posterior face of the temporal bone. Objective To describe cases of spontaneous posterior cranial fossa defects. Methods This study reviewed all cases of spontaneous posterior fossa defects presenting to a tertiary referral center over the last decade and described clinical presentation, imaging, operative findings, and outcomes. We also compared these lesions to those previously reported in the literature as well as the more common spontaneous encephaloceles of the middle cranial fossa. Results This study identified five cases with a mean age of 61.4 years, female-to-male ratio of 4:1, and a mean BMI of 31. Three cases presented with spontaneous pneumocephalus, one with CSF otorrhea, and one as an incidental imaging finding. Four defects were found medial to the sigmoid sinus and one was in the lateral retrosigmoid air cells.

  8. Cranial arterial patterns of the alpaca (Camelidae: Vicugna pacos)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Artiodactyl cranial arterial patterns deviate significantly from the standard mammalian pattern, most notably in the possession of a structure called the carotid rete (CR)—a subdural arterial meshwork that is housed within the cavernous venous sinus, replacing the internal carotid artery (ICA). This relationship between the CR and the cavernous sinus facilitates a suite of unique physiologies, including selective brain cooling. The CR has been studied in a number of artiodactyls; however, to my knowledge, only a single study to date documents a subset of the cranial arteries of New World camelids (llamas, alpacas, vicugñas and guanacoes). This study is the first complete description of the cranial arteries of a New World camelid species, the alpaca (Vicugna pacos), and the first description of near-parturition cranial arterial morphology within New World camelids. This study finds that the carotid arterial system is conserved between developmental stages in the alpaca, and differs significantly from the pattern emphasized in other long-necked ruminant artiodactyls in that a patent, homologous ICA persists through the animal's life.

  9. Symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis: clinical features and treatment.

    PubMed

    De Santi, Lorenzo; Annunziata, Pasquale

    2012-02-01

    In multiple sclerosis, neuropathic pain is a frequent condition, negatively influencing the overall quality of life. Cranial neuralgias, including trigeminal, glossopharyngeal neuralgias, as well as occipital neuralgia, are typical expression of neuropathic pain. Neuralgias are characterised by paroxysmal painful attacks of electric shock-like sensation, occurring spontaneously or evoked by innocuous stimuli in specific trigger areas. In multiple sclerosis, demyelination in the centrally myelinated part of the cranial nerve roots plays an important role in the origin of neuralgic pain. These painful syndromes arising in multiple sclerosis are therefore considered "symptomatic", in contrast to classic cranial neuralgias, in which no cause other than a neurovascular contact is identified. At this time, the evidence on the management of symptomatic cranial neuralgias in multiple sclerosis is fragmentary and a comprehensive review addressing this topic is still lacking. For that reason, treatment is often based on personal clinical experience as well as on anecdotal reports. The aim of this review is to critically summarise the latest findings regarding the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, the instrumental evaluation and the medical as well as neurosurgical treatment of symptomatic trigeminal, glossopharyngeal and occipital neuralgia in multiple sclerosis, providing useful insights for neurologists and neurosurgeons and a broad range of specialists potentially involved in the treatment of these painful syndromes.

  10. Cranial helminths of Mustela vison Schreber, 1777 in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, J; Miquel, J; Mañas, S; Asensio, V; Eira, C; Palazón, S

    2006-04-30

    A survey was carried out to investigate the presence of cranial helminths in 337 American minks (Mustela vison) from Spain. This information was obtained partly in order to evaluate potential conservation problems and sanitary risks to the congeneric European mink (Mustela lutreola), one of the most endangered carnivores in the world. Skulls and rectal faeces of each specimen were simultaneously analysed. Troglotrema acutum and Skrjabingylus nasicola were found in 5.6% of the M. vison analysed. No cranial lesions were seen in any of the examined skulls. The finding of both helminths in Spanish free-living M. vison specimens enlarges their natural definitive host spectrum in Western Europe. One relatively important focus of T. acutum in M. vison was detected (30.4%) in the Spanish Alava province while S. nasicola was found to be very infrequent. The suitability of both analytical methods was assessed in order to know to what degree coprological analysis reflects the real prevalence of cranial helminths in this host. It is possible to conclude that coprological analysis can be used instead of necropsies to analyse the possible incidence of pathogenic cranial helminths in mustelids. This aspect is very important and useful when trying to analyse the helminthological status of endangered species such as the native mink (M. lutreola) particularly in areas where both congeneric species are present and strict competition occurs.

  11. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  12. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  13. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  14. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  15. 21 CFR 882.5800 - Cranial electrotherapy stimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cranial electrotherapy stimulator. 882.5800 Section 882.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5800...

  16. Phylogeny, phylogenetic inference, and cranial evolution in pitheciids and Aotus.

    PubMed

    Bjarnason, Alexander; Soligo, Christophe; Elton, Sarah

    2017-03-01

    Pitheciids, one of the major radiations of New World monkeys endemic to South and Central America, are distributed in the Amazon and Orinoco basins, and include Callicebus, Cacajao, Chiropotes, and Pithecia. Molecular phylogenetics strongly support pitheciid monophyly, whereas morphological analyses infer a range of phylogenies including a sister relationship between Aotus and Callicebus. We collected geometric morphometric cranial data from pitheciids and Aotus, and used cranial data for distance-based phylogenetic analysis and tests of phylogenetic signal. Phylogenetic analyses of pitheciids were repeated with Lagothrix, Callimico, and Saimiri outgroups for Procrustes shape with and without Aotus based on the whole cranium and six anatomical regions. All phylogenetic signal tests were significant, and tree lengths were shortest and had the least morphological change over the phylogeny for Procrustes residuals from the cranial base and palate. The majority of phylogenetic analyses of Procrustes shape for pitheciids without Aotus supported the molecular phylogeny, and with Aotus included the majority inferred an Aotus-Callicebus clade, although three analyses with Callimico as outgroup supported the molecular phylogeny. The morphological similarity of Aotus and Callicebus is likely a mix of plesiomorphy, allometry, and homoplasy, and future phylogenetic inference of living and extinct platyrrhine taxa should consider the impact of these factors alongside outgroup selection and cranial region.

  17. Testing the cranial evolutionary allometric 'rule' in Galliformes.

    PubMed

    Linde-Medina, M

    2016-09-01

    Recent comparative studies have indicated the existence of a common cranial evolutionary allometric (CREA) pattern in mammals and birds, in which smaller species have relatively smaller faces and bigger braincases than larger species. In these studies, cranial allometry was tested using a multivariate regression between shape (described using landmarks coordinates) and size (i.e. centroid size), after accounting for phylogenetic relatedness. Alternatively, cranial allometry can be determined by comparing the sizes of two anatomical parts using a bivariate regression analysis. In this analysis, a slope higher or lower than one indicates the existence of positive or negative allometry, respectively. Thus, in those species that support the CREA 'rule', positive allometry is expected for the association between face size and braincase size, which would indicate that larger species have disproportionally larger faces. In this study, I applied these two approaches to explore cranial allometry in 83 Galliformes (Aves, Galloanserae), ranging in mean body weight from 30 g to 2.5 kg. The multivariate regression between shape and centroid size revealed the existence of a significant allometric pattern resembling CREA, whereas the second analysis revealed a negative allometry for beak size and braincase size (i.e. contrary to the CREA 'rule', larger galliform species have disproportionally shorter beaks than smaller galliform species). This study suggests that the presence of CREA may be overestimated when using cranium size as the standard measurement.

  18. Increased cranial capacity in hominid evolution and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Chaline, Jean

    2003-08-01

    One of the major trends in primate evolution generally and hominid evolution in particular, is cranio-facial contraction accompanied by an increase in cranial capacity. Landmark-based morphometric methods are applied to adult skulls of great apes (Gorilla, Pan), australopithecines (Australopithecus and Paranthropus), and humans (Homo eragster, erectus, neanderthalensis, and sapiens). Morphological changes quantified by vector fields (Procrustes methods) indicate that these skull plans are characterized by distinctive degrees of cranio-facial contraction. These suggest the existence of three discrete skull organization plans: "great ape", "australopithecine" and "Homo". This paper focuses on the "Homo" skull bauplan and discusses the possible relationships between greatly increased cranial capacity and preeclampsia. The earliest species of the human lineage exhibit less cranio-facial contraction and smaller cranial capacity than Homo neanderthalensis and modern Homo sapiens. Neandertalization introduces a posterior elongation of the skull and leads to a large increase in cranial capacity in the last Neandertals, with values as large as in present-day H. sapiens. Consequently, a new biological hypothesis is proposed to account for the unexplained disappearance of H. neanderthalensis some 30000 years ago related to the possible appearance of preeclampsia as a factor affecting the survival of the species.

  19. Tumors of the cranial base: Diagnosis and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sekhar, L.N.; Schramm, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The first section of this book highlights the differences and similarities in the pathology and biology of the various types of neoplasms of the cranial base. The second section covers improvements in radiological diagnosis with the advent of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and a better knowledge of radiological anatomy. It also examines the significance and proper evaluation of minor symptoms to enable earlier diagnosis, as well as the advances in interventional radiology that have produced the balloon occlusion text and tumor embolization. Section three is on advanced neuroanesthetic techniques and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring. Section four describes specialized treatment modalities including microsurgical resection with the laser, radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Section five reviews the latest techniques for reconstruction of the cranial base following resection, as well as the preservation and reconstruction of cranial nerves and cerebral blood vessels exposed during the surgery. The final three sections examine the lesions and surgical techniques specific to the different anatomical regions, i.e, the anterior, middle and posterior cranial base.

  20. The lower cranial nerves: IX, X, XI, XII.

    PubMed

    Sarrazin, J-L; Toulgoat, F; Benoudiba, F

    2013-10-01

    The lower cranial nerves innervate the pharynx and larynx by the glossopharyngeal (CN IX) and vagus (CN X) (mixed) nerves, and provide motor innervation of the muscles of the neck by the accessory nerve (CN XI) and the tongue by the hypoglossal nerve (CN XII). The symptomatology provoked by an anomaly is often discrete and rarely in the forefront. As with all cranial nerves, the context and clinical examinations, in case of suspicion of impairment of the lower cranial nerves, are determinant in guiding the imaging. In fact, the impairment may be located in the brain stem, in the peribulbar cisterns, in the foramens or even in the deep spaces of the face. The clinical localization of the probable seat of the lesion helps in choosing the adapted protocol in MRI and eventually completes it with a CT-scan. In the bulb, the intra-axial pathology is dominated by brain ischemia (in particular, with Wallenberg syndrome) and multiple sclerosis. Cisternal pathology is tumoral with two tumors, schwannoma and meningioma. The occurrence is much lower than in the cochleovestibular nerves as well as the leptomeningeal nerves (infectious, inflammatory or tumoral). Finally, foramen pathology is tumoral with, outside of the usual schwannomas and meningiomas, paragangliomas. For radiologists, fairly hesitant to explore these lower cranial pairs, it is necessary to be familiar with (or relearn) the anatomy, master the exploratory technique and be aware of the diagnostic possibilities.

  1. Schwannoma originating from lower cranial nerves: report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Hirofumi; Kito, Akira; Maki, Hideki; Hattori, Kenichi; Noda, Tomoyuki; Wada, Kentaro

    2012-02-01

    Four cases of schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves are presented. Case 1 is a schwannoma of the vagus nerve in the parapharyngeal space. The operation was performed by the transcervical approach. Although the tumor capsule was not dissected from the vagus nerve, hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Case 2 is a schwannoma in the jugular foramen. The operation was performed by the infralabyrinthine approach. Although only the intracapsular tumor was enucleated, facial palsy, hoarseness, dysphagia and paresis of the deltoid muscle occurred transiently after the operation. The patient's hearing had also slightly deteriorated. Case 3 is a dumbbell-typed schwannoma originating from the hypoglossal nerve. The hypoglossal canal was markedly enlarged by the tumor. As the hypoglossal nerves were embedded in the tumor, the tumor around the hypoglossal nerves was not resected. The tumor was significantly enlarged for a while after stereotactic irradiation. Case 4 is an intracranial cystic schwannoma originating from the IXth or Xth cranial nerves. The tumor was resected through the cerebello-medullary fissure. The tumor capsule attached to the brain stem was not removed. Hoarseness and dysphagia happened transiently after the operation. Cranial nerve palsy readily occurs after the removal of the schwannoma originating from the lower cranial nerves. Mechanical injury caused by retraction, extension and compression of the nerve and heat injury during the drilling of the petrous bone should be cautiously avoided.

  2. A study of isokinetic strength and laxity with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Mullineaux, David R.; Cho, Eunok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide useful information for future treatments and to organize rehabilitation programs for anterior cruciate ligament injury by assessing isokinetic muscle strength and laxity of knee joints in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one high school athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injuries participated in this study. Isokinetic muscle strength at 60°/sec and anterior cruciate ligament laxity for non-involved and involved sides, classified on the basis of the severity of anterior cruciate ligament injury, were assessed. [Results] A comparison of isokinetic muscle strength measured from the non-involved and involved sides showed a significant difference in the maximum strength and knee flexor muscle strength. For laxity, a significant difference was observed in the anterior drawer test results obtained with a force of 88 N. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study has shown that the assessment of isokinetic muscle strength and ligament laxity from athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury should be utilized to provide baseline data for prevention and prediction of injury. PMID:28174432

  3. The cranial anatomy of the neornithischian dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Though the dinosaur Thescelosaurus neglectus was first described in 1913 and is known from the relatively fossiliferous Lance and Hell Creek formations in the Western Interior Basin of North America, the cranial anatomy of this species remains poorly understood. The only cranial material confidently referred to this species are three fragmentary bones preserved with the paratype, hindering attempts to understand the systematic relationships of this taxon within Neornithischia. Here the cranial anatomy of T. neglectus is fully described for the first time based on two specimens that include well-preserved cranial material (NCSM 15728 and TLAM.BA.2014.027.0001). Visual inspection of exposed cranial elements of these specimens is supplemented by detailed CT data from NCSM 15728 that enabled the examination of otherwise unexposed surfaces, facilitating a complete description of the cranial anatomy of this species. The skull of T. neglectus displays a unique combination of plesiomorphic and apomorphic traits. The premaxillary and ‘cheek’ tooth morphologies are relatively derived, though less so than the condition seen in basal iguanodontians, suggesting that the high tooth count present in the premaxillae, maxillae, and dentaries may be related to the extreme elongation of the skull of this species rather than a retention of the plesiomorphic condition. The morphology of the braincase most closely resembles the iguanodontians Dryosaurus and Dysalotosaurus, especially with regard to the morphology of the prootic. One autapomorphic feature is recognized for the first time, along with several additional cranial features that differentiate this species from the closely related and contemporaneous Thescelosaurus assiniboiensis. Published phylogenetic hypotheses of neornithischian dinosaur relationships often differ in the placement of the North American taxon Parksosaurus, with some recovering a close relationship with Thescelosaurus and others with the South American

  4. Cranial base deviation in hemifacial microsomia by craniometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Paliga, James Thomas; Tahiri, Youssef; Wink, Jason; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse A

    2015-01-01

    Although facial asymmetry in hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is well documented in the literature, no studies have concentrated on the morphology of the cranial base. This study aimed to evaluate the endocranial morphology in patients with HFM. Consecutive patients with unilateral HFM treated at a craniofacial center from 2000 to 2012 were included. The patients were grouped according to severity on the basis of the Kaban-Pruzansky classification: mild (0-1), moderate (2a), and severe (2b-3). Skull base angulation and transverse craniometric measures were recorded and then compared with those of age-matched controls. A total of 30 patients (14 males, 16 females) averaging 7.5 years of age (range, 1.1-15.7 y) were included. Four patients were classified as mild; 12, as moderate; and 14, as severe. The mean cranial base angle was found to be between 179 and 181 degrees with no significant difference between the severity groups (P = 0.57). The mean cranial base angle did not differ significantly in the patients compared with the controls(179.6 vs 180.0; P = 0.51) No significant differences between the affected and unaffected sides in the patients were found in distances from the midline to hypoglossal canal, internal acoustic meatus, lateral carotid canal, medial carotid canal, foramen ovale, and rotundum. There were no significant differences in transverse measurements between the severity classes using the same landmarks (P = 0.46, P = 0.30, P = 0.40, P = 0.25, P = 0.57, and P = 0.76, respectively). The cranial base axis is not deviated in the patients with HFM compared with the age-matched controls, and there exists little difference in endocranial morphologic measurements with increasing severity of HFM. These data are interesting, given the role of the cranial base in facial growth and the varying hypotheses regarding the mechanism of disease in HFM.

  5. Evidence for cranial endothermy in the opah (Lampris guttatus)

    PubMed Central

    Runcie, Rosa M.; Dewar, Heidi; Hawn, Donald R.; Frank, Lawrence R.; Dickson, Kathryn A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cranial endothermy evolved independently in lamnid sharks, billfishes and tunas, and is thought to minimize the effects of ambient temperature change on both vision and neural function during deep dives. The opah, Lampris guttatus, is a large epipelagic–mesopelagic predator that makes repeated dives into cool waters to forage. To determine if L. guttatus exhibits cranial endothermy, we measured cranial temperatures in live, decked fish and identified potential sources of heat and mechanisms to conserve heat. In 40 opah (95.1±7.6 cm fork length), the temperature of the tissue behind the eye was elevated by a mean (±s.e.m.) of 2.1±0.3°C and a maximum of 6.3°C above myotomal muscle temperature (Tm), used as a proxy for ambient temperature. Cranial temperature varied significantly with Tm and temperature elevation was greater at lower Tm. The proximal region of the paired lateral rectus extraocular muscle appears to be the primary source of heat. This muscle is the largest extraocular muscle, is adjacent to the optic nerve and brain and is separated from the brain only by a thin layer of bone. The proximal lateral rectus muscle is darker red in color and has a higher citrate synthase activity, indicating a higher capacity for aerobic heat production, than all other extraocular muscles. Furthermore, this muscle has a layer of fat insulating it from the gill cavity and is perfused by a network of arteries and veins that forms a putative counter-current heat exchanger. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the opah can maintain elevated cranial temperatures. PMID:19181893

  6. Cranial suture biology of the Aleutian Island inhabitants.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-04-01

    Research on cranial suture biology suggests there is biological and taxonomic information to be garnered from the heritable pattern of suture synostosis. Suture synostosis along with brain growth patterns, diet, and biomechanical forces influence phenotypic variability in cranial vault morphology. This study was designed to determine the pattern of ectocranial suture synostosis in skeletal populations from the Aleutian Islands. We address the hypothesis that ectocranial suture synostosis pattern will differ according to cranial vault shape. Ales Hrdlicka identified two phenotypes in remains excavated from the Aleutian Island. The Paleo-Aleutians, exhibiting a dolichocranic phenotype with little prognathism linked to artifacts distinguished from later inhabitants, Aleutians, who exhibited a brachycranic phenotype with a greater amount of prognathism. A total of 212 crania representing Paleo-Aleuts and Aleutian as defined by Hrdlicka were investigated for suture synostosis pattern following standard methodologies. Comparisons were performed using Guttmann analyses. Results revealed similar suture fusion patterns for the Paleo-Aleut and Aleutian, a strong anterior to posterior pattern of suture fusion for the lateral-anterior suture sites, and a pattern of early termination at the sagittal suture sites for the vault. These patterns were found to differ from that reported in the literature. Because these two populations with distinct cranial shapes exhibit similar patterns of suture synostosis it appears pattern is independent of cranial shape in these populations of Homo sapiens. These findings suggest that suture fusion patterns may be population dependent and that a standardized methodology, using suture fusion to determine age-at-death, may not be applicable to all populations.

  7. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Vascular Complications in Arthroscopic Repair Of Posterior Cruciate Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Agotegaray, Juan Ignacio; Comba, Ignacio; Bisiach, Luciana; Grignaffini, María Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament is the primary stabilizer of the knee. Among the potential complications in arthroscopic repair of this ligament, there are vascular lesions, due to laceration, thrombosis and injury of the intima of the popliteal artery. We used one case to show the vascular complications that may arise in arthroscopic repair of the posterior cruciate ligament, how to handle it and the results. Methods: One patient, 33 years old, with a history of traffic accident. In a physical exam the patient shows pain and swelling of the knee, positive posterior drawer test and positive Godfrey test. X-rays on the knee show posterior tibial translation and MRI a complete fibers rupture at the middle third of the posterior cruciate ligament. An arthroscopic repair surgery was scheduled three weeks after trauma, with PCL reconstruction using simple band technique.After surgical intervention, hemostatic cuff was released, no peripheral pulse, paleness and coldness of the member was confirmed. An arteriography was carried out, which confirmed absences of distal vascular filling in the popliteal artery. An urgent referral was carried out with Vascular Surgery Services, who had been informed of the surgery previously (a notification that is part of our routine for this kind of interventions). Arteriorrhaphy and venorrhaphy of the popliteal arteries was fulfilled 12 hours later, with a leg fasciotomy. Daily monitoring was performed, and after 72 hours, muscle necrosis is seen with wound drainage, analysis shows presence of gram-negative bacilli, Proteus Mirabilis-Pseudomonas spp and the lab results showed leukocytes: 8.700/ml, ESR: 58, CRP: 48. A new surgery is performed with complete resection of the anterior external compartment of the leg, and a system of continuous cleansing is applied with physiological saline solution and boric acid for 14 days until drainage is eliminated. Vancomycin and ceftazidime EV was indicated for 14 days and, after a good

  9. Compartment pressure monitoring during anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Amendola, A; Faber, K; Willits, K; Miniaci, A; Labib, S; Fowler, P

    1999-09-01

    A prospective double blind randomized study was carried out using 20 healthy males with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency undergoing bone-patellar tendon-bone ACL reconstruction. The subjects were randomized into either water or saline irrigation and then underwent identical reconstructive procedures using an arthroscopic pump. Continuous preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative pressures were monitored using the slit catheter technique. Blood pressure and compartment pressure measurements were continuously recorded and noted at all stages of the procedure. Mean preoperative anterior and posterior compartment pressures were similar in both groups. No significant differences were noted between the anterior and posterior compartments of each group. No difference between water and saline irrigation was identified throughout the procedure. In both groups, postoperative pressures were slightly lower in the anterior and posterior compartments compared with preoperative pressures, but not significantly.

  10. Simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligaments.

    PubMed

    Demircay, Emre; Ofluoglu, Demet; Ozel, Omer; Oztop, Pinar

    2015-04-01

    Intra-articular ganglion cysts of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are rare, and bilateral ganglion cysts are even rarer. These cysts may cause intermittent or chronic nonspecific knee discomfort. Although three cases of bilateral ganglion cysts have been reported in the literature, the knees were not simultaneously affected in those cases. Herein, we report the case of a 56-year-old woman who presented with simultaneous bilateral ganglion cysts of the ACL that were symptomatic. She was successfully treated with arthroscopic resection and debridement. We also present a brief review of the literature, highlighting the aetiology, diagnosis and management of ganglion cysts of the ACL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous bilateral intra-articular ganglion cysts of the ACL.

  11. Current Trends in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Review.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Ingole, Sachin; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-11-13

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) is an accepted and established surgical technique for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries and is now being practiced across the globe in increasing numbers. Although most patients get good to excellent results in the short-term after ACLR, its consequences in the long-term in prevention or acceleration of knee osteoarthritis (OA) are not yet well-defined. Still, there are many debatable issues related to ACLR, such as the appropriate timing of surgery, graft selection, fixation methods of the graft, operative techniques, rehabilitation after surgery, and healing augmentation techniques. Most surgeons prefer not to wait long after an ACL injury to do an ACLR, as delayed reconstruction is associated with secondary damages to the intra- and periarticular structures of the knee. Autografts are the preferred choice of graft in primary ACLR, and hamstring tendons are the most popular amongst surgeons. Single bundle ACLR is being practiced by the majority, but double bundle ACLR is getting popular due to its theoretical advantage of providing more anatomical reconstruction. A preferred construct is the interference fixation (Bio-screw) at the tibial site and the suspensory method of fixation at the femoral site. In a single bundle hamstring graft, a transportal approach for creating a femoral tunnel has recently become more popular than the trans-tibial technique. Various healing augmentation techniques, including the platelet rich plasma (PRP), have been tried after ACLR, but there is still no conclusive proof of their efficacy. Accelerated rehabilitation is seemingly more accepted immediately after ACLR.

  12. Direct Cranial Nerve Involvement by Gliomas: Case series and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Mabray, Marc C.; Glastonbury, Christine M.; Mamlouk, Mark D.; Punch, Gregory E.; Solomon, David A.; Cha, Soonmee

    2017-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by infiltrative growth of tumor cells, including along white matter tracts. This may result in clinical cranial neuropathy due to direct involvement of a cranial nerve rather than by leptomeningeal spread along cranial nerves. Gliomas directly involving cranial nerves III-XII are rare with only eleven cases reported in the literature prior to 2014, including eight with imaging. We present eight additional cases demonstrating direct infiltration of a cranial nerve by glioma. Asymmetric cisternal nerve expansion as compared to the contralateral nerve was noted with a mean length of involvement of 9.4 mm. Based on our case series, the key imaging feature to recognize direct cranial nerve involvement by a glioma is the detection of an intra-axial mass in the pons or midbrain that is directly associated with expansion, signal abnormality, and/or enhancement of the adjacent cranial nerve(s). PMID:25857757

  13. Heritability of human cranial dimensions: comparing the evolvability of different cranial regions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; González-José, Rolando; Santos, Mauro; Hernández, Miquel

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative craniometrical traits have been successfully incorporated into population genetic methods to provide insight into human population structure. However, little is known about the degree of genetic and non-genetic influences on the phenotypic expression of functionally based traits. Many studies have assessed the heritability of craniofacial traits, but complex patterns of correlation among traits have been disregarded. This is a pitfall as the human skull is strongly integrated. Here we reconsider the evolutionary potential of craniometric traits by assessing their heritability values as well as their patterns of genetic and phenotypic correlation using a large pedigree-structured skull series from Hallstatt (Austria). The sample includes 355 complete adult skulls that have been analysed using 3D geometric morphometric techniques. Heritability estimates for 58 cranial linear distances were computed using maximum likelihood methods. These distances were assigned to the main functional and developmental regions of the skull. Results showed that the human skull has substantial amounts of genetic variation, and a t-test showed that there are no statistically significant differences among the heritabilities of facial, neurocranial and basal dimensions. However, skull evolvability is limited by complex patterns of genetic correlation. Phenotypic and genetic patterns of correlation are consistent but do not support traditional hypotheses of integration of the human shape, showing that the classification between brachy- and dolicephalic skulls is not grounded on the genetic level. Here we support previous findings in the mouse cranium and provide empirical evidence that covariation between the maximum widths of the main developmental regions of the skull is the dominant factor of integration in the human skull. PMID:19166470

  14. Cranial nerves XIII and XIV: nerves in the shadows

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    It has been known for over a century that these cranial nerves exist, and that they are not typographical errors nor a sensational event reported in the medical literature. A number of scientific articles on anatomy highlight how textbooks on descriptive anatomy do not always consider variables such as differences related to the geographical areas where people live, and these differences do exist. This is an important concept not only for surgeons, but also for all medical professionals who use manual techniques when treating their patients, ie, osteopaths, chiropractors, physiotherapists, and other manual therapists. This paper highlights the latest developments regarding these cranial nerves, offering at the same time some ideas for further reflection when looking at clinical scenarios that appear to bear little relationship to each other. Inclusion of these concepts in everyday anamnesis is encouraged. PMID:23516138

  15. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-11-11

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact.

  16. Cranial injuries as evidence of violence in prehistoric southern California.

    PubMed

    Walker, P L

    1989-11-01

    Crania from the Channel Island area of southern California were examined for evidence of traumatic injuries. Well-healed depressed fractures in the outer table of the cranial vault are common in skeletal remains from the northern Channel Islands (18.56% n = 598) but rare in those from the mainland coast (7.5% n = 146). This prevalence of traumatic injuries among the islanders may be a result of intense competition over resources in a geographically circumscribed environment. The frequency of cranial injuries increases significantly between the early and late prehistoric periods on the Channel Islands. This temporal variation appears to reflect changes in patterns of violence associated with population growth and environmental instability.

  17. Cranial radiation in childhood acute lymphocytic leukemia. Neuropsychologic sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Whitt, J.K.; Wells, R.J.; Lauria, M.M.; Wilhelm, C.L.; McMillan, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    A battery of neuropsychologic tests was administered ''blindly'' to 18 children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had been randomly assigned to treatment regimens with or without cranial radiation. These children were all in complete continuous remission for more than 3 1/2 years and were no longer receiving therapy. The results indicated no substantial differences between groups as a function of radiation therapy. However, decreased neuropsychologic performance was found when the entire sample was compared with population norms. These data do not support the hypothesis that cranial radiation therapy is responsible for the neuropsychologic sequelae seen in these survivors of ALL. Post hoc multiple regression analysis indicated that parental education levels accounted for more of the neuropsychologic variability seen in these children than other factors such as age at diagnosis, type of therapy, or sex of child.

  18. Distraction Osteogenesis Update: Introduction of Multidirectional Cranial Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sunaga, Ataru; Kamochi, Hideaki; Oguma, Hirofumi; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we discuss in detail our current procedure for treating craniosynostosis using multidirectional cranial distraction osteogenesis (MCDO). The MCDO method allows all phenotypes of skull deformity to be reshaped by distraction osteogenesis, except in patients who are 5 months of age or younger and patients with posterior cranial vault problems. We report the results of clinical data of 36 children with craniosynostosis who underwent MCDO between 2005 and 2014 in our institute. This method has the following benefits, such as a high flexibility of reshaping, shorter treatment period and less invasive secondary intervention. We also discuss the other distraction osteogenesis techniques that are used to treat craniosynostosis and compare them with MCDO. The preferred procedure for correction of craniosynostosis may depend on the patient's age, the extent of deformity, and the extent of correction achievable by surgery. We can arrange the combinations of various methods according to the advantage and disadvantage of each technique. PMID:27226854

  19. Blunt force cranial trauma in the Cambodian killing fields.

    PubMed

    Ta'ala, Sabrina C; Berg, Gregory E; Haden, Kathryn

    2006-09-01

    In this paper we present a unique pattern of blunt force cranial trauma that was observed in 10 of a sample of 85 crania from a Cambodian skeletal collection comprised of Khmer Rouge victims. Initial examination of the trauma, which presents as substantial damage to the occipital with fractures extending to the cranial base, suggested the pattern was classifiable as a basilar or ring fracture. However, further investigation, including trauma analysis and historical research, revealed that this fracture type is distinctive from basilar and ring fractures. Historical data indicate that a particular execution method was the likely source of the trauma. Recognition of this trauma pattern is significant because it exemplifies the distinct fracture configuration resulting from an apparently categorical and methodical execution technique. Identification of this fracture type could potentially assist forensic investigators in the recognition of specific methods of murder or execution.

  20. Motonuclear changes after cranial nerve injury and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, E; Pallini, R; Lauretti, L; La Marca, F; Scogna, A; Rossi, G F

    1997-09-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms at play in nerve regeneration after nerve injury. Personal studies are reported regarding motonuclear changes after regeneration of injured cranial nerves, in particular of the facial and oculomotor nerves, as well as the influence that the natural molecule acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) has on post-axotomy cranial nerve motoneuron degeneration after facial and vagus nerve lesions. Adult and newborn animal models were used. Massive motoneuron response after nerve section and reconstruction was observed in the motonuclei of all nerves studied. ALC showed to have significant neuroprotective effects on the degeneration of axotomized motoneurons. Complex quantitative, morphological and somatotopic nuclear changes occurred that sustain new hypotheses regarding the capacities of motoneurons to regenerate and the possibilities of new neuron proliferation. The particularities of such observations are described and discussed.

  1. Tracking modern human population history from linguistic and cranial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Centeno, Hugo; Harvati, Katerina; Jäger, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Languages and genes arguably follow parallel evolutionary trajectories, descending from a common source and subsequently differentiating. However, although common ancestry is established within language families, it remains controversial whether language preserves a deep historical signal. To address this question, we evaluate the association between linguistic and geographic distances across 265 language families, as well as between linguistic, geographic, and cranial distances among eleven populations from Africa, Asia, and Australia. We take advantage of differential population history signals reflected by human cranial anatomy, where temporal bone shape reliably tracks deep population history and neutral genetic changes, while facial shape is more strongly associated with recent environmental effects. We show that linguistic distances are strongly geographically patterned, even within widely dispersed groups. However, they are correlated predominantly with facial, rather than temporal bone, morphology, suggesting that variation in vocabulary likely tracks relatively recent events and possibly population contact. PMID:27833101

  2. Plexin a4 expression in adult rat cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Gross, Robert E

    2014-11-01

    PlexinsA1-A4 participate in class 3 semaphorin signaling as co-receptors to neuropilin 1 and 2. PlexinA4 is the latest member of the PlexinA subfamily to be identified. In previous studies, we described the expression of PlexinA4 in the brain and spinal cord of the adult rat. Here, antibodies to PlexinA4 were used to reveal immunolabeling in most of the cranial nerve surveyed. Labeling was found in the olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, abducens, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, and hypoglossal nerves. This is the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of PlexinA4 in the adult cranial nerves. The findings will set the basis for future studies on the potential role of PlexinA4 in regeneration and repair of the adult central and peripheral nervous system.

  3. Neanderthal cranial ontogeny and its implications for late hominid diversity.

    PubMed

    Ponce de León, M S; Zollikofer, C P

    2001-08-02

    Homo neanderthalensis has a unique combination of craniofacial features that are distinct from fossil and extant 'anatomically modern' Homo sapiens (modern humans). Morphological evidence, direct isotopic dates and fossil mitochondrial DNA from three Neanderthals indicate that the Neanderthals were a separate evolutionary lineage for at least 500,000 yr. However, it is unknown when and how Neanderthal craniofacial autapomorphies (unique, derived characters) emerged during ontogeny. Here we use computerized fossil reconstruction and geometric morphometrics to show that characteristic differences in cranial and mandibular shape between Neanderthals and modern humans arose very early during development, possibly prenatally, and were maintained throughout postnatal ontogeny. Postnatal differences in cranial ontogeny between the two taxa are characterized primarily by heterochronic modifications of a common spatial pattern of development. Evidence for early ontogenetic divergence together with evolutionary stasis of taxon-specific patterns of ontogeny is consistent with separation of Neanderthals and modern humans at the species level.

  4. [Complex diagnosis of congenital cranial dysostosis in children].

    PubMed

    Iakubov, R K; Azimov, M I

    2002-01-01

    Ten patients (aged 3-15 years) with congenital cranial dysostosis were examined by a pediatrician, geneticist, gastroenterologist, neuropathologist, ophthalmologist, endocrinologist, and orthopaedist. In addition to the clinical signs characteristic of hereditary multiple developmental defects, the study revealed changes in the jaws and temporomandibular joint and local factors promoting the progress of deformations of the jaws. Manifest and inapparent pathological changes and dysfunctions in gastrointestinal organs were paralleled by dysfunctions of the central and autonomic nervous systems, risk of maxillofacial and general deformations, and signs of congenital disorders in calcium, lactic acid, and pyridoxine metabolism. The results necessitate analyses of the blood and urine and development of new methods for the diagnosis of congenital cranial dysostosis and improvement of methods for the correction of this condition.

