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Sample records for partial gdh gene

  1. Introduction of the Escherichia coli gdhA gene into Rhizobium phaseoli: effect on nitrogen fixation.

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, A; Becerril, B; Mora, J

    1988-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli lacks glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and assimilates ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway. A strain of R. phaseoli harboring the Escherichia coli GDH structural gene (gdhA) was constructed. GDH activity was expressed in R. phaseoli in the free-living state and in symbiosis. Nodules with bacteroids that expressed GDH activity had severe impairment of nitrogen fixation. Also, R. phaseoli cells that lost GDH activity and assimilated ammonium by the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway preferentially nodulated Phaseolus vulgaris. PMID:2892830

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the GDH gene coding for the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nagasu, T; Hall, B D

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) by cross hybridization to the Neurospora crassa am gene, known to encode for NADP-GDH is described. Two DNA fragments selected from a yeast genomic library in phage lambda gt11 were shown by restriction analysis to share 2.5 kb of common sequence. A yeast shuttle vector (CV13) carrying either to the cloned fragments complements the gdh- strain of S. cerevisiae and directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH. One of the cloned fragments was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of the yeast NADP-GDH is 64% homologous to N. crassa, 51% to Escherichia coli and 24% to bovine NADP-GDHs.

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3 protein activates expression of GDH1, a key gene in nitrogen assimilation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Cooper, T G; Kohlhaw, G B

    1995-01-01

    The Leu3 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a transcriptional regulator of genes encoding enzymes of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways. Leu3 binds to upstream activating sequences (UASLEU) found in the promoters of LEU1, LEU2, LEU4, ILV2, and ILV5. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that activation by Leu3 requires the presence of alpha-isopropylmalate. In at least one case (LEU2), Leu3 actually represses basal-level transcription when alpha-isopropylmalate is absent. Following identification of a UASLEU-homologous sequence in the promoter of GDH1, the gene encoding NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, we demonstrate that Leu3 specifically interacts with this UASLEU element. We then show that Leu3 is required for full activation of the GDH1 gene. First, the expression of a GDH1-lacZ fusion gene is three- to sixfold lower in a strain lacking the LEU3 gene than in an isogenic LEU3+ strain. Expression is restored to near-normal levels when the leu3 deletion cells are transformed with a LEU3-bearing plasmid. Second, a significant decrease in GDH1-lacZ expression is also seen when the UASLEU of the GDH1-lacZ construct is made nonfunctional by mutation. Third, the steady-state level of GDH1 mRNA decreases about threefold in leu3 null cells. The decrease in GDH1 expression in leu3 null cells is reflected in a diminished specific activity of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. We also demonstrate that the level of GDH1-lacZ expression correlates with the cells' ability to generate alpha-isopropylmalate and is lowest in cells unable to produce alpha-isopropylmalate. We conclude that GDH1, which plays an important role in the assimilation of ammonia in yeast cells, is, in part, activated by a Leu3-alpha-isopropylmalate complex. This conclusion suggests that Leu3 participates in transcriptional regulation beyond the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways.

  4. Studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae under carbon-limiting growth transformed with plasmid pCYG4 that carries the gene for NADP-GDH.

    PubMed

    Lima Filho, J L; Ledingham, W M

    1990-02-01

    The gene (GDH1) coding for the NADP-linked glutamate dehydrogenase system (NADP-GDH) has been cloned from Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Cells being transformed by the NADP-GDH gene on a 2 micron bared vector (pCYG4) plasmid confering 11-fold higher level on expressed GDH activity over the wild-type cells. The behavior of these cells was investigated under chemostatic growth with a carbon rate-limiting nutrient. Specific growth rates of cells carrying plasmid pCYG4 were found to be slightly slower than wild type cells. Furthermore, the NADP-GDH activity increases proportionally with the dilution rate. In addition, oscillations in the NADP-GDH activity, especially at a dilution rate up to 0.15/h, are probably consequential on the appearance of a changing mixed population (cells with and without plasmids).

  5. Characterization and nitrogen-source regulation at the transcriptional level of the gdhA gene of Aspergillus awamori encoding an NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, R E; Moralejo, F J; Gutiérrez, S; Casqueiro, J; Fierro, F; Martín, J F

    1998-07-01

    A 28.7-kb DNA region containing the gdhA gene of Aspergillus awamori was cloned from a genomic DNA library. A fragment of 2570 nucleotides was sequenced that contained ORF1, of 1380 bp, encoding a protein of 460 amino acids (Mr 49.4 kDa). The encoded protein showed high similarity to the NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases of different organisms. The cloned gene was functional since it complemented two different Aspergillus nidulans gdhA mutants, restoring high levels of NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase to the transformants. The A. awamori gdhA gene was located by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in a 5.5-Mb band (corresponding to a doublet of chromosomes II and III), and was transcribed as a monocistronic transcript of 1.7 kb. Transcript levels of the gdhA gene were very high during the rapid growth phase and decreased drastically after 48 h of cultivation. Very high expression levels of the gdhA gene were observed in media with ammonium or asparagine as the nitrogen source, whereas glutamic acid repressed transcription of the gdhA gene. These results indicate that expression of the gdhA gene is subject to a strong nitrogen regulation at the transcriptional level.

  6. The gdhB gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an arginine-inducible NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase which is subject to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Abdelal, A T

    2001-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was purified, and its amino-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. This sequence information was used in identifying and cloning the encoding gdhB gene and its flanking regions. The molecular mass predicted from the derived sequence for the encoded NAD-GDH was 182.6 kDa, in close agreement with that determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme (180 kDa). Cross-linking studies established that the native NAD-GDH is a tetramer of equal subunits. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of NAD-GDH from P. aeruginosa with the GenBank database showed the highest homology with hypothetical polypeptides from Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rickettsia prowazakii, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Caulobacter crescentus. A moderate degree of homology, primarily in the central domain, was observed with the smaller tetrameric NAD-GDH (protomeric mass of 110 kDa) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Neurospora crassa. Comparison with the yet smaller hexameric GDH (protomeric mass of 48 to 55 kDa) of other prokaryotes yielded a low degree of homology that was limited to residues important for binding of substrates and for catalytic function. NAD-GDH was induced 27-fold by exogenous arginine and only 3-fold by exogenous glutamate. Primer extension experiments established that transcription of gdhB is initiated from an arginine-inducible promoter and that this induction is dependent on the arginine regulatory protein, ArgR, a member of the AraC/XyIS family of regulatory proteins. NAD-GDH was purified to homogeneity from a recombinant strain of P. aeruginosa and characterized. The glutamate saturation curve was sigmoid, indicating positive cooperativity in the binding of glutamate. NAD-GDH activity was subject to allosteric control by arginine and citrate, which

  7. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 3 (GDH3) of Arabidopsis thaliana is less thermostable than GDH1 and GDH2 isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Laura; Polverini, Eugenia; Degola, Francesca; Baruffini, Enrico; Restivo, Francesco Maria

    2014-10-01

    NAD(H)-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is an abundant and ubiquitous enzyme that may exist in different isoenzymic forms. Variation in the composition of the GDH isoenzyme pattern is observed during plant development and specific cell, tissue and organ localization of the different isoforms have been reported. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the isoenzymatic pattern are still obscure. Regulation may be exerted at several levels, i.e. at the level of transcription and translation of the relevant genes, but also when the enzyme is assembled to originate the catalytically active form of the protein. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three genes (GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3) encode three different GDH subunits (β, α and γ) that randomly associate to form a complex array of homo- and hetero-hexamers. In order to asses if the different Arabidopsis GDH isoforms may display different structural properties we have investigated their thermal stability. In particular the stability of GDH1 and GDH3 isoenzymes was studied using site-directed mutagenesis in a heterologous yeast expression system. It was established that the carboxyl terminus of the GDH subunit is involved in the stabilization of the oligomeric structure of the enzyme.

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Gdh and Bg Genes of Animal-Derived Giardia duodenalis Isolates in Northeastern China and Evaluation of Zoonotic Transmission Potential

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yujuan; Zhang, Weizhe; Wang, Rongjun; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Longxian; Ling, Hong; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Background Giardia duodenalis is a common intestinal parasite that infects humans and many other mammals, mainly distributing in some areas with poor sanitation. The proportion of the human giardiasis burden attributable to G. duodenalis of animal origin differs in different geographical areas. In Mainland China, genetic data of the gdh and bg genes of G. duodenalis from animals are only limited in dogs and cats. The aim of the study was to provide information on the genetic characterizations of animal-derived G. duodenalis isolates (from rabbits, sheep and cattle) at both loci in Heilongjiang Province, Northeastern China, and to assess the potential for zoonotic transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings 61 G. duodenalis isolates from animal feces (dairy and beef cattle, sheep and rabbits) in Heilongjiang Province were characterized at the gdh and bg loci in the present study. The gdh and bg gene sequences of sheep-derived G. duodenalis assemblage AI, and the gdh sequences of rabbit-derived G. duodenalis assemblage B had 100% similarity with those from humans, respectively. Novel subtypes of G. duodenalis were identified, with one and seven subtypes for assemblages A and E at the gdh locus, and two and three subtypes for assemblages B and E at the bg locus, respectively. Three pairs of the same bg sequences of assemblage E were observed in sheep and cattle. Conclusions/Significance This is the first description of genetic characterizations of the gdh and bg genes of G. duodenalis from rabbits, sheep and cattle in Mainland China. Homology analysis of assemblages AI and B implied the possibility of zoonotic transmission. The novel subtypes of assemblages of G. duodenalis may represent the endemic genetic characteristics of G. duodenalis in Heilongjiang Province, China. PMID:24748379

  9. Genetic analysis of the Gdh and Bg genes of animal-derived Giardia duodenalis isolates in Northeastern China and evaluation of zoonotic transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiqin; Yang, Fengkun; Shen, Yujuan; Zhang, Weizhe; Wang, Rongjun; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Longxian; Ling, Hong; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a common intestinal parasite that infects humans and many other mammals, mainly distributing in some areas with poor sanitation. The proportion of the human giardiasis burden attributable to G. duodenalis of animal origin differs in different geographical areas. In Mainland China, genetic data of the gdh and bg genes of G. duodenalis from animals are only limited in dogs and cats. The aim of the study was to provide information on the genetic characterizations of animal-derived G. duodenalis isolates (from rabbits, sheep and cattle) at both loci in Heilongjiang Province, Northeastern China, and to assess the potential for zoonotic transmission. 61 G. duodenalis isolates from animal feces (dairy and beef cattle, sheep and rabbits) in Heilongjiang Province were characterized at the gdh and bg loci in the present study. The gdh and bg gene sequences of sheep-derived G. duodenalis assemblage AI, and the gdh sequences of rabbit-derived G. duodenalis assemblage B had 100% similarity with those from humans, respectively. Novel subtypes of G. duodenalis were identified, with one and seven subtypes for assemblages A and E at the gdh locus, and two and three subtypes for assemblages B and E at the bg locus, respectively. Three pairs of the same bg sequences of assemblage E were observed in sheep and cattle. This is the first description of genetic characterizations of the gdh and bg genes of G. duodenalis from rabbits, sheep and cattle in Mainland China. Homology analysis of assemblages AI and B implied the possibility of zoonotic transmission. The novel subtypes of assemblages of G. duodenalis may represent the endemic genetic characteristics of G. duodenalis in Heilongjiang Province, China.

  10. Bioinformatics based structural characterization of glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene and growth promoting activity of Leclercia sp. QAU-66.

    PubMed

    Naveed, Muhammad; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.1. 5.2) is the member of quinoproteins group that use the redox cofactor pyrroloquinoline quinoine, calcium ions and glucose as substrate for its activity. In present study, Leclercia sp. QAU-66, isolated from rhizosphere of Vigna mungo, was characterized for phosphate solubilization and the role of GDH in plant growth promotion of Phaseolus vulgaris. The strain QAU-66 had ability to solubilize phosphorus and significantly (p ≤ 0.05) promoted the shoot and root lengths of Phaseolus vulgaris. The structural determination of GDH protein was carried out using bioinformatics tools like Pfam, InterProScan, I-TASSER and COFACTOR. These tools predicted the structural based functional homology of pyrroloquinoline quinone domains in GDH. GDH of Leclercia sp. QAU-66 is one of the main factor that involved in plant growth promotion and provides a solid background for further research in plant growth promoting activities.

  11. Role of the complex upstream region of the GDH2 gene in nitrogen regulation of the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We analyzed the upstream region of the GDH2 gene, which encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for elements important for the regulation of the gene by the nitrogen source. The levels of this enzyme are high in cells grown with glutamate as the sole source of nitrogen and low in cells grown with glutamine or ammonium. We found that this regulation occurs at the level of transcription and that a total of six sites are required to cause a CYC1-lacZ fusion to the GDH2 gene to be regulated in the same manner as the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase. Two sites behaved as upstream activation sites (UASs). The remaining four sites were found to block the effects of the two UASs in such a way that the GDH2-CYC1-lacZ fusion was not expressed unless the cells containing it were grown under conditions favorable for the activity of both UASs. This complex regulatory system appears to account for the fact that GDH2 expression is exquisitely sensitive to glutamine, whereas the expression of GLN1, coding for glutamine synthetase, is not nearly as sensitive. Images PMID:1682801

  12. Swi/SNF-GCN5-dependent chromatin remodelling determines induced expression of GDH3, one of the paralogous genes responsible for ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Amaranta; Riego, Lina; DeLuna, Alexander; Aranda, Cristina; Romero, Guillermo; Ishida, Cecilia; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Rodarte, Beatriz; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Valenzuela, Lourdes; Zonszein, Sergio; González, Alicia

    2005-07-01

    It is accepted that Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome arose from complete duplication of eight ancestral chromosomes; functionally normal ploidy was recovered because of the massive loss of 90% of duplicated genes. There is evidence that indicates that part of this selective conservation of gene pairs is compelling to yeast facultative metabolism. As an example, the duplicated NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase pathway has been maintained because of the differential expression of the paralogous GDH1 and GDH3 genes, and the biochemical specialization of the enzymes they encode. The present work has been aimed to the understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that modulate GDH3 transcriptional activation. Our results show that GDH3 expression is repressed in glucose-grown cultures, as opposed to what has been observed for GDH1, and induced under respiratory conditions, or under stationary phase. Although GDH3 pertains to the nitrogen metabolic network, and its expression is Gln3p-regulated, complete derepression is ultimately determined by the carbon source through the action of the SAGA and SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complexes. GDH3 carbon-mediated regulation is over-imposed to that exerted by the nitrogen source, highlighting the fact that operation of facultative metabolism requires strict control of enzymes, like Gdh3p, involved in biosynthetic pathways that use tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates.

  13. Glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism among ethnic groups of Singapore--with report of two additional alleles (GDH4 and GDH5).

    PubMed

    Saha, N; Bhattacharyya, S P; Yeoh, S C; Chua, S P; Ratnam, S S

    1987-02-01

    Placental glucose dehydrogenase (GDH; E.C.1.1.1.47) polymorphism was studied in 254 Chinese, 104 Malays, and 47 Indians from Singapore using isoelectric focusing. There is suggestive evidence of two additional anodal alleles (GDH4 and GDH5) in addition to the three alleles described in earlier studies. Altogether, 14 phenotypes have been observed in the present investigation, compared with six phenotypes described in earlier studies. It appears that placental GDH is controlled by five codominant autosomal alleles producing 15 possible phenotypes. The gene frequencies of GDH1, GDH2, and GDH3 in these ethnic groups are significantly different from those reported in Caucasians. There were slight differences in the gene frequencies between the three ethnic groups, with those of Indians being nearer to the frequency in Caucasians. In general, the distribution of GDH phenotypes was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all three ethnic groups studied.

  14. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 3 (GDH3) of Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a combined effect of nitrogen and cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Laura; Degola, Francesca; Polverini, Eugenia; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Dubois, Frédéric; Hirel, Bertrand; Restivo, Francesco Maria

    2013-12-01

    In higher plants, NAD(H)-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is an abundant enzyme that exists in different isoenzymic forms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three genes (Gdh1, Gdh2 and Gdh3) encode three different GDH subunits (β, α and γ) that randomly associate to form a complex array of homo- and heterohexamers. The modification of the GDH isoenzyme pattern and its regulation was studied during the development of A. thaliana in the gdh1, gdh2 single mutants and the gdh1-2 double mutant, with particular emphasis on GDH3. Investigations showed that the GDH3 isoenzyme could not be detected in closely related Arabidopsis species. The induction and regulation of GDH3 activity in the leaves and roots was investigated following nitrogen deprivation in the presence or absence of sucrose or kinetin. These experiments indicate that GDH3 is likely to play an important role during senescence and nutrient remobilization.

  15. Organ-specific expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) subunits in yellow lupine.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Dabert, Mirosława; Nowak, Witold

    2011-07-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.2-4) is present in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus cv. Juno) in many isoforms. The number and banding pattern of isoenzymes varies with respect to plant organ and developmental stage. To better understand the complex nature of GDH regulation in plants, the levels of GDH transcripts, enzyme activity and isoenzyme patterns in germinating seeds and roots of yellow lupine were examined. The analysis of GDH cDNA sequences in lupine revealed three mRNA types, of which two encoded the β-GDH subunit and one encoded the α-GDH subunit (corresponding to the GDH1(GDH3) and GDH2 genes, respectively). The relative expression of GDH1 and GDH2 genes was analyzed in various lupine organs by using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results indicate that different mRNA types were differently regulated depending on organ type. Although both genes appeared to be ubiquitously expressed in all lupine tissues, the GDH1 transcripts evidently predominated over those of GDH2. Immunochemical analyses confirmed that, during embryo development, varied expression of two GDH subunits takes place. The α-GDH subunit (43kDa) predominated in the early stages of germinating seeds, while the β-GDH subunit (44kDa) was the only GDH polypeptide present in lupine roots. These results firmly support the hypothesis that isoenzyme variability of GDH in yellow lupine is associated with the varied expression of α and β subunits into the complexes of hexameric GDH forms. The presence of several isogenes of GDH in yellow lupine may explain the high number (over 20) of its molecular forms in germinating lupine.

  16. Cellulose production from glucose using a glucose dehydrogenase gene (gdh)-deficient mutant of Gluconacetobacter xylinus and its use for bioconversion of sweet potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Toru; Takamine, Kazunori; Kitazato, Masaya; Morita, Tetsuya; Naritomi, Takaaki; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    A gene fragment encoding a putative pyrroloquinoline quinone glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ GDH) was cloned from a bacterial cellulose (BC)-forming acetic acid bacterium, Gluconacetobacter xylinus (=Acetobacter xylinum) strain BPR 2001, which was isolated as a high BC producer when using fructose as the carbon source. A GDH-deficient mutant of strain BPR 2001, namely GD-I, was then generated via gene disruption using the cloned gene fragment. Strain GD-I produced no gluconic acid but produced 4.1 g.l(-1) of BC aerobically in medium containing glucose as the carbon source. The ability of strain GD-I to convert glucose to BC was approximately 1.7-fold higher than that of the wild type. Strain GD-I was also able to produce 5.0 g.l(-1) of BC from a saccharified solution, which was derived from sweet potato pulp by enzymatic saccharification. Supplementation of ethanol during aerobic cultivation further increased the concentration of BC produced by strain GD-I to 7.0 g.l(-1). The rate of conversion from glucose to BC under these cultivation conditions was equivalent to that of strain BPR 2001 cultivated with fructose as the carbon source.

  17. Giardia duodenalis genotypes in domestic and wild animals from Romania identified by PCR-RFLP targeting the gdh gene.

    PubMed

    Adriana, Gyӧrke; Zsuzsa, Kalmár; Mirabela Oana, Dumitrache; Mircea, Gherman Călin; Viorica, Mircean

    2016-02-15

    Sixty Giardia duodenalis isolates from domestic (n=49) and wild (n=11) animals (dogs, cats, deers, wolves, raccoon dog and muskrat) were analysed by PCR-RFLP at glutamate dehydrogenase locus (gdh). The isolates were obtained from positive feces samples for Giardia cysts analysed by flotation technique with saturated sodium chloride solution (specific gravity 1.28). Three G. duodenalis genotypes were identified: C (10/60; 16.7%); D (42/60; 70.0%); and E (7/60; 11.7%). In dogs all three genotypes were found, with the following prevalences: 76.9% genotype D (30/39); 23.1% C (9/39); 2.6% genotype E (1/39). One dog was co-infected with C and D genotypes. In cats we identified only G. duodenalis genotype D. Wolves and raccoon dog harbored infection with G. duodenalis genotype D, deers with E type and muskrat C type. This is the first study regarding genotyping of G. duodenalis in cats and wild animals from Romania. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of assemblages E in roe deers; assemblage C in wolves and muskrat; and assemblage D in raccoon dog. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Mutations that disrupt either the pqq or the gdh gene of Rahnella aquatilis abolish the production of an antibacterial substance and result in reduced biological control of grapevine crown gall.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan Bin; Li, Jinyun; Li, Lei; Chen, Fan; Wu, Wenliang; Wang, Jianhui; Wang, Huimin

    2009-11-01

    Rahnella aquatilis HX2, a biocontrol agent for grapevine crown gall caused by Agrobacterium vitis, produces an antibacterial substance that inhibits the growth of A. vitis in vitro. In this study, we show that MH15 and MH16, two Tn5-induced mutants of HX2, have lost their abilities to inhibit A. vitis and have reduced biocontrol activities; they grow in logarithmic phase at a rate similar to that of the wild type and have single Tn5 insertions. They are also impaired in producing pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) or glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). Complementation of MH15 and MH16 with cosmid clones of CP465 and CP104 from an HX2 DNA library restored the antibiosis, biocontrol, and PQQ or GDH production phenotypes. A 6.7-kb BamHI fragment from CP465 that fully restored the MH15-affected phenotypes was cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis of the mutated DNA region resulted in the identification of seven open reading frames (ORFs), six of which share significant homology with PQQ-synthesizing genes in other bacteria, designated pqqA through pqqF. Meanwhile, A 5.5-kb PstI fragment from CP104 fully complemented the MH16 mutant and contained a single ORF highly similar to that of genes coding for GDHs. An in-frame gdh deletion mutant has the same phenotypes as the Tn5 mutant of MH16. Complementation of both deletion and Tn5 gdh mutants restored the affected phenotypes to wild-type levels. Our results suggest that an antibacterial substance plays a role in biocontrol of A. vitis by HX2.

  19. Mutations That Disrupt Either the pqq or the gdh Gene of Rahnella aquatilis Abolish the Production of an Antibacterial Substance and Result in Reduced Biological Control of Grapevine Crown Gall▿

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan Bin; Li, Jinyun; Li, Lei; Chen, Fan; Wu, Wenliang; Wang, Jianhui; Wang, Huimin

    2009-01-01

    Rahnella aquatilis HX2, a biocontrol agent for grapevine crown gall caused by Agrobacterium vitis, produces an antibacterial substance that inhibits the growth of A. vitis in vitro. In this study, we show that MH15 and MH16, two Tn5-induced mutants of HX2, have lost their abilities to inhibit A. vitis and have reduced biocontrol activities; they grow in logarithmic phase at a rate similar to that of the wild type and have single Tn5 insertions. They are also impaired in producing pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) or glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). Complementation of MH15 and MH16 with cosmid clones of CP465 and CP104 from an HX2 DNA library restored the antibiosis, biocontrol, and PQQ or GDH production phenotypes. A 6.7-kb BamHI fragment from CP465 that fully restored the MH15-affected phenotypes was cloned and sequenced. Sequence analysis of the mutated DNA region resulted in the identification of seven open reading frames (ORFs), six of which share significant homology with PQQ-synthesizing genes in other bacteria, designated pqqA through pqqF. Meanwhile, A 5.5-kb PstI fragment from CP104 fully complemented the MH16 mutant and contained a single ORF highly similar to that of genes coding for GDHs. An in-frame gdh deletion mutant has the same phenotypes as the Tn5 mutant of MH16. Complementation of both deletion and Tn5 gdh mutants restored the affected phenotypes to wild-type levels. Our results suggest that an antibacterial substance plays a role in biocontrol of A. vitis by HX2. PMID:19734331

  20. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  1. Detection and characterisation of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in Hungarian raw, surface and sewage water samples by IFT, PCR and sequence analysis of the SSUrRNA and GDH genes.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, Judit; Karanis, Panagiotis; Domokos, Klarissza; Törökné, Andrea; Márialigeti, Károly

    2008-10-01

    We investigated the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species and analysed the genotypes in 36 samples collected from different water sources and various geographic areas in Hungary. Samples were collected from drinking water and sewage treatment plants and from the recreation area of Lake Balaton. The (oo)cysts were purified according to the US EPA 1623 method and they were detected by immunofluorescence test (IFT). Genomic DNA was extracted from all samples and then the GDH target gene for Giardia and the SSUrDNA for both Giardia and for Cryptosporidium species were amplified by PCR. 24 out of 36 samples (67%) were Giardia positive and 15 (42%) were Cryptosporidium positive by IFT. PCR confirmed that 13 out of 36 samples (36%) were Giardia positive and 10 (28%) contained Cryptosporidium. Twelve Giardia and two Cryptosporidium PCR products were successfully sequenced. In seven samples G. lamblia Assemblage A and in one sample Assemblage B and in four cases Assemblages A and B have been found. In one sample C. parvum and in the other separate sample C. meleagridis were detected. Sequence analysis revealed a new subtype of G. duodenalis complex, clustered close to the Assemblage A group. This study provides the first report on simultaneous detection and genotyping of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium species from water supplies in Hungary.

  2. Hypoxia promotes mitochondrial glutamine metabolism through HIF1α-GDH pathway in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zi-Feng; Wang, Min; Xu, Jian-Lin; Ning, Ya-Jing

    2017-01-29

    Drug-resistance is common in human lung cancer therapy. Hypoxia remarkably contributes to drug-resistance in lung cancer but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia-induced glutamine metabolism is involved in drug resistance in lung cancer cells. Hypoxia increases glutamine up-take, glutamate to α-ketoglutarate flux and the generation of ATP in lung cancer cells by up-regulating the expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). Hypoxia-induced expression of GDH relies on the up-regulation of HIF1α but not HIF2α. HIF1α binds the promoter of GDH and promotes the transcription of GDH gene in lung cancer cells. Finally, we show that GDH represses cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis and repression of colony formation, indicating that GDH contributes to drug-resistance in lung cancer cells. In conclusion, HIF1α-GDH pathway regulates glutamine metabolism and ATP production upon hypoxia stress and contributes to drug-resistance in human lung cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Control of gdhR Expression in Neisseria gonorrhoeae via Autoregulation and a Master Repressor (MtrR) of a Drug Efflux Pump Operon

    PubMed Central

    Rouquette-Loughlin, Corinne E.; Zalucki, Yaramah M.; Dhulipala, Vijaya L.; Balthazar, Jacqueline T.; Doyle, Raúl G.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Begum, Afrin A.; Raterman, Erica L.; Jerse, Ann E.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The MtrCDE efflux pump of Neisseria gonorrhoeae contributes to gonococcal resistance to a number of antibiotics used previously or currently in treatment of gonorrhea, as well as to host-derived antimicrobials that participate in innate defense. Overexpression of the MtrCDE efflux pump increases gonococcal survival and fitness during experimental lower genital tract infection of female mice. Transcription of mtrCDE can be repressed by the DNA-binding protein MtrR, which also acts as a global regulator of genes involved in important metabolic, physiologic, or regulatory processes. Here, we investigated whether a gene downstream of mtrCDE, previously annotated gdhR in Neisseria meningitidis, is a target for regulation by MtrR. In meningococci, GdhR serves as a regulator of genes involved in glucose catabolism, amino acid transport, and biosynthesis, including gdhA, which encodes an l-glutamate dehydrogenase and is located next to gdhR but is transcriptionally divergent. We report here that in N. gonorrhoeae, expression of gdhR is subject to autoregulation by GdhR and direct repression by MtrR. Importantly, loss of GdhR significantly increased gonococcal fitness compared to a complemented mutant strain during experimental murine infection. Interestingly, loss of GdhR did not influence expression of gdhA, as reported for meningococci. This variance is most likely due to differences in promoter localization and utilization between gonococci and meningococci. We propose that transcriptional control of gonococcal genes through the action of MtrR and GdhR contributes to fitness of N. gonorrhoeae during infection. PMID:28400529

  4. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  5. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis.

  6. TamA interacts with LeuB, the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Leu3p, to regulate gdhA expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Polotnianka, R; Monahan, B J; Hynes, M J; Davis, M A

    2004-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that expression of the gdhA gene, encoding NADP-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH), in Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by the major nitrogen regulatory protein AreA and its co-activator TamA. We show here that loss of TamA function has a more severe effect on the levels of gdhA expression than loss of AreA function. Using TamA as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified a second protein that interacts with TamA. Sequencing analysis and functional studies have shown that this protein, designated LeuB, is a transcriptional activator with similar function to the homologous Leu3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Inactivation of leuB revealed that this gene is involved in the regulation of gdhA, and an areA; leuB double mutant was shown to have similar NADP-GDH levels to a tamA single mutant. The requirement for TamA function to promote gdhA expression is likely to be due to its dual interaction with AreA and LeuB.

  7. Arabidopsis mutant analysis and gene regulation define a nonredundant role for glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen assimilation.

    PubMed

    Melo-Oliveira, R; Oliveira, I C; Coruzzi, G M

    1996-05-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is ubiquitous to all organisms, yet its role in higher plants remains enigmatic. To better understand the role of GDH in plant nitrogen metabolism, we have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant (gdh1-1) defective in one of two GDH gene products and have studied GDH1 gene expression. GDH1 mRNA accumulates to highest levels in dark-adapted or sucrose-starved plants, and light or sucrose treatment each repress GDH1 mRNA accumulation. These results suggest that the GDH1 gene product functions in the direction of glutamate catabolism under carbon-limiting conditions. Low levels of GDH1 mRNA present in leaves of light-grown plants can be induced by exogenously supplied ammonia. Under such conditions of carbon and ammonia excess, GDH1 may function in the direction of glutamate biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis gdh-deficient mutant allele gdh1-1 cosegregates with the GDH1 gene and behaves as a recessive mutation. The gdh1-1 mutant displays a conditional phenotype in that seedling growth is specifically retarded on media containing exogenously supplied inorganic nitrogen. These results suggest that GDH1 plays a nonredundant role in ammonia assimilation under conditions of inorganic nitrogen excess. This notion is further supported by the fact that the levels of mRNA for GDH1 and chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) are reciprocally regulated by light.

  8. Characterization of five partial deletions of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Youssoufian, H.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Aronis, S.; Tsiftis, G.; Phillips, D.G.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.

    1987-06-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked disorder of coagulation caused by a deficiency of factor VIII. By using cloned DNA probes, the authors have characterized the following five different partial deletions of the factor VIII gene from a panel of 83 patients with hemophilia A: (i) a 7-kilobase (kb) deletion that eliminates exon 6; (ii) a 2.5-kb deletion that eliminates 5' sequences of exon 14; (iii) a deletion of at least 7 kb that eliminates exons 24 and 25; (iv) a deletion of at least 16 kb that eliminates exons 23-25; and (v) a 5.5-kb deletion that eliminates exon 22. The first four deletions are associated with severe hemophilia A. By contrast, the last deletion is associated with moderate disease, possibly because of in-frame splicing from adjacent exons. None of those patients with partial gene deletions had circulating inhibitors to factor VIII. One deletion occurred de novo in a germ cell of the maternal grandmother, while a second deletion occurred in a germ cell of the maternal grandfather. These observations demonstrate that de novo deletions of X-linked genes can occur in either male or female gametes.

  9. Partial AUC maximization for essential gene prediction using genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kyu-Baek; Ha, Beom-Yong; Ju, Sanghun; Kim, Sangsoo

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genes indispensable for an organism's life and their characteristics is one of the central questions in current biological research, and hence it would be helpful to develop computational approaches towards the prediction of essential genes. The performance of a predictor is usually measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). We propose a novel method by implementing genetic algorithms to maximize the partial AUC that is restricted to a specific interval of lower false positive rate (FPR), the region relevant to follow-up experimental validation. Our predictor uses various features based on sequence information, protein-protein interaction network topology, and gene expression profiles. A feature selection wrapper was developed to alleviate the over-fitting problem and to weigh each feature's relevance to prediction. We evaluated our method using the proteome of budding yeast. Our implementation of genetic algorithms maximizing the partial AUC below 0.05 or 0.10 of FPR outperformed other popular classification methods.

  10. Molecular test to determine toxigenic capabilities in GDH-positive, toxin-negative samples: evaluation of the Portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay.

    PubMed

    Finch, L S; Duncan, C M

    2013-01-01

    New recommendations for testing and reporting of Clostridium difficile were introduced in the NHS in 2012. These guidelines have improved identification of potential C. difficile infection (CDI) cases, but questions remain around the management of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-positive, toxin-negative patients. This study aims to assess the introduction of the Portrait C. difficile assay as the third step to identify the presence of the toxigenic C. difficile B (tcdB) gene and thus determine toxigenic capability. Stool samples with a GDH-positive, toxin-negative result were tested using the Portrait analyser to detect the presence of tcdB. A retrospective evaluation was performed, assessing the clinical course of patients who were isolated as a result of the current algorithm using GDH enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and toxin EIA. Of the stool samples tested, 40% carried the tcdB gene. Four tcdB-positive stool samples initially toxin A/B-negative subsequently became positive. Thirteen patients were isolated, four of which did not have the tcdB gene. The total time to 'process' a positive CDI case was 102 hours and cost pounds 592. The additional time and cost of incorporating the Portrait toxigenic C. difficile assay was 105-115 minutes and pounds 46.48 to pounds 51.88. This study confirms that toxigenic capabilities in GDH-positive, toxin-negative specimens can facilitate effective treatment and infection prevention, and results show there is potential value in repeat toxin testing.

  11. GDH1 expression is regulated by GLN3, GCN4, and HAP4 under respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Riego, Lina; Avendaño, Amaranta; DeLuna, Alexander; Rodríguez, Ekaterina; González, Alicia

    2002-04-26

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes encoded by GDH1 and GDH3 catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. In this work we analyzed GDH1 transcriptional regulation, in order to deepen the studies in regard to its physiological role. Our results indicate that: (i) GDH1 expression is strictly controlled in ethanol-grown cultures, constituting a fine-tuning mechanism that modulates the abundance of Gdh1p monomers under this condition, (ii) GDH1 expression is controlled by transcriptional activators that have been considered as exclusive of either nitrogen (Gln3p and Gcn4p) or carbon metabolism (HAP complex), and (iii) chromatin remodeling complexes play a role in GDH1 expression; ADA2 and ADA3 up-regulated GDH1 expression on ethanol, while that on glucose was ADA3-dependent. SPT3 and SNF2 activated GDH1 expression on either carbon source whereas GCN5 played no role in any condition tested. The above described combinatorial control results in a refined mechanism that coordinates carbon and nitrogen utilization.

  12. Partial replication of two rumination-related candidate gene studies.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Carol A; Clifford, Sierra; Moore, Mollie N; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Goldsmith, H Hill

    2017-08-01

    Two recent papers associated candidate genes with brooding rumination, a possible cognitive endophenotype for depression, in children ages 8-14 years. Stone et al. reported that BDNF val66met polymorphism predicted brooding in adolescence. Woody et al. reported that children carrying at least one copy of a CRHR1 TAT haplotype reported less brooding than their peers in the presence of maternal depression. We attempted to replicate and extend these findings in a sample of twins aged 12-16 years. We analyzed the BDNF val66met (rs6265) polymorphism and two (rs242924 and rs7209436) out of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that Woody et al. used to create a CRHR1 haplotype. We controlled for maternal history of depression and clustering within families. Unlike Stone et al., we found higher brooding among BDNF Met carriers. This main effect was qualified by an interaction with pubertal status, with the effect driven by more physically mature participants. Similar to Woody et al., we found an interaction between CRHR1 SNPs and maternal depression, with the homozygous minor genotype acting as a protective factor against brooding in the presence of maternal depression. Findings provide partial support for the influence of candidate genes in two environmentally sensitive systems on brooding.

  13. Erroneously elevated glucose values due to maltose interference in mutant glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (mutant GDH-PQQ) based glucometer.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Patra, Shinjan; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2017-05-12

    Currently available glucose test strip enzymes include glucose oxidase (GOD) and glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). In GDH-based glucometers, glucose oxidation can be catalysed by different cofactors: nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (GDH-NAD), flavin adenine dinucleotide (GDH-FAD), pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ) and mutant GDH-PQQ. GOD-based and GDH-NAD-based glucometers are substrate-specific and do not react with sugars other than glucose. GDH-FAD reacts with xylose only in addition to glucose. GDH-PQQ is not glucose-specific; in addition to glucose, it reacts with different other sugars and produces falsely high values of capillary glucose in the presence of such substances. There are reports of several deaths associated with usage of GDH-PQQ-based test strips. A modified form of GDH-PQQ, the so-called mutant GDH-PQQ, is supposedly free from such interferences. In this article spuriously high glucose values due to maltose interference in a glucometer using the mutant GDH-PQQ chemistry are being reported. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  15. Characterization of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene and its regulation in a euryhaline copepod.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S; Burton, Ronald S

    2003-08-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays a key role in the metabolism of free amino acids (FAA) in crustaceans and other metazoans. Glutamate synthesized by GDH via reductive amination is the amino group donor for alanine synthesis and the precursor required for proline synthesis. Since both proline and alanine are important intracellular osmolytes in many marine invertebrates, GDH has been widely implicated as playing a central role in response to hyperosmotic stress in these organisms. We have isolated the gene encoding a GDH homolog from the euryhaline copepod Tigriopus californicus and examined the regulation of GDH under salinity stress. The gene encodes a protein of 557 residues with 76% amino acid identity with Drosophila melanogaster GDH. The gene encodes an N-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence peptide. Only a single intron of 71 bp was found in the GDH gene in T. californicus when genomic sequences and cDNA sequences were compared. The levels of GDH mRNA do not increase during hyperosmotic stress in this copepod. The effects of salt and hyperosmotic stress on GDH enzyme activity were also investigated. GDH activities decrease with increasing NaCl concentrations in in vitro enzyme assays, while live animals exposed to hyperosmotic stress showed no change in GDH enzyme activities. Combined, these results indicate that GDH transcription and enzyme activity do not appear to function in the regulation of alanine and proline accumulation during hyperosmotic stress in T. californicus. The manner in which this important physiological process is regulated remains unknown.

  16. Characterization and expression of NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Turano, F J; Thakkar, S S; Fang, T; Weisemann, J M

    1997-04-01

    Two distinct cDNA clones encoding NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD[H]-GDH) in Arabidopsis thaliana were identified and sequenced. The genes corresponding to these cDNA clones were designated GDH1 and GDH2. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences suggest that both gene products contain putative mitochondrial transit polypeptides and NAD(H)- and alpha-ketoglutarate-binding domains. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the mitochondrial location of the NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. In addition, a putative EF-hand loop, shown to be associated with Ca2+ binding, was identified in the GDH2 gene product but not in the GDH1 gene product. GDH1 encodes a 43.0-kD polypeptide, designated alpha, and GDH2 encodes a 42.5-kD polypeptide, designated beta. The two subunits combine in different ratios to form seven NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. The slowest-migrating isoenzyme in a native gel, GDH1, is a homohexamer composed of alpha subunits, and the fastest-migrating isoenzyme, GDH7, is a homohexamer composed of beta subunits. GDH isoenzymes 2 through 6 are heterohexamers composed of different ratios of alpha and beta subunits. NAD(H)-GDH isoenzyme patterns varied among different plant organs and in leaves of plants irrigated with different nitrogen sources or subjected to darkness for 4 d. Conversely, there were little or no measurable changes in isoenzyme patterns in roots of plants treated with different nitrogen sources. In most instances, changes in isoenzyme patterns were correlated with relative differences in the level of alpha and beta subunits. Likewise, the relative difference in the level of alpha or beta subunits was correlated with changes in the level of GDH1 or GDH2 transcript detected in each sample, suggesting that NAD(H)-GDH activity is controlled at least in part at the transcriptional level.

  17. The GDH-M øller-Polarimeter at ELSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speckner, T.; Anton, G.; von Drachenfels, W.; Frommberger, F.; Helbing, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Kiel, B.; Michel, T.; Naumann, J.; Zeitler, G.

    2004-03-01

    The design, setup and performance of a new two-arm coincidence, large acceptance and variable energy M øller-Polarimeter used within the GDH-Experiment at the Electron Stretcher Accelerator Facility (ELSA) in Bonn is described. The polarimeter employs a dipole magnetic spectrometer and lead glass detectors to detect both M øller scattered electrons in coincidence. A target system consisting of three different pairs of coils provides the magnetic field to magnetize Vacoflux foils in three different space orientations. This allows to measure all beam polarization components. The variable geometry of the detector system enables adjustments to the kinematic conditions between 0.8 and 3.5 GeV electron beam energy. A large center of mass acceptance of θ¯=[65°;115°] provides the measurement of the longitudinal electron beam polarization, for example at 1.9 GeV with a statistical precision of 1% within 10 min ( I e≈500 pA). Unprecedented systematic studies of M øller polarimetry as well as direct measurements of the transversal beam polarization components have been performed with this device.

  18. Coexpression of Lactobacillus brevis ADH with GDH or G6PDH in Arxula adeninivorans for the synthesis of 1-(R)-phenylethanol.

    PubMed

    Rauter, Marion; Prokoph, Alexandra; Kasprzak, Jakub; Becker, Karin; Baronian, Keith; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard; Vorbrodt, H- Matthias

    2015-06-01

    The yeast Arxula adeninivorans was used for the overexpression of an ADH gene of Lactobacillus brevis coding for (R)-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (LbADH) to synthesise enantiomerically pure 1-(R)-phenylethanol. Glucose dehydrogenase gene from Bacillus megaterium (BmGDH) or glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of Bacillus pumilus (BpG6PDH) were coexpressed in Arxula to regenerate the cofactor NADPH by oxidising glucose or glucose 6-phosphate. The yeast strain expressing LbADH and BpG6PDH produced 5200 U l(-1) ADH and 370 U l(-1) G6PDH activity, whereas the strain expressing LbADH and BmGDH produced 2700 U l(-1) ADH and 170 U l(-1) GDH activity. However, the crude extract of both strains reduced 40 mM acetophenone to pure 1-(R)-phenylethanol with an enantiomeric excess (ee) of >99 % in 60 min without detectable by-products. An increase in yield was achieved using immobilised crude extracts (IEs), Triton X-100 permeabilised cells (PCs) and permeabilised immobilised cells (PICs) with PICs being most stable with GDH regeneration over 52 cycles. Even though the activity and synthesis rate of 1-(R)-phenylethanol with the BpG6PDH and LbADH coexpressing strain was higher, the BmGDH-LbADH strain was more stable over successive reaction cycles. This, combined with its higher total turnover number (TTN) of 391 mol product per mole NADP(+), makes it the preferred strain for continuous reaction systems. The initial non-optimised semi-continuous reaction produced 9.74 g l(-1) day(-1) or 406 g kg(-1) dry cell weight (dcw) day(-1) isolated 1-(R)-phenylethanol with an ee of 100 % and a TTN of 206 mol product per mole NADP(+). In conclusion, A. adeninivorans is a promising host for LbADH and BpG6PDH or BmGDH production and offers a simple method for the production of enantiomerically pure alcohols.

  19. Spatio-temporal variability in the GDH activity to ammonium excretion ratio in epipelagic marine zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Urruzola, I.; Osma, N.; Packard, T. T.; Maldonado, F.; Gómez, M.

    2016-11-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activities have been widely used in oceanographic research as an index of in situ NH4+ excretion rates (RNH4+) in zooplankton. Here we study the variability in the relationship between the enzymatic rates and the actual rates measured in epipelagic marine zooplankton between several marine ecosystems. Although both measures were significantly correlated across zooplankton assemblages, the regression models yielded different GDH/RNH4+ ratios across ecosystems. Accordingly, the error of a general equation increased up to ±42.5 % when regressing all our data together. Aside from possible interspecific differences, some of the variability was explained by the unequal allometric relation that each rate maintained with protein. Scaling exponents were 1.38 for GDH activities and 0.87 for RNH4+, which would induce uncertainties in the GDH/RNH4+ ratios when organisms with different sizes were considered. Nevertheless, the main factor causing divergence between GDH activities and RNH4+ was the potential prey availability. We compared the excretory metabolism of the zooplankton community at different productivity periods in waters off Gran Canaria, and observed an important decrease in the RNH4+ during stratification. A similar decrease was found in the internal pool of glutamate, which may be critical in the regulation of in vivo rates. Strengthening our knowledge of the relationship between GDH activities and the RNH4+ will lead to more meaningful predictions of phytoplankton regeneration and community nitrogen fluxes across large spatial scales.