  5. Psychic stress in cranial-cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Rotarescu, Virginia; Ciurea, Vlad Alexandru

    2009-01-01

    From a historical point of view, medicine (in modem society) has set its mission as to cure diseases--medical-type issues--and to ignore patient's condition--illness endurance. By accepting this point of view with reference to their problem, patients have entered some sort of conspiracy of silence and started ignoring the emotional reaction to their medical problems (or to cancel these reactions), regarding them as irrelevant to the problem itself. This approach is also reinforced by the medical pattern that absolutely contests the idea that mind influences the body in a very important way. Another equally unproductive ideology is the idea that people could cure themselves alone even of the most serious illnesses by feeling happy or by thinking in a positive manner, or the idea that people are guilty of getting sick. This attitude resulted in creating a widespread confusion and in significant misunderstandings regarding the extent to which illness can be influenced by mind, at times even blaming someone for having got ill. In the world of illness, emotions have supremacy and fear is the only "thought". We can be so fragile emotionally speaking when we suffer from some illness because part of our mental good-humor is partially based on the illusion of invulnerability. Illness--especially a severe one--destroys this illusion and cancels the premise that our world is one in which existence is completely secure. All of a sudden, we feel thick with weaknesses, we feel helpless and vulnerable (Dixon, 1992). There is a problem when the medical personnel ignore the way patients react from an emotional point of view, even though they should exclusively take care of our physical state. This lack of interest in the emotional reality of an illness neglects something obvious which shows that the emotional state of people can play a significant role as to their vulnerability towards illness and during the recovery process (Ciofu et al., 1978). There is already a scientific basis

  6. The Impact of the Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network (MOON) Research on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction and Orthopaedic Practice.

    PubMed

    Lynch, T Sean; Parker, Richard D; Patel, Ronak M; Andrish, Jack T; Spindler, Kurt P; Amendola, Annunziata; Brophy, Robert H; Dunn, Warren R; Flanigan, David C; Huston, Laura J; Jones, Morgan H; Kaeding, Christopher C; Marx, Robert G; Matava, Matthew J; McCarty, Eric C; Pedroza, Angela D; Reinke, Emily K; Wolf, Brian R; Wright, Rick W

    2015-03-01

    With an estimated 200,000 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions performed annually in the United States, there is an emphasis on determining patient-specific information to help educate patients on expected clinically relevant outcomes. The Multicenter Orthopaedic Outcomes Network consortium was created in 2002 to enroll and longitudinally follow a large population cohort of anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. The study group has enrolled >4,400 anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions from seven institutions to establish the large level I prospective anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction outcomes cohort. The group has become more than a database with information regarding anterior cruciate ligament injuries; it has helped to establish a new benchmark for conducting multicenter, multisurgeon orthopaedic research. The changes in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction practice resulting from the group include the use of autograft for high school, college, and competitive athletes in their primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions. Other modifications include treatment options for meniscus and cartilage injuries, as well as lifestyle choices made after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

  7. Avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament in an uncommon location associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament.

    PubMed

    E Albuquerque, Rodrigo Pires; da Palma, Idemar Monteiro; Cobra, Hugo; de Paula Mozella, Alan; Vaques, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Avulsion fractures of the posterior cruciate ligament in unusual locations are rare injuries. We report the first case in the literature of an avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament associated with distal injury to the patellar ligament. The aim of this study was to present a novel case, the therapy used and the clinical follow-up.

  8. Characterization of a Composite Material to Mimic Human Cranial Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army Research Laboratory ATTN: RDRL-WMM-A Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005...5069 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER ARL-RP-0552 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S...human cranial bone. The simulant material consists of a photocurable polymer with a high loading of ceramic particulate reinforcement that is compatible

  9. A Comparison between Clinical Results of Selective Bundle and Double Bundle Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yon-Sik; Song, Si Young; Yang, Cheol Jung; Ha, Jong Mun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of arthroscopic anatomical double bundle (DB) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction with either selective anteromedial (AM) or posterolateral (PL) bundle reconstruction while preserving a relatively healthy ACL bundle. Materials and Methods The authors evaluated 98 patients with a mean follow-up of 30.8±4.0 months who had undergone DB or selective bundle ACL reconstructions. Of these, 34 cases underwent DB ACL reconstruction (group A), 34 underwent selective AM bundle reconstruction (group B), and 30 underwent selective PL bundle reconstructions (group C). These groups were compared with respect to Lysholm and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, side-to-side differences of anterior laxity measured by KT-2000 arthrometer at 30 lbs, and stress radiography and Lachman and pivot shift test results. Pre- and post-operative data were objectively evaluated using a statistical approach. Results The preoperative anterior instability measured by manual stress radiography at 90° of knee flexion in group A was significantly greater than that in groups B and C (all p<0.001). At last follow-up, mean side-to-side instrumented laxities measured by the KT-2000 and manual stress radiography were significantly improved from preoperative data in all groups (all p<0.001). There were no significant differences between the three groups in anterior instability measured by KT-2000 arthrometer, pivot shift, or functional scores. Conclusion Selective bundle reconstruction in partial ACL tears offers comparable clinical results to DB reconstruction in complete ACL tears. PMID:27401652

  10. Effect of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture on Biomechanical and Histological Features of Lateral Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhenhan; Li, Yusheng; Liu, Hong; Li, Kanghua; Lei, Guanghua; Lu, Bangbao

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate bone mineral density (BMD) and the biomechanical and histological effects of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) rupture on the lateral femoral condyle. Material/Methods Strain on different parts of the lateral femoral condyle from specimens of normal adult knee joints, including 12 intact PCLs, 6 ruptures of the anterolateral bundle, 6 ruptures of the postmedial bundle, and 12 complete ruptures, was tested when loaded with different loads on the knee at various flexion angles. Lateral femoral condyles were also collected randomly from both the experimental side in which the PCLs were transected and the control side from 4 sets of 12 matched-mode pairs of rabbits at 4, 8, 16, and 24 weeks after surgery, and their BMD and morphological and histological changes were observed. Results Partial and complete rupture of the PCL may cause an abnormal load on all parts of the lateral femoral condyle with any axial loading at all positions. Noticeable time-dependent degenerative histological changes of the lateral femoral condyle were observed in the rabbit model of PCL rupture. All of the PCL rupture groups had a higher expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) and collagen type II than the control group at all time points (P<0.05), but no significant difference in BMD (P>0.05). Conclusions Rupture of the PCL may trigger a coordinated response of lateral femoral condyle degeneration in a time-dependent manner, to which the high level of expression of MMP-7 and collagen type II could contribute. PMID:27843134

  11. Reactive Neuromuscular Training for the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Deficient Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Gray; Burton, Lee; Fields, Keith

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the response to a proprioceptive training model during a 1-week rehabilitation regime. The techniques were demonstrated on a college-aged female basketball player who had injured her anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) several weeks earlier. The athlete was tested, trained, and then retested during her semester break. Background: The ACL injury has become a fairly common occurrence in the world of athletics. Knowing this, the athletic trainer is constantly searching for ways to improve the rehabilitative process. New research demonstrates that rehabilitation should be based on proprioception. The ACL not only serves a mechanical role by limiting passive knee mobility but also serves a sensory role through the mechanoreceptors deep in its tissue, which communicate with the neuromuscular system to provide proprioceptive feedback during training and competition. Differential Diagnosis: Partial or complete tear of the ACL. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a rehabilitation protocol based on proprioception, which uses reactive neuromuscular training. Uniqueness: Our rehabilitation focused on the muscular imbalances about the hip, knee, and ankle. The athlete achieved dramatic decreases in muscular imbalances about the hip and knee in only 1 week of rehabilitation through reactive neuromuscular training. Conclusions: The athlete had significant gains in strength over her brief period of therapy. However, these gains can be viewed only as neuromuscular changes and not strictly as gains in strength. The athlete returned to postseason competition under the supervision of her surgeon, who later recommended surgical reconstruction at the completion of the basketball season with rehabilitation during the offseason. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12. PMID:16558562

  12. Transphyseal anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in a skeletally immature knee using anterior tibialis allograft.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yool; Jang, Soo-Jin; Son, Jung-Hwan

    2011-05-18

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in the skeletally immature individual is being recognized with increasing frequency. Nonoperative treatment of ACL injuries in skeletally immature patients have not been favorable. Surgical treatment options for complete ACL tears include primary ligament repair, extraarticular tenodesis, transphyseal reconstruction, partial transphyseal reconstruction, and physeal-sparing reconstruction. The advantage of transphyseal reconstruction is placement of the graft tissue in an isometric position, which provides better results, according to the literature. The potential disadvantage is angular or limb-length discrepancy caused by physeal violation. Controversy exists in allograft selection about whether bone or soft tissue passes into physes. The use of standard tunnels provides reliable results, but carries the risk of iatrogenic growth disturbance from physeal injury.This article presents 4 cases of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients that had satisfactory functional outcomes with no growth disturbances. This is the first report of transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis allograft in skeletally immature patients in the English-speaking literature. All patients underwent transphyseal ACL reconstruction using anterior tibialis tendon allograft. None of the patients had angular deformities. No early physeal arrest was measured between the preoperative and postoperative radiographs. At last follow-up, the results of the Lachman test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. All patients demonstrated full range of knee motion (comparing the reconstructed knee to the contralateral knee). The results of the pivot-shift test were normal for 3 patients and nearly normal for 1 patient. No patients reported giving way.

  13. The management of cranial injuries in antiquity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kshettry, Varun R; Mindea, Stefan A; Batjer, H Hunt

    2007-01-01

    Cranial injuries were among the earliest neurosurgical problems faced by ancient physicians and surgeons. In this review, the authors trace the development of neurosurgical theory and practice for the treatment of cranial injuries beginning from the earliest ancient evidence available to the collapse of the Greco-Roman civilizations. The earliest neurosurgical procedure was trephination, which modern scientists believe was used to treat skull fractures in some civilizations. The Egyptian papyri of Edwin Smith provide a thorough description of 27 head injuries with astute observations of clinical signs and symptoms, but little information on the treatment of these injuries. Hippocrates offered the first classification of skull fractures and discussion of which types required trephining, in addition to refining this technique. Hippocrates was also the first to understand the basis of increased intracranial pressure. After Hippocrates, the physicians of the Alexandrian school provided further insight into the clinical evaluation of patients with head trauma, including the rudiments of a Glasgow Coma Scale. Finally, Galen of Pergamon, a physician to fallen gladiators, substantially contributed to the understanding of the neuroanatomy and physiology. He also described his own classification system for skull fractures and further refined the surgical technique of trephination. From the study of these important ancient figures, it is clearly evident that the knowledge and experience gained from the management of cranial injuries has laid the foundation not only for how these injuries are managed today, but also for the development of the field of neurosurgery.

  14. A method for whole protein isolation from human cranial bone.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Sarah M; Mayampurath, Anoop; Rogers, M Rose; Wolfgeher, Donald J; Fisher, Sean M; Volchenboum, Samuel L; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R

    2016-12-15

    The presence of the dense hydroxyapatite matrix within human bone limits the applicability of conventional protocols for protein extraction. This has hindered the complete and accurate characterization of the human bone proteome thus far, leaving many bone-related disorders poorly understood. We sought to refine an existing method of protein extraction from mouse bone to extract whole proteins of varying molecular weights from human cranial bone. Whole protein was extracted from human cranial suture by mechanically processing samples using a method that limits protein degradation by minimizing heat introduction to proteins. The presence of whole protein was confirmed by western blotting. Mass spectrometry was used to sequence peptides and identify isolated proteins. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003215. Extracted proteins were characterized as both intra- and extracellular and had molecular weights ranging from 9.4 to 629 kDa. High correlation scores among suture protein spectral counts support the reproducibility of the method. Ontology analytics revealed proteins of myriad functions including mediators of metabolic processes and cell organelles. These results demonstrate a reproducible method for isolation of whole protein from human cranial bone, representing a large range of molecular weights, origins and functions.

  15. Craniometric measurements of artificial cranial deformations in Eastern European skulls.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Wolfgang H; Fedorischeva, Victoria A; Naumova, Ella A; Yabluchansky, Nikolay I

    2008-06-01

    Standardized lateral cephalograms of eleven skulls with artificial cranial deformations from Eastern Europe and twenty normal skulls from the same population were made, digitized and imported into the AutoCAD 2005 computer program. The x- and y-coordinates of defined measuring points were determined and angle measurements were made. The form difference of the skulls was tested with the Euclidean Distance Matrix Analysis (EDMA) and the difference of the angle measurements were compared statistically using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. All deformed skulls belonged to the tabular fronto-occipital type of deformation. The results of the EDMA and the angle measurements indicated significant differences for the neurocranium and the facial cranium in height between the normal and the deformed skulls, but not in the cranial length. It can be concluded that in Eastern Europe one method of cranial molding was used. The deformation of the neurocranium also affected the development of the facial cranium regarding facial height. This may indicate a dependency of the developmental fields of the neurocranium and facial cranium.

  16. Morphology and variation in porpoise (Cetacea: Phocoenidae) cranial endocasts.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Rachel A; Colbert, Matthew W

    2013-06-01

    Evolution of endocranial anatomy in cetaceans is important from the perspective of echolocation ability, intelligence, social structure, and alternate pathways for circulation to the brain. Apart from the importance of studying brain shape and asymmetries as they relate to aspects of behavior and intelligence, cranial endocasts can show a close correspondence to the hydrostatic shape of the brain in life, and canals and grooves can preserve features of the circulatory system. Multiple samples are rarely available for studies of individual variation, especially in fossils, thus a first step in quantifying variation and making comparisons with fossils is made possible with CT scans of osteological specimens. This study presents a series of high-resolution X-ray CT-derived cranial endocasts of six extant species of Phocoenidae, a clade including some of the smallest and one of the rarest cetaceans. Degree of gyrification varies interspecifically and intraspecifically, possibly resulting from variation in preservation of the ossified meninges. Computed tomographic data show that visually assessed asymmetry in the cranial endocasts is not correlated with volumetric measurements, but nonetheless may reflect torsion in the skull's shape such that the right cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres extend rostrally and laterally more than the left. Vasculature and canals are similar to other described cetacean species, but the hypophyseal casts are unusual. Similarities between brain shape and volume measurements in the different species can be attributed to paedomorphism and concomitant variation in ecological preferences. This may explain similarities Neophocaena phocaenoides and Phocoena sinus share with the juvenile Phocoena phocoena specimen studied.

  17. Phylogeny, Diet, and Cranial Integration in Australodelphian Marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Anjali

    2007-01-01

    Studies of morphological integration provide valuable information on the correlated evolution of traits and its relationship to long-term patterns of morphological evolution. Thus far, studies of morphological integration in mammals have focused on placentals and have demonstrated that similarity in integration is broadly correlated with phylogenetic distance and dietary similarity. Detailed studies have also demonstrated a significant correlation between developmental relationships among structures and adult morphological integration. However, these studies have not yet been applied to marsupial taxa, which differ greatly from placentals in reproductive strategy and cranial development and could provide the diversity necessary to assess the relationships among phylogeny, ecology, development, and cranial integration. This study presents analyses of morphological integration in 20 species of australodelphian marsupials, and shows that phylogeny is significantly correlated with similarity of morphological integration in most clades. Size-related correlations have a significant affect on results, particularly in Peramelia, which shows a striking decrease in similarity of integration among species when size is removed. Diet is not significantly correlated with similarity of integration in any marsupial clade. These results show that marsupials differ markedly from placental mammals in the relationships of cranial integration, phylogeny, and diet, which may be related to the accelerated development of the masticatory apparatus in marsupials. PMID:17912372

  18. Successful endovascular management of brain aneurysms presenting with mass effect and cranial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Tamer; Hamimi, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysms presented with mass effect are traditionally treated by surgical clipping to decompress their mass effect. The aim of this work is to discuss the efficiency of endovascular techniques in treating 47 patients with variable sizes of intracranial aneurysms presented with mass effect and/or cranial nerve palsy. There were 47 patients with 47 unruptured aneurysms. Group I includes 28 giant aneurysms; all are treated by parent vessel occlusion with or without intra-aneurysmal occlusion depending on anatomical locations. Group II includes 19 small and large aneurysms; all are treated by selective endosaccular occlusion with coils. Clinical presentations were ocular cranial nerve dysfunction (82.9%), optic nerve or chiasmatic dysfunction (21.2%), brain stem compression (8.5%), embolic (6%), epistaksis (4%), proptosis (2%), and bleeding per ear (2%). Out of 47 patients, symptoms were resolved in 31 cases (66%), improved in 10 cases (21%), and unchanged in six cases (13%). Out of 28 giant aneurysms, symptoms were resolved in 19 (68%), improved in four (14%), and unchanged in five (18%). Only four (14%) patients out of the 19 giant aneurysms with complete symptoms resolution showed significant mass reduction in MRI. Out of 19 non-giant aneurysm cases treated by selective endovascular occlusion with coils, symptoms were resolved in 12 cases (63%), improved in six (32%), and unchanged in one (5%). No complications from the treatment were observed. The longer the duration of symptoms before endovascular treatment is, the longer the duration till improvement or resolution postoperative in both groups. Recovery of aneurysm-induced mass effect occurs in most patients both after parent vessel occlusion and after selective coiling, and is comparable to results after surgical clipping. The improvement starts independent of aneurysmal shrinkage in postoperative MRI follow-ups. The arrest of pulsations and partial shrinkage within the aneurysms after endovascular treatment may

  19. Effects of postoperative immobilization on the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament. An experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Muneta, T; Yamamoto, H; Takakuda, K; Sakai, H; Furuya, K

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the effects of postoperative immobilization and limited motion on reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments, 28 rabbits received an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using autogenous Achilles tendon and were then divided into three groups: fully immobilized, 4 weeks immobilized, and limited motion. Two rabbits from each group were evaluated macroscopically, histologically and microangiographically at 4-week intervals until 12 weeks postoperatively. An additional six rabbits in the 4 weeks immobilized and limited motion groups were studied biomechanically at 12 weeks postoperatively. Macroscopically, both immobilized groups showed more proliferation of the infrapatellar fat pad, which was adherent to the reconstructed anterior cruciate ligament. Histology revealed more rapid regeneration of reconstructed anterior cruciate ligaments in the limited motion group, with no findings of necrosis in the mid-substance. Microangiography indicated faster normalization of vascularity in the limited motion group. The biomechanical study showed no significant difference in laxity between the 4 weeks immobilized and limited motion groups. The graft stiffness and maximum load to failure were greater for the limited motion group, although the increase was not statistically significant. The histologic and microangiographic results from the limited number of animals in this study support limited postoperative motion in the anterior cruciate ligament reconstructed knee. However, there were no differences in terms of the biomechanical parameters at 12 weeks postoperatively between the immobilized and limited motion treatment modes.

  20. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  1. Preoperative anemia increases postoperative morbidity in elective cranial neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Abt, Nicholas B.; Macki, Mohamed; Brem, Henry; Huang, Judy; Bydon, Ali; Tamargo, Rafael J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative anemia may affect postoperative mortality and morbidity following elective cranial operations. Methods: The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to identify elective cranial neurosurgical cases (2006-2012). Morbidity was defined as wound infection, systemic infection, cardiac, respiratory, renal, neurologic, and thromboembolic events, and unplanned returns to the operating room. For 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were estimated with multivariable logistic regression. Results: Of 8015 patients who underwent elective cranial neurosurgery, 1710 patients (21.4%) were anemic. Anemic patients had an increased 30-day mortality of 4.1% versus 1.3% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001) and an increased 30-day morbidity rate of 25.9% versus 14.14% in non-anemic patients (P < 0.001). The 30-day morbidity rates for all patients undergoing cranial procedures were stratified by diagnosis: 26.5% aneurysm, 24.7% sellar tumor, 19.7% extra-axial tumor, 14.8% intra-axial tumor, 14.4% arteriovenous malformation, and 5.6% pain. Following multivariable regression, the 30-day mortality in anemic patients was threefold higher than in non-anemic patients (4.1% vs 1.3%; OR = 2.77; 95% CI: 1.65-4.66). The odds of postoperative morbidity in anemic patients were significantly higher than in non-anemic patients (OR = 1.29; 95% CI: 1.03-1.61). There was a significant difference in postoperative morbidity event odds with a hematocrit level above (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.78-1.48) and below (OR = 2.30; 95% CI: 1.55-3.42) 33% [hemoglobin (Hgb) 11 g/dl]. Conclusions: Preoperative anemia in elective cranial neurosurgery was independently associated with an increased risk of 30-day postoperative mortality and morbidity when compared to non-anemic patients. A hematocrit level below 33% (Hgb 11 g/dl) was associated with a significant increase in postoperative morbidity. PMID

  2. Endoscopic endonasal cranial base surgery simulation using an artificial cranial base model created by selective laser sintering.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Kenichi; Ditzel Filho, Leo F S; Muto, Jun; de Souza, Daniel G; Gun, Ramazan; Otto, Bradley A; Carrau, Ricardo L; Prevedello, Daniel M

    2015-01-01

    Mastery of the expanded endoscopic endonasal approach (EEA) requires anatomical knowledge and surgical skills; the learning curve for this technique is steep. To a great degree, these skills can be gained by cadaveric dissections; however, ethical, religious, and legal considerations may interfere with this paradigm in different regions of the world. We assessed an artificial cranial base model for the surgical simulation of EEA and compared its usefulness with that of cadaveric specimens. The model is made of both polyamide nylon and glass beads using a selective laser sintering (SLS) technique to reflect CT-DICOM data of the patient's head. It features several artificial cranial base structures such as the dura mater, venous sinuses, cavernous sinuses, internal carotid arteries, and cranial nerves. Under endoscopic view, the model was dissected through the nostrils using a high-speed drill and other endonasal surgical instruments. Anatomical structures around and inside the sphenoid sinus were accurately reconstructed in the model, and several important surgical landmarks, including the medial and lateral optico-carotid recesses and vidian canals, were observed. The bone was removed with a high-speed drill until it was eggshell thin and the dura mater was preserved, a technique very similar to that applied in patients during endonasal cranial base approaches. The model allowed simulation of almost all sagittal and coronal plane EEA modules. SLS modeling is a useful tool for acquiring the anatomical knowledge and surgical expertise for performing EEA while avoiding the ethical, religious, and infection-related problems inherent with use of cadaveric specimens.

  3. Filling the gap. Human cranial remains from Gombore II (Melka Kunture, Ethiopia; ca. 850 ka) and the origin of Homo heidelbergensis.

    PubMed

    Profico, Antonio; Di Vincenzo, Fabio; Gagliardi, Lorenza; Piperno, Marcello; Manzi, Giorgio

    2016-06-20

    African archaic humans dated to around 1,0 Ma share morphological affinities with Homo ergaster and appear distinct in cranio-dental morphology from those of the Middle Pleistocene that are referred to Homo heidelbergensis. This observation suggests a taxonomic and phylogenetic discontinuity in Africa that ranges across the Matuyama/Brunhes reversal (780 ka). Yet, the fossil record between roughly 900 and 600 ka is notoriously poor. In this context, the Early Stone Age site of Gombore II, in the Melka Kunture formation (Upper Awash, Ethiopia), provides a privileged case-study. In the Acheulean layer of Gombore II, somewhat more recent than 875 ±10 ka, two large cranial fragments were discovered in 1973 and 1975 respectively: a partial left parietal (Melka Kunture 1) and a right portion of the frontal bone (Melka Kunture 2), which probably belonged to the same cranium. We present here the first detailed description and computer-assisted reconstruction of the morphology of the cranial vault pertaining to these fossil fragments. Our analysis suggest that the human fossil specimen from Gombore II fills a phenetic gap between Homo ergaster and Homo heidelbergensis. This appears in agreement with the chronology of such a partial cranial vault, which therefore represents at present one of the best available candidates (if any) for the origin of Homo heidelbergensis in Africa.

  4. A review of ultrasonographic methods for the assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament in patients with knee instability – diagnostics using a posterior approach

    PubMed Central

    Kielar, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to improve the ultrasonographic assessment of the anterior cruciate ligament by an inclusion of a dynamic element. The proposed functional modification aims to restore normal posterior cruciate ligament tension, which is associated with a visible change in the ligament shape. This method reduces the risk of an error resulting from subjectively assessing the shape of the posterior cruciate ligament. It should be also emphasized that the method combined with other ultrasound anterior cruciate ligament assessment techniques helps increase diagnostic accuracy. Methods Ultrasonography is used as an adjunctive technique in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament injury. The paper presents a sonographic technique for the assessment of suspected anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency supplemented by the use of a dynamic examination. This technique can be recommended as an additional procedure in routine ultrasound diagnostics of anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Results Supplementing routine ultrasonography with the dynamic assessment of posterior cruciate ligament shape changes in patients with suspected anterior cruciate ligament injury reduces the risk of subjective errors and increases diagnostic accuracy. This is important especially in cases of minor anterior knee instability and bilateral anterior knee instability. Conclusions An assessment of changes in posterior cruciate ligament using a dynamic ultrasound examination effectively complements routine sonographic diagnostic techniques for anterior cruciate ligament insufficiency. PMID:27679732

  5. Microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Baba, Hisatoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Negoro, Kohei; Sato, Mituhiko; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Nomura, Eiki; Murakami, Kaname; Shimizubata, Matsuyuki; Meir, Adam

    2006-07-01

    This study was done to investigate the microvascular system of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using dogs. The objective was to study the microvascular architecture and the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL by using microangiogram, scanning (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The vascular system in the ACL has been intensively studied by a number of researchers, using several microangiographic techniques in dogs, rabbits, and humans. However, most of these microangiographic studies had significant shortcomings, including the lack of three-dimensional observations and function of the blood-joint barrier in the ACL. In this study, the microstructure of the ACL was examined using microangiogram, SEM, and TEM. We investigated the vasculature of the ACL with SEM of vascular corrosion casts. In addition, we examined the status of the barrier function of the capillary wall in the ACL using the protein tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Feeding vessels of the ligament were predominantly coming from the synovial-derived vessels originating from the synovium attached to the ligament near the tibial and femoral bone insertions of the ACL. The anterior cruciate ligament was surrounded by synovium, which had abundant vessels. The branches of these synovial vessels were penetrating into the ligament and making the intrinsic vascular network. It was also ascertained under SEM that the perivascular space around the intrinsic vessels were communicating through the intrinsic ligament fiber bundles and the mesh-like synovial membrane. The capillaries in the ACL were all of the continuous type under TEM. The protein tracer that was injected into the joint space passed through the synovial membrane and entered into the capillary lumen in the ACL, but the tracer that was injected intravenously did not appear in the perivascular space. The existence of a blood-ACL barrier does not necessarily imply the existence of an ACL-blood barrier. We

  6. Arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft versus autograft

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiujiang; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qu, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to compare and analyze retrospectively the outcomes of arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with autograft versus allograft. Material and methods Seventy-one patients who underwent arthroscopic posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with an autograft or allograft met our inclusion criteria. There were 36 patients in the autograft group and 35 patients in the allograft group. All the patients were evaluated by physical examination and a functional ligament test. Comparative analysis was done in terms of operation time, incision length, fever time, postoperative infection rate, incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision, as well as a routine blood test. Results The average follow-up of the autograft group was 3.2 ±0.2 years and that of the allograft group was 3.3 ±0.6 years; there was no significant difference (p > 0.05). No differences existed in knee range of motion, Lysholm scores, International Knee Documentation Committee standard evaluation form and Tegner activity score at final follow-up (p > 0.05), except that patients in the allograft group had a shorter operation time and incision length and a longer fever time (p < 0.05). We found a difference in posterior drawer test and KT-2000 arthrometer assessment (p < 0.05). The posterior tibia displacement averaged 3.8 ±1.5 mm in the autograft group and 4.8 ±1.7 mm in the allograft group (p < 0.05). The incidence of numbness and dysesthesia around the incision in the autograft group was higher than that in the allograft group (p < 0.05). There was no infection postoperatively. The white blood cells and neutrophils in the allograft group increased more than those in the autograft group postoperatively (p < 0.05). Conclusions Both groups of patients had satisfactory outcomes after the operation. However, in the instrumented posterior laxity test, the autograft gave better results than the allograft. No differences in functional scores

  7. Editorial Commentary: Renaissance of Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair: Is History Repeating Itself?

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Erik

    2016-12-01

    In a comparative Level III study, Achtnich et al. compared suture anchor repair of acute proximal anterior cruciate ligament avulsion tears with single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with the quadrupled semitendinosus tendon. Short-term follow-up at a mean of 28 months showed that the between-group differences were not different. These results are encouraging but not different from other published series 25+ years ago. Only time will tell whether the long-term outcomes are identical and whether these techniques will also die a slow death. Hopefully history is not repeating itself.

  8. The fate of cranial neural crest cells in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Rolf; Joss, Jean; Olsson, Lennart

    2008-06-15

    The cranial neural crest has been shown to give rise to a diversity of cells and tissues, including cartilage, bone and connective tissue, in a variety of tetrapods and in the zebrafish. It has been claimed, however, that in the Australian lungfish these tissues are not derived from the cranial neural crest, and even that no migrating cranial neural crest cells exist in this species. We have earlier documented that cranial neural crest cells do migrate, although they emerge late, in the Australian lungfish. Here, we have used the lipophilic fluorescent dye, DiI, to label premigratory cranial neural crest cells and follow their fate until stage 43, when several cranial skeletal elements have started to differentiate. The timing and extent of their migration was investigated, and formation of mandibular, hyoid and branchial streams documented. Cranial neural crest was shown to contribute cells to several parts of the head skeleton, including the trabecula cranii and derivatives of the mandibular arch (e.g., Meckel's cartilage, quadrate), the hyoid arch (e.g., the ceratohyal) and the branchial arches (ceratobranchials I-IV), as well as to the connective tissue surrounding the myofibers in cranial muscles. We conclude that cranial neural crest migration and fate in the Australian lungfish follow the stereotyped pattern documented in other vertebrates.

  9. Sensations experienced and patients' perceptions of osteopathy in the cranial field treatment.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Jane; Vaughan, Brett

    2014-10-01

    Osteopathy in the cranial field is an approach used by manual and physical therapists. However, there is minimal information in the literature about patient experiences of this treatment. The present study was undertaken to explore patients' experiences of osteopathy in the cranial field. Patients completed the Patient Perception Measure-Osteopathy in the Cranial Field and identified sensations they experienced during treatment. Additional measures of anxiety, depression, Satisfaction With Life, and Meaningfulness of Daily Activity were completed. The Patient Perception Measure-Osteopathy in the Cranial Field was internally consistent (Cronbach's α = .85). The most frequently experienced sensations of osteopathy in the cranial field patients were "relaxed," "releasing," and "unwinding." Satisfaction With Life and Meaningfulness of Daily Activity were positively associated with Patient Perception Measure-Osteopathy in the Cranial Field scores. Negative associations were observed between the Patient Perception Measure-Osteopathy in the Cranial Field and depression. Psychometric properties of the Patient Perception Measure-Osteopathy in the Cranial Field require further testing. The observed associations of Satisfaction With Life and depression with patients' perceptions of osteopathy in the cranial field treatment needs to be tested in larger clinical manual therapy cohorts.

  10. Accuracy and reliability of cetacean cranial measurements using computed tomography three dimensional volume rendered images

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Adams Hei Long; Tsui, Henry Chun Lok; Kot, Brian Chin Wing

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has become more readily available for post-mortem examination, offering an alternative to cetacean cranial measurements obtained manually. Measurement error may result in possible variation in cranial morphometric analysis. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of cetacean cranial measurements obtained by CT three-dimensional volume rendered images (3DVRI). CT scans of 9 stranded cetaceans were performed. The acquired images were reconstructed using bone reconstruction algorithms. The reconstructed crania obtained by 3DVRI were visualized after excluding other body structures. Accuracy of cranial measurements obtained by CT 3DVRI was evaluated by comparing with that obtained by manual approach as standard of reference. Reproducibility and repeatability of cranial measurements obtained by CT 3DVRI were evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The results demonstrated that cranial measurements obtained by CT 3DVRI yielded high accuracy (88.05%– 99.64%). High reproducibility (ICC ranged from 0.897 to 1.000) and repeatability (ICC ranged from 0.919 to 1.000 for operator 1 and ICC range from 0.768 to 1.000 for operator 2) were observed in cranial measurements obtained by CT 3DVRI. Therefore, cranial measurements obtained by CT 3DVRI could be considered as virtual alternative to conventional manual approach. This may help the development of a normative reference for current cranial maturity and discriminant analysis studies in cetaceans. PMID:28329016

  11. Morphometric characteristics of caudal cranial nerves at petroclival region in fetuses.

    PubMed

    Ozdogmus, Omer; Saban, Enis; Ozkan, Mazhar; Yildiz, Sercan Dogukan; Verimli, Ural; Cakmak, Ozgur; Arifoglu, Yasin; Sehirli, Umit

    2016-06-01

    Morphometric measurements of cranial nerves in posterior cranial fossa of fetus cadavers were carried out in an attempt to identify any asymmetry in their openings into the cranium. Twenty-two fetus cadavers (8 females, 14 males) with gestational age ranging between 22 and 38 weeks (mean 30 weeks) were included in this study. The calvaria were removed, the brains were lifted, and the cranial nerves were identified. The distance of each cranial nerve opening to midline and the distances between different cranial nerve openings were measured on the left and right side and compared. The mean clivus length and width were 21.2 ± 4.4 and 13.2 ± 1.5 mm, respectively. The distance of the twelfth cranial nerve opening from midline was shorter on the right side when compared with the left side (6.6 ± 1.1 versus 7.1 ± 0.8 mm, p = 0.038). Openings of other cranial nerves did not show such asymmetry with regard to their distance from midline, and the distances between different cranial nerves were similar on the left and right side. Cranial nerves at petroclival region seem to show minimal asymmetry in fetuses.

  12. [Craniological basis of operative approaches to the structures of posterior cranial fossa using endovideo-monitoring].

    PubMed

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, A I

    2007-01-01

    Cranioscopic and craniometric characteristics of posterior cranial fossa and correlations between them were studied using 127 skulls with different cranial shape (dolicho-, meso- and brachicraniums). It was found that most of the craniometric characteristics were independent on gender and shape of the skull, while each characteristic had some individual peculiarities. Endovideomonitoring was used to assess the optimality of suboccipital paramedial and retrosigmoid approaches to posterior cranial fossa using 20 heads of the corpses belonging to adult individuals. It was demonstrated that retrosigmoid approach was optimal for the accessibility of major anatomical structures of posterior cranial fossa.

  13. The impact of cranial irradiation on the growth of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.J.; Foster, M.B.; D'Ercole, A.J.; McMillan, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Heights, height velocities, weights, and weight velocities were measured serially in 21 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) who had survived three to five years in continuous complete remission. These patients were assigned randomly to treatment regimens that varied according to whether cranial irradiation was used. Patients receiving cranial irradiation had lower height velocities during therapy than normal subjects and patients not receiving cranial irradiation. Twenty-two other children with ALL, who were irradiated but not randomized, exhibited similar alterations in growth. These results indicate that cranial irradiation, and not leukemia or antileukemia chemotherapy, causes reduced growth.

  14. Rehabilitation After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Female Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Kevin E.; Arrigo, Christopher; Andrews, James R.; Clancy, William G.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the rehabilitation program after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in the female athlete. In addition, we will discuss 8 unique characteristics identified in the female athlete and specific training drills to address and correct the potentially deleterious effects of these unique characteristics. Background: The female athlete appears to be more susceptible to noncontact ACL injuries than the male athlete. There seem to be many differences between the female and male athlete that may contribute to the increased injury rate in the female athlete. These variations include anatomical and neuromuscular considerations and differences. Description: Based on the unique characteristics of the female athlete and the anatomical and neuromuscular dissimilarities, a specially designed rehabilitation program has been established for the female athlete after ACL surgery. Clinical Advantages: The rehabilitation drills discussed in this article challenge the neuromuscular system through proprioception, kinesthesia, dynamic joint stability, neuromuscular control, and perturbation training activities. Improving the female athlete's neuromuscular system will, we believe, expedite the injured athlete's recovery after ACL injury or surgery. Although the concepts discussed are part of a postoperative rehabilitation program after ACL surgery, these concepts may also be implemented as a preventive program to assist in reducing the incidence of ACL injuries in the female athlete. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10.Figure 11.Figure 12.Figure 13.Figure 14.Figure 15.Figure 16.Figure 17.Figure 18.Figure 19.Figure 20.Figure 21.Figure 22.Figure 23. PMID:16558561

  15. Neuroscience Application to Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Grooms, Dustin R.; Onate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Many factors, including anatomy, neuromuscular control, hormonal regulation, and genetics, are known to contribute to the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk profile. The neurocognitive and neurophysiological influences on the noncontact ACL injury mechanism have received less attention despite their implications to maintain neuromuscular control. Sex-specific differences in neurocognition may also play a critical role in the elevated female ACL injury risk. This report serves to frame existing literature in a new light to consider neurocognition and its implications for movement control, visual-motor function, and injury susceptibility. Evidence Acquisition: Sources were obtained from PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and LISTA (EBSCO) databases from 1990 onward and ranged from diverse fields including psychological and neuroscience reviews to injury epidemiology and biomechanical reports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Neurological factors may contribute to the multifactorial ACL injury risk paradigm and the increased female injury susceptibility. Conclusion: When developing ACL injury prevention programs, considering neurocognition and its role in movement, neuromuscular control, and injury risk may help improve intervention effectiveness. PMID:26608453

  16. Adaptation Strategies of Individuals With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roper, Jaimie A.; Terza, Matthew J.; Tillman, Mark D.; Hass, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the strong implications for rehabilitation design, the capability of individuals with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) to adapt and store novel gait patterns have not been well studied. Purpose: To investigate how reconstructive surgery may affect the ability to adapt and store novel gait patterns in persons with ACLR while walking on a split-belt treadmill. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Gait adaptation was compared between 20 participants with ACLR and 20 healthy controls during split-belt treadmill walking. Gait adaptation was assessed in slow- and fast-adapting parameters by (1) the magnitude of symmetry during late adaptation and (2) the amount of the asymmetry during de-adaptation. Results: Healthy individuals adapted a new walking pattern and stored the new walking pattern equally in both the dominant and nondominant limbs. Conversely, individuals with ACLR displayed impairments in both slow-adapting and fast-adapting derived gait adaptation and significant differences in behavior between the reconstructed and uninjured limb. Conclusion: While surgical reconstruction and physical therapy are aimed at improving mechanical stability to the knee, the study data suggest that fundamental features of motor control remain altered. After ACLR, participants display an altered ability to learn and store functional gait patterns. PMID:26894200

  17. Crimp morphology in the ovine anterior cruciate ligament

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lei; Thambyah, Ashvin; Broom, Neil

    2015-01-01

    While the crimp morphology in ligaments and tendons has been described in detail in the literature, its relative distribution within the tissue has not been studied, especially in relation to the complex multi-bundle arrangement as is found in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In this study, the crimp morphology of the ovine ACL was examined topologically and with respect to its double-bundle structure. The crimp morphologies were compared with the knee in three knee positions, namely stance, maximum extension and maximum flexion. As a control, the crimp morphology of the ACL free from its bony attachments was determined. In the control samples, the anterior-medial (AM) bundle contained a combination of coarse and fine crimp, whereas the posterior-lateral (PL) bundle manifested only a coarse crimp. Using the extent of crimp loss observed when subjecting the knee to the respective positions, and comparing with the controls, the crimp morphologies show that the AM bundle of the ACL is most active in the stance position, whereas for the maximum extension and flexion positions the PL bundle is most active. We propose that these differences in crimp morphologies have relevance to ACL design and function. PMID:25677165

  18. Extracellular matrix content of ruptured anterior cruciate ligament tissue.

    PubMed

    Young, Kate; Samiric, Tom; Feller, Julian; Cook, Jill

    2011-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligaments (ACLs) can rupture with simple movements, suggesting that structural changes in the ligament may reduce the loading capacity of the ligament. We aimed to investigate if proteoglycan and collagen levels were different between ruptured and non-ruptured ACLs. We also compared changes in ruptured tissue over time. During arthroscopic knee reconstruction surgery 24 ruptured ACLs were collected from participants (10 females; 14 males; mean age 24 years). Four non-ruptured ACLs were obtained from participants undergoing total knee replacement surgery (one female, three males; mean age 66 years). Western blot analysis was used to characterise core proteins of aggrecan, versican, decorin and biglycan and glycosaminoglycan assays were also conducted. Collagen levels were measured by hydroxyproline (OHPr) assays. Significantly lower levels of collagen, were found in ruptured ACL compared to non-ruptured ACL (p=0.004). Lower levels of both small and large proteoglycans were found in ruptured than non-ruptured ACLs. No correlation was found between time since rupture and proteoglycan or collagen levels. Ruptured ACLs had less collagen and proteoglycans than non-ruptured ACLs. These changes indicate either extracellular matrix protein levels were reduced prior to rupture or levels decreased immediately after rupture. It is possible that the composition and structure of ACLs that rupture are different to normal ACLs, potentially reducing the tissue's ability to withstand loading. An enhanced understanding of the aetiology of ACL injury could help identify individuals who may be predisposed to rupture.

  19. FEMORAL INSERTION OF THE POSTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT: AN ANATOMICAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    de Paula Leite Cury, Ricardo; Severino, Nilson Roberto; Camargo, Osmar Pedro Arbix; Aihara, Tatsuo; Neto, Leopoldo Viana Batista; Goarayeb, Dedley Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify objective parameters to guide correct location of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the femur. Methods: The PCLs of 20 human cadavers were resected. The following portions were measured: distance from the most distal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior edge of the cartilage (AB); distance from the most proximal portion of the PCL, close to the roof, to the most anterior cartilage (AC); distance between the two parts of the ligament close to the roof (BC); distance from the distal edge in its posterior portion, to the more posterior joint edge (DE); distance from the distal edge of the ligament in its posterior portion, to the intercondylar roof (DF); and finally, the format of the ligament insertion and area of coverage on the femoral condyle. Results: The PCL has the shape of a quarter ellipse, with an average area of 153.5mm2. The mean distances found were: AB of 2.1mm, AC of 10.7mm, BC of 8.6mm DE of 12.4mm and DF of 16.8mm. Conclusions: The edge close to the roof of the anterolateral bundle is closer to the joint cartilage (2.1mm) than the posteromedial bundle is, which is 12.4mm from the edge proximal to the cartilage. These references should assist in better and more accurate positioning of femoral tunnels in PCL reconstruction. PMID:27027059

  20. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus with hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Cátia; Castro, Ricardo; Cadilha, Rui; Raposo, Frederico; Melão, Lina

    2015-12-01

    Knee joint lesions can be solitary or occur concomitantly with other lower limb abnormalities. Ring-shaped lateral meniscus (RSM) and hypoplasic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are two rare malformations. The therapeutic management of such abnormalities is not consensual, and highly depends on clinical symptomatology. We report a case of a 25-year-old girl with progressive knee pain whose MRI demonstrated a continuous segment of lateral meniscus situated along the medial aspect of the lateral compartment, continuous with the otherwise normal-appearing lateral meniscus, compatible with an RSM. This anatomic variant can be mistaken by a displaced meniscal fragment, like a bucket-handle tear, a central tear of a discoid meniscus, or incomplete discoid meniscus, as previously reported. Her MRI examination also showed a thinned ACL with anomalous lateral course. This abnormality may be mistaken for an ACL rupture and/or a meniscofemoral ligament with agenesis of ACL. Multiple images in different planes as well as following the course of meniscal and ligaments are critical clues to avoid misdiagnosis. As a result, the diagnosis of an RSM along with hypoplasic ACL with abnormal attachment was assumed based on MRI and confirmed during arthroscopy. The patient was treated conservatively with clinical outcome improvement.

  1. Basic science of anterior cruciate ligament injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Kiapour, A. M.; Murray, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most devastating and frequent injuries of the knee. Surgical reconstruction is the current standard of care for treatment of ACL injuries in active patients. The widespread adoption of ACL reconstruction over primary repair was based on early perception of the limited healing capacity of the ACL. Although the majority of ACL reconstruction surgeries successfully restore gross joint stability, post-traumatic osteoarthritis is commonplace following these injuries, even with ACL reconstruction. The development of new techniques to limit the long-term clinical sequelae associated with ACL reconstruction has been the main focus of research over the past decades. The improved knowledge of healing, along with recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, has resulted in the discovery of novel biologically augmented ACL-repair techniques that have satisfactory outcomes in preclinical studies. This instructional review provides a summary of the latest advances made in ACL repair. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:20–31. PMID:24497504

  2. Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament in soccer.

    PubMed

    Rochcongar, P; Laboute, E; Jan, J; Carling, C

    2009-05-01

    Ruptures of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are serious, common and costly injuries. The present 12-year investigation was undertaken to examine the frequency of ACL ruptures and identify the game events that may have contributed to the cause of these injuries in male soccer players across a French district. A retrospective questionnaire was used to record the players' age at the time of injury, laterality, standard of play, playing position and injured side. The characteristics of the injury situations were described in detail to investigate the game events involved in each case. A total of 934 ruptures was reported. Significantly more ruptures were sustained in a non-contact versus a contact situation (p<0.01). Of the total number of lesions, 34.5% occurred during a pivot action. The right knee was affected more than the left knee (p<0.001), irrespective of the dominant side of the player. Certain game events reported in the injury situations were shown to be related to player's age, standard and position. While these results have confirmed observations from previous investigations on ACL ruptures in soccer, the analysis of a considerably larger number of injury cases has brought new findings to the literature as well as recommendations for future research.

  3. Treating Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tears in Skeletally Immature Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vavken, Patrick; Murray, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the current evidence for conservative and surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears in skeletally immature patients. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, CCTR, and CDSR was performed for surgical and/or conservative treatment of complete ACL tears in immature individuals. Studies with less than six months of follow-up were excluded. Study quality was assessed and data were collected on clinical outcome, growth disturbance, and secondary joint damage. Results We identified 48 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Conservative treatment was found to result in poor clinical outcomes and a high incidence of secondary defects, including meniscal and cartilage injury. Surgical treatment had only very weak evidence for growth disturbance, yet strong evidence of good postoperative stability and function. No specific surgical treatment showed clearly superior outcomes, yet the studies using physeal-sparing techniques had no reported growth disturbances at all. Conclusions The current best evidence suggests that surgical stabilization should be considered the preferred treatment in immature patients with complete ACL tears. While physeal-sparing techniques are not associated with a risk of growth disturbance, transphyseal reconstruction is an alternative with a beneficial safety profile and a minimal risk of growth disturbance. Conservative treatment commonly leads to meniscal damage and cartilage destruction and should be considered a last resort. Level of Evidence Level IV, systematic review of Level II, III, and IV studies. PMID:21552340

  4. Radiation risk from fluoroscopically-assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chitnavis, JP; Karthikesaligam, A; Macdonald, A; Brown, C

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Precise tunnel positioning is crucial for success in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The use of intra-operative fluoroscopy has been shown to improve the accuracy of tunnel placement. Although radiation exposure is a concern, we lack information on the radiation risk to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-assisted ACL reconstruction with a standard C-arm. The aim of our study was to determine the mean radiation doses received by our patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS Radiation doses were recorded for 18 months between 1 April 2007 and 30 September 2008 for 58 consecutive patients undergoing ACL reconstruction assisted by intra-operative fluoroscopy. Dose area product (DAP) values were used to calculate the entrance skin dose (ESD), an indicator of potential skin damage and the effective dose (ED), an indicator of long-term cancer risk, for each patient. RESULTS The median age of 58 patients included in data analysis was 28 years (range, 14–52 years), of whom 44 were male (76%). The mean ESD during intra-operative fluoroscopy was 0.0015 ± 0.0029 Gy. The mean ED was 0.001 ± 0.002 mSv. No results exceeded the threshold of 2 Gy for skin damage, and the life-time risk of developing new cancer due to intra-operative fluoroscopy is less than 0.0001%. CONCLUSIONS Radiation doses administered during fluoroscopically-assisted ACL reconstruction were safe and do not represent a contra-indication to the procedure. PMID:20501019

  5. Association Between Previous Meniscal Surgery and the Incidence of Chondral Lesions at Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Wright, Rick W.; David, Tal S.; McCormack, Robert G.; Sekiya, Jon K.; Svoboda, Steven J.; Huston, Laura J.; Haas, Amanda K.; Steger-May, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction typically have more intra-articular injuries than do knees undergoing primary reconstruction. Hypothesis Previous partial meniscectomy (PM) is associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, whereas previous meniscal repair (MR) is not associated with a higher rate of chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction, compared with knees undergoing revision ACL with no previous meniscal surgery. Study design Cohort study (Prevalence); Level of evidence, 2. Methods Data from a multicenter cohort was reviewed to determine the history of prior meniscal surgery (PM/MR) and the presence of grade II/III/IV chondral lesions at revision ACL reconstruction. The association between previous meniscal surgery and the incidence of chondral lesions was examined. Patient age was included as a covariate to determine if surgery type contributes predictive information independent of patient age. Results The cohort included 725 ACL revision surgeries. Chondrosis was associated with patient age (P < .0001) and previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). After adjusting for patient age, knees with previous PM were more likely to have chondrosis than knees with previous MR (P = .003) or no previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001). There was no difference between knees without previous meniscal surgery and knees with previous MR (P = .7). Previous partial meniscectomy was associated with a higher rate of chondrosis in the same compartment compared with knees without previous meniscal surgery (P < .0001) and knees with previous MR (P ≤ .03). Conclusion The status of articular cartilage at the time of revision ACL reconstruction relates to previous meniscal surgery independent of the effect of patient age. Previous partial meniscectomy is associated with a higher incidence of articular cartilage lesions, whereas previous meniscal repair is not. Although this association may

  6. Assessment of Knee Proprioception in the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Risk Position in Healthy Subjects: A Cross-sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Mir, Seyed Mohsen; Talebian, Saeed; Naseri, Nasrin; Hadian, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] Knee joint proprioception combines sensory input from a variety of afferent receptors that encompasses the sensations of joint position and motion. Poor proprioception is one of the risk factors of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Most studies have favored testing knee joint position sense in the sagittal plane and non-weight-bearing position. One of the most common mechanisms of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury is dynamic knee valgus. No study has measured joint position sense in a manner relevant to the mechanism of injury. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy male athletes participated in the study. Joint position sense was evaluated by active reproduction of the anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position and normal condition. The dominant knees of subjects were tested. [Results] The results showed less accurate knee joint position sense in the noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position rather than the normal condition. [Conclusion] The poorer joint position sense in non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury risk position compared with the normal condition may contribute to the increased incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  7. Nonlinear dynamical model and response of avian cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Meekangvan, Preeda; A Barhorst, Alan; Burton, Thomas D; Chatterjee, Sankar; Schovanec, Lawrence

    2006-05-07

    All modern birds have kinetic skulls in which the upper bill can move relative to the braincase, but the biomechanics and motion dynamics of cranial kinesis in birds are poorly understood. In this paper, we model the dynamics of avian cranial kinesis, such as prokinesis and proximal rhynchokinesis in which the upper jaw pivots around the nasal-frontal (N-F) hinge. The purpose of this paper is to present to the biological community an approach that demonstrates the application of sophisticated predictive mathematical modeling tools to avian kinesis. The generality of the method, however, is applicable to the advanced study of the biomechanics of other skeletal systems. The paper begins with a review of the relevant biological literature as well as the essential morphology of avian kinesis, especially the mechanical coupling of the upper and lower jaw by the postorbital ligament. A planar model of the described bird jaw morphology is then developed that maintains the closed kinematic topology of the avian jaw mechanism. We then develop the full nonlinear equations of motion with the assumption that the M. protractor pterygoideus and M. depressor mandibulae act on the quadrate as a pure torque, and the nasal frontal hinge is elastic with damping. The mechanism is shown to be a single degree of freedom device due to the holonomic constraints present in the quadrate-jugal bar-upper jaw-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain as well as the quadrate-lower jaw-postorbital ligament-braincase-quadrate kinematic chain. The full equations are verified via simulation and animation using the parameters of a Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea). Next we develop a simplified analytical model of the equations by power series expansion. We demonstrate that this model reproduces the dynamics of the full model to a high degree of fidelity. We proceed to use the harmonic balance technique to develop the frequency response characteristics of the jaw mechanism. It is shown that this avian cranial

  8. Hyponatraemia associated with lamotrigine in cranial diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Mewasingh, L; Aylett, S; Kirkham, F; Stanhope, R

    2000-08-19

    We report the cases of two children with cranial diabetes insipidus who were treated with lamotrigine for seizures and who had accompanying changes in desmopressin requirements. Lamotrigine is a new anticonvulsant chemically unrelated to other existing antiepileptic drugs. Studies suggest it acts at voltage-sensitive sodium channels and also decreases calcium conductance. Both of these mechanisms of action are shared by carbamazepine, which can cause hyponatraemia secondary to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. It is possible that the effect of lamotrigine on fluid balance in the cases described is also centrally mediated.

  9. [Endocrine function following cranial radiotherapy of neoplasms in children].

    PubMed

    Couselo Sánchez, J M; Fernández Bujía, M L; Pombo Arias, M; Devesa Múgiga, J; Tojo Sierra, R; Peña Guitán, J

    1984-01-01

    The effect of radiotherapy upon the diencephalo-hypophyseal axis was studied in 14 children that had received cranial radio-therapy (2,400 to 6,000 R) to treat different intracranial tumors. Several hormones were evaluated between 2 months and 3 years after radiotherapy was performed. 35.7 per 100 of the patients were deficient in growth hormone, 37.5 per 100 showed an alteration of prolactin secretion, and 28 per 100 an abnormal response to thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  10. Three-dimensional photographic analysis of outcome after helmet treatment of a nonsynostotic cranial deformity.

    PubMed

    Schaaf, Heidrun; Malik, Christoph Yves; Streckbein, Philipp; Pons-Kuehnemann, Joern; Howaldt, Hans-Peter; Wilbrand, Jan-Falco

    2010-11-01

    Cranial asymmetries due to nonsynostotic deformation of the skull have been reported with increasing frequency during the last decade. Conservative approaches using helmets and physiotherapy have been shown to be effective in their treatment. Traditionally, documentation has been carried out using anthropometric caliper measurements. The present study evaluates the use of a new three-dimensional photographic system in the improved validation of changes in head deformities. This prospective analysis introduces a new technique for digital anthropometric measurement. The study series comprised 181 children with nonsynostotic head deformities. Three-dimensional photographs were obtained before and after treatment with an orthotic helmet device. The oblique head diagonals and head width and length were measured from three-dimensional photographs using 3dMD customer software. The cranial vault asymmetry index, cranial vault asymmetry, and cranial index were compared before and after treatment. The measurements obtained on three-dimensional images were able to demonstrate significant improvement in early infant cranial deformity after treatment with an orthotic helmet. The cranial vault asymmetry index in plagiocephaly was reduced by 7.16%, and cranial vault asymmetry was reduced by 0.86 cm. The cranial index in brachycephaly decreased by 7.32%. In children with combined plagiocephaly and brachycephaly, the cranial vault asymmetry index improved by 5.77%, cranial vault asymmetry improved by 0.71 cm, whereas the cranial index changed by 5.48%. Three-dimensional photogrammetry can support treatment control in patients with deformational plagiocephaly. This new technology offers several advantages such as easy acquisition of images, detection of landmarks without patient movement, repeatable measurements without patient discomfort, and the opportunity for unbiased evaluation.

  11. Instrumented measurement of in vivo anterior-posterior translation in the canine knee to assess anterior cruciate integrity

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mandi J.; Hagquist, William; Jeffrey, Susan L.; Gilbertson, Sara; Markel, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    This study was designed to objectively quantify in vivo anterior-posterior canine knee translation relative to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) integrity. Tibial translation was determined in one knee of 43 crossbreed hounds from radiographs performed while a set anterior and then posterior force was applied to the tibia using a custom designed device. The total (TTT), anterior (ATT), and posterior (PTT) tibial translation were measured (absolute) and normalized to the width of the tibia (normalized). Absolute and normalized TTT was significantly greater in ruptured ACL knees than in partially disrupted (PD) ACL knees, which were significantly greater than in intact ACL knees. ATT and PTT was significantly greater in ruptured ACL knees than in PD or intact ACL knees, which were not significantly different. The sensitivity and specificity of normalized TTT to distinguish knees with intact from PD ACLs were both 100%. Normalized TTT to distinguish knees with PD from ruptured ACLs had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 92%, respectively. Intra- and inter-observer intra-class correlation coefficients were 0.84 or higher for all translations. This precise non-invasive technique to assess canine knee translational stability and ACL integrity permits repetitive, objective measurements for diagnostic use and to assess therapeutic intervention efficacy. PMID:15304264

  12. All-Epiphyseal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Skeletally Immature Patients: A Surgical Technique Using a Split Tibial Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G.; Nathan, Senthil T.; Wall, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Many techniques have been described for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in skeletally immature patients, including extra-articular, complete or partial transphyseal, and physeal-sparing techniques. An all-epiphyseal technique places the tendon and its tunnels and fixation all within the child's epiphysis, leaving the growth plates untouched. We describe an all-epiphyseal quadruple-hamstring ACL reconstruction using a split tibial tunnel. The split tibial tunnels drop the tunnel size down to 4.5 to 5.5 mm from 7 to 8 mm because only half the total graft diameter passes through each of the split tunnels. This increases the safety margin for keeping the tunnel within the tibial epiphysis, in addition to avoiding damage into the growth plate. The bone bridge between the 2 tunnels serves as a solid low-profile fixation post. Femoral graft fixation is achieved with an interference screw, which allows precise tensioning and low-profile fixation entirely within the femoral tunnel. By placing the graft at the native ACL's anatomic attachment points without spanning or violating the growth plates at any step of the procedure, an all-epiphyseal ACL reconstruction with a split tibial tunnel theoretically minimizes the risk of growth disturbance in an ACL-deficient child. PMID:23766968

  13. Phenytoin Induced Erythema Multiforme after Cranial Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tekkök, İsmail Hakkı

    2015-01-01

    The prophylactic use of phenytoin during and after brain surgery and cranial irradiation is a common measure in brain tumor therapy. Phenytoin has been associated with variety of adverse skin reactions including urticaria, erythroderma, erythema multiforme (EM), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. EM associated with phenytoin and cranial radiation therapy (EMPACT) is a rare specific entity among patients with brain tumors receiving radiation therapy while on prophylactic anti-convulsive therapy. Herein we report a 41-year-old female patient with left temporal glial tumor who underwent surgery and then received whole brain radiation therapy and chemotherapy. After 24 days of continous prophylactic phenytoin therapy the patient developed minor skin reactions and 2 days later the patient returned with generalized erythamatous and itchy maculopapuler rash involving neck, chest, face, trunk, extremities. There was significant periorbital and perioral edema. Painful mucosal lesions consisting of oral and platal erosions also occurred and prevented oral intake significantly. Phenytoin was discontinued gradually. Systemic admistration of corticosteroids combined with topical usage of steroids for oral lesions resulted in complete resolution of eruptions in 3 weeks. All cutaneous lesions in patients with phenytoin usage with the radiotherapy must be evoluated with suspicion for EM. PMID:26361537

  14. Cranial neural crest migration: new rules for an old road.

    PubMed

    Kulesa, Paul M; Bailey, Caleb M; Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C; McLennan, Rebecca

    2010-08-15

    The neural crest serve as an excellent model to better understand mechanisms of embryonic cell migration. Cell tracing studies have shown that cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) emerge from the dorsal neural tube in a rostrocaudal manner and are spatially distributed along stereotypical, long distance migratory routes to precise targets in the head and branchial arches. Although the CNCC migratory pattern is a beautifully choreographed and programmed invasion, the underlying orchestration of molecular events is not well known. For example, it is still unclear how single CNCCs react to signals that direct their choice of direction and how groups of CNCCs coordinate their interactions to arrive at a target in an ordered manner. In this review, we discuss recent cellular and molecular discoveries of the CNCC migratory pattern. We focus on events from the time when CNCCs encounter the tissue adjacent to the neural tube and their travel through different microenvironments and into the branchial arches. We describe the patterning of discrete cell migratory streams that emerge from the hindbrain, rhombomere (r) segments r1-r7, and the signals that coordinate directed migration. We propose a model that attempts to unify many complex events that establish the CNCC migratory pattern, and based on this model we integrate information between cranial and trunk neural crest development.

  15. Heterochrony and patterns of cranial suture closure in hystricognath rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2009-01-01

    Sutures, joints that allow one bone to articulate with another through intervening fibrous connective tissue, serve as major sites of bone expansion during postnatal craniofacial growth in the vertebrate skull and represent an aspect of cranial ontogeny which may exhibit functional and phylogenetic correlates. Suture evolution among hystricognath rodents, an ecologically diverse group represented here by 26 species, is examined using sequence heterochrony methods, i.e. event pairing and parsimov. Although minor nuances in suture closure sequence exist between species, the overall sequence was found to be conserved both across the hystricognath group and, to an increasing degree, within selected clades. At species level, suture closure pattern exhibited a significant positive correlation with patterns previously reported for hominoids. Patterns for most clades revealed the first sutures to close are those contacting the exoccipital, interparietal, and palatine bones. Heterochronic shifts were found along 19 of 35 branches within the hystricognath phylogeny. The number of shifts per node ranged from one to seven events and, overall, involved 21 of 34 suture sites. The topology generated by parsimony analyses of the event pair matrix yielded only one grouping that was congruent with the evolutionary relationships, compiled from morphological and molecular studies, taken as framework. Sutures contacting the exoccipital displayed the highest levels of most complete closure across all species. Level of suture closure is negatively correlated with cranial length (P < 0.05). Differing life history and locomotory strategies are coupled in part with differing suture closure patterns among several species. PMID:19245501

  16. Unsteady 3D flow simulations in cranial arterial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Leopold; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph; Karniadakis, George

    2008-11-01

    High resolution unsteady 3D flow simulations in major cranial arteries have been performed. Two cases were considered: 1) a healthy volunteer with a complete Circle of Willis (CoW); and 2) a patient with hydrocephalus and an incomplete CoW. Computation was performed on 3344 processors of the new half petaflop supercomputer in TACC. Two new numerical approaches were developed and implemented: 1) a new two-level domain decomposition method, which couples continuous and discontinuous Galerkin discretization of the computational domain; and 2) a new type of outflow boundary conditions, which imposes, in an accurate and computationally efficient manner, clinically measured flow rates. In the first simulation, a geometric model of 65 cranial arteries was reconstructed. Our simulation reveals a high degree of asymmetry in the flow at the left and right parts of the CoW and the presence of swirling flow in most of the CoW arteries. In the second simulation, one of the main findings was a high pressure drop at the right anterior communicating artery (PCA). Due to the incompleteness of the CoW and the pressure drop at the PCA, the right internal carotid artery supplies blood to most regions of the brain.

  17. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  18. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base

    PubMed Central

    Kimbel, William H.; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D.

    2014-01-01

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee–human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade. PMID:24395771

  19. Ardipithecus ramidus and the evolution of the human cranial base.

    PubMed

    Kimbel, William H; Suwa, Gen; Asfaw, Berhane; Rak, Yoel; White, Tim D

    2014-01-21

    The early Pliocene African hominoid Ardipithecus ramidus was diagnosed as a having a unique phylogenetic relationship with the Australopithecus + Homo clade based on nonhoning canine teeth, a foreshortened cranial base, and postcranial characters related to facultative bipedality. However, pedal and pelvic traits indicating substantial arboreality have raised arguments that this taxon may instead be an example of parallel evolution of human-like traits among apes around the time of the chimpanzee-human split. Here we investigated the basicranial morphology of Ar. ramidus for additional clues to its phylogenetic position with reference to African apes, humans, and Australopithecus. Besides a relatively anterior foramen magnum, humans differ from apes in the lateral shift of the carotid foramina, mediolateral abbreviation of the lateral tympanic, and a shortened, trapezoidal basioccipital element. These traits reflect a relative broadening of the central basicranium, a derived condition associated with changes in tympanic shape and the extent of its contact with the petrous. Ar. ramidus shares with Australopithecus each of these human-like modifications. We used the preserved morphology of ARA-VP 1/500 to estimate the missing basicranial length, drawing on consistent proportional relationships in apes and humans. Ar. ramidus is confirmed to have a relatively short basicranium, as in Australopithecus and Homo. Reorganization of the central cranial base is among the earliest morphological markers of the Ardipithecus + Australopithecus + Homo clade.

  20. [Structural anatomy of cranial nerves (V, VII, VIII, IX, X)].

    PubMed

    Guclu, B; Meyronet, D; Simon, E; Streichenberger, N; Sindou, M; Mertens, P

    2009-04-01

    This study reports a review of the literature on the structural anatomy of the Vth, VIIth, VIIIth, IXth, and Xth cranial nerves, known to harbor dysfunction syndromes in humans. Because these dysfunctions are hypothesized to be caused by neurovascular conflicts at the root entry/exit zone and the transitional zone between central and peripheral myelinization, this investigation focused on the study and description of this junction. All the cranial nerves, except the optic and olfactory nerves, which are considered to be more a direct expansion of the central nervous system, have a transitional zone between central myelin (coming from oligodendrocytes) and peripheral myelin (produced by Schwann cells). The human studies reported in the literature argue in favor of a dome-shaped transitional zone directed to the periphery. It seems that this junctional region is situated more peripherally in sensory nerves than in motor nerves. The transitional zone is situated very peripherally for the cochlear and vestibular nerves, and on the contrary very close to its exit from the brain stem for the facial nerve.

  1. Cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Zhong, Ding-Rong; Hao, Hong-Lin; Kong, Wei-Ze; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Guan, Hong-Zhi; Cui, Li-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hypertrophic pachymeningitis (HP) is a chronic disease characterized by inflammatory hypertrophy and fibrosis of dura mater. It can be divided into cranial and spinal forms depending on the location of the lesion. HP involving 2 separate sites simultaneously is quite uncommon. Case summary: This study presents a case of a 49-year-old woman with pathologically confirmed cranial and lumbosacral hypertrophic pachymeningitis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which is a rare etiology of HP. She experienced persistent numbness and pain of the left lower limb, followed by headache and seizures. In laboratory tests, levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein were elevated, and antinuclear antibodies and anti–double-strand deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) antibodies were detected. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed dural thickening with homogenous gadolinium enhancement both at lumbosacral level and over cerebral convexities. Histology suggested chronic inflammation in spinal dura mater with extensive fibrosis, dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and focal vasculitis. Treatment with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide was started with significant clinical and radiological improvement. Conclusion: HP is etiologically heterogeneous. Despite its rarity, SLE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of HP. Early recognition and therapy may provide an optimal outcome. PMID:27684799

  2. Surgical Anatomy of the Extended Middle Cranial Fossa Approach

    PubMed Central

    Arìstegui, Miguel; Cokkeser, Yasar; Saleh, Essam; Naguib, Maged; Landolfi, Mauro; Taibah, Abdel; Sanna, Mario

    1994-01-01

    The extended middle cranial fossa approach includes removal of the petrous bone from its subtemporal surface in order to expose widely the internal auditory canal and the posterior fossa dura around its porus while preserving all the important and closely related anatomical structures. We have dissected 25 temporal bones and five fresh cadavers in order to define the limits of this approach. Measurements were obtained between the different structures to find reliable angles and distances that could guide working in this area. A new method of identification of the internal auditory canal is discussed based on the measurements taken. The results of the present work showed wide variations in the different structures. The arcuate eminence was coincident with the superior semicircular canal in only 48% of bones. Dehiscence of the geniculate ganglion and of the internal carotid artery was noted in 16% and 20% of specimens, respectively. The angles measured between the different structures showed great variations. However, the angle between the internal auditory canal and superior petrosal sinus was constant. Though the extended middle cranial fossa is a versatile approach, it affords a limited access to the cerebellopontine angle. A thorough understanding of the complex and variable anatomy of this area is necessary should this approach be utilized. ImagesFigure 1p183-bFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171170

  3. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury.

  4. Preclinical pathways to treatment in infants with positional cranial deformity.

    PubMed

    Kluba, S; Lypke, J; Kraut, W; Krimmel, M; Haas-Lude, K; Reinert, S

    2014-10-01

    Positional plagiocephaly in infants is frequent. As well as positioning, physiotherapy, and osteopathy, helmet therapy is an effective treatment option. The outcome also depends on the timely initiation of treatment. We investigated the preclinical pathways to treatment. Parents of 218 affected children were interviewed. Data were collected regarding detection and the treatments used prior to the first craniofacial consultation at the study clinic in Germany. Descriptive and statistical analyses were performed. For 78.4% of the children, the cranial deformities were first detected at ≤4 months of age. One hundred and twenty-two children received helmet therapy. Parents consulted the paediatrician with a mean latency of 0.4 months; 3.3 months passed until the first craniofacial consultation. Approximately 90% were treated with repositioning and 75.2% received additional physiotherapy or osteopathy prior to presentation. Children treated with physiotherapy/osteopathy presented significantly later (P=0.023). The time lapse to craniofacial consultation was not significantly different between children with and without later helmet therapy. We identified a relevant delay between the detection of positional cranial deformity and consultation with a craniofacial specialist. For affected children, this may potentially compromise the outcome of helmet therapy. Early referral to a specialist and if necessary the simultaneous application of different treatments should be preferred.

  5. Gait analysis comparison of cruciate retaining and substituting TKA following PCL sacrifice.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Siddharth; Gioe, Terence J; Yoon, Patrick; Schwartz, Michael H

    2012-08-01

    The role of the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) remains controversial in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), with some surgeons who believe in PCL sacrifice and substitution and others who believe in PCL preservation for stability. Manufacturers have developed both cruciate-substituting/posterior stabilized (PS) implants typically used when the ligament is sacrificed and cruciate retaining (CR) implants designed for ligament preservation. However, studies demonstrate excellent clinical results with CR implants despite PCL sacrifice. This study sought to determine functional stability differences between PS and CR TKAs following PCL sacrifice. Eighteen (9 matched pairs) subjects with either a PS or CR TKA and sacrificed PCL and a normal contralateral knee were subjected to physical exam and gait analysis (walking, stair ascent and descent) using a staircase model, passive reflective arrays and an optoelectric system. No differences were detected between the two groups among any of the measured parameters (knee flexion angle, knee flexion moment, knee power absorption, pelvic tilt). PCL sacrifice in a well-balanced cruciate retaining TKA did not result in instability during stair descent based on gait parameters. The decision to use a posterior stabilized design when faced with an incompetent PCL intraoperatively should be based on factors other than anticipated instability.