  20. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides WCFur3 partial 16S rRNA gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study used a partial 535 base pair 16S rRNA gene sequence to identify a bacterial isolate. Fatty acid profiles are consistent with the 16S rRNA gene sequence identification of this bacterium. The isolate was obtained from a compost bin in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. The 16S rRNA gene sequen...

  1. GDH3 encodes a glutamate dehydrogenase isozyme, a previously unrecognized route for glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, A; Deluna, A; Olivera, H; Valenzuela, L; Gonzalez, A

    1997-09-01

    It has been considered that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like many other microorganisms, synthesizes glutamate through the action of NADP+-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GDH), encoded by GDH1, or through the combined action of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase (GOGAT), encoded by GLN1 and GLT1, respectively. A double mutant of S. cerevisiae lacking NADP+-GDH and GOGAT activities was constructed. This strain was able to grow on ammonium as the sole nitrogen source and thus to synthesize glutamate through an alternative pathway. A computer search for similarities between the GDH1 nucleotide sequence and the complete yeast genome was carried out. In addition to identifying its cognate sequence at chromosome XIV, the search found that GDH1 showed high identity with a previously recognized open reading frame (GDH3) of chromosome I. Triple mutants impaired in GDH1, GLT1, and GDH3 were obtained. These were strict glutamate auxotrophs. Our results indicate that GDH3 plays a significant physiological role, providing glutamate when GDH1 and GLT1 are impaired. This is the first example of a microorganism possessing three pathways for glutamate biosynthesis.

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  3. Involvement of GDH3-encoded NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in yeast cell resistance to stress-induced apoptosis in stationary phase cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Joo; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kang, Hong Yong; Kim, Hye-Rim; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-12-28

    Glutamate metabolism is linked to a number of fundamental metabolic pathways such as amino acid metabolism, the TCA cycle, and glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glutamate is synthesized from α-ketoglutarate by two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDH) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3. Here, we report the relationship between the function of the NADP-GDH and stress-induced apoptosis. Gdh3-null cells showed accelerated chronological aging and hypersusceptibility to thermal and oxidative stress during stationary phase. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Gdh3-null strains displayed a rapid loss in viability associated with typical apoptotic hallmarks, i.e. reactive oxygen species accumulation, nuclear fragmentation, DNA breakage, and phosphatidylserine translocation. In addition, Gdh3-null cells, but not Gdh1-null cells, had a higher tendency toward GSH depletion and subsequent reactive oxygen species accumulation than did WT cells. GSH depletion was rescued by exogenous GSH or glutamate. The hypersusceptibility of stationary phase Gdh3-null cells to stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed by deletion of GDH2. Promoter swapping and site-directed mutagenesis of GDH1 and GDH3 indicated that the necessity of GDH3 for the resistance to stress-induced apoptosis and chronological aging is due to the stationary phase-specific expression of GDH3 and concurrent degradation of Gdh1 in which the Lys-426 residue plays an essential role.

  4. Involvement of GDH3-encoded NADP+-dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Yeast Cell Resistance to Stress-induced Apoptosis in Stationary Phase Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Joo; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kang, Hong Yong; Kim, Hye-Rim; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate metabolism is linked to a number of fundamental metabolic pathways such as amino acid metabolism, the TCA cycle, and glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glutamate is synthesized from α-ketoglutarate by two NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDH) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3. Here, we report the relationship between the function of the NADP-GDH and stress-induced apoptosis. Gdh3-null cells showed accelerated chronological aging and hypersusceptibility to thermal and oxidative stress during stationary phase. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Gdh3-null strains displayed a rapid loss in viability associated with typical apoptotic hallmarks, i.e. reactive oxygen species accumulation, nuclear fragmentation, DNA breakage, and phosphatidylserine translocation. In addition, Gdh3-null cells, but not Gdh1-null cells, had a higher tendency toward GSH depletion and subsequent reactive oxygen species accumulation than did WT cells. GSH depletion was rescued by exogenous GSH or glutamate. The hypersusceptibility of stationary phase Gdh3-null cells to stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed by deletion of GDH2. Promoter swapping and site-directed mutagenesis of GDH1 and GDH3 indicated that the necessity of GDH3 for the resistance to stress-induced apoptosis and chronological aging is due to the stationary phase-specific expression of GDH3 and concurrent degradation of Gdh1 in which the Lys-426 residue plays an essential role. PMID:23105103

  5. A note on the change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, A.

    1996-02-01

    The change in gene frequency of a selected allele in partial full-sib mating populations was analyzed. The implications of these papers is important in terms of the fixation probability of genes because, for the same equilibrium inbreeding coefficient, fixation rates of mutant genes would be larger for partial full-sib mating than for partial selfing. 4 refs.

  6. Sequence and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs isolated by functional complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Truong, H N; Caboche, M; Daniel-Vedele, F

    1997-06-30

    We have isolated two Arabidopsis thaliana cDNAs by complementation of a yeast gln3 gdh1 strain that is affected in the regulation of nitrogen metabolism. The two clones (RGA1 and RGA2) are homologous to each other and to the SCARECROW (SCR) gene that is involved in regulating an asymmetric cell division in plants. RGA1, RGA2 and SCR share several structural features and may define a new family of genes. RGA1 and RGA2 have been mapped, respectively, to chromosome II and I, and their expression in plant is constitutive.

  7. Isolation and partial characterization of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, D A

    1980-01-01

    The alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH; alcohol: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) gene (Adh) of Drosophila melanogaster was isolated by utilizing a mutant strain in which the Adh locus is deleted. Adult RNA from wild-type flies was enriched in ADH sequences by gel electrophoresis and then used to prepare labeled cDNA for screening a bacteriophage lambda library of genomic Drosophila DNA. Of the clones that hybridized in the initial screen, one clone was identified that hybridized with labeled cDNA prepared from a wild-type Drosophila strain but did not hybridize with cDNA prepared from an Adh deletion strain. This clone was shown to contain ADH structural gene sequences by three criteria: in situ hybridization, in vitro translation of mRNA selected by hybridization to the cloned DNA, and comparison of the ADH protein sequence with a nucleotide sequence derived from the cloned DNA. Comparison of the restriction site maps from clones of three different wild-type Drosophila strains revealed the presence of a 200-nucleotide sequence in one strain that was absent from the other two strains. The ADH mRNA sequences were located within the cloned DNA by hybridization mapping experiments. Two intervening sequences were identified within Adh by S1 nuclease mapping experiments. Images PMID:6777776

  8. GDH-Dependent Glutamate Oxidation in the Brain Dictates Peripheral Energy Substrate Distribution.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Melis; Frigerio, Francesca; Migrenne, Stephanie; Martin-Levilain, Juliette; Skytt, Dorte M; Pajecka, Kamilla; Martin-del-Rio, Rafael; Gruetter, Rolf; Tamarit-Rodriguez, Jorge; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Magnan, Christophe; Maechler, Pierre

    2015-10-13

    Glucose, the main energy substrate used in the CNS, is continuously supplied by the periphery. Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, is foreseen as a complementary energy contributor in the brain. In particular, astrocytes actively take up glutamate and may use it through oxidative glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. Here, we investigated the significance of glutamate as energy substrate for the brain. Upon glutamate exposure, astrocytes generated ATP in a GDH-dependent way. The observed lack of glutamate oxidation in brain-specific GDH null CnsGlud1(-/-) mice resulted in a central energy-deprivation state with increased ADP/ATP ratios and phospho-AMPK in the hypothalamus. This induced changes in the autonomous nervous system balance, with increased sympathetic activity promoting hepatic glucose production and mobilization of substrates reshaping peripheral energy stores. Our data reveal the importance of glutamate as necessary energy substrate for the brain and the role of central GDH in the regulation of whole-body energy homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Statistical completion of a partially identified graph with applications for the estimation of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donghyeon; Son, Won; Lim, Johan; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    We study the estimation of a Gaussian graphical model whose dependent structures are partially identified. In a Gaussian graphical model, an off-diagonal zero entry in the concentration matrix (the inverse covariance matrix) implies the conditional independence of two corresponding variables, given all other variables. A number of methods have been proposed to estimate a sparse large-scale Gaussian graphical model or, equivalently, a sparse large-scale concentration matrix. In practice, the graph structure to be estimated is often partially identified by other sources or a pre-screening. In this paper, we propose a simple modification of existing methods to take into account this information in the estimation. We show that the partially identified dependent structure reduces the error in estimating the dependent structure. We apply the proposed method to estimating the gene regulatory network from lung cancer data, where protein–protein interactions are partially identified from the human protein reference database. The application shows that proposed method identified many important cancer genes as hub genes in the constructed lung cancer network. In addition, we validated the prognostic importance of a newly identified cancer gene, PTPN13, in four independent lung cancer datasets. The results indicate that the proposed method could facilitate studying underlying lung cancer mechanisms and identifying reliable biomarkers for lung cancer prognosis. PMID:25837438

  10. Rehabilitation outcomes of older patients at 6 months follow-up after discharged from a geriatric day hospital (GDH).

    PubMed

    Luk, James Ka Hay; Chan, Charles Fei

    2011-01-01

    Whether rehabilitation outcome can be maintained after discharged from GDH has not been thoroughly investigated. This study was conducted to examine the rehabilitation outcome and its predictors 6 months after discharged from GDH. We studied 418 patients attended a GDH in Hong Kong. All of them had post-6-month assessment. Cognitive status was assessed with Cantonese version of mini-mental state examination (C-MMSE). Functional independence measure (FIM) upon GDH admission (FIM-adm), discharge (FIM-dis) and 6 months after discharge (FIM-p6m) were measured. FIM gain was FIM-dis-FIM-adm while FIM efficiency was FIM gain divided by number of GDH visits. Of the study pool, 164 (39.2%) showed a drop of FIM-p6m. There was a significant drop of FIM-p6m as compared with FIM-dis (p<0.001). However, the FIM-p6m remained significantly higher than FIM-adm (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that FIM-dis was a negative predictor (p<0.001) while Parkinsonism was a positive predictor for drop of FIM-p6m (p=0.008). A proportion of functional gain can still be maintained 6 months after discharged from GDH. More studies are needed to look for strategies in maintaining functional gain in GDH discharged patients, especially those with Parkinsonism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Identification of homeobox genes expressed during the process of rat liver regeneration after partial hapatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Ikuko; Ogasawara, Naotake; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Sakoyama, Yasuhiko

    1996-02-01

    Homeobox (HBox) genes are well-known to be involved in development and differentiation. To ascertain a role of HBox genes in the process of liver regeneration, we identified HBox genes expressed at various times after partial hepatectomy in rats (at 0 hr, 1 hr, 2 days, and 4 days) by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloning, and sequencing techniques. By the competitive RT-PCR method using generic primers, expression levels of HBox genes in regenerating livers were estimated at as low as only 0.4-2% of that in 14-day embryonic liver; however, we identified multiple HBox genes at different stages. Comparing sets of HBox genes identified at different stages, we could find two candidates of stage specifically expressed HBox genes (one rat caudal-related gene, RCdx-3, stimulated at 1 hr, and one rat Hox gene, RHoxB5, repressed after hepatectomy) and continuous expression of five Hox genes (RHoxAl, A4, A5, B2, and B3) before and after hepatectomy. These HBox genes are considered to correlate with the process of liver regeneration. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. The discovery of four distinct glutamate dehydrogenase genes in a strain of Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Ingoldsby, Lorna M; Geoghegan, Kieran F; Hayden, Bronagh M; Engel, Paul C

    2005-04-11

    In earlier work, two glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) proteins were purified from a strain of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum (NRC-36014). One of these, an NAD+-specific enzyme, was matched to a cloned gene from H. salinarum (GenBank accession number: X63837 S75579) by sequencing peptide fragments. Analysis of enzymatic digests of the NADP+-GDH and database searching have now established that a gene encoding this protein exists in the full genomic sequence of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 as gdhA1, together with two other distinct gdh genes, gdhA2 and gdhB. From N-terminal sequence, it is clear that the genomic listing incorrectly assigns the start codon for gdhA1 and the corresponding protein is 43 amino acids longer than previously indicated. The three genes could be amplified by PCR either from NRC-1, as expected, or from NRC-36014 (GenBank accession numbers: YA840085-AY840087). A gene encoding the previously purified NAD+-GDH, is absent from the NRC-1 genome but can be successfully amplified from genomic DNA of NRC-36014 (GenBank accession number: AY840088). This establishes that NRC-36014 contains four gdh genes.

  13. Experimental Tests of the GDH and Other Sum Rules at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.E.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2005-06-14

    Recent measurements from SLAC of the polarized nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} have been used to experimentally test the Bjorken, Ellis-Jaffe, Burkhardt-Cottingham, and Efremov-Leader-Teryaev sum rules. In the future, the SLAC E159 experiment will extend structure function measurements using real photons to 40 GeV, enabling a definitive test of the high energy convergence of the GDH sum rule for both proton and deuteron targets.

  14. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  15. Phylogenetic analysis of oryx species using partial sequences of mitochondrial rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Khan, H A; Arif, I A; Al Farhan, A H; Al Homaidan, A A

    2008-10-28

    We conducted a comparative evaluation of 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA genes of the mitochondrial genome for molecular differentiation among three oryx species (Oryx leucoryx, Oryx dammah and Oryx gazella) with respect to two closely related outgroups, addax and roan. Our findings showed the failure of 12S rRNA gene to differentiate between the genus Oryx and addax, whereas a 342-bp partial sequence of 16S rRNA accurately grouped all five taxa studied, suggesting the utility of 16S rRNA segment for molecular phylogeny of oryx at the genus and possibly species levels.

  16. Kinetics of NH(4) Assimilation in Zea mays: Preliminary Studies with a Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH1) Null Mutant.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, J R; Ju, G C; Rich, P J; Rhodes, D

    1990-10-01

    In higher plants it is now generally considered that glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays only a small or negligible role in ammonia assimilation. To test this specific point, comparative studies of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation were undertaken with a GDH1-null mutant of Zea mays and a related (but not strictly isogenic) GDH1-positive wild type from which this mutant was derived. The kinetics of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen were monitored in both roots and shoots of 2-week-old seedlings supplied with 5 millimolar 99% ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) via the aerated root medium in hydroponic culture over a 24-h period. The GDH1-null mutant, with a 10- to 15-fold lower total root GDH activity in comparison to the wild type, was found to exhibit a 40 to 50% lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into total reduced nitrogen. Observed rates of root ammonium assimilation were 5.9 and 3.1 micromoles per hour per gram fresh weight for the wild type and mutant, respectively. The lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation in the mutant was associated with lower rates of labeling of several free amino acids (including glutamate, glutamine-amino N, aspartate, asparagine-amino N, and alanine) in both roots and shoots of the mutant in comparison to the wild type. Qualitatively, these labeling kinetics appear consistent with a reduced flux of (15)N via glutamate in the GDH1-null mutant. However, the responses of the two genotypes to the potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, methionine sulfoximine, and differences in morphology of the two genotypes (particularly a lower shoot:root ratio in the GDH1-null mutant) urge caution in concluding that GDH1 is solely responsible for these differences in ammonia assimilation rate.

  17. [Analysis of SMN1 gene partial deletion of spinal muscular atrophy based on MLPA].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Cao, Yanyan; Song, Fang; Qu, Yujin; Bai, Jinli; Jin, Yuwei; Wang, Hong

    2015-02-10

    To explore the diversity of mutations in survival motor neuron gene 1 (SMN1) by analyzing seven cases of partial deletion of SMN1 gene. Seven patients suspected spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were recruited from 2011 to 2013. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for genetic testing of SMA was based on the commercially available SALSA MLPA kit P021-A2. Then the data were analyzed by the software Coffalyser.Negative control samples were chosen with two copies of SMN1 and SMN2. Positive control samples were chosen with zero copies of SMN1 and two copies of SMN2. According to the product description (www.mlpa.com): for exon 7 and 8 of SMN1 and SMN2: a ratio of <0.7 indicates 1 copy, a ratio of 0.7-1.3 2 copies, a ratio of 1.3-1.7 3 copies and a ratio of 1.7-2.3 4 copies. For exon 1, 4, 6, 8 of SMN gene (SMN1+SMN2): a ratio <0.4 indicates 1 copy, a ratio of 4.0-0.6 2 copies, a ratio of 0.7-0.9 3 copies and a ratio of 0.9-1.1 4 copies. All samples were analyzed in duplicate. Using MLPA for clinical diagnostics, two types of partial deletions of SMN1were identified in 7 patients.Since exon 8 is not translated and has no effect on the function of SMN protein, exons 1, 4, 6, 7 were targeted.One had an isolated deletion of exon 7 while the other ones were caused by the deletions of exon 1, 4 and 7. These mutations were not detected by conventional diagnostic methods. Both types of partial deletions of SMN1 gene contained a deletion of exon 7. Two types of partial deletions of SMN1 gene indicate that the structure of SMN gene is unstable leading to a variety of mutation forms. But the major cause of SMA lies in a deletion of exon 7 of SMN1 gene.

  18. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  19. Directed partial correlation: inferring large-scale gene regulatory network through induced topology disruptions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinyin; Li, Chang-Tsun; Windram, Oliver

    2011-04-06

    Inferring regulatory relationships among many genes based on their temporal variation in transcript abundance has been a popular research topic. Due to the nature of microarray experiments, classical tools for time series analysis lose power since the number of variables far exceeds the number of the samples. In this paper, we describe some of the existing multivariate inference techniques that are applicable to hundreds of variables and show the potential challenges for small-sample, large-scale data. We propose a directed partial correlation (DPC) method as an efficient and effective solution to regulatory network inference using these data. Specifically for genomic data, the proposed method is designed to deal with large-scale datasets. It combines the efficiency of partial correlation for setting up network topology by testing conditional independence, and the concept of Granger causality to assess topology change with induced interruptions. The idea is that when a transcription factor is induced artificially within a gene network, the disruption of the network by the induction signifies a genes role in transcriptional regulation. The benchmarking results using GeneNetWeaver, the simulator for the DREAM challenges, provide strong evidence of the outstanding performance of the proposed DPC method. When applied to real biological data, the inferred starch metabolism network in Arabidopsis reveals many biologically meaningful network modules worthy of further investigation. These results collectively suggest DPC is a versatile tool for genomics research. The R package DPC is available for download (http://code.google.com/p/dpcnet/).

  20. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Stridh, Malin H; Zaganas, Ioannis; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Enard, Wolfgang; Pääbo, Svante; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1 and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation and supports the TCA cycle during energy-demanding processes such as high intensity glutamatergic signaling. However, little is known about how expression of hGDH2 affects the handling of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolism in astrocytes. Therefore, we cultured astrocytes from cerebral cortical tissue of hGDH2-expressing transgenic mice. We measured glutamate uptake and metabolism using [(3) H]glutamate, while the effect on metabolic pathways of glutamate and glucose was evaluated by use of (13) C and (14) C substrates and analysis by mass spectrometry and determination of radioactively labeled metabolites including CO2 , respectively. We conclude that hGDH2 expression increases capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamate, particularly during increased workload and aglycemia. Additionally, hGDH2 expression increased utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) during aglycemia and caused a general decrease in oxidative glucose metabolism. We speculate, that expression of hGDH2 allows astrocytes to spare glucose and utilize BCAAs during substrate shortages. These findings support the proposed role of hGDH2 in astrocytes as an important fail-safe during situations of intense glutamatergic activity. GLIA 2017;65:474-488.

  1. Partial rpoB gene sequencing for identification of Leptospira species.

    PubMed

    La Scola, Bernard; Bui, Lan T M; Baranton, Guy; Khamis, Atieh; Raoult, Didier

    2006-10-01

    The usual target for sequence-based identification of Leptospira species is the 16S rRNA gene. However, because the 16S rRNA gene is not polymorphic enough, it is necessary to sequence a 1500 bp segment of this gene for accurate identification. Based on the alignment of previously determined rpoB of three Leptospira strains, we designed and tested a primer pair that enabled us to amplify and sequence a 600 bp segment of Leptospira rpoB. This segment was species-specific for the 16 species tested, but was unable to separate Leptospira interrogans serovars accurately. For the 11 L. interrogans serovars tested, only seven genotypes could be determined. We thus think that analysis of partial rpoB may be useful as an initial screening test for the identification of a new isolate of Leptospira and detection or identification of Leptospira in clinical or environmental samples, but not for serovar determination.

  2. Isolation, cloning, and characterization of a partial novel aro A gene in common reed (Phragmites australis).

    PubMed

    Taravat, Elham; Zebarjadi, Alireza; Kahrizi, Danial; Yari, Kheirollah

    2015-05-01

    Among the essential amino acids, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine are aromatic amino acids which are synthesized by the shikimate pathway in plants and bacteria. Herbicide glyphosate can inhibit the biosynthesis of these amino acids. So, identification of the gene tolerant to glyphosate is very important. It has been shown that the common reed or Phragmites australis Cav. (Poaceae) is relatively tolerant to glyphosate. The aim of the current research is identification, cloning, sequencing, and registering of partial aro A gene of the common reed P. australis. The partial aro A gene of common reed (P. australis) was cloned in Escherichia coli and the amino acid sequence was identified/determined for the first time. This is the first report for isolation, cloning, and sequencing of a part of aro A gene from the common reed. A 670 bp fragment including two introns (86 bp and 289 bp) was obtained. The open reading frame (ORF) region in part of gene was encoded for 98 amino acids. Alignment showed high similarity among this region with Zea mays (L.) (Poaceae) (94.6%), Eleusine indica L. Gaertn (Poaceae) (94.2%), and Zoysia japonica Steud. (Poaceae) (94.2%). The alignment of amino acid sequence of the investigated part of the gene showed a homology with aro A from several other plants. This conserved region forms the enzyme active site. The alignment results of nucleotide and amino acid residues with related sequences showed that there are some differences among them. The relative glyphosate tolerance in the common reed may be related to these differences.

  3. Partial biotinidase deficiency is usually due to the D444H mutation in the biotinidase gene.

    PubMed

    Swango, K L; Demirkol, M; Hüner, G; Pronicka, E; Sykut-Cegielska, J; Schulze, A; Mayatepek, E; Wolf, B

    1998-05-01

    Newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency has identified children with profound biotinidase deficiency (<10% of mean normal serum activity) and those with partial biotinidase deficiency (10%-30% of mean normal serum activity). Children with partial biotinidase deficiency and who are not treated with biotin do not usually exhibit symptoms unless they are stressed (i.e., prolonged infection). We found that 18 of 19 randomly selected individuals with partial deficiency have the transversion missense mutation G1330>C, which substitutes a histidine for aspartic acid444 (D444H) in one allele of the biotinidase gene. We have previously estimated that the D444H mutation results in 48% of normal enzyme activity for that allele and occurs with an estimated frequency of 0.039 in the general population. The D444H mutation in biotinidase deficiency is similar to the Duarte variant in galactosemia. The D444H mutation in one allele in combination with a mutation for profound deficiency in the other allele is the common cause of partial biotinidase deficiency.

  4. [Partial gene clone and nif gene homologous sequence analysis of Streptococcus sanguis].

    PubMed

    Pan, Y; Wang, H; Jin, C; Sun, K

    1999-02-01

    To analyze the sequence of Streptococcus sanguis chromosome which contains one DNA fragment of 800 base pairs (bp) and discuss Streptococcus sanguis biological features of heredity. Streptococcus DNA of 800-bp genetic fragment was cloned and analyzed by using eukaryotic expression vector. By Genbank database, it showed that the 800-bp genetic sequence was highly homologous with other bacterial nifS and nifU gene, and the highest homologous score was 114. This nif gene of ATCC 10556 strain may correlate with nutrient metabolism and peroxide hydrogen release of Streptococcus sanguis.

  5. Epigenetic landscapes explain partially reprogrammed cells and identify key reprogramming gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Alex; Li, Hu; Collins, James; Mehta, Pankaj

    2013-03-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged epigenetic landscape where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from physics, specifically Hopfield neural networks. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells (cells found in reprogramming experiments but not in vivo) are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that coexpress genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing data sets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity.

  6. Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Alex H.; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged “epigenetic landscape” where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from spin-glass physics. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes, and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that co-express genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing datasets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity. PMID:25122086

  7. Metabolic regulation of Escherichia coli and its gdhA, glnL, gltB, D mutants under different carbon and nitrogen limitations in the continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-27

    It is quite important to understand how the central metabolism is regulated under nitrogen (N)- limitation as well as carbon (C)- limitation. In particular, the effect of C/N ratio on the metabolism is of practical interest for the heterologous protein production, PHB production, etc. Although the carbon and nitrogen metabolisms are interconnected and the overall mechanism is complicated, it is strongly desirable to clarify the effects of culture environment on the metabolism from the practical application point of view. The effect of C/N ratio on the metabolism in Escherichia coli was investigated in the aerobic continuous culture at the dilution rate of 0.2 h-1 based on fermentation data, transcriptional RNA level, and enzyme activity data. The glucose concentration was kept at 10 g/l, while ammonium sulfate concentration was varied from 5.94 to 0.594 g/l. The resultant C/N ratios were 1.68 (100%), 2.81(60%), 4.21(40%), 8.42(20%), and 16.84(10%), where the percentage values in brackets indicate the ratio of N- concentration as compared to the case of 5.94 g/l of ammonium sulfate. The mRNA levels of crp and mlc decreased, which caused ptsG transcript expression to be up-regulated as C/N ratio increased. As C/N ratio increased cra transcript expression decreased, which caused ptsH, pfkA, and pykF to be up-regulated. At high C/N ratio, transcriptional mRNA level of soxR/S increased, which may be due to the activated respiratory chain as indicated by up-regulations of such genes as cyoA, cydB, ndh as well as the increase in the specific CO2 production rate. The rpoN transcript expression increased with the increase in C/N ratio, which led glnA, L, G and gltD transcript expression to change in similar fashion. The nac transcript expression showed similar trend as rpoN, while gdhA transcript expression changed in reverse direction. The transcriptional mRNA level of glnB, which codes for PII, glnD and glnK increased as C/N ratio increases. It was shown that GS

  8. In Vivo Gene Transfer Strategies to Achieve Partial Correction of von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; De, Bishnu P.; Ferris, Barbara; Wang, Rui; Rivella, Stefano; Kaminsky, Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract von Willebrand disease (VWD), the most common hereditary coagulation disorder, results from mutations in the 52-exon gene for von Willebrand factor (VWF), which encodes an 8.4-kB cDNA. Studies with VWF cDNA plasmids have demonstrated that in vivo gene transfer to the liver will correct the coagulation dysfunction in VWF−/− mice, but the correction is transient. To develop gene therapy for VWF that would mediate long-term expression of the VWF cDNA in liver, we first evaluated segmental pre-mRNA trans-splicing (SPTS) with two adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 8 vectors, each delivering one-half of the VWF cDNA. However, although the two vectors functioned well to generate VWF multimers after infection of cells in vitro, the efficiency of SPTS was insufficient to correct the VWF−/− mouse in vivo. As an alternative, we assessed the ability of a lentiviral vector to transfer the intact murine VWF cDNA in vivo directly to the neonatal liver of VWF−/− mice, using generation of VWF multimers, bleeding time, and bleeding volume as efficacy parameters. The VWF lentivirus generated VWF multimers and partially or completely corrected the coagulation defect on a persistent basis in 33% of the treated VWF-deficient mice. On the basis of the concept that partial persistent correction with gene transfer could be beneficial in VWD patients, these observations suggest that lentiviral delivery of VWF cDNA should be explored as a candidate for gene therapy in patients with a severe form of VWD. PMID:22482515

  9. Absence of PAX6 gene mutations in Gillespie syndrome (partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation)

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, T.; Maas, R.L. ); Ton, C.C.T.; Housman, D.E. ); Mueller, R.; Oliver, C. ); Petzl-Erler, M.L. ); Nevin, N.C. )

    1994-01-01

    The PAX6 gene is expressed at high levels in the developing eye and cerebellum and is mutated in patients with autosomal dominant aniridia. The authors have tested the role of PAX6 mutations in three families with Gillespie syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive condition consisting of partial aniridia, cerebellar ataxia, and mental retardation. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of affected individuals revealed no alteration of PAX6 sequences. In two families, the disease trait segregates independently from chromosome 11p markers flanking PAX6. The authors conclude that Gillespie syndrome is genetically distinct from autosomal dominant aniridia. 28 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  11. GRAIN: a computer program to calculate ancestral and partial inbreeding coefficients using a gene dropping approach.

    PubMed

    Baumung, R; Farkas, J; Boichard, D; Mészáros, G; Sölkner, J; Curik, I

    2015-04-01

    GRain is freely available software intended to enable and promote testing of hypotheses with respect to purging and heterogeneity of inbreeding depression. The program is based on a stochastic approach, the gene dropping method, and calculates various coefficients from large and complex pedigrees. GRain calculates, together with the 'classical' inbreeding coefficient, ancestral inbreeding coefficients proposed by Ballou, (1997) J. Hered., 88, 169 and Kalinowski et al., (2000) Conserv. Biol., 14, 1375 as well as an ancestral history coefficient (AHC ), defined here for the first time. AHC is defined as the number that tells how many times during pedigree segregation (gene dropping) a randomly taken allele has been in IBD status. Furthermore, GRain enables testing of heterogeneity and/or purging of inbreeding depression with respect to different founders/ancestors by calculating partial coefficients for all previously obtained coefficients.

  12. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Flora Aparecida; Cvoro, Aleksandra; Amato, Angelica A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani; Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan; Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de; Webb, Paul

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  13. Jinggangmycin-suppressed reproduction in the small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen), is mediated by glucose dehydrogenase (GDH).

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Wu, You; You, Lin-Lin; Xu, Bin; Ge, Lin-Quan; Yang, Guo-Qing; Wu, Jin-Cai

    2017-06-01

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH), Laodelphax striatellus (Fallen), is a serious pest insect of rice, wheat, and maize in China. SBPH not only sucks plant sap but also transmits plant disease viruses, causing serious damage. These viruses include rice striped virus disease (RSV disease), black streaked dwarf, and maize rough disease virus. SBPH outbreaks are related to the overuse of pesticides in China. Some pesticides, such as triazophos, stimulate the reproduction of SBPH, but an antibiotic fungicide jinggangmycin (JGM) suppresses its reproduction. However, mechanisms of decreased reproduction of SBPH induced by JGM remain unclear. The present findings show that JGM suppressed reproduction of SBPH (↓approximately 35.7%) and resulted in the down-regulated expression of glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). GDH-silenced control females (control+dsGDH) show that the number of eggs laid was reduced by 48.6% compared to control females. Biochemical tests show that the total lipid and fatty acid contents in JGM-treated and control+dsGDH females decreased significantly. Thus, we propose that the suppression of reproduction in SBPH induced by JGM is mediated by GDH via metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Sequencing of the Reannotated LMNB2 Gene Reveals Novel Mutations in Patients with Acquired Partial Lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Cao, Henian; Liu, Dora M.; Costain, Gary A.; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Rodger, N. Wilson; Durrington, Paul N.

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, also called “Barraquer-Simons syndrome”) is unknown. Genomic DNA mutations affecting the nuclear lamina protein lamin A cause inherited partial lipodystrophy but are not found in patients with APL. Because it also encodes a nuclear lamina protein (lamin B2) and its genomic structure was recently reannotated, we sequenced LMNB2 as a candidate gene in nine white patients with APL. In four patients, we found three new rare mutations in LMNB2: intron 1 −6G→T, exon 5 c.643G→A (p.R215Q; in two patients), and exon 8 c.1218G→A (p.A407T). The combined frequency of these mutations was 0.222 in the patients with APL, compared with 0.0018 in a multiethnic control sample of 1,100 subjects (P=2.1×10-7) and 0.0045 in a sample of 330 white controls (P=1.2×10-5). These novel heterozygous mutations are the first reported for LMNB2, are the first reported among patients with APL, and indicate how sequencing of a reannotated candidate gene can reveal new disease-associated mutations. PMID:16826530

  15. Sequencing of the reannotated LMNB2 gene reveals novel mutations in patients with acquired partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hegele, Robert A; Cao, Henian; Liu, Dora M; Costain, Gary A; Charlton-Menys, Valentine; Rodger, N Wilson; Durrington, Paul N

    2006-08-01

    The etiology of acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL, also called "Barraquer-Simons syndrome") is unknown. Genomic DNA mutations affecting the nuclear lamina protein lamin A cause inherited partial lipodystrophy but are not found in patients with APL. Because it also encodes a nuclear lamina protein (lamin B2) and its genomic structure was recently reannotated, we sequenced LMNB2 as a candidate gene in nine white patients with APL. In four patients, we found three new rare mutations in LMNB2: intron 1 -6G-->T, exon 5 c.643G-->A (p.R215Q; in two patients), and exon 8 c.1218G-->A (p.A407T). The combined frequency of these mutations was 0.222 in the patients with APL, compared with 0.0018 in a multiethnic control sample of 1,100 subjects (P = 2.1 x 10-7) and 0.0045 in a sample of 330 white controls (P = 1.2 x 10-5). These novel heterozygous mutations are the first reported for LMNB2, are the first reported among patients with APL, and indicate how sequencing of a reannotated candidate gene can reveal new disease-associated mutations.

  16. Optimized AAV rh.10 Vectors That Partially Evade Neutralizing Antibodies during Hepatic Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Selot, Ruchita; Arumugam, Sathyathithan; Mary, Bertin; Cheemadan, Sabna; Jayandharan, Giridhara R.

    2017-01-01

    Of the 12 common serotypes used for gene delivery applications, Adeno-associated virus (AAV)rh.10 serotype has shown sustained hepatic transduction and has the lowest seropositivity in humans. We have evaluated if further modifications to AAVrh.10 at its phosphodegron like regions or predicted immunogenic epitopes could improve its hepatic gene transfer and immune evasion potential. Mutant AAVrh.10 vectors were generated by site directed mutagenesis of the predicted targets. These mutant vectors were first tested for their transduction efficiency in HeLa and HEK293T cells. The optimal vector was further evaluated for their cellular uptake, entry, and intracellular trafficking by quantitative PCR and time-lapse confocal microscopy. To evaluate their potential during hepatic gene therapy, C57BL/6 mice were administered with wild-type or optimal mutant AAVrh.10 and the luciferase transgene expression was documented by serial bioluminescence imaging at 14, 30, 45, and 72 days post-gene transfer. Their hepatic transduction was further verified by a quantitative PCR analysis of AAV copy number in the liver tissue. The optimal AAVrh.10 vector was further evaluated for their immune escape potential, in animals pre-immunized with human intravenous immunoglobulin. Our results demonstrate that a modified AAVrh.10 S671A vector had enhanced cellular entry (3.6 fold), migrate rapidly to the perinuclear region (1 vs. >2 h for wild type vectors) in vitro, which further translates to modest increase in hepatic gene transfer efficiency in vivo. More importantly, the mutant AAVrh.10 vector was able to partially evade neutralizing antibodies (~27–64 fold) in pre-immunized animals. The development of an AAV vector system that can escape the circulating neutralizing antibodies in the host will substantially widen the scope of gene therapy applications in humans. PMID:28769791

  17. Partial least squares dimension reduction for microarray gene expression data with a censored response.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Danh V

    2005-01-01

    An important application of DNA microarray technologies involves monitoring the global state of transcriptional program in tumor cells. One goal in cancer microarray studies is to compare the clinical outcome, such as relapse-free or overall survival, for subgroups of patients defined by global gene expression patterns. A method of comparing patient survival, as a function of gene expression, was recently proposed in [Bioinformatics 18 (2002) 1625] by Nguyen and Rocke. Due to the (a) high-dimensionality of microarray gene expression data and (b) censored survival times, a two-stage procedure was proposed to relate survival times to gene expression profiles. The first stage involves dimensionality reduction of the gene expression data by partial least squares (PLS) and the second stage involves prediction of survival probability using proportional hazard regression. In this paper, we provide a systematic assessment of the performance of this two-stage procedure. PLS dimension reduction involves complex non-linear functions of both the predictors and the response data, rendering exact analytical study intractable. Thus, we assess the methodology under a simulation model for gene expression data with a censored response variable. In particular, we compare the performance of PLS dimension reduction relative to dimension reduction via principal components analysis (PCA) and to a modified PLS (MPLS) approach. PLS performed substantially better relative to dimension reduction via PCA when the total predictor variance explained is low to moderate (e.g. 40%-60%). It performed similar to MPLS and slightly better in some cases. Additionally, we examine the effect of censoring on dimension reduction stage. The performance of all methods deteriorates for a high censoring rate, although PLS-PH performed relatively best overall.

  18. Gene profile in the spleen under massive partial hepatectomy using complementary DNA microarray and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Yusuke; Shimada, Mitsuo; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Imura, Satoru; Morine, Yuji; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Mori, Hiroki; Kanamoto, Mami; Iwahashi, Shuichi; Saito, Yu; Takasu, Chie

    2014-08-01

    In general, the spleen is one of the abdominal organs connected by the portal system, and a splenectomy improves hepatic functions in the settings of partial hepatectomy (Hx) for portal hypertensive cases or living donor liver transplantation with excessive portal vein flow. Those precise mechanisms remain still unclear; therefore, we investigated the DNA expression profile in the spleen after 90% Hx in rats using complementary DNA microarray and pathway analysis. Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) were prepared from three rat spleens at each time point (0, 3, and 6 h after 90% Hx). Using the gene chip, mRNA was hybridized to Affymetrix GeneChip Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array (Affymetrix®) and pathway analysis was done with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA®). We determined the 3-h or 6-h/0-h ratio to assess the influence of Hx, and cut-off values were set at more than 2.0-fold or less than 1/2 (0.5)-fold. Chemokine activity-related genes including Cxcl1 (GRO1) and Cxcl2 (MIP-2) related pathway were upregulated in the spleen. Also, immediate early response genes including early growth response-1 (EGR1), FBJ murine osteosarcoma (FOS) and activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) related pathway were upregulated in the spleen. We concluded that in the spleen the expression of numerous inflammatory-related genes would occur after 90% Hx. The spleen could take a harmful role and provide a negative impact during post Hx phase due to the induction of chemokine and transcription factors including GRO1 and EGR1. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    DOE PAGES

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; ...

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed formore » $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $$\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$$ and $$^{12}C$$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $$^{12}C$$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.« less

  20. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Xin -Hu; Ye, Yun -Xiu; Chen, Jian -Ping; Lu, Hai -Jiang; Zhu, Peng -Jia; Jiang, Feng -Jian

    2015-07-17

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio $\\frac{\\Delta p}{p}$ and $^{12}C$ elastic cross section are compared without and with radiation energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for $^{12}C$ elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment.

  1. Identification of Scopulariopsis species by partial 28S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Jagielski, Tomasz; Kosim, Kinga; Skóra, Magdalena; Macura, Anna Barbara; Bielecki, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    The genus Scopulariopsis contains over 30 species of mitosporic moulds, which although usually saprophytic may also act as opportunistic pathogens in humans. They have mainly been associated with onychomycosis, and only sporadically reported as a cause of deep tissue infections or systemic disease. Identification of Scopulariopsis species still largely relies on phenotype-based methods. There is a need for a molecular diagnostic approach, that would allow to reliably discriminate between different Scopulariopsis species. The aim of this study was to apply sequence analysis of partial 28S rRNA gene for species identification of Scopulariopsis clinical isolates. Although the method employed did reveal some genetic polymorphism among Scopulariopsis isolates tested, it was not enough for species delineation. For this to be achieved, other genetic loci, within and beyond the rDNA operon, need to be investigated.

  2. GBF-dependent family genes morphologically suppress the partially active Dictyostelium STATa strain.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Kanno-Tanabe, Naoko; Minemura, Kakeru; Kawata, Takefumi

    2008-02-01

    Transcription factor Dd-STATa, a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins, is necessary for culmination during development. We have isolated more than 18 putative multicopy suppressors of Dd-STATa using genetic screening. One was hssA gene, whose expression is known to be G-box-binding-factor-dependent and which was specific to prestalk A (pstA) cells, where Dd-STATa is activated. Also, hssA mRNA was expressed in pstA cells in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. At least 40 hssA-related genes are present in the genome and constitute a multigene family. The tagged HssA protein was translated; hssA encodes an unusually high-glycine-serine-rich small protein (8.37 kDa), which has strong homology to previously reported cyclic-adenosine-monophosphate-inducible 2C and 7E proteins. Overexpression of hssA mRNA as well as frame-shifted versions of hssA RNA suppressed the phenotype of the partially active Dd-STATa strain, suggesting that translation is not necessary for suppression. Although overexpression of prespore-specific genes among the family did not suppress the parental phenotype, prestalk-specific family members did. Although overexpression of the hssA did not revert the expression of Dd-STATa target genes, and although its suppression mechanism remains unknown, morphological reversion implies functional relationships between Dd-STATa and hssA.

  3. Evolution of a Novel Antiviral Immune-Signaling Interaction by Partial-Gene Duplication

    PubMed Central

    Korithoski, Bryan; Kolaczkowski, Oralia; Mukherjee, Krishanu; Kola, Reema; Earl, Chandra; Kolaczkowski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    The RIG-like receptors (RLRs) are related proteins that identify viral RNA in the cytoplasm and activate cellular immune responses, primarily through direct protein-protein interactions with the signal transducer, IPS1. Although it has been well established that the RLRs, RIG-I and MDA5, activate IPS1 through binding between the twin caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs) on the RLR and a homologous CARD on IPS1, it is less clear which specific RLR CARD(s) are required for this interaction, and almost nothing is known about how the RLR-IPS1 interaction evolved. In contrast to what has been observed in the presence of immune-modulating K63-linked polyubiquitin, here we show that—in the absence of ubiquitin—it is the first CARD domain of human RIG-I and MDA5 (CARD1) that binds directly to IPS1 CARD, and not the second (CARD2). Although the RLRs originated in the earliest animals, both the IPS1 gene and the twin-CARD domain architecture of RIG-I and MDA5 arose much later in the deuterostome lineage, probably through a series of tandem partial-gene duplication events facilitated by tight clustering of RLRs and IPS1 in the ancestral deuterostome genome. Functional differentiation of RIG-I CARD1 and CARD2 appears to have occurred early during this proliferation of RLR and related CARDs, potentially driven by adaptive coevolution between RIG-I CARD domains and IPS1 CARD. However, functional differentiation of MDA5 CARD1 and CARD2 occurred later. These results fit a general model in which duplications of protein-protein interaction domains into novel gene contexts could facilitate the expansion of signaling networks and suggest a potentially important role for functionally-linked gene clusters in generating novel immune-signaling pathways. PMID:26356745

  4. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection

    PubMed Central

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L.; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop. PMID:27303424

  5. Identification of Genes in a Partially Resistant Genotype of Avena sativa Expressed in Response to Puccinia coronata Infection.

    PubMed

    Loarce, Yolanda; Navas, Elisa; Paniagua, Carlos; Fominaya, Araceli; Manjón, José L; Ferrer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated oat (Avena sativa), an important crop in many countries, can suffer significant losses through infection by the fungus Puccinia coronata, the causal agent of crown rust disease. Understanding the molecular basis of existing partial resistance to this disease might provide targets of interest for crop improvement programs. A suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library was constructed using cDNA from the partially resistant oat genotype MN841801-1 after inoculation with the pathogen. A total of 929 genes returned a BLASTx hit and were annotated under different GO terms, including 139 genes previously described as participants in mechanisms related to the defense response and signal transduction. Among these were genes involved in pathogen recognition, cell-wall modification, oxidative burst/ROS scavenging, and abscisic acid biosynthesis, as well genes related to inducible defense responses mediated by salicylic and jasmonic acid (although none of which had been previously reported involved in strong responses). These findings support the hypothesis that basal defense mechanisms are the main systems operating in oat partial resistance to P. coronata. When the expression profiles of 20 selected genes were examined at different times following inoculation with the pathogen, the partially resistant genotype was much quicker in mounting a response than a susceptible genotype. Additionally, a number of genes not previously described in oat transcriptomes were identified in this work, increasing our molecular knowledge of this crop.

  6. Chromosomal localization and partial sequencing of the 18S and 28S ribosomal genes from Bradysia hygida (Diptera: Sciaridae).

    PubMed

    Gaspar, V P; Shimauti, E L T; Fernandez, M A

    2014-03-26

    In insects, ribosomal genes are usually detected in sex chromosomes, but have also or only been detected in autosomal chromosomes in some cases. Previous results from our research group indicated that in Bradysia hygida, nucleolus organizer regions were associated with heterochromatic regions of the autosomal C chromosome, using the silver impregnation technique. The present study confirmed this location of the ribosomal genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis also revealed the partial sequences of the 18S and 28S genes for this sciarid. The sequence alignment showed that the 18S gene has 98% identity to Corydalus armatus and 91% identity to Drosophila persimilis and Drosophila melanogaster. The partial sequence analysis of the 28S gene showed 95% identity with Bradysia amoena and 93% identity with Schwenckfeldina sp. These results confirmed the location of ribosomal genes of B. hygida in an autosomal chromosome, and the partial sequence analysis of the 18S and 28S genes demonstrated a high percentage of identity among several insect ribosomal genes.

  7. Improved specificity of reagentless amperometric PQQ-sGDH glucose biosensors by using indirectly heated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carolin; Borgmann, Sabine; Maciejewska, Monika; Ngounou, Bertrand; Gründler, Peter; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2007-06-15

    Indirectly heated electrodes operating in a non-isothermal mode have been used as transducers for reagentless glucose biosensors. Pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent soluble glucose dehydrogenase (PQQ-sGDH) was entrapped on the electrode surface within a redox hydrogel layer. Localized polymer film precipitation was invoked by electrochemically modulating the pH-value in the diffusion zone in front of the electrode. The resulting decrease in solubility of an anodic electrodeposition paint (EDP) functionalized with Osmium complexes leads to precipitation of the redox hydrogel concomitantly entrapping the enzyme. The resulting sensor architecture enables a fast electron transfer between enzyme and electrode surface. The glucose sensor was operated at pre-defined temperatures using a multiple current-pulse mode allowing reproducible indirect heating of the sensor. The sensor characteristics such as the apparent Michaelis constants K(M)(app) and maximum currents I(max)(app) were determined at different temperatures for the main substrate glucose as well as a potential interfering co-substrate maltose. The limit of detection increased with higher temperatures for both substrates (0.020 mM for glucose, and 0.023 mM for maltose at 48 degrees C). The substrate specificity of PQQ-sGDH is highly temperature dependent. Therefore, a mathematical model based on a multiple linear regression approach could be applied to discriminate between the current response for glucose and maltose. This allowed accurate determination of glucose in a concentration range of 0-0.1mM in the presence of unknown maltose concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.04 mM.

  8. Partial Deletion of Chromosome 1p31.1 Including only the Neuronal Growth Regulator 1 Gene in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Ann; Cox, Devin M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    We present two siblings with a partial deletion of chromosome 1p31.1 involving only the neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) gene. The siblings had a history of neuropsychiatric and behavioral problems, learning difficulties, hypotonia, mild aortic root dilatation, hypermobility, and scoliosis. This is the first clinical report of a microdeletion of chromosome 1p31.1 involving only the NEGR1 gene. PMID:27617112

  9. The wheat durable, multipathogen resistance gene Lr34 confers partial blast resistance in rice.

    PubMed

    Krattinger, Simon G; Sucher, Justine; Selter, Liselotte L; Chauhan, Harsh; Zhou, Bo; Tang, Mingzhi; Upadhyaya, Narayana M; Mieulet, Delphine; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Weidenbach, Denise; Schaffrath, Ulrich; Lagudah, Evans S; Keller, Beat

    2016-05-01

    The wheat gene Lr34 confers durable and partial field resistance against the obligate biotrophic, pathogenic rust fungi and powdery mildew in adult wheat plants. The resistant Lr34 allele evolved after wheat domestication through two gain-of-function mutations in an ATP-binding cassette transporter gene. An Lr34-like fungal disease resistance with a similar broad-spectrum specificity and durability has not been described in other cereals. Here, we transformed the resistant Lr34 allele into the japonica rice cultivar Nipponbare. Transgenic rice plants expressing Lr34 showed increased resistance against multiple isolates of the hemibiotrophic pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of rice blast disease. Host cell invasion during the biotrophic growth phase of rice blast was delayed in Lr34-expressing rice plants, resulting in smaller necrotic lesions on leaves. Lines with Lr34 also developed a typical, senescence-based leaf tip necrosis (LTN) phenotype. Development of LTN during early seedling growth had a negative impact on formation of axillary shoots and spikelets in some transgenic lines. One transgenic line developed LTN only at adult plant stage which was correlated with lower Lr34 expression levels at seedling stage. This line showed normal tiller formation and more importantly, disease resistance in this particular line was not compromised. Interestingly, Lr34 in rice is effective against a hemibiotrophic pathogen with a lifestyle and infection strategy that is different from obligate biotrophic rusts and mildew fungi. Lr34 might therefore be used as a source in rice breeding to improve broad-spectrum disease resistance against the most devastating fungal disease of rice.

  10. Partial prevention of hepatic lipid alterations in nude mice by neonatal thymulin gene therapy.

    PubMed

    García de Bravo, Margarita M; Polo, Mónica P; Reggiani, Paula C; Rimoldi, Omar J; Dardenne, Mireille; Goya, Rodolfo G

    2006-08-01

    During adult life athymic (nude) male mice display not only a severe T-cell-related immunodeficiency but also endocrine imbalances and a moderate hyperglycemia. We studied the impact of congenital athymia on hepatic lipid composition and also assessed the ability of neonatal thymulin gene therapy to prevent the effects of athymia. We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector, RAd-metFTS, expressing a synthetic DNA sequence encoding met-FTS, an analog of the thymic peptide facteur thymique sérique (FTS), whose Zn-bound biologically active form is known as thymulin. On postnatal day 1-2 homozygous (nu/nu) nude and heterozygous (nu/+) mice were injected with 10(8) pfu of RAd-metFTS or RAd-betagal (control vector) intramuscularly. The animals were processed at 52 d of age. Serum thymulin, glycemia, hepatic phospholipid FA composition and free and esterified cholesterol were determined. Adult homozygous male nudes were significantly (P < 0.01) hyperglycemic when compared with their heterozygous counterparts (2.04 vs. 1.40 g/L, respectively). The relative percentage of 16:0, 18:1 n-9, and 18:1n-7 FA was lower, whereas that of 18:0, 20:4n-6, and 22:6n-3 FA was higher, in hepatic phospholipid (PL) of nu/nu animals as compared with their nu/+ counterparts. Some of these alterations, such as that in the relative content of 22:6n-3 in liver PL and the unsaturation index, were completely or partially prevented by neonatal thymulin gene therapy. We conclude that the thymus influences lipid metabolism and that thymulin is involved in this modulatory activity.

  11. Plum pox virus induces differential gene expression in the partially resistant stone fruit tree Prunus armeniaca cv. Goldrich.

    PubMed

    Schurdi-Levraud Escalettes, Valérie; Hullot, Clémence; Wawrzy'nczak, Danuta; Mathieu, Elodie; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Le Gall, Olivier; Decroocq, Véronique

    2006-06-07

    We investigated the changes in the expression profiles of the partially resistant apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivar Goldrich following inoculation with Plum pox virus (PPV) using cDNA-amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Altered expression patterns were detected and twenty-one differentially expressed cDNA had homologies with genes in databases coding for proteins involved in metabolism, signal transduction, defense, stress and intra/intercellular connections. Seven of the modified expressed patterns were further investigated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR or Northern blotting. The expression patterns of five of these genes were confirmed in the partially resistant P. armeniaca cv. 'Goldrich' and assessed in a susceptible genotype. One of these cDNAs, coding for a putative class III chitinase, appeared to be repressed in infected plants of the partially resistant genotype and expressed in the susceptible one which could be related to the partially resistant phenotype. On the contrary, the expression patterns of the genes coding for a transketolase, a kinesin-like and an ankyrin-like protein, were clearly linked to the susceptible interaction. These candidate genes could play a role either in the compatible interaction leading to virus invasion or to the quantitative resistance of apricot to PPV.

  12. Phylogenetic Relationships of 3 Korean Neodiplostomum Species (Digenea: Neodiplostomidae) Based on Partial CO1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Yi Lee, Jo Woon; Lee, Jin-Ju; Park, Yun-Kyu; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2014-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the 3 Neodiplostomum spp. (Digenea: Neodiplostomidae) occurring in Korea (N. seoulense, N. leei, and N. boryongense) were analyzed using the partial mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene. The adult flukes were recovered from Sprague-Dawley rats (N. seoulense) and newborn chicks (N. leei and N. boryongense) experimentally infected with the neodiplostomula from the grass snake, Rhabdophis tigrinus tigrinus. The genomic DNA was amplified using specific primers, and the sequence of CO1 was obtained. According to the results, the pairwise similarity was 96.1% between N. boryongense and N. seoulense, but was 95.0% between N. boryongense and N. leei and 94.2% between N. leei and N. seoulense. The results demonstrated a closer phylogenetic relationship between N. seoulense and N. boryongense. This high relationship of N. seoulense and N. boryongense may be related to their similar morphologic features including the limited distribution of vitellaria and the presence of a genital cone. N. leei is distinct on the other hand with an extensive distribution of vitellaria and the absence of a genital cone. PMID:25031477

  13. Overproduction and partial purification of the Norrie disease gene product, norrin, from a recombinant baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Shastry, Barkur S; Trese, Michael T

    2003-12-05

    Abnormal vascularization of the peripheral retina and retinal detachment are common clinical characteristics of Norrie disease (ND), familial exudative vitreoretinopathy, Coats' disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Although little is known about the molecular basis of these diseases, studies have shown that all of these diseases are associated with mutations in the ND gene. In spite of this, little is known about norrin, its molecular mechanism of action, and its functional relationship with the development of abnormal retinal vasculature. To obtain a large quantity of norrin for structural and functional studies, we have overproduced it in insect cells. For this purpose, a cDNA fragment (869 bp) was isolated from a human retinal cDNA library by amplification and was cloned into an expression vector. The purified plasmid was co-transfected with wild-type linearized Bac-N-Blue DNA into S. frugiperda Sf21 insect cells. The recombinant virus plaques were purified and clones were selected based on the level of recombinant protein expressed in Sf21 cells infected with a purified recombinant virus. From these, a high-titer stock was generated and subsequently used to prepare a fused protein on a large scale. The protein was partially purified by the process of immobilized metal affinity chromatography and the use of ion exchange chromatography

  14. Mutational analysis of the androgen receptor gene in two Indian families with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nagaraja, M R; Rastogi, Amit; Raman, Rajiva; Gupta, Dinesh K; Singh, S K

    2009-12-01

    Mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is known to cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In an X-linked recessive manner, an AR mutation gets transmitted to the offspring through carrier mothers in 70% of cases, the other 30% arising de novo. However, reports on AR mutations amongst Indian patients with AIS are scarce in the literature. This study reports mutations in AR from two Indian families, each having a proband with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) phenotype. Clinical, endocrine and cytogenetic evaluation of these affected children was performed. Mutational analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis followed by sequencing. The two point mutations were in exon 5: p.M742I, familial in patient 1 and p.V746M de novo in patient 2. These are hitherto unrecognized mutations in our population. Similar mutational studies are suggested in patients with AIS, in order to identify their frequency and clinical severity in our population.

  15. Partial Functional Diversification of Drosophila melanogaster Septin Genes Sep2 and Sep5

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Ryan S.; Clark, Denise V.

    2016-01-01

    The septin family of hetero-oligomeric complex-forming proteins can be divided into subgroups, and subgroup members are interchangeable at specific positions in the septin complex. Drosophila melanogaster has five septin genes, including the two SEPT6 subgroup members Sep2 and Sep5. We previously found that Sep2 has a unique function in oogenesis, which is not performed by Sep5. Here, we find that Sep2 is uniquely required for follicle cell encapsulation of female germline cysts, and that Sep2 and Sep5 are redundant for follicle cell proliferation. The five D. melanogaster septins localize similarly in oogenesis, including as rings flanking the germline ring canals. Pnut fails to localize in Sep5; Sep2 double mutant follicle cells, indicating that septin complexes fail to form in the absence of both Sep2 and Sep5. We also find that mutations in septins enhance the mutant phenotype of bazooka, a key component in the establishment of cell polarity, suggesting a link between septin function and cell polarity. Overall, this work suggests that Sep5 has undergone partial loss of ancestral protein function, and demonstrates redundant and unique functions of septins. PMID:27172205

  16. Mammalian genes induce partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cells in non-mammalian vertebrate and invertebrate species

    PubMed Central

    Rosselló, Ricardo Antonio; Chen, Chun-Chun; Dai, Rui; Howard, Jason T; Hochgeschwender, Ute; Jarvis, Erich D

    2013-01-01

    Cells are fundamental units of life, but little is known about evolution of cell states. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are once differentiated cells that have been re-programmed to an embryonic stem cell-like state, providing a powerful platform for biology and medicine. However, they have been limited to a few mammalian species. Here we found that a set of four mammalian transcription factor genes used to generate iPSCs in mouse and humans can induce a partially reprogrammed pluripotent stem cell (PRPSCs) state in vertebrate and invertebrate model organisms, in mammals, birds, fish, and fly, which span 550 million years from a common ancestor. These findings are one of the first to show cross-lineage stem cell-like induction, and to generate pluripotent-like cells for several of these species with in vivo chimeras. We suggest that the stem-cell state may be highly conserved across a wide phylogenetic range. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00036.001 PMID:24015354

  17. Molecular epidemiology of rabies in Colombia 1994-2005 based on partial nucleoprotein gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Páez, Andrés; Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Rey, Gloria; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2007-12-01

    One hundred and twenty-four rabies viruses (RABV) were isolated from humans and eight species of mammals in Colombia during 1994-2005. To determine the genetic and reservoir-associated diversity cDNA fragments encoding 88 amino acids at the carboxyl terminus of the nucleoprotein were sequenced and used in phylogenetic analyses. Eight genetic lineages (GL) were characterized. GL1, GL2 and GL3 consisted of dog-associated antigenic variant (AV) 1 RABV, isolated in the centre-east, north and southwest of Colombia, respectively. GL1 is apparently extinct in Colombia. The GL4 were AV3, AV8 and non-determined (ND) AV viruses associated with hematophagous bats. The GL5 and GL6 consisted of AV4 viruses. GL6 isolate was found associated with Tadarida brasiliensis bats. GL5 segregated independently. The GL7 and GL8 segregated independently within clades associated with colonial insectivorous and solitary bats, respectively. Both of these were represented by NDAV viruses. Viruses isolated from humans grouped within GL2, GL3 and GL4, which in turn corresponded to AV1, 3, 8 and ND. Dogs and D. rotundus are the two major rabies reservoirs and vectors in Colombia. Insectivorous bats may also be important rabies reservoirs but spillovers to other species are rare. Our data were consistent with previous studies in which partial Psi, G and L gene sequences were analyzed. Our results confirmed the existence of RABV of unclassified AV in Colombia.

  18. Gene expression profiling by cDNA-AFLP reveals potential candidate genes for partial resistance of 'Président Roulin' against Venturia inaequalis.

    PubMed

    Bastiaanse, Héloïse; Muhovski, Yordan; Parisi, Olivier; Paris, Roberta; Mingeot, Dominique; Lateur, Marc

    2014-11-29

    Scab, caused by the fungus Venturia inaequalis, is one of the most important diseases of cultivated apple. While a few scab resistance genes (R genes) governing qualitative resistance have been isolated and characterized, the biological roles of genes governing quantitative resistance, supposed to be more durable, are still unknown. This study aims to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in the partial resistance of the old Belgian apple cultivar 'Président Roulin' against V. inaequalis. A global gene expression analysis was conducted in 'Président Roulin' (partially resistant) and in 'Gala' (susceptible) challenged by V. inaequalis by using the cDNA-AFLP method (cDNA-Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism). Transcriptome analysis revealed significant modulation (up- or down-regulation) of 281 out of approximately 20,500 transcript derived fragments (TDFs) in 'Président Roulin' 48 hours after inoculation. Sequence annotation revealed similarities to several genes encoding for proteins belonging to the NBS-LRR and LRR-RLK classes of plant R genes and to other defense-related proteins. Differentially expressed genes were sorted into functional categories according to their gene ontology annotation and this expression signature was compared to published apple cDNA libraries by Gene Enrichment Analysis. The first comparison was made with two cDNA libraries from Malus x domestica uninfected leaves, and revealed in both libraries a signature of enhanced expression in 'Président Roulin' of genes involved in response to stress and photosynthesis. In the second comparison, the pathogen-responsive TDFs from the partially resistant cultivar were compared to the cDNA library from inoculated leaves of Rvi6 (HcrVf2)-transformed 'Gala' lines (complete disease resistance) and revealed both common physiological events, and notably differences in the regulation of defense response, the regulation of hydrolase activity, and response to DNA damage. TDFs were in silico

  19. Changes in Gene Expression of Arabidopsis Thaliana Cell Cultures Upon Exposure to Real and Simulated Partial- g Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengler, Svenja; Spirer, Ina; Neef, Maren; Ecke, Margret; Hauslage, Jens; Hampp, Rüdiger

    2016-06-01

    Cell cultures of the plant model organism Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed to partial- g forces during parabolic flight and clinostat experiments (0.16 g, 0.38 g and 0.5 g were tested). In order to investigate gravity-dependent alterations in gene expression, samples were metabolically quenched by the fixative RNA later Ⓡ to stabilize nucleic acids and used for whole-genome microarray analysis. An attempt to identify the potential threshold acceleration for the gravity-dependent response showed that the smaller the experienced g-force, the greater was the susceptibility of the cell cultures. Compared to short-term μ g during a parabolic flight, the number of differentially expressed genes under partial- g was lower. In addition, the effect on the alteration of amounts of transcripts decreased during partial- g parabolic flight due to the sequence of the different parabolas (0.38 g, 0.16 g and μ g). A time-dependent analysis under simulated 0.5 g indicates that adaptation occurs within minutes. Differentially expressed genes (at least 2-fold up- or down-regulated in expression) under real flight conditions were to some extent identical with those affected by clinorotation. The highest number of homologuous genes was detected within seconds of exposure to 0.38 g (both flight and clinorotation). To a considerable part, these genes deal with cell wall properties. Additionally, responses specific for clinorotation were observed.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis Highlights Defense and Signaling Pathways Mediated by Rice pi21 Gene with Partial Resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Yali; Yuan, Zhengjie; He, Haiyan; Yang, Haihe; Qu, Haiyan; Ma, Chenyan; Qu, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. The pi21 gene confers partial and durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21. In this study, comparative transcriptome profiling of the Pi21-RNAi transgenic rice line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection at different time points (0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi) were investigated using RNA sequencing. The results generated 43,222 unique genes mapped to the rice genome. In total, 1109 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the Pi21-RNAi line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection, with 103, 281, 209, 69, and 678 DEGs at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi, respectively. Functional analysis showed that most of the DEGs were involved in metabolism, transport, signaling, and defense. Among the genes assigned to plant-pathogen interaction, we identified 43 receptor kinase genes associated with pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition and calcium ion influx. The expression levels of brassinolide-insensitive 1, flagellin sensitive 2, and elongation factor Tu receptor, ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and signaling genes, were higher in the Pi21-RNAi line than Nipponbare. This suggested that there was a more robust PTI response in Pi21-RNAi plants and that ET signaling was important to rice blast resistance. We also identified 53 transcription factor genes, including WRKY, NAC, DOF, and ERF families that show differential expression between the two genotypes. This study highlights possible candidate genes that may serve a function in the partial rice blast resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21 and increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in partial resistance against M. oryzae.

  1. Transcriptome Analysis Highlights Defense and Signaling Pathways Mediated by Rice pi21 Gene with Partial Resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Jianhua; Li, Yali; Yuan, Zhengjie; He, Haiyan; Yang, Haihe; Qu, Haiyan; Ma, Chenyan; Qu, Shaohong

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast disease is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. The pi21 gene confers partial and durable resistance to Magnaporthe oryzae. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21. In this study, comparative transcriptome profiling of the Pi21-RNAi transgenic rice line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection at different time points (0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi) were investigated using RNA sequencing. The results generated 43,222 unique genes mapped to the rice genome. In total, 1109 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between the Pi21-RNAi line and Nipponbare with M. oryzae infection, with 103, 281, 209, 69, and 678 DEGs at 0, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hpi, respectively. Functional analysis showed that most of the DEGs were involved in metabolism, transport, signaling, and defense. Among the genes assigned to plant—pathogen interaction, we identified 43 receptor kinase genes associated with pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition and calcium ion influx. The expression levels of brassinolide-insensitive 1, flagellin sensitive 2, and elongation factor Tu receptor, ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and signaling genes, were higher in the Pi21-RNAi line than Nipponbare. This suggested that there was a more robust PTI response in Pi21-RNAi plants and that ET signaling was important to rice blast resistance. We also identified 53 transcription factor genes, including WRKY, NAC, DOF, and ERF families that show differential expression between the two genotypes. This study highlights possible candidate genes that may serve a function in the partial rice blast resistance mediated by the loss-of-function of Pi21 and increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in partial resistance against M. oryzae. PMID:28008334

  2. Radiation and ionization energy loss simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at Jefferson Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xin-Hu; Ye, Yun-Xiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Lu, Hai-Jiang; Zhu, Peng-Jia; Jiang, Feng-Jian

    2015-07-01

    The radiation and ionization energy loss are presented for single arm Monte Carlo simulation for the GDH sum rule experiment in Hall-A at the Jefferson Lab. Radiation and ionization energy loss are discussed for 12C elastic scattering simulation. The relative momentum ratio \\frac{{Δ p}}{p} and 12C elastic cross section are compared without and with radiative energy loss and a reasonable shape is obtained by the simulation. The total energy loss distribution is obtained, showing a Landau shape for 12C elastic scattering. This simulation work will give good support for radiation correction analysis of the GDH sum rule experiment. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275083), US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-84ER-40150 under which Jefferson Science Associates operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and Natural Science Foundation of An'hui Educational Committee (KJ2012B179)

  3. Palynomorphs of Permian Gondwana coal from borehole GDH-38, Barapukuria Coal Basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtar, A.; Kosanke, R. M.

    2000-07-01

    Thirty-two core samples of Permian Gondwana coal from three coal beds of borehole GDH-38, Barapukuria Coal Basin, Dinajpur, the north-northwestern part of Bangladesh, have been collected for palynological analysis. All samples except one yielded palynomorphs and some samples contain well-preserved and abundant palynomorphs of the gymnospermal and cryptogamic groups that are considered to be useful for future correlation studies. The lower coal bed (331.6-372.5 m) can easily be differentiated from the upper two coal beds by the presence of Alisporites, Cordaitina, Corisaccites, Hamiapollenites, Leuckisporites, Nuskoisporites, Tumoripollenites, Vestgisporites and Vittatina. It is difficult to palynologically differentiate the middle (198.1-208 m) and upper (162.3-172.9 m) coal beds as they contain a very limited number of specimens by which they can be identified. The middle bed is distinguished by the presence of Microbaculispora and Weylandites and the upper bed by the presence of a single taxon Acanthotriletes. Some of the vesiculate or saccate taxa extracted from these coal beds are typical of those occurring in Permian strata of Gondwana in India, South Africa, South America, Russia, Australia and Antarctica. They are thought to be derived from Glossopteris flora, which is characterised by an abundance of Pteridospermic plants of the gymnosperm group.

  4. Palynomorphs of Permian Gondwana coal from borehole GDH-38, Barapukuria Coal Basin, Bangladesh

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Akhtar, A.; Kosanke, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    Thirty-two core samples of Permian Gondwana coal from three coal beds of borehole GDH-38, Barapukuria Coal Basin, Dinajpur, the north-northwestern part of Bangladesh, have been collected for palynological analysis. All samples except one yielded palynomorphs and some samples contain well-preserved and abundant palynomorphs of the gymnospermal and cryptogamic groups that are considered to be useful for future correlation studies. The lower coal bed (331.6-372.5 m) can easily be differentiated from the upper two coal beds by the presence of Alisporites, Cordaitina, Corisaccites, Hamiapollenites, Leuckisporites, Nuskoisporites, Tumoripollenites, Vestgisporites and Vittatina. It is difficult to palynologically differentiate the middle (198.1-208 m) and upper (162.3-172.9 m) coal beds as they contain a very limited number of specimens by which they can be identified. The middle bed is distinguished by the presence of Microbaculispora and Weylandites and the upper bed by the presence of a single taxon Acanthotriletes. Some of the vesiculate or saccate taxa extracted from these coal beds are typical of those occurring in Permian strata of Gondwana in India, South Africa, South America, Russia, Australia and Antarctica. They are thought to be derived from Glossopteris flora, which is characterised by an abundance of Pteridospermic plants of the gymnosperm group. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science Limited. All rights reserved.

  5. Rat Hepatocytes Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis Identifies Specific Modules and Hub Genes Related to Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Xu, Jiucheng; Liu, Yunqing; Li, Juntao; Chang, Cuifang; Xu, Cunshuan

    2014-01-01

    The recovery of liver mass is mainly mediated by proliferation of hepatocytes after 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PH) in rats. Studying the gene expression profiles of hepatocytes after 2/3 PH will be helpful to investigate the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration (LR). We report here the first application of weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to analyze the biological implications of gene expression changes associated with LR. WGCNA identifies 12 specific gene modules and some hub genes from hepatocytes genome-scale microarray data in rat LR. The results suggest that upregulated MCM5 may promote hepatocytes proliferation during LR; BCL3 may play an important role by activating or inhibiting NF-kB pathway; MAPK9 may play a permissible role in DNA replication by p38 MAPK inactivation in hepatocytes proliferation stage. Thus, WGCNA can provide novel insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms of LR. PMID:24743545

  6. Suitability of partial 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis for the identification of dangerous bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ruppitsch, W; Stöger, A; Indra, A; Grif, K; Schabereiter-Gurtner, C; Hirschl, A; Allerberger, F

    2007-03-01

    In a bioterrorism event a rapid tool is needed to identify relevant dangerous bacteria. The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and the suitability of diverse databases for identifying dangerous bacterial pathogens. For rapid identification purposes a 500-bp fragment of the 16S rRNA gene of 28 isolates comprising Bacillus anthracis, Brucella melitensis, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, and eight genus-related and unrelated control strains was amplified and sequenced. The obtained sequence data were submitted to three public and two commercial sequence databases for species identification. The most frequent reason for incorrect identification was the lack of the respective 16S rRNA gene sequences in the database. Sequence analysis of a 500-bp 16S rDNA fragment allows the rapid identification of dangerous bacterial species. However, for discrimination of closely related species sequencing of the entire 16S rRNA gene, additional sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene or sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer is essential. This work provides comprehensive information on the suitability of partial 16S rDNA analysis and diverse databases for rapid and accurate identification of dangerous bacterial pathogens.

  7. 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing for the differentiation and molecular subtyping of Listeria species.

    PubMed

    Hellberg, Rosalee S; Martin, Keely G; Keys, Ashley L; Haney, Christopher J; Shen, Yuelian; Smiley, R Derike

    2013-12-01

    Use of 16S rRNA partial gene sequencing within the regulatory workflow could greatly reduce the time and labor needed for confirmation and subtyping of Listeria monocytogenes. The goal of this study was to build a 16S rRNA partial gene reference library for Listeria spp. and investigate the potential for 16S rRNA molecular subtyping. A total of 86 isolates of Listeria representing L. innocua, L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. monocytogenes were obtained for use in building the custom library. Seven non-Listeria species and three additional strains of Listeria were obtained for use in exclusivity and food spiking tests. Isolates were sequenced for the partial 16S rRNA gene using the MicroSeq ID 500 Bacterial Identification Kit (Applied Biosystems). High-quality sequences were obtained for 84 of the custom library isolates and 23 unique 16S sequence types were discovered for use in molecular subtyping. All of the exclusivity strains were negative for Listeria and the three Listeria strains used in food spiking were consistently recovered and correctly identified at the species level. The spiking results also allowed for differentiation beyond the species level, as 87% of replicates for one strain and 100% of replicates for the other two strains consistently matched the same 16S type. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Sequence diversity patterns suggesting balancing selection in partially sex-linked genes of the plant Silene latifolia are not generated by demographic history or gene flow.

    PubMed

    Guirao-Rico, Sara; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    DNA sequence diversity in genes in the partially sex-linked pseudoautosomal region (PAR) of the sex chromosomes of the plant Silene latifolia is higher than expected from within-species diversity of other genes. This could be the footprint of sexually antagonistic (SA) alleles that are maintained by balancing selection in a PAR gene (or genes) and affect polymorphism in linked genome regions. SA selection is predicted to occur during sex chromosome evolution, but it is important to test whether the unexpectedly high sequence polymorphism could be explained without it, purely by the combined effects of partial linkage with the sex-determining region and the population's demographic history, including possible introgression from Silene dioica. To test this, we applied approximate Bayesian computation-based model choice to autosomal sequence diversity data, to find the most plausible scenario for the recent history of S. latifolia and then to estimate the posterior density of the most relevant parameters. We then used these densities to simulate variation to be expected at PAR genes. We conclude that an excess of variants at high frequencies at PAR genes should arise in S. latifolia populations only for genes with strong associations with fully sex-linked genes, which requires closer linkage with the fully sex-linked region than that estimated for the PAR genes where apparent deviations from neutrality were observed. These results support the need to invoke selection to explain the S. latifolia PAR gene diversity, and encourage further work to test the possibility of balancing selection due to sexual antagonism.

  9. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) genomic approach reveals partial clustering of the furanocoumarin pathway genes in parsnip.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Sandro; Olry, Alexandre; Vautrin, Sonia; Coriton, Olivier; Ritchie, Dave; Galati, Gianni; Navrot, Nicolas; Krieger, Célia; Vialart, Guilhem; Bergès, Hélène; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Hehn, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Furanocoumarins are specialized metabolites that are involved in the defense of plants against phytophagous insects. The molecular and functional characterization of the genes involved in their biosynthetic pathway is only partially complete. Many recent reports have described gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites in plants. To investigate possible co-localization of the genes involved in the furanocoumarin pathway, we sequenced parsnip BAC clones spanning two different gene loci. We found that two genes previously identified in this pathway, CYP71AJ3 and CYP71AJ4, were located on the same BAC, whereas a third gene, PsPT1, belonged to a different BAC clone. Chromosome mapping using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) indicated that PsPT1 and the CYP71AJ3-CYP71AJ4 clusters are located on two different chromosomes. Sequencing the BAC clone harboring PsPT1 led to the identification of a gene encoding an Fe(II) α-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase (PsDIOX) situated in the neighborhood of PsPT1 and confirmed the occurrence of a second gene cluster involved in the furanocoumarin pathway. This enzyme metabolizes p-coumaroyl CoA, leading exclusively to the synthesis of umbelliferone, an important intermediate compound in furanocoumarin synthesis. This work provides an insight into the genomic organization of genes from the furanocoumarin biosynthesis pathway organized in more than one gene cluster. It also confirms that the screening of a genomic library and the sequencing of BAC clones represent a valuable tool to identify genes involved in biosynthetic pathways dedicated to specialized metabolite synthesis. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Human speech- and reading-related genes display partially overlapping expression patterns in the marmoset brain.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masaki; Okanoya, Kazuo; Koike, Taku; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Watanabe, Shigeru; Iriki, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Language is a characteristic feature of human communication. Several familial language impairments have been identified, and candidate genes for language impairments already isolated. Studies comparing expression patterns of these genes in human brain are necessary to further understanding of these genes. However, it is difficult to examine gene expression in human brain. In this study, we used a non-human primate (common marmoset; Callithrix jacchus) as a biological model of the human brain to investigate expression patterns of human speech- and reading-related genes. Expression patterns of speech disorder- (FoxP2, FoxP1, CNTNAP2, and CMIP) and dyslexia- (ROBO1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319) related genes were analyzed. We found the genes displayed overlapping expression patterns in the ocular, auditory, and motor systems. Our results enhance understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying language impairments.

  11. Partial Least Squares Based Gene Expression Analysis in EBV- Positive and EBV-Negative Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorders.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sa; Zhang, Xin; Li, Zhi-Ming; Shi, Yan-Xia; Huang, Jia-Jia; Xia, Yi; Yang, Hang; Jiang, Wen-Qi

    2013-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a common complication of therapeutic immunosuppression after organ transplantation. Gene expression profile facilitates the identification of biological difference between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive and negative PTLDs. Previous studies mainly implemented variance/regression analysis without considering unaccounted array specific factors. The aim of this study is to investigate the gene expression difference between EBV positive and negative PTLDs through partial least squares (PLS) based analysis. With a microarray data set from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we performed PLS based analysis. We acquired 1188 differentially expressed genes. Pathway and Gene Ontology enrichment analysis identified significantly over-representation of dysregulated genes in immune response and cancer related biological processes. Network analysis identified three hub genes with degrees higher than 15, including CREBBP, ATXN1, and PML. Proteins encoded by CREBBP and PML have been reported to be interact with EBV before. Our findings shed light on expression distinction of EBV positive and negative PTLDs with the hope to offer theoretical support for future therapeutic study.

  12. Phasic-like stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle augments striatal gene expression despite methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christopher D; Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Garris, Paul A; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine depletions are associated with impaired basal ganglia function, including decreased preprotachykinin mRNA expression and impaired transcriptional activation of activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) gene in striatum. Recent work implicates deficits in phasic dopamine signaling as a potential mechanism linking methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss to impaired basal ganglia function. This study thus sought to establish a causal link between phasic dopamine transmission and altered basal ganglia function by determining whether the deficits in striatal neuron gene expression could be restored by increasing phasic dopamine release. Three weeks after pretreatment with saline or a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine, rats underwent phasic- or tonic-like stimulation of ascending dopamine neurons. Striatal gene expression was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Phasic-like, but not tonic-like, stimulation induced immediate-early genes Arc and zif268 in both groups, despite the partial striatal dopamine denervation in methamphetamine-pretreated rats, with the Arc expression occurring in presumed striatonigral efferent neurons. Phasic-like stimulation also restored preprotachykinin mRNA expression. These results suggest that disruption of phasic dopamine signaling likely underlies methamphetamine-induced impairments in basal ganglia function, and that restoring phasic dopamine signaling may be a viable approach to manage long-term consequences of methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss on basal ganglia functions. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Partial Gene Sequencing of CYP1A, Vitellogenin, and Metallothionein in Mosquitofish Gambusia yucatana and Gambusia sexradiata.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Euán, Roberto; Escalante-Herrera, Karla S; Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Ground characteristics in the Yucatan Peninsula make recovery and treatment of wastewater very expensive. This situation has contributed to an increase of pollutants in the aquifer. Unfortunately, studies related to the effects of those pollutants in native organisms are scarce. The aim of this work was to obtain partial sequences of widely known genes used as biomarkers of pollutant effect in Gambusia yucatana and Gambusia sexradiata. The studied genes were: cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A); vitellogenin (VTG); metallothionein (MT), and two housekeeping genes, 18S and β-actin. From reported sequences of Gambusia affinis, primers were designed and amplification was done in the local Gambusia species exposed for 48 h to gasoline (100 µL/L, stirred for 24 h pre-exposure). Preliminary results revealed partial sequences of all genes with an approximate average length of 200 bp. BLAST analysis of found sequences indicated a minimum of 97% identity with reported sequences for G. affinis or Gambusia holbrooki showing great similarity.

  14. A mutation within the leucine-rich repeat domain of the Arabidopsis disease resistance gene RPS5 partially suppresses multiple bacterial and downy mildew resistance genes.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R F; Henk, A; Mowery, P; Holub, E; Innes, R W

    1998-01-01

    Recognition of pathogens by plants is mediated by several distinct families of functionally variable but structurally related disease resistance (R) genes. The largest family is defined by the presence of a putative nucleotide binding domain and 12 to 21 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). The function of these LRRs has not been defined, but they are speculated to bind pathogen-derived ligands. We have isolated a mutation in the Arabidopsis RPS5 gene that indicates that the LRR region may interact with other plant proteins. The rps5-1 mutation causes a glutamate-to-lysine substitution in the third LRR and partially compromises the function of several R genes that confer bacterial and downy mildew resistance. The third LRR is relatively well conserved, and we speculate that it may interact with a signal transduction component shared by multiple R gene pathways. PMID:9724691

  15. Partial sleep restriction activates immune response-related gene expression pathways: experimental and epidemiological studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Aho, Vilma; Ollila, Hanna M; Rantanen, Ville; Kronholm, Erkki; Surakka, Ida; van Leeuwen, Wessel M A; Lehto, Maili; Matikainen, Sampsa; Ripatti, Samuli; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Salomaa, Veikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Alenius, Harri; Paunio, Tiina; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-κB signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases.

  16. Partial Sleep Restriction Activates Immune Response-Related Gene Expression Pathways: Experimental and Epidemiological Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rantanen, Ville; Kronholm, Erkki; Surakka, Ida; van Leeuwen, Wessel M. A.; Lehto, Maili; Matikainen, Sampsa; Ripatti, Samuli; Härmä, Mikko; Sallinen, Mikael; Salomaa, Veikko; Jauhiainen, Matti; Alenius, Harri; Paunio, Tiina; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that short or insufficient sleep is associated with increased risk for metabolic diseases and mortality. To elucidate mechanisms behind this connection, we aimed to identify genes and pathways affected by experimentally induced, partial sleep restriction and to verify their connection to insufficient sleep at population level. The experimental design simulated sleep restriction during a working week: sleep of healthy men (N = 9) was restricted to 4 h/night for five nights. The control subjects (N = 4) spent 8 h/night in bed. Leukocyte RNA expression was analyzed at baseline, after sleep restriction, and after recovery using whole genome microarrays complemented with pathway and transcription factor analysis. Expression levels of the ten most up-regulated and ten most down-regulated transcripts were correlated with subjective assessment of insufficient sleep in a population cohort (N = 472). Experimental sleep restriction altered the expression of 117 genes. Eight of the 25 most up-regulated transcripts were related to immune function. Accordingly, fifteen of the 25 most up-regulated Gene Ontology pathways were also related to immune function, including those for B cell activation, interleukin 8 production, and NF-κB signaling (P<0.005). Of the ten most up-regulated genes, expression of STX16 correlated negatively with self-reported insufficient sleep in a population sample, while three other genes showed tendency for positive correlation. Of the ten most down-regulated genes, TBX21 and LGR6 correlated negatively and TGFBR3 positively with insufficient sleep. Partial sleep restriction affects the regulation of signaling pathways related to the immune system. Some of these changes appear to be long-lasting and may at least partly explain how prolonged sleep restriction can contribute to inflammation-associated pathological states, such as cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:24194869

  17. Trade-off between constitutive and inducible resistance against herbivores is only partially explained by gene expression and glucosinolate production.

    PubMed

    Rasmann, Sergio; Chassin, Estelle; Bilat, Julia; Glauser, Gaétan; Reymond, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    The hypothesis that constitutive and inducible plant resistance against herbivores should trade-off because they use the same resources and impose costs to plant fitness has been postulated for a long time. Negative correlations between modes of deployment of resistance and defences have been observed across and within species in common garden experiments. It was therefore tested whether that pattern of resistance across genotypes follows a similar variation in patterns of gene expression and chemical defence production. Using the genetically tractable model Arabidopsis thaliana and different modes of induction, including the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis, the specialist herbivore Pieris brassicae, and jasmonate application, constitutive and inducibility of resistance was measured across seven A. thaliana accessions that were previously selected based on constitutive levels of defence gene expression. According to theory, it was found that modes of resistance traded-off among accessions, particularly against S. littoralis, in which accessions investing in high constitutive resistance did not increase it substantially after attack and vice-versa. Accordingly, the average expression of eight genes involved in glucosinolate production negatively predicted larval growth across the seven accessions. Glucosinolate production and genes related to defence induction on healthy and herbivore-damaged plants were measured next. Surprisingly, only a partial correlation between glucosinolate production, gene expression, and the herbivore resistance results was found. These results suggest that the defence outcome of plants against herbivores goes beyond individual molecules or genes but stands on a complex network of interactions.

  18. A Gene Encoding Pentatricopeptide Repeat Protein Partially Restores Fertility in RT98-Type Cytoplasmic Male-Sterile Rice.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Keisuke; Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2016-10-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) lines in rice, which have the cytoplasm of a wild species and the nuclear genome of cultivated rice, are of value for the study of genetic interactions between the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. The RT98-type CMS line RT98A and the fertility restorer line RT98C carry the cytoplasm of the wild species Oryza rufipogon and the nuclear genome of the Taichung 65 cultivar (Oryza sativa L.). Based on a classical crossing experiment, fertility is reported to be restored gametophytically by the presence of a tentative single gene, designated Rf98, which is derived from the cytoplasm donor. Fine mapping of Rf98 revealed that at least two genes, which are closely positioned, are required for complete fertility restoration in RT98A. Here, we identified seven pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) genes that are located within a 170 kb region as candidates for Rf98 Complementation tests revealed that the introduction of one of these PPR genes, PPR762, resulted in the partial recovery of fertility with a seed setting rate up to 9.3%. We conclude that PPR762 is an essential fertility restorer gene for RT98-type CMS. The low rate of seed setting suggested that some other genes near the Rf98 locus are also necessary for the full recovery of seed setting. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Gene- and strand-specific repair in vitro: Partial purification of a transcription-repair coupling factor

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. )

    1991-09-15

    In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, actively transcribed genes and, in some instances, the template strand of these genes have been found to be repaired 2-10 times more rapidly than nontranscribed genes or the coding strand of transcribed genes. The authors demonstrate here gene- and template strand-specific repair synthesis in vitro by using an Escherichia coli cell-free extract and a plasmid carrying a gene with the strong tac promoter. Strand-specific repair of UV, 4{prime}-hydroxymethyl-4,5{prime}, 8-trimethylpsoralen, and cis-dicholorodiammine platinum(II) damage was dependent upon transcription and a functional nucleotide excision repair system and was stimulated by 6% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol. A defined system consisting of the transcription and repair proteins in highly purified form did not perform strand-specific repair; however, active fractions of extract conferred strand specificity to the defined system. Transcription-repair coupling activity was partially purified from extract by successive DEAE-agarose and gel filtration chromatography. The coupling factor is heat-labile, with an estimated M{sub r} of 100,000.

  20. Partial cloning of CYP2C23a genes and hepatic protein expression in eight representative avian species.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K P; Kawai, Y K; Nakayama, S M M; Ikenaka, Y; Mizukawa, H; Takaesu, N; Ito, M; Ikushiro, S-I; Sakaki, T; Ishizuka, M

    2015-04-01

    Large interspecies differences in avian xenobiotic metabolism have been revealed by microsome-based studies, but specific enzyme isoforms in different bird species have not yet been compared. We have previously shown that CYP2C23 genes are the most induced CYP isoforms in chicken liver. In this study, we collected partial CYP2C23a gene sequences from eight avian species (ostrich, blue-eared pheasant, snowy owl, great-horned owl, Chilean flamingo, peregrin falcon, Humboldt penguin, and black-crowned night heron) selected to cover the whole avian lineage: Paleognathae, Galloanserae, and Neoaves. Genetic analysis showed that CYP2C23 genes of Galloanserae species (chicken and blue-eared pheasant) had unique characteristics. We found some duplicated genes (CYP2C23a and CYP2C23b) and two missing amino acid residues in Galloanserae compared to the other two lineages. The genes have lower homology than in other avian lineages, which suggests Galloanserae-specific rapid evolutionary changes. These genetic features suggested that the Galloanserae are not the most representative avian species, considering that the Neoaves comprise more than 95% of birds. Moreover, we succeeded in synthesizing an antipeptide polyclonal antibody against the region of CYP2C23 protein conserved in avians. However, comparative quantitation of CYP2C23 proteins in livers from six species showed that expression levels of these proteins differed no more than fourfold. Further study is needed to clarify the function of avian CYP2C23 proteins.