  6. Fracture of the proximal extremity of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: case report.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Carneiro, Márcio; de Almeida Monteiro, Thiago; Zenovello Bueno, Marcos Renato; Augustin Júnior, Jorge Luis

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare condition that has been little described in the literature: a fracture of the proximal extremity of the tibia after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an autologous patellar bone-tendon graft. In this report, we discuss the factors that predisposed toward this episode, the treatment and the evolution of the case after the surgical treatment.

  7. Implementation of Open and Closed Kinetic Chain Quadriceps Strengthening Exercises after Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael D.; Denegar, Craig R.; Winzenried, Jay A.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews the effects of open kinetic chain (OKC) and closed kinetic chain (CKC) exercise on anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) strain and patellofemoral joint stress, suggesting a combination of the two for quadriceps strengthening after ACL reconstruction. Both OKC and CKC exercises may be modified and implemented for quadriceps strengthening after…

  8. Training for Women's Basketball: A Biomechanical Emphasis for Preventing Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettitt, Robert W.; Bryson, Erin R.

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes proposed variables linked with higher incidences of anterior cruciate ligament tears in females and the biomechanical aspects of the lower extremity during the performance of common basketball skills, focusing on gender differences in knee joint stability and neuromuscular control, biomechanical aspects of lower extremity skills in…

  9. Determining the Optimal Number of Stimuli per Cranial Site during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Mapping.

    PubMed

    Cavaleri, Rocco; Schabrun, Siobhan M; Chipchase, Lucy S

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of five stimuli to each cranial site is recommended during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) mapping. However, this time-consuming practice restricts the use of TMS mapping beyond the research environment. While reducing the number of stimuli administered to each cranial site may improve efficiency and decrease physiological demand, doing so may also compromise the procedure's validity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the minimum number of stimuli per cranial site required to obtain valid outcomes during TMS mapping. Map volume and centre of gravity (CoG) recordings obtained using five stimuli per cranial site were retrospectively compared to those obtained using one, two, three, and four stimuli per cranial site. For CoG longitude, one stimulus per cranial site produced valid recordings (ICC = 0.91, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.95). However, this outcome is rarely explored in isolation. As two stimuli per cranial site were required to obtain valid CoG latitude (ICC = 0.99, 95% CI 0.99 to 0.99) and map volume (ICC = 0.99, 95% CI 0.99 to 0.99) recordings, it is recommended that a minimum of two stimuli be delivered to each cranial site during TMS mapping in order to obtain valid outcomes.

  10. An unusual case of multiple cranial nerve palsies in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Daderian, A. D.; Chayasirisobhon, S.

    2000-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of Wegener's granulomatosis, which initially caused fulminant palsies affecting cranial nerves II, V, VI, VII, and VIII during a brief episode of the disease. The patient was successfully treated with immunosuppressive therapy. Wegener's granulomatosis should be suspected when multiple cranial nerves are initially affected. PMID:11052460

  11. Determining the Optimal Number of Stimuli per Cranial Site during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Schabrun, Siobhan M.

    2017-01-01

    The delivery of five stimuli to each cranial site is recommended during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) mapping. However, this time-consuming practice restricts the use of TMS mapping beyond the research environment. While reducing the number of stimuli administered to each cranial site may improve efficiency and decrease physiological demand, doing so may also compromise the procedure's validity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the minimum number of stimuli per cranial site required to obtain valid outcomes during TMS mapping. Map volume and centre of gravity (CoG) recordings obtained using five stimuli per cranial site were retrospectively compared to those obtained using one, two, three, and four stimuli per cranial site. For CoG longitude, one stimulus per cranial site produced valid recordings (ICC = 0.91, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.95). However, this outcome is rarely explored in isolation. As two stimuli per cranial site were required to obtain valid CoG latitude (ICC = 0.99, 95% CI 0.99 to 0.99) and map volume (ICC = 0.99, 95% CI 0.99 to 0.99) recordings, it is recommended that a minimum of two stimuli be delivered to each cranial site during TMS mapping in order to obtain valid outcomes. PMID:28331848

  12. Asymmetric class III malocclusion: association with cranial base deformation and occult torticollis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Joyce T; Teng, Edward; Heller, Justin B; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2012-09-01

    The etiology of Angle class III malocclusion with facial asymmetry has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the etiology, patients with asymmetric prognathism (n = 30) from a single institution were assessed for previously undiagnosed torticollis and cranial base asymmetry. Presence of torticollis was determined by measuring restricted head movement when turning the head against a wall and cranial base tilt with upward gaze. Cranial base asymmetry was evaluated by preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography scans. Thirty-one percent of patients with prognathism presented with concurrent facial asymmetry. In patients with asymmetric prognathism, cranial base tilt was present on upward gaze in all patients; mean angle between head and wall was 31 degrees greater than that in control patients, and a 22% to 36% difference in the angle was present when comparing one side with the other. Based on these findings, all patients with asymmetric prognathism were found to be affected by torticollis. By computed tomography scan, 85% of these torticollis patients showed slight anteromedial displacement of the glenoid fossa ipsilateral to torticollis, and 73% demonstrated temporal fossa shift of 4 mm or greater. The current study demonstrates a strong association between asymmetric class III malocclusion, torticollis, and cranial base asymmetry. We conclude that undiagnosed torticollis is a likely etiology for otherwise idiopathic cranial base asymmetry and that cranial base asymmetry in turn causes facial asymmetry and malocclusion. This study highlights the importance of evaluating cranial base asymmetry and torticollis in patients with class III malocclusion to allow for earlier treatment and improved outcomes.

  13. Defending Puts the Anterior Cruciate Ligament at Risk During Soccer

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Silvers, Holly J.; Mandelbaum, Bert R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soccer athletes are at risk for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. To date, there are limited studies on the mechanisms of ACL injuries in soccer athletes and no video-based analysis or sex-based comparison of these mechanisms. Hypothesis: There is no difference in ACL injury mechanisms among soccer athletes by sex. Study design: Case series. Level of evidence: Level 4. Methods: Fifty-five videos of ACL injuries in 32 male and 23 female soccer players were reviewed. Most athletes were professionals (22 males, 4 females) or collegiate players (8 males, 14 females). Visual analysis of each case was performed to describe the injury mechanisms in detail (game situation, player behavior, and lower extremity alignment). Results: The majority of ACL injuries occurred when the opposing team had the ball and the injured athlete was defending (73%). Females were more likely to be defending when they injured their ACLs (87% vs 63% for males, P = 0.045). The most common playing action was tackling (51%), followed by cutting (15%). Most injuries occurred due to a contact mechanism (56%) with no significant difference for sex. Females were more likely to suffer a noncontact injury in their left knee (54%) than males (33%) (P = 0.05). Conclusion: Soccer players are at greatest risk for ACL injury when defending, especially when tackling the opponent in an attempt to win possession of the ball. Females are more likely to injure their ACLs when defending and are at greater risk for noncontact injuries in their left lower extremity. Clinical Relevance: Soccer ACL injury prevention programs should include proper defending and tackling techniques, particularly for female athletes. PMID:26131302

  14. Kinematic Analysis of Five Different Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Techniques.

    PubMed

    Gadikota, Hemanth R; Hosseini, Ali; Asnis, Peter; Li, Guoan

    2015-06-01

    Several anatomical anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction techniques have been proposed to restore normal joint kinematics. However, the relative superiorities of these techniques with one another and traditional single-bundle reconstructions are unclear. Kinematic responses of five previously reported reconstruction techniques (single-bundle reconstruction using a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft [SBR-BPTB], single-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [SBR-HST], single-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [STDBR-HST], anatomical single-tunnel reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [ASTR-HST], and a double-tunnel double-bundle reconstruction using a hamstring tendon graft [DBR-HST]) were systematically analyzed. The knee kinematics were determined under anterior tibial load (134 N) and simulated quadriceps load (400 N) at 0°, 15°, 30°, 60°, and 90° of flexion using a robotic testing system. Anterior joint stability under anterior tibial load was qualified as normal for ASTR-HST and DBR-HST and nearly normal for SBR-BPTB, SBR-HST, and STDBR-HST as per the International Knee Documentation Committee knee examination form categorization. The analysis of this study also demonstrated that SBR-BPTB, STDBR-HST, ASTR-HST, and DBR-HST restored the anterior joint stability to normal condition while the SBR-HST resulted in a nearly normal anterior joint stability under the action of simulated quadriceps load. The medial-lateral translations were restored to normal level by all the reconstructions. The internal tibial rotations under the simulated muscle load were over-constrained by all the reconstruction techniques, and more so by the DBR-HST. All five ACL reconstruction techniques could provide either normal or nearly normal anterior joint stability; however, the techniques over-constrained internal tibial rotation under the simulated quadriceps load.

  15. Ultrastructure of the three anterior cruciate ligament bundles.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Otsubo, Hidenori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Kamiya, Tomoaki; Nagoya, Satoshi; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Shino, Konsei

    2015-10-01

    The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) can be morphologically separated into not only two, but three bundles: the anteromedial-medial bundle (AM-MB), the anteromedial-lateral bundle (AM-LB), and the posterolateral bundle (PLB). Our hypothesis was that the three bundles differ in their microstructures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the microstructural differences among the three bundles. The normal ACLs of six fresh frozen cadavers were harvested. After the AM-MB, AM-LB, and PLB were identified, their fibril structures were analyzed using a transmission electron microscope. The fibril orientation, distribution pattern, and the mass average diameter of the fibrils (MAD) were compared among the AM-MBs, AM-LBs, and PLBs. The AM-MB and AM-LB fibrils were arranged mostly in the longitudinal direction, while the PLB fibrils were not aligned in a uniform direction. The fibril diameter distribution pattern of AM-MBs showed a bi-modal pattern due to the existence of small-diameter (30-40 nm) and large-diameter fibrils (70-80 nm), while that of the AM-LBs and PLBs had a unimodal pattern with one prominent high peak at a diameter of 50-60 nm. The mean MAD of the AM-MBs (83.2 - 11.2 nm) was significantly larger than that of the PLBs (66.8 - 7.7 nm), while it showed no significant difference compared to that of the AM-LBs (77.6 - 12.3 nm). The three ACL bundles have different ultrastructures. The AM-MB predominantly includes thick, uni-directionally oriented fibrils like tendons, while the PLB consists of thinner, multi-directionally oriented fibrils. The AM-LB shows an intermediate structure between the AM-MB and the PLB.

  16. Preoperative cryotherapy use in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Koyonos, Loukas; Owsley, Kevin; Vollmer, Emily; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph

    2014-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may impair rehabilitation, compromise functional outcomes, and lead to patient dissatisfaction. Preemptive multimodal analgesic techniques may improve outcomes after surgery. We hypothesized that patients using preoperative cryotherapy plus a standardized postoperative treatment plan will have lower pain scores and require less pain medication compared with patients receiving a standardized postoperative treatment plan alone after arthroscopically assisted anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). A total of 53 consecutive patients undergoing arthroscopically assisted ACLR performed by one of seven surgeons were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received no preoperative cryotherapy and group 2 received 30 to 90 minutes of preoperative cryotherapy to the operative leg using a commercial noncompressive cryotherapy unit. Visual analog scale pain scores and narcotic use were recorded for the first 4 days postoperatively. Total hours of cold therapy and continuous passive motion (CPM) use and highest degree of flexion achieved were recorded as well. Group 1 consisted of 26 patients (15 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft bone patellar tendon bone [BPTB]), and group 2 consisted of 27 patients (16 allograft Achilles tendon and 11 autograft BPTB). Group 2 patients reported less pain (average 1.3 units, p < 0.02) and used less narcotic use (average 1.7 tablets, p < 0.02) for the first 36 hours compared with group 1. No statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups with regard to demographics, hours of postoperative cryotherapy, hours of CPM use, or maximum knee flexion achieved. Complications did not occur in either group. This is the first report we are aware of showing the postoperative effects of preoperative cryotherapy. Our results support the safety and efficacy of preoperative cryotherapy in a multimodal pain regimen for patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  17. Gait Asymmetries Persist 1 Year After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    White, Kathleen; Logerstedt, David; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Background: After anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR), motivation to return to previous levels of activity is high. Very few studies have used return-to-activity criteria to determine when to permit athletic play. Return-to-activity measures objectively evaluate functional limb symmetry; however, previous biomechanical studies have found gait deviations in these individuals that persist up to 2 years after surgery. Purpose: To evaluate gait biomechanics in a specific cohort of ACL patients 1 year after surgery and retrospectively compare individuals who pass return-to-activity criteria 6 months after surgery with those who fail. Study Design: Prospective analysis. Methods: A total of 40 athletes who participated regularly (>50 h/y) in cutting, jumping, and pivoting activities and who sustained an isolated, unilateral ACL rupture were included in this study. All participants underwent reconstruction by the same surgeon and received individualized postoperative rehabilitation. Performance-based and self-report data were measured 6 months after surgery to assess readiness to return to activity (90% outcome required to pass); 20 subjects passed return-to-activity criteria and 20 subjects did not. Motion analysis was performed 1 year after surgery, and knee flexion angles, moments, and excursions were measured during gait and evaluated for all subjects. Results: There was no limb × group interaction or effect of group for all measures. Decreased knee measures were seen on the involved limb compared with the uninvolved limb for all subjects, and failed subjects demonstrated larger differences between limbs. Conclusion: Patients continued to demonstrate biomechanical limb asymmetries 1 year after ACLR, regardless of performance-based measures at 6 months. Early return to activity did not ensure limb symmetry at 1 year. Clinical Relevance: Gait asymmetries were seen in all subjects 1 year after surgery regardless of status at 6 months. Potentially prolonging

  18. Long Term Gait Deviations in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstructed Females

    PubMed Central

    Noehren, Brian; Wilson, Hilary; Miller, Casey; Lattermann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Little is known of the potential long term gait alterations that occur after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. In particular, variables such as impact loading which have been previously associated with joint deterioration have not been studied in walking and running after an ACL reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to define the alterations in impact forces, loading rates, and the accompanying sagittal plane kinematic and kinetic mechanics at the time of impact between the ACL reconstructed group and a healthy control group. Methods 40 females (20 ACL reconstruction, 20 controls) participated in the study. An instrumented gait analysis was performed on all subjects. Between group and limb comparisons were made for initial vertical impact force, loading rate, sagittal plane knee and hip angles as well as moments. Results During walking and running the ACL cohort had significantly greater initial vertical impact force (p=0.002 and p= 0.001), and loading rates (p=0.03 and p= 0.01), as well as a smaller knee extensor moment and hip angle during walking (p=0.000 and p=0.01). There was a trend towards a smaller knee moment and hip angle during running (p=0.08 and p=0.06) as well as a larger hip extensor moment during walking (p=0.06) in the ACL group. No differences were found for hip extensor moment during running, knee angles between groups during walking or running. Lastly, no between limb differences were found for any variable. Conclusion Gait deviations such as elevated impact loading and loading rates do not resolve long term after the individual has resumed previous activity levels and may contribute to the greater risk of early joint degeneration in this population. PMID:23568090

  19. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Military Personnel.

    PubMed

    Balazs, George C; Grimm, Patrick D; Donohue, Michael A; Keblish, David J; Rue, John-Paul

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to report the clinical and functional outcomes of revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in a young, active duty military population. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction were enrolled in an institutional clinical database and followed prospectively. The primary outcomes were patients' scores on a timed run, as compared with recorded scores before reinjury. Secondary outcomes included scores on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC), the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective (IKDC subjective), the Short Form - 36 health survey (SF-36) version 2, the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), and the Tegner activity scale. A total of 13 patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria and had complete follow-up. The mean age at revision ACL reconstruction was 20.5 years (range, 19-22 years), and mean follow-up was 40.2 months (range, 13-66 months). All patients underwent a single stage revision ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral bone-patellar tendon-bone autograft, ipsilateral hamstring autograft, or bone-tendon-bone allograft. Mean physical readiness test (PRT) score at final follow-up was not statistically different than documented preinjury PRT score (77.9 vs. 85.5, p > 0.05), nor was the mean run time (7:12 vs. 6:43/mile, p > 0.05). Significant improvements exceeding published minimal clinically important differences were seen in SANE score, SF-36 physical component summary score, KOOS sports and recreation, KOOS quality of life, WOMAC pain score, and WOMAC function score. Patients undergoing revision ACL reconstruction at our facility show good recovery of baseline physical performance as measured by the semiannual PRT and timed run test, and significant improvements in patient-reported outcome scores. Level of Evidence Level IV, case series.

  20. Potential Involvement of Draxin in the Axonal Projection of Cranial Nerves, Especially Cranial Nerve X, in the Chick Hindbrain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sanbing; Cui, Huixian; Wang, Lei; Kang, Lin; Huang, Guannan; Du, Juan; Li, Sha; Tanaka, Hideaki; Su, Yuhong

    2016-07-01

    The appropriate projection of axons within the nervous system is a crucial component of the establishment of neural circuitry. Draxin is a repulsive axon guidance protein. Draxin has important functions in the guidance of three commissures in the central nervous system and in the migration of neural crest cells and dI3 interneurons in the chick spinal cord. Here, we report that the distribution of the draxin protein and the location of 23C10-positive areas have a strong temporal and spatial correlation. The overexpression of draxin, especially transmembrane draxin, caused 23C10-positive axon bundles to misproject in the dorsal hindbrain. In addition, the overexpression of transmembrane draxin caused abnormal formation of the ganglion crest of the IX and X cranial nerves, misprojection of some anti-human natural killer-1 (HNK-1)-stained structures in the dorsal roof of the hindbrain, and a simultaneous reduction in the efferent nerves of some motoneuron axons inside the hindbrain. Our data reveal that draxin might be involved in the fascicular projection of cranial nerves in the hindbrain.

  1. Sir Robert Boyle and his unique case report on depressed cranial fracture.

    PubMed

    Rengachary, Setti S; Ashan, Sidra

    2007-09-01

    Sir Robert Boyle is one of the foremost English scientists in history. He received his inspiration from the scientific approaches initiated by Galileo and his disciple, Torricelli. Through rigorous experimentation, Boyle established the fundamental gas laws as we know them today. Although not a physician himself, he contributed enormously to the practice of medical sciences. His voluminous observations and writings represent a landmark in the history of human thought. This article summarizes the scientific contributions of Robert Boyle, with particular emphasis on his contributions to medicine. Boyle wrote a unique case report describing in detail a patient with depressed cranial fracture who underwent successful surgery. Although on only a single case report, it provides us with a unique and rare opportunity to look at the practice of neurosurgery in the mid-17th century. Also presented in this article is Boyle's accurate description of a horse with holoprosencephaly, which was perhaps the first in history. The oft-quoted axiom in clinical medicine "First, do no harm (primum non nocere)" attributed to Sydenham, may be partially credited to Robert Boyle as well.

  2. Anatomical study of the roots of cranial parasympathetic ganglia: a contribution to medical education.

    PubMed

    Lovasova, Kvetuse; Sulla, Igor J; Bolekova, Adriana; Sulla, Igor; Kluchova, Darina

    2013-05-01

    A major key to increasing the safety of cranial surgery is a thorough understanding of anatomy. The anatomy of the head is of fundamental interest to dental and medical students early in their studies. Clinically, it is mostly relevant to surgeons who are performing interventions and reconstruction in the maxillofacial region, skull base, and the orbit. However, the level of appropriate anatomical knowledge necessary for general and special medical and surgical practice is still under discussion. This study maps the significant areas and structures of the head that are not normally accessible during dissection courses because of time and difficulties involved in the preparation. The detailed photodocumentation enriched by diagrams provides a view of structures until now only partially documented. Three parasympathetic ganglia are located in hardly accessible areas of the head - inside the orbit, infratemporal fossa, and in the pterygopalatine fossa. No detailed photographs have been found in current anatomical textbooks and atlases in relation to the morphology of fibers (roots) connected to the ciliary, otic, and pterygopalatine ganglia. Therefore, this study focused on the detailed display of sensory, sympathetic, and parasympathetic roots of ganglia to provide relevant photodocumentation and an improvement in human anatomy teaching. This study also confirms that cadaver dissection provides an excellent opportunity for the integration of anatomy and clinical medicine into the early clinical training of undergraduate dental and medical students. We believe this article, because of the details mentioned above, will be beneficial not only for the future anatomical undergraduate but also for postgraduate education.

  3. Testing for isometry during reconstruction of the posterior cruciate ligament. Anatomic and biomechanical considerations.

    PubMed

    Covey, D C; Sapega, A A; Sherman, G M

    1996-01-01

    The change in the distance of linear separation between each pair of osseous fiber attachment sites of the posterior cruciate ligaments was measured and plotted as a function of the knee flexion angle from 0 degree to 120 degrees. Data were collected under four sequential test conditions that had in common quadriceps relaxation, absence of tibial rotation forces, and horizontal femoral stabilization. The posterior cruciate ligament fibers were intact or transected (excursion wires left intact) with gravitational joint distraction of the lower leg unconstrained or constrained. The small, posterior oblique fiber region was the most isometric of the four tested fiber regions. Progressively increasing deviations from isometry were seen in the posterior longitudinal, central, and anterior fiber regions, in that order. Transection of the posterior cruciate ligament, combined with unconstrained gravitational distraction of the knee joint, further increased the magnitude of deviation from isometry of the anterior and central fibers, but only changed the pattern of deviation for the more nearly isometric posterior fibers. Under simulated operative conditions, most of the posterior cruciate ligament's anatomic attachment sites exhibit nonisometric behavior, with near isometry demonstrated only by the relatively small posterior fiber attachment sites. If isometry alone is used for bone tunnel placement, the large anterior and central fiber regions will be left largely unreconstructed. Because the normal behavior of most of the fibers of the posterior cruciate ligament involves 4 to 6 mm of end-to-end length increase with progressive knee flexion, this pattern and degree of deviation from isometry should be sought to approximate an anatomic reconstruction of the anterocentral bulk of the ligament.

  4. Robust frameless stereotactic localization in extra-cranial radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Riboldi, Marco; Baroni, Guido; Spadea, Maria Francesca; Bassanini, Fabio; Tagaste, Barbara; Garibaldi, Cristina; Orecchia, Roberto; Pedotti, Antonio

    2006-04-15

    In the field of extra-cranial radiotherapy, several inaccuracies can make the application of frameless stereotactic localization techniques error-prone. When optical tracking systems based on surface fiducials are used, inter- and intra-fractional uncertainties in marker three-dimensional (3D) detection may lead to inexact tumor position estimation, resulting in erroneous patient setup. This is due to the fact that external fiducials misdetection results in deformation effects that are poorly handled in a rigid-body approach. In this work, the performance of two frameless stereotactic localization algorithms for 3D tumor position reconstruction in extra-cranial radiotherapy has been specifically tested. Two strategies, unweighted versus weighted, for stereotactic tumor localization were examined by exploiting data coming from 46 patients treated for extra-cranial lesions. Measured isocenter displacements and rotations were combined to define isocentric procedures, featuring 6 degrees of freedom, for correcting patient alignment (isocentric positioning correction). The sensitivity of the algorithms to uncertainties in the 3D localization of fiducials was investigated by means of 184 numerical simulations. The performance of the implemented isocentric positioning correction was compared to conventional point-based registration. The isocentric positioning correction algorithm was tested on a clinical dataset of inter-fractional and intra-fractional setup errors, which was collected by means of an optical tracker on the same group of patients. The weighted strategy exhibited a lower sensitivity to fiducial localization errors in simulated misalignments than those of the unweighted strategy. Isocenter 3D displacements provided by the weighted strategy were consistently smaller than those featured by the unweighted strategy. The peak decrease in median and quartile values of isocenter 3D displacements were 1.4 and 2.7 mm, respectively. Concerning clinical data, the

  5. Cranial nerves of the coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae [Osteichthyes: Sarcopterygii: Actinistia], and comparisons with other craniata.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, R G; Bemis, W E

    1993-01-01

    We reconstructed the cranial nerves of a serially sectioned prenatal coelacanth, Latimeria chalumnae. This allowed us to correct several mistakes in the literature and to make broad phylogenetic comparisons with other craniates. The genera surveyed in our phylogenetic analysis were Eptatretus, Myxine, Petromyzon, Lampetra, Chimaera, Hydrolagus, Squalus, Mustelus, Polypterus, Acipenser, Lepisosteus, Amia, Neoceratodus, Protopterus, Lepidosiren, Latimeria and Ambystoma. Cladistic analysis of our data shows that Latimeria shares with Ambystoma two characters of the cranial nerves. Our chief findings are: 1) Latimeria possesses an external nasal papilla and pedunculated olfactory bulbs but lacks a discrete terminal nerve. In other respects its olfactory system resembles the plesiomorphic pattern for craniates. 2) The optic nerve is plicated, a character found in many but not all gnathostomes. Latimeria retains an interdigitated partial decussation of the optic nerves, a character found in all craniates surveyed. 3) The oculomotor nerve supplies the same extrinsic eye muscles as in lampreys and gnathostomes. As in gnathostomes generally, Latimeria has a ciliary ganglion but its cells are located intracranially in the root of the oculomotor nerve, and their processes reach the eye via oculomotor and profundal rami. 4) The trochlear nerve supplies the superior oblique muscle as in all craniates that have not secondarily reduced the eye and its extrinsic musculature. 5) The profundal ganglion and ramus are entirely separate from the trigeminal system, with no exchange of fibers. This character has an interesting phylogenetic distribution: in hagfishes, lampreys, lungfishes and tetrapods, the profundal and trigeminal ganglia are fused, whereas in other taxa surveyed the ganglia are separate. The principal tissues innervated by the profundal nerve are the membranous walls of the tubes of the rostral organ. 6) As in lampreys and gnathostomes, the trigeminal nerve has

  6. Cranial malformations in related white lions (Panthera leo krugeri).

    PubMed

    Scaglione, F E; Schröder, C; Degiorgi, G; Zeira, O; Bollo, E

    2010-11-01

    White lions (Panthera leo krugeri) have never been common in the wild, and at present, the greatest population is kept in zoos where they are bred for biological and biodiversity conservation. During the years 2003 to 2008 in a zoological garden in northern Italy, 19 white lions were born to the same parents, who were in turn paternally consanguineous. Out of the 19 lions, 4 (21%) were stillborn, 13 (69%) died within 1 month, and 1 (5%) was euthanatized after 6 months because of difficulty with prehension of food. Six lions (32%) showed malformations involving the head (jaw, tongue, throat, teeth, and cranial bones). One lion (5%) still alive at 30 months revealed an Arnold-Chiari malformation upon submission for neurological evaluation of postural and gait abnormalities. Paternal consanguinity of the parents, along with inbreeding among white lions in general, could account for the high incidence of congenital malformations of the head in this pride of white lions.

  7. Cranial non-metric variation in north and central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A F

    1997-03-01

    Fifty cranial non-metric traits were scored on twenty series of crania from north and central Mexico in the American Museum of Natural History. Additional crania from three of the series were scored in the Musco Nacional de Antropología. Mexico City. Although a total of 471 crania and 316 mandibles were registered, only 11 series containing 387 crania and 270 mandibles, were of sufficient length for statistical analysis. Trait frequencies in these series were compared by multidimensional scaling and principal component analysis. The results suggest a degree of biological continuity in the Basin of Mexico over a twenty-five hundred year period, although the later samples from that area exhibit signs of some gene flow from more northern populations.

  8. Bioceramic Implant Induces Bone Healing of Cranial Defects.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, Thomas; Kihlström, Lars; Lundgren, Kalle; Trobos, Margarita; Engqvist, Håkan; Thomsen, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Autologous bone or inert alloplastic materials used in cranial reconstructions are techniques that are associated with resorption, infection, and implant exposure. As an alternative, a calcium phosphate-based implant was developed and previously shown to potentially stimulate bone growth. We here uncover evidence of induced bone formation in 2 patients. Histological examination 9 months postoperatively showed multinuclear cells in the central defect zone and bone ingrowth in the bone-implant border zone. An increased expression of bone-associated markers was detected. The other patient was investigated 50 months postoperatively. Histological examination revealed ceramic materials covered by vascularized compact bone. The bone regenerative effect induced by the implant may potentially improve long-term clinical outcome compared with conventional techniques, which needs to be verified in a clinical study.

  9. Scoring of nonmetric cranial traits: a population study

    PubMed Central

    BRASILI, P.; ZACCAGNI, L.; GUALDI-RUSSO, E.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of the present study were: (1) to supply further knowledge about variations in nonmetric cranial traits in relation to sex, age and laterality and (2) to evaluate biological distance between samples from a recent population. The incidence of 18 nonmetric variants of the cranium were determined in 3 adult samples of 394 skulls of known sex from North Sardinia (Sassari, Alghero and Ozieri); for the Sassari sample (n = 200) age at death was also known. Some significant sex differences were observed. Age did not appear to influence the frequency of the discontinuous traits but did for legibility. Side differences may provide important information about environmental influences. The interpopulation analysis indicates a stronger relationship between samples that are geographically closer (Sassari and Alghero), in accordance with other studies, strengthening the hypothesis of the validity of the use of nonmetric traits in the study of the peopling of a territory. PMID:10634694

  10. Cranial trauma in ancient Greece: from Homer to classical authors.

    PubMed

    Konsolaki, Eleni; Astyrakaki, Elisabeth; Stefanakis, George; Agouridakis, Panos; Askitopoulou, Helen

    2010-12-01

    This article presents literary evidence on traumatic cranio-cerebral injuries in ancient Greece from about 900 B.C. to 100 B.C. The main sources of information are epic and classic Greek texts of that period. Homer provides the first literary source of head trauma, which he portrayed in his epic poems The Iliad and The Odyssey. He describes 41 injuries of the head, face and cervical spine, of which all but two were fatal. Subsequently, other classical authors like Plato, Plutarch and others illustrate cases of cranial trauma that occurred mainly in the battlefields, during athletic games or in unusual accidents. They describe some interesting cases of head trauma in prominent men, such as the poet Aeschylos, the kings Pyrrhos and Kyros and Alexander the Great. Most of these descriptions show that the ancient Greeks possessed very good knowledge of the anatomy of the head and neck region and also of the pathophysiological consequences of trauma in the region.

  11. Cranial arachnoid membranes: some aspects of microsurgical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lü, Jian; Zhu, Xian-Li

    2007-07-01

    Although the arachnoid membranes have been known for more than 300 years, the anatomy of the arachnoid membranes has not been studied in detail. This study was performed to explore the microanatomical features of the cranial arachnoid membranes. The arachnoid membranes and cisterns were observed in eight Han Chinese adult human cadaveric brains with an operating microscope, without staining of intracranial structures or injection of colored material into blood vessels. Twenty seven arachnoid membranes and 21 subarachnoid cisterns were identified. The topographical features of each arachnoid membrane were described. On the basis of the arachnoid membranes we identified, the arachnoidal limits of the cisterns were discussed. The microsurgical anatomical research on the arachnoid membranes is a supplement to the anatomical study of the subarachnoid cisterns. The understanding of the topographical features of the arachnoid membranes is valuable to the reasonable dissection of the cisterns and the minimally invasive manipulations during microsurgical procedures.

  12. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training.

  13. Neurochemical Evidence of Potential Neurotoxicity After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kalm, Marie; Abel, Edvard; Wasling, Pontus; Nyman, Jan; Hietala, Max Albert; Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars; Elam, Mikael; Blennow, Kaj; Björk-Eriksson, Thomas; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To examine whether cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for neuroaxonal damage, neuroglial activation, and amyloid β–related processes could characterize the neurochemical response to cranial radiation. Methods and Materials: Before prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) of patients with small cell lung cancer, each patient underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, lumbar puncture, and Mini-Mental State Examination of cognitive function. These examinations were repeated at approximately 3 and 12 months after radiation. Results: The major findings were as follows. (1) Cerebrospinal fluid markers for neuronal and neuroglial injury were elevated during the subacute phase after PCI. Neurofilament and T-tau increased 120% and 50%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). The same was seen for the neuroglial markers YKL-40 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, which increased 144% and 106%, respectively, after PCI (P<.05). (2) The levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-α and -β were reduced 44% and 46%, respectively, 3 months after PCI, and the levels continued to decrease as long as 1 year after treatment (P<.05). (3) Mini-Mental State Examination did not reveal any cognitive decline, indicating that a more sensitive test should be used in future studies. Conclusion: In conclusion, we were able to detect radiation therapy–induced changes in several markers reflecting neuronal injury, inflammatory/astroglial activation, and altered amyloid precursor protein/amyloid β metabolism, despite the low number of patients and quite moderate radiation doses (20-30 Gy). These changes are hypothesis generating and could potentially be used to assess the individual risk of developing long-term symptoms of chronic encephalopathy after PCI. This has to be evaluated in large studies with extended clinical follow-up and more detailed neurocognitive assessments.

  14. Utility of genetic testing in suspected familial cranial diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ramesh; Ball, Stephen; Ward-Platt, Martin; Bourn, David; McAnulty, Ciaron; Cheetham, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim Differentiating familial cranial diabetes insipidus (CDI) from primary polydipsia can be difficult. We report the diagnostic utility of genetic testing as a means of confirming or excluding this diagnosis. Patient and methods The index case presented at 3 months with polydipsia. He was diagnosed with familial CDI based on a positive family history combined with what was considered to be suspicious symptomatology and biochemistry. He was treated with desmopressin (DDAVP) but re-presented at 5 months of age with hyponatraemia and the DDAVP was stopped. Gene sequencing of the vasopressin gene in father and his offspring was undertaken to establish the underlying molecular defect. Results Both father and daughter were found to have the pathogenic mutation c.242T>C (p.Leu81Pro) in exon 2 of the AVP gene consistent with a diagnosis of familial diabetes insipidus. The index case did not have the pathogenic mutation and the family could be reassured that he would not require intervention with DDAVP. Conclusions Gene sequencing of AVP gene can have a valuable role in predicting whether or not a child is at risk of developing CDI in future. This can help to prevent family uncertainty and unnecessary treatment with its associated risks. Learning points Differentiating patients with familial cranial diabetes insipidus from those with primary polydipsia is not always straightforward.Molecular genetic analysis of the vasopressin gene is a valuable way of confirming or refuting a diagnosis of familial CDI in difficult cases and is a valuable way of identifying individuals who will develop CDI in later childhood. This information can be of great value to families. PMID:24616780

  15. Hyperfractionated Low-Dose (21 Gy) Radiotherapy for Cranial Skeletal Metastases in Patients With High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kushner, Brian H.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Barker, Christopher A.; Kramer, Kim; Modak, Shakeel; Yataghene, Karima; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To present a large experience (73 patients) using a standard radiotherapy (RT) protocol to prevent relapse in cranial sites where measurable metastatic neuroblastoma (NB), an adverse prognostic marker, is common. Methods and Materials: High-risk NB patients with measurable cranial disease at diagnosis or residual cranial disease after induction therapy had those sites irradiated with hyperfractionated 21 Gy; a brain-sparing technique was used for an extensive field. The patients were grouped according to the response to systemic therapy. Thus, when irradiated, Group 1 patients were in complete remission and Group 2 patients had primary refractory disease. Follow-up was from the start of cranial RT. Results: At 3 years, the 39 Group 1 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 51%; control of cranial disease was 79%. Two relapses involved irradiated cranial sites. Two other patients relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites 6 and 12 months after a systemic relapse. At 3 years, the 34 Group 2 patients had a progression-free survival rate of 33%; control of cranial disease was 52%. Group 2 included 19 patients who had residual cranial (with or without extracranial) disease. The cranial sites showed major (n = 13), minor (n = 2), or no response (n = 4) to RT. Five patients had progression in the cranial RT field at 10-27 months. Group 2 also included 15 patients who had persistent NB in extracranial, but not cranial, sites. Of these 15 patients, 2 relapsed in the irradiated cranial sites and elsewhere at 8 and 14 months. Cranial RT was well tolerated, with no Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: Hyperfractionated 21-Gy cranial RT might help control NB and is feasible without significant toxicity in children.

  16. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Timothy M.; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M.; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background: Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (hamstring tendon [2ST/2GR]) anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. Purpose: To prospectively investigate and describe the recovery of objective clinical outcomes after autograft (2ST/2GR) and synthetic (LARS) ACL reconstructions, as well as to investigate the relationship between these clinimetric test outcomes and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity scale [TAS] score) at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft) and 32 healthy reference participants were assessed for joint laxity (KT-1000 arthrometer), clinical outcome (2000 International Knee Documentation Committee [IKDC] knee examination), and activity (TAS score) preoperatively and at 12, 16, 20, and 24 weeks and 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Results: There was no significant correlation observed between clinical results using the 2000 IKDC knee examination and TAS score at 24 months (r s = 0.188, P = .137), nor were results for side-to-side difference (r s = 0.030, P = .814) or absolute KT-1000 arthrometer laxity of the surgical leg at 24 months postoperatively (r s = 0.076, P = .553) correlated with return-to-sport activity. Nonetheless, return-to-sport rates within the surgical cohort were 81% at 12 months and 83% at 24 months, respectively. No statistically significant differences were observed between physiological laxity of the uninjured knee within the surgical group compared with healthy knees within the reference group (P = .522). Conclusion: The results indicate that although relatively high levels of return-to-sport outcomes were achieved at 24 months compared with those previously reported in

  17. Fifty most-cited articles in anterior cruciate ligament research.

    PubMed

    Voleti, Pramod B; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Rotmil, Gayle; Freedman, Kevin B

    2015-04-01

    The number of times an article has been cited in the peer-reviewed literature is indicative of its impact on its respective medical specialty. No study has used citation analysis to determine the most influential studies pertaining to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The primary aims of this study were to identify the classic works in ACL research using citation analysis and to characterize these articles to determine which types of studies have had the most influence on the field. A systematic query of ISI Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) was performed for articles pertaining to the ACL, and the 50 most-cited articles were selected for evaluation. The following characteristics were determined for each article: number of citations, citation density, journal, publication year, country of origin, language, article type, article subtype, and level of evidence. The number of citations ranged from 219 to 1073 (mean, 326), and the citation densities ranged from 4.9 to 55.6 citations per year (mean, 18.2). All articles were published in 1 of 11 journals, with the most being published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (46%) and The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery American (30%). The most common decades of publication were the 1990s (34%), 1980s (28%), and 2000s (26%). The majority (68%) of articles originated from the United States, and all were written in English. By article type, 42% were basic science, and 58% were clinical. Of the clinical articles, 3% were Level I, 17% were Level II, 28% were Level III, and 52% were Level IV. The articles were heterogeneous with regard to article type, article subtype, and level of evidence and tended to have the following characteristics: high-impact journal of publication, recent publication year, US origin, English language, and low level of evidence. These works represent some of the most popular scientific contributions to ACL research. This list may aid residency and fellowship

  18. Predictors of Revision Surgery After Primary Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yabroudi, Mohammad A.; Björnsson, Haukur; Lynch, Andrew D.; Muller, Bart; Samuelsson, Kristian; Tarabichi, Majd; Karlsson, Jón; Fu, Freddie H.; Harner, Christopher D.; Irrgang, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Revision anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery occurs in 5% to 15% of individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction. Identifying predictors for revision ACL surgery is of essence in the pursuit of creating adequate prevention programs and to identify individuals at risk for reinjury and revision. Purpose: To determine predictors of revision ACL surgery after failed primary ACL reconstruction. Study Design: Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 251 participants (mean age ± SD, 26.1 ± 9.9 years) who had undergone primary ACL reconstruction 1 to 5 years earlier completed a comprehensive survey to determine predictors of revision ACL surgery at a mean 3.4 ± 1.3 years after the primary ACL reconstruction. Potential predictors that were assessed included subject characteristics (age at the time of surgery, time from injury to surgery, sex, body mass index, preinjury activity level, return to sport status), details of the initial injury (mechanism; concomitant injury to other ligaments, menisci, and cartilage), surgical details of the primary reconstruction (Lachman and pivot shift tests under anesthesia, graft type, femoral drilling technique, reconstruction technique), and postoperative course (length of rehabilitation, complications). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors that predicted the need for revision ACL surgery. Results: Overall, 21 (8.4%) subjects underwent revision ACL surgery. Univariate analysis showed that younger age at the time of surgery (P = .003), participation in sports at a competitive level (P = .023), and double-bundle ACL reconstruction (P = .024) predicted increased risk of revision ACL surgery. Allograft reconstructions also demonstrated a trend toward greater risk of revision ACL surgery (P = .076). No other variables were significantly associated with revision ACL surgery. Multivariate analysis revealed that revision ACL surgery was

  19. Functional Performance Testing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Geoffrey D.; Harris, Joshua D.; Gupta, Anil K.; McCormick, Frank M.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: When to allow an athlete to return to unrestricted sporting activity after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction remains controversial. Purpose: To report the results of functional performance testing reported in the literature for individuals at differing time points following ACL reconstruction and to examine differences between graft types. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed using PRISMA guidelines. Inclusion criteria were English-language studies that examined any functional rehabilitation test from 6 months to 2 years following ACL reconstruction. All patient-, limb-, and knee-specific demographics were extracted from included investigations. All functional rehabilitation tests were analyzed and compared when applicable. Results: The search term returned a total of 890 potential studies, with 88 meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 4927 patients were included, of which 66% were male. The mean patient age was 26.5 ± 3.4 years. The predominant graft choices for reconstruction were bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) autograft (59.8%) and hamstring autograft (37.9%). The most commonly reported functional tests were the hop tests. The results of these functional tests, as reported in the Limb Symmetry Index (LSI), improved with increasing time, with nearly all results greater than 90% at 1 year following primary ACL reconstruction. At 6 months postoperatively, a number of isokinetic strength measurements failed to reach 80% LSI, most commonly isokinetic knee extension testing in both BPTB and hamstring autograft groups. The knee flexion strength deficit was significantly less in the BPTB autograft group as compared with those having hamstring autograft at 1 year postoperatively, while no significant differences were found in isokinetic extension strength between the 2 groups. Conclusion: Hop

  20. The Bridge-Enhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair (BEAR) Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Martha M.; Flutie, Brett M.; Kalish, Leslie A.; Ecklund, Kirsten; Fleming, Braden C.; Proffen, Benedikt L.; Micheli, Lyle J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the safety of the newly developed bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair (BEAR), which involves suture repair of the ligament combined with a bioactive scaffold to bridge the gap between the torn ligament ends. As the intra-articular environment is complex in its response to implanted materials, this study was designed to determine whether there would be a significant rate of adverse reaction to the implanted scaffold. Hypothesis: The primary hypothesis was that the implanted scaffold would not result in a deep joint infection (arthrocentesis with positive culture) or significant inflammation (clinical symptoms justifying arthrocentesis but negative culture). The secondary hypotheses were that patients treated with BEAR would have early postoperative outcomes that were similar to patients treated with ACL reconstruction with an autologous hamstring graft. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 20 patients were enrolled in this nonrandomized, first-in-human study. Ten patients received BEAR treatment and 10 received a hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction. The BEAR procedure was performed by augmenting a suture repair with a proprietary scaffold, the BEAR scaffold, placed in between the torn ends of the ACL at the time of suture repair. The BEAR scaffold is to our knowledge the only device that fills the gap between the torn ligament ends to have current Investigational Device Exemption approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Ten milliliters of autologous whole blood were added to the scaffold prior to wound closure. Outcomes were assessed at 3 months postoperatively. The outcomes measures included postoperative pain, muscle atrophy, loss of joint range of motion, and implant failure (designated by an International Knee Documentation Committee grade C or D Lachman test and/or an absence of continuous ACL tissue on magnetic resonance images). Results: There were no joint

  1. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Timothy D.; Stringer, Chris B.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on. PMID:26468243

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Change in Intracranial Volume After Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Azusa; Komuro, Yuzo; Shimoji, Kazuaki; Miyajima, Masakazu; Arai, Hajime

    2016-07-01

    Posterior cranial vault distraction is considered to be more effective for increasing intracranial volume than fronto-orbital advancement or anterior cranial vault expansion, but the changes in intracranial volumes after posterior cranial vault distraction remain unclear. The changes in intracranial volume were investigated in patients of premature craniosynostosis treated by this technique. Seven patients, 3 boys and 4 girls aged from 5 months to 3 years 3 months (mean 23 months) at operation, with craniosynostosis underwent posterior cranial vault distraction at Juntendo University Hospital from 2011 to 2014. Patient characteristics, length of distraction, and pre- and postoperative computed tomography findings were reviewed. Total intracranial volume, including the supratentorial space and posterior cranial fossa, was measured using the workstation functions on three-dimensional computed tomography scans. Posterior distraction was performed without severe complications except in 2 patients requiring additional surgeries. The distraction length was 22.3 to 39 mm (mean 31 mm), the intracranial volume change was 144 to 281 mL (mean 192 mL), and the enlargement ratio of intracranial volume was 113% to 134% (mean 121%). The present quantitative analysis of intracranial volume change after posterior distraction showed greater increases in intracranial volume compared with previous reports. Furthermore, intracranial volumes in our patients became nearly normal and were maintained for the follow-up period (maximum 13 months). Posterior cranial vault distraction is very effective to increase cranial volume, so may be the first choice of treatment in patients of craniosynostosis.

  3. Unconstrained cranial evolution in Neandertals and modern humans compared to common chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D; Stringer, Chris B

    2015-10-22

    A variety of lines of evidence support the idea that neutral evolutionary processes (genetic drift, mutation) have been important in generating cranial differences between Neandertals and modern humans. But how do Neandertals and modern humans compare with other species? And how do these comparisons illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? To address these questions, we used 27 standard cranial measurements collected on 2524 recent modern humans, 20 Neandertals and 237 common chimpanzees to estimate split times between Neandertals and modern humans, and between Pan troglodytes verus and two other subspecies of common chimpanzee. Consistent with a neutral divergence, the Neandertal versus modern human split-time estimates based on cranial measurements are similar to those based on DNA sequences. By contrast, the common chimpanzee cranial estimates are much lower than DNA-sequence estimates. Apparently, cranial evolution has been unconstrained in Neandertals and modern humans compared with common chimpanzees. Based on these and additional analyses, it appears that cranial differentiation in common chimpanzees has been restricted by stabilizing natural selection. Alternatively, this restriction could be due to genetic and/or developmental constraints on the amount of within-group variance (relative to effective population size) available for genetic drift to act on.

  4. Arterial relationships to the nerves and some rigid structures in the posterior cranial fossa.

    PubMed

    Surchev, N

    2008-09-01

    The close relationships between the cranial nerves and the arterial vessels in the posterior cranial fossa are one of the predisposing factors for artery-nerve compression. The aim of this study was to examine the relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to some skull and dural structures and the nerves in the posterior cranial fossa. For this purpose, the skull bases and brains of 70 cadavers were studied. The topographic relationships of the vertebral and basilar arteries to the cranial nerves in the posterior cranial fossa were studied and the distances between the arteries and some osseous formations were measured. The most significant variations in arterial position were registered in the lower half of the basilar artery. Direct contact with an artery was established for the hypoglossal canal, jugular tubercle, and jugular foramen. The results reveal additional information about the relationships of the nerves and arteries to the skull and dural formations in the posterior cranial fossa. New quantitative information is given to illustrate them. The conditions for possible artery-nerve compression due to arterial dislocation are discussed and two groups (lines) of compression points are suggested. The medial line comprises of the brain stem points, usually the nerve root entry/exit zone. The lateral line includes the skull eminences, on which the nerves lie, or skull and dural foramina through which they exit the cranial cavity.

  5. Cranial musculature in the larva of the caecilian, Ichthyophis kohtaoensis (Lissamphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Kleinteich, Thomas; Haas, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Within the Gymnophiona (caecilians) oviparous species with biphasic life-cycles possess a free living semi-aquatic larval stage that feeds in aquatic habitats. The larvae pass through a metamorphosis to a purely terrestrial adult stage. It is likely that the cranial morphology of caecilian larvae has specializations for aquatic feeding. However, little is known about the cranial morphology, and the cranial musculature is especially neglected in the literature. This study provides a detailed description of the jaw and hyobranchial musculature in larval stages of a caecilian. We studied late embryonic and early larval specimens of Ichthyophis kohtaoensis. Furthermore, we compared and homologized the cranial muscles found in larval I. kohtaoensis with the muscles described for adult caecilians. Most cranial muscles of larval I. kohtaoensis are also present in the adult, except for the m. levator mandibulae externus and the m. subarcualis obliquus II. Our results were compared with the data available for larval frogs and salamanders in order to hypothesize the cranial musculature in the larva of the most recent common ancestor of the Lissamphibia. Larval caecilians, frog tadpoles, and salamander larvae share many characters in their cranial musculature, which, consequently, can be assigned to the lissamphibian ground pattern. However, the m. pterygoideus and the m. levator quadrati are unique to the Gymnophiona.

  6. The effects of in situ freezing on the anterior cruciate ligament. An experimental study in goats.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D W; Grood, E S; Cohn, B T; Arnoczky, S P; Simon, T M; Cummings, J F

    1991-02-01

    We developed an in situ freeze-thaw model designed to simulate an ideally placed and oriented autogenous graft of the anterior cruciate ligament. In this model, the anterior cruciate ligament was exposed, and the femoral insertion, tibial insertion, and body of the anterior cruciate ligament were frozen in situ with specially designed freezing probes. Freeze-thaw cycles were repeated five times. We used the technique in thirty-three mature goats to study the biological and biomechanical outcomes of the devitalized and devascularized anterior cruciate ligament at zero, six, and twenty-six weeks after treatment. Thus, the collagen fibers of the simulated autogenous graft remain in normal anatomical position and the simulated graft is fixed under physiological tension. At twenty-six weeks, no statistically significant differences were noted between treated and contralateral control (untreated) ligaments relative to anterior-posterior translation, maximum force to rupture, stiffness in the linear region of the force-length curve, modulus of elasticity in the linear region, strain to maximum stress, or maximum stress. The only statistically significant difference was an increase in cross-sectional area of the ligament. This increase was 22 and 42 per cent greater than that in the control ligaments at six weeks and six months. At six months, the ligaments in the control group had an average mid-cross-sectional area of 17.7 +/- 1.2 square millimeters and the ligaments in the experimental group, 25.2 +/- 3.1 square millimeters. Changes in the size and density of the collagen fibrils also were demonstrated at six months. These observations are in sharp contrast to our previous studies of replacement of the anterior cruciate ligament, in which an allograft of the ligament or an allograft supplemented with a 3M ligament augmentation device (LAD; 3M, St. Paul, Minnesota) was used. In those studies, an average reduction in maximum strength of 75 per cent for the allografts and

  7. Arachnoid Cyst in the Middle Cranial Fossa Presenting with Pulsatile Exophthalmos: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, Atsushi; KON, Hiroyuki; HARYU, Shinya; MINO, Masaki; SASAKI, Tatsuya; NISHIJIMA, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old woman suffered gradual progression of right pulsatile exophthalmos and slight headache. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated outward and downward displacement of the right globe and an arachnoid cyst in the right middle cranial fossa associated with thinned and anterior protrusion of a bony orbit. Microscopic cystocisternotomy was performed and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inside of the cyst communicated into the carotid cistern and cistern in the posterior cranial fossa. Pulsatile exophthalmos improved immediately after surgery. Arachnoid cyst in the middle cranial fossa presenting with exophthalmos is rare. Microscopic cystocisternotomy might successfully improve CSF flow and relieve exophthalmos. PMID:24305013

  8. Immunohistochemical analysis of the neural structures of the posterior cruciate ligament in osteoarthritis patients submitted to total knee arthroplasty: an analysis of thirty-four cases

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Glaucus Cajaty; Camanho, Gilberto; Rodrigues, Mara Ibis

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many authors recommend posterior cruciate ligament-retaining arthroplasty with the intention to maintain the proprioception properties of this ligament. Preservation of the neuroreceptors and nervous fibers may be essential for retaining the proprioception function of the posterior cruciate ligament. The present study was thus developed to evaluate the presence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament resected during posterior stabilized arthroplasty in osteoarthritis patients. In particular, clinical, radiographic and histological parameters were correlated with the presence or absence of neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. METHODS: In total, 34 posterior cruciate ligament specimens were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Gomori trichrome. An immunohistochemical analysis using antibodies against the S100 protein and neurofilaments was also performed. The presence of neural structures was correlated with parameters such as tibiofemoral angulation, histological degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament, Ahlbäck radiological classification, age, gender and the histologic pattern of the synovial neurovascular bundle around the posterior cruciate ligament. RESULTS: In total, 67.5% of the cases presented neural structures in the posterior cruciate ligament. In 65% of the cases, the neurovascular bundle was degenerated. Nervous structures were more commonly detected in varus knees than in valgus knees (77% versus 50%). Additionally, severe histologic degeneration of the posterior cruciate ligament was related to neurovascular bundle degeneration. CONCLUSIONS: Severe posterior cruciate ligament degeneration was related to neurovascular bundle compromise. Neural structures were more commonly detected in varus knees. Intrinsic neural structures were detected in the majority of the posterior cruciate ligaments of patients submitted to knee arthroplasty for osteoarthritis. PMID:25789514

  9. Comparison of probabilistic and deterministic fiber tracking of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Sobottka, Stephan B; Podlesek, Dino; Linn, Jennifer; Rieger, Bernhard; Juratli, Tareq A; Schackert, Gabriele; Kitzler, Hagen H

    2016-12-16

    OBJECTIVE The depiction of cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is of great interest in skull base tumor surgery and DTI used with deterministic tracking methods has been reported previously. However, there are still no good methods usable for the elimination of noise from the resulting depictions. The authors have hypothesized that probabilistic tracking could lead to more accurate results, because it more efficiently extracts information from the underlying data. Moreover, the authors have adapted a previously described technique for noise elimination using gradual threshold increases to probabilistic tracking. To evaluate the utility of this new approach, a comparison is provided with this work between the gradual threshold increase method in probabilistic and deterministic tracking of CNs. METHODS Both tracking methods were used to depict CNs II, III, V, and the VII+VIII bundle. Depiction of 240 CNs was attempted with each of the above methods in 30 healthy subjects, which were obtained from 2 public databases: the Kirby repository (KR) and Human Connectome Project (HCP). Elimination of erroneous fibers was attempted by gradually increasing the respective thresholds (fractional anisotropy [FA] and probabilistic index of connectivity [PICo]). The results were compared with predefined ground truth images based on corresponding anatomical scans. Two label overlap measures (false-positive error and Dice similarity coefficient) were used to evaluate the success of both methods in depicting the CN. Moreover, the differences between these parameters obtained from the KR and HCP (with higher angular resolution) databases were evaluated. Additionally, visualization of 10 CNs in 5 clinical cases was attempted with both methods and evaluated by comparing the depictions with intraoperative findings. RESULTS Maximum Dice similarity coefficients were significantly higher with probabilistic tracking (p < 0.001; Wilcoxon signed-rank test). The false

  10. The immediate intervention effects of robotic training in patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Ye, Miao

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate effects of robot-assisted therapy on functional activity level after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included 10 patients (8 males and 2 females) following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy and treadmill exercise on different days. The Timed Up-and-Go test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and maximal extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated in both groups before and after the experiment. [Results] The results for the Timed Up-and-Go Test and the 10-Meter Walk Test improved in the robot-assisted rehabilitation group. Surface electromyography of the vastus medialis muscle showed significant increases in maximum and average discharge after the intervention. [Conclusion] The results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic training. PMID:27512258

  11. Massage Therapy Protocol for Post–Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Zalta, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background: The intent of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of massage therapy in the rehabilitation of post–anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction patellofemoral pain syndrome. The primary complications following surgical repair of the anterior cruciate ligament—classified as patellofemoral pain syndrome—are hamstring flexion contracture and quadriceps weakness, leading to patellofemoral dysfunction and retropatellar pain. Methods: Treatment included lymphatic drainage, myofascial release, neuromuscular techniques including trigger point release, muscle energy techniques and cross-fiber friction. Orthopedic physical assessment tests were used to chart changes in patellofemoral function and changes in range of motion in the knee during the course of the massage interventions. Subjective reporting on pain level and function were also documented. Results: A decrease in pain level, hamstring flexion contracture and lateral tracking of the patella were documented. Conclusion: Massage therapy was determined to be an effective complementary therapy in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome. PMID:21589717

  12. Bone tunnel enlargement following hamstring anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Stolarz, Mateusz; Ficek, Krzysztof; Binkowski, Marcin; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, bone tunnel enlargement (BTE) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is a well-known phenomenon. It has been identified, investigated and described by many authors during the last thirty years. Nevertheless, the etiology of bone tunnel enlargement still remains unclear. It is known that the causes are multifactorial and may include the surgical technique, the method of fixation, materials used, type of graft as well as biological factors. Due to the recent popularization of the use of hamstring grafts in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, the bone tunnel enlargement phenomenon is becoming increasingly common. In this review article, the authors focus on compiling current knowledge about the etiology, diagnosis, and the possibility of reducing the occurrence of this phenomenon by using the latest methods of supporting reconstruction surgery.

  13. Cranial base abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta: phenotypic and genotypic determinants.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Moira S; Arponen, Heidi; Roughley, Peter; Azouz, Michel E; Glorieux, Francis H; Waltimo-Sirén, Janna; Rauch, Frank

    2011-02-01

    Cranial base abnormalities are an important complication of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a hereditary bone fragility disorder that in most patients is caused by mutations affecting collagen type I. To elucidate which clinical characteristics are associated with the occurrence of cranial base abnormalities in OI, we compared cephalometric results of 187 OI patients (median age 12.0 years, range 3.4 to 47 years; 96 female) with those of 191 healthy subjects and related findings to clinical descriptors of the disease. Overall, 41 patients (22%) had at least one unambiguously abnormal skull base measure. Multivariate logistic regression analysis in patients with OI types I, III, and IV (n = 169) revealed that height Z-score [odds ratio (OR) = 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.43-0.66, p < .001]--but not age, gender, scleral hue, lumbar spine areal bone mineral density, or a history of bisphosphonate treatment--was a significant independent determinant of skull base abnormalities. Among patients with a height Z-score below -3, 48% had a skull base abnormality regardless of whether they had received bisphosphonate treatment in the first year of life or not. Genotype-phenotype correlations were evaluated in patients with detectable mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2, the genes coding for collagen type I (n = 140). Skull base abnormalities were present in 6% of patients with haploinsufficiency (frameshift or nonsense) mutations, in 43% of patients with helical glycine substitutions caused by COL1A1 mutations, in 32% of patients with helical glycine substitutions owing to COL1A2 mutations, and in 17% of patients with splice-site mutations affecting either COL1A1 or COL1A2. However, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that height Z-score but not the type of collagen type I mutation was independently associated with the prevalence of skull base abnormalities. In conclusion, this study shows that clinical severity of OI, as expressed by the height Z-score, was

  14. Evaluation of static and dynamic balance in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury – A controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Tiago Lazzaretti; Felix, Ellen Cristina Rodrigues; Bessa, Felipe; Luna, Natália MS; Sugimoto, Dai; Greve, Júlia Maria D’Andrea; Hernandez, Arnaldo José

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Anterior cruciate ligament injury leads to adaptive responses to maintain postural control. However, there is no consensus regarding whether leg dominance also affects postural control in athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dynamic and static postural control among athletes with and without anterior cruciate ligament injury to the dominant leg. METHODS: Twenty-eight athletes, twenty-one males and seven females aged 15-45 years, were allocated to one of two groups: the anterior cruciate ligament injury group (26±3 years) or the control group without anterior cruciate ligament injury (25±6.5 years). All subjects performed one legged stance tests under eyes open and eyes closed conditions and squat and kick movement tests using a postural control protocol (AccuSwayPlus force platform, Massachusetts). The center of pressure displacement and speed were measured by the force platform. In addition, the distance traveled on the single-leg hop test was assessed as an objective measure of function. RESULTS: Significantly greater mediolateral sway was found under the eyes closed condition (p=0.04) and during squat movement (p=0.01) in the anterior cruciate ligament injury group than in the control group. Analysis of the single-leg hop test results showed no difference between the groups (p=0.73). CONCLUSION: Athletes with anterior cruciate ligament injury had greater mediolateral displacement of the center of pressure toward the dominant leg under the eyes closed condition and during squat movement compared to control athletes. PMID:27626471

  15. Changes in dynamic medial tibiofemoral contact mechanics and kinematics after injury of the anterior cruciate ligament: A cadaveric model

    PubMed Central

    Bedi, Asheesh; Chen, Tony; Santner, Thomas J; El-Amin, Saadiq; Kelly, Natalie H; Warren, Russell F; Maher, Suzanne A

    2014-01-01

    The effects of tears of the anterior cruciate ligament on knee kinematics and contact mechanics during dynamic everyday activities, such as gait, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to characterize anterior cruciate ligament–deficient knee contact mechanics and kinematics during simulated gait. Nine human cadaveric knees were each augmented with a sensor capable of measuring dynamic normal contact stresses on the tibial plateau, mounted on a load-controlled simulator, and subjected to physiological, multidirectional, dynamic loads to mimic gait. Using a mixed model with random knee identifiers, confidence intervals were constructed for contact stress before and after anterior cruciate ligament transection at two points in the gait cycle at which axial force peaked (14% and 45% of the gait cycle). Kinematic and contact mechanics changes after anterior cruciate ligament transection were highly variable across knees. Nonetheless, a statistically significant increase in contact stress in the posterior–central aspect of the medial tibial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was identified, the location of which corresponds to the location of degenerative changes that are frequently found in patients with chronic anterior cruciate ligament injury. The variability in the contact stress in other regions of the medial plateau at 45% of the gait cycle was partly explained by the variations in osseous geometry across the nine knees tested. At 14% of gait, there was no significant change in peak contact stress after anterior cruciate ligament transection in any of the four quadrants, and none of the possible explanatory variables showed statistical significance. Understanding the variable effect of anterior cruciate ligament injury on contact mechanics based on geometric differences in osseous anatomy is of paramount clinical importance and may be invaluable to select the best reconstruction techniques and counsel patients on their individual risk of subsequent

  16. Risk factors and prevention strategies of non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Laible, Catherine; Sherman, Orrin H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the number of women playing sports has increased significantly. The passage of Title IX in 1972 had a significant effect in encouraging female participation in sports. This increase in women's sports participation also led to a rise in noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. As ACL injuries in young female athletes have be- come a public health issue, much research has been done on risk factors and prevention strategies.

  17. Avulsion of both posterior meniscal roots associated with acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Pier Paolo; Iannella, Germano; Cerullo, Guglielmo; Giacobbe, Marco

    2015-09-01

    A rare case of acute avulsion of both posterior meniscal roots concomitant with an acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear in a professional soccer player is described. While avulsion of the lateral meniscal root has been extensively reported in association with ACL injuries, medial root avulsion has never been reported in association with acute ACL. A review of the video documentation of the match accident revealed the exact mechanism of injury was a forceful external rotation of the standing limb.

  18. Radiographic visualization of patellar tendon grafts for the reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, J; Vidal, C; Cubillo, A

    1997-12-01

    The new biodegradable interference screws offer very many advantages for anterior cruciate ligament replacement with patellar tendon. However, their radiolucency makes it impossible to identify the anchorage sites. We describe an imaging technique of the plasty and its anchorage sites by means of a radiopaque contrast that is commonly used in radiology (Iopamidol; Bracco, Milan, Italy). It is an easy technique that does not extend the time of surgery, it is harmless, and allows us to identify malpositioning or impingement of the plasty.

  19. Tibial Fixation of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Allograft Tendons. Comparison of 1-, 2-, and 4-Stranded Constructs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Provencher Daniel K. Park, Harold A. Fogel, Sanjeev Bhatia, Bernard R. Bach , Jr, Aman Gupta, Elizabeth F. Shewman, Vincent Tibial Fixation of Anterior...Harold A. Fogel,* BA, Sanjeev Bhatia,* MD, Bernard R. Bach Jr,* MD, Aman Gupta,* Elizabeth F. Shewman,* PhD, Vincent Wang,* PhD, Nikhil Verma,* MD...knee laxity: a comparison of five arthrometers. Am J Sports Med. 1992;20:135-140. 3. Bach BR Jr. Revision anterior cruciate ligament surgery

  20. The anatomy of the anterior cruciate ligament and its relevance to the technique of reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Śmigielski, R; Zdanowicz, U; Drwięga, M; Ciszek, B; Williams, A

    2016-08-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is commonly performed and has been for many years. Despite this, the technical details related to ACL anatomy, such as tunnel placement, are still a topic for debate. In this paper, we introduce the flat ribbon concept of the anatomy of the ACL, and its relevance to clinical practice. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1020-6.

  1. Clinically-Relevant Measures Associated with Altered Contact Forces in Patients with Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gardinier, Emily S.; Manal, Kurt; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Background Knee joint contact forces are altered after anterior cruciate ligament injury during walking and may be related to clinically-relevant measures of impairments or self-reported function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of several clinically-relevant measures with altered knee contact forces in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. Methods Data for this study represent a cross-sectional observational analysis of thirty-seven (23 M, 14 F) patients with complete unilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Gait analysis with electromyography was used to obtain estimates of tibiofemoral joint contact force using an electromyography-driven musculoskeletal model. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify measures associated with tibiofemoral joint contact force. Findings Involved knee extensor muscle strength and patient-reported knee function on the Global Rating Scale of Perceived Function were significantly associated with peak tibiofemoral contact force for the involved limb. Patients who were stronger and who perceived higher knee function walked with greater contact forces on their involved knees. After controlling for walking speed, involved extensor strength explained 8.9% of the variance in involved peak tibiofemoral contact force and score on the Global Rating Scale explained an additional 9.4% of the variance. Interpretation Improvements in involved quadriceps strength and overall function as measured by patient self-report may be important for increasing involved limb contact forces, thereby restoring loading symmetry in these patients who demonstrate decreased involved limb loading after injury. These results highlight the potential value of studying the recovery of strength, self-reported function and joint loading symmetry in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury. PMID:24746854

  2. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-09-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  3. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Gates, Terry A; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E

    2016-09-27

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers.

  4. Application of thinned-skull cranial window to mouse cerebral blood flow imaging using optical microangiography.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuandong; Baran, Utku; Wang, Ruikang K

    2014-01-01

    In vivo imaging of mouse brain vasculature typically requires applying skull window opening techniques: open-skull cranial window or thinned-skull cranial window. We report non-invasive 3D in vivo cerebral blood flow imaging of C57/BL mouse by the use of ultra-high sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) and Doppler optical microangiography (DOMAG) techniques to evaluate two cranial window types based on their procedures and ability to visualize surface pial vessel dynamics. Application of the thinned-skull technique is found to be effective in achieving high quality images for pial vessels for short-term imaging, and has advantages over the open-skull technique in available imaging area, surgical efficiency, and cerebral environment preservation. In summary, thinned-skull cranial window serves as a promising tool in studying hemodynamics in pial microvasculature using OMAG or other OCT blood flow imaging modalities.

  5. Morbidity of cranial relapse in small cell lung cancer and the impact of radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, C.F.; Robinson, B.; Hoskin, P.J.; Yarnold, J.R.; Smith, I.E.; Ford, H.T.

    1986-05-01

    Thirty-nine of 225 patients with small cell lung cancer developed brain metastases after the initiation of chemotherapy. Treatment with high-dose dexamethasone in all 39 patients and cranial irradiation in 32 patients resulted in a complete neurological recovery in only eight of 39 patients (20%). Twenty-one of 39 patients (53%) failed to derive lasting benefit from their palliative treatment. Thirteen of 24 patients with limited disease with cranial relapse had no clinical evidence of other distant metastases prior to death and in these patients the CNS disease was an important cause of morbidity. On the basis of this study, it appears that palliative treatment of overt cranial metastases is relatively unsuccessful and that patients with limited disease represent a group with much to gain from effective prophylactic cranial irradiation.

  6. Bony cranial ornamentation linked to rapid evolution of gigantic theropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Terry A.; Organ, Chris; Zanno, Lindsay E.

    2016-01-01

    Exaggerated cranial structures such as crests and horns, hereafter referred to collectively as ornaments, are pervasive across animal species. These structures perform vital roles in visual communication and physical interactions within and between species. Yet the origin and influence of ornamentation on speciation and ecology across macroevolutionary time scales remains poorly understood for virtually all animals. Here, we explore correlative evolution of osseous cranial ornaments with large body size in theropod dinosaurs using a phylogenetic comparative framework. We find that body size evolved directionally toward phyletic giantism an order of magnitude faster in theropod species possessing ornaments compared with unadorned lineages. In addition, we find a body mass threshold below which bony cranial ornaments do not originate. Maniraptoriform dinosaurs generally lack osseous cranial ornaments despite repeatedly crossing this body size threshold. Our study provides novel, quantitative support for a shift in selective pressures on socio-sexual display mechanisms in theropods coincident with the evolution of pennaceous feathers. PMID:27676310

  7. MRI of the cranial nerves--more than meets the eye: technical considerations and advanced anatomy.

    PubMed

    Casselman, Jan; Mermuys, Koen; Delanote, Joost; Ghekiere, Johan; Coenegrachts, Kenneth

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the method of choice to evaluate the cranial nerves. Although the skull base foramina can be seen on CT, the nerves themselves can only be visualized in detail on MR. To see the different segments of nerves I to XII, the right sequences must be used. Detailed clinical information is needed by the radiologist so that a tailored MR study can be performed. In this article, MR principles for imaging of the cranial nerves are discussed. The basic anatomy of the cranial nerves and the cranial nerve nuclei as well as their central connections are discussed and illustrated briefly. The emphasis is on less known or more advanced extra-axial anatomy, illustrated with high-resolution MR images.

  8. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  9. The reverse Segond fracture: not associated with knee dislocation and rarely with posterior cruciate ligament tear.