  1. Partial mitochondrial gene arrangements support a close relationship between Tardigrada and Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Shi Hyun; Lee, Ji Min; Jang, Kuem-Hee; Choi, Eun Hwa; Park, Shin Ju; Chang, Cheon Young; Kim, Won; Hwang, Ui Wook

    2007-12-31

    Regions (about 3.7-3.8 kb) of the mitochondrial genomes (rrnL-cox1) of two tardigrades, a heterotardigrade, Batillipes pennaki, and a eutardigrade, Pseudobiotus spinifer, were sequenced and characterized. The gene order in Batillipes was rrnL-V-rrnS-Q-I-M-nad2-W-C-Y-cox1, and in Pseudobiotus it was rrnL-V-rrnS-Q-M-nad2-W-C-Y-cox1. With the exception of the trnI gene, the two tardigrade regions have the same gene content and order. Their gene orders are strikingly similar to that of the chelicerate Limulus polyphemus (rrnL-V-rrnS-CR-I-Q-M-nad2-W-C-Y-cox1), which is considered to be ancestral for arthropods. Although the tardigrades do not have a distinct control region (CR) within this segment, the trnI gene in Pseudobiotus is located between rrnL-trnL1 and trnL2-nad1, and the trnI gene in Batillipes is located between trnQ and trnM. In addition, the 106-bp region between trnQ and trnM in Batillipes not only contains two plausible trnI genes with opposite orientations, but also exhibits some CR-like characteristics. The mitochondrial gene arrangements of 183 other protostomes were compared. 60 (52.2%) of the 115 arthropods examined have the M-nad2-W-C-Y-cox1 arrangement, and 88 (76.5%) the M-nad2-W arrangement, as found in the tardigrades. In contrast, no such arrangement was seen in the 70 non-arthropod protostomes studied. These are the first non-sequence molecular data that support the close relationship of tardigrades and arthropods.

  2. [Cloning and analysis of geldanamycin partial biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 17997].

    PubMed

    He, Wei-Qing; Wang, Yi-Guang

    2006-11-01

    A geldanamycin (GDM) producing strain, Streptomyces hygroscopicus 17997, was isolated from Yunnan China soil by our institute researchers. GDM is an ansamycin antibiotic, which has the ability to bind with Hsp90 (Heat Shock Protein 90) and alter its function. Hsp90 is a chaperone protein involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, cell growth, cell survival, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. So it plays a key role in regulating the physiology of cells exposed to environmental stress and in maintaining the malignant phenotype of tumor cells. As an inhibitor of Hsp90, GDM possesses potent antitumor and antivirus bioactivity, but the hypato-toxicity and poor solubility in water limits its clinical use. Two GDM derivatives, 17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) and 17-dimethylamino-ethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), both showing lesser hepato-toxicity, are now in Phase II and Phase I clinic trials. In order to accomplish the structure modification of GDM by genetic means, an attempt to obtain the biosynthetic gene cluster of GDM from S. hygroscopicus 17997 was made. In this study, a pair of primers was designed according to a conserved sequence of one of possible post-PKS (polyketides synthase) modification genes, the carbamoyltransferase (CT) gene (gdmN) in GDM biosynthesis. The 732 bp PCR product was obtained from the S. hygroscopicus 17997 genomic DNA. Through the colony-PCR Binary Search Method, using the CT gene primers, six positive cosmid clones, CT1-6, were identified from the S. hygroscopicus 17997 cosmid genomic library. The CT gene containing fragments were verified and localized by Southern blot. The CT-4 positive cosmid was then sub-cloned and sequenced. Approximately 28.356kb of foreign gene sequence from CT-4 cosmid and by further PCR extension reaction was obtained. Based on BLAST analysis, this sequence contains 13 possible ORFs and their deduced functions are believed to be involved in GDM production. The ORF1 encoding products

  3. Sequence analysis of a few species of termites (Order: Isoptera) on the basis of partial characterization of COII gene.

    PubMed

    Sobti, Ranbir Chander; Kumari, Mamtesh; Sharma, Vijay Lakshmi; Sodhi, Monika; Mukesh, Manishi; Shouche, Yogesh

    2009-11-01

    The present study was aimed to get the nucleotide sequences of a part of COII mitochondrial gene amplified from individuals of five species of Termites (Isoptera: Termitidae: Macrotermitinae). Four of them belonged to the genus Odontotermes (O. obesus, O. horni, O. bhagwatii and Odontotermes sp.) and one to Microtermes (M. obesi). Partial COII gene fragments were amplified by using specific primers. The sequences so obtained were characterized to calculate the frequencies of each nucleotide bases and a high A + T content was observed. The interspecific pairwise sequence divergence in Odontotermes species ranged from 6.5% to 17.1% across COII fragment. M. obesi sequence diversity ranged from 2.5 with Odontotermes sp. to 19.0% with O. bhagwatii. Phylogenetic trees drawn on the basis of distance neighbour-joining method revealed three main clades clustering all the individuals according to their genera and families.

  4. Gene dosage effect for fumarate hydratase (FH; E.C. 4.2.1.2) in partial trisomy 1.

    PubMed

    Braunger, R; Kling, H; Krone, W; Schmid, M; Olert, J

    1977-08-31

    A strain of fibroblasts partially trisomic for the larger part of 1q (Norwood and Hoehn, 1974) contains about 1.5 times as much fumarate hydratase (FH) as various control-strains. This gene dosage effect was ascertained by (1) comparative measurements of the specific activity; (2) relating the specific activity of FH to that of reference enzymes, not influenced by the chromosomal anomaly; and (3) by immunoprecipitation methods, using a rabbit antiserum against pig heart FH which cross-reacts with the human enzyme. Among others, this gene dosage effect can be demonstrated numerically by the following parameters: Ratio of the average specific activity of FH in the trisomic strain to that of the control strains: 1.53. Corresponding ratio after dividing FH activity by that of reference enzymes; for acid phosphatase: 1.58, for glutamate dehydrogenase: 1.53. Average ratio of the immunoprecipitation areas obtained upon radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini et al. (1965): 1.56.

  5. Germinal mosaicism in a sample of families with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy with partial deletions in the DMD gene.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez-López, Cesárea; García-de Teresa, Benilde; González-del Angel, Ariadna; Alcántara-Ortigoza, Miguel Angel

    2014-02-01

    Germinal mosaicism should be considered when estimating the recurrence risk in families with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD). Germinal mosaicism, however, has not been assessed in Mexican families with deletions in the DMD gene. To determine the distribution of deletions in the two hot spots and the proportion of de novo and transmitted deletions, we analyzed 153 individuals with D/BMD and a DMD partial deletion and 322 of their maternal female relatives. Predilection for the distal hot spot was observed in 112 families (73%), while gene dosage analysis of female relatives of D/BMD patients identified germinal mosaicism deletions in at least 11.6% of the patients' families, thought to result from de novo mutations. Recurrence risk due to germinal mosaicism justifies carrier detection in maternal female relatives and prenatal diagnosis in mothers of individuals with apparently de novo DMD deletions.

  6. Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes from Freesia hybrida Play Important and Partially Overlapping Roles in the Biosynthesis of Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueqing; Liu, Xingxue; Cai, Xinquan; Shan, Xiaotong; Gao, Ruifang; Yang, Song; Han, Taotao; Wang, Shucai; Wang, Li; Gao, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) is a key enzyme in the reduction of dihydroflavonols to leucoanthocyanidins in both anthocyanin biosynthesis and proanthocyanidin accumulation. In many plant species, it is encoded by a gene family, however, how the different copies evolve either to function in different tissues or at different times or to specialize in the use of different but related substrates needs to be further investigated, especially in monocot plants. In this study, a total of eight putative DFR-like genes were firstly cloned from Freesia hybrida. Phylogenetic analysis showed that they were classified into different branches, and FhDFR1, FhDFR2, and FhDFR3 were clustered into DFR subgroup, whereas others fell into the group with cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) proteins. Then, the functions of the three FhDFR genes were further characterized. Different spatio-temporal transcription patterns and levels were observed, indicating that the duplicated FhDFR genes might function divergently. After introducing them into Arabidopsis dfr (tt3-1) mutant plants, partial complementation of the loss of cyanidin derivative synthesis was observed, implying that FhDFRs could convert dihydroquercetin to leucocyanidin in planta. Biochemical assays also showed that FhDFR1, FhDFR2, and FhDFR3 could utilize dihydromyricetin to generate leucodelphinidin, while FhDFR2 could also catalyze the formation of leucocyanidin from dihydrocyanidin. On the contrary, neither transgenic nor biochemical analysis demonstrated that FhDFR proteins could reduce dihydrokaempferol to leucopelargonidin. These results were consistent with the freesia flower anthocyanin profiles, among which delphinidin derivatives were predominant, with minor quantities of cyanidin derivatives and undetectable pelargonidin derivatives. Thus, it can be deduced that substrate specificities of DFRs were the determinant for the categories of anthocyanins aglycons accumulated in F. hybrida. Furthermore, we also found that

  7. Phylogenetic relationships among the Nymphalidae (Lepidoptera) inferred from partial sequences of the wingless gene.

    PubMed Central

    Brower, A V

    2000-01-01

    A cladistic analysis was performed on a 378 bp region of the wingless gene from 103 nymphalid species and three pierid outgroups in order to infer higher level patterns of relationship among nymphalid subfamilies and tribes. Although the data are highly homoplastic, in many instances the most parsimonious cladograms corroborate traditionally recognized groups. The results suggest that this short gene region provides a useful source of data for phylogenetic inference, provided that adequate effort is made to sample a diversity of taxa. PMID:10902686

  8. Molecular phylogenetics of cupped oysters based on partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, D T

    1994-09-01

    Partial sequences of 28S-like rDNA were amplified using PCR and sequenced for eight species of oyster and one species of mussel. Phylogenetic relationships among seven species of Crassostreinid oyster were inferred from aligned sequences by parsimony and maximum-likelihood methods. Of the 315 sites that varied, 90 were phylogenetically informative in parsimony analysis. Inference by maximum parsimony (MP) is consistent with maximum-likelihood (ML) analysis for the major lineages, yielding a tree with the topology (Mytilus edulis (Ostrea edulis ((Crassostrea rivularis (C. belcheri, C. gigas))(C. virginica, C. rhizophorae, Saccostrea cuccullata, S. commercialis)))). MP and ML analyses resolved the systematic relationships of the Saccostrea and Atlantic Crassostrea differently such that a polytomy linking these four taxa is preferred with the data available. Molecular data support a later divergence of the tropical Pacific Saccostrea from a common ancestor of the Atlantic Crassostrea species. Molecular data from domains D1, D2, and partial D3 of the 28S rDNA supply sufficient phylogenetic information to determine systematic relationships among the extant oyster taxa, from the major species groups to the family level, thus providing valuable characters that are able to supplement the paucity of morphological characters so far recognized.

  9. Partial correction of a severe molecular defect in hemophilia A, because of errors during expression of the factor VIII gene

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.; Antonarakis, S.E.; Inaba, Hiroshi

    1997-03-01

    Although the molecular defect in patients in a Japanese family with mild to moderately severe hemophilia A was a deletion of a single nucleotide T within an A{sub 8}TA{sub 2} sequence of exon 14 of the factor VIII gene, the severity of the clinical phenotype did not correspond to that expected of a frameshift mutation. A small amount of functional factor VIII protein was detected in the patient`s plasma. Analysis of DNA and RNA molecules from normal and affected individuals and in vitro transcription/translation suggested a partial correction of the molecular defect, because of the following: (i) DNA replication/RNA transcription errors resulting in restoration of the reading frame and/or (ii) {open_quotes}ribosomal frameshifting{close_quotes} resulting in the production of normal factor VIII polypeptide and, thus, in a milder than expected hemophilia A. All of these mechanisms probably were promoted by the longer run of adenines, A{sub 10} instead of A{sub 8}TA{sub 2}, after the delT. Errors in the complex steps of gene expression therefore may partially correct a severe frameshift defect and ameliorate an expected severe phenotype. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Isolation of DNA encoding sucrase genes from Streptococcus salivarius and partial characterization of the enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Houck, C M; Pear, J R; Elliott, R; Perchorowicz, J T

    1987-01-01

    Restriction enzyme fragments containing two sucrase genes have been isolated from a cosmid library of Streptococcus salivarius DNA. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and the properties of both enzymes were studied in partially purified protein extracts from E. coli. One gene encoding an invertase-type sucrase was subcloned on a 2.4-kilobase-pair fragment. The sucrase enzyme had a Km for sucrose of 48 mM and a pH optimum of 6.5. The S. salivarius sucrase clone showed no detectable hybridization to a yeast invertase clone. Two overlapping subclones which had 1 kilobase pair of DNA in common were used to localize a fructosyltransferase gene. The fructosyltransferase had a Km of 93 mM and a pH optimum of 7.0. The product of the fructosyltransferase was a levan. A fructosyltransferase clone from Bacillus subtilis did not hybridize to S. salivarius DNA. The properties of the enzymes were compared with those of previously characterized sucrases. Images PMID:3112128

  11. Porcine CD14 gene silencing partially inhibited the bacterial immune response mediated by TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chaohui; Wang, Haifei; Zhu, Guoqiang; Wu, Shenglong; Bao, Wenbin

    2017-09-10

    Cluster of differentiation antigen 14 (CD14) is the membrane receptor protein in Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway, which plays an important regulation role in not only innate immune response but also adaptive immune response. In this study, the pig kidney epithelial cell (PK15) line with CD14 gene silencing mediated by lentivirus was established and cells of CD14-RNAi and NC group were exposed to three kinds of Escherichia coli (E. coli F18ab, E. coli F18ac and E. coli K88ac) and LPS. Then qPCR and western blot were used to detect expression levels of TLR4 signaling pathway-related genes. Finally, ELISA was used to detect the level of proinflammatory cytokines in the cell culture supernatant. The results showed that the expression level of TLR4 signaling pathway-related genes in the entire signal pathway had obvious increases when cells were exposed to the stimulation induced by E. coli and LPS. In addition, the expression levels of CD14-RNAi group were overall significantly lower than NC group (P<0.05 or P<0.01), which was the same with the release levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This study revealed that pig CD14 gene silencing partially inhibited immune response to E. coli F18 invasion mediated by TLR4 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular phylogeny of Fusarium inferred from partial RNA polymerase II gene sequences

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Currently there are no robust phylogenetic hypotheses for Fusarium based on large-scale sampling across the breadth of this important group of mycotoxigenic phytopathogens. Nucleotide variation within the second largest RNA polymerase subunit (RPB2) protein-coding gene, however, has clearly demonst...

  13. Partial Reconstruction of the Ergot Alkaloid Pathway by Heterologous Gene Expression in Aspergillus nidulans

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Katy L.; Moore, Christopher T.; Panaccione, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are pharmaceutically and agriculturally important secondary metabolites produced by several species of fungi. Ergot alkaloid pathways vary among different fungal lineages, but the pathway intermediate chanoclavine-I is evolutionarily conserved among ergot alkaloid producers. At least four genes, dmaW, easF, easE, and easC, are necessary for pathway steps prior to chanoclavine-I; however, the sufficiency of these genes for chanoclavine-I synthesis has not been established. A fragment of genomic DNA containing dmaW, easF, easE, and easC was amplified from the human-pathogenic, ergot alkaloid-producing fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and transformed into Aspergillus nidulans, a model fungus that does not contain any of the ergot alkaloid synthesis genes. HPLC and LC-MS analyses demonstrated that transformed A. nidulans strains produced chanoclavine-I and an earlier pathway intermediate. Aspergillus nidulans transformants containing dmaW, easF, and either easE or easC did not produce chanoclavine-I but did produce an early pathway intermediate and, in the case of the easC transformant, an additional ergot alkaloid-like compound. We conclude that dmaW, easF, easE, and easC are sufficient for the synthesis of chanoclavine-I in A. nidulans and expressing ergot alkaloid pathway genes in A. nidulans provides a novel approach to understanding the early steps in ergot alkaloid synthesis. PMID:23435153

  14. Partial Deletion of the Bovine ED1 Gene Causes Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Cord; Distl, Ottmar; Leeb, Tosso

    2001-01-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (ED1) is characterized by hypotrichosis, reduced number of sweat glands, and incisior anodontia in human, mouse, and cattle. In affected humans and mice, mutations in the ED1 gene coding for ectodysplasin 1 are found. Ectodysplasin 1 is a novel trimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like signaling domain that is believed to be involved in the formation of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. We report the construction of a 480-kb BAC contig harboring the complete bovine ED1 gene on BTA Xq22–Xq24. Physical mapping and sequence analysis of the coding parts of the ED1 gene revealed that a large genomic region including exon 3 of the ED1 gene is deleted in cattle with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in a family of German Holstein cattle with three affected maternal half sibs. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL nucleotide database under accession nos. AJ300468, AJ300469, and AJ278907.] PMID:11591646

  15. Review of adverse events associated with false glucose readings measured by GDH-PQQ-based glucose test strips in the presence of interfering sugars.

    PubMed

    Frias, Juan P; Lim, Christine G; Ellison, John M; Montandon, Carol M

    2010-04-01

    To assess the implications of falsely elevated glucose readings measured with glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ) test strips. We conducted a review of the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database and medical literature for adverse events (AEs) associated with falsely elevated glucose readings with GDH-PQQ test strips in the presence of interfering sugars. Eighty-two reports were identified: 16 (20%) were associated with death, 46 (56%) with severe hypoglycemia, and 12 (15%) with nonsevere hypoglycemia. In eight reports (10%), the AE was not described. Forty-two events (51%) occurred in the U.S. Although most events occurred in hospitalized patients, at least 14 (17%) occurred in outpatients. Agents most commonly associated with AEs were icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysate and maltose-containing intravenous immune globulin. GDH-PQQ test strips pose a safety risk to insulin-using patients treated with agents containing or metabolized to interfering sugars.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of Xanthomonas based on partial rpoB gene sequences and species differentiation by PCR-RFLP.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Tonin, Mariana; Rodrigues-Neto, Júlio; Harakava, Ricardo; Destéfano, Suzete Aparecida Lanza

    2012-06-01

    The rpoB gene was evaluated as an alternative molecular marker for the differentiation of Xanthomonas species and in order to understand better the phylogenetic relationships within the genus. PCR-RFLP experiments using HaeIII allowed differentiation of Xanthomonas species, particularly those that affect the same plant host such as Xanthomonas albilineans and X. sacchari, pathogenic to sugar cane, Xanthomonas cucurbitae and X. melonis, which cause disease in melon, and Xanthomonas gardneri, X. vesicatoria and X. euvesicatoria/X. perforans, pathogenic to tomato. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus Xanthomonas were also examined by comparing partial rpoB gene sequences (612 nt) and the Xanthomonas species were separated into two main groups. Group I, well supported by bootstrap values of 99 %, comprised X. euvesicatoria, X. perforans, X. alfalfae, X. citri, X. dyei, X. axonopodis, X. oryzae, X. hortorum, X. bromi, X. vasicola, X. cynarae, X. gardneri, X. campestris, X. fragariae, X. arboricola, X. cassavae, X. cucurbitae, X. pisi, X. vesicatoria, X. codiaei and X. melonis. Group II, again well supported by bootstrap values of 99 %, comprised X. albilineans, X. sacchari, X. theicola, X. translucens and X. hyacinthi. The rpoB gene sequence similarity observed among the species in this study ranged from 87.8 to 99.7 %. The results of PCR-RFLP of the rpoB gene indicated that this technique can be used for diagnosis and identification of most Xanthomonas strains, including closely related species within the genus. However, species that showed identical profiles could be differentiated clearly only by sequence analysis. The results obtained in our phylogenetic analysis suggested that the rpoB gene can be used as an alternative molecular marker for genetic relatedness in the genus Xanthomonas. The results of PCR-RFLP of the rpoB gene indicate that this technique can be used for diagnosis and identification of closely related species within the genus, representing

  17. False elevation of blood glucose levels measured by GDH-PQQ-based glucometers occurs during all daily dwells in peritoneal dialysis patients using icodextrin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chiu-Yeh; Lee, Su-Chu; Hung, Chi-Chih; Lee, Jia-Jung; Kuo, Mei-Chuan; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2010-01-01

    False elevation of blood glucose levels measured by glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinoline quinone (GDH-PQQ)-based glucose self-monitoring systems; glucometer) in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients using icodextrin solution has been well documented. However, adverse hypoglycemic events caused by misreadings for blood glucose are still being reported. We aimed to study blood glucose levels measured simultaneously using different methods in PD patients with switching of icodextrin, and throughout daily exchanges either using icodextrin or not. We recruited 100 PD patients, including 40 using icodextrin; 128 hemodialysis patients served as a reference. Fasting serum glucose was measured using our laboratory reference method (LAB) and 2 glucose self-monitoring systems based on glucose dehydrogenase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (GDH-NAD) and GDH-PQQ respectively. 80 PD patients had a second follow-up study. A time course study was performed in 16 PD patients through measuring fingertip glucose using the 2 glucose self-monitoring systems during daily exchanges. The differences in measured serum glucose levels in (PQQ minus LAB) versus (NAD minus LAB) were markedly increased in PD patients using icodextrin compared to other patient groups, and was further confirmed by the follow-up study in patients that switched to icodextrin. The high serum glucose levels measured by the GDH-PQQ-based glucose self-monitoring system were present throughout all exchanges during the day in patients using icodextrin solution. False elevation of blood glucose measured by GDH-PQQ-based glucose self-monitoring systems exists in patients using icodextrin. To avoid misinterpretation of hyperglycemia and subsequent over-injection of insulin, GDH-PQQ-based glucose self-monitoring systems should not be used in PD patients.

  18. Gene cloning, heterologous overexpression and optimized refolding of the NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase from Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Susana; Pérez-Pomares, Francisco; Pire, Carmen; Ferrer, Juan; Bonete, María-José

    2006-04-01

    The NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei has been cloned. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1323 bp that encodes a NAD-GDH. The amino acid sequence displayed high homology with those from other sources, especially the highly conserved residues involved in 2-oxoglutarate binding. The expression of this gene in Escherichia coli, the refolding and further characterization, yielded a fully active NAD-GDH with the same features than those found for the wild-type enzyme. This halophilic NAD-GDH showed a highly dependence on salts for both stability and activity, being essential for the refolding of the recombinant enzyme.

  19. Partial sequence of the alpha-tubulin gene from Histomonas meleagridis isolates from the United States.

    PubMed

    Gerhold, Richard W; Lollis, Lori A; McDougald, Larry R; Beckstead, Robert B

    2011-04-01

    Histomonas meleagridis , the causative agent of histomoniasis, is a protozoan parasite classified in the Dientamoebidae (order Tritrichomonadida). The α-tubulin gene of 7 H. meleagridis isolates originating from either domestic chickens or turkeys from the United States was amplified by nested PCR and sequenced. A 91.4-99.8% nucleotide identity was shared among the 7 different sequences, and phylogenetic analysis disclosed that the 7 isolates were divided into at least 3 clades. These sequences had a 91-99% nucleotide identity and a 96-100% amino acid identity compared with 3 H. meleagridis α-tubulin sequences obtained from isolates originating from turkeys in Germany. Further α-tubulin gene analysis from species in the Dientamoebidae will be useful in elucidating the evolutionary relationship of these protozoans.

  20. High-resolution mapping of genes involved in plant stage-specific partial resistance of barley to leaf rust.

    PubMed

    Yeo, F K S; Bouchon, R; Kuijken, R; Loriaux, A; Boyd, C; Niks, R E; Marcel, T C

    2017-01-01

    Partial resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) Rphq11 and rphq16 against Puccinia hordei isolate 1.2.1 were previously mapped in seedlings of the mapping populations Steptoe/Morex and Oregon Wolfe Barleys, respectively. In this study, QTL mapping was performed at adult plant stage for the two mapping populations challenged with the same rust isolate. The results suggest that Rphq11 and rphq16 are effective only at seedling stage, and not at adult plant stage. The cloning of several genes responsible for partial resistance of barley to P. hordei will allow elucidation of the molecular basis of this type of plant defence. A map-based cloning approach requires to fine-map the QTL in a narrow genetic window. In this study, Rphq11 and rphq16 were fine-mapped using an approach aiming at speeding up the development of plant material and simplifying its evaluation. The plant materials for fine-mapping were identified from early plant materials developed to produce QTL-NILs. The material was first selected to carry the targeted QTL in heterozygous condition and susceptibility alleles at other resistance QTLs in homozygous condition. This strategy took four to five generations to obtain fixed QTL recombinants (i.e., homozygous resistant at the Rphq11 or rphq16 QTL alleles, homozygous susceptible at the non-targeted QTL alleles). In less than 2 years, Rphq11 was fine-mapped into a 0.2-cM genetic interval and a 1.4-cM genetic interval for rphq16. The strongest candidate gene for Rphq11 is a phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase. Thus far, no candidate gene was identified for rphq16.

  1. MDR-1 and MRP2 Gene Polymorphisms in Mexican Epileptic Pediatric Patients with Complex Partial Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Rayo-Mares, Dario; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; López-García, Miguel Angel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1/ABCB1 and MRP2/ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with ADR and patients with good response (CTR) to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples In Material and Methods, from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to AEDs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA) and rs2032582 (AT and AG) were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT) and 66744T > A (TG) were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy (ADR) used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with ADR. PMID:25346718

  2. MDR-1 and MRP2 Gene Polymorphisms in Mexican Epileptic Pediatric Patients with Complex Partial Seizures.

    PubMed

    Escalante-Santiago, David; Feria-Romero, Iris Angélica; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Rayo-Mares, Dario; Fagiolino, Pietro; Vázquez, Marta; Escamilla-Núñez, Consuelo; Grijalva-Otero, Israel; López-García, Miguel Angel; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Although the Pgp efflux transport protein is overexpressed in resected tissue of patients with epilepsy, the presence of polymorphisms in MDR1/ABCB1 and MRP2/ABCC2 in patients with antiepileptic-drugs resistant epilepsy (ADR) is controversial. The aim of this study was to perform an exploratory study to identify nucleotide changes and search new and reported mutations in patients with ADR and patients with good response (CTR) to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a rigorously selected population. We analyzed 22 samples In Material and Methods, from drug-resistant patients with epilepsy and 7 samples from patients with good response to AEDs. Genomic DNA was obtained from leukocytes. Eleven exons in both genes were genotyped. The concentration of drugs in saliva and plasma was determined. The concentration of valproic acid in saliva was lower in ADR than in CRT. In ABCB1, five reported SNPs and five unreported nucleotide changes were identified; rs2229109 (GA) and rs2032582 (AT and AG) were found only in the ADR. Of six SNPs associated with the ABCC2 that were found in the study population, rs3740066 (TT) and 66744T > A (TG) were found only in the ADR. The strongest risk factor in the ABCB1 gene was identified as the TA genotype of rs2032582, whereas for the ABCC2 gene the strongest risk factor was the T allele of rs3740066. The screening of SNPs in ACBC1 and ABCC2 indicates that the Mexican patients with epilepsy in this study display frequently reported ABCC1 polymorphisms; however, in the study subjects with a higher risk factor for drug resistance, new nucleotide changes were found in the ABCC2 gene. Thus, the population of Mexican patients with AED-resistant epilepsy (ADR) used in this study exhibits genetic variability with respect to those reported in other study populations; however, it is necessary to explore this polymorphism in a larger population of patients with ADR.

  3. Structure and partial genomic sequence of the human E2F1 gene.

    PubMed

    Neuman, E; Sellers, W R; McNeil, J A; Lawrence, J B; Kaelin, W G

    1996-09-16

    The E2F family of transcription factors appears to play a critical role in the transcription of certain genes required for cell cycle progression. E2F1, the first cloned member of this family, is regulated during the cell cycle at the mRNA level by changes in transcription of the E2F1 gene and at the protein level by complex formation with proteins such as the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB), cyclin A and DP1. E2F1 can override a pRB-induced G1/S block and can behave as an oncogene in certain cells. E2F1 was cloned and was found to contain seven exons. The dinucleotides at the 5' and 3' splice sites of intron 4 do not agree with consensus splice site sequences. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized E2F1 to chromosome 20q11. Knowledge of the organization of E2F1 may facilitate identification of additional E2F family members, as well as detection of E2F1 abnormalities in human tumors.

  4. Partially phosphorylated Pho4 activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Springer, Michael; Wykoff, Dennis D; Miller, Nicole; O'Shea, Erin K

    2003-11-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin-CDK complex Pho80-Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80-Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80-Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs.

  5. Partially Phosphorylated Pho4 Activates Transcription of a Subset of Phosphate-Responsive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nicole

    2003-01-01

    A cell's ability to generate different responses to different levels of stimulus is an important component of an adaptive environmental response. Transcriptional responses are frequently controlled by transcription factors regulated by phosphorylation. We demonstrate that differential phosphorylation of the budding yeast transcription factor Pho4 contributes to differential gene expression. When yeast cells are grown in high-phosphate growth medium, Pho4 is phosphorylated on four critical residues by the cyclin–CDK complex Pho80–Pho85 and is inactivated. When yeast cells are starved for phosphate, Pho4 is dephosphorylated and fully active. In intermediate-phosphate conditions, a form of Pho4 preferentially phosphorylated on one of the four sites accumulates and activates transcription of a subset of phosphate-responsive genes. This Pho4 phosphoform binds differentially to phosphate-responsive promoters and helps to trigger differential gene expression. Our results demonstrate that three transcriptional outputs can be generated by a pathway whose regulation is controlled by one kinase, Pho80–Pho85, and one transcription factor, Pho4. Differential phosphorylation of Pho4 by Pho80–Pho85 produces phosphorylated forms of Pho4 that differ in their ability to activate transcription, contributing to multiple outputs. PMID:14624238

  6. The Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) Testing Assay in the Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infections: A High Sensitive Screening Test and an Essential Step in the Proposed Laboratory Diagnosis Workflow for Developing Countries like China.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-Wei; Xiao, Meng; Kudinha, Timothy; Xu, Zhi-Peng; Sun, Lin-Ying; Hou, Xin; Zhang, Li; Fan, Xin; Kong, Fanrong; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in North America and Europe has increased significantly since the 2000s. However, CDI is not widely recognized in China and other developing countries due to limited laboratory diagnostic capacity and low awareness. Most published studies on laboratory workflows for CDI diagnosis are from developed countries, and thus may not be suitable for most developing countries. Therefore, an alternative strategy for developing countries is needed. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) test and its associated workflow on 416 fecal specimens from suspected CDI cases. The assay exhibited excellent sensitivity (100.0%) and specificity (92.8%), compared to culture based method, and thus could be a good screening marker for C. difficile but not for indication of toxin production. The VIDAS CDAB assay, which can detect toxin A/B directly from fecal specimens, showed good specificity (99.7%) and positive predictive value (97.2%), but low sensitivity (45.0%) and negative predictive value (88.3%), compared with PCR-based toxin gene detection. Therefore, we propose a practical and efficient GDH test based workflow strategy for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries like China. By applying this new workflow, the CDI laboratory diagnosis rate was notably improved in our center, yet the increasing cost was kept at a minimum level. Furthermore, to gain some insights into the genetic population structure of C. difficile isolates from our hospital, we performed MLST and PCR toxin gene typing.

  7. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Gornik, Kara R.; Ramsey, David T.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Bartoe, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968–77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  8. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Gornik, Kara R; Ramsey, David T; Dubielzig, Richard R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Bartoe, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model.

  9. Multi-class cancer classification via partial least squares with gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Danh V; Rocke, David M

    2002-09-01

    Discrimination between two classes such as normal and cancer samples and between two types of cancers based on gene expression profiles is an important problem which has practical implications as well as the potential to further our understanding of gene expression of various cancer cells. Classification or discrimination of more than two groups or classes (multi-class) is also needed. The need for multi-class discrimination methodologies is apparent in many microarray experiments where various cancer types are considered simultaneously. Thus, in this paper we present the extension to the classification methodology proposed earlier Nguyen and Rocke (2002b; Bioinformatics, 18, 39-50) to classify cancer samples from multiple classes. The methodologies proposed in this paper are applied to four gene expression data sets with multiple classes: (a) a hereditary breast cancer data set with (1) BRCA1-mutation, (2) BRCA2-mutation and (3) sporadic breast cancer samples, (b) an acute leukemia data set with (1) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), (2) T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and (3) B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) samples, (c) a lymphoma data set with (1) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), (2) B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL) and (3) follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, and (d) the NCI60 data set with cell lines derived from cancers of various sites of origin. In addition, we evaluated the classification algorithms and examined the variability of the error rates using simulations based on randomization of the real data sets. We note that there are other methods for addressing multi-class prediction recently and our approach is along the line of Nguyen and Rocke (2002b; Bioinformatics, 18, 39-50). dnguyen@stat.tamu.edu; dmrocke@ucdavis.edu

  10. Effects of partial deletion of the wzm and wzt genes on lipopolysaccharide synthesis and virulence of Brucella abortus S19.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuran; Wang, Lin; Lu, Tiancheng; Yang, Yanling; Chen, Si; Zhang, Rui; Lang, Xulong; Yan, Guangmou; Qian, Jing; Wang, Xiaoxu; Meng, Lingyi; Wang, Xinglong

    2014-06-01

    Brucellosis is a worldwide human and animal infectious disease, and the effective methods of its control are immunisation of animals by vaccination and elimination. Brucella abortus S19 is one of the popular vaccines with virulence in the control of cattle Brucellosis. In the present study, allelic exchange plasmids of wzm and wzt genes and partial knockout mutants of wzm and wzt were constructed to evaluate the resulting difference in virulence of B. abortus S19. PCR analysis revealed that the target genes were knocked out. The mutants were rough mutants and they could be differentiated from natural infection by the Rose Bengal plate and standard agglutination tests. The molecular weights of lipopolysaccharides of the Δwzm and Δwzt mutants were clustered between 25 and 40 kDa, and 30 and 35 kDa separately, and were markedly different from those in B. abortus S19. The virulence of B. abortus Δwzm and Δwzt was decreased compared with that of B. abortus S19 in mice. All these results identified that there were several differences between the wzm and wzt genes on lipopolysaccharide synthesis and on the virulence of B. abortus.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis-like phenotype in feline Sandhoff disease and partial correction after AAV gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gray-Edwards, Heather L; Brunson, Brandon L; Holland, Merrilee; Hespel, Adrien-Maxence; Bradbury, Allison M; McCurdy, Victoria J; Beadlescomb, Patricia M; Randle, Ashley N; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Beyers, Ronald J; Johnson, Aime K; Voyles, Meredith L; Montgomery, Ronald D; Wilson, Diane U; Hudson, Judith A; Cox, Nancy R; Baker, Henry J; Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Martin, Douglas R

    2015-01-01

    Sandhoff disease (SD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the enzyme β-N-acetylhexosaminidase. Children with infantile onset SD develop seizures, loss of motor tone and swallowing problems, eventually reaching a vegetative state with death typically by 4years of age. Other symptoms include vertebral gibbus and cardiac abnormalities strikingly similar to those of the mucopolysaccharidoses. Isolated fibroblasts from SD patients have impaired catabolism of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). To evaluate mucopolysaccharidosis-like features of the feline SD model, we utilized radiography, MRI, echocardiography, histopathology and GAG quantification of both central nervous system and peripheral tissues/fluids. The feline SD model exhibits cardiac valvular and structural abnormalities, skeletal changes and spinal cord compression that are consistent with accumulation of GAGs, but are much less prominent than the severe neurologic disease that defines the humane endpoint (4.5±0.5months). Sixteen weeks after intracranial AAV gene therapy, GAG storage was cleared in the SD cat cerebral cortex and liver, but not in the heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, spleen, pancreas, small intestine, skin, or urine. GAG storage worsens with time and therefore may become a significant source of pathology in humans whose lives are substantially lengthened by gene therapy or other novel treatments for the primary, neurologic disease.

  12. Electronic structure and metallization of cubic GdH3 under pressure: Ab initio many-body GW calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Bo; Zhang, Yachao

    2016-07-01

    The electronic structures of the cubic GdH3 are extensively investigated using the ab initio many-body GW calculations treating the Gd 4f electrons either in the core (4f-core) or in the valence states (4f-val). Different degrees of quasiparticle (QP) self-consistent calculations with the different starting points are used to correct the failures of the GGA/GGA + U/HSE03 calculations. In the 4f-core case, GGA + G0W0 calculations give a fundamental band gap of 1.72 eV, while GGA+ GW0 or GGA + GW calculations present a larger band gap. In the 4f-val case, the nonlocal exchange-correlation (xc) functional HSE03 can account much better for the strong localization of the 4f states than the semilocal or Hubbard U corrected xc functional in the Kohn-Sham equation. We show that the fundamental gap of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) or ferromagnetic (FM) GdH3 can be opened up by solving the QP equation with improved starting point of eigenvalues and wave functions given by HSE03. The HSE03 + G0W0 calculations present a fundamental band gap of 2.73 eV in the AFM configuration, and the results of the corresponding GW0 and GW calculations are 2.89 and 3.03 eV, respectively. In general, for the cubic structure, the fundamental gap from G0W0 calculations in the 4f-core case is the closest to the real result. By G0W0 calculations in the 4f-core case, we find that H or Gd defects can strongly affect the band structure, especially the H defects. We explain the mechanism in terms of the possible electron correlation on the hydrogen site. Under compression, the insulator-to-metal transition in the cubic GdH3 occurs around 40 GPa, which might be a satisfied prediction.

  13. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Paolella, Brenton R; Gibson, William J; Urbanski, Laura M; Alberta, John A; Zack, Travis I; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Nichols, Caitlin A; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Brown, Meredith S; Lamothe, Rebecca; Yu, Yong; Choi, Peter S; Obeng, Esther A; Heckl, Dirk; Wei, Guo; Wang, Belinda; Tsherniak, Aviad; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Root, David E; Cowley, Glenn S; Buhrlage, Sara J; Stiles, Charles D; Ebert, Benjamin L; Hahn, William C; Reed, Robin; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-02-08

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent. One of these, the pre-mRNA splicing factor SF3B1, is also frequently mutated in cancer. We validated SF3B1 as a CYCLOPS gene and found that human cancer cells harboring partial SF3B1 copy-loss lack a reservoir of SF3b complex that protects cells with normal SF3B1 copy number from cell death upon partial SF3B1 suppression. These data provide a catalog of copy-number associated gene dependencies and identify partial copy-loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel, non-driver cancer gene dependency.

  14. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Paolella, Brenton R; Gibson, William J; Urbanski, Laura M; Alberta, John A; Zack, Travis I; Bandopadhayay, Pratiti; Nichols, Caitlin A; Agarwalla, Pankaj K; Brown, Meredith S; Lamothe, Rebecca; Yu, Yong; Choi, Peter S; Obeng, Esther A; Heckl, Dirk; Wei, Guo; Wang, Belinda; Tsherniak, Aviad; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Root, David E; Cowley, Glenn S; Buhrlage, Sara J; Stiles, Charles D; Ebert, Benjamin L; Hahn, William C; Reed, Robin; Beroukhim, Rameen

    2017-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent. One of these, the pre-mRNA splicing factor SF3B1, is also frequently mutated in cancer. We validated SF3B1 as a CYCLOPS gene and found that human cancer cells harboring partial SF3B1 copy-loss lack a reservoir of SF3b complex that protects cells with normal SF3B1 copy number from cell death upon partial SF3B1 suppression. These data provide a catalog of copy-number associated gene dependencies and identify partial copy-loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel, non-driver cancer gene dependency. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23268.001 PMID:28177281

  15. Molecular characterization of partial fusion gene and C-terminus extension length of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene of recently isolated Newcastle disease virus isolates in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Newcastle disease (ND), caused by Newcastle disease virus (NDV), is a highly contagious disease of birds and has been one of the major causes of economic losses in the poultry industry. Despite routine vaccination programs, sporadic cases have occasionally occurred in the country and remain a constant threat to commercial poultry. Hence, the present study was aimed to characterize NDV isolates obtained from clinical cases in various locations of Malaysia between 2004 and 2007 based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis of partial F gene and C-terminus extension length of HN gene. Results The coding region of eleven NDV isolates fusion (F) gene and carboxyl terminal region of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene including extensions were amplified by reverse transcriptase PCR and directly sequenced. All the isolates have shown to have non-synonymous to synonymous base substitution rate ranging between 0.081 - 0.264 demonstrating presence of negative selection. Analysis based on F gene showed the characterized isolates possess three different types of protease cleavage site motifs; namely 112RRQKRF117, 112RRRKRF117 and 112GRQGRL117 and appear to show maximum identities with isolates in the region such as cockatoo/14698/90 (Indonesia), Ch/2000 (China), local isolate AF2240 indicating the high similarity of isolates circulating in the South East Asian countries. Meanwhile, one of the isolates resembles commonly used lentogenic vaccine strains. On further characterization of the HN gene, Malaysian isolates had C-terminus extensions of 0, 6 and 11 amino acids. Analysis of the phylogenetic tree revealed that the existence of three genetic groups; namely, genotype II, VII and VIII. Conclusions The study concluded that the occurrence of three types of NDV genotypes and presence of varied carboxyl terminus extension lengths among Malaysian isolates incriminated for sporadic cases. PMID:20691110

  16. Identification and partial characterization of a candidate gene for X-linked retinopathies using a lateral approach

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, P.; MacDonald, I.M.; Sood, R.; Smith, C.; Pilon, R.; Tenniswood, M. )

    1993-03-01

    Using library to library cross-screening the authors have identified a number of genomic clones that harbor X-linked sequences expressed in the human choroid/retina. They describe the characterization of one of these, designated XEH.8 (DXS542), which is localized to Xp11.3-q12. Isolation, partial sequencing, and Northern analysis of the cognate cDNA (XEH.8[sub c]), has shown that the cDNA has some homology to the dystrophin gene and hybridizes to a 10-kb mRNA present in the choroid and retina but not in fibroblasts. This expressed sequence maps to the same region of the X chromosome as several known X-linked ophthalmic diseases, including Norrie disease, retinitis pigmentosa 2, congenital night blindness and Aland Island eye disease. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  17. 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA and internal transcribed spacers ribosomal DNA as differential markers of Trichuris discolor populations.

    PubMed

    Callejón, R; Halajian, A; de Rojas, M; Marrugal, A; Guevara, D; Cutillas, C

    2012-05-25

    Comparative morphological, biometrical and molecular studies of Trichuris discolor isolated from Bos taurus from Spain and Iran was carried out. Furthermore, Trichuris ovis isolated from B. taurus and Capra hircus from Spain has been, molecularly, analyzed. Morphological studies revealed clear differences between T. ovis and T. discolor isolated from B. taurus but differences were not observed between populations of T. discolor isolated from different geographical regions. Nevertheless, the molecular studies based on the amplification and sequencing of the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 ribosomal DNA and 16S partial gene mitochondrial DNA showed clear differences between both populations of T. discolor from Spain and Iran suggesting two cryptic species. Phylogenetic studies corroborated these data. Thus, phylogenetic trees based on ITS1, ITS2 and 16S partial gene sequences showed that individuals of T. discolor from B. taurus from Iran clustered together and separated, with high bootstrap values, of T. discolor isolated from B. taurus from Spain, while populations of T. ovis from B. taurus and C. hircus from Spain clustered together but separated with high bootstrap values of both populations of T. discolor. Furthermore, a comparative phylogenetic study has been carried out with the ITS1and ITS2 sequences of Trichuris species from different hosts. Three clades were observed: the first clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing herbivores (T. discolor, T. ovis, Trichuris leporis and Trichuris skrjabini), the second clustered all the species of Trichuris parasitizing omnivores (Trichuris trichiura and Trichuris suis) and finally, the third clustered species of Trichuris parasitizing carnivores (Trichuris muris, Trichuris arvicolae and Trichuris vulpis). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids partially revert the metabolic gene expression profile induced by long-term calorie restriction.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Cánovas, Ángela; Medrano, Juan F; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Villalba, José Manuel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon J

    2016-05-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) consistently extends longevity and delays age-related diseases across several animal models. We have previously shown that different dietary fat sources can modulate life span and mitochondrial ultrastructure, function and membrane fatty acid composition in mice maintained on a 40% CR. In particular, animals consuming lard as the main fat source (CR-Lard) lived longer than CR mice consuming diets with soybean oil (CR-Soy) or fish oil (CR-Fish) as the predominant lipid source. In the present work, a transcriptomic analysis in the liver and skeletal muscle was performed in order to elucidate possible mechanisms underlying the changes in energy metabolism and longevity induced by dietary fat in CR mice. After 8 months of CR, transcription downstream of several mediators of inflammation was inhibited in liver. In contrast, proinflammatory signaling was increased in the CR-Fish versus other CR groups. Dietary fish oil induced a gene expression pattern consistent with increased transcriptional regulation by several cytokines (TNF, GM-CSF, TGF-β) and sex hormones when compared to the other CR groups. The CR-Fish also had lower expression of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and increased expression of mitochondrial and peroxisomal fatty acid β-oxidation genes than the other CR diet groups. Our data suggest that a diet high in n-3 PUFA, partially reverts CR-related changes in gene expression of key processes, such as inflammation and steroid hormone signaling, and this may mitigate life span extension with CR in mice consuming diets high in fish oil.