    PubMed

    Peltola, Erno K; Lindahl, Jan; Koskinen, Seppo K

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the incidence of reverse Segond fracture, to examine the associated ligamentous injuries, and to examine how often reverse Segond fracture coexists with a knee dislocation. At a level 1 trauma center, an 11-year period of emergency department multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) examinations for knee trauma was evaluated for reverse Segond and Segond fractures. Surgical findings served as the reference standard for intra-articular injuries. The hospital discharge register was searched for the diagnosis of knee dislocation from August 2000 through the end of August 2011. A total of 1,553 knee MDCT examinations were evaluated. Ten patients with a reverse Segond fracture were found, comprising 0.64 % of emergency room acute knee trauma MDCT examinations. Seven patients who had a reverse Segond fracture were operated: Three had an avulsion fracture of the anterior cruciate ligament, one had an avulsion fracture of posterior cruciate ligament, two had a lateral meniscal tear, and two had a medial collateral ligament tear. The ratio of reverse Segond fractures to Segond fractures was 1:4. None of the 71 knee dislocation patients had a reverse Segond fracture. Reverse Segond fracture is a rare finding even in a level 1 trauma center. Cruciate ligament injuries appear to be associated with avulsion fracture, but every patient does not have PCL injury, as previously reported. Our results do not support the association of knee dislocation with reverse Segond fracture.

  10. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  11. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  12. An Ecological Study of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Timothy M.; Waddington, Gordon; Scarvell, Jennie M.; Ball, Nick; Creer, Rob; Woods, Kevin; Smith, Damian; Adams, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Background: Additional high-quality prospective studies are needed to better define the objective criteria used in relation to return-to-sport decisions after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in active populations. Purpose: To investigate prospectively the relationship between functional performance test results at 24 weeks postoperative and return-to-sport activity (Tegner activity score) at 12 and 24 months, respectively, after synthetic (ligament advanced reinforcement system [LARS]) and autograft (doubled semitendinosus/gracilis [2ST/2GR]) ACL reconstructions. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A total of 64 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction (32 LARS, 32 2ST/2GR autograft; mean age, 27.9 years; body mass index [BMI], 24.9 kg/m2) were assessed preoperatively and at staged intervals postoperatively up to 24 weeks for isokinetic testing of quadriceps and hamstring average power per repetition at 60 deg/s and 180 deg/s, a battery of hop tests, peak vertical ground-reaction force (vGRF), and time to peak vGRF (in seconds) during a step- and jump-down task onto a force platform and peak speed (m/s) using a global positioning system (GPS unit) during a running task. A cohort of 32 healthy matched participants (mean age, 26.31 years; BMI, 25.7 kg/m2) were also tested to act as reference. Pearson correlation was calculated to assess correlation of each performance measure at 24 weeks postoperative with activity outcomes (Tegner score) at 12 and 24 months. Results: The strongest correlation between physical performance tests and return-to-sport outcomes was observed with peak speed during running. Large correlations were also observed for hamstring isokinetic power and hop test for distance. Moderate correlations were observed for timed hop, peak vGRF during a jump-down task, and quadriceps isokinetic power. No statistical correlations were observed for time to peak vGRF during a step-down and jump-down task as well as peak v

  13. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in the Skeletally Immature

    PubMed Central

    Kercher, Jim; Xerogeanes, John; Tannenbaum, Allen; Al-Hakim, Ramsey; Black, James C.; Zhao, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has proven to be a reliable method to restore knee stability. However, the risk of physeal arrest with transphyseal tunnel placement in skeletally immature patients has raised concern regarding this technique. Conservative nonoperative management also has its limitations resulting in meniscal and chondral damage that may lead to degenerative joint disease and poor return to sport. Researchers have used animal models to study the threshold of physeal damage producing growth deformity. The purpose of this study was to examine the distal femoral and proximal tibial physes and determine the damage produced by drilling transphyseal tunnels. In addition, we attempted to find a reproducible angle at which to drill the tibial tunnel for safe interference screw placement. To do this, we used a custom software module. Methods A custom software package designed by our team was used: Module for Adolescent ACL Reconstructive Surgery (MAARS). This module created a 3-dimensional model of the distal femur and proximal tibia. The data required for MAARS were sagittal and coronal T1 magnetic resonance imagings of at least 1.5T. Thirty-one knee magnetic resonance imaging studies from patients aged 10 to 15 years old were used. The physes were segmented out to obtain volumetric measurements. Transphyseal tunnels were simulated based on the anatomic trajectory of the native ACL. The module calculated volume of physis was removed with the use of an 8-mm tunnel and the optimum angle for trajectory. Results Average volume of the tibial and femoral physis was 12,683.1 μL and 14,708.3 μL, respectively. The volume increased linearly with age. Average volume removed from the tibial and femoral physis was 318.4 μL and 306.29 μL, respectively. This represented 2.4% of the distal femoral physis and 2.5% of the proximal tibial physis. The volume percent removed decreased linearly with age. Manipulation of the variables

  14. Neural Excitability Alterations After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pietrosimone, Brian G.; Lepley, Adam S.; Ericksen, Hayley M.; Clements, Amy; Sohn, David H.; Gribble, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Context Neuromuscular dysfunction is common after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R). However, little is known about quadriceps spinal-reflex and descending corticomotor excitability after ACL-R. Understanding the effects of ACL-R on spinal-reflex and corticomotor excitability will help elucidate the origins of neuromuscular dysfunction. Objective To determine whether spinal-reflex excitability and corticomotor excitability differed between the injured and uninjured limbs of patients with unilateral ACL-R and between these limbs and the matched limbs of healthy participants. Design Case-control study. Setting Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 28 patients with unilateral ACL-R (9 men, 19 women; age = 21.28 ± 3.79 years, height = 170.95 ± 10.04 cm, mass = 73.18 ± 18.02 kg, time after surgery = 48.10 ± 36.17 months) and 29 participants serving as healthy controls (9 men, 20 women; age = 21.55 ± 2.70 years, height = 170.59 ± 8.93 cm, mass = 71.89 ± 12.70 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s) Active motor thresholds (AMTs) were collected from the vastus medialis (VM) using transcranial magnetic stimulation. We evaluated VM spinal reflexes using the Hoffmann reflex normalized to maximal muscle responses (H : M ratio). Voluntary quadriceps activation was measured with the superimposed-burst technique and calculated using the central activation ratio (CAR). We also evaluated whether ACL-R patients with high or low voluntary activation had different outcomes. Results The AMT was higher in the injured than in the uninjured limb in the ACL-R group (t27 = 3.32, P = .003) and in the matched limb of the control group (t55 = 2.05, P = .04). The H : M ratio was bilaterally higher in the ACL-R than the control group (F1,55 = 5.17, P = .03). The quadriceps CAR was bilaterally lower in the ACL-R compared with the control group (F1,55 = 10.5, P = .002). The ACL-R group with low voluntary activation (CAR < 0.95) had higher AMT than

  15. Spinal subdural hematoma following cranial subdural hematoma : a case report with a literature review.

    PubMed

    Ji, Gyu Yeul; Oh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Daeyeong; Shin, Dong Ah

    2013-12-01

    Coexistence of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas is rare and only a few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a case of cranial and spinal subdural hematomas after previous head trauma. As the pathogenesis of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma yet remains unclear, we developed an alternative theory to those proposed in the literature for their coexistence, the migration of blood through the subdural space.

  16. Progressive multiple cranial neuropathies presenting as a delayed complication of radiotherapy in infancy.

    PubMed Central

    Pall, H. S.; Nightingale, S.; Clough, C. G.; Spooner, D.

    1988-01-01

    A 38 year old woman who had undergone irradiation during infancy for a left facial cutaneous arteriovenous malformation sequentially developed complete palsies of the ipsilateral VII, V, XI, IX, X, XII and VI cranial nerves. Apart from optic and olfactory nerve damage there are few reports of radiotherapy causing cranial nerve injury. We link the unusually extensive and progressive neural damage and the prolonged latency to the patient's age at time of irradiation. PMID:3186574

  17. Elimination of microglia improves cognitive function following cranial irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Green, Kim N.; Allen, Barrett D.; Najafi, Allison R.; Syage, Amber; Minasyan, Harutyun; Le, Mi T.; Kawashita, Takumi; Giedzinski, Erich; Parihar, Vipan K.; West, Brian L.; Baulch, Janet E.; Limoli, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Cranial irradiation for the treatment of brain cancer elicits progressive and severe cognitive dysfunction that is associated with significant neuropathology. Radiation injury in the CNS has been linked to persistent microglial activation, and we find upregulation of pro-inflammatory genes even 6 weeks after irradiation. We hypothesize that depletion of microglia in the irradiated brain would have a neuroprotective effect. Adult mice received acute head only irradiation (9 Gy) and were administered a dietary inhibitor (PLX5622) of colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R) to deplete microglia post-irradiation. Cohorts of mice maintained on a normal and PLX5662 diet were analyzed for cognitive changes using a battery of behavioral tasks 4–6 weeks later. PLX5622 treatment caused a rapid and near complete elimination of microglia in the brain within 3 days of treatment. Irradiation of animals given a normal diet caused characteristic behavioral deficits designed to test medial pre-frontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampal learning and memory and caused increased microglial activation. Animals receiving the PLX5622 diet exhibited no radiation-induced cognitive deficits, and exhibited near complete loss of IBA-1 and CD68 positive microglia in the mPFC and hippocampus. Our data demonstrate that elimination of microglia through CSF1R inhibition can ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive deficits in mice. PMID:27516055

  18. Prenatal cranial ossification of the humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae).

    PubMed

    Hampe, Oliver; Franke, Helena; Hipsley, Christy A; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Müller, Johannes

    2015-05-01

    Being descendants of small terrestrial ungulate mammals, whales underwent enormous transformations during their evolutionary history, that is, extensive changes in anatomy, physiology, and behavior were evolved during secondary adaptations to life in water. However, still only little is known about whale ontogenetic development, which help to identify the timing and sequence of critical evolutionary events, such as modification of the cetacean ear. This is particularly true for baleen whales (Mysticeti), the group including the humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae. We use high-resolution X-ray computed tomography to reinvestigate humpback whale fetuses from the Kükenthal collection at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, thus, extending historic descriptions of their skeletogenesis and providing for the first time sequences of cranial ossification for this species. Principally, the ossification sequence of prenatal Megaptera follows a typical mammalian pattern with the anterior dermal bones being the first ossifying elements in the skull, starting with the dentary. In contrast to other mammals, the ectotympanic bone ossifies at an early stage. Alveolar structure can be observed in both the maxillae and dentaries in these early prenatal specimens but evidence for teeth is lacking. Although the possibility of obtaining new embryological material is unlikely due to conservation issues, our study shows that reexamination of existing specimens employing new technologies still holds promise for filling gaps in our knowledge of whale evolution and ontogeny.

  19. The first virtual cranial endocast of a lungfish (sarcopterygii: dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Clement, Alice M; Ahlberg, Per E

    2014-01-01

    Lungfish, or dipnoans, have a history spanning over 400 million years and are the closest living sister taxon to the tetrapods. Most Devonian lungfish had heavily ossified endoskeletons, whereas most Mesozoic and Cenozoic lungfish had largely cartilaginous endoskeletons and are usually known only from isolated tooth plates or disarticulated bone fragments. There is thus a substantial temporal and evolutionary gap in our understanding of lungfish endoskeletal morphology, between the diverse and highly variable Devonian forms on the one hand and the three extant genera on the other. Here we present a virtual cranial endocast of Rhinodipterus kimberleyensis, from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation of Australia, one of the most derived fossil dipnoans with a well-ossified braincase. This endocast, generated from a Computed Microtomography (µCT) scan of the skull, is the first virtual endocast of any lungfish published, and only the third fossil dipnoan endocast to be illustrated in its entirety. Key features include long olfactory canals, a telencephalic cavity with a moderate degree of ventral expansion, large suparaotic cavities, and moderately enlarged utricular recesses. It has numerous similarities to the endocasts of Chirodipterus wildungensis and Griphognathus whitei, and to a lesser degree to 'Chirodipterus' australis and Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi. Among extant lungfish, it consistently resembles Neoceratodus more closely than Lepidosiren and Protopterus. Several trends in the evolution of the brains and labyrinth regions in dipnoans, such as the expansions of the utricular recess and telencephalic regions over time, are identified and discussed.

  20. State of the art cranial ultrasound imaging in neonates.

    PubMed

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Camfferman, Fleur A; Leijser, Lara M; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-02-02

    Cranial ultrasound (CUS) is a reputable tool for brain imaging in critically ill neonates. It is safe, relatively cheap and easy to use, even when a patient is unstable. In addition it is radiation-free and allows serial imaging. CUS possibilities have steadily expanded. However, in many neonatal intensive care units, these possibilities are not optimally used. We present a comprehensive approach for neonatal CUS, focusing on optimal settings, different probes, multiple acoustic windows and Doppler techniques. This approach is suited for both routine clinical practice and research purposes. In a live demonstration, we show how this technique is performed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Using optimal settings and probes allows for better imaging quality and improves the diagnostic value of CUS in experienced hands. Traditionally, images are obtained through the anterior fontanel. Use of supplemental acoustic windows (lambdoid, mastoid, and lateral fontanels) improves detection of brain injury. Adding Doppler studies allows screening of patency of large intracranial arteries and veins. Flow velocities and indices can be obtained. Doppler CUS offers the possibility of detecting cerebral sinovenous thrombosis at an early stage, creating a window for therapeutic intervention prior to thrombosis-induced tissue damage. Equipment, data storage and safety aspects are also addressed.

  1. [A case of Cogan's syndrome associated with multiple cranial neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Takase, Y; Nogaki, H; Fukusako, T; Morimatus, M

    1990-06-01

    A 52-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital because of disturbance of right visual acuity and double vision. At 38-year-old she became deaf bilaterally and experienced many vertigo attacks. She was diagnosed as Ménière disease. At 45-year-old vertigo attacks disappeared. At 47-year-old right peripheral facial nerve palsy developed transiently with interstitial keratitis and episcleritis of the both eyes. Oral adrenocorticosteroid therapy produced an improvement of interstitial keratitis and episcleritis. On admission, ophthalmological examination revealed bilateral interstitial keratitis and episcleritis, right retrobulbar optic neuritis and she was proven to have bilateral sensorineural deafness by otologist. Neurological examination revealed right abducens nerve paresis. Laboratory examinations revealed slightly increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate. CRP was positive. Serological tests for syphilis were negative. CSF showed mildly elevated protein level. Orbital CT scans revealed the swelling of right optic nerve. Cerebral MRI showed multiple high spotty areas in left thalamus, bilateral basal ganglia and deep white matter in T2 weighted images. After treatment with adrenocorticosteroid, right optic neuritis and abducens nerve paresis improved together with bilateral interstitial keratitis and episcleritis. Multiple cranial neuropathy may develop with Cogan's syndrome.

  2. Promoting central nervous system regeneration: lessons from cranial nerve I.

    PubMed

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Vukovic, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The olfactory nerve differs from cranial nerves III-XII in that it contains a specialised type of glial cell, called 'olfactory ensheathing cell' (OEC), rather than Schwann cells. In addition, functional neurogenesis persists postnatally in the olfactory system, i.e. the primary olfactory pathway continuously rebuilds itself throughout adult life. The presence of OECs in the olfactory nerve is thought to be critical to this continuous growth process. Because of this intrinsic capacity for self-repair, the mammalian olfactory system has proved as a useful model in neuroregeneration studies. In addition, OECs have been used in transplantation studies to promote pathway regeneration elsewhere in the nervous system. Here, we have reviewed the parameters that allow for repair within the primary olfactory pathway and the role that OECs are thought to play in this process. We conclude that, in addition to intrinsic growth potential, the presence of an aligned substrate to the target structure is a fundamental prerequisite for appropriate restoration of connectivity with the olfactory bulb. Hence, strategies to promote regrowth of injured nerve pathways should incorporate usage of aligned, oriented substrates of OECs or other cellular conduits with additional intervention to boost neuronal cell body responses to injury and/or neutralisation of putative inhibitors.

  3. The incidence of second brain tumors related to cranial irradiation.

    PubMed

    Marta, Gustavo Nader; Murphy, Erin; Chao, Samuel; Yu, Jennifer S; Suh, John H

    2015-03-01

    Secondary brain tumor (SBT) is a devastating complication of cranial irradiation (CI). We reviewed the literature to determine the incidence of SBT as related to specific radiation therapy (RT) treatment modalities. The relative risk of radiation-associated SBT after conventional and conformal RT is well established and ranges from 5.65 to 10.9; latent time to develop second tumor ranges from 5.8 to 22.4 years, depending on radiation dose and primary disease. Theories and dosimetric models suggest that intensity-modulated radiation therapy may result in an increased risk of SBT, but clinical evidence is limited. The incidence of stereotactic radiosurgery-related SBT is low. Initial data suggest that no increased risk from proton therapy and dosimetric models predict a lower incidence of SBT compared with photons. In conclusion, the incidence of SBT related to CI is low. Longer follow-up is needed to clarify the impact of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, proton therapy and other developing technologies.

  4. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae

    PubMed Central

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed. PMID:27482355

  5. The First Virtual Cranial Endocast of a Lungfish (Sarcopterygii: Dipnoi)

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Alice M.; Ahlberg, Per E.

    2014-01-01

    Lungfish, or dipnoans, have a history spanning over 400 million years and are the closest living sister taxon to the tetrapods. Most Devonian lungfish had heavily ossified endoskeletons, whereas most Mesozoic and Cenozoic lungfish had largely cartilaginous endoskeletons and are usually known only from isolated tooth plates or disarticulated bone fragments. There is thus a substantial temporal and evolutionary gap in our understanding of lungfish endoskeletal morphology, between the diverse and highly variable Devonian forms on the one hand and the three extant genera on the other. Here we present a virtual cranial endocast of Rhinodipterus kimberleyensis, from the Late Devonian Gogo Formation of Australia, one of the most derived fossil dipnoans with a well-ossified braincase. This endocast, generated from a Computed Microtomography (µCT) scan of the skull, is the first virtual endocast of any lungfish published, and only the third fossil dipnoan endocast to be illustrated in its entirety. Key features include long olfactory canals, a telencephalic cavity with a moderate degree of ventral expansion, large suparaotic cavities, and moderately enlarged utricular recesses. It has numerous similarities to the endocasts of Chirodipterus wildungensis and Griphognathus whitei, and to a lesser degree to 'Chirodipterus' australis and Dipnorhynchus sussmilchi. Among extant lungfish, it consistently resembles Neoceratodus more closely than Lepidosiren and Protopterus. Several trends in the evolution of the brains and labyrinth regions in dipnoans, such as the expansions of the utricular recess and telencephalic regions over time, are identified and discussed. PMID:25427173

  6. Histomorphogenesis of cranial nerves in Huso huso larvae.

    PubMed

    Tavighi, Sherma; Saadatfar, Zohreh; Shojaei, Bahador; Behnam Rassouli, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    In this study the cranial nerves development of H. huso are explained from 1 to 54-days-old (1, 3, 6, 15, 21 and 54 days). Despite all the researches on fish brain, there are no study on nerves evolution on H. huso during their larvae life. For this research 40 samples of larvae H. huso were obtained (from each age, about six samples were selected). The specimens were maintained in fiberglass tank, then histological samples were taken from tissues and stained with hematoxylin and eosin for general histological studies using light microscope. According to the results, on 1 and 3-days-old, no nerve was observed. The terminal nerve and their dendrites were observed around the nasal cavity and the axons projected to different areas in forebrain especially around olfactory bulb diffusely, on 6-day-old fish. Also, olfactory, optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, lateral line and vagus nerves were detected on 6-day-old fish, however two parts of lateral line nerve were separated on 54-day-old. Three nerves, profundus, facial and octaval were observed on 54-day-old, however, up to this age, epiphysial nerve was not observed.

  7. 24R,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Protects against Articular Cartilage Damage following Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Hyzy, Sharon L.; Pan, Qingfen; Scott, Kayla M.; Coutts, Richard D.; Healey, Robert; Schwartz, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in humans is associated with low circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3]. In vitamin D replete rats, radiolabeled 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24R,25(OH)2D3] accumulates in articular cartilage following injection of [3H]-25(OH)D3. Previously, we showed that 24R,25(OH)2D3 blocks chondrocyte apoptosis via phospholipase D and p53, suggesting a role for 24R,25(OH)2D3 in maintaining cartilage health. We examined the ability of 24R,25(OH)2D3 to prevent degenerative changes in articular cartilage in an OA-like environment and the potential mechanisms involved. In vitro, rat articular chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β with and without 24R,25(OH)2D3 or 1α,25(OH)2D3. 24R,25(OH)2D3 but not 1α,25(OH)2D3 blocked the effects of IL-1β in a dose-dependent manner, and its effect was partially mediated through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. In vivo, unilateral anterior cruciate ligament transections were performed in immunocompetent rats followed by intra-articular injections of 24R,25(OH)2D3 or vehicle (t = 0, 7, 14, 21 days). Tissues were harvested on day 28. Joints treated with vehicle had changes typical of OA whereas joints treated with 24R,25(OH)2D3 had less articular cartilage damage and levels of inflammatory mediators. These results indicate that 24R,25(OH)2D3 protects against OA, and suggest that it may be a therapeutic approach for preventing trauma-induced osteoarthritis. PMID:27575371

  8. Associated cranial and forelimb remains attributed to Australopithecus afarensis from Hadar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Drapeau, M S M; Ward, C V; Kimbel, W H; Johanson, D C; Rak, Y

    2005-06-01

    A partial skeleton from Hadar, Ethiopia (A.L. 438-1) attributed to Australopithecus afarensis is comprised of part of the mandible, a frontal bone fragment, a complete left ulna, two second metacarpals, one third metacarpal, plus parts of the clavicle, humerus, radius, and right ulna. It is one of only a few early hominin specimens to preserve both cranial and postcranial elements. It also includes the first complete ulna from a large A. afarensis individual, and the first associated metacarpal and forelimb remains. This specimen, dated to approximately 3Ma, is among the geologically youngest A. afarensis fossils and is also one of the largest individuals known. Its ulnar to mandibular proportions are similar to those of the geologically older and much smaller A.L. 288-1, suggesting that body size increased without disproportional enlargement of the mandible. Overall, however, analysis of this large specimen and of the diminutive A.L. 288-1 demonstrates that the functional morphology of the A. afarensis upper limb was similar at all body sizes; there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that more than one hominin species is present at Hadar. Morphologically, all apparent apomorphic traits of the elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand of A.L. 438-1 are shared uniquely with humans. Compared to humans, A.L. 438-1 does have a more curved ulna, although A.L. 288-1 does not, and it appears to have had slightly less well-developed manipulatory capabilities of its hands, although still more derived than in apes. We conclude that selection for effective arboreality in the upper limb of Australopithecus afarensis was weaker than in non-hominins, and that manipulative ability was of greater selective advantage than in extant great apes.

  9. The relationship between skull morphology, masticatory muscle force and cranial skeletal deformation during biting.

    PubMed

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Zapata Muñoz, Víctor; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human skull is gracile when compared to many Middle Pleistocene hominins. It has been argued that it is less able to generate and withstand high masticatory forces, and that the morphology of the lower portion of the modern human face correlates most strongly with dietary characteristics. This study uses geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the relationship between skull morphology, muscle force and cranial deformations arising from biting, which is relevant in understanding how skull morphology relates to mastication. The three-dimensional skull anatomies of 20 individuals were reconstructed from medical computed tomograms. Maximal contractile muscle forces were estimated from muscular anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs). Fifty-nine landmarks were used to represent skull morphology. A partial least squares analysis was performed to assess the association between skull shape and muscle force, and FEA was used to compare the deformation (strains) generated during incisor and molar bites in two individuals representing extremes of morphological variation in the sample. The results showed that only the proportion of total muscle CSA accounted for by the temporalis appears associated with skull morphology, albeit weekly. However, individuals with a large temporalis tend to possess a relatively wider face, a narrower, more vertically oriented maxilla and a lower positioning of the coronoid process. The FEAs showed that, despite differences in morphology, biting results in similar modes of deformation for both crania, but with localised lower magnitudes of strains arising in the individual with the narrowest, most vertically oriented maxilla. Our results suggest that the morphology of the maxilla modulates the transmission of forces generated during mastication to the rest of the cranium by deforming less in individuals with the ability to generate proportionately larger temporalis muscle forces.

  10. Alternative causes of hypopituitarism: traumatic brain injury, cranial irradiation, and infections.

    PubMed

    Pekic, Sandra; Popovic, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Hypopituitarism often remains unrecognized due to subtle clinical manifestations. Anterior pituitary hormone deficiencies may present as isolated or multiple and may be transient or permanent. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is recognized as a risk factor for hypopituitarism, most frequently presenting with isolated growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Data analysis shows that about 15% of patients with TBI have some degree of hypopituitarism which if not recognized may be mistakenly ascribed to persistent neurologic injury and cognitive impairment. Identification of predictors for hypopituitarism after TBI is important, one of them being the severity of TBI. The mechanisms involve lesions in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis and inflammatory changes in the central nervous system (CNS). With time, hypopituitarism after TBI may progress or reverse. Cranial irradiation is another important risk factor for hypopituitarism. Deficiencies in anterior pituitary hormone secretion (partial or complete) occur following radiation damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary region, the severity and frequency of which correlate with the total radiation dose delivered to the region and the length of follow-up. These radiation-induced hormone deficiencies are irreversible and progressive. Despite numerous case reports, the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction following infectious diseases of the CNS has been underestimated. Hypopituitarism usually relates to the severity of the disease, type of causative agent (bacterial, TBC, fungal, or viral) and primary localization of the infection. Unrecognized hypopituitarism may be misdiagnosed as postencephalitic syndrome, while the presence of a sellar mass with suprasellar extension may be misdiagnosed as pituitary macroadenoma in a patient with pituitary abscess which is potentially a life-threatening disease.

  11. Cranial dural arteriovenous shunts. Part 1. Anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins.

    PubMed

    Baltsavias, Gerasimos; Parthasarathi, Venkatraman; Aydin, Emre; Al Schameri, Rahman A; Roth, Peter; Valavanis, Anton

    2015-04-01

    We reviewed the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins aiming to elucidate aspects related to the cranial dural arteriovenous fistulae. Data from relevant articles on the anatomy and embryology of the bridging and emissary veins were identified using one electronic database, supplemented by data from selected reference texts. Persisting fetal pial-arachnoidal veins correspond to the adult bridging veins. Relevant embryologic descriptions are based on the classic scheme of five divisions of the brain (telencephalon, diencephalon, mesencephalon, metencephalon, myelencephalon). Variation in their exact position and the number of bridging veins is the rule and certain locations, particularly that of the anterior cranial fossa and lower posterior cranial fossa are often neglected in prior descriptions. The distal segment of a bridging vein is part of the dural system and can be primarily involved in cranial dural arteriovenous lesions by constituting the actual site of the shunt. The veins in the lamina cribriformis exhibit a bridging-emissary vein pattern similar to the spinal configuration. The emissary veins connect the dural venous system with the extracranial venous system and are often involved in dural arteriovenous lesions. Cranial dural shunts may develop in three distinct areas of the cranial venous system: the dural sinuses and their interfaces with bridging veins and emissary veins. The exact site of the lesion may dictate the arterial feeders and original venous drainage pattern.

  12. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  13. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  14. Reconstruction of cranial defects with individually formed cranial prostheses made of polypropylene polyester knitwear: an analysis of 48 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Grzegorz; Kotwica, Zbigniew; Kwinta, Borys; Zwoliński, Jerzy

    2012-04-10

    This article presents a new method of cranioplasty in which polypropylene polyester knitwear was used as the filling material. The basis for prosthesis shaping was a three-dimensional model of the defect made according to the patient's CT scans. Previously, such material has never been a subject of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) individual forming. The process of the prosthesis design included CT bone scans and mold preparation for each patient. Such prostheses were implanted in 48 patients with cranial defects. The total number of prostheses applied was 51. The follow-up time was at least 6 months up to 36 months. The group of treated patients is described here, and sample pictures are shown to illustrate the results. The smallest defect had a size of 15 cm(2); the biggest, 178 cm(2). The coverage and the aesthetic results were very good in all cases. Two patients had postoperative complications. The cranioplastic solution described here is a valuable addition to the existing reconstructive methods, because of the low cost of the implant, the ease of its adjustment to the shape of the defect, and the short time of preparation.

  15. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population.

  16. Studies of the cranial base in 23 patients with cri-du-chat syndrome suggest a cranial developmental field involved in the condition.

    PubMed

    Kjaer, I; Niebuhr, E

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cranial base on profile radiographs of patients with cri-du-chat syndrome and to relate the findings to current knowledge of brain malformation in an attempt to localize the developmental field affected in cri-du-chat syndrome. The material of profile radiographs of 23 patients was collected in Denmark in the 1970s. Twenty-two patients had terminal deletions of chromosome 5 (5p13.3, 5p14.1, 5p14.2, and 5p14.3), and one patient had an interstitial deletion. The cranial base angle (n-s-ba) was in most cases reduced and in no cases increased compared to age-related standards for normal individuals. Malformations in the bony contours of the sella turcica and the clivus occurred in cri-du-chat patients with terminal deletions. This specific cranial base region develops around the notochord at the location from where the rhombencephalic-derived brainstem, pons, and cerebellum have developed dorsally, and from where the neurons to the larynx have migrated ventrally. As the cranial base, the cerebellum and the larynx are involved in cri-du-chat syndrome, and attention is drawn to a new developmental field which comprises the dorsum sellae, clivus, cerebellum, and larynx. This field seemingly originates from the same notochordal location. The study has demonstrated a cranial base malformation in cri-du-chat patients, which ought to be elucidated in future research and combined with neurological and chromosomal investigations.

  17. Three-dimensional model of the skull and the cranial bones reconstructed from CT scans designed for rapid prototyping process.

    PubMed

    Skrzat, Janusz; Spulber, Alexandru; Walocha, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the effects of building mesh models of the human skull and the cranial bones from a series of CT-scans. With the aid of computer so ware, 3D reconstructions of the whole skull and segmented cranial bones were performed and visualized by surface rendering techniques. The article briefly discusses clinical and educational applications of 3D cranial models created using stereolitographic reproduction.

  18. Brief Communication: Quantitative- and molecular-genetic differentiation in humans and chimpanzees: implications for the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Timothy D

    2014-08-01

    Estimates of the amount of genetic differentiation in humans among major geographic regions (e.g., Eastern Asia vs. Europe) from quantitative-genetic analyses of cranial measurements closely match those from classical- and molecular-genetic markers. Typically, among-region differences account for ∼10% of the total variation. This correspondence is generally interpreted as evidence for the importance of neutral evolutionary processes (e.g., genetic drift) in generating among-region differences in human cranial form, but it was initially surprising because human cranial diversity was frequently assumed to show a strong signature of natural selection. Is the human degree of similarity of cranial and DNA-sequence estimates of among-region genetic differentiation unusual? How do comparisons with other taxa illuminate the evolutionary processes underlying cranial diversification? Chimpanzees provide a useful starting point for placing the human results in a broader comparative context, because common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) are the extant species most closely related to humans. To address these questions, I used 27 cranial measurements collected on a sample of 861 humans and 263 chimpanzees to estimate the amount of genetic differentiation between pairs of groups (between regions for humans and between species or subspecies for chimpanzees). Consistent with previous results, the human cranial estimates are quite similar to published DNA-sequence estimates. In contrast, the chimpanzee cranial estimates are much smaller than published DNA-sequence estimates. It appears that cranial differentiation has been limited in chimpanzees relative to humans.

  19. The Effects of Generalized Joint Laxity on Risk of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in Young Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Paterno, Mark V.; Nick, Todd G.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Women who participate in high-risk sports suffer anterior cruciate ligament injury at a 4- to 6-fold greater rate than men. Purpose To prospectively determine if female athletes with decreased passive knee joint restraint (greater joint laxity) and greater side-to-side differences in knee laxity would be at increased risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Study Design Case control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods From 1558 female soccer and basketball players who were prospectively screened, 19 went on to tear their anterior cruciate ligaments. Four height- and mass-matched control subjects were selected from the uninjured screened athletes for comparison with each of the 19 injured subjects, making a total of 95 subjects (19 injured; 76 uninjured). Generalized joint-laxity tests and anterior-posterior tibiofemoral translation were quantified using the CompuKT knee arthrometer. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to determine predictors of anterior cruciate ligament injury status from recorded laxity measures. Results A multivariable logistic regression model (chi-square = 18.6; P = .002) used the independent variables laxity measures of knee hyperextension (P = .02), wrist and thumb to forearm opposition (P = .80), fifth-finger hyperextension >90° (P = .71), side-to-side differences in anterior-posterior tibiofemoral translation (P = .002), and prior knee injury (P = .22) to predict anterior cruciate ligament–injury status. The validated C statistic, or validated area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, was 0.72. For every 1.3-mm increase in side-to-side differences in anterior-posterior knee displacement, the odds of anterior cruciate ligament–injured status increased 4-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.68–9.69). A positive measure of knee hyperextension increased the odds of anterior cruciate ligament–injured status 5-fold (95% confidence interval, 1.24–18.44). Conclusion The current results

  20. Cranial nerves in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil relatives (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Kemp, A

    2017-02-01

    Three systems, two sensory and one protective, are present in the skin of the living Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, and in fossil lungfish, and the arrangement and innervation of the sense organs is peculiar to lungfish. Peripheral branches of nerves that innervate the sense organs are slender and unprotected, and form before any skeletal structures appear. When the olfactory capsule develops, it traps some of the anterior branches of cranial nerve V, which emerged from the chondrocranium from the lateral sphenotic foramen. Cranial nerve I innervates the olfactory organ enclosed within the olfactory capsule and cranial nerve II innervates the eye. Cranial nerve V innervates the sense organs of the snout and upper lip, and, in conjunction with nerve IX and X, the sense organs of the posterior and lateral head. Cranial nerve VII is primarily a motor nerve, and a single branch innervates sense organs in the mandible. There are no connections between nerves V and VII, although both emerge from the brain close to each other. The third associated system consists of lymphatic vessels covered by an extracellular matrix of collagen, mineralised as tubules in fossils. Innervation of the sensory organs is separate from the lymphatic system and from the tubule system of fossil lungfish.

  1. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    PubMed

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  2. Cranial trauma in iron age Samnite agriculturists, Alfedena, Italy: implications for biocultural and economic stress.

    PubMed

    Paine, R R; Mancinelli, D; Ruggieri, M; Coppa, A

    2007-01-01

    The Samnites are an Iron Age protohistoric people from the central region of Italy. The skeletal remains are from the Alfedena necropolis, 6th through 5th centuries B.C. Macchiarelli et al. (Antropologia Contemporanea 4 (1981) 239-243) were the first to report on cranial trauma for this population, presenting four cases with extreme injuries. We re-examined this well documented skeletal population for additional examples of trauma. Previously unexamined remains from Alfedena, excavated at the turn of the 20th century, are also included in our analysis (Mariani. 1901. "Aufidena", ricerche archeologiche e storiche del Sannio settentrionale. Roma: Acc Naz Dei Lincei). Of the 209 adult crania examined, 12.9% of them exhibited trauma. Analysis of location and frequency of cranial trauma revealed that cranial injuries to the head appear to originate from all directions. The high rate of cranial trauma underscores the violent circumstances experienced during the Iron Age protohistoric period of central Italy. Males are much more likely to exhibit cranial injury than females (P = 0.009). We conclude that the injuries received by Samnite male farmer-warriors occurred while defending pastoral-agricultural resources. Trauma rates are similar for some Iron Age populations and not for others. Behavior associated with violence during the Iron Age period can not be generalized for all populations found in Italy.