  19. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the Schwanniomyces occidentalis NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, P A; Connerton, I F; Watson, D C; Johnston, J R

    1991-08-01

    The cloned NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes of Aspergillus nidulans (gdhA) and Neurospora crassa (am) have been shown to hybridize under reduced stringency conditions to genomic sequences of the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Using 5' and 3' gene-specific probes, a unique 5.1 kb BclI restriction fragment that encompasses the entire Schwanniomyces sequence has been identified. A recombinant clone bearing the unique BclI fragment has been isolated from a pool of enriched clones in the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector pWH5 by colony hybridization. The identity of the plasmid clone was confirmed by functional complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gdh-1 mutation. The nucleotide sequence of the Schw. occidentalis GDH gene, which consists of 1380 nucleotides in a continuous reading frame of 459 amino acids, has been determined. The predicted amino acid sequence shows considerable homology with GDH proteins from other fungi and significant homology with all other available GDH sequences.

  20. Cloning, partial sequence, expression, and antigenic analysis of the filamentous hemagglutinin gene of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Delisse-Gathoye, A M; Locht, C; Jacob, F; Raaschou-Nielsen, M; Heron, I; Ruelle, J L; de Wilde, M; Cabezon, T

    1990-01-01

    The gene coding for the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), one of the main factors involved in mediating adherence of Bordetella pertussis to ciliated host cells, was cloned in Escherichia coli, and the 3,500-base-pair nucleotide sequence encoding the amino-terminal region was determined. Molecular cloning, together with the characterization of recombinant FHA-related proteins produced in E. coli, revealed that the primary translation product is a protein of about 370 kilodaltons (kDa). The mature 220-kDa FHA polypeptide secreted by B. pertussis is most probably generated by proteolytic processing that eliminates a carboxy-terminal portion of about 150 kDa. The 1,087 amino-terminal residues of the predicted FHA sequence showed a number of remarkable features. Extensive homology to the Serratia marcescens and Proteus mirabilis hemolysin proteins was found between amino acids 91 and 205 of the FHA sequence, suggesting involvement of this FHA domain in host cell binding or secretion of FHA from B. pertussis. In addition, two regions containing repetitive amino acid sequences were identified. One region, extending from residues 382 to 664, was formed by six repeats, and a second, extending from residues 701 to 912, contained three repeats. The reactivities of several recombinant FHA-derived proteins with a panel of monoclonal antibodies identified at least four epitopes composing an immunoreactive domain present in the carboxy-terminal moiety of the mature FHA. Images PMID:1696934

  1. Phylogenetic relationships of conifers inferred from partial 28S rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stefanoviac, S; Jager, M; Deutsch, J; Broutin, J; Masselot, M

    1998-05-01

    The conifers, which traditionally comprise seven families, are the largest and most diverse group of living gymnosperms. Efforts to systematize this diversity without a cladistic phylogenetic framework have often resulted in the segregation of certain genera and/or families from the conifers. In order to understand better the relationships between the families, we performed cladistic analyses using a new data set obtained from 28S rRNA gene sequences. These analyses strongly support the monophyly of conifers including Taxaceae. Within the conifers, the Pinaceae are the first to diverge, being the sister group of the rest of conifers. A recently discovered Australian genus Wollemia is confirmed to be a natural member of the Araucariaceae. The Taxaceae are nested within the conifer clade, being the most closely related to the Cephalotaxaceae. The Taxodiaceae and Cupressaceae together form a monophyletic group. Sciadopitys should be considered as constituting a separate family. These relationships are consistent with previous cladistic analyses of morphological and molecular (18S rRNA, rbcL) data. Furthermore, the well-supported clade linking the Araucariaceae and Podocarpaceae, which has not been previously reported, suggests that the common ancestor of these families, both having the greatest diversity in the Southern Hemisphere, inhabited Gondwanaland.

  2. [Genetic polymorphism for GOT and GDH loci of Scotch pine seed embryos in the area of nitrogen emissions from the chemical enterprise].

    PubMed

    Korshikov, I I; Demkovich, A E

    2011-01-01

    Variability for the loci GOT and GDH of seed embryos of three subpopulations of Pinus sylvestris L. exposed to the emissions from the chemical enterprise manufacturing nitrogen fertilizers was studied during four years. The trend to heterozygosity reduction and increased occurrence of the cases of significant deviation of the distribution of genotypes from the theoretically expected one was shown.

  3. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Asao; Suemori, Hirofumi; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Mitani, Hiroshi; Landes, Reid D.; Nakamura, Nori

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3’ portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas), fixed whole mount (small intestine), or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes). The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy) increased the frequency moderately (~2 times) in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation). Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the background mutation

  4. Sequence variations of the partially dominant DELLA gene Rht-B1c in wheat and their functional impacts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wen; Deng, Qingyan; Jia, Haiyan; Wei, Lingzhu; Wei, Jingbo; Wan, Hongshen; Yang, Liming; Cao, Wenjin; Ma, Zhengqiang

    2013-08-01

    Rht-B1c, allelic to the DELLA protein-encoding gene Rht-B1a, is a natural mutation documented in common wheat (Triticum aestivum). It confers variation to a number of traits related to cell and plant morphology, seed dormancy, and photosynthesis. The present study was conducted to examine the sequence variations of Rht-B1c and their functional impacts. The results showed that Rht-B1c was partially dominant or co-dominant for plant height, and exhibited an increased dwarfing effect. At the sequence level, Rht-B1c differed from Rht-B1a by one 2kb Veju retrotransposon insertion, three coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), one 197bp insertion, and four SNPs in the 1kb upstream sequence. Haplotype investigations, association analyses, transient expression assays, and expression profiling showed that the Veju insertion was primarily responsible for the extreme dwarfing effect. It was found that the Veju insertion changed processing of the Rht-B1c transcripts and resulted in DELLA motif primary structure disruption. Expression assays showed that Rht-B1c caused reduction of total Rht-1 transcript levels, and up-regulation of GATA-like transcription factors and genes positively regulated by these factors, suggesting that one way in which Rht-1 proteins affect plant growth and development is through GATA-like transcription factor regulation.

  5. The equine herpesvirus 1 gene 63 RING finger protein partially complements Vmw110, its herpes simplex virus type 1 counterpart.

    PubMed

    Everett, R; Orr, A; Elliott, M

    1995-09-01

    All alpha herpesviruses of known DNA sequence have been found to encode a protein with similarities to immediate early protein Vmw110 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The conserved portion of this family of proteins is a characteristic zinc binding module, known as a RING finger or C3HC4 domain. Examples of RING finger domains occur in many other proteins of diverse evolutionary origin and function. Recently, the solution structure of the equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) RING finger protein, encoded by gene 63, has been solved. To investigate whether this structure could be considered to be a paradigm of herpesvirus RING domains, we have constructed a recombinant HSV-1 which expresses the EHV-1 gene 63 protein (EHVg63) in place of Vmw110. Comparison of the growth properties of the recombinant with those of wild-type and Vmw110-defective viruses indicates that EHVg63 is able to fulfil partially, but not completely, the roles of Vmw110 during virus growth in tissue culture.

  6. Alteration of a recombinant protein N-glycan structure in silkworms by partial suppression of N-acetylglucosaminidase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tatsuya; Kikuta, Kotaro; Kanematsu, Ayumi; Kondo, Sachiko; Yagi, Hirokazu; Kato, Koichi; Park, Enoch Y

    2017-09-01

    To synthesize complex type N-glycans in silkworms, shRNAs against the fused lobe from Bombyx mori (BmFDL), which codes N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase) in the Golgi, was expressed by recombinant B. mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) in silkworm larvae. Expression was under the control of the actin promoter of B. mori or the U6-2 and i.e.-2 promoters from Orgyia pseudotsugata multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (OpMNPV). The reduction of specific GlcNAcase activity was observed in Bm5 cells and silkworm larvae using the U6-2 promoter. In silkworm larvae, the partial suppression of BmFDL gene expression was observed. When shRNA against BmFDL was expressed under the control of U6-2 promoter, the Man3GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc structure appeared in a main N-glycans of recombinant human IgG. These results suggested that the control of BmFDL expression by its shRNA in silkworms caused the modification of its N-glycan synthetic pathway, which may lead to the alteration of N-glycans in the expressed recombinant proteins. Suppression of BmFDL gene expression by shRNA is not sufficient to synthesize complex N-glycans in silkworm larvae but can modify the N-glycan synthetic pathway.

  7. The phylogenetic position of Allocreadiidae (Trematoda: Digenea) from partial sequences of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Anindo; Rosas Valdez, Rogelio; Johnson, Ryan C; Hoffmann, Brian; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2007-02-01

    Species of Allocreadiidae are an important component of the parasite fauna of freshwater vertebrates, particularly fishes, and yet their systematic relationships with other trematodes have not been clarified. Partial sequences of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes from 3 representative species of Allocreadiidae, i.e., Crepidostomum cooperi, Bunodera mediovitellata, and Polylekithum ictaluri, and from 79 other taxa representing 78 families of trematodes obtained from GenBank, were used in a phylogenetic analysis to address the relationships of Allocreadiidae with other plagiorchiiforms/plagiorchiidans. Maximum parsimony and Bayesian analyses of combined 18S and 28S rRNA gene sequence data place 2 of the allocreadiids, Crepidostomum cooperi and Bunodera mediovitellata, in a clade with species of Callodistomidae and Gorgoderidae, which, in turn is sister to a clade containing Polylekithum ictaluri and representatives of Encyclometridae, Dicrocoelidae, and Orchipedidae, a grouping supported by high bootstrap values. These results suggest that Polylekithum ictaluri is not an allocreadiid, a conclusion that is supported by reported differences between its cercaria and that of other allocreadiids. Although details of the life cycle of callodistomids, the sister taxon to Allocreadiidae, remain unknown, the relationship of Allocreadiidae and Gorgoderidae is consistent with their larval development in bivalve, rather than gastropod, molluscs, and with their host relationships (predominantly freshwater vertebrates). The results also indicate that, whereas Allocreadiidae is not a basal taxon, it is not included within the suborder Plagiorchiata. No support was found for a direct relationship between allocreadiids and opecoelids either.

  8. Plasticity response in the contralesional hemisphere after subtle neurotrauma: gene expression profiling after partial deafferentation of the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Daniel; Wilhelmsson, Ulrika; Nilsson, Michael; Kubista, Mikael; Ståhlberg, Anders; Pekna, Marcela; Pekny, Milos

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrauma or focal brain ischemia are known to trigger molecular and structural responses in the uninjured hemisphere. These responses may have implications for tissue repair processes as well as for the recovery of function. To determine whether the plasticity response in the uninjured hemisphere occurs even after a subtle trauma, we subjected mice to a partial unilateral deafferentation of the hippocampus induced by stereotactically performed entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL). The expression of selected genes was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR in the hippocampal tissue at the injured side and the contralesional side at day 4 and 14 after injury. We observed that expression of genes coding for synaptotagmin 1, ezrin, thrombospondin 4, and C1q proteins, that have all been implicated in the synapse formation, re-arrangement and plasticity, were upregulated both in the injured and the contralesional hippocampus, implying a plasticity response in the uninjured hemisphere. Several of the genes, the expression of which was altered in response to ECL, are known to be expressed in astrocytes. To test whether astrocyte activation plays a role in the observed plasticity response to ECL, we took advantage of mice deficient in two intermediate filament (nanofilament) proteins glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin (GFAP(-/-)Vim(-/-) ) and exhibiting attenuated astrocyte activation and reactive gliosis. The absence of GFAP and vimentin reduced the ECL-induced upregulation of thrombospondin 4, indicating that this response to ECL depends on astrocyte activation and reactive gliosis. We conclude that even a very limited focal neurotrauma triggers a distinct response at the contralesional side, which at least to some extent depends on astrocyte activation.

  9. A complete alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase gene is present in the human genome and partially transcribed.

    PubMed

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Vidal, Frédérique; Gaudray, Patrick; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2002-12-01

    The synthesis of Galalpha1-3Gal-terminated oligosaccharides (alpha-Gal) epitopes has been interrupted during the course of evolution, starting with Old World primates. Partial sequences similar to the alpha1,3-galactosyltransferase (alpha1,3GalT) gene, which governs the synthesis of alpha-Gal epitopes, have been detected in the human genome and were found to correspond to pseudogenes. We completed the sequence of the human alpha1,3GalT pseudogene present on chromosome 9 and found it to be organized like the murine alpha1,3GalT gene. In human cell lines and several normal and tumor tissues we detected truncated transcripts corresponding to this pseudogene. Considering these mRNAs, translation of an open reading frame containing the first four translated exons but missing the two catalytic exons could predict a truncated alpha1,3GalT polypeptide that should be enzymatically inactive. We show that transcription of human alpha1,3GalT is prematurely terminated at the level of a strong transcriptional stop signal in the middle of intron VII. We were able to reproduce this effect in vitro by subcloning the implicated DNA region upstream from a reporter cDNA. The premature transcriptional arrest of human alpha1,3-GalT gene leads to an ectopic splicing event and to the connection of a short intronic sequence downstream from translated exons. Finally, we show that these truncated transcripts are overexpressed in cell lines with modifications of O-glycans.

  10. Lethality of mice bearing a knockout of the Ngly1-gene is partially rescued by the additional deletion of the Engase gene

    PubMed Central

    Fujihira, Haruhiko; Masahara-Negishi, Yuki; Tamura, Masaru; Huang, Chengcheng; Harada, Yoichiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Takakura, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Nana; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kondoh, Gen; Yamashita, Tadashi; Funakoshi, Yoko; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2017-01-01

    The cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (Ngly1 in mammals) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme that is highly conserved among eukaryotes. It was recently reported that subjects harboring mutations in the NGLY1 gene exhibited severe systemic symptoms (NGLY1-deficiency). While the enzyme obviously has a critical role in mammals, its precise function remains unclear. In this study, we analyzed Ngly1-deficient mice and found that they are embryonic lethal in C57BL/6 background. Surprisingly, the additional deletion of the gene encoding endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (Engase), which is another de-N-glycosylating enzyme but leaves a single GlcNAc at glycosylated Asn residues, resulted in the partial rescue of the lethality of the Ngly1-deficient mice. Additionally, we also found that a change in the genetic background of C57BL/6 mice, produced by crossing the mice with an outbred mouse strain (ICR) could partially rescue the embryonic lethality of Ngly1-deficient mice. Viable Ngly1-deficient mice in a C57BL/6 and ICR mixed background, however, showed a very severe phenotype reminiscent of the symptoms of NGLY1-deficiency subjects. Again, many of those defects were strongly suppressed by the additional deletion of Engase in the C57BL/6 and ICR mixed background. The defects observed in Ngly1/Engase-deficient mice (C57BL/6 background) and Ngly1-deficient mice (C57BL/6 and ICR mixed background) closely resembled some of the symptoms of patients with an NGLY1-deficiency. These observations strongly suggest that the Ngly1- or Ngly1/Engase-deficient mice could serve as a valuable animal model for studies related to the pathogenesis of the NGLY1-deficiency, and that cytoplasmic ENGase represents one of the potential therapeutic targets for this genetic disorder. PMID:28426790

  11. Copy-number and gene dependency analysis reveals partial copy loss of wild-type SF3B1 as a novel cancer vulnerability. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer, and results in widespread somatic copy number alterations. We used a genome-scale shRNA viability screen in human cancer cell lines to systematically identify genes that are essential in the context of particular copy-number alterations (copy-number associated gene dependencies). The most enriched class of copy-number associated gene dependencies was CYCLOPS (Copy-number alterations Yielding Cancer Liabilities Owing to Partial losS) genes, and spliceosome components were the most prevalent.

  12. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum affects the expression of genes involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption in colonic mucosa of db/db male mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Zenta; Naito, Yuji; Takagi, Tomohisa; Mizushima, Katsura; Tokunaga, Makoto; Ishihara, Noriyuki; R. Juneja, Lekh; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    Biomedical evidence in the last 20 years has shown that the consumption of partially hydrolyzed guar gum may influence lipid and/or carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. Since intestine represents the first interface to interact with dietary partially hydrolyzed guar gum in vivo, we evaluated gene expression profiles in small intestinal mucosa of db/db mice fed with partially hydrolyzed guar gum in an effort to delineate its effect on the small intestine. DNA microarray and real-time PCR analyses were performed to evaluate the gene expression profiles in mice small intestinal mucosa. Among the 28,853 transcripts represented on the GeneChip® microarray, no more than 20 genes exhibited up- or down-regulation by 1.5-fold or more after four weeks following partially hydrolyzed guar gum consumption. No adverse effects were apparent. We detected up- or down-regulation of some genes known to be involved in host defense functions and cholesterol absorption. PMID:22798710

  13. Novel mutations within the RFX-B gene and partial rescue of MHC and related genes through exogenous class II transactivator in RFX-B-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, U M; Peijnenburg, A; Gobin, S J; Boss, J M; van den elsen, P J

    2000-04-01

    MHC class II deficiency or bare lymphocyte syndrome is a severe combined immunodeficiency caused by defects in MHC-specific regulatory factors. Fibroblasts derived from two recently identified bare lymphocyte syndrome patients, EBA and FZA, were found to contain novel mutations in the RFX-B gene. RFX-B encodes a component of the RFX transcription factor that functions in the assembly of multiple transcription factors on MHC class II promoters. Unlike RFX5- and RFXAP-deficient cells, transfection of exogenous class II transactivator (CIITA) into these RFX-B-deficient fibroblasts resulted in the induction of HLA-DR and HLA-DP and, to a lesser extent, HLA-DQ. Similarly, CIITA-mediated induction of MHC class I, beta2-microglobulin, and invariant chain genes was also found in these RFX-B-deficient fibroblasts. Expression of wild-type RFX-B completely reverted the noted deficiencies in these cells. Transfection of CIITA into Ramia cells, a B cell line that does not produce a stable RFX-B mRNA, resulted in induction of an MHC class II reporter, suggesting that CIITA overexpression may partially override the RFX-B defect.

  14. Gene profiling approach to establish the molecular bases for partial versus full activation of naïve CD8 T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Verdeil, Gréory; Puthier, Denis; Nguyen, Catherine; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie

    2002-12-01

    When initial antigen encounter involves optimal antigenic and costimulatory stimuli, naïve CD8 T cells undergo a developmental program that leads to their activation, expansion and acquisition of effector functions (including production of IL-2, IFNgamma and expression of cytolytic effector molecules). A subset of the activated CD8 T cells thrives as long-lived memory cells. Encounter of tissue-associated, and in particular tumor-associated antigen, may often be suboptimal in terms of antigenicity and costimulation, however. We previously developed a model of naïve CD8 T cells from transgenic mice expressing an alloreactive TCR for which a mutant alloantigen behaved as a partial agonist, inducing only some of the effector functions induced by the native alloantigen. To ascertain the molecular bases for the establishment of divergent fates within the same naïve CD8 T cells, we have used cDNA microarrays to monitor sequential gene expression patterns in conditions of full or partial response of these naïve CD8 T cells. Of the 5000 different genes monitored on the array, 18% showed changes in expression in activated versus naïve CD8 T cells, independent of whether stimulation was with full or partial agonist. These included antigen-induced upregulated as well as downregulated genes. Clusters of genes that were differentially expressed were also identified, being either (i) weakly versus strongly, or (ii) transiently versus stably expressed in response to partial and full agonist, respectively. They included (i) genes encoding costimulatory molecules and (ii) genes controlling cytolytic function, cytokine production, and chemokines. Therefore, the cDNA microarray approach was a sensitive tool to provide an exhaustive picture of T cell activation as it could discriminate quantitative, qualitative and dynamic differences in mRNA expression profiles between fully or partially activated T cells.

  15. Genetic Associations for Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time and Prothrombin Time, their Gene Expression Profiles, and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S.; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B.; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J.; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W.G.; Porteous, David J.; Starr, John M.; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10−24). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10−9) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10−8). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10−56) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10−13). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data. PMID:22703881

  16. Genetic associations for activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time, their gene expression profiles, and risk of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D; Samani, Nilesh J; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D O; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W G; Porteous, David J; Starr, John M; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J; Hicks, Andrew A; Folsom, Aaron R

    2012-07-13

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10(-24)). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10(-9)) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10(-8)). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10(-56)) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10(-13)). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data.

  17. Inheritance of partial resistance against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Phaseolus vulgaris and co-localization of quantitative trait loci with genes involved in specific resistance.

    PubMed

    Geffroy, V; Sévignac, M; De Oliveira, J C; Fouilloux, G; Skroch, P; Thoquet, P; Gepts, P; Langin, T; Dron, M

    2000-03-01

    Anthracnose, one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. A "candidate gene" approach was used to map anthracnose resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL). Candidate genes included genes for both pathogen recognition (resistance genes and resistance gene analogs [RGAs]) and general plant defense (defense response genes). Two strains of C. lindemuthianum, identified in a world collection of 177 strains, displayed a reproducible and differential aggressiveness toward BAT93 and JaloEEP558, two parental lines of P. vulgaris representing the two major gene pools of this crop. A reliable test was developed to score partial resistance in aerial organs of the plant (stem, leaf, petiole) under controlled growth chamber conditions. BAT93 was more resistant than JaloEEP558 regardless of the organ or strain tested. With a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between these two parental lines, 10 QTL were located on a genetic map harboring 143 markers, including known defense response genes, anthracnose-specific resistance genes, and RGAs. Eight of the QTL displayed isolate specificity. Two were co-localized with known defense genes (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein) and three with anthracnose-specific resistance genes and/or RGAs. Interestingly, two QTL, with different allelic contribution, mapped on linkage group B4 in a 5.0 cM interval containing Andean and Mesoamerican specific resistance genes against C. lindemuthianum and 11 polymorphic fragments revealed with a RGA probe. The possible relationship between genes underlying specific and partial resistance is discussed.

  18. Analysis of partial sequences of genes coding for 16S rRNA of actinomycetes isolated from Casuarina equisetifolia nodules in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Niner, B M; Brandt, J P; Villegas, M; Marshall, C R; Hirsch, A M; Valdés, M

    1996-01-01

    Filamentous bacteria isolated from surface-sterilized nodules of Casuarina equisetifolia trees in México were capable of reducing acetylene, a diagnostic test for nitrogenase, but were unable to nodulate their host. Analysis of partial 16S rRNA gene sequences suggests that the Mexican isolates are not Frankia strains but members of a novel clade. PMID:8702297

  19. Egg yolks inhibit activation of NF-κB and expression of its target genes in adipocytes after partial delipidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Qiwen; Riedl, Ken M.; Cole, Rachel M.; Lehman, Christopher; Xu, Lu; Alder, Hansjuerg; Belury, Martha A.; Schwartz, Steven J.; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    How composition of egg yolk (EY) influences NF-κB, a key transcription pathway in inflammation, remains unclear. We performed partial delipidation of EY that removed 20–30% of cholesterol and triglycerides. The resulting polar and non-polar fractions were termed EY-P and EY-NP. NF-κB activation in response to EY from different suppliers and their fractions was examined in 3T3-L1 adipocytes using a NF-κB response element reporter assay and by analyzing expression of 248 inflammatory genes. Although EY-P and EY contained similar level of vitamins, carotenoids, and fatty acids, only delipidated EY-P fraction suppressed NF-κB via down-regulation of toll like receptor-2 and up-regulation of inhibitory toll interacting protein (Tollip) and lymphocyte antigen 96 (Ly96). Our data suggest that anti-inflammatory activity of lutein and retinol were blunted by non-polar lipids in EY likely via crosstalk between SREBP and NF-κB pathways in adipocytes. Thus, moderate delipidation may improve their beneficial properties of regular eggs. PMID:25620076

  20. Pathogenesis of growth failure and partial reversal with gene therapy in murine and canine Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Little, Dianne; Arumugam, Ramamani; Sun, Baodong; Curtis, Sarah; Demaster, Amanda; Maranzano, Michael; Jackson, Mark W; Kishnani, Priya; Freemark, Michael S; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) in humans frequently causes delayed bone maturation, decrease in final adult height, and decreased growth velocity. This study evaluates the pathogenesis of growth failure and the effect of gene therapy on growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs and mice. Here we found that homozygous G6pase (-/-) mice with GSD-Ia have normal growth hormone (GH) levels in response to hypoglycemia, decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 levels, and attenuated weight gain following administration of GH. Expression of hepatic GH receptor and IGF 1 mRNAs and hepatic STAT5 (phospho Y694) protein levels are reduced prior to and after GH administration, indicating GH resistance. However, restoration of G6Pase expression in the liver by treatment with adeno-associated virus 8 pseudotyped vector expressing G6Pase (AAV2/8-G6Pase) corrected body weight, but failed to normalize plasma IGF 1 in G6pase (-/-) mice. Untreated G6pase (-/-) mice also demonstrated severe delay of growth plate ossification at 12 days of age; those treated with AAV2/8-G6Pase at 14 days of age demonstrated skeletal dysplasia and limb shortening when analyzed radiographically at 6 months of age, in spite of apparent metabolic correction. Moreover, gene therapy with AAV2/9-G6Pase only partially corrected growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs as detected by weight and bone measurements and serum IGF 1 concentrations were persistently low in treated dogs. We also found that heterozygous GSD-Ia carrier dogs had decreased serum IGF 1, adult body weights and bone dimensions compared to wild-type littermates. In sum, these findings suggest that growth failure in GSD-Ia results, at least in part, from hepatic GH resistance. In addition, gene therapy improved growth in addition to promoting long-term survival in dogs and mice with GSD-Ia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pathogenesis of growth failure and partial reversal with gene therapy in murine and canine Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elizabeth Drake; Little, Dianne; Arumugam, Ramamani; Sun, Baodong; Curtis, Sarah; DeMaster, Amanda; Maranzano, Michael; Jackson, Mark W.; Kishnani, Priya; Freemark, Michael S.; Koeberl, Dwight D.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen Storage Disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) in humans frequently causes delayed bone maturation, decrease in final adult height, and decreased growth velocity. This study evaluates the pathogenesis of growth failure and the effect of gene therapy on growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs and mice. Here we found that homozygous G6pase (−/−) mice with GSD-Ia have normal growth hormone (GH) levels in response to hypoglycemia, decreased insulin-like growth factor (IGF) 1 levels, and attenuated weight gain following administration of GH. Expression of hepatic GH receptor and IGF 1 mRNAs and hepatic STAT5 (phospho Y694) protein levels are reduced prior to and after GH administration, indicating GH resistance. However, restoration of G6Pase expression in the liver by treatment with adeno-associated virus 8 pseudotyped vector expressing G6Pase (AAV2/8-G6Pase) corrected body weight, but failed to normalize plasma IGF 1 in G6pase (−/−) mice. Untreated G6pase (−/−) mice also demonstrated severe delay of growth plate ossification at 12 days of age; those treated with AAV2/8-G6Pase at 14 days of age demonstrated skeletal dysplasia and limb shortening when analyzed radiographically at 6 months of age, in spite of apparent metabolic correction. Moreover, gene therapy with AAV2/9-G6Pase only partially corrected growth in GSD-Ia affected dogs as detected by weight and bone measurements and serum IGF 1 concentrations were persistently low in treated dogs. We also found that heterozygous GSD-Ia carrier dogs had decreased serum IGF 1, adult body weights and bone dimensions compared to wild-type littermates. In sum, these findings suggest that growth failure in GSD-Ia results, at least in part, from hepatic GH resistance. In addition, gene therapy improved growth in addition to promoting long-term survival in dogs and mice with GSD-Ia. PMID:23623482

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of partial S1 and N gene sequences of infectious bronchitis virus isolates from Italy revealed genetic diversity and recombination.

    PubMed

    Bochkov, Yury A; Tosi, Giovanni; Massi, Paola; Drygin, Vladimir V

    2007-08-01

    A total of ten infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) isolates collected from commercial chickens in Italy in 1999 were characterized by RT-PCR and sequencing of the S1 and N genes. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial S1 gene sequences showed that five field viruses clustered together with 793/B-type strains, having 91.3-98.5% nucleotide identity within the group, and one isolate had very close sequence relationship (94.6% identity) with 624/I strain. These two IBV types have been identified in Italy previously. The other three variant isolates formed novel genotype detected recently in many countries of Western Europe. For one of these variant viruses, Italy-02, which afterwards became the prototype strain, the entire S1 gene was sequenced to confirm its originality. In contrast, phylogenetic analysis of more conserved partial N gene sequences, comprising 1-300 nucleotides, revealed different clustering. Thus, three variant IBVs of novel Italy-02 genotype, which had 96.7-99.2% S1 gene nucleotide identity with each other, belonged to three separate subgroups based on N gene sequences. 624/I-type isolate Italy-06 together with Italy-03, which was undetectable using S1 gene primers, shared 97.7% and 99.3% identity, respectively, in N gene region with vaccine strain H120. Only one of the 793/B-type isolates, Italy-10, clustered with the 793/B strain sharing 99.3% partial N gene identity, whereas the other four isolates were genetically distant from them (only 87.7-89.7% identity) and formed separate homogenous subgroup. The results demonstrated that both mutations and recombination events could contribute to the genetic diversity of the Italian isolates.

  3. The Long-Term Outcome of Boys With Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and a Mutation in the Androgen Receptor Gene.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Herald, A; Bertelloni, S; Juul, A; Bryce, J; Jiang, J; Rodie, M; Sinnott, R; Boroujerdi, M; Lindhardt Johansen, M; Hiort, O; Holterhus, P M; Cools, M; Guaragna-Filho, G; Guerra-Junior, G; Weintrob, N; Hannema, S; Drop, S; Guran, T; Darendeliler, F; Nordenstrom, A; Hughes, I A; Acerini, C; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R; Ahmed, S F

    2016-11-01

    In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes in young men with suspected PAIS in relation to the results of AR analysis. Through the International Disorders of Sex Development Registry, clinical information was gathered on young men suspected of having PAIS (n = 52) who presented before the age of 16 years and had genetic analysis of AR. The median ages at presentation and at the time of the study were 1 month (range, 1 day to 16 years) and 22 years (range, 16 to 52 years), respectively. Of the cohort, 29 men (56%) had 20 different AR mutations reported. At diagnosis, the median external masculinization scores were 7 and 6 in cases with and without AR mutation, respectively (P = .9), and median current external masculinization scores were 9 and 10, respectively (P = .28). Thirty-five men (67%) required at least one surgical procedure, and those with a mutation were more likely to require multiple surgeries for hypospadias (P = .004). All cases with an AR mutation had gynecomastia, compared to 9% of those without an AR mutation. Of the six men who had a mastectomy, five (83%) had an AR mutation. Boys with genetically confirmed PAIS are likely to have a poorer clinical outcome than those with XY DSD, with normal T synthesis, and without an identifiable AR mutation. Routine genetic analysis of AR to confirm PAIS informs long-term prognosis and management.

  4. The Long-Term Outcome of Boys With Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and a Mutation in the Androgen Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lucas-Herald, A.; Bertelloni, S.; Juul, A.; Bryce, J.; Jiang, J.; Rodie, M.; Sinnott, R.; Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; Hiort, O.; Holterhus, P. M.; Cools, M.; Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; Weintrob, N.; Hannema, S.; Drop, S.; Guran, T.; Darendeliler, F.; Nordenstrom, A.; Hughes, I. A.; Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes in young men with suspected PAIS in relation to the results of AR analysis. Methods: Through the International Disorders of Sex Development Registry, clinical information was gathered on young men suspected of having PAIS (n = 52) who presented before the age of 16 years and had genetic analysis of AR. Results: The median ages at presentation and at the time of the study were 1 month (range, 1 day to 16 years) and 22 years (range, 16 to 52 years), respectively. Of the cohort, 29 men (56%) had 20 different AR mutations reported. At diagnosis, the median external masculinization scores were 7 and 6 in cases with and without AR mutation, respectively (P = .9), and median current external masculinization scores were 9 and 10, respectively (P = .28). Thirty-five men (67%) required at least one surgical procedure, and those with a mutation were more likely to require multiple surgeries for hypospadias (P = .004). All cases with an AR mutation had gynecomastia, compared to 9% of those without an AR mutation. Of the six men who had a mastectomy, five (83%) had an AR mutation. Conclusions: Boys with genetically confirmed PAIS are likely to have a poorer clinical outcome than those with XY DSD, with normal T synthesis, and without an identifiable AR mutation. Routine genetic analysis of AR to confirm PAIS informs long-term prognosis and management. PMID:27403927

  5. Magnetization and magnetic susceptibilities of GdH3, HoH3, ErH3 and YbH3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of powdered samples of HoH3, ErH3, GdH3 and YbH3 have been measured in the temperature range from 4.2 to 1.2 K. Two broad, local maxima are observed in the variation of chi versus T for GdH3, with maxima in (delta chi delta T) versus T at 1.8 K and 3.3 K. The inverse susceptibilities for HoH3 and ErH3 both obey a Curies-Weiss law over a limited range (4.2 to 2.6K and 4.2 to 2 K respectively) with values for the Weiss constant of -4.25 K and -1.11 K, and effective moments of 8.6 and 7.7 Bohr magnetons respectively. The susceptibility of YbH3 is independent of temperature over the range investigated. High-field magnetization measurements yield extrapolated saturation moments of 7.0 + or - 0.25 Bohr magnetons/ion for GdH3, 6.1 + or - 0.2 Bohr magnetons/ion for HoH3 and 3.74 + or - 0.11 Bohr magnetons/ion for ErH3. In addition, ErH3 exhibits a van Vleck paramagnetism in the high field region.

  6. Review of Adverse Events Associated With False Glucose Readings Measured by GDH-PQQ–Based Glucose Test Strips in the Presence of Interfering Sugars

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Juan P.; Lim, Christine G.; Ellison, John M.; Montandon, Carol M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the implications of falsely elevated glucose readings measured with glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone (GDH-PQQ) test strips. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a review of the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database and medical literature for adverse events (AEs) associated with falsely elevated glucose readings with GDH-PQQ test strips in the presence of interfering sugars. RESULTS Eighty-two reports were identified: 16 (20%) were associated with death, 46 (56%) with severe hypoglycemia, and 12 (15%) with nonsevere hypoglycemia. In eight reports (10%), the AE was not described. Forty-two events (51%) occurred in the U.S. Although most events occurred in hospitalized patients, at least 14 (17%) occurred in outpatients. Agents most commonly associated with AEs were icodextrin-containing peritoneal dialysate and maltose-containing intravenous immune globulin. CONCLUSIONS GDH-PQQ test strips pose a safety risk to insulin-using patients treated with agents containing or metabolized to interfering sugars. PMID:20351227

  7. Characterization of full-length and polymerase chain reaction-derived partial-length Gottfried and OSU gene 4 probes for serotypic differentiation of porcine rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, B I; Parwani, A V; Gorziglia, M; Larralde, G; Saif, L J

    1992-01-01

    To determine the VP4 (P type) specificity of porcine rotaviruses, full- and partial-length gene 4 probes were produced from cloned Gottfried and OSU porcine rotavirus genomic segment 4 cDNAs. The gene 4 segments from the prototype Gottfried (VP7 serotype 4) and OSU (VP7 serotype 5) porcine rotavirus strains were selected for study because of their distinct P types and the occurrence of rotaviruses with similar serotypes among swine. Partial-length gene 4 cDNAs were produced and amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and encompassed portions of the variable region (nucleotides 211 to 612) of VP8 encoded by genomic segment 4. The hybridization stringency conditions necessary for optimal probe specificity and sensitivity were determined by dot or Northern (RNA) blot hybridizations against a diverse group of human and animal rotaviruses of heterologous group A serotypes and against representative group B and C porcine rotaviruses. The PCR-derived gene 4 probes were more specific than the full-length gene 4 probes but demonstrated equivalent sensitivity. The Gottfried PCR-derived probe hybridized with Gottfried, SB2, SB3, and SB5 G serotype 4 porcine rotaviruses. The OSU PCR-derived probe hybridized with OSU, EE, A580, and SB-1A porcine rotaviruses and equine H1 rotavirus. Results of the hybridization reactions of the PCR-derived gene 4 probes with selected porcine rotavirus strains agreed with previous serological or genetic analyses, indicating their suitability as diagnostic reagents. Images PMID:1328281

  8. Partial Complementation of the UV Sensitivity of Deinococcus Radiodurans Excision Repair Mutants by the Cloned denv Gene of Bacteriophage T4

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-19

    partially characterized as incising UV irradiated DNA at the same frequency as the PD-glycosylase from Micrococcus luteus (Evans and Moseley, 1985...the dimer-glycosylase of Micrococcus luteus . Excision repair in E. coli is governed by the uvr A, uvr B and uvr C genes. Mutations in any one of... Micrococcus luteus are very similar: they specifically recognize only dimers, and not 6-4 photoproducts or chemical adducts, and have been shown in vitro

  9. Comparison of green and albino individuals of the partially mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipactis helleborine on molecular identities of mycorrhizal fungi, nutritional modes and gene expression in mycorrhizal roots.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kenji; Yamato, Masahide; Miura, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Takahashi, Kazuya; Ida, Yoshiko; Shigenobu, Shuji; Kaminaka, Hironori

    2017-03-01

    Some green orchids obtain carbon from their mycorrhizal fungi, as well as from photosynthesis. These partially mycoheterotrophic orchids sometimes produce fully achlorophyllous, leaf-bearing (albino) variants. Comparing green and albino individuals of these orchids will help to uncover the molecular mechanisms associated with mycoheterotrophy. We compared green and albino Epipactis helleborine by molecular barcoding of mycorrhizal fungi, nutrient sources based on (15) N and (13) C abundances and gene expression in their mycorrhizae by RNA-seq and cDNA de novo assembly. Molecular identification of mycorrhizal fungi showed that green and albino E. helleborine harboured similar mycobionts, mainly Wilcoxina. Stable isotope analyses indicated that albino E. helleborine plants were fully mycoheterotrophic, whereas green individuals were partially mycoheterotrophic. Gene expression analyses showed that genes involved in antioxidant metabolism were upregulated in the albino variants, which indicates that these plants experience greater oxidative stress than the green variants, possibly due to a more frequent lysis of intracellular pelotons. It was also found that some genes involved in the transport of some metabolites, including carbon sources from plant to fungus, are higher in albino than in green variants. This result may indicate a bidirectional carbon flow even in the mycoheterotrophic symbiosis. The genes related to mycorrhizal symbiosis in autotrophic orchids and arbuscular mycorrhizal plants were also upregulated in the albino variants, indicating the existence of common molecular mechanisms among the different mycorrhizal types. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Screening, diversity and partial sequence comparison of vegetative insecticidal protein (vip3A) genes in the local isolates of Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner.

    PubMed

    Asokan, R; Swamy, H M Mahadeva; Arora, D K

    2012-04-01

    Characterization, direct sequencing of the PCR amplicon and phylogenetic relationship was done to discover a novel Vip protein genes of the Bt isolates, to improve the prospects for insect control, more Vip proteins should be sought out and researched to predict their insecticidal activity. Characterization was based on direct sequencing of PCR amplicon using primers specific to vip3A gene was presented here. 12 out of 18 isolates screened were positive for vip gene-specific primers. Homology search for the partial sequences using BLAST showed that 11 isolates had high similarity to vip3Aa gene and only one fragment with vip3Ae gene (25-100% at nucleotide and amino acid level). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene sequences were responsible for geographic separation for divergence within vip genes, consistent with the evaluation of distinct bacterial population. Despite the geographical distances, strains harbouring vip genes have originated from common ancestors may significantly contribute to control resistant insect pests. Some strains have evolved to be quite distinct and others remain as members of closely related groups. The reported method is a powerful tool to find novel Vip3A proteins from large-scale Bt strains which is effective in terms of time and cost. Further the Vip proteins produced by different strains of B. thuringiensis are unique in terms of the sequence divergence and hence may also differ in their insecticidal activities.

  11. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  12. Methylation and expression analyses of Pallister-Killian syndrome reveal partial dosage compensation of tetrasomy 12p and hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Josef; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-03-03

    To ascertain the epigenomic features, i.e., the methylation, non-coding RNA, and gene expression patterns, associated with gain of i(12p) in Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), we investigated single cell clones, harboring either disomy 12 or tetrasomy 12p, from a patient with PKS. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed a characteristic expression and methylation signature. Of all the genes on 12p, 13% were overexpressed, including the ATN1, COPS7A, and NECAP1 genes in 12p13.31, a region previously implicated in PKS. However, the median expression fold change (1.3) on 12p was lower than expected by tetrasomy 12p. Thus, partial dosage compensation occurs in cells with i(12p). The majority (89%) of the significantly deregulated genes were not situated on 12p, indicating that global perturbation of gene expression is a key pathogenetic event in PKS. Three genes-ATP6V1G1 in 9q32, GMPS in 3q25.31, and TBX5 in 12q24.21-exhibited concomitant hypermethylation and decreased expression. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed global hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p, a footprint previously associated with constitutional and acquired gains of whole chromosomes as well as with X-chromosome inactivation in females. We hypothesize that this non-genic hypomethylation is associated with chromatin processing that facilitates cellular adaptation to excess genetic material.

  13. Partial deficiency of isoleucine impairs root development and alters transcript levels of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid and glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isoleucine is one of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) that are essential substrates for protein synthesis in all organisms. Although the metabolic pathway for isoleucine has been well characterized in higher plants, it is not known whether it plays a specific role in plant development. In this study, an Arabidopsis mutant, lib (low isoleucine biosynthesis), that has defects in both cell proliferation and cell expansion processes during root development, was characterized. The lib mutant carries a T-DNA insertion in the last exon of the OMR1 gene that encodes a threonine deaminase/dehydratase (TD). TD catalyses the deamination and dehydration of threonine, which is the first and also the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. This T-DNA insertion results in a partial deficiency of isoleucine in lib root tissues but it does not affect its total protein content. Application of exogenous isoleucine or introduction of a wild-type OMR1 gene into the lib mutant can completely rescue the mutant phenotypes. These results reveal an important role for isoleucine in plant development. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that the partial deficiency of isoleucine in the lib mutant triggers a decrease in transcript levels of the genes encoding the major enzymes involved in the BCAA degradation pathway; the analysis also indicated that many genes involved in the biosynthesis of methionine-derived glucosinolates are up-regulated. PMID:23230023

  14. Partial deficiency of isoleucine impairs root development and alters transcript levels of the genes involved in branched-chain amino acid and glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Zhang, Fengxia; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yule; Liu, Dong

    2013-01-01

    Isoleucine is one of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) that are essential substrates for protein synthesis in all organisms. Although the metabolic pathway for isoleucine has been well characterized in higher plants, it is not known whether it plays a specific role in plant development. In this study, an Arabidopsis mutant, lib (low isoleucine biosynthesis), that has defects in both cell proliferation and cell expansion processes during root development, was characterized. The lib mutant carries a T-DNA insertion in the last exon of the OMR1 gene that encodes a threonine deaminase/dehydratase (TD). TD catalyses the deamination and dehydration of threonine, which is the first and also the committed step in the biosynthesis of isoleucine. This T-DNA insertion results in a partial deficiency of isoleucine in lib root tissues but it does not affect its total protein content. Application of exogenous isoleucine or introduction of a wild-type OMR1 gene into the lib mutant can completely rescue the mutant phenotypes. These results reveal an important role for isoleucine in plant development. In addition, microarray analysis indicated that the partial deficiency of isoleucine in the lib mutant triggers a decrease in transcript levels of the genes encoding the major enzymes involved in the BCAA degradation pathway; the analysis also indicated that many genes involved in the biosynthesis of methionine-derived glucosinolates are up-regulated.