  3. A Cross-sectional Anthropometric Study of Cranial Capacity among Ukwuani People of South Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eboh, Dennis Erhisenebe; Okoro, Ewaen Churchill; Iteire, Kingsley Afoke

    2016-01-01

    Background Cranial capacity is used as a measure of brain volume and has a relationship with age and gender. The purpose of this study was to provide normative data and population-, age- and gender-specific regression formulae related to cranial capacity using head dimensions among the Ukwuani people of Nigeria. Methods This study included 605 subjects grouped according to age as follows: 6–12 years, 13–19 years and ≥20 years. A cross-sectional study design using multistage sampling technique was adopted. Head length, head width, and auricular head height were measured in centimetres using a spreading caliper, and cranial capacity was calculated. The data were analysed using SPSS 20. Descriptive and inferential statistics were applied. A t-test was used to identify significant gender differences. Regression analyses were performed to derive age-, gender- and population-specific models. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results In all the parameters, males had significantly higher values than females (P < 0.05). The mean (SD) cranial capacity values at 6–12 years, 13–19 years and ≥20 years were 1176.95 (98.35) cc, 1288.59 (113.21) cc and 1408.90 (116.44) cc, respectively. Conclusions All the parameters exhibited sexual dimorphism. Cranial capacity was found to increase with age. The models derived in this work will be relevant to population and growth studies as well as forensic anthropology. PMID:27904428

  4. Effects on the maxilla and cranial base caused by cervical headgear: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Conde, Carmen; Lorenzo-Pernía, José; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asunción; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to test the possible orthopedic effects of cervical headgear on the cranial base and maxilla. Study design: a sample consisting of 79 subjects with skeletal class II malocclusion was divided into two groups. The experimental group was made up of 41 patients all treated with cervical headgear. The control group included a total of 38 non-treated patients. Each one of these groups was then subdivided according to age into one of three groups: prepubescent, pubescent or post-pubescent. Cephalometric parameters were compared in both groups in order to measure the cranial base angle and the vertical and sagittal position of the maxilla. Additionally, cephalometric superimpositions taken at the beginning and end of the study were compared. Results: results revealed significant differences in the cranial base angle and in the SNA angle (p<0.05). However, no differences were observed in the variables that measure the maxillomandibular relationship. While no changes were noted in the palatal plane slope, a flattening of the cranial base was found caused by the cervical headgear, in addition to a retrusion of point A that does not mean there was a reduction in the maxillomandibular relationship. Conclusions: cervical headgear treatment induces cephalometric flattening of the cranial base and a decrease of the SNA angle. Key words:Orthodontics, cervical headgear, class II treatment, cephalometry, superimposition. PMID:22322499

  5. Effect of cranial window type on monitoring neurovasculature using laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Senarathna, Janaka; Tyler, Betty M.; Hossain, Syed; Thakor, Nitish V.; Pathak, Arvind P.

    2016-03-01

    The cranial window preparation provides optical access to the rodent brain for high-resolution in vivo optical imaging. Two types of cranial windows are commonly employed, namely the open-skull window and thinned-skull window. Chronic in vivo laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) through the cranial window permits characterization of neurovascular morphology and blood flow changes over days or weeks. However, the effects of window type and their long-term stability for in vivo LSCI have not been studied. Here we systematically characterize the effect of each cranial window type on in vivo neurovascular monitoring with LSCI over two weeks. Imaging outcomes for each window were assessed in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), microvessel density (MVD) and total vessel length (TVL). We found that the thinned-skull window required a shorter recovery period (~ 4 days), provided a larger field of view and was a good choice for short-term (i.e. < 10 days) in vivo imaging, but not for the long term because of the confounding effects of skull regrowth after ten days. The open-skull window required a longer recovery period, as made evident by the decrease in window quality within the 10-day period. In spite of this, the open-skull window would be preferable for chronic (i.e. < 10 days) in vivo imaging applications. Overall, this study informs about the pros and cons of each cranial window type for LSCI-based neurovascular imaging.

  6. Cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueirido, Borja; Palmqvist, Paul; Pérez-Claros, Juan A.; Dong, Wei

    2011-02-01

    In this study, landmark-based methods of geometric morphometrics are used for investigating the main aspects of cranial shape transformation in the evolution of the giant panda, Ailuropoda melanoleuca. Specifically, we explore if the highly derived cranial adaptations for bamboo feeding of the living panda were developed early in the panda's lineage. Results obtained show that the overall cranial morphologies of the oldest known panda, the "pygmy" Ailuropoda microta, and the late Pleistocene Ailuropoda baconi are both very similar to that of their closest living relative, A. melanoleuca, which agrees with a previous proposal based on qualitative criteria. However, we also describe several differences between the crania of A. microta, A. baconi, and A. melanoleuca, including the development of the postorbital process, the orientation of the occipital region, and the expansion of the braincase. As a result, the cranial morphology of A. microta shows a less specialized morphology toward a fibrous and durophagous diet compared to the giant panda. These results are confirmed by a comparative analysis of the dimensions of the upper teeth in bears, which has revealed differences in relative tooth size between A. microta and A. melanoleuca, most probably as a result of mosaic evolution. Therefore, we conclude that cranial shape did not remain essentially uniform in the Ailuropoda lineage, as previously thought, but underwent a number of changes during more than 2 Myr.

  7. Cardiac musculature of the cranial vena cava in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis).

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Maeda, S; Kimura, J; Yamada, J; Rerkamnuaychoke, W; Chungsamarnyart, N; Tanigawa, M; Kurohmaru, M; Hayashi, Y; Nishida, T

    1995-10-01

    Cardiac musculature of the cranial vena cava in the common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) was examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. The common tree shrew has well developed cardiac myocyte layers in the tunica media of the cranial vena cava, extending from the right atrium to the root of the subclavian vein. Because the common tree shrew belongs to a primitive group of mammals, the occurrence of cardiac musculature in the cranial vena cava may be a common feature in lower mammals. The development of this musculature indicates that active contraction of the cranial vena cava wall occurs in this species. Electron micrographs showed the typical ultrastructure of myocytes and nerve endings. These observations suggest that this musculature may serve as a regulatory pump for the return of venous blood to the right atrium and as a blood reservoir system under conditions of rapid heart rate. Additionally, the presence of atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) was also demonstrated in the myocytes of the vena cava immunohistochemically. These findings show that the cardiac endocrine organ for ANP develops even in the principal veins including the cranial vena cava.

  8. Clinical Relevance of Cranial Nerve Injury following Carotid Endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Fokkema, M.; de Borst, G.J.; Nolan, B.W.; Indes, J.; Buck, D.B.; Lo, R.C.; Moll, F.L.; Schermerhorn, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The benefit of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) may be diminished by cranial nerve injury (CNI). Using a quality improvement registry, we aimed to identify the nerves affected, duration of symptoms (transient vs. persistent), and clinical predictors of CNI. Methods We identified all patients undergoing CEA in the Vascular Study Group of New England (VSGNE) between 2003 and 2011. Surgeon-observed CNI rate was determined at discharge (postoperative CNI) and at follow-up to determine persistent CNI (CNIs that persisted at routine follow-up visit). Hierarchical multivariable model controlling for surgeon and hospital was used to assess independent predictors for postoperative CNI. Results A total of 6,878 patients (33.8% symptomatic) were included for analyses. CNI rate at discharge was 5.6% (n = 382). Sixty patients (0.7%) had more than one nerve affected. The hypoglossal nerve was most frequently involved (n = 185, 2.7%), followed by the facial (n = 128, 1.9%), the vagus (n = 49, 0.7%), and the glossopharyngeal (n = 33, 0.5%) nerve. The vast majority of these CNIs were transient; only 47 patients (0.7%) had a persistent CNI at their follow-up visit (median 10.0 months, range 0.3–15.6 months). Patients with perioperative stroke (0.9%, n = 64) had significantly higher risk of CNI (n = 15, CNI risk 23.4%, p < .01). Predictors for CNI were urgent procedures (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.1, p < .01), immediate re-exploration after closure under the same anesthetic (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–3.0, p < .01), and return to the operating room for a neurologic event or bleeding (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4–3.8, p < .01), but not redo CEA (OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.5–1.9, p = .90) or prior cervical radiation (OR 0.9, 95% CI 0.3–2.5, p = .80). Conclusions As patients are currently selected in the VSGNE, persistent CNI after CEA is rare. While conditions of urgency and (sub)acute reintervention carried increased risk for postoperative CNI, a history of prior ipsilateral CEA or cervical

  9. Anatomic Anterolateral Ligament Reconstruction Improves Postoperative Clinical Outcomes Combined with Anatomic Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Man; Zhou, Aiguo; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Dianming

    2016-01-01

    A significant cohort of patients is plagued by postoperative rotational instability after the anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery. Anatomic anterolateral ligament (ALL) reconstruction was performed in this study with the aim to assess the clinical role of ALL in knee’s stability and joint functions. Sixty patients were recruited and divided into three groups to perform the operations of anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction, anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction, and anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + anterolateral ligament reconstruction, respectively. And then postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions were evaluated to compare the clinical outcomes among the three different kind of operations. The postoperative knee’s stability and joint functions of the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group were better than the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group. No significant difference was observed between the anatomic double-bundle ACL reconstruction group and the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group. The anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction could improve the clinical outcomes after patients performed the anatomic single-bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. This indicates that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function, especially the rotational stability. Key points Anatomic anterolateral ligament reconstruction combined with anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction was performed to treat the patients with ACL rupture. Compared to the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction group, the anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction + ALL reconstruction group achieve a better clinical outcomes. The results suggest that the anterolateral ligament plays a crucial role in knee’s stability and joint function

  10. ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT INJURY: TREATMENT AND REHABILITATION. CURRENT PERSPECTIVES AND TRENDS

    PubMed Central

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Astur, Diego da Costa; Kanas, Michel; Kaleka, Camila Cohen; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the procedures used by knee surgeons in Brazil for treating and rehabilitating anterior cruciate ligament injuries. Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 21 closed questions was developed, addressing topics relating to treatment and rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The questionnaire was applied to Brazilian knee surgeons during the three days of the 42nd Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology in 2010. Results: A total of 226 surgeons filled out the questionnaire completely. The most commonly used types of graft were hamstrings tendons and the central third of the ipsilateral patellar tendon, which were used by 82.3% and 53.5% of the sample, respectively. The technique of reconstruction with a single transtibial band was the first preference and was used by 66.4% of the participants. A period of 1 to 4 weeks between injury and surgical procedure was considered ideal by most participants (52.65%). Complaints from patients that the knee was ‘giving way’ or unstable and presence of a positive pivot shift maneuver were the most decisive factors considered in making the decision to operate the patient. Patient satisfaction and absence of complaints of instability during the postoperative period were the criteria deemed to be most important for the surgery to be considered a success. Conclusions: There are clearly evolving trends in treating and rehabilitating the anterior cruciate ligament in Brazil. However, more prospective controlled studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefits of these trends. PMID:27042620

  11. A 3-Year Review of Cranial Nerve Palsies from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Egbe, Chinyere Nnenne; Fiebai, Bassey; Awoyesuku, Elizabeth Akon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the types, frequency and clinical information on common cranial nerve palsies seen at the Eye Clinic at the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods: A chart review was performed of patients who presented with cranial nerve palsy at the Eye Clinic over a 3-year period (January 2009-December 2011). Data were collected on age, sex, type of cranial nerve palsy, a history of systemic disease such as diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. Exclusion criteria included medical charts with incomplete data. Data was analyzed using Epi-info Version 6.04D. Statistical significance was indicated by P < 0.05. Results: Twenty-four patients had cranial nerve palsies. There were 11 males and 13 females with a mean age of 34.50 ± 18.41 years. Four patients (26.6%) had exotropia while three patients (20%) had esotropia. Complete ophthalmoplegia was noted in two patients (13.3%). The 3rd and 6th cranial nerves were affected in seven patients each (29.2%) and five patients (20.8%) had 7th cranial nerve palsy. Approximately 38% of patients with cranial nerve palsies had systemic disorders (16.7% systemic hypertension; 12.5% DM). The relationship between cranial nerve palsy and systemic disorder was statistically significant (P < 0.01). Conclusion: This is the first study in the literature on ocular cranial nerve palsies in Southern Nigeria. Third and sixth cranial nerve palsies were the most common cases to present to the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital Eye Clinic. There was a statistically significant association to systemic disorders such as hypertension and DM and majority of cases with 6th cranial nerve palsy. PMID:24791110

  12. [Patient with MPO-ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia and lower cranial nerves palsy who was previously exposed to asbestos].

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Kenji; Fukuzumi, Munehisa; Aizawa, Toyoaki; Shibata, Masahiko; Sakai, Toshihiko; Tojima, Hirokazu

    2010-11-01

    A 65-year-old man who was occupationally exposed to asbestos for 40 years was admitted to our hospital with fever and cough. Chest CT revealed paraseptal emphysema, subpleural fibrosis in both lungs, and pleural plaques. On bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained elevated levels of lymphocytes and neutrophils (15% and 17%, respectively), and asbestos bodies were also found. Because serum MPO-ANCA titer was elevated to 188 EU, we suspected ANCA-associated disease with interstitial pneumonia. Prednisolone was begun at 30 mg/day and his lung opacities partially disappeared. Six weeks later, he complained of headache, dysphagia and hoarseness, and was admitted to the neurology department of the hospital. Under a diagnosis of either hypertrophic pachymeningitis or neuritis due to angiitis of the lower cranial nerves, steroid pulse therapy was performed. Asbestos exposure may have been a contributing factor for ANCA generation in this case. Furthermore, the fact that cranial nerves palsy occurred in spite of steroid therapy may also be important.

  13. Surgical Management and Treatment of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament/Posterolateral Corner Injured Knee.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Nicholas I; LaPrade, Christopher M; LaPrade, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    Posterolateral knee injuries occur more commonly than in the past. These injuries most commonly occur concurrent with cruciate ligament tears. The main stabilizers of the posterolateral knee are the fibular collateral ligament, the popliteus tendon, and the popliteofibular ligament. These static stabilizers function to prevent increased varus, external rotation, and coupled posterolateral rotation of the knee. The most important clinical tests to diagnose posterolateral knee injuries are the varus stress test, posterolateral drawer, and dial tests. Varus stress radiographs are key objective means to diagnose these injuries. Anatomic- based reconstructions have been validated to restore stability and improve outcomes.

  14. Depression and psychiatric disease associated with outcomes after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao-Hua; Liu, Max; Dines, Joshua S; Kelly, John D; Garcia, Grant H

    2016-01-01

    While most patients with an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury indicate satisfaction with surgical intervention, a significant proportion still do not return to pre-injury level of function or sport. Psychiatric comorbidities, such as depression, have recently been associated with poor clinical outcomes after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). To date, no article has yet examined how depression affects ACLR outcomes and how potential screening and intervention for psychological distress may affect postoperative activity level. The purpose of this review is to delineate potential relationships between depression and ACLR outcome, discuss clinical implications and identify future directions for research. PMID:27900267

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture secondary to a 'heel hook': a dangerous martial arts technique.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph F; Devitt, Brian M; Moran, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The 'heel hook' is a type of knee lock used in some forms of martial arts to stress the knee and cause opponent to concede defeat. While the knee is in a flexed and valgus disposition, an internal rotation force is applied to the tibia. Reports are lacking on serious knee trauma as a result of this technique. We report the case of a 32-year-old Mixed Martial Arts exponent who sustained complete anterior cruciate ligament rupture and an medial collateral ligament injury from the use of a 'heel hook'.

  16. Injury to the Anterior Tibial Artery during Bicortical Tibial Drilling in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Bum; Lim, Jin Woo; Seo, Jeong Gook

    2016-01-01

    Many complications have been reported during or after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, including infection, bleeding, tibial tunnel widening, arthrofibrosis, and graft failure. However, arterial injury has been rarely reported. This paper reports a case of an anterior tibial arterial injury during bicortical tibial drilling in arthroscopic ACL reconstruction, associated with an asymptomatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. The patient had a vague pain which led to delayed diagnosis of compartment syndrome and delayed treatment with fasciotomy. All surgeons should be aware of these rare but critical complications because the results may be disastrous like muscle necrosis as in this case. PMID:26929808

  17. Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament and anterolateral ligament using interlinked hamstrings - technical note.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Marcio de Castro; Zidan, Flavio Ferreira; Miduati, Francini Belluci; Fortuna, Caio Cesar; Mizutani, Bruno Moreira; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Recent anatomical and biomechanical studies on the anterolateral ligament (ALL) of the knee have shown that this structure has an important function in relation to joint stability, especially when associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. However, the criteria for its reconstruction have not yet been fully established and the surgical techniques that have been described present variations regarding anatomical points and fixation materials. This study presents a reproducible technique for ALL and ACL reconstruction using hamstring tendons, in which three interference screws are used for fixation.

  18. Endoscopic Endonasal Approach to the Middle Cranial Fossa through the Cavernous Sinus Triangles: Anatomical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    KOMATSU, Fuminari; ODA, Shinri; SHIMODA, Masami; IMAI, Masaaki; SHIGEMATSU, Hideaki; KOMATSU, Mika; TSCHABITSCHER, Manfred; MATSUMAE, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    The lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the lateral limit of endoscopic endonasal surgery at the level of the sphenoid sinus. Access from the sphenoid sinus to the middle cranial fossa through the cavernous sinus triangles was evaluated by cadaver dissection. Anatomical analysis demonstrated that the medial temporal dura mater was exposed through the anterior area of the clinoidal triangle, anteromedial triangle, and superior area of the anterolateral triangle, indicating potential corridors to the middle cranial fossa. This study suggests that the cavernous sinus triangles are applicable in selected cases to manage middle cranial fossa lesions by endoscopic endonasal surgery. PMID:25446385

  19. Posterior Cranial Vault Distraction Osteogenesis with Barrel Stave Osteotomy in the Treatment of Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    KOMURO, Yuzo; SHIMIZU, Azusa; SHIMOJI, Kazuaki; MIYAJIMA, Masakazu; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Twenty years have passed since distraction osteogenesis was introduced into the field of craniomaxillofacial surgery, with distraction osteogenesis gradually consolidating its position for midface advancement in syndromic craniosynostosis. On the other hand, no consensus has been reached regarding its adaptation to calvarial bone. We reported that distraction osteogenesis was useful in posterior cranial vault expansion, and subsequently, similar reports have been successively observed worldwide. In posterior cranial vault distraction, intracranial capacity could be greatly expanded due to its simultaneous expansion with the scalp, with little risk of relapse because new bone is regenerated in the distraction gap. The possibility was suggested that the standard of first carrying out fronto-orbital advancement (FOA) for brachycephaly observed in syndromic craniosynostosis will greatly change posterior cranial vault distraction. PMID:26226978

  20. [Tuberculous cranial pachymeningitis presenting with long-standing diffuse brain dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Toshihisa; Katoh, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Daigo; Ohnaka, Yohei; Nakajima, Masashi; Kawamura, Mitsuru

    2011-04-01

    We report a 59-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with slowly progressive gait unsteadiness, dysarthria, and clumsiness in writing over 6 months. There were bilateral pyramidal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, and attention deficits. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed mild mononuclear pleocytosis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed pachymeningeal pattern of contrast enhancement beneath the calvarium and the posterior cranial fossa. Interferon-gamma release assay in whole blood after stimulation by specific tuberculosis antigens was positive and repeat polymerase chain reaction assay detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome in the cerebrospinal fluid. After combination therapy with anti-tuberculous agents and corticosteroids, the patient's pachymeningitis regressed. Tuberculous cranial pachymeningitis may present with chronic diffuse brain dysfunction without headache, fever, or cranial nerve dysfunction.

  1. ANCA-negative Wegener's granulomatosis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hee; Park, Jin; Bae, Jung Ho; Cho, Min-Sun; Park, Kee Duk; Jeong, Jee Hyang

    2013-11-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a systemic vasculitis affecting small and medium-sized vessels with granulomatous formation. Though it is known for respiratory tract and kidney involvement, neurologic manifestation has been also reported. Herein we report a patient who suffered pansinusitis with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies but reached remission by immunosuppressant after the diagnosis of WG. A 54-yr-old female visited with headache, hearing difficulty, and progressive bulbar symptoms. She experienced endoscopic sinus surgeries due to refractory sinusitis. Neurologic examination revealed multiple lower cranial nerve palsies. Vasculitic markers showed no abnormality. Nasal biopsy revealed granulomatous inflammation and vasculitis involving small vessels. Given cyclophosphamide and prednisolone, her symptoms were prominently improved. WG should be considered in the patient with multiple cranial nerve palsies, especially those with paranasal sinus disease. Because WG can be lethal if delayed in treatment, prompt immunosuppressant is warranted after the diagnostic tissue biopsy.

  2. Long-term imaging in awake mice using removable cranial windows

    PubMed Central

    Glickfeld, Lindsey L.; Kerlin, Aaron M.; Reid, R. Clay; Bonin, Vincent; Schafer, Dorothy P.; Andermann, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial window implants in head-fixed rodents are becoming a preparation of choice for stable optical access to large areas of cortex over extended periods of time. Here, we provide a highly detailed and reliable surgical protocol for a cranial window implantation procedure for chronic widefield and cellular imaging in awake, head-fixed mice, which enables subsequent window removal and replacement in the weeks and months following the initial craniotomy. This protocol has facilitated awake, chronic imaging in adolescent as well as adult mice over several months from a large number of cortical brain regions; targeted virus and tracer injections from data obtained using prior awake functional mapping; and functionally-targeted two-photon imaging across all cortical layers in awake mice using a microprism attachment to the cranial window. Collectively, these procedures extend the reach of chronic imaging of cortical function and dysfunction in behaving animals. PMID:25275789

  3. [Anatomy of the skull base and the cranial nerves in slice imaging].

    PubMed

    Bink, A; Berkefeld, J; Zanella, F

    2009-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are suitable methods for examination of the skull base. Whereas CT is used to evaluate mainly bone destruction e.g. for planning surgical therapy, MRI is used to show pathologies in the soft tissue and bone invasion. High resolution and thin slice thickness are indispensible for both modalities of skull base imaging. Detailed anatomical knowledge is necessary even for correct planning of the examination procedures. This knowledge is a requirement to be able to recognize and interpret pathologies. MRI is the method of choice for examining the cranial nerves. The total path of a cranial nerve can be visualized by choosing different sequences taking into account the tissue surrounding this cranial nerve. This article summarizes examination methods of the skull base in CT and MRI, gives a detailed description of the anatomy and illustrates it with image examples.

  4. Primary neurolymphomatosis of the lower cranial nerves presenting as Dysphagia and hoarseness: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Naoto; Ito-Yamashita, Tae; Takahashi, Goro; Baba, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Yamasaki, Tomohiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2014-08-01

    Primary neurolymphomatosis is an extremely rare tumor. We report the case of a 74-year-old patient presenting with dysphagia and hoarseness. Initial contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the head, neck, and chest did not reveal any lesions. His symptoms improved with short-term administration of prednisone but recurred and deteriorated. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a tumor along the ninth and tenth cranial nerves across the jugular foramen. Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography indicated this was a primary tumor. Repeated MR imaging after 2 months revealed considerable tumor enlargement. A left suboccipital craniotomy was performed to remove the tumor that infiltrated the ninth and tenth cranial nerves. The histopathologic diagnosis was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Although focal radiation therapy was administered to ensure complete eradication of the tumor, the patient died of aspiration pneumonia with systemic metastasis. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of primary neurolymphomatosis in the lower cranial nerves.

  5. [Chondroma adjacent to Meckel's cave mimicking a fifth cranial nerve neurinoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Narro-Donate, Jose María; Huete-Allut, Antonio; Velasco-Albendea, Francisco J; Escribano-Mesa, Jose A; Mendez-Román, Paddy; Masegosa-González, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Cranial chondromas are tumours arising from chondrocyte embryonic remnants cells that usually appear in the skull base synchondrosis. In contrast to the rest of the organism, where chondroid tumours are the most common primary bone tumour just behind the haematopoietic lineage ones, they are a rarity at cranial level, with an incidence of less than 1% of intracranial tumours. The case is reported on a 42 year-old male referred to our clinic due to the finding of an extra-axial lesion located close to the Meckel's cave region, with extension to the posterior fossa and brainstem compression after progressive paraparesis of 6 months onset. With the diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma, a subtotal tumour resection was performed using a combined supra-infratentorial pre-sigmoidal approach. The postoperative histopathology report confirmed the diagnosis of cranial chondroma.

  6. Upper neck forces and moments and cranial angular accelerations in lateral impact.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Zhang, Jiangyue; Stemper, Brian D; Philippens, Mat

    2008-03-01

    Biomechanical studies using postmortem human subjects (PMHS) in lateral impact have focused primarily on chest and pelvis injuries, mechanisms, tolerances, and comparison with side impact dummies. A paucity of data exists on the head-neck junction, i.e., forces and moments, and cranial angular accelerations. The objective of this study was to determine lateral impact-induced three-dimensional temporal forces and moments at the head-neck junction and cranial linear and angular accelerations from sled tests using PMHS and compare with responses obtained from an anthropomorphic test device (dummy) designed for lateral impact. Following initial evaluations, PMHS were seated on a sled, restrained using belts, and lateral acceleration was applied. Specimens were instrumented with a pyramid-shaped nine-accelerometer package to record cranial accelerations. A sled accelerometer was used to record the input acceleration. Radiographs and computed tomography scans were obtained to identify pathology. A similar testing protocol was adopted for dummy tests. Results indicated that profiles of forces and moments at the head-neck junction and cranial accelerations were similar between the two models. However, peak forces and moments at the head-neck junction were lower in the dummy than PMHS. Peak cranial linear and angular accelerations were also lower in the dummy than in the PMHS. Fractures to the head-neck complex were not identified in PMHS tests. Peak cranial angular accelerations were suggestive of mild traumatic brain injury with potential for loss of consciousness. Findings from this study with a limited dataset are valuable in establishing response corridors for side impacts and evaluating side impact dummies used in crashworthiness and safety-engineering studies.

  7. Fibrous dysplasia of the cranial bones: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed Central

    Iseri, Pervin K.; Efendi, Husnu; Demirci, Ali; Komsuoglu, Sezer

    2005-01-01

    Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a relatively uncommon disorder that affects primarily the cranial region; its occurrence in the cranial base in combination with hindbrain herniation and aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) constitutes an extremely rare condition. We report a case of polyostotic fibrous dysplasia with progressive occipital, temporal, and clival involvement. Clinical findings and differential diagnosis with special emphasis on the imaging features were discussed. A small posterior fossa volume has been thought to lead to hind brain herniation. The resultant obstruction to the CSF pathways at the level of the foramen magnum has been implicated in the development and subsequent progression of syringobulbia. PMID:16464312

  8. Somnolence syndrome in leukemic children following reduced daily dose fractions of cranial radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Littman, P.; Rosenstock, J.; Gale, G.; Krisch, R.E.; Meadows, A.; Sather, H.; Coccia, P.; DeCamagro, B.

    1984-10-01

    A group of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia was studied to investigate if a reduction in daily dose fraction of cranial radiation would reduce the incidence of somnolence syndrome. Thirty-one evaluable patients received 100 rad x 18 cranial radiation therapy. Sixty-six similar evaluable patients were given 180 rad x 10. Both groups received the same chemotherapy including intrathecal methotrexate. Clinically detectable somnolence appeared in 58% of each group without significant differences in the overall frequency or severity of somnolence. This study failed to substantiate a radiation dose fraction size dependence for somnolence syndrome in children with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  9. Signaling pathways in osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis: Lessons from cranial sutures and applications to regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Maxhimer, Justin B.; Bradley, James P.; Lee, Justine C.

    2015-01-01

    One of the simplest models for examining the interplay between bone formation and resorption is the junction between the cranial bones. Although only roughly a quarter of patients diagnosed with craniosynostosis have been linked to known genetic disturbances, the molecular mechanisms elucidated from these studies have provided basic knowledge of bone homeostasis. This work has translated to methods and advances in bone tissue engineering. In this review, we examine the current knowledge of cranial suture biology derived from human craniosynostosis syndromes and discuss its application to regenerative medicine. PMID:25961069

  10. Cranial findings and iatrogenesis from craniosacral manipulation in patients with traumatic brain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenman, P E; McPartland, J M

    1995-03-01

    Craniosacral findings were recorded for all patients with traumatic brain injury entering an outpatient rehabilitation program between 1978 and 1992. The average cranial rhythmic impulse was low in all 55 patients (average, 7.2 c/min). At least one cranial strain pattern was exhibited by 95%, and 87% had one or more bony motion restrictions. Sacral findings were similar to those in patients with low back pain. Although craniosacral manipulation has been found empirically useful in patients with traumatic brain injury, three cases of iatrogenesis occurred. The incidence rate is low (5%), but the practitioner must be prepared to deal with the possibility of adverse reactions.

  11. [High-dose radiation-induced meningioma following prophylactic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Yuji; Yamada, Tomonori; Mishima, Hideaki; Tamaki, Ryo

    2005-03-01

    A 12 year-old girl was treated with prophylatic cranial irradiation for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). At the age of 39, she was admitted to our hospital for status epilepticus. Computed tomography demonstrated two, enhancing bilateral sided intracranial tumors. After surgery, this patient presented meningiomas which histologically, were of the meningothelial type. The high cure rate in childhood ALL, attributable to aggressive chemotherapy and prophylatic cranial irradiation, is capable of inducing secondary brain tumor. Twelve cases of high-dose radiation-induced meningioma following ALL are also reviewed.

  12. Clinical anatomy and imaging of the cranial nerves and skull base.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ruchira M; Klein, Joshua P

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of patients with cranial neuropathies requires an understanding of brainstem anatomy and nerve pathways. Advances in neuroimaging, particularly high spatial resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have enabled visualization of these tiny structures and their related pathology. This review provides an approach toward using imaging in the evaluation of cranial nerve (CN) and skull base anatomy and pathology. Because brainstem nuclei are inextricably linked to the information contained within CNs, they are briefly mentioned whenever relevant; however, a comprehensive discussion of brainstem syndromes is beyond the scope of this review.

  13. Sensory-motor axonal polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves: An uncommon manifestation of disulfiram toxicity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Telma; Martins Campos, António; Morais, Hugo

    2017-01-01

    Disulfiram (tetraethylthiuram disulfide) has been used for the treatment of alcohol dependence. An axonal sensory-motor polyneuropathy with involvement of cranial pairs due to disulfiram is exceedingly rare. The authors report a unique case of an extremely severe axonal polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves that developed within weeks after a regular dosage of 500mg/day disulfiram. To the authors best knowledge, such a severe and rapidly-progressive course has never been described with disulfiram dosages of only 500mg/day.

  14. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement

    PubMed Central

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves. PMID:26793453

  15. Postoperative Analgesia Using PSOAS Sheath Block Versus Three-in-One Block in Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT In this study, the effects of two regional anesthetic techniques on postoperative pain of patients...TERMS Regional Anesthesia; Lumbar Plexus Block, Postoperative Pain Management; Pre-emptive analgesia 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...violations. v ABSTRACT In this study, the effects of two regional anesthetic techniques on postoperative pain of patients undergoing anterior cruciate

  16. Tibial plateau fracture following gracilis-semitendinosus anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: The tibial tunnel stress-riser.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, R O; Cohen, D; Barton-Hanson, N

    2006-06-01

    Tibial plateau fractures following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction are extremely rare. This is the first reported case of a tibial plateau fracture following four-strand gracilis-semitendinosus autograft ACL reconstruction. The tibial tunnel alone may behave as a stress riser which can significantly reduce bone strength.

  17. Distinct Requirements for Cranial Ectoderm and Mesenchyme-Derived Wnts in Specification and Differentiation of Osteoblast and Dermal Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Goodnough, L. Henry; DiNuoscio, Gregg J.; Ferguson, James W.; Williams, Trevor; Lang, Richard A.; Atit, Radhika P.

    2014-01-01

    The cranial bones and dermis differentiate from mesenchyme beneath the surface ectoderm. Fate selection in cranial mesenchyme requires the canonical Wnt effector molecule β-catenin, but the relative contribution of Wnt ligand sources in this process remains unknown. Here we show Wnt ligands are expressed in cranial surface ectoderm and underlying supraorbital mesenchyme during dermal and osteoblast fate selection. Using conditional genetics, we eliminate secretion of all Wnt ligands from cranial surface ectoderm or undifferentiated mesenchyme, to uncover distinct roles for ectoderm- and mesenchyme-derived Wnts. Ectoderm Wnt ligands induce osteoblast and dermal fibroblast progenitor specification while initiating expression of a subset of mesenchymal Wnts. Mesenchyme Wnt ligands are subsequently essential during differentiation of dermal and osteoblast progenitors. Finally, ectoderm-derived Wnt ligands provide an inductive cue to the cranial mesenchyme for the fate selection of dermal fibroblast and osteoblast lineages. Thus two sources of Wnt ligands perform distinct functions during osteoblast and dermal fibroblast formation. PMID:24586192

  18. Motor palsies of cranial nerves (excluding VII) after vaccination: reports to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

    PubMed

    Woo, Emily Jane; Winiecki, Scott K; Ou, Alan C

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed cranial nerve palsies, other than VII, that have been reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). We examined patterns for differences in vaccine types, seriousness, age, and clinical characteristics. We identified 68 reports of cranial nerve palsies, most commonly involving the oculomotor (III), trochlear (IV), and abducens (VI) nerves. Isolated cranial nerve palsies, as well as palsies occurring as part of a broader clinical entity, were reported. Forty reports (59%) were classified as serious, suggesting that a cranial nerve palsy may sometimes be the harbinger of a broader and more ominous clinical entity, such as a stroke or encephalomyelitis. There was no conspicuous clustering of live vs. inactivated vaccines. The patient age range spanned the spectrum from infants to the elderly. Independent data may help to clarify whether, when, and to what extent the rates of cranial nerve palsies following particular vaccines may exceed background levels.

  19. Cranial vena caval syndrome secondary to central venous obstruction associated with a pacemaker lead in a dog.

    PubMed

    Mulz, Jennifer M; Kraus, Marc S; Thompson, Margret; Flanders, James A

    2010-12-01

    This report describes the case of an 11-year-old castrated male Shih Tzu who developed chylothorax three years following implantation of a transvenous pacemaker. Imaging demonstrated one definitive obstruction in the cranial vena cava and 3 additional suspected filling abnormalities within both external jugular veins, brachiocephalic veins and cranial vena cava. A thrombus was visualized in the cranial vena cava via transesophageal echocardiography. Thoracic duct ligation and cisterna chyli ablation were performed, with a resultant change in the nature of the fluid from chylous to a modified transudate. Repeat angiography and computed tomography three months later demonstrated a stenosis within the cranial vena cava. Balloon angioplasty was attempted, however it was unsuccessful in decreasing pleural effusion. Palliative thoracocentesis was continued until the patient developed a lung lobe torsion, at which time euthanasia was elected. Necropsy confirmed cranial vena caval syndrome secondary to transvenous pacemaker implantation induced fibrous proliferation within the vessel lumen.