  15. Severe forms of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome due to p.L830F novel mutation in androgen receptor gene in a Brazilian family

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The androgen insensitivity syndrome may cause developmental failure of normal male external genitalia in individuals with 46,XY karyotype. It results from the diminished or absent biological action of androgens, which is mediated by the androgen receptor in both embryo and secondary sex development. Mutations in the androgen receptor gene, located on the X chromosome, are responsible for the disease. Almost 70% of 46,XY affected individuals inherited mutations from their carrier mothers. Findings Molecular abnormalities in the androgen receptor gene in individuals of a Brazilian family with clinical features of severe forms of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome were evaluated. Seven members (five 46,XY females and two healthy mothers) of the family were included in the investigation. The coding exons and exon-intron junctions of androgen receptor gene were sequenced. Five 46,XY members of the family have been found to be hemizygous for the c.3015C>T nucleotide change in exon 7 of the androgen receptor gene, whereas the two 46,XX mothers were heterozygote carriers. This nucleotide substitution leads to the p.L830F mutation in the androgen receptor. Conclusions The novel p.L830F mutation is responsible for grades 5 and 6 of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome in two generations of a Brazilian family. PMID:21645389

  16. Intrinsic androgen-dependent gene expression patterns revealed by comparison of genital fibroblasts from normal males and individuals with complete and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Deppe, Uta; Werner, Ralf; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Bebermeier, Jan-Hendrik; Wünsch, Lutz; Krege, Susanne; Schweikert, Hans-Udo; Demeter, Janos; Riepe, Felix; Hiort, Olaf; Brooks, James D

    2007-01-01

    Background To better understand the molecular programs of normal and abnormal genital development, clear-cut definition of androgen-dependent gene expression patterns, without the influence of genotype (46, XX vs. 46, XY), is warranted. Previously, we have identified global gene expression profiles in genital-derived fibroblasts that differ between 46, XY males and 46, XY females with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) due to inactivating mutations of the androgen receptor (AR). While these differences could be due to cell autonomous changes in gene expression induced by androgen programming, recent work suggests they could also be influenced by the location from which the fibroblasts were harvested (topology). To minimize the influence of topology, we compared gene expression patterns of fibroblasts derived from identical urogenital anlagen: the scrotum in normally virilized 46, XY males and the labia majora from completely feminized 46, XY individuals with CAIS. Results 612 transcripts representing 440 unique genes differed significantly in expression levels between scrotum and CAIS labia majora, suggesting the effects of androgen programming. While some genes coincided with those we had identified previously (TBX3, IGFBP5, EGFR, CSPG2), a significant number did not, implying that topology had influenced gene expression in our previous experiments. Supervised clustering of gene expression data derived from a large set of fibroblast cultures from individuals with partial AIS revealed that the new, topology controlled data set better classified the specimens. Conclusion Inactivating mutations of the AR, in themselves, appear to induce lasting changes in gene expression in cultured fibroblasts, independent of topology and genotype. Genes identified are likely to be relevant candidates to decipher androgen-dependent normal and abnormal genital development. PMID:17945006

  17. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins.

    PubMed

    González-Guerra, José Luis; Castilla-Cortazar, Inma; Aguirre, Gabriel A; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions.

  18. Partial IGF-1 deficiency is sufficient to reduce heart contractibility, angiotensin II sensibility, and alter gene expression of structural and functional cardiac proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Gabriel A.; Muñoz, Úrsula; Martín-Estal, Irene; Ávila-Gallego, Elena; Granado, Miriam; Puche, Juan E.; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2017-01-01

    Circulating levels of IGF-1 may decrease under several circumstances like ageing, metabolic syndrome, and advanced cirrhosis. This reduction is associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, progression to type 2 diabetes, and increased risk for cardiovascular diseases. However, underlying mechanisms between IGF-1 deficiency and cardiovascular disease remain elusive. The specific aim of the present work was to study whether the partial IGF-1 deficiency influences heart and/or coronary circulation, comparing vasoactive factors before and after of ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). In addition, histology of the heart was performed together with cardiac gene expression for proteins involved in structure and function (extracellular matrix, contractile proteins, active peptides); carried out using microarrays, followed by RT-qPCR confirmation of the three experimental groups. IGF-1 partial deficiency is associated to a reduction in contractility and angiotensin II sensitivity, interstitial fibrosis as well as altered expression pattern of genes involved in extracellular matrix proteins, calcium dynamics, and cardiac structure and function. Although this work is descriptive, it provides a clear insight of the impact that partial IGF-1 deficiency on the heart and establishes this experimental model as suitable for studying cardiac disease mechanisms and exploring therapeutic options for patients under IGF-1 deficiency conditions. PMID:28806738

  19. Methylation and expression analyses of Pallister-Killian syndrome reveal partial dosage compensation of tetrasomy 12p and hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p

    PubMed Central

    Davidsson, Josef; Johansson, Bertil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To ascertain the epigenomic features, i.e., the methylation, non-coding RNA, and gene expression patterns, associated with gain of i(12p) in Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS), we investigated single cell clones, harboring either disomy 12 or tetrasomy 12p, from a patient with PKS. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed a characteristic expression and methylation signature. Of all the genes on 12p, 13% were overexpressed, including the ATN1, COPS7A, and NECAP1 genes in 12p13.31, a region previously implicated in PKS. However, the median expression fold change (1.3) on 12p was lower than expected by tetrasomy 12p. Thus, partial dosage compensation occurs in cells with i(12p). The majority (89%) of the significantly deregulated genes were not situated on 12p, indicating that global perturbation of gene expression is a key pathogenetic event in PKS. Three genes—ATP6V1G1 in 9q32, GMPS in 3q25.31, and TBX5 in 12q24.21—exhibited concomitant hypermethylation and decreased expression. The i(12p)-positive cells displayed global hypomethylation of gene-poor regions on 12p, a footprint previously associated with constitutional and acquired gains of whole chromosomes as well as with X-chromosome inactivation in females. We hypothesize that this non-genic hypomethylation is associated with chromatin processing that facilitates cellular adaptation to excess genetic material. PMID:26890086

  20. New insights from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy into the chemistry of covalent enzyme immobilization, with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on silicon dioxide as an example.

    PubMed

    Longo, Luigia; Vasapollo, Giuseppe; Guascito, Maria Rachele; Malitesta, Cosimino

    2006-05-01

    A three-step process for immobilization of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on the surface of silicon dioxide has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The enzyme layer was deposited on the silicon dioxide surface after first exposing the surface to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) and reacting the silylated surface with glutaraldehyde (GA). Fine XPS analysis, performed after each step of the chemical procedure, revealed unknown details of the step-by-step construction of the enzyme layer under different experimental conditions.

  1. The Spin Structure of 3He and the Neutron at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Generalized GDH Integrand

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent

    2007-08-01

    Since the 1980's, the study of nucleon (proton or neutron) spin structure has been an active field both experimentally and theoretically. One of the primary goals of this work is to test our understanding of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. In the high energy region of asymptotically free quarks, QCD has been verified. However, verifiable predictions in the low energy region are harder to obtain due to the complex interactions between the nucleon's constituents: quarks and gluons. In the non-pertubative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory provide predictions for the spin structure functions in the form of sum rules. Spin-dependent sum rules such as the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule are important tools available to study nucleon spin structure. Originally derived for real photon absorption, the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule was first extended for virtual photon absorption in 1989. The extension of the sum rule provides a unique relation, valid at any momentum transfer ($Q^{2}$), that can be used to study the nucleon spin structure and make comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental data. Experiment E97-110 was performed at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) to examine the spin structure of the neutron and $^{3}$He. The Jefferson Lab longitudinally-polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 and 4.4 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized $^{3}$He gas target in the Hall A end station. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the quasielastic and resonance regions to extract the spin structure functions $g_{1}(x,Q^{2})$ and $g_{2}(x,Q^{2})$ at low momentum transfers (0.02 $< Q^{2} <$ 0.3 GeV$^{2}$). The goal of the experiment was to perform a precise measurement of the $Q^{2}$ dependence of the extended GDH integral and of the moments of the neutron

  2. Transcriptional control of vitamin C defective 2 and tocopherol cyclase genes by light and plastid-derived signals: the partial involvement of GENOMES UNCOUPLED 1.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Maruta, Takanori; Tamoi, Masahiro; Yabuta, Yukinori; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    Previous findings have suggested that light and plastid-derived signals are involved in the regulation of biosynthetic pathways for l-ascorbic acid (AsA) and tocopherols (Toc). Photosynthetic electron transport (PET) activity, plastid gene expression (PGE), and the tetrapyrrole metabolism have been identified as signals that regulate nuclear gene expression through the GENOMES UNCOUPLED 1 (GUN1) protein. Here, we examined the effects of disrupting GUN1 on these pathways. The expression of vitamin C defective 2 (VTC2) and tocopherol cyclase (TC) genes, which encode key enzymes in the AsA and Toc biosynthetic pathways, respectively, was affected by illumination and darkness in parallel with the levels of both these antioxidants. However, the GUN1 disruption had no effect on these biosynthetic pathways under light-dark conditions. All treatments that inhibited PET, PGE, and the tetrapyrrole metabolism interrupted both biosynthetic pathways; however, this was partially mitigated by the GUN1 disruption. The expression patterns of VTC2 and TC reflected the levels of both antioxidants under most of the conditions examined. Our results suggest that the transcriptional control of VTC2 and TC by light and plastid-derived signals is important for the regulation of the biosynthetic pathways, and that GUN1 is at least partially involved in the plastid-derived signals-dependent regulation.

  3. Androgen Activation of the Folate Receptor α Gene through Partial Tethering of the Androgen Receptor by C/EBPα○

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumaran, Suneethi; Zhang, Juan; Kelley, Karen M.M.; Gonit, Mesfin; Hao, Hong; Ratnam, Manohar

    2010-01-01

    The folate receptor α (FRα) is critical for normal embryonic and fetal development. The receptor has a relatively narrow tissue specificity which includes the visceral endoderm and the placenta and mediates delivery of folate, inadequacy of which results in termination of pregnancy or developmental defects. We have previously reported that the FRα gene is negatively and directly regulated by estrogen and positively but indirectly by progesterone and glucocorticoid. To further investigate hormonal control of this gene and in view of the growing evidence for the importance of the androgen receptor (AR) in endometrial and placental functions, we examined the response of the FRα gene to androgen. Here we demonstrate that the FRα gene is directly activated by androgen. The P4 promoter of the FRα gene is the target of hormone-dependent activation by the androgen receptor (AR) in a manner that is co-activator-dependent. The site of functional association of AR in the FRα gene maps to a 35bp region occurring ~1500bp upstream of the target promoter. The functional elements within this region are an androgen response element (ARE) half-site and a non-canonical C/EBP element that cooperate to recruit AR in a manner that is dependent on the DNA-bound C/EBPα. Since the placenta is rich in C/EBPα, the findings underscore the multiplicity of mechanisms by which the FRα gene is under the exquisite control of steroid hormones. PMID:20817090

  4. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  5. The major and minor chicken vitellogenin genes are each adjacent to partially deleted pseudogene copies of the other.

    PubMed Central

    Silva, R; Fischer, A H; Burch, J B

    1989-01-01

    The major chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGII) has previously been cloned and sequenced. We now report the isolation of genomic clones that encompass a minor chicken vitellogenin gene (VTGIII) which is also expressed in the liver in response to estradiol. Our analysis reveals that a pseudogene for VTGII (psi VTGII) lies 1,426 base pairs upstream of this VTGIII gene. A reevaluation of published sequence data reveals that the converse is also true, namely, that a pseudogene for VTGIII (psi VTGIII) lies 1,345 base pairs downstream of the VTGII gene. Our results show that a 335-base-pair deletion has removed the psi VTGIII promoter and cap site but left residual estrogen response element in a region where nuclease-hypersensitive sites have been reported to be induced in response to estradiol. Images PMID:2796998

  6. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty. It is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. However, AR gene mutations are found in less than a third of PAIS cases. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of gynecomastia and sparse facial hair. Family history revealed male relatives from maternal side with similar clinical phenotype. His external genitalia were phenotypically male with pubic hair Tanner stage IV, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with bilateral atrophic testes. He had elevated gonadotropins with a normal testosterone level. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. Due to the family history suggesting a disorder of X-linked trait, PAIS was considered and molecular analysis of AR gene was performed. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel hemizygous mutation p.T576I (c.1727C>T) in the AR gene. The diagnosis of PAIS is based upon clinical phenotype and laboratory findings and can be confirmed by detection of a defect in the AR gene. An accurate approach including a detailed family history suggesting an X-linked trait is an important clue for a quick diagnosis. PMID:27087292

  7. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty.

    PubMed

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-06-05

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty. It is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. However, AR gene mutations are found in less than a third of PAIS cases. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of gynecomastia and sparse facial hair. Family history revealed male relatives from maternal side with similar clinical phenotype. His external genitalia were phenotypically male with pubic hair Tanner stage IV, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with bilateral atrophic testes. He had elevated gonadotropins with a normal testosterone level. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. Due to the family history suggesting a disorder of X-linked trait, PAIS was considered and molecular analysis of AR gene was performed. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel hemizygous mutation p.T576I (c.1727C>T) in the AR gene. The diagnosis of PAIS is based upon clinical phenotype and laboratory findings and can be confirmed by detection of a defect in the AR gene. An accurate approach including a detailed family history suggesting an X-linked trait is an important clue for a quick diagnosis.

  8. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS): partial gene deletions contribute to APS I.

    PubMed

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, C; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions of the AIRE gene covering at least exon 2 to exon 8. We conclude that polymorphisms in the AIRE gene are not associated with AAD and APS II. We further suggest that DNA analysis of the parents of patients found to be homozygous for mutations in AIRE, always should be performed.

  9. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis. PMID:26355961

  10. A Robust and Versatile Method of Combinatorial Chemical Synthesis of Gene Libraries via Hierarchical Assembly of Partially Randomized Modules.

    PubMed

    Popova, Blagovesta; Schubert, Steffen; Bulla, Ingo; Buchwald, Daniela; Kramer, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in gene library generation is to guarantee a large functional size and diversity that significantly increases the chances of selecting different functional protein variants. The use of trinucleotides mixtures for controlled randomization results in superior library diversity and offers the ability to specify the type and distribution of the amino acids at each position. Here we describe the generation of a high diversity gene library using tHisF of the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima as a scaffold. Combining various rational criteria with contingency, we targeted 26 selected codons of the thisF gene sequence for randomization at a controlled level. We have developed a novel method of creating full-length gene libraries by combinatorial assembly of smaller sub-libraries. Full-length libraries of high diversity can easily be assembled on demand from smaller and much less diverse sub-libraries, which circumvent the notoriously troublesome long-term archivation and repeated proliferation of high diversity ensembles of phages or plasmids. We developed a generally applicable software tool for sequence analysis of mutated gene sequences that provides efficient assistance for analysis of library diversity. Finally, practical utility of the library was demonstrated in principle by assessment of the conformational stability of library members and isolating protein variants with HisF activity from it. Our approach integrates a number of features of nucleic acids synthetic chemistry, biochemistry and molecular genetics to a coherent, flexible and robust method of combinatorial gene synthesis.

  11. Host-mediated gene silencing of a single effector gene from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans imparts partial resistance to late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Sanju, Suman; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Thakur, Aditi; Shukla, Pradeep K; Srivastava, Nidhi; Pattanayak, Debasis; Sharma, Sanjeev; Singh, B P

    2015-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has proved a powerful genetic tool for silencing genes in plants. Host-induced gene silencing of pathogen genes has provided a gene knockout strategy for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The RXLR effector Avr3a gene is largely responsible for virulence of oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In this study, we attempted to silence the Avr3a gene of P. infestans through RNAi technology. The P. infestans inoculation resulted in lower disease progression and a reduction in pathogen load, as demonstrated by disease scoring and quantification of pathogen biomass in terms of Pi08 repetitive elements, respectively. Transgenic plants induced moderate silencing of Avr3a, and the presence and/or expression of small interfering RNAs, as determined through Northern hybridization, indicated siRNA targeted against Avr3a conferred moderate resistance to P. infestans. The single effector gene did not provide complete resistance against P. infestans. Although the Avr3a effector gene could confer moderate resistance, for complete resistance, the cumulative effect of effector genes in addition to Avr3a needs to be considered. In this study, we demonstrated that host-induced RNAi is an effective strategy for functional genomics in oomycetes.

  12. Application of SmartGene IDNS software to partial 16S rRNA gene sequences for a diverse group of bacteria in a clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Simmon, Keith E; Croft, Ann C; Petti, Cathy A

    2006-12-01

    Laboratories often receive clinical isolates for bacterial identification that have ambiguous biochemical profiles by conventional testing. With the emergence of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as an identification tool, we evaluated the usefulness of SmartGene IDNS, a 16S rRNA sequence database and software program for microbial identification. Identification by conventional methods of a diverse group of bacterial clinical isolates was compared with gene sequences interrogated by the SmartGene and MicroSeq databases. Of 300 isolates, SmartGene identified 295 (98%) to the genus level and 262 (87%) to the species level, with 5 (2%) being inconclusive. MicroSeq identified 271 (90%) to the genus level and 223 (74%) to the species level, with 29 (10%) being inconclusive. SmartGene and MicroSeq agreed on the genus for 233 (78%) isolates and the species for 212 (71%) isolates. Conventional methods identified 291 (97%) isolates to the genus level and 208 (69%) to the species level, with 9 (3%) being inconclusive. SmartGene, MicroSeq, and conventional identifications agreed for 193 (64%) of the results. Twenty-seven microorganisms were not represented in MicroSeq, compared to only 2 not represented in SmartGene. Overall, SmartGene IDNS provides comprehensive and accurate identification of a diverse group of bacteria and has the added benefit of being a user-friendly program that can be modified to meet the unique needs of clinical laboratories.

  13. Application of SmartGene IDNS Software to Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequences for a Diverse Group of Bacteria in a Clinical Laboratory▿

    PubMed Central

    Simmon, Keith E.; Croft, Ann C.; Petti, Cathy A.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratories often receive clinical isolates for bacterial identification that have ambiguous biochemical profiles by conventional testing. With the emergence of 16S rRNA gene sequencing as an identification tool, we evaluated the usefulness of SmartGene IDNS, a 16S rRNA sequence database and software program for microbial identification. Identification by conventional methods of a diverse group of bacterial clinical isolates was compared with gene sequences interrogated by the SmartGene and MicroSeq databases. Of 300 isolates, SmartGene identified 295 (98%) to the genus level and 262 (87%) to the species level, with 5 (2%) being inconclusive. MicroSeq identified 271 (90%) to the genus level and 223 (74%) to the species level, with 29 (10%) being inconclusive. SmartGene and MicroSeq agreed on the genus for 233 (78%) isolates and the species for 212 (71%) isolates. Conventional methods identified 291 (97%) isolates to the genus level and 208 (69%) to the species level, with 9 (3%) being inconclusive. SmartGene, MicroSeq, and conventional identifications agreed for 193 (64%) of the results. Twenty-seven microorganisms were not represented in MicroSeq, compared to only 2 not represented in SmartGene. Overall, SmartGene IDNS provides comprehensive and accurate identification of a diverse group of bacteria and has the added benefit of being a user-friendly program that can be modified to meet the unique needs of clinical laboratories. PMID:17050811

  14. Construction of 4"-isovalerylspiramycin-I-producing strain by in-frame partial deletion of 3-O-acyltransferase gene in Streptomyces spiramyceticus WSJ-1, the bitespiramycin producer.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunyan; Zhou, Hongxia; Li, Jingyan; Dai, Jianlu; He, Weiqing; Wang, Hongyuan; Wu, Linzhuan; Wang, Yiguang

    2011-01-01

    Bitespiramycin (BT), a multi-component antibiotic consisted mainly of 4"-isovalerylspiramycin I, II and III, is produced by Streptomyces spiramyceticus WSJ-1, a recombinant spiramycin-production strain that harbored the 4"-O-acyltransferase gene (ist) from Streptomyces mycarofaciens 1748, which could isovalerylate the 4"-OH of spiramycin. To eliminate the production of components 4"-isovalerylspiramycin II and III, therefore reducing the component complexity of BT, inactivation of the sspA gene, which encodes the 3-O-acyltransferase responsible for the acylation of spiramycin I to spiramycin II and III, was performed in Streptomyces spiramyceticus WSJ-1, by in-frame partial deletion. The resulting strain, Streptomyces spiramyceticus WSJ-2, is a 4"-isovalerylspiramycin-I-producing strain as expected.

  15. Detection of a true breeding homeotic gene mutant Pps-1 with partially petaloid sepals in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) and its genetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Om Prakash; Dubey, Mukesh Kumar; Khanuja, Suman Preet Singh

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous true breeding homeotic gene mutant Pps-1 with distinct partial petaloid sepals was detected in the population of downy mildew (DM)-resistant elite accession I-14 during our studies for the identification of disease resistance sources in opium poppy. The trait was found to be stable and inherited truly in the subsequent generations. Genetic studies were carried out through systematic reciprocal crosses with the parental wild-type genotype I-14, and segregation pattern of phenotypic characteristics in F(1) and F(2) populations clearly indicated single recessive nuclear gene control of the mutant character. The studies have demonstrated that the mutant phenotype is due to mutations at the Pps-1 locus that possibly corresponds to B-class function (according to ABC model) with negative control function. The mutant Pps-1 being single-whorl homeotic mutant might greatly help in providing insight into mechanisms of flower development in opium poppy.

  16. Efficient production of α-ketoglutarate in the gdh deleted Corynebacterium glutamicum by novel double-phase pH and biotin control strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanjun; Sun, Lanchao; Feng, Jia; Wu, Ruifang; Xu, Qingyang; Zhang, Chenglin; Chen, Ning; Xie, Xixian

    2016-06-01

    Production of L-glutamate using a biotin-deficient strain of Corynebacterium glutamicum has a long history. The process is achieved by controlling biotin at suboptimal dose in the initial fermentation medium, meanwhile feeding NH4OH to adjust pH so that α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) can be converted to L-glutamate. In this study, we deleted glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh1 and gdh2) of C. glutamicum GKG-047, an L-glutamate overproducing strain, to produce α-KG that is the direct precursor of L-glutamate. Based on the method of L-glutamate fermentation, we developed a novel double-phase pH and biotin control strategy for α-KG production. Specifically, NH4OH was added to adjust the pH at the bacterial growth stage and NaOH was used when the cells began to produce acid; besides adding an appropriate amount of biotin in the initial medium, certain amount of additional biotin was supplemented at the middle stage of fermentation to maintain a high cell viability and promote the carbon fixation to the flux of α-KG production. Under this control strategy, 45.6 g/L α-KG accumulated after 30-h fermentation in a 7.5-L fermentor and the productivity and yield achieved were 1.52 g/L/h and 0.42 g/g, respectively.

  17. Development of a (PQQ)-GDH-anode based on MWCNT-modified gold and its application in a glucose/O2-biofuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tanne, C; Göbel, G; Lisdat, F

    2010-10-15

    In this study a biofuel cell anode is developed on the basis of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Recombinant pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) is covalently coupled to a PQQ-layer which is adsorbed onto thiol-modified MWCNTs at a gold electrode. In the presence of glucose a catalytic current starts at a potential of -80 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, 1M KCl. Under substrate saturation current densities of 170-200 μA/cm2 can be achieved. The operation is based on mediated electron transfer of the enzyme. This (PQQ)-GDH-MWCNT-electrode is combined with a MWCNT-modified electrode to which bilirubin oxidase (BOD) is covalently coupled. The resulting membrane-free biofuel cell has an open cell potential of 600 mV and can achieve a power density in the range of 23 μW/cm2. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Partial deletion of both the spermine synthase gene and the Pex gene in the X-linked hypophosphatemic, gyro (Gy) mouse.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R A; Henley, C M; Meyer, M H; Morgan, P L; McDonald, A G; Mills, C; Price, D K

    1998-03-15

    Gy, along with Hyp, is a dominant mutation of the normal gene Pex causing X-linked hypophosphatemia in the mouse. Hemizygous Gy male mice, however, have greater defects in survival, bodily growth, skeletal mineralization, and neurological function than those found in heterozygous Gy females or in Hyp mice. Since the gene for spermine synthase is immediately upstream of the homologous human gene PEX, we compared the effects of the Gy and Hyp mutations on both the spermine synthase gene and the Pex gene. Barely detectable levels of spermine (< 5% of normal) with elevated levels of its precursor, spermidine, were found in organs of Gy male mice compared to normal male littermates. Neither Gy females nor Hyp male mice were significantly affected. Four missing introns of the spermine synthase gene were identified in Gy male mice, suggesting extensive gene disruption. A pseudogene for spermine synthase was also identified in the mouse genome. Pex mRNA was found in several but not all tissues studied in adult normal mice. Pex mRNA was altered in both Gy and Hyp mice. All male Hyp mice were lacking the 3' end of the Pex message, whereas all male Gy mice were deficient at the 5' end. In summary, the Gy mutation is associated with a recessively expressed mutation of the spermine synthase gene, leading to spermine deficiency, and a dominantly expressed mutation of the Pex gene, leading to hypophosphatemia. Alterations in two contiguous genes in Gy may explain the additional phenotypic abnormalities present in the Gy male mouse.

  19. Splicing defects in ABCD1 gene leading to both exon skipping and partial intron retention in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy Tunisian patient.

    PubMed

    Kallabi, Fakhri; Hadj Salem, Ikhlass; Ben Chehida, Amel; Ben Salah, Ghada; Ben Turkia, Hadhami; Tebib, Neji; Keskes, Leila; Kamoun, Hassen

    2015-08-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein: the adrenoleukodystrophy protein. The disease is characterized by high concentrations of very long-chain fatty acids in plasma, adrenal, testicular and nervous tissues. Various types of mutations have been identified in the ABCD1 gene: point mutations, insertions, and deletions. To date, more than 40 point mutations have been reported at the splice junctions of the ABCD1 gene; only few functional studies have been performed to explore these types of mutations. In this study, we have identified de novo splice site mutation c.1780+2T>G in ABCD1 gene in an X-ALD Tunisian patient. Sequencing analysis of cDNA showed a minor transcript lacking exon 7 and a major transcript with a partial intron 7 retention due to activation of a new intronic cryptic splice site. Both outcomes lead to frameshifts with premature stop codon generation in exon 8 and intron 7 respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the current study demonstrates that a single splicing mutation affects the ABCD1 transcripts and the ALDP protein function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Attenuated phenotypes and analysis of a herpes simplex virus 1 strain with partial deletion of the UL7, UL41 and LAT genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xingli; Guo, Yingqiu; Fan, Shengtao; Cui, Pingfang; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Zhang, Ying; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Qihan

    2017-09-29

    We previously constructed a herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL7 mutant virus (M1) and showed that a partial deletion mutation of the UL7 gene led to a lower proliferative rate and an attenuated phenotype. Using the M1 mutant, we further modified the UL41 gene, which encodes another tegument protein, and the latency-associated transcript (LAT) gene. Observations of the resulting mutants with modified UL7 and UL41 (M2) or UL7, UL41 and LAT (M3) genes indicated attenuated phenotypes, with lower proliferative ratios in various cells, non-lethal infections in mice and lower viral loads in nervous tissues compared with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, no LAT stable intron could be detected in the trigeminal ganglion of M3-infected animals. The results obtained with the three HSV-1 mutants indicate that the M3 mutant is an attenuated strain with low pathogenicity during both acute and latent infections. Together, the results support the use of the M3 mutant as a candidate for the development of an HSV-1 vaccine.

  1. Laminarin modulates the chloroplast antioxidant system to enhance abiotic stress tolerance partially through the regulation of the defensin-like gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ru; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chuang, Huey-wen

    2016-06-01

    Algae wall polysaccharide, laminarin (Lam), has an established role on induction of plant disease resistance. In this study, application of Lam increased Arabidopsis fresh weight and enhanced tolerance to salt and heat stress by stabilizing chloroplast under adverse environment. Transcriptome analysis indicated that, in addition to induced a large number of genes associated with the host defense, genes involved in the regulation of abiotic stress tolerance mostly the heat stress response constituted the largest group of the up-regulated genes. Lam induced expression of IRT1, ZIP8, and copper transporters involved in transport of Fe, Zn, Cu ions associated with the activity of chloroplast antioxidant system. Lam also up-regulated genes involved in the synthesis of terpenoid, a plastidial-derived secondary metabolite with antioxidant activity. Overexpression of a Lam-induced defensin like 202 (DEFL202) resulted in increased chloroplast stability under salt stress and increased plant growth activity after heat stress. Expression of antioxidant enzymes including SOD and ascorbate peroxidase (APX), photosystem PsbA-D1 and ABA-dependent responsive to desiccation 22 (RD22) was induced to higher levels in the transgenic seedlings. In sum, our results suggest that Lam is an potent inducer for induction of chloroplastic antioxidant activity. Lam affect plant abiotic stress tolerance partially through regulation of the DEFL-mediated pathway.

  2. Dose-dependent effects of calorie restriction on gene expression, metabolism, and tumor progression are partially mediated by insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Leticia M; Lavigne, Jackie A; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Lui, Huaitian; Barrett, J Carl; Hursting, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    IGF-1 rescued the hepatic expression of several metabolic genes and pathways affected by CR. Exogenous IGF-1 also rescued the expression of several metabolism- and cancer-related genes affected by CR in the mammary gland. Furthermore, exogenous IGF-1 partially reversed the mammary tumor inhibitory effects of 30% CR. We conclude that several genes and pathways, particularly those associated with macronutrient and steroid hormone metabolism, are associated with the anticancer effects of CR, and that reduced IGF-1 levels can account, at least in part, for many of the effects of CR on gene expression and mammary tumor burden.

  3. Molecular characterization and expression profile of partial TLR4 gene in association to mastitis in crossbred cattle.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manjit; Sharma, Arjava; Bhushan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Crossbred cattle are more prone to mastitis in comparison to indigenous cattle. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) recognizes pathogen ligands, for example, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin from Escherichia coli and mediates signaling to initiate innate and adaptive immune responses. Mutations in TLR4 can compromise the host immune response to certain pathogens, so it may be a potential candidate for marker assisted selection to enhance mastitis resistance in dairy cattle. Hence, in this study role of bovine TLR4 gene in mastitis resistance was investigated by association as well as expression profiling analysis in crossbred cattle. The animals were divided into mastitis affected and unaffected groups on the basis of history of animals and California Mastitis Test (CMT). PCR-SSCP and Sequence analysis revealed three genotypes of coreceptor binding region 1 (CRBR1) fragment of TLR4 gene namely AA, AB, and BB in both groups of cattle. The logistic regression model did not show any significant effect of these genotypes on the occurrence of clinical mastitis. Moreover, in vitro challenge of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with LPS failed to show any association of the genotypes with TLR4 gene expression. In a nutshell, in the present study enough evidence was not found for association of the SNP variants of CRBR1 fragment of TLR4 gene with mastitis susceptibility in crossbred cattle.

  4. Identification, classification, and partial characterization of genes in humans and other vertebrates homologous to a fish membrane progestin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yong; Bond, Jason; Thomas, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Recently we discovered a previously uncharacterized gene with the characteristics of a membrane progestin receptor (mPR) in a fish model, spotted seatrout. Here, we report the identification, cloning, and characteristics of other members of this hitherto unknown family of putative mPRs from several vertebrate species, including human, mouse, pig, Xenopus, zebrafish, and Fugu, with highly conserved nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences and similar structures to the spotted seatrout mPR. The 13 vertebrate genes identified seem to belong to an unknown gene family. Phylogenetic analysis indicates these cDNAs comprise three distinct groups (named α, β, and γ) within this gene family. Structural analyses of the translated cDNAs suggest they encode membrane proteins with seven transmembrane domains. The transcript sizes of the human α, β, and γ putative mPR mRNAs varied from 2.8 to 5.8 kb and showed distinct distributions in reproductive, neural, kidney and intestinal tissues, respectively. Recombinant human α, γ, and mouse β proteins produced in an Escherichia coli expression system demonstrated high affinity (Kd = 20–30 nM) saturable binding for progesterone. Further analysis of binding to the γ-subtype revealed binding was specific for progestins and was displaceable, with rapid rates of association and dissociation (t1/2 = 2–8 min). These results suggest this is a new family of steroid receptors unrelated to nuclear steroid receptors, but instead having characteristics of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:12601167

  5. A CGMMV genome-replicon vector with partial sequences of coat protein gene efficiently expresses GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Jailani, A Abdul Kader; Solanki, Vikas; Roy, Anirban; Sivasudha, T; Mandal, Bikash

    2017-03-02

    A highly infectious clone of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), a cucurbit-infecting tobamovirus was utilized for designing of gene expression vectors. Two versions of vector were examined for their efficacy in expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. When the GFP gene was inserted at the stop codon of coat protein (CP) gene of the CGMMV genome without any read-through codon, systemic expression of GFP, as well as virion formation and systemic symptoms expression were obtained in N. benthamiana. The qRT-PCR analysis showed 23 fold increase of GFP over actin at 10days post inoculation (dpi), which increased to 45 fold at 14dpi and thereafter the GFP expression was significantly declined. Further, we show that when the most of the CP sequence is deleted retaining only the first 105 nucleotides, the shortened vector containing GFP in frame of original CP open reading frame (ORF) resulted in 234 fold increase of GFP expression over actin at 5dpi in N. benthamiana without the formation of virions and disease symptoms. Our study demonstrated that a simple manipulation of CP gene in the CGMMV genome while preserving the translational frame of CP resulted in developing a virus-free, rapid and efficient foreign protein expression system in the plant. The CGMMV based vectors developed in this study may be potentially useful for the production of edible vaccines in cucurbits.

  6. Annotation of a hybrid partial genome of the coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix) contributes to the gene repertoire catalog of the Pucciniales.

    PubMed

    Cristancho, Marco A; Botero-Rozo, David Octavio; Giraldo, William; Tabima, Javier; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Escobar, Carolina; Rozo, Yomara; Rivera, Luis F; Durán, Andrés; Restrepo, Silvia; Eilam, Tamar; Anikster, Yehoshua; Gaitán, Alvaro L

    2014-01-01

    Coffee leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix is the most damaging disease to coffee worldwide. The pathogen has recently appeared in multiple outbreaks in coffee producing countries resulting in significant yield losses and increases in costs related to its control. New races/isolates are constantly emerging as evidenced by the presence of the fungus in plants that were previously resistant. Genomic studies are opening new avenues for the study of the evolution of pathogens, the detailed description of plant-pathogen interactions and the development of molecular techniques for the identification of individual isolates. For this purpose we sequenced 8 different H. vastatrix isolates using NGS technologies and gathered partial genome assemblies due to the large repetitive content in the coffee rust hybrid genome; 74.4% of the assembled contigs harbor repetitive sequences. A hybrid assembly of 333 Mb was built based on the 8 isolates; this assembly was used for subsequent analyses. Analysis of the conserved gene space showed that the hybrid H. vastatrix genome, though highly fragmented, had a satisfactory level of completion with 91.94% of core protein-coding orthologous genes present. RNA-Seq from urediniospores was used to guide the de novo annotation of the H. vastatrix gene complement. In total, 14,445 genes organized in 3921 families were uncovered; a considerable proportion of the predicted proteins (73.8%) were homologous to other Pucciniales species genomes. Several gene families related to the fungal lifestyle were identified, particularly 483 predicted secreted proteins that represent candidate effector genes and will provide interesting hints to decipher virulence in the coffee rust fungus. The genome sequence of Hva will serve as a template to understand the molecular mechanisms used by this fungus to attack the coffee plant, to study the diversity of this species and for the development of molecular markers to distinguish races/isolates.

  7. Annotation of a hybrid partial genome of the coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix) contributes to the gene repertoire catalog of the Pucciniales

    PubMed Central

    Cristancho, Marco A.; Botero-Rozo, David Octavio; Giraldo, William; Tabima, Javier; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Escobar, Carolina; Rozo, Yomara; Rivera, Luis F.; Durán, Andrés; Restrepo, Silvia; Eilam, Tamar; Anikster, Yehoshua; Gaitán, Alvaro L.

    2014-01-01

    Coffee leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix is the most damaging disease to coffee worldwide. The pathogen has recently appeared in multiple outbreaks in coffee producing countries resulting in significant yield losses and increases in costs related to its control. New races/isolates are constantly emerging as evidenced by the presence of the fungus in plants that were previously resistant. Genomic studies are opening new avenues for the study of the evolution of pathogens, the detailed description of plant-pathogen interactions and the development of molecular techniques for the identification of individual isolates. For this purpose we sequenced 8 different H. vastatrix isolates using NGS technologies and gathered partial genome assemblies due to the large repetitive content in the coffee rust hybrid genome; 74.4% of the assembled contigs harbor repetitive sequences. A hybrid assembly of 333 Mb was built based on the 8 isolates; this assembly was used for subsequent analyses. Analysis of the conserved gene space showed that the hybrid H. vastatrix genome, though highly fragmented, had a satisfactory level of completion with 91.94% of core protein-coding orthologous genes present. RNA-Seq from urediniospores was used to guide the de novo annotation of the H. vastatrix gene complement. In total, 14,445 genes organized in 3921 families were uncovered; a considerable proportion of the predicted proteins (73.8%) were homologous to other Pucciniales species genomes. Several gene families related to the fungal lifestyle were identified, particularly 483 predicted secreted proteins that represent candidate effector genes and will provide interesting hints to decipher virulence in the coffee rust fungus. The genome sequence of Hva will serve as a template to understand the molecular mechanisms used by this fungus to attack the coffee plant, to study the diversity of this species and for the development of molecular markers to distinguish races/isolates. PMID

  8. Partial least squares regression, support vector machine regression, and transcriptome-based distances for prediction of maize hybrid performance with gene expression data.

    PubMed

    Fu, Junjie; Falke, K Christin; Thiemann, Alexander; Schrag, Tobias A; Melchinger, Albrecht E; Scholten, Stefan; Frisch, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    The performance of hybrids can be predicted with gene expression data from their parental inbred lines. Implementing such prediction approaches in breeding programs promises to increase the efficiency of hybrid breeding. The objectives of our study were to compare the accuracy of prediction models employing multiple linear regression (MLR), partial least squares regression (PLS), support vector machine regression (SVM), and transcriptome-based distances (D(B)). For a factorial of 7 flint and 14 dent maize lines, the grain yield of the hybrids was assessed and the gene expression of the parental lines was profiled with a 56k microarray. The accuracy of the prediction models was measured by the correlation between predicted and observed yield employing two cross-validation schemes. The first modeled the prediction of hybrids when testcross data are available for both parental lines (type 2 hybrids), and the second modeled the prediction of hybrids when no testcross data for the parental lines were available (type 0 hybrids). MLR, SVM, and PLS resulted in a high correlation between predicted and observed yield for type 2 hybrids, whereas for type 0 hybrids D(B) had greater prediction accuracy. The regression methods were robust to the choice of the set of profiled genes and required only a few hundred genes. In contrast, for an accurate hybrid prediction with D(B), 1,000-1,500 genes were required, and the prediction accuracy depended strongly on the set of profiled genes. We conclude that for prediction within one set of genetic material MLR is a promising approach, and for transferring prediction models from one set of genetic material to a related one, the transcriptome-based distance D(B) is most promising.

  9. Polyvariant mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genes. The polymorphic (Tg)m locus explains the partial penetrance of the T5 polymorphism as a disease mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Cuppens, H; Lin, W; Jaspers, M; Costes, B; Teng, H; Vankeerberghen, A; Jorissen, M; Droogmans, G; Reynaert, I; Goossens, M; Nilius, B; Cassiman, J J

    1998-01-01

    In congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens patients, the T5 allele at the polymorphic Tn locus in the CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene is a frequent disease mutation with incomplete penetrance. This T5 allele will result in a high proportion of CFTR transcripts that lack exon 9, whose translation products will not contribute to apical chloride channel activity. Besides the polymorphic Tn locus, more than 120 polymorphisms have been described in the CFTR gene. We hypothesized that the combination of particular alleles at several polymorphic loci might result in less functional or even insufficient CFTR protein. Analysis of three polymorphic loci with frequent alleles in the general population showed that, in addition to the known effect of the Tn locus, the quantity and quality of CFTR transcripts and/or proteins was affected by two other polymorphic loci: (TG)m and M470V. On a T7 background, the (TG)11 allele gave a 2.8-fold increase in the proportion of CFTR transcripts that lacked exon 9, and (TG)12 gave a sixfold increase, compared with the (TG)10 allele. T5 CFTR genes derived from patients were found to carry a high number of TG repeats, while T5 CFTR genes derived from healthy CF fathers harbored a low number of TG repeats. Moreover, it was found that M470 CFTR proteins matured more slowly, and that they had a 1.7-fold increased intrinsic chloride channel activity compared with V470 CFTR proteins, suggesting that the M470V locus might also play a role in the partial penetrance of T5 as a disease mutation. Such polyvariant mutant genes could explain why apparently normal CFTR genes cause disease. Moreover, they might be responsible for variation in the phenotypic expression of CFTR mutations, and be of relevance in other genetic diseases. PMID:9435322

  10. Relationship Among Genes Conferring Partial Resistance to Leaf Rust (Puccinia triticina) in Wheat Lines CI 13227 and L-574-1.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Jeffrey S; Hanson, Karin A; Shaner, Gregory

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT This study describes the segregation of genes for resistance to the fungus Puccinia triticina in a cross between partially resistant wheat lines L-574-1 and CI 13227 with two and four genes for resistance, respectively. The objectives of this study were to use parental, F(1), F(2), and backcross populations to quantify maternal effects, degree of dominance, and transgressive segregation, and to determine whether CI 13227 and L-574-1 share any resistance genes for long latent period or small uredinia. In two experiments conducted in the greenhouse, the uppermost leaf of adult wheat plants was inoculated prior to heading with P. triticina. On days 6 to 21 after inoculation, the number of uredinia that erupted from the leaf surface was counted and used to calculate the mean latent period (MLP). The length and width of five arbitrarily selected uredinia were measured and used to calculate uredinium area. Midparent values, degree of dominance, and broad-sense heritability were calculated for MLP and uredinium area. For experiment A, MLP values for CI 13227, L-574-1, F(1), and F(2) generations were 12.2, 10.5, 10.2, and 10.6 days, respectively. For experiment B, MLP values for CI 13227, L-574-1, F(1), F(2), backcross to CI 13227, and backcross to L-574-1 were 12.3, 10.0, 10.6, 10.8, 11.1, and 10.0 days, respectively. The inheritance of long latent period was partially recessive, and no maternal effect was present (P = 0.62 to 0.87 for the comparison of means in reciprocal crosses). Broad-sense heritability for MLP ranged from 0.72 to 0.74, and there was transgressive segregation in the F(2) and backcross populations. Uredinia of the F(1) generation were slightly larger than uredinia for CI 13227. The inheritance of uredinium size was partially dominant, and no maternal effect was present (P = 0.5 to 0.63). Broad-sense heritability for uredinium area ranged from 0.36 to 0.73 and transgressive segregation was present in the F(2) and backcross populations. The

  11. Molecular phylogenetic relationships of puffer fish inferred from partial sequences of cytochrome b gene and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Wen; Hwang, Deng-Fwu

    2004-06-30

    Phylogenetic relationships among puffer fish were investigated by comparing cytochrome b gene sequences and restriction endonuclease assays of 16 species from Taiwan. DNA was prepared for sequencing by PCR. No variation in sequences was detected among individuals within each species. Direct estimates of mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence divergence among 16 puffer fish were from 3.41 to 31.78%. Different restriction patterns were found among 16 puffer fish with 10 restriction endonucleases, whereas no variation in patterns was detected among individuals within each species. The polymorphisms obtained by RFLP have provided a new set of genetic markers for the accurate identification of sibling puffer species. It is the first molecularly based study of puffer diversity and sheds light on the evolution and taxonomy of this major puffer fish family.

  12. Metagenomic survey of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) catabolic genes in an Atlantic Ocean surface water sample and in a partial enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Ana C.; Azevedo, Rui M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a relevant intermediate of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and environmental microorganisms assume an important role in the mineralization of this compound. Several methylotrophic bacterial strains able to grow on MSA have been isolated from soil or marine water and two conserved operons, msmABCD coding for MSA monooxygenase and msmEFGH coding for a transport system, have been repeatedly encountered in most of these strains. Homologous sequences have also been amplified directly from the environment or observed in marine metagenomic data, but these showed a base composition (G + C content) very different from their counterparts from cultivated bacteria. The aim of this study was to understand which microorganisms within the coastal surface oceanic microflora responded to MSA as a nutrient and how the community evolved in the early phases of an enrichment by means of metagenome and gene-targeted amplicon sequencing. From the phylogenetic point of view, the community shifted significantly with the disappearance of all signals related to the Archaea, the Pelagibacteraceae and phylum SAR406, and the increase in methylotroph-harboring taxa, accompanied by other groups so far not known to comprise methylotrophs such as the Hyphomonadaceae. At the functional level, the abundance of several genes related to sulfur metabolism and methylotrophy increased during the enrichment and the allelic distribution of gene msmA diagnostic for MSA monooxygenase altered considerably. Even more dramatic was the disappearance of MSA import-related gene msmE, which suggests that alternative transporters must be present in the enriched community and illustrate the inadequacy of msmE as an ecofunctional marker for MSA degradation at sea. PMID:27761315

  13. Metagenomic survey of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) catabolic genes in an Atlantic Ocean surface water sample and in a partial enrichment.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana C; Azevedo, Rui M S; De Marco, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is a relevant intermediate of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur and environmental microorganisms assume an important role in the mineralization of this compound. Several methylotrophic bacterial strains able to grow on MSA have been isolated from soil or marine water and two conserved operons, msmABCD coding for MSA monooxygenase and msmEFGH coding for a transport system, have been repeatedly encountered in most of these strains. Homologous sequences have also been amplified directly from the environment or observed in marine metagenomic data, but these showed a base composition (G + C content) very different from their counterparts from cultivated bacteria. The aim of this study was to understand which microorganisms within the coastal surface oceanic microflora responded to MSA as a nutrient and how the community evolved in the early phases of an enrichment by means of metagenome and gene-targeted amplicon sequencing. From the phylogenetic point of view, the community shifted significantly with the disappearance of all signals related to the Archaea, the Pelagibacteraceae and phylum SAR406, and the increase in methylotroph-harboring taxa, accompanied by other groups so far not known to comprise methylotrophs such as the Hyphomonadaceae. At the functional level, the abundance of several genes related to sulfur metabolism and methylotrophy increased during the enrichment and the allelic distribution of gene msmA diagnostic for MSA monooxygenase altered considerably. Even more dramatic was the disappearance of MSA import-related gene msmE, which suggests that alternative transporters must be present in the enriched community and illustrate the inadequacy of msmE as an ecofunctional marker for MSA degradation at sea.

  14. The HLA-B*83:01 allele is generated by a gene conversion event including whole of exon 2 and partial introns 1 and 2 between B*44 and B*56 alleles.

    PubMed

    Cervera, I; Herraiz, M A; Vidart, J A; Peñaloza, J; Martinez-Laso, J

    2011-02-01

    Several studies have indicated the gene conversion as the most important mechanism about the MHC polymorphism generation when intron sequences are studied. The data obtained confirm that the B*83:01 allele is generated by gene conversion event including exon 2 and partial intron 1 and 2 between B*44 and B*56 alleles.

  15. In Silico Assigned Resistance Genes Confer Bifidobacterium with Partial Resistance to Aminoglycosides but Not to Β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Fouhy, Fiona; O’Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Ross, R. Paul; Stanton, Catherine; van Sinderen, Douwe; Cotter, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have received significant attention due to their contribution to human gut health and the use of specific strains as probiotics. It is thus not surprising that there has also been significant interest with respect to their antibiotic resistance profile. Numerous culture-based studies have demonstrated that bifidobacteria are resistant to the majority of aminoglycosides, but are sensitive to β-lactams. However, limited research exists with respect to the genetic basis for the resistance of bifidobacteria to aminoglycosides. Here we performed an in-depth in silico analysis of putative Bifidobacterium-encoded aminoglycoside resistance proteins and β-lactamases and assess the contribution of these proteins to antibiotic resistance. The in silico-based screen detected putative aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance proteins across the Bifidobacterium genus. Laboratory-based investigations of a number of representative bifidobacteria strains confirmed that despite containing putative β-lactamases, these strains were sensitive to β-lactams. In contrast, all strains were resistant to the aminoglycosides tested. To assess the contribution of genes encoding putative aminoglycoside resistance proteins in Bifidobacterium sp. two genes, namely Bbr_0651 and Bbr_1586, were targeted for insertional inactivation in B. breve UCC2003. As compared to the wild-type, the UCC2003 insertion mutant strains exhibited decreased resistance to gentamycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. This study highlights the associated risks of relying on the in silico assignment of gene function. Although several putative β-lactam resistance proteins are located in bifidobacteria, their presence does not coincide with resistance to these antibiotics. In contrast however, this approach has resulted in the identification of two loci that contribute to the aminoglycoside resistance of B. breve UCC2003 and, potentially, many other bifidobacteria. PMID:24324818

  16. The inactivation of the sortilin gene leads to a partial disruption of prosaposin trafficking to the lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jibin; Racicott, Jesse; Morales, Carlos R.

    2009-11-01

    Lysosomes are intracellular organelles which contain enzymes and activator proteins involved in the digestion and recycling of a variety of cellular and extracellular substances. We have identified a novel sorting receptor, sortilin, which is involved in the lysosomal trafficking of the sphingolipid activator proteins, prosaposin and GM{sub 2}AP, and the soluble hydrolases cathepsin D, cathepsin H, and acid sphingomyelinase. Sortilin belongs to a growing family of receptors with homology to the yeast Vps10 protein, which acts as a lysosomal sorting receptor for carboxypeptidase Y. In this study we examined the effects of the sortilin gene inactivation in mice. The inactivation of this gene did not yield any noticeable lysosomal pathology. To determine the existence of an alternative receptor complementing the sorting function of sortilin, we quantified the concentration of prosaposin in the lysosomes of the nonciliated epithelial cells lining the efferent ducts. These cells were chosen because they express sortilin and have a large number of lysosomes containing prosaposin. In addition, the nonciliated cells are known to endocytose luminal prosaposin that is synthesized and secreted by Sertoli cells into the seminiferous luminal fluids. Consequently, the nonciliated cells are capable of targeting both exogenous and endogenous prosaposin to the lysosomes. Using electron microscope immunogold labeling and quantitative analysis, our results demonstrate that inactivation of the sortilin gene produces a significant decrease of prosaposin in the lysosomes. When luminal prosaposin was excluded from the efferent ducts, the level of prosaposin in lysosomes was even lower in the mutant mice. Nonetheless, a significant amount of prosaposin continues to reach the lysosomal compartment. These results strongly suggest the existence of an alternative receptor that complements the function of sortilin and explains the lack of lysosomal storage disorders in the sortilin

  17. In silico assigned resistance genes confer Bifidobacterium with partial resistance to aminoglycosides but not to β-lactams.

    PubMed

    Fouhy, Fiona; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; van Sinderen, Douwe; Cotter, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    Bifidobacteria have received significant attention due to their contribution to human gut health and the use of specific strains as probiotics. It is thus not surprising that there has also been significant interest with respect to their antibiotic resistance profile. Numerous culture-based studies have demonstrated that bifidobacteria are resistant to the majority of aminoglycosides, but are sensitive to β-lactams. However, limited research exists with respect to the genetic basis for the resistance of bifidobacteria to aminoglycosides. Here we performed an in-depth in silico analysis of putative Bifidobacterium-encoded aminoglycoside resistance proteins and β-lactamases and assess the contribution of these proteins to antibiotic resistance. The in silico-based screen detected putative aminoglycoside and β-lactam resistance proteins across the Bifidobacterium genus. Laboratory-based investigations of a number of representative bifidobacteria strains confirmed that despite containing putative β-lactamases, these strains were sensitive to β-lactams. In contrast, all strains were resistant to the aminoglycosides tested. To assess the contribution of genes encoding putative aminoglycoside resistance proteins in Bifidobacterium sp. two genes, namely Bbr_0651 and Bbr_1586, were targeted for insertional inactivation in B. breve UCC2003. As compared to the wild-type, the UCC2003 insertion mutant strains exhibited decreased resistance to gentamycin, kanamycin and streptomycin. This study highlights the associated risks of relying on the in silico assignment of gene function. Although several putative β-lactam resistance proteins are located in bifidobacteria, their presence does not coincide with resistance to these antibiotics. In contrast however, this approach has resulted in the identification of two loci that contribute to the aminoglycoside resistance of B. breve UCC2003 and, potentially, many other bifidobacteria.

  18. Microdiversification of a Pelagic Polynucleobacter Species Is Mainly Driven by Acquisition of Genomic Islands from a Partially Interspecific Gene Pool

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Johanna; Jezberová, Jitka; Koll, Ulrike; Hahn, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microdiversification of a planktonic freshwater bacterium was studied by comparing 37 Polynucleobacter asymbioticus strains obtained from three geographically separated sites in the Austrian Alps. Genome comparison of nine strains revealed a core genome of 1.8 Mb, representing 81% of the average genome size. Seventy-five percent of the remaining flexible genome is clustered in genomic islands (GIs). Twenty-four genomic positions could be identified where GIs are potentially located. These positions are occupied strain specifically from a set of 28 GI variants, classified according to similarities in their gene content. One variant, present in 62% of the isolates, encodes a pathway for the degradation of aromatic compounds, and another, found in 78% of the strains, contains an operon for nitrate assimilation. Both variants were shown in ecophysiological tests to be functional, thus providing the potential for microniche partitioning. In addition, detected interspecific horizontal exchange of GIs indicates a large gene pool accessible to Polynucleobacter species. In contrast to core genes, GIs are spread more successfully across spatially separated freshwater habitats. The mobility and functional diversity of GIs allow for rapid evolution, which may be a key aspect for the ubiquitous occurrence of Polynucleobacter bacteria. IMPORTANCE Assessing the ecological relevance of bacterial diversity is a key challenge for current microbial ecology. The polyphasic approach which was applied in this study, including targeted isolation of strains, genome analysis, and ecophysiological tests, is crucial for the linkage of genetic and ecological knowledge. Particularly great importance is attached to the high number of closely related strains which were investigated, represented by genome-wide average nucleotide identities (ANI) larger than 97%. The extent of functional diversification found on this narrow phylogenetic scale is compelling. Moreover, the transfer of

  19. Partially Hydrolyzed Poly(n-propyl-2-oxazoline): Synthesis, Aqueous Solution Properties, and Preparation of Gene Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Mees, Maarten; Haladjova, Emi; Momekova, Denitsa; Momekov, Georgi; Shestakova, Pavletta S; Tsvetanov, Christo B; Hoogenboom, Richard; Rangelov, Stanislav

    2016-11-14

    Random copolymers of n-propyl-2-oxazoline and ethylenimine (PPrOx-PEI) were prepared by partial acidic hydrolysis of poly(n-propyl-2-oxazoline) (PPrOx). Dynamic and electrophoretic light scattering and diffusion-ordered NMR spectroscopy were utilized to investigate aqueous solution properties of the copolymers. Above a specific cloud point temperature, well-defined nanoparticles were formed. The latter consisted of a core composed predominantly of PPrOx and a thin positively charged shell from PEI moieties that mediated formation of polyplexes with DNA. The polyplexes were prepared at 65 °C at varying N/P (amine-to-phosphate groups) ratios. They underwent structural changes upon temperature variations 65-25-37 °C depending on N/P. At N/P < 2, the polyplex particles underwent minor changes because of formation of a surface layer of DNA that acted as a barrier and prevented swelling and disintegration of the initial particles. Dramatic rearrangements at N/P ≥ 2 resulting in large swollen microgel particles were overcome by coating of the polyplex particles with a cross-linked polymeric shell. The shell retained the colloidal stability and preserved the physicochemical parameters of the initial polyplex particles while it reduced the high surface potential values. Progressive loss of cytotoxicity upon complexation with DNA and coating of polyplex particles was displayed.

  20. Genes galore: a summary of methods for accessing results from large-scale partial sequencing of anonymous Arabidopsis cDNA clones.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, T; de Bruijn, F J; Green, P; Keegstra, K; Kende, H; McIntosh, L; Ohlrogge, J; Raikhel, N; Somerville, S; Thomashow, M

    1994-01-01

    High-throughput automated partial sequencing of anonymous cDNA clones provides a method to survey the repertoire of expressed genes from an organism. Comparison of the coding capacity of these expressed sequence tags (ESTs) with the sequences in the public data bases results in assignment of putative function to a significant proportion of the ESTs. Thus, the more than 13,400 plant ESTs that are currently available provide a new resource that will facilitate progress in many areas of plant biology. These opportunities are illustrated by a description of the results obtained from analysis of 1500 Arabidopsis ESTs from a cDNA library prepared from equal portions of poly(A+) mRNA from etiolated seedlings, roots, leaves, and flowering inflorescences. More than 900 different sequences were represented, 32% of which showed significant nucleotide or deduced amino acid sequences similarity to previously characterized genes or proteins from a wide range of organisms. At least 165 of the clones had significant deduced amino acid sequence homology to proteins or gene products that have not been previously characterized from higher plants. A summary of methods for accessing the information and materials generated by the Arabidopsis cDNA sequencing project is provided. PMID:7846151

  1. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  2. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  3. [Phylogeographic carrion, hooded and jungle crows (Aves, Corvidae) from data on partial sequencing of the mitochondrial DNA cytochrome B gene].

    PubMed

    Kriukov, A P; Suzuki, H

    2000-08-01

    Distribution of mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b gene haplotypes in two crow species was examined by means of sequencing of the 336-bp gene fragment. The topology of the NJ and UPGMA trees showed that the carrion crow range was split into two parts due to the presence of significantly diverged ancestral lineage localized in the southeastern part of the range. The carrion crow populations, inhabiting a territory ranging from France to northern Sakhalin, along with interspersed hooded crow populations and hybrid Siberian populations, shared a common haplotype. The border between two carrion crow lineages revealed is located in central Sakhalin. The subdivision of two weakly differentiated lineages within the jungle crown range, also observed within this territory, coincided with the subspecies division of this species. The estimated genetic distances indicate the isolation of the subgenus Coloeus. These data also suggest the convergent similarity between the chough Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax and the Corvus genus, as well as the conspecificity of Corvus corone corone and C. c. cornix.

  4. Molecular analysis of 16S rRNA genes identifies potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria and archaea in the plaque of partially erupted third molars.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, J M; Campbell, J H; Bhandari, A R; Jesionowski, A M; Vickerman, M M

    2012-07-01

    Small subunit rRNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis were used to identify cultivable and uncultivable microorganisms present in the dental plaque of symptomatic and asymptomatic partially erupted third molars to determine the prevalence of putative periodontal pathogens in pericoronal sites. Template DNA prepared from subgingival plaque collected from partially erupted symptomatic and asymptomatic mandibular third molars and healthy incisors was used in polymerase chain reaction with broad-range oligonucleotide primers to amplify 16S rRNA bacterial and archaeal genes. Amplicons were cloned, sequenced, and compared with known nucleotide sequences in online databases to identify the microorganisms present. Two thousand three hundred two clones from the plaque of 12 patients carried bacterial sequences from 63 genera belonging to 11 phyla, including members of the uncultivable TM7, SR1, and Chloroflexi, and difficult-to-cultivate Synergistetes and Spirochaetes. Dialister invisus, Filifactor alocis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Porphyromonas endodontalis, Prevotella denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, which have been associated with periodontal disease, were found in significantly greater abundance in pericoronal compared with incisor sites. Dialister invisus and F nucleatum were found in greater abundance in sites exhibiting clinical symptoms. The archaeal species, Methanobrevibacter oralis, which has been associated with severe periodontitis, was found in 3 symptomatic patients. These findings have provided new insights into the complex microbiota of pericoronitis. Several bacterial and archaeal species implicated in periodontal disease were recovered in greater incidence and abundance from the plaque of partially erupted third molars compared with incisors, supporting the hypothesis that the pericoronal region may provide a favored niche for periodontal pathogens in otherwise healthy mouths. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and

  5. Two new species of photosymbiotic ascidians of the genus Diplosoma from the Ryukyu Archipelago, with partial sequences of the COI gene.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Euichi; Oka, Atsushi T; Hirose, Mamiko

    2009-05-01

    Two new species of Diplosoma are described from coral reefs in the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan: D. watanabei sp. nov. and D. gumavirens sp. nov. Colonies of both species are green due to algal symbionts of Prochloron, which are distributed in the common cloacal cavity. Both species are characterized by the point of emergence of the retractor muscle and a unique combination of stigma numbers among the four rows of the branchial sac. There are three adhesive papillae in the embryos of D. watanabei, as in most ascidian embryos and larvae, whereas the pre-hatching embryos of D. gumavirens sp. nov. posses 12-16 adhesive papillae. Partial sequences of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene discriminated the new species from each other and from congeners.

  6. [The effect of altered oxygen partial pressure on the resisitance to hypoxia and expression of oxygen-sensitive genes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Berezovs'kyĭ, V Ia; Chaka, O H; Litovka, I H; Levashov, M I; Ianko, R V

    2014-01-01

    As a result of resistance test to hypoxia of Drosophilas melanogaster of Oregon strain, we identified a high resistance (Group II) and low resistance (Group III) subpopulations of flies. Flies from groups II and III were incubated in a constant normobaric hypoxia (Po2=62-64 mm Hg) for 10 generations. A highly resistant group (Group IV) were exposed to a shortterm anoxia (Po,=1,5 mm Hg, 5 min) every generation. Larvae from Groups II, III, and IV demonstrated significantly elevated levels of Sir and CG 14740 expression. Larvae from Group II had a significantly higher expression of CG 14740 compared to group III. The restitution time after exposure to anoxia was significantly reduced in Group II (on 31% of the control values) Our results suggest that long-term adaptation to low oxygen partial pressure of highly resistant Drosophila significantly reduces the time of restitution and increases the expression of Sir2 and CG14740 genes.

  7. Novel point mutation in the splice donor site of exon-intron junction 6 of the androgen receptor gene in a patient with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sammarco, I; Grimaldi, P; Rossi, P; Cappa, M; Moretti, C; Frajese, G; Geremia, R

    2000-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations have been shown to cause androgen insensitivity syndrome with altered sexual differentiation in XY individuals, ranging from a partial insensitivity with male phenotype and azoospermia to a complete insensitivity with female phenotype and the absence of pubic and axillary sexual hair after puberty. In this study we present an 11-yr-old XY girl, with clinical manifestations peculiar for impaired androgen biological action, including female phenotype, blind-ending vagina, small degree of posterior labial fusion, and absence of uterus, fallopian tubes, and ovaries. At the time of the diagnosis the patient had a FSH/LH ratio according to the puberal stage, undetectable 17beta-estradiol, and high levels of testosterone (80.1 ng/mL). After bilateral gonadectomy, performed at the age of 11 yr, histological examination showed small embryonic seminiferous tubules containing prevalently Sertoli cells and occasional spermatogonia together with abundant fibrous tissue. Molecular study of the patient showed a guanine to thymine transversion in position +5 of the donor splice site in the junction between exon 6 and intron 6 of the AR gene. The result of RT-PCR amplification of the AR messenger ribonucleic acid from cultured genital skin fibroblasts of the patient suggests that splicing is defective, and intron 6 is retained in most of the receptor messenger ribonucleic acid molecules. We show by immunoblotting that most of the expressed protein lacks part of the C-terminal hormone-binding domain, and a small amount of normal receptor is observed. This is probably responsible for the reduced binding capacity in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The molecular basis of the alteration in this case is a novel, uncommon mutation, leading to a phenotype indicative of a partial androgen insensitivity syndrome, Quigley's grade 5.

  8. Partial gene sequences for the A subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) as a phylogenetic tool for the family Methanosarcinaceae.

    PubMed

    Springer, E; Sachs, M S; Woese, C R; Boone, D R

    1995-07-01

    Representatives of the family Methanosarcinaceae were analyzed phylogenetically by comparing partial sequences of their methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) genes. A 490-bp fragment from the A subunit of the gene was selected, amplified by the PCR, cloned, and sequenced for each of 25 strains belonging to the Methanosarcinaceae. The sequences obtained were aligned with the corresponding portions of five previously published sequences, and all of the sequences were compared to determine phylogenetic distances by Fitch distance matrix methods. We prepared analogous trees based on 16S rRNA sequences; these trees corresponded closely to the mcrI trees, although the mcrI sequences of pairs of organisms had 3.01 +/- 0.541 times more changes than the respective pairs of 16S rRNA sequences, suggesting that the mcrI fragment evolved about three times more rapidly than the 16S rRNA gene. The qualitative similarity of the mcrI and 16S rRNA trees suggests that transfer of genetic information between dissimilar organisms has not significantly affected these sequences, although we found inconsistencies between some mcrI distances that we measured and and previously published DNA reassociation data. It is unlikely that multiple mcrI isogenes were present in the organisms that we examined, because we found no major discrepancies in multiple determinations of mcrI sequences from the same organism. Our primers for the PCR also match analogous sites in the previously published mcrII sequences, but all of the sequences that we obtained from members of the Methanosarcinaceae were more closely related to mcrI sequences than to mcrII sequences, suggesting that members of the Methanosarcinaceae do not have distinct mcrII genes.

  9. Partial gene sequences for the A subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) as a phylogenetic tool for the family Methanosarcinaceae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, E.; Sachs, M. S.; Woese, C. R.; Boone, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Representatives of the family Methanosarcinaceae were analyzed phylogenetically by comparing partial sequences of their methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) genes. A 490-bp fragment from the A subunit of the gene was selected, amplified by the PCR, cloned, and sequenced for each of 25 strains belonging to the Methanosarcinaceae. The sequences obtained were aligned with the corresponding portions of five previously published sequences, and all of the sequences were compared to determine phylogenetic distances by Fitch distance matrix methods. We prepared analogous trees based on 16S rRNA sequences; these trees corresponded closely to the mcrI trees, although the mcrI sequences of pairs of organisms had 3.01 +/- 0.541 times more changes than the respective pairs of 16S rRNA sequences, suggesting that the mcrI fragment evolved about three times more rapidly than the 16S rRNA gene. The qualitative similarity of the mcrI and 16S rRNA trees suggests that transfer of genetic information between dissimilar organisms has not significantly affected these sequences, although we found inconsistencies between some mcrI distances that we measured and and previously published DNA reassociation data. It is unlikely that multiple mcrI isogenes were present in the organisms that we examined, because we found no major discrepancies in multiple determinations of mcrI sequences from the same organism. Our primers for the PCR also match analogous sites in the previously published mcrII sequences, but all of the sequences that we obtained from members of the Methanosarcinaceae were more closely related to mcrI sequences than to mcrII sequences, suggesting that members of the Methanosarcinaceae do not have distinct mcrII genes.

  10. Partial gene sequences for the A subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) as a phylogenetic tool for the family Methanosarcinaceae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, E.; Sachs, M. S.; Woese, C. R.; Boone, D. R.

    1995-01-01

    Representatives of the family Methanosarcinaceae were analyzed phylogenetically by comparing partial sequences of their methyl-coenzyme M reductase (mcrI) genes. A 490-bp fragment from the A subunit of the gene was selected, amplified by the PCR, cloned, and sequenced for each of 25 strains belonging to the Methanosarcinaceae. The sequences obtained were aligned with the corresponding portions of five previously published sequences, and all of the sequences were compared to determine phylogenetic distances by Fitch distance matrix methods. We prepared analogous trees based on 16S rRNA sequences; these trees corresponded closely to the mcrI trees, although the mcrI sequences of pairs of organisms had 3.01 +/- 0.541 times more changes than the respective pairs of 16S rRNA sequences, suggesting that the mcrI fragment evolved about three times more rapidly than the 16S rRNA gene. The qualitative similarity of the mcrI and 16S rRNA trees suggests that transfer of genetic information between dissimilar organisms has not significantly affected these sequences, although we found inconsistencies between some mcrI distances that we measured and and previously published DNA reassociation data. It is unlikely that multiple mcrI isogenes were present in the organisms that we examined, because we found no major discrepancies in multiple determinations of mcrI sequences from the same organism. Our primers for the PCR also match analogous sites in the previously published mcrII sequences, but all of the sequences that we obtained from members of the Methanosarcinaceae were more closely related to mcrI sequences than to mcrII sequences, suggesting that members of the Methanosarcinaceae do not have distinct mcrII genes.

  11. Molecular cloning of eucaryotic genes required for excision repair of UV-irradiated DNA: isolation and partial characterization of the RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Naumovski, L; Friedberg, E C

    1982-01-01

    We describe the molecular cloning of a 6-kilobase (kb) fragment of yeast chromosomal DNA containing the RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When present in the autonomously replicating yeast cloning vector YEp24, this fragment transformed two different UV-sensitive, excision repair-defective rad3 mutants of S. cerevisiae to UV resistance. The same result was obtained with a variety of other plasmids containing a 4.5-kb subclone of the 6-kb fragment. The UV sensitivity of mutants defective in the RAD1, RAD2, RAD4, and RAD14 loci was not affected by transformation with these plasmids. The 4.5-kb fragment was subcloned into the integrating yeast vector YIp5, and the resultant plasmid was used to transform the rad3-1 mutant to UV resistance. Both genetic and physical studies showed that this plasmid integrated by homologous recombination into the rad3 site uniquely. We conclude from these studies that the cloned DNA that transforms the rad3-1 mutant to UV resistance contains the yeast chromosomal RAD3 gene. The 4.5-kb fragment was mapped by restriction analysis, and studies on some of the subclones generated from this fragment indicate that the RAD3 gene is at least 1.5 kb in size. Images PMID:6749808

  12. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-05-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia into glutamine. Glutamine-limited continuous cultures were used to completely derepress the expression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1. Following an ammonia pulse, the expression of GAP1, PUT4 and GDH1 decreased while the intracellular glutamine concentration remained constant, both in the cytoplasm and in the vacuole. Therefore, it was concluded that ammonia causes gene repression independent of the intracellular glutamine concentration. The expression of GLN1 was not decreased by an ammonia pulse but solely by a glutamine pulse. Analysis of the mRNA levels of ILV5 and HIS4 showed that the response of the two biosynthetic genes, GDH1 and GLN1, to ammonia and glutamine in the wild-type and gln1-37 was not due to changes in general transcription of biosynthetic genes. Ure2p has been shown to be an essential element for nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Deletion of URE2 in the gln1-37 background prevented repression of gene expression by ammonia, showing that the ammonia-induced repression is not caused by a general stress response but represents a specific signal for nitrogen catabolite regulation.

  13. Hereditary fructose intolerance: functional study of two novel ALDOB natural variants and characterization of a partial gene deletion.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Gabriella; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Ieno, Luigi; Sorvillo, Rosa; Benigno, Vincenzo; Parenti, Giancarlo; Parini, Rossella; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Salvatore, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by impaired functioning of human liver aldolase (ALDOB). At least 54 subtle/point mutations and only two large intragenic deletions have been found in the ALDOB gene. Here we report two novel ALDOB variants (p.R46W and p.Y343H) and an intragenic deletion that we found in patients with suspected HFI. The residual catalytic activity of the recombinant p.R46W and p.Y343H variants toward F1P was particularly altered. We also characterized a large intragenic deletion that we found in six unrelated patients. This is the first report of six unrelated patients sharing the same ALDOB deletion, thus indicating a founder effect for this allele in our geographic area. Because this deletion involves ALDOB exon 5, it can mimic worldwide common pathogenic genotypes, that is, homozygous p.A150P and p.A175D. Finally, the identification of only one ALDOB mutation in symptomatic patients suggests that HFI symptoms can, albeit rarely, appear also in heterozygotes. Therefore, an excessive and continuous fructose dietary intake may have deleterious effects even in apparently asymptomatic HFI carriers.

  14. Membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vector gene transfer mimics partial function of the B-cell receptor in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Feng; Xu, Zhen; Zhang, Lingling; Xu, Peng; Liu, Depei; Liang, Chihchuan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of B-cells is initiated by the ligation of B-cell receptors by its cognate antigen, inducing a series of signal cascades. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of these important events is a crucial goal for immunologists. Chimeric B cell receptors provide a powerful tool for analysis of B-cell signal function. However, this method can only be used in tool cells, but cannot be used for in vivo study. Here, we constructed a retroviral vector to encode both heavy chains and light chains of a membrane immunoglobulin, and expressed them in primary B-cells using retroviral gene transfer. Our results demonstrate that the membrane immunoglobulin expressed by retroviral vectors transfer can initiate B-cell receptor-mediated signaling, resulting in the phosphorylation of Syk and Erk1/2 proteins. The results showed that B-cells expressing membrane immunoglobulin can make proliferative responses to cognate antigen both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, we provide a methodology for rapidly analyzing the downstream signals of B-cell receptors both in vitro and in vivo, which could expedite the identification of proteins involved in B-cell function.

  15. Self-Complementary AAV9 Gene Delivery Partially Corrects Pathology Associated with Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN3).

    PubMed

    Bosch, Megan E; Aldrich, Amy; Fallet, Rachel; Odvody, Jessica; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Schuberth, Kaitlyn; Fitzgerald, Julie A; Foust, Kevin D; Kielian, Tammy

    2016-09-14

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a fatal lysosomal storage disease caused by autosomal-recessive mutations in CLN3 for which no treatment exists. Symptoms appear between 5 and 10 years of age, beginning with blindness and seizures, followed by progressive cognitive and motor decline and premature death (late teens to 20s). We explored a gene delivery approach for JNCL by generating two self-complementary adeno-associated virus 9 (scAAV9) constructs to address CLN3 dosage effects using the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and β-actin promoters to drive low versus high transgene expression, respectively. This approach was based on the expectation that low CLN3 levels are required for cellular homeostasis due to minimal CLN3 expression postnatally, although this had not yet been demonstrated in vivo One-month-old Cln3(Δex7/8) mice received one systemic (intravenous) injection of scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3 or scAAV9/β-actin-hCLN3, with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing viruses as controls. A promoter-dosage effect was observed in all brain regions examined, in which hCLN3 levels were elevated 3- to 8-fold in Cln3(Δex7/8) mice receiving scAAV9/β-actin-hCLN3 versus scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3. However, a disconnect occurred between CLN3 levels and disease improvement, because only the scAAV9 construct driving low CLN3 expression (scAAV9/MeCP2-hCLN3) corrected motor deficits and attenuated microglial and astrocyte activation and lysosomal pathology. This may have resulted from preferential promoter usage because transgene expression after intravenous scAAV9/MeCP2-GFP injection was primarily detected in NeuN(+) neurons, whereas scAAV9/β-actin-GFP drove transgene expression in GFAP(+) astrocytes. This is the first demonstration of a systemic delivery route to restore CLN3 in vivo using scAAV9 and highlights the importance of promoter selection for disease modification in juvenile animals. Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL) is a fatal lysosomal

  16. Nitroglycerin-inhibited whole blood aggregation is partially mediated by calcitonin gene-related peptide–a neurogenic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Brian P; Nolan, Timothy D; Fung, Ho-Leung

    1997-01-01

    The role of the vasculature and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in nitroglycerin (NTG)-mediated platelet inhibition was studied. In vitro incubations of CGRP in whole blood induced a dose-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 62.1 nM. The platelet inhibition induced by CGRP was blocked by co-incubation of 0.53 μM CGRP8-37, as well as 30 μM NG-nitro-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). In a separate group of experiments, 100 nM NTG in rat whole blood (WB) induced platelet inhibition of 6.0±1.3% (mean±s.d.), which was enhanced to 77.6±3.5% by the addition of rat aortic tissue (AT) (P<0.001). The inclusion of CGRP8-37 with NTG and AT in WB reduced platelet inhibition to 31.6±6.8% (P<0.01). Incubation of WB and AT with 30 μM L-NMMA reduced NTG-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation to 26.4±4.2% (P<0.001). It is concluded that vascular tissue contributes to the antiplatelet mechanism of action of NTG. Furthermore, NTG apparently evokes the release of CGRP from vascular tissue and this neuropeptide contributes to the antiplatelet actions of NTG. The antiplatelet activity of CGRP in whole blood is mediated primarily through the activation of nitric oxide synthase. PMID:9351518

  17. De novo synthesis, constitutive expression of Aspergillus sulphureus beta-xylanase gene in Pichia pastoris and partial enzymic characterization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yunhe; Qiao, Jiayun; Li, Yihang; Lu, Wenqing

    2007-09-01

    The endo-beta-1, 4-xylanase gene xynA from Aspergillus sulphureus, encoded a lack-of-signal peptide protein of 184 amino acids, was de novo synthesized by splicing overlap extension polymerase chain reaction according to Pichia pastoris protein's codon bias. The synthetic DNA, composed of 572 nucleotides, was ligated into the downstream sequence of an alpha-mating factor in a constitutive expression vector pGAPzalphaA and electrotransformed into the P. pastoris X-33 strain. The transformed yeast screened by Zeocin was able to constitutively secrete the xylanase in yeast-peptone-dextrose liquid medium. The heterogenous DNA was stabilized in the strain by 20-times passage culture. The recombinant enzyme was expressed with a yield of 120 units/mL under the flask culture at 28 degrees C for 3 days. The enzyme showed optimal activity at 50 degrees C and pH 2.4-3.4. Residual activity of the raw recombinant xylanase was not less than 70% when fermentation broth was directly heated at 80 degrees C for 30 min. However, the dialyzed xylanase supernatant completely lost the catalytic activity after being heated at 60 degrees C for 30 min. The recombinant xylanase showed no obvious activity alteration by being pretreated with Na(2)HPO(4)-citric acid buffer of pH 2.4 for 2 h. The xylanase also showed resistance to certain metal ions (Na(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), Ba(2+), Zn(2+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+)) and EDTA. These biochemical characteristics suggest that the recombinant xylanase has a prospective application in feed industry as an additive.

  18. Transgenic Expression of the piRNA-Resistant Masculinizer Gene Induces Female-Specific Lethality and Partial Female-to-Male Sex Reversal in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Chikami, Yasuhiko; Yahata, Kensuke; Uchino, Keiro; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu; Aoki, Fugaku; Sezutsu, Hideki; Suzuki, Masataka G.

    2016-01-01

    In Bombyx mori (B. mori), Fem piRNA originates from the W chromosome and is responsible for femaleness. The Fem piRNA-PIWI complex targets and cleaves mRNAs transcribed from the Masc gene. Masc encodes a novel CCCH type zinc-finger protein and is required for male-specific splicing of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) transcripts. In the present study, several silkworm strains carrying a transgene, which encodes a Fem piRNA-resistant Masc mRNA (Masc-R), were generated. Forced expression of the Masc-R transgene caused female-specific lethality during the larval stages. One of the Masc-R strains weakly expressed Masc-R in various tissues. Females heterozygous for the transgene expressed male-specific isoform of the Bombyx homolog of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (ImpM) and Bmdsx. All examined females showed a lower inducibility of vitellogenin synthesis and exhibited abnormalities in the ovaries. Testis-like tissues were observed in abnormal ovaries and, notably, the tissues contained considerable numbers of sperm bundles. Homozygous expression of the transgene resulted in formation of the male-specific abdominal segment in adult females and caused partial male differentiation in female genitalia. These results strongly suggest that Masc is an important regulatory gene of maleness in B. mori. PMID:27579676

  19. A gene-centric analysis of activated partial thromboplastin time and activated protein C resistance using the HumanCVD focused genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Tom R; Lowe, Gordon D O; Lawlor, Debbie A; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Day, Ian N M

    2013-07-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is an important routine measure of intrinsic blood coagulation. Addition of activated protein C (APC) to the aPTT test to produce a ratio, provides one measure of APC resistance. The associations of some genetic mutations (eg, factor V Leiden) with these measures are established, but associations of other genetic variations remain to be established. The objective of this work was to test for association between genetic variants and blood coagulation using a high-density genotyping array. Genetic association with aPTT and APC resistance was analysed using a focused genotyping array that tests approximately 50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nearly 2000 cardiovascular candidate genes, including coagulation pathway genes. Analyses were conducted on 2544 European origin women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. We confirm associations with aPTT at the coagulation factor XII (F12)/G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and kininogen 1 (KNG1)/histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) loci, and identify novel SNPs at the ABO locus and novel locus kallikrein B (KLKB1)/F11. In addition, we confirm association between APC resistance and factor V Leiden mutation, and identify novel SNP associations with APC resistance in the HRG and F5/solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) regions. In conclusion, variation at several genetic loci influences intrinsic blood coagulation as measured by both aPTT and APC resistance.

  20. Transgenic Expression of the piRNA-Resistant Masculinizer Gene Induces Female-Specific Lethality and Partial Female-to-Male Sex Reversal in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiroki; Sumitani, Megumi; Chikami, Yasuhiko; Yahata, Kensuke; Uchino, Keiro; Kiuchi, Takashi; Katsuma, Susumu; Aoki, Fugaku; Sezutsu, Hideki; Suzuki, Masataka G

    2016-08-01

    In Bombyx mori (B. mori), Fem piRNA originates from the W chromosome and is responsible for femaleness. The Fem piRNA-PIWI complex targets and cleaves mRNAs transcribed from the Masc gene. Masc encodes a novel CCCH type zinc-finger protein and is required for male-specific splicing of B. mori doublesex (Bmdsx) transcripts. In the present study, several silkworm strains carrying a transgene, which encodes a Fem piRNA-resistant Masc mRNA (Masc-R), were generated. Forced expression of the Masc-R transgene caused female-specific lethality during the larval stages. One of the Masc-R strains weakly expressed Masc-R in various tissues. Females heterozygous for the transgene expressed male-specific isoform of the Bombyx homolog of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein (ImpM) and Bmdsx. All examined females showed a lower inducibility of vitellogenin synthesis and exhibited abnormalities in the ovaries. Testis-like tissues were observed in abnormal ovaries and, notably, the tissues contained considerable numbers of sperm bundles. Homozygous expression of the transgene resulted in formation of the male-specific abdominal segment in adult females and caused partial male differentiation in female genitalia. These results strongly suggest that Masc is an important regulatory gene of maleness in B. mori.

  1. Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy associated with the heterozygous R482W mutation in LMNA gene - case study of three women from one family.

    PubMed

    Nabrdalik, Katarzyna; Strózik, Agnieszka; Minkina-Pędras, Mariola; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemysława; Młynarski, Wojciech; Grzeszczak, Władysław; Gumprecht, Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Lipodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting adipose tissue distribution. Familial partial lipodystrophy of the Dunnigantype (FPLD) is a rare autosomal, dominant disorder caused by missense mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene where selective loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue from the limbs and trunk, and accumulation of fat in the neck and face, is usually associated with a variety of metabolic disorders including insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis and high blood pressure.In this report we present clinical and molecular features of three Polish women with FLPD phenotype coming from one family (a motherand her two daughters). FPLD was recognised under the circumstances of diabetes treatment, where sequencing of LMNA gene revealed heterozygous R482W mutation. In order to be able to recognise monogenic diabetes associated with lipodystrophy, it is important to bevery precise in physical examination while diagnosing diabetes and to be aware of the necessity of performing genetic testing. Diabetes appropriate differential diagnosis is essential for the treatment strategy, anticipation of the disease progression, and determination of the prognosis. It is necessary for an individual mutation carrier to look carefully at the patient's family.

  2. Claudin-3 and claudin-19 partially restore native phenotype to ARPE-19 cells via effects on tight junctions and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shaomin; Wang, Shao-Bin; Singh, Deepti; Zhao, Peter Y C; Davis, Katherine; Chen, Bo; Adelman, Ron A; Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2016-10-01

    Mutations of claudin-19 cause severe ocular deficits that are not easily reconciled with its role in regulating the outer blood retinal barrier. ARPE-19 is a widely used culture model of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). ARPE-19 is unique among epithelial cell lines, because it expresses all tight junction proteins except claudin family members. ARPE-19 also loses aspects of the RPE phenotype with cell passage. This study asks whether exogenous expression of the main RPE claudins, claudin-3 and claudin-19, would restore RPE phenotype, and whether these claudins have distinct roles in RPE. An Ussing chamber was used to measure the transepithelial electrical resistance and transepithelial electrical potential. These measurements were used to estimate the permeability co-efficients of ions. The transepithelial diffusion of polyethylene glycols were used to examine the leak pathway of tight junctions. Wound-healing, quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting examined diverse aspects of the RPE phenotype. Over-expression of either claudin decreased the permeability of small ions and polyethylene glycol. Both claudins were slightly cation-specific, but claudin-3 was less permeable to large solutes. Claudin expression widely affected gene expression to partially restore RPE phenotype. Claudins redistributed filamentous actin from stress fibers to circumferential bands associated with tight junctions, and made wound-healing more epithelial-like. Both claudins increased the expression of genes related to RPE core functions and increased steady-state levels of phosphorylated-AKT. In conclusion, claudin-3 and claudin-19 formed general permeability barriers and affected cell morphology, proliferation, migration, AKT signaling, and gene expression. When claudins are exogenously expressed, ARPE-19 more closely model native RPE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A de novo 2.78-Mb duplication on chromosome 21q22.11 implicates candidate genes in the partial trisomy 21 phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Weisfeld-Adams, James D; Tkachuk, Amanda K; Maclean, Kenneth N; Meeks, Naomi L; Scott, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) and in the majority of cases is the result of complete trisomy 21. The hypothesis that the characteristic DS clinical features are due to a single DS critical region (DSCR) at distal chromosome 21q has been refuted by recently reported segmental trisomy 21 cases characterised by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH). These rare cases have implicated multiple regions on chromosome 21 in the aetiology of distinct features of DS; however, the map of chromosome 21 copy-number aberrations and their associated phenotypes remains incompletely defined. We report a child with ID who was deemed very high risk for DS on antenatal screening (1 in 13) and has partial, but distinct, dysmorphologic features of DS without congenital heart disease (CHD). Oligonucleotide aCGH testing of the proband detected a previously unreported de novo 2.78-Mb duplication on chromosome 21q22.11 that includes 16 genes; however, this aberration does not harbour any of the historical DSCR genes (APP, DSCR1, DYRK1A and DSCAM). This informative case implicates previously under-recognised candidate genes (SOD1, SYNJ1 and ITSN1) in the pathogenesis of specific DS clinical features and supports a critical region for CHD located more distal on chromosome 21q. In addition, this unique case illustrates how the increasing resolution of microarray and high-throughput sequencing technologies can continue to reveal new biology and enhance understanding of widely studied genetic diseases that were originally described over 50 years ago. PMID:27840696

  4. Four-locus phylogeny of Fusarium avenaceum and related species and their species-specific identification based on partial phosphate permease gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Stakheev, Alexander A; Khairulina, Dina R; Zavriev, Sergey K

    2016-05-16

    The fungus Fusarium avenaceum and its closest relatives are responsible for contamination of agricultural plants and their products by mycotoxins such as enniatins and moniliformin. Precise identification of mycotoxin producers is necessary for estimation of the accumulation risk of those compounds and for preventing the consumption of highly contaminated products. Nucleic acids amplification-based techniques proved to be the most rapid and reliable approach for pathogen diagnostics and identification. In this study partial phosphate permease gene (PHO) sequences were determined for Fusarium avenaceum (including one isolate identified as F. arthrosporioides), F. tricinctum, F. acuminatum and F. torulosum. Phylogenetic analysis of 40 isolates of those species from different climates and geographical regions of Russia and some neighboring countries based on sequences of PHO, translation elongation factor 1 alpha (TEF1α), beta-tubulin (β-TUB), enniatin synthetase (Esyn1) genes and combined data set demonstrated that the PHO gene possesses the highest rate of variability among them and can be considered as an informative marker for phylogenetic studies of these species. According to the combined data set phylogeny, the isolates of each species formed clusters with a high bootstrap support. Analysis of PHO sequences revealed a high intraspecific variability of F. avenaceum: there were 5 independent clusters on the dendrogram, including one cluster which was closer to F. torulosum than to other F. avenaceum isolates. Variable sites in PHO sequences have been used for the design of species-specific primers and a fluorescent hydrolysis probe. The specificity of the assay was shown for DNA samples extracted from 68 isolates of 23 Fusarium species. Quantitative PCR approach was applied to estimate the contamination rate of 17 naturally infected oat and barley samples, previously characterized by microbiological procedures.