  20. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  1. ANATOMICAL RECONSTRUCTION OF ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT OF THE KNEE: DOUBLE BAND OR SINGLE BAND?

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Luiz Antonio Zanotelli; Junior, Adair Bervig; Badotti, Augusto Alves; Michelin, Alexandre Froes; Algarve, Rodrigo Ilha; de Quadros Martins, Cesar Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the double-band and single-band techniques for anatomical reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and demonstrate that the double-band technique not only provides greater anterior stability but also causes less pain and a better subjective patient response. Methods: We selected 42 patients who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, by means of either the single-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using flexor tendon grafts with two tunnels, or the double-band anatomical reconstruction technique, using four tunnels and grafts from the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons. All fixations were performed using interference screws. There was no variation in the sample. Before the operation, the objective and subjective IKDC scores, Lysholm score and length of time with the injury were evaluated. All these variables were reassessed six months later, and the KT-1000 correlation with the contralateral knee was also evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but the single-band group showed better results in relation to range of motion and objective evaluations including KT-1000 (with statistical significance). Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that there was no difference between the two groups in subjective evaluations, but better results were found using the single-band anatomical technique, in relation to objective evaluations. PMID:27042621

  2. Prognosis of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a data-driven approach

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Abhijit; Kar, Oliva; Wu, Kuan-Chuen; Hall, Michelle; Gillette, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Individuals who suffer anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury are at higher risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) and almost 50% display symptoms 10–20 years post injury. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) often does not protect against knee OA development. Accordingly, a multi-scale formulation for data-driven prognosis (DDP) of post-ACLR is developed. Unlike traditional predictive strategies that require controlled off-line measurements or ‘training’ for determination of constitutive parameters to derive the transitional statistics, the proposed DDP algorithm relies solely on in situ measurements. The proposed DDP scheme is capable of predicting onset of instabilities. As the need for off-line testing (or training) is obviated, it can be easily implemented for ACLR, where such controlled a priori testing is almost impossible to conduct. The DDP algorithm facilitates hierarchical handling of the large dataset and can assess the state of recovery in post-ACLR conditions based on data collected from stair ascent and descent exercises of subjects. The DDP algorithm identifies inefficient knee varus motion and knee rotation as primary difficulties experienced by some of the post-ACLR population. In such cases, levels of energy dissipation rate at the knee, and its fluctuation may be used as measures for assessing progress after ACL reconstruction. PMID:27547072

  3. Long-term interventions effects of robotic training on patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Ye, Miao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the long-term interventions effects of robot-assisted therapy rehabilitation on functional activity levels after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 8 patients (6 males and 2 females) who received anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The subjects participated in robot-assisted therapy lasting for one month. The Timed Up-and-Go test, 10-Meter Walk test, Functional Reach Test, surface electromyography of the vastus lateralis and vastus medialis, and extensor strength of isokinetic movement of the knee joint were evaluated before and after the intervention. [Results] The average value of the of vastus medialis EMG, Functional Reach Test, and the maximum and average extensor strength of the knee joint isokinetic movement increased significantly, and the time of the 10-Meter Walk test decreased significantly. [Conclusion] These results suggest that walking ability and muscle strength can be improved by robotic walking training as a long-term intervention. PMID:27630396

  4. Transphyseal Reconstruction of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament Using Hamstring Autograft in Skeletally Immature Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Jong Keun; Yoon, Taek Rim; Park, Sang Jin

    2005-01-01

    Eleven skeletally immature adolescents underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using a transphyseal tibial and femoral tunnel. An autologous quadrupled hamstring tendon was used in all cases and the average follow-up was 77.7 months. Clinical results were evaluated using Lysholm knee scores and a return to pre-injury sports activities. Radiological results were evaluated using side-to-side differences of instrumented laxities and growth disturbances compared with the uninjured side on final follow-up orthoroentgenograms. The mean Lysholm score was 97.8 (range 94-100) and mean side-to-side laxity difference was 2.4 mm (range 1-4). Ten of 11 patients returned to pre-injury sports activity. No patient had a leg length discrepancy of over 1 cm or a significant abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. Therefore, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using the transphyseal tunnel and hamstring autograft in skeletally immature adolescents is believed to be a reliable treatment method, which is not associated with significant leg length discrepancy or abnormal angular deformity of the knee joint. PMID:16361818

  5. Anterior Tibial Translation in Collegiate Athletes with Normal Anterior Cruciate Ligament Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Rosene, John M.; Fogarty, Tracey D.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences in anterior tibial translation (ATT) among sports, sex, and leg dominance in collegiate athletes with normal anterior cruciate ligament integrity. Design and Setting: Subjects from various athletic teams were measured for ATT in right and left knees. Subjects: Sixty subjects were measured for ATT with a KT-1000 knee arthrometer. Measurements: Statistical analyses were computed for each sex and included a 2 × 3 × 4 mixed-factorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) for anterior cruciate ligament displacement, right and left sides, and force and sport. A 2 × 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare means for sex and force. A 2 × 3 mixed-factorial ANOVA was computed to compare sex differences across 3 forces. Results: For males and females, no significant interactions were found among leg, force, and sport for mean ATT, for leg and sport or leg and force, or for translation values between dominant and nondominant legs. Males had a significant interaction for force and sport, and a significant difference was found for side of body, since the right side had less translation than the left side. Females had greater ATT than males at all forces. Conclusions: Sex differences exist for ATT, and differences in ATT exist among sports for both sexes. Differences between the right and left sides of the body should be expected when making comparisons of ligamentous laxity. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 5. PMID:16558565

  6. Surgical treatment of avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament: functional result☆

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marcos Alexandre; Cervone, Gabriel Lopes de Faria; Costa, André Luis Serigatti

    2015-01-01

    Objective To objectively and subjectively evaluate the functional result from before to after surgery among patients with a diagnosis of an isolated avulsion fracture of the posterior cruciate ligament who were treated surgically. Method Five patients were evaluated by means of reviewing the medical files, applying the Lysholm questionnaire, physical examination and radiological examination. For the statistical analysis, a significance level of 0.10 and 95% confidence interval were used. Results According to the Lysholm criteria, all the patients were classified as poor (<64 points) before the operation and evolved to a mean of 96 points six months after the operation. We observed that 100% of the posterior drawer cases became negative, taking values less than 5 mm to be negative. Conclusion Surgical methods with stable fixation for treating avulsion fractures at the tibial insertion of the posterior cruciate ligament produce acceptable functional results from the surgical and radiological points of view, with a significance level of 0.042. PMID:27218073

  7. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-02-15

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical.

  8. Management of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Asheesh; Musahl, Volker; Cowan, James B

    2016-05-01

    Isolated injuries of the posterior cruciate ligament are uncommon, are often caused by a posteriorly directed force to the proximal tibia, and result in abnormal knee kinematics and function. A thorough clinical evaluation, including history, physical examination, and imaging, is required to rule out a concomitant structural knee injury. No clear prognostic factors predict outcomes, and ideal management remains uncertain. Nonsurgical management is advocated for isolated grade I or II posterior cruciate ligament injuries or for grade III injuries in patients with mild symptoms or low activity demands. Surgical management is reserved for high-demand athletes or patients in whom nonsurgical management has been unsuccessful. Although biomechanical studies have identified differences between single-bundle, double-bundle, transtibial, and tibial inlay reconstruction techniques, the optimal surgical technique has not been established. No high-quality evidence is available regarding immobilization, weight-bearing, bracing, or rehabilitation protocols for patients treated either nonsurgically or surgically. Additional long-term clinical studies with homogeneous patient populations are needed to identify the ideal management of these injuries.

  9. Extra-articular tenodesis for anterior cruciate ligament rupture in amateur skiers.

    PubMed Central

    Neyret, P; Palomo, J R; Donell, S T; Dejour, H

    1994-01-01

    Thirty one amateur skiers with 33 knees which had had a symptomatic chronic rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) treated with the Lemaire operation were reviewed retrospectively at an average of 4.5 years. Of the patients 23 were women. The operation failed to control symptoms in 17 out of the 33 knees. However the operation did control symptoms in 13 out of 19 knees in patients over 35 years old, compared with only three out of 14 knees in patients under 35 years old. Clinical and objective testing however showed that most knees were still unstable. Despite this 21 patients continued skiing. One patient with a successful result switched to playing tennis. Five patients gave up all sports. Four further patients, all under 35 years old, returned to skiing after an additional intra-articular reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament. An isolated extra-articular procedure in amateur skiers under 35 years old with symptomatic chronic ACL rupture is not recommended. They need at least an intra-articular reconstruction to control their symptoms and to stabilize the knee. PMID:8044490

  10. Rationale and implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention warm-up programs in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Bien, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The sex disparity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk and the subsequent adverse effects on knee joint health, psychosocial well-being, and financial costs incurred have produced a surge in research on risk factors and interventions designed to decrease this disparity and overall incidence. Biomechanical and neuromuscular differences have been identified throughout the trunk and lower extremity that may increase noncontact ACL injury risk in female athletes. Evidence demonstrates that many risk factors are modifiable with intervention programs and that athletic performance measures can be enhanced. No universally accepted ACL injury prevention program currently exists, and injury prevention programs are diverse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs introduced in a warm-up format offer multiple benefits, primarily, improved compliance based on improved practicality of implementation. However, drawbacks of warm-up style formats also exist, most notably that a lack of equipment and resources may preclude measurable improvements in athletic performance that foster improved compliance among participants. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current literature researching possible biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors in noncontact ACL injury in female athletes and the most effective means of implementing critical elements of a program to decrease ACL injury risk in female athletes while improving athletic performance. Hip and hamstring training, core stabilization, plyometrics, balance, agility, neuromuscular training with video and verbal feedback to modify technique, and stretching appear to be essential components of these programs. Further research is critical to determine ideal training program volume, intensity, duration, and frequency.

  11. Effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Kwang; Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Jun-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of neuromuscular training on knee joint stability after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 16 adults who underwent arthroscopic anterior cruciate reconstruction and neuromuscular training. The Lysholm scale was used to assess functional disorders on the affected knee joint. A KT-2000 arthrometer was used to measure anterior displacement of the tibia against the femur. Surface electromyography was used to detect the muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus before and after neuromuscular training. [Results] There was significant relaxation in tibial anterior displacement of the affected and sound sides in the supine position before neuromuscular training. Furthermore, the difference in the tibial anterior displacement of the affected knee joints in the standing position was reduced after neuromuscular training. Moreover, the variation of the muscle activation evoked higher muscle activation of the vastus medialis oblique, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, and semitendinosus. [Conclusion] Neuromuscular training may improve functional joint stability in patients with orthopedic musculoskeletal injuries in the postoperative period. PMID:26834316

  12. 3D Printing Surgical Implants at the clinic: A Experimental Study on Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, An; Xue, Guang-huai; Sun, Miao; Shao, Hui-feng; Ma, Chi-yuan; Gao, Qing; Gou, Zhong-ru; Yan, Shi-gui; Liu, Yan-ming; He, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Desktop three-dimensional (3D) printers (D3DPs) have become a popular tool for fabricating personalized consumer products, favored for low cost, easy operation, and other advantageous qualities. This study focused on the potential for using D3DPs to successfully, rapidly, and economically print customized implants at medical clinics. An experiment was conducted on a D3DP-printed anterior cruciate ligament surgical implant using a rabbit model. A well-defined, orthogonal, porous PLA screw-like scaffold was printed, then coated with hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve its osteoconductivity. As an internal fixation as well as an ideal cell delivery system, the osteogenic scaffold loaded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were evaluated through both in vitro and in vivo tests to observe bone-ligament healing via cell therapy. The MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel on PLA/HA screw-like scaffold showed the highest cell proliferation and osteogenesis in vitro. In vivo assessment of rabbit anterior cruciate ligament models for 4 and 12 weeks showed that the PLA/HA screw-like scaffold loaded with MSCs suspended in Pluronic F-127 hydrogel exhibited significant bone ingrowth and bone-graft interface formation within the bone tunnel. Overall, the results of this study demonstrate that fabricating surgical implants at the clinic (fab@clinic) with D3DPs can be feasible, effective, and economical. PMID:26875826

  13. Assessment of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using 3D ultrashort echo-time MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Rahmer, Jürgen; Börnert, Peter; Dries, Sebastian P M

    2009-02-01

    This work demonstrates the potential of ultrashort TE (UTE) imaging for visualizing graft material and fixation elements after surgical repair of soft tissue trauma such as ligament or meniscal injury. Three asymptomatic patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction using different graft fixation methods were imaged at 1.5T using a 3D UTE sequence. Conventional multislice turbo spin-echo (TSE) measurements were performed for comparison. 3D UTE imaging yields high signal from tendon graft material at isotropic spatial resolution, thus facilitating direct positive contrast graft visualization. Furthermore, metal and biopolymer graft fixation elements are clearly depicted due to the high contrast between the signal-void implants and the graft material. Thus, the ability of UTE MRI to visualize short-T(2) tissues such as tendons, ligaments, or tendon grafts can provide additional information about the status of the graft and its fixation in the situation after cruciate ligament repair. UTE MRI can therefore potentially support diagnosis when problems occur or persist after surgical procedures involving short-T(2) tissues and implants.

  14. Validation of predicted patellofemoral mechanics in a finite element model of the healthy and cruciate-deficient knee.

    PubMed

    Ali, Azhar A; Shalhoub, Sami S; Cyr, Adam J; Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J; Shelburne, Kevin B

    2016-01-25

    Healthy patellofemoral (PF) joint mechanics are critical to optimal function of the knee joint. Patellar maltracking may lead to large joint reaction loads and high stresses on the articular cartilage, increasing the risk of cartilage wear and the onset of osteoarthritis. While the mechanical sources of PF joint dysfunction are not well understood, links have been established between PF tracking and abnormal kinematics of the tibiofemoral (TF) joint, specifically following cruciate ligament injury and repair. The objective of this study was to create a validated finite element (FE) representation of the PF joint in order to predict PF kinematics and quadriceps force across healthy and pathological specimens. Measurements from a series of dynamic in-vitro cadaveric experiments were used to develop finite element models of the knee for three specimens. Specimens were loaded under intact, ACL-resected and both ACL and PCL-resected conditions. Finite element models of each specimen were constructed and calibrated to the outputs of the intact knee condition, and subsequently used to predict PF kinematics, contact mechanics, quadriceps force, patellar tendon moment arm and patellar tendon angle of the cruciate resected conditions. Model results for the intact and cruciate resected trials successfully matched experimental kinematics (avg. RMSE 4.0°, 3.1mm) and peak quadriceps forces (avg. difference 5.6%). Cruciate resections demonstrated either increased patellar tendon loads or increased joint reaction forces. The current study advances the standard for evaluation of PF mechanics through direct validation of cruciate-resected conditions including specimen-specific representations of PF anatomy.

  15. Partial ACL tears: anatomic reconstruction versus nonanatomic augmentation surgery.

    PubMed

    Buda, Roberto; Ruffilli, Alberto; Parma, Alessandro; Pagliazzi, Gherardo; Luciani, Deianira; Ramponi, Laura; Castagnini, Francesco; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of partial anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears requires ACL remnant preservation. The goal of this study was to compare the outcome of anatomic reconstruction of the torn bundle with nonanatomic augmentation using the over-the-top femoral route. Fifty-two athletes (mean age, 23.3 years) with partial ACL lesions underwent anatomic reconstruction (n=26) or nonanatomic augmentation (n=26). Intraoperative damage of the healthy bundle that required a standard ACL reconstruction occurred in 2 patients in the anatomic reconstruction group. International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) score, Tegner score, and arthrometer evaluation were used pre-operatively and at follow-up for up to 5 years postoperatively. One failure occurred in the anatomic reconstruction group. Mean IKDC subjective score at follow-up was 88.2 ± 5.7 in the anatomic reconstruction group and 90.2 ± 4.7 in the nonanatomic augmentation group. According to the IKDC objective score at final follow-up, 96% of knees in the nonanatomic augmentation group were normal vs 87.5% in the anatomic reconstruction group. No significative differences were observed between the 2 groups at final follow-up. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction showed significantly lower IKDC subjective and objective scores and higher residual instability values as evaluated with the arthrometer compared with posterolateral bundle reconstruction (P=.017). The surgical treatment of ACL partial tears is demanding. Adapted portals, perfect control of the tunnel drilling process, and intercondylar space management are required in anatomic reconstruction. The nonanatomic augmentation technique is simpler, providing excellent durable results over time with a lower complication rate. Anteromedial bundle reconstruction is associated with a poorer outcome, especially when performed with anatomic reconstruction.

  16. It's All in the Mime: Actions Speak Louder than Words When Teaching the Cranial Nerves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Kerry Ann; Stephens, Bruce Warren

    2015-01-01

    Cranial nerve (CN) knowledge is essential for students in health professions. Gestures and body movements (e.g., mime) have been shown to improve cognition and satisfaction with anatomy teaching. The aim of this pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of didactic lecturing with that of miming lecturing for student learning of the CNs. The…

  17. Diagnosis of infant synostotic and nonsynostotic cranial deformities: a review for pediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Ghizoni, Enrico; Denadai, Rafael; Raposo-Amaral, Cesar Augusto; Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Tedeschi, Helder; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To review the current comprehensive care for nonsyndromic craniosynostosis and nonsynostotic cranial deformity and to offer an overall view of these craniofacial conditions. Data source: The review was conducted in the PubMed, SciELO, and LILACS databases without time or language restrictions. Relevant articles were selected for the review. Data synthesis: We included the anatomy and physiology of normal skull development of children, discussing nuances related to nomenclature, epidemiology, etiology, and treatment of the most common forms of nonsyndromic craniosynostosis. The clinical criteria for the differential diagnosis between positional deformities and nonsyndromic craniosynostosis were also discussed, giving to the pediatrician subsidies for a quick and safe clinical diagnosis. If positional deformity is accurately diagnosed, it can be treated successfully with behavior modification. Diagnostic doubts and craniosynostosis patients should be referred straightaway to a multidisciplinary craniofacial center. Conclusions: Pediatricians are in the forefront of the diagnosis of patients with cranial deformities. Thus, it is of paramount importance that they recognize subtle cranial deformities as it may be related to premature fusion of cranial sutures. PMID:27256993

  18. A molecular analysis of neurogenic placode and cranial sensory ganglion development in the shark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P; McCole, R B; Baker, C V H

    2007-04-01

    In order to gain insight into the evolution of the genetic control of the development of cranial neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in vertebrates, we cloned and analysed the spatiotemporal expression pattern of six transcription factor genes in a chondrichthyan, the shark Scyliorhinus canicula (lesser-spotted dogfish/catshark). As in other vertebrates, NeuroD is expressed in all cranial sensory ganglia. We show that Pax3 is expressed in the profundal placode and ganglion, strongly supporting homology between the separate profundal ganglion of elasmobranchs and basal actinopterygians and the ophthalmic trigeminal placode-derived neurons of the fused amniote trigeminal ganglion. We show that Pax2 is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial and otic placodes, and confirm that Phox2b is a conserved pan-gnathostome marker for epibranchial placode-derived neurons. We identify Eya4 as a novel marker for the lateral line system throughout its development, expressed in lateral line placodes, sensory ridges and migrating primordia, neuromasts and electroreceptors. We also identify Tbx3 as a specific marker for lateral line ganglia in shark embryos. We use the spatiotemporal expression pattern of these genes to characterise the development of neurogenic placodes and cranial sensory ganglia in the dogfish, with a focus on the epibranchial and lateral line placodes. Our findings demonstrate the evolutionary conservation across all gnathostomes of at least some of the transcription factor networks underlying neurogenic placode development.

  19. Evolution of cranial development and the role of neural crest: insights from amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Hanken, James; Gross, Joshua B

    2005-01-01

    Contemporary studies of vertebrate cranial development document the essential role played by the embryonic neural crest as both a source of adult tissues and a locus of cranial form and patterning. Yet corresponding and basic features of cranial evolution, such as the extent of conservation vs. variation among species in the contribution of the neural crest to specific structures, remain to be adequately resolved. Investigation of these features requires comparable data from species that are both phylogenetically appropriate and taxonomically diverse. One key group are amphibians, which are uniquely able to inform our understanding of the ancestral patterns of ontogeny in fishes and tetrapods as well as the evolution of presumably derived patterns reported for amniotes. Recent data support the hypothesis that a prominent contribution of the neural crest to cranial skeletal and muscular connective tissues is a fundamental property that evolved early in vertebrate history and is retained in living forms. The contribution of the neural crest to skull bones appears to be more evolutionarily labile than that of cartilages, although significance of the limited comparative data is difficult to establish at present. Results underline the importance of accurate and reliable homology assessments for evaluating the contrasting patterns of derivation reported for the three principal tetrapod models: mouse, chicken and frog. PMID:16313386

  20. Stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy: the SMART syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sue Yin; Brooke, Jonathan; Dineen, Robert; O'Donoghue, Michael

    2016-10-01

    We describe a patient who experienced a prolonged episode of headache, drowsiness, seizure, unilateral weakness, delusion and hallucination due to a stroke-like migraine attack after cranial radiation therapy. Stroke-like migraine attack after radiation therapy (SMART) syndrome is a rare complication of therapeutic brain irradiation.

  1. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO. J.B. Smith, K.K. Sulik, E.S. Hunter III. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
    The induction of craniofacial defects by ethanol exposure is mediated in part by...

  3. Timing of ectocranial suture activity in Gorilla gorilla as related to cranial volume and dental eruption.

    PubMed

    Cray, James; Cooper, Gregory M; Mooney, Mark P; Siegel, Michael I

    2011-05-01

    Research has shown that Pan and Homo have similar ectocranial suture synostosis patterns and a similar suture ontogeny (relative timing of suture fusion during the species ontogeny). This ontogeny includes patency during and after neurocranial expansion with a delayed bony response associated with adaptation to biomechanical forces generated by mastication. Here we investigate these relationships for Gorilla by examining the association among ectocranial suture morphology, cranial volume (as a proxy for neurocranial expansion) and dental development (as a proxy for the length of time that it has been masticating hard foods and exerting such strains on the cranial vault) in a large sample of Gorilla gorilla skulls. Two-hundred and fifty-five Gorilla gorilla skulls were examined for ectocranial suture closure status, cranial volume and dental eruption. Regression models were calculated for cranial volumes by suture activity, and Kendall's tau (a non-parametric measure of association) was calculated for dental eruption status by suture activity. Results suggest that, as reported for Pan and Homo, neurocranial expansion precedes suture synostosis activity. Here, Gorilla was shown to have a strong relationship between dental development and suture activity (synostosis). These data are suggestive of suture fusion extending further into ontogeny than brain expansion, similar to Homo and Pan. This finding allows for the possibility that masticatory forces influence ectocranial suture morphology.

  4. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development

    PubMed Central

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2015-01-01

    During development transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors, but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of Retinal Ganglion Cells (RGC), Spiral and Vestibular Ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the Dorsal Root Ganglia (DRG). In the present study we investigated the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, X, as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3bKO RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor. PMID:26356988

  5. Evolution of cranial development and the role of neural crest: insights from amphibians.

    PubMed

    Hanken, James; Gross, Joshua B

    2005-11-01

    Contemporary studies of vertebrate cranial development document the essential role played by the embryonic neural crest as both a source of adult tissues and a locus of cranial form and patterning. Yet corresponding and basic features of cranial evolution, such as the extent of conservation vs. variation among species in the contribution of the neural crest to specific structures, remain to be adequately resolved. Investigation of these features requires comparable data from species that are both phylogenetically appropriate and taxonomically diverse. One key group are amphibians, which are uniquely able to inform our understanding of the ancestral patterns of ontogeny in fishes and tetrapods as well as the evolution of presumably derived patterns reported for amniotes. Recent data support the hypothesis that a prominent contribution of the neural crest to cranial skeletal and muscular connective tissues is a fundamental property that evolved early in vertebrate history and is retained in living forms. The contribution of the neural crest to skull bones appears to be more evolutionarily labile than that of cartilages, although significance of the limited comparative data is difficult to establish at present. Results underline the importance of accurate and reliable homology assessments for evaluating the contrasting patterns of derivation reported for the three principal tetrapod models: mouse, chicken and frog.

  6. Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kazuki; Tabata, Yuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2016-04-01

    Effect of echo artifacts on characterization of pulsatile tissues has been examined in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by characterizing pulsatile intensities with different regions of interest (ROIs). The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point in pediatric diagnosis of brain tissue, was detected from a heartbeat-frequency component in Fourier transform of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in a movie fragment. The averages of pulsatile intensity and power were evaluated in two ROIs: common fan-shape and individual cranial-shape. The area of pulsatile region was also evaluated as the number of pixels where the pulsatile intensity exceeds a proper threshold. The extracranial pulsatile region was found mainly in the sections where mirror image was dominant echo artifact. There was significant difference of pulsatile area between two ROIs especially in the specific sections where mirror image was included, suggesting the suitability of cranial-shape ROI for statistical study on pulsatile tissues in brain. The normalized average of pulsatile power in the cranial-shape ROI exhibited most similar tendency to the normalized pulsatile area which was treated as a conventional measure in spite of its requirement of thresholding. It suggests the potential of pulsatile power as an alternative measure for pulsatile area in further statistical study of pulsatile tissues because it was neither affected by echo artifacts nor threshold.

  7. HINDBRAIN AND CRANIAL NERVE DYSMORPHOGENESIS RESULT FROM ACUTE MATERNAL ETHANOL ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure of mouse embryos to ethanol during stages of hindbrain segmentation results in excessive cell death in specific cell populations. This study details the ethanol-induced cell loss and defines the subsequent effects of this early insult on rhombomere and cranial ner...

  8. Cranial nerve assessment in posterior fossa tumors with fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA).

    PubMed

    Mikami, Takeshi; Minamida, Yoshihiro; Yamaki, Toshiaki; Koyanagi, Izumi; Nonaka, Tadashi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2005-10-01

    Steady-state free precession is widely used for ultra-fast cardiac or abdominal imaging. The purpose of this work was to assess fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and to evaluate its efficacy for depiction of the cranial nerve affected by the tumor. Twenty-three consecutive patients with posterior fossa tumors underwent FIESTA sequence after contrast agent administration, and then displacement of the cranial nerve was evaluated. The 23 patients with posterior fossa tumor consisted of 12 schwannomas, eight meningiomas, and three cases of epidermoid. Except in the cases of epidermoid, intensity of all tumors increased on FIESTA imaging of the contrast enhancement. In the schwannoma cases, visualization of the nerve became poorer as the tumor increased in size. In cases of encapsulated meningioma, all the cranial nerves of the posterior fossa were depicted regardless of location. The ability to depict the nerves was also significantly higher in meningioma patients than in schwannoma patients (P<0.05). In cases of epidermoid, extension of the tumors was depicted clearly. Although the FIESTA sequence offers similar contrast to other heavily T2-weighted sequences, it facilitated a superior assessment of the effect of tumors on cranial nerve anatomy. FIESTA sequence was useful for preoperative simulations of posterior fossa tumors.

  9. Development of a bioactive implant for repair and potential healing of cranial defects.

    PubMed

    Engstrand, Thomas; Kihlström, Lars; Neovius, Erik; Skogh, Ann-Charlott Docherty; Lundgren, T Kalle; Jacobsson, Hans; Bohlin, Jan; Åberg, Jonas; Engqvist, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    The repair of complex craniofacial bone defects is challenging and a successful result is dependent on the size of the defect, quality of the soft tissue covering the defect, and choice of reconstruction method. The objective of this study was to develop a bioactive cranial implant that could provide a permanent reconstructive solution to the patient by stimulating bone healing of the defect. In this paper the authors report on the feasibility and clinical results of using such a newly developed device for the repair of a large traumatic and therapy-resistant cranial bone defect. The patient had undergone numerous attempts at repair, in which established methods had been tried without success. A mosaic-designed device was manufactured and implanted, comprising interconnected ceramic tiles with a defined calcium phosphate composition. The clinical outcome 30 months after surgery revealed a restored cranial vault without postoperative complications. Computed tomography demonstrated signs of bone ingrowth. Examination with combined (18)F-fluoride PET and CT provided further evidence of bone healing of the cranial defect.

  10. Cranial muscle development in frogs with different developmental modes: direct development versus biphasic development.

    PubMed

    Ziermann, Janine M; Diogo, Rui

    2014-04-01

    Normal development in anurans includes a free swimming larva that goes through metamorphosis to develop into the adult frog. We have investigated cranial muscle development and adult cranial muscle morphology in three different anuran species. Xenopus laevis is obligate aquatic throughout lifetime, Rana(Lithobates) pipiens has an aquatic larvae and a terrestrial adult form, and Eleutherodactylus coqui has direct developing juveniles that hatch from eggs deposited on leaves (terrestrial). The adult morphology shows hardly any differences between the investigated species. Cranial muscle development of E. coqui shows many similarities and only few differences to the development of Rana (Lithobates) and Xenopus. The differences are missing muscles of the branchial arches (which disappear during metamorphosis of biphasic anurans) and a few heterochronic changes. The development of the mandibular arch (adductor mandibulae) and hyoid arch (depressor mandibulae) muscles is similar to that observed in Xenopus and Rana (Lithobates), although the first appearance of these muscles displays a midmetamorphic pattern in E. coqui. We show that the mix of characters observed in E. coqui indicates that the larval stage is not completely lost even without a free swimming larval stage. Cryptic metamorphosis is the process in which morphological changes in the larva/embryo take place that are not as obvious as in normal metamorphosing anurans with a clear biphasic lifestyle. During cryptic metamorphosis, a normal adult frog develops, indicating that the majority of developmental mechanisms towards the functional adult cranial muscles are preserved.

  11. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices §...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices §...

  13. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices §...

  14. 21 CFR 882.4300 - Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual cranial drills, burrs, trephines, and their accessories 882.4300 Section 882.4300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Surgical Devices §...

  15. Cranial irradiation regulates CREB-BDNF signaling and variant BDNF transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Son, Yeonghoon; Yang, Miyoung; Kang, Sohi; Lee, Sueun; Kim, Jinwook; Kim, Juhwan; Park, Seri; Kim, Joong-Sun; Jo, Sung-Kee; Jung, Uhee; Shin, Taekyun; Kim, Sung-Ho; Wang, Hongbing; Moon, Changjong

    2015-05-01

    The brain can be exposed to ionizing radiation in various ways, and such irradiation can trigger adverse effects, particularly on learning and memory. However, the precise mechanisms of cognitive impairments induced by cranial irradiation remain unknown. In the hippocampus, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays roles in neurogenesis, neuronal survival, neuronal differentiation, and synaptic plasticity. The significance of BDNF transcript variants in these contexts is becoming clearer. In the present study, both object recognition memory and contextual fear conditioning task performance in adult C57BL/6 mice were assessed 1 month after a single exposure to cranial irradiation (10 Gy) to evaluate hippocampus-related behavioral dysfunction following such irradiation. Furthermore, changes in the levels of BDNF, the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and BDNF transcript variants were measured in the hippocampus 1 month after cranial irradiation. On object recognition memory and contextual fear conditioning tasks, mice evaluated 1 month after irradiation exhibited significant memory deficits compared to sham-irradiated controls, but no apparent change was evident in locomotor activity. Both phosphorylated CREB and BDNF protein levels were significantly downregulated after irradiation of the hippocampus. Moreover, the levels of mRNAs encoding common BDNF transcripts, and exons IIC, III, IV, VII, VIII, and IXA, were significantly downregulated after irradiation. The reductions in CREB phosphorylation and BDNF expression induced by differential regulation of BDNF hippocampal exon transcripts may be associated with the memory deficits evident in mice after cranial irradiation.

  16. The Comprehensive AOCMF Classification: Skull Base and Cranial Vault Fractures – Level 2 and 3 Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Ieva, Antonio Di; Audigé, Laurent; Kellman, Robert M.; Shumrick, Kevin A.; Ringl, Helmut; Prein, Joachim; Matula, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The AOCMF Classification Group developed a hierarchical three-level craniomaxillofacial classification system with increasing level of complexity and details. The highest level 1 system distinguish four major anatomical units, including the mandible (code 91), midface (code 92), skull base (code 93), and cranial vault (code 94). This tutorial presents the level 2 and more detailed level 3 systems for the skull base and cranial vault units. The level 2 system describes fracture location outlining the topographic boundaries of the anatomic regions, considering in particular the endocranial and exocranial skull base surfaces. The endocranial skull base is divided into nine regions; a central skull base adjoining a left and right side are divided into the anterior, middle, and posterior skull base. The exocranial skull base surface and cranial vault are divided in regions defined by the names of the bones involved: frontal, parietal, temporal, sphenoid, and occipital bones. The level 3 system allows assessing fracture morphology described by the presence of fracture fragmentation, displacement, and bone loss. A documentation of associated intracranial diagnostic features is proposed. This tutorial is organized in a sequence of sections dealing with the description of the classification system with illustrations of the topographical skull base and cranial vault regions along with rules for fracture location and coding, a series of case examples with clinical imaging and a general discussion on the design of this classification. PMID:25489394

  17. Cranial vena cava syndrome secondary to cryptococcal mediastinal granuloma in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Letendre, Jo-Annie; Boysen, Søren

    2015-01-01

    The successful management of cranial vena cava syndrome with suspected secondary chylothorax due to mediastinal cryptococcal granuloma in a 4-year-old male domestic shorthair cat is described. Treatment included long-term antifungal medication, short-term corticosteroids, intermittent thoracocentesis, rutin, octreotide, and enalapril. PMID:25829555

  18. Dynamic expression of transcription factor Brn3b during mouse cranial nerve development.

    PubMed

    Sajgo, Szilard; Ali, Seid; Popescu, Octavian; Badea, Tudor Constantin

    2016-04-01

    During development, transcription factor combinatorial codes define a large variety of morphologically and physiologically distinct neurons. Such a combinatorial code has been proposed for the differentiation of projection neurons of the somatic and visceral components of cranial nerves. It is possible that individual neuronal cell types are not specified by unique transcription factors but rather emerge through the intersection of their expression domains. Brn3a, Brn3b, and Brn3c, in combination with each other and/or transcription factors of other families, can define subgroups of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), spiral and vestibular ganglia, inner ear and vestibular hair cell neurons in the vestibuloacoustic system, and groups of somatosensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia. The present study investigates the expression and potential role of the Brn3b transcription factor in cranial nerves and associated nuclei of the brainstem. We report the dynamic expression of Brn3b in the somatosensory component of cranial nerves II, V, VII, and VIII and visceromotor nuclei of nerves VII, IX, and X as well as other brainstem nuclei during different stages of development into adult stage. We find that genetically identified Brn3b(KO) RGC axons show correct but delayed pathfinding during the early stages of embryonic development. However, loss of Brn3b does not affect the anatomy of the other cranial nerves normally expressing this transcription factor.

  19. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  20. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.