  5. Partial Attenuation of Respiratory Syncytial Virus with a Deletion of a Small Hydrophobic Gene Is Associated with Elevated Interleukin-1β Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ryan F.; McDonald, Jacqueline U.; Ivanova, Maria; Zhong, Ziyun; Bukreyev, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small hydrophobic (SH) gene of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a major cause of infant hospitalization, encodes a viroporin of unknown function. SH gene knockout virus (RSV ΔSH) is partially attenuated in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting that the SH protein may have an immunomodulatory role. RSV ΔSH has been tested as a live attenuated vaccine in humans and cattle, and here we demonstrate that it protected against viral rechallenge in mice. We compared the immune response to infection with RSV wild type and RSV ΔSH in vivo using BALB/c mice and in vitro using epithelial cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Strikingly, the interleukin-1β (IL-1β) response to RSV ΔSH infection was greater than to wild-type RSV, in spite of a decreased viral load, and when IL-1β was blocked in vivo, the viral load returned to wild-type levels. A significantly greater IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH was also detected in vitro, with higher-magnitude responses in neutrophils and macrophages than in epithelial cells. Depleting macrophages (with clodronate liposome) and neutrophils (with anti-Ly6G/1A8) demonstrated the contribution of these cells to the IL-1β response in vivo, the first demonstration of neutrophilic IL-1β production in response to viral lung infection. In this study, we describe an increased IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH, which may explain the attenuation in vivo and supports targeting the SH gene in live attenuated vaccines. IMPORTANCE There is a pressing need for a vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). A number of live attenuated RSV vaccine strains have been developed in which the small hydrophobic (SH) gene has been deleted, even though the function of the SH protein is unknown. The structure of the SH protein has recently been solved, showing it is a pore-forming protein (viroporin). Here, we demonstrate that the IL-1β response to RSV ΔSH is greater in spite of a lower viral load, which contributes to the attenuation in vivo. This

  6. Transcriptome of Proteus mirabilis in the Murine Urinary Tract: Virulence and Nitrogen Assimilation Gene Expression▿†

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Melanie M.; Yep, Alejandra; Smith, Sara N.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is a common cause of complicated urinary tract infections. In this study, microarrays were used to analyze P. mirabilis gene expression in vivo from experimentally infected mice. Urine was collected at 1, 3, and 7 days postinfection, and RNA was isolated from bacteria in the urine for transcriptional analysis. Across nine microarrays, 471 genes were upregulated and 82 were downregulated in vivo compared to in vitro broth culture. Genes upregulated in vivo encoded mannose-resistant Proteus-like (MR/P) fimbriae, urease, iron uptake systems, amino acid and peptide transporters, pyruvate metabolism enzymes, and a portion of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. Flagella were downregulated. Ammonia assimilation gene glnA (glutamine synthetase) was repressed in vivo, while gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) was upregulated in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, ammonia availability due to urease activity in P. mirabilis did not drive this gene expression. A gdhA mutant was growth deficient in minimal medium with citrate as the sole carbon source, and loss of gdhA resulted in a significant fitness defect in the mouse model of urinary tract infection. Unlike Escherichia coli, which represses gdhA and upregulates glnA in vivo and cannot utilize citrate, the data suggest that P. mirabilis uses glutamate dehydrogenase to monitor carbon-nitrogen balance, and this ability contributes to the pathogenic potential of P. mirabilis in the urinary tract. PMID:21505083

  7. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T G

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupted. Expression of the GDH1, PUT1, PUT2, and PUT4 genes also responded to DAL80 disruption, but much more modestly. Expression of GLN1 and GDH2 exhibited parallel responses to the provision of asparagine and glutamine as nitrogen sources but did not follow the regulatory responses noted above for the nitrogen catabolic genes such as DAL5. Steady-state mRNA levels of both genes did not significantly decrease when glutamine was provided as nitrogen source but were lowered by the provision of asparagine. They also did not respond to disruption of DAL80.

  8. Redox engineering by ectopic expression of glutamate dehydrogenase genes links NADPH availability and NADH oxidation with cold growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2015-07-09

    Cold stress reduces microbial growth and metabolism being relevant in industrial processes like wine making and brewing. Knowledge on the cold transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests the need of a proper redox balance. Nevertheless, there are no direct evidence of the links between NAD(P) levels and cold growth and how engineering of enzymatic reactions requiring NAD(P) may be used to modify the performance of industrial strains at low temperature. Recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae modified for increased NADPH- and NADH-dependent Gdh1 and Gdh2 activity were tested for growth at low temperature. A high-copy number of the GDH2-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase gene stimulated growth at 15°C, while overexpression of GDH1 had detrimental effects, a difference likely caused by cofactor preferences. Indeed, neither the Trp(-) character of the tested strains, which could affect the synthesis of NAD(P), nor changes in oxidative stress susceptibility by overexpression of GDH1 and GDH2 account for the observed phenotypes. However, increased or reduced NADPH availability by knock-out or overexpression of GRE3, the NADPH-dependent aldose reductase gene, eliminated or exacerbated the cold-growth defect observed in YEpGDH1 cells. We also demonstrated that decreased capacity of glycerol production impairs growth at 15 but not at 30°C and that 15°C-grown baker's yeast cells display higher fermentative capacity than those cultivated at 30°C. Thus, increasing NADH oxidation by overexpression of GDH2 would help to avoid perturbations in the redox metabolism induced by a higher fermentative/oxidative balance at low temperature. Finally, it is shown that overexpression of GDH2 increases notably the cold growth in the wine yeast strain QA23 in both standard growth medium and synthetic grape must. Redox constraints limit the growth of S. cerevisiae at temperatures below the optimal. An adequate supply of NAD(P) precursors as well as a proper level of reducing

  9. Expression of root glutamate dehydrogenase genes in tobacco plants subjected to boron deprivation.

    PubMed

    Beato, Víctor M; Teresa Navarro-Gochicoa, M; Rexach, Jesús; Begoña Herrera-Rodríguez, M; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Kempa, Stefan; Weckwerth, Wolfram; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2011-11-01

    Recently it has been reported that boron (B) deficiency increases the expression of Nicotiana tabacum asparagine synthetase (AS) gene in roots, and that AS might play a main role as a detoxifying mechanism to convert ammonium into asparagine. Interestingly, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes, Ntgdh-NAD;A1 and Ntgdh-NAD;B2, were up-regulated when tobacco roots were subjected to B deprivation for 8 and 24 h. In addition, aminating and deaminating GDH (EC 1.4.1.2) activities were higher in B-deficient than in B-sufficient plants after 24 h of B deficiency. Ammonium concentrations were kept sufficiently low and with similar values in B-deficient roots when compared to control. Glucose and fructose contents decreased after 24 h of B deprivation. This drop in hexoses, which was corroborated by metabolomic analysis, correlated with higher GDH gene expression. Furthermore, metabolomic profiling showed that concentrations of several organic acids, phenolics, and amino acids increased after 24 h of B deficiency. Our results suggest that GDH enzyme plays an important role in metabolic acclimation of tobacco roots to B deprivation. A putative model to explain these results is proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Partial Tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kevin; Levi, Jessica R

    2017-03-01

    Evaluate the content and readability of health information regarding partial tonsillectomy. A web search was performed using the term partial tonsillectomy in Google, Yahoo!, and Bing. The first 50 websites from each search were evaluated using HONcode standards for quality and content. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease, Gunning-Fog Index, Coleman-Liau Index, Automated Readability Index, and SMOG score. The Freeman-Halton extension of Fisher's exact test was used to compare categorical differences between engines. Less than half of the websites mentioned patient eligibility criteria (43.3%), referenced peer-reviewed literature (43.3%), or provided a procedure description (46.7%). Twenty-two websites (14.7%) were unrelated to partial tonsillectomy, and over half contained advertisements (52%). These finding were consistent across search engines and search terms. The mean FKGL was 11.6 ± 0.11, Gunning-Fog Index was 15.1 ± 0.13, Coleman-Liau Index was 14.6 ± 0.11, ARI was 12.9 ± 0.13, and SMOG grade was 14.0 ± 0.1. All readability levels exceeded the abilities of the average American adult. Current online information regarding partial tonsillectomy may not provide adequate information and may be written at a level too difficult for the average adult reader.

  11. Analysis of cellulose synthase genes from domesticated apple identifies collinear genes WDR53 and CesA8A: partial co-expression, bicistronic mRNA, and alternative splicing of CESA8A

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Spadiut, Oliver; Kerschbamer, Christine; Giorno, Filomena; Baric, Sanja; Ezcurra, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose synthase (CesA) genes constitute a complex multigene family with six major phylogenetic clades in angiosperms. The recently sequenced genome of domestic apple, Malus×domestica, was mined for CesA genes, by blasting full-length cellulose synthase protein (CESA) sequences annotated in the apple genome against protein databases from the plant models Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa. Thirteen genes belonging to the six angiosperm CesA clades and coding for proteins with conserved residues typical of processive glycosyltransferases from family 2 were detected. Based on their phylogenetic relationship to Arabidopsis CESAs, as well as expression patterns, a nomenclature is proposed to facilitate further studies. Examination of their genomic organization revealed that MdCesA8-A is closely linked and co-oriented with WDR53, a gene coding for a WD40 repeat protein. The WDR53 and CesA8 genes display conserved collinearity in dicots and are partially co-expressed in the apple xylem. Interestingly, the presence of a bicistronic WDR53–CesA8A transcript was detected in phytoplasma-infected phloem tissues of apple. The bicistronic transcript contains a spliced intergenic sequence that is predicted to fold into hairpin structures typical of internal ribosome entry sites, suggesting its potential cap-independent translation. Surprisingly, the CesA8A cistron is alternatively spliced and lacks the zinc-binding domain. The possible roles of WDR53 and the alternatively spliced CESA8 variant during cellulose biosynthesis in M.×domestica are discussed. PMID:23048131

  12. Gene transcript accumulation and in situ mRNA hybridization of two putative glutamate dehydrogenase genes in etiolated Glycine max seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dimou, M; Tsaniklidis, G; Aivalakis, G; Katinakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.2) is a multimeric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible amination of α-ketoglutarate to form glutamate. We characterized cDNA clones of two Glycine max sequences, GmGDH1 and GmGDH2, that code for putative α- and β-subunits, respectively, of the NADH dependent enzyme. Temporal and spatial gene transcript accumulation studies using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization have shown an overlapping gene transcript accumulation pattern with differences in relative gene transcript accumulation in the organs examined. Detection of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity in situ using a histochemical method showed concordance with the spatial gene transcript accumulation patterns. Our findings suggest that although the two gene transcripts are co-localized in roots of etiolated soybean seedlings, the ratio of the two subunits of the active holoenzyme may vary among tissues.

  13. The paralogous genes RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 have partially redundant functions during Arabidopsis development.

    PubMed

    Teotia, Sachin; Lamb, Rebecca S

    2009-09-01

    RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1) and SIMILAR TO RCD ONE1 (SRO1) are the only two proteins encoded in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genome containing both a putative poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase catalytic domain and a WWE protein-protein interaction domain, although similar proteins have been found in other eukaryotes. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases mediate the attachment of ADP-ribose units from donor NAD(+) molecules to target proteins and have been implicated in a number of processes, including DNA repair, apoptosis, transcription, and chromatin remodeling. We have isolated mutants in both RCD1 and SRO1, rcd1-3 and sro1-1, respectively. rcd1-3 plants display phenotypic defects as reported for previously isolated alleles, most notably reduced stature. In addition, rcd1-3 mutants display a number of additional developmental defects in root architecture and maintenance of reproductive development. While single mutant sro1-1 plants are relatively normal, loss of a single dose of SRO1 in the rcd1-3 background increases the severity of several developmental defects, implying that these genes do share some functions. However, rcd1-3 and sro1-1 mutants behave differently in several developmental events and abiotic stress responses, suggesting that they also have distinct functions. Remarkably, rcd1-3; sro1-1 double mutants display severe defects in embryogenesis and postembryonic development. This study shows that RCD1 and SRO1 are at least partially redundant and that they are essential genes for plant development.

  14. Flavobacterium johnsoniae gldN and gldO Are Partially Redundant Genes Required for Gliding Motility and Surface Localization of SprB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Ryan G.; Samarasam, Mudiarasan Napoleon; Shrivastava, Abhishek; van Baaren, Jessica M.; Pochiraju, Soumya; Bollampalli, Sreelekha; McBride, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the gliding bacterium Flavobacterium johnsoniae move rapidly over surfaces. Mutations in gldN cause a partial defect in gliding. A novel bacteriophage selection strategy was used to aid construction of a strain with a deletion spanning gldN and the closely related gene gldO in an otherwise wild-type F. johnsoniae UW101 background. Bacteriophage transduction was used to move a gldN mutation into F. johnsoniae UW101 to allow phenotypic comparison with the gldNO deletion mutant. Cells of the gldN mutant formed nonspreading colonies on agar but retained some ability to glide in wet mounts. In contrast, cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were completely nonmotile, indicating that cells require GldN, or the GldN-like protein GldO, to glide. Recent results suggest that Porphyromonas gingivalis PorN, which is similar in sequence to GldN, has a role in protein secretion across the outer membrane. Cells of the F. johnsoniae gldNO deletion mutant were defective in localization of the motility protein SprB to the cell surface, suggesting that GldN may be involved in secretion of components of the motility machinery. Cells of the gldNO deletion mutant were also deficient in chitin utilization and were resistant to infection by bacteriophages, phenotypes that may also be related to defects in protein secretion. PMID:20038590

  15. Phylogenetic analysis on genera of Corallobothriinae (Cestoda: Proteocephalidea) from North American ictalurid fishes, using partial sequences of the 28s ribosomal gene.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Valdez, Rogelio; Choudhury, Anindo; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2004-10-01

    Partial sequences of the 28S rDNA (ribosomal gene) were obtained from a total of 11 populations of 5 species (in 3 genera) of North American corallobothriine proteocephalideans. These included Corallobothrium fimbriatum (3 populations), Corallobothrium parafimbriatum (1 population), Corallotaenia minutia (1 population), Megathylacoides giganteum (2 populations), and Megathylacoides lamothei (4 populations). These sequences were used in a phylogenetic analysis to test the monophyly of Corallobothriinae and to investigate the interrelationships of the North American species. The results indicate that Corallobothriinae, as conventionally understood, is not monophyletic and that only the North American corallobothriines, parasites of ictalurid catfishes, form a monophyletic group. Corallobothrium parafimbriatum is sister taxon to a clade that includes Corallotaenia intermedia and C. minutia and not to its congener C. fimbriatum. Also, M. giganteum from Mexico appears to be more closely related to M. lamothei than to its conspecific in Canada. This and the amount of sequence divergence indicate possible cryptic speciation in its endemic host, the Lerma catfish, Ictalurus dugesi.

  16. Molecular and phylogenetic characterizations of an Eimeria krijgsmanni Yakimoff & Gouseff, 1938 (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) mouse intestinal protozoan parasite by partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequence analysis.

    PubMed

    Takeo, Toshinori; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Matsubayashi, Makoto; Maeda, Hiroki; Kusakisako, Kodai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Mochizuki, Masami; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2014-08-01

    Previously, we characterized an undocumented strain of Eimeria krijgsmanni by morphological and biological features. Here, we present a detailed molecular phylogenetic analysis of this organism. Namely, 18S ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) sequences of E. krijgsmanni were analyzed to incorporate this species into a comprehensive Eimeria phylogeny. As a result, partial 18S rDNA sequence from E. krijgsmanni was successfully determined, and two different types, Type A and Type B, that differed by 1 base pair were identified. E. krijgsmanni was originally isolated from a single oocyst, and thus the result show that the two types might have allelic sequence heterogeneity in the 18S rDNA. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the two types of E. krijgsmanni 18S rDNA formed one of two clades among murine Eimeria spp.; these Eimeria clades reflected morphological similarity among the Eimeria spp. This is the third molecular phylogenetic characterization of a murine Eimeria spp. in addition to E. falciformis and E. papillata.

  17. Measurement of the doubly-polarized 3He → (γ → , n) pp reaction at 16.5 MeV and its implications for the GDH sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskaris, G.; Yan, X.; Mueller, J. M.; Zimmerman, W. R.; Xiong, W.; Ahmed, M. W.; Averett, T.; Chu, P.-H.; Deltuva, A.; Flower, C.; Fonseca, A. C.; Gao, H.; Golak, J.; Heideman, J. N.; Karwowski, H. J.; Meziane, M.; Sauer, P. U.; Skibiński, R.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Weller, H. R.; Witała, H.; Wu, Y. K.

    2015-11-01

    We report new measurements of the double-polarized photodisintegration of 3He at an incident photon energy of 16.5 MeV, carried out at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility located at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The spin-dependent double-differential cross sections and the contribution from the three-body channel to the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) integrand were extracted and compared with the state-of-the-art three-body calculations. The calculations, which include the Coulomb interaction and are in good agreement with the results of previous measurements at 12.8 and 14.7 MeV, deviate from the new cross section results at 16.5 MeV. The GDH integrand was found to be about one standard deviation larger than the maximum value predicted by the theories.

  18. Measurement of the doubly-polarized He3→(γ→,n)pp reaction at 16.5 MeV and its implications for the GDH sum rule

    DOE PAGES

    Laskaris, G.; Yan, X.; Mueller, J. M.; ...

    2015-10-01

    We report new measurements of the double-polarized photodisintegration of 3He at an incident photon energy of 16.5 MeV, carried out at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility located at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The spin-dependent double-differential cross sections and the contribution from the three-body channel to the Gerasimov–Drell–Hearn (GDH) integrand were extracted and compared with the state-of-the-art three-body calculations. The calculations, which include the Coulomb interaction and are in good agreement with the results of previous measurements at 12.8 and 14.7 MeV, deviate from the new cross section results at 16.5 MeV. Lastly, the GDH integrand was foundmore » to be about one standard deviation larger than the maximum value predicted by the theories.« less

  19. Hap2-3-5-Gln3 determine transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Hugo; Aranda, Cristina; López, Geovani; Riego, Lina; González, Alicia

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional activation response relies on a repertoire of transcriptional activators, which decipher regulatory information through their specific binding to cognate sequences, and their capacity to selectively recruit the components that constitute a given transcriptional complex. We have addressed the possibility of achieving novel transcriptional responses by the construction of a new transcriptional regulator--the Hap2-3-5-Gln3 hybrid modulator--harbouring the HAP complex polypeptides that constitute the DNA-binding domain (Hap2-3-5) and the Gln3 activation domain, which usually act in an uncombined fashion. The results presented in this paper show that transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions is achieved through the action of the novel Hap2-3-5-Gln3 transcriptional regulator. We propose that the combination of the Hap DNA-binding and Gln3 activation domains results in a hybrid modulator that elicits a novel transcriptional response not evoked when these modulators act independently.

  20. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C.

  1. Impact of simultaneous glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A/B rapid immunoassay on Clostridium difficile diagnosis and treatment in hospitalized patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea in a university hospital of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cançado, Guilherme Grossi Lopes; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Nader, Amanda Pontes; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Vilela, Eduardo Garcia

    2017-07-20

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care-associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making. Conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for toxin detection is currently the most frequently used technique for CDI diagnosis, but its low sensitivity makes the development of an alternative strategy necessary for improving the diagnosis in developing countries. Between years 2011 and 2015, 154 stool samples from patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea were examined by toxigenic culture (TC) and EIA for the diagnosis of CDI. In the year 2015, when glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) test was first available in Brazil, 53 of those fecal specimens were also tested by the C. diff Quik Chek Complete® rapid immunoassay. At this time, we prospectively assessed the impact of this test on CDI treatment rates before and after it was introduced in clinical practice. The GDH component of C. diff Quik Chek Complete® test had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 95.1% compared to TC, with 89.8% concordance. The Tox A/B II EIA® and the toxin portion of C. diff Quik Chek Complete® yielded sensitivities between values of 50-58.3%, with 100% specificities. The introduction of GDH test increased the number of treated patients with CDI from 57.7% to 100%. GDH test is a reliable method for the diagnosis of CDI and greatly increases the number of properly treated patients with CDI. Therefore, this exam should be considered the mainstay for the laboratory diagnosis of CDI in developing countries. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Selection-Driven Accumulation of Suppressor Mutants in Bacillus subtilis: The Apparent High Mutation Frequency of the Cryptic gudB Gene and the Rapid Clonal Expansion of gudB+ Suppressors Are Due to Growth under Selection

    PubMed Central

    Gunka, Katrin; Stannek, Lorena; Care, Rachel A.; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2013-01-01

    Soil bacteria like Bacillus subtilis can cope with many growth conditions by adjusting gene expression and metabolic pathways. Alternatively, bacteria can spontaneously accumulate beneficial mutations or shape their genomes in response to stress. Recently, it has been observed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the catabolically active glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), RocG, mutates the cryptic gudBCR gene at a high frequency. The suppressor mutants express the active GDH GudB, which can fully replace the function of RocG. Interestingly, the cryptic gudBCR allele is stably inherited as long as the bacteria synthesize the functional GDH RocG. Competition experiments revealed that the presence of the cryptic gudBCR allele provides the bacteria with a selective growth advantage when glutamate is scarce. Moreover, the lack of exogenous glutamate is the driving force for the selection of mutants that have inactivated the active gudB gene. In contrast, two functional GDHs are beneficial for the cells when glutamate was available. Thus, the amount of GDH activity strongly affects fitness of the bacteria depending on the availability of exogenous glutamate. At a first glance the high mutation frequency of the cryptic gudBCR allele might be attributed to stress-induced adaptive mutagenesis. However, other loci on the chromosome that could be potentially mutated during growth under the selective pressure that is exerted on a GDH-deficient mutant remained unaffected. Moreover, we show that a GDH-proficient B. subtilis strain has a strong selective growth advantage in a glutamate-dependent manner. Thus, the emergence and rapid clonal expansion of the active gudB allele can be in fact explained by spontaneous mutation and growth under selection without an increase of the mutation rate. Moreover, this study shows that the selective pressure that is exerted on a maladapted bacterium strongly affects the apparent mutation frequency of mutational hot spots. PMID:23785476

  3. Genetic Classification and Distinguishing of Staphylococcus Species Based on Different Partial gap, 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf Gene Sequences▿

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremedhin, B.; Layer, F.; König, W.; König, B.

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences has been the technique generally used to study the evolution and taxonomy of staphylococci. However, the results of this method do not correspond to the results of polyphasic taxonomy, and the related species cannot always be distinguished from each other. Thus, new phylogenetic markers for Staphylococcus spp. are needed. We partially sequenced the gap gene (∼931 bp), which encodes the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, for 27 Staphylococcus species. The partial sequences had 24.3 to 96% interspecies homology and were useful in the identification of staphylococcal species (F. Layer, B. Ghebremedhin, W. König, and B. König, J. Microbiol. Methods 70:542-549, 2007). The DNA sequence similarities of the partial staphylococcal gap sequences were found to be lower than those of 16S rRNA (∼97%), rpoB (∼86%), hsp60 (∼82%), and sodA (∼78%). Phylogenetically derived trees revealed four statistically supported groups: S. hyicus/S. intermedius, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus/S. simulans, and S. aureus/epidermidis. The branching of S. auricularis, S. cohnii subsp. cohnii, and the heterogeneous S. saprophyticus group, comprising S. saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus and S. equorum subsp. equorum, was not reliable. Thus, the phylogenetic analysis based on the gap gene sequences revealed similarities between the dendrograms based on other gene sequences (e.g., the S. hyicus/S. intermedius and S. sciuri groups) as well as differences, e.g., the grouping of S. arlettae and S. kloosii in the gap-based tree. From our results, we propose the partial sequencing of the gap gene as an alternative molecular tool for the taxonomical analysis of Staphylococcus species and for decreasing the possibility of misidentification. PMID:18174295

  4. Genetic classification and distinguishing of Staphylococcus species based on different partial gap, 16S rRNA, hsp60, rpoB, sodA, and tuf gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Ghebremedhin, B; Layer, F; König, W; König, B

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences has been the technique generally used to study the evolution and taxonomy of staphylococci. However, the results of this method do not correspond to the results of polyphasic taxonomy, and the related species cannot always be distinguished from each other. Thus, new phylogenetic markers for Staphylococcus spp. are needed. We partially sequenced the gap gene (approximately 931 bp), which encodes the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, for 27 Staphylococcus species. The partial sequences had 24.3 to 96% interspecies homology and were useful in the identification of staphylococcal species (F. Layer, B. Ghebremedhin, W. König, and B. König, J. Microbiol. Methods 70:542-549, 2007). The DNA sequence similarities of the partial staphylococcal gap sequences were found to be lower than those of 16S rRNA (approximately 97%), rpoB (approximately 86%), hsp60 (approximately 82%), and sodA (approximately 78%). Phylogenetically derived trees revealed four statistically supported groups: S. hyicus/S. intermedius, S. sciuri, S. haemolyticus/S. simulans, and S. aureus/epidermidis. The branching of S. auricularis, S. cohnii subsp. cohnii, and the heterogeneous S. saprophyticus group, comprising S. saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus and S. equorum subsp. equorum, was not reliable. Thus, the phylogenetic analysis based on the gap gene sequences revealed similarities between the dendrograms based on other gene sequences (e.g., the S. hyicus/S. intermedius and S. sciuri groups) as well as differences, e.g., the grouping of S. arlettae and S. kloosii in the gap-based tree. From our results, we propose the partial sequencing of the gap gene as an alternative molecular tool for the taxonomical analysis of Staphylococcus species and for decreasing the possibility of misidentification.

  5. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    NADH oxidases (NOXs) play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3)) was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme), with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol) 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol) 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH) 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH) 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis. PMID:26115038

  6. A D+ blood donor with a novel RHD*D-CE(5-6)-D gene variant exhibits the low-frequency antigen RH23 (D(W) ) characteristic of the partial DVa phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Genghis H; McGowan, Eunike C; McGrath, Kelli A; Abaca-Cleopas, Maria E; Schoeman, Elizna M; Millard, Glenda M; O'Brien, Helen; Liew, Yew-Wah; Flower, Robert L; Hyland, Catherine A

    2016-09-01

    Blood donors whose red blood cells (RBCs) exhibit a partial RhD phenotype, lacking some D epitopes, present as D+ in routine screening. Such phenotypes can exhibit low-frequency antigens (LFAs) of clinical significance. The aim of this study was to describe the serologic and genetic profile for a blood donor with an apparent D+ phenotype carrying a variant RHD gene where D Exons 5 and 6 are replaced by RHCE Exon (5-6). Anti-D monoclonal antibodies were used to characterize the presentation of RhD epitopes on the RBCs. RHD exon scanning and DNA sequencing of short- and long-range polymerase chain reaction amplicons were used to determine the RHD structure and sequence. Extended phenotyping for LFAs RH23 (D(W) ) and Rh32 was performed. The donor serology profile was consistent with partial RhD epitope presentation. The donor was hemizygous for an RHD variant allele described as RHD*D-CE(5-6)-D hybrid. The RHCE gene insert is at least 3.868 kb with 5' and 3' breakpoints between IVS4 + 132-c.667 and IVS6 + 1960-IVS6 + 2099, respectively. The sequence for this hybrid was assigned GenBank Accession Number KT099190.2. The RBCs were RH23 (D(W) )+ and Rh32-. A novel RHD*D-CE(5-6)-D hybrid allele encodes a partial RhD epitope and carries the LFA RH23 (D(W) ). This and the epitope profile resemble the partial DVa phenotype. Given that RBCs from this individual lack some RhD epitopes, there is an alloimmunization risk if the donor is exposed to D+ RBCs. Conversely, transfusions of RH23 (D(W) )+ cells to RH23 (D(W) )- recipients also pose an alloimmunization risk. © 2016 AABB.

  7. Identification and Partial Characterization of Extracellular Aspartic Protease Genes from Metschnikowia pulcherrima IWBT Y1123 and Candida apicola IWBT Y1384

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Vernita J.; Theron, Louwrens W.; du Toit, Maret

    2012-01-01

    The extracellular acid proteases of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts may fulfill a number of roles in winemaking, which include increasing the available nitrogen sources for the growth of fermentative microbes, affecting the aroma profile of the wine, and potentially reducing protein haze formation. These proteases, however, remain poorly characterized, especially at genetic level. In this study, two extracellular aspartic protease-encoding genes were identified and sequenced, from two yeast species of enological origin: one gene from Metschnikowia pulcherrima IWBT Y1123, named MpAPr1, and the other gene from Candida apicola IWBT Y1384, named CaAPr1. In silico analysis of these two genes revealed a number of features peculiar to aspartic protease genes, and both the MpAPr1 and CaAPr1 putative proteins showed homology to proteases of yeast genera. Heterologous expression of MpAPr1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae YHUM272 confirmed that it encodes an aspartic protease. MpAPr1 production, which was shown to be constitutive, and secretion were confirmed in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), casein, and grape juice proteins. The MpAPr1 gene was found to be present in 12 other M. pulcherrima strains; however, plate assays revealed that the intensity of protease activity was strain dependent and unrelated to the gene sequence. PMID:22820332

  8. Identification and partial characterization of extracellular aspartic protease genes from Metschnikowia pulcherrima IWBT Y1123 and Candida apicola IWBT Y1384.

    PubMed

    Reid, Vernita J; Theron, Louwrens W; du Toit, Maret; Divol, Benoit

    2012-10-01

    The extracellular acid proteases of non-Saccharomyces wine yeasts may fulfill a number of roles in winemaking, which include increasing the available nitrogen sources for the growth of fermentative microbes, affecting the aroma profile of the wine, and potentially reducing protein haze formation. These proteases, however, remain poorly characterized, especially at genetic level. In this study, two extracellular aspartic protease-encoding genes were identified and sequenced, from two yeast species of enological origin: one gene from Metschnikowia pulcherrima IWBT Y1123, named MpAPr1, and the other gene from Candida apicola IWBT Y1384, named CaAPr1. In silico analysis of these two genes revealed a number of features peculiar to aspartic protease genes, and both the MpAPr1 and CaAPr1 putative proteins showed homology to proteases of yeast genera. Heterologous expression of MpAPr1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae YHUM272 confirmed that it encodes an aspartic protease. MpAPr1 production, which was shown to be constitutive, and secretion were confirmed in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), casein, and grape juice proteins. The MpAPr1 gene was found to be present in 12 other M. pulcherrima strains; however, plate assays revealed that the intensity of protease activity was strain dependent and unrelated to the gene sequence.

  9. Establishment of a recessive mutant small-eye rat with lens involution and retinal detachment associated with partial deletion and rearrangement of the Cryba1 gene.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Toshiyuki; Nanashima, Naoki; Shimizu, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Yosuke; Nakazawa, Mitsuru; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2015-10-15

    From our stock of SDRs (Sprague-Dawley rats), we established a mutant strain having small opaque eyes and named it HiSER (Hirosaki small-eye rat). The HiSER phenotype is progressive and autosomal recessive. In HiSER eyes, disruption and involution of the lens, thickening of the inner nuclear layer, detachment and aggregation of the retina, rudimentary muscle in the ciliary body and cell infiltration in the vitreous humour were observed. Genetic linkage analysis using crossing with Brown Norway rat suggested that the causative gene(s) is located on chromosome 10. Microarray analysis showed that the expression level of the Cryba1 gene encoding βA3/A1-crystallin on chromosome 10 was markedly decreased in HiSER eyes. Genomic PCR revealed deletion of a 3.6-kb DNA region encompassing exons 4-6 of the gene in HiSERs. In HiSER eyes, a chimaeric transcript of the gene containing exons 1-3 and an approximately 250-bp sequence originating from the 3'-UTR of the Nufip2 gene, located downstream of the breakpoint in the opposite direction, was present. Whereas the chimaeric transcript was expressed in HiSER eyes, neither normal nor chimaeric βA3/A1-crystallin proteins were detected by Western blot analysis. Real-time RT (reverse transcription)-PCR analysis revealed that expression level of the Nufip2 gene in the HiSER eye was 40% of that in the SDR eye. These results suggest that the disappearance of the βA3/A1-crystallin protein and, in addition, down-regulation of the Nufip2 gene as a consequence of gene rearrangement causes the HiSER phenotype.

  10. Glucose dehydrogenase polymorphism in man.

    PubMed

    King, J; Cook, P J

    1981-05-01

    An isoelectric focusing method for human GDH is described which reveals seven GDH phenotypes. Family studies demonstrate that the variation is genetically determined by three alleles at an autosomal locus with gene frequencies GDH1 = 0.723, GDH2 = 0.194, GDH3 = 0.083. Linkage analysis shows that GDH may be closely linked to PGD on chromosome 1.

  11. Molecular cloning, partial genomic structure and functional characterization of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase genes from the parasitic insects Lucilia cuprina and Ctenocephalides felis.

    PubMed

    Rothacker, B; Werr, M; Ilg, T

    2008-06-01

    The enzyme succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH; EC1.2.1.24) is a component of the gamma-aminobutyric acid degradation pathway in mammals and is essential for development and function of the nervous system. Here we report the identification, cDNA cloning and functional expression of SSADH from the parasitic insects Lucilia cuprina and Ctenocephalides felis. The recombinant proteins possess potent NAD+-dependent SSADH activity, while their catalytic efficiency for other aldehyde substrates is lower. A genomic copy of the L. cuprina SSADH gene contains two introns, while a genomic gene version of C. felis is devoid of introns. In contrast to the single copy SSADH genes in Drosophila melanogaster and mammals, in L. cuprina and C. felis, multiple SSADH gene copies are present in the genome.

  12. A gain-of-function mutation of plastidic invertase alters nuclear gene expression with sucrose treatment partially via GENOMES UNCOUPLED1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Maruta, Takanori; Miyazaki, Nozomi; Nosaka, Ryota; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Padilla-Chacon, Daniel; Otori, Kumi; Kimura, Ayako; Tanabe, Noriaki; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Tamoi, Masahiro; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2015-05-01

    Plastid gene expression (PGE) is one of the signals that regulate the expression of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs) via GENOMES UNCOUPLED1 (GUN1)-dependent retrograde signaling. We recently isolated Arabidopsis sugar-inducible cotyledon yellow-192 (sicy-192), a gain-of-function mutant of plastidic invertase, and showed that following the treatment of this mutant with sucrose, the expression of PhANGs as well as PGE decreased, suggesting that the sicy-192 mutation activates a PGE-evoked and GUN1-mediated retrograde pathway. To clarify the relationship between the sicy-192 mutation, PGE, and GUN1-mediated pathway, plastid and nuclear gene expression in a double mutant of sicy-192 and gun1-101, a null mutant of GUN1 was studied. Plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP)-dependent PGE was markedly suppressed in the sicy-192 mutant by the sucrose treatment, but the suppression as well as cotyledon yellow phenotype was not mitigated by GUN1 disruption. Microarray analysis revealed that the altered expression of nuclear genes such as PhANG in the sucrose-treated sicy-192 mutant was largely dependent on GUN1. The present findings demonstrated that the sicy-192 mutation alters nuclear gene expression with sucrose treatment via GUN1, which is possibly followed by inhibiting PEP-dependent PGE, providing a new insight into the role of plastid sugar metabolism in nuclear gene expression.

  13. Filamentous invasive growth of mutants of the genes encoding ammonia-metabolizing enzymes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Yoshie; Kojima, Ayumi; Shibata, Yuriko; Mitsuzawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe undergoes a switch from yeast to filamentous invasive growth in response to certain environmental stimuli. Among them is ammonium limitation. Amt1, one of the three ammonium transporters in this yeast, is required for the ammonium limitation-induced morphological transition; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be understood. Cells lacking Amt1 became capable of invasive growth upon increasing concentrations of ammonium in the medium, suggesting that the ammonium taken up into the cell or a metabolic intermediate in ammonium assimilation might serve as a signal for the ammonium limitation-induced morphological transition. To investigate the possible role of ammonium-metabolizing enzymes in the signaling process, deletion mutants were constructed for the gdh1, gdh2, gln1, and glt1 genes, which were demonstrated by enzyme assays to encode NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase, NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase, respectively. Growth tests on various nitrogen sources revealed that a gln1Δ mutant was a glutamine auxotroph and that a gdh1Δ mutant had a defect in growth on ammonium, particularly at high concentrations. The latter observation indicates that the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of S. pombe plays a major role in ammonium assimilation under high ammonium concentrations. Invasive growth assays showed that gdh1Δ and glt1Δ mutants underwent invasive growth to a lesser extent than did wild-type strains. Increasing the ammonium concentration in the medium suppressed the invasive growth defect of the glt1Δ mutant, but not the gdh1Δ mutant. These results suggest that the nitrogen status of the cell is important in the induction of filamentous invasive growth in S. pombe.

  14. Silenced rRNA genes are activated and substitute for partially eliminated active homeologs in the recently formed allotetraploid, Tragopogon mirus (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Dobešová, E; Malinská, H; Matyášek, R; Leitch, A R; Soltis, D E; Soltis, P S; Kovařík, A

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between uniparental rDNA (encoding 18S, 5.8S and 26S ribosomal RNA) silencing (nucleolar dominance) and rRNA gene dosage, we studied a recently emerged (within the last 80 years) allotetraploid Tragopogon mirus (2n=24), formed from the diploid progenitors T. dubius (2n=12, D-genome donor) and T. porrifolius (2n=12, P-genome donor). Here, we used molecular, cytogenetic and genomic approaches to analyse rRNA gene activity in two sibling T. mirus plants (33A and 33B) with widely different rRNA gene dosages. Plant 33B had ~400 rRNA genes at the D-genome locus, which is typical for T. mirus, accounting for ~25% of total rDNA. We observed characteristic expression dominance of T. dubius-origin genes in all organs. Its sister plant 33A harboured a homozygous macrodeletion that reduced the number of T. dubius-origin genes to about 70 copies (~4% of total rDNA). It showed biparental rDNA expression in root, flower and callus, but not in leaf where D-genome rDNA dominance was maintained. There was upregulation of minor rDNA variants in some tissues. The RNA polymerase I promoters of reactivated T. porrifolius-origin rRNA genes showed reduced DNA methylation, mainly at symmetrical CG and CHG nucleotide motifs. We hypothesise that active, decondensed rDNA units are most likely to be deleted via recombination. The silenced homeologs could be used as a ‘first reserve' to ameliorate mutational damage and contribute to evolutionary success of polyploids. Deletion and reactivation cycles may lead to bidirectional homogenisation of rRNA arrays in the long term. PMID:25537492

  15. Partial breast brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... brachytherapy; Accelerated partial breast irradiation - brachytherapy; Partial breast radiation therapy - brachytherapy; Permanent breast seed implant; PBSI; Low-dose radiotherapy - breast; High-dose radiotherapy - breast; Electronic balloon ...

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of a mammalian excision repair gene that partially restores UV resistance to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arrand, J.E.; Bone, N.M.; Johnson, R.T. )

    1989-09-01

    A hamster DNA repair gene has been isolated by cosmid rescue after two rounds of transfection of an immortalized xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group D cell line with neomycin-resistance gene (neo)-tagged normal hamster DNA and selection with G418 and ultraviolet irradiation. The functional length of the sequence has been defined as 11.5 kilobase pairs by measurement of the region of overlap between two hamster DNA-containing cosmids, cloned by selection for the integrated neo gene, that are able to confer an increase in resistance to ultraviolet irradiation on two XP-D cell line but not on an XP-A line. Detailed molecular characterization of the hamster repair gene has revealed no obvious similarities to two human excision repair genes (ERCC1 and ERCC2) that correct repair-defective hamster cells but have no effect on XP cells. Hybridization analyses of normal human and XP cell genomic DNAs and mRNAs, using a cosmid-clone probe from which repeated sequences have been removed, show that homologues are present and expressed in all cases.

  17. Regulation of the laminin beta 1 (LAMB1), retinoic acid receptor beta, and bone morphogenetic protein 2 genes in mutant F9 teratocarcinoma cell lines partially deficient in cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Li, C; Gudas, L J

    1997-12-01

    We stably transfected a gene encoding a dominant negative regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) into F9 cells and generated cell lines partially deficient in PKA activity (DN16 and DN19). In these cell lines, the retinoic acid (RA) receptor beta and laminin beta(1) chain (LAMB1) genes were regulated normally by RA alone, indicating that in the absence of exogenous modulation of cAMP levels, the PKA signaling pathway does not seem to play a major role in the RA-associated regulation of these genes. However, alterations in gene regulation were observed when the mutant cell lines were treated with a combination of RA and cAMP analogues. Moreover, in the DN16 cell line, which exhibits the lowest PKA activity among the mutant cell lines [22% of wild type (WT) at 1 microM cAMP], there was a significant decrease in the cAMP-associated activation of the LAMB1 gene DNase I hypersensitivity site 2 enhancer, as measured by chloramphenicol acetyl transferase assays. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, less protein binding was observed at one of the motifs (C2) within this enhancer region in the DN16 cells as compared to the F9 WT cells after treatment of the cells with RA and cAMP analogues for 24 h. Furthermore, no increase in C2 binding was observed when extracts from RA-treated F9 ST or DN16 cells were subjected to in vitro phosphorylation, suggesting that PKA is involved in the induction of the C2-binding protein in RA-treated cells. In contrast to the results with RA receptor beta and LAMB1, the effects of cAMP analogues on the RA-associated regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein 2 gene were not altered in the cell lines that exhibited reduced PKA activity. These results suggest that a partial reduction in PKA activity is not sufficient to abrogate the effects of cAMP analogues on all of the genes regulated by RA.

  18. Localization of the gene (LAMA4) to chromosome 6q21 and isolation of a partial cDNA encoding a variant laminin A chain

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, A.J.; Al-Imara, L.; Carter, N.P.

    1994-07-01

    Laminin is a basement membrane glycoprotein composed of three nonidentical chains, A, B1, and B2. Variant chains such as merosin and S-laminin have been found in different tissues. The authors have isolated a cDNA encoding a novel laminin A variant that hybridizes to a 6.45-kb mRNA. Using amplification of genomic DNA and flow-sorted chromosomes they have assigned the gene (LAMA4) for this new laminin A variant to chromosome 6. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of a YAC clone further localized the gene to 6q21. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Partial resistance of Medicago truncatula to Aphanomyces euteiches is associated with protection of the root stele and is controlled by a major QTL rich in proteasome-related genes.

    PubMed

    Djébali, Naceur; Jauneau, Alain; Ameline-Torregrosa, Carine; Chardon, Fabien; Jaulneau, Valérie; Mathé, Catherine; Bottin, Arnaud; Cazaux, Marc; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Baranger, Alain; Aouani, Mohamed Elarbi; Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Bernard; Huguet, Thierry; Jacquet, Christophe

    2009-09-01

    A pathosystem between Aphanomyces euteiches, the causal agent of pea root rot disease, and the model legume Medicago truncatula was developed to gain insights into mechanisms involved in resistance to this oomycete. The F83005.5 French accession and the A17-Jemalong reference line, susceptible and partially resistant, respectively, to A. euteiches, were selected for further cytological and genetic analyses. Microscopy analyses of thin root sections revealed that a major difference between the two inoculated lines occurred in the root stele, which remained pathogen free in A17. Striking features were observed in A17 roots only, including i) frequent pericycle cell divisions, ii) lignin deposition around the pericycle, and iii) accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds. Genetic analysis of resistance was performed on an F7 population of 139 recombinant inbred lines and identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) near the top of chromosome 3. A second study, with near-isogenic line responses to A. euteiches confirmed the role of this QTL in expression of resistance. Fine-mapping allowed the identification of a 135-kb sequenced genomic DNA region rich in proteasome-related genes. Most of these genes were shown to be induced only in inoculated A17. Novel mechanisms possibly involved in the observed partial resistance are proposed.

  20. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  1. Expression of a partially deleted gene of human type II procollagen (COL2A1) in transgenic mice produces a chondrodysplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Vandenberg, P.; Khillan, J.S.; Prockop, D.J.; Helminen, H.; Kontusaari, S.; Ala-Kokko, L. )

    1991-09-01

    A minigene version of the human gene for type II procollagen (COL2AI) was prepared that lacked a large central region containing 12 of the 52 exons and therefore 291 of the 1523 codons of the gene. The construct was modeled after sporadic in-frame deletions of collagen genes that cause synthesis of shortened pro{alpha} chains that associate with normal pro{alpha} chains and thereby cause degradation of the shortened and normal pro{alpha} chains through a process called procollagen suicide. The gene construct was used to prepare five lines of transgenic mice expressing the minigene. A large proportion of the mice expressing the minigene developed a phenotype of a chondrodysplasia with dwarfism, short and thick limbs, a short snout, a cranial bulge, a cleft palate, and delayed mineralization of bone. A number of mice died shortly after birth. Microscopic examination of cartilage revealed decreased density and organization of collagen fibrils. In cultured chondrocytes from the transgenic mice, the minigene was expressed as shortened pro{alpha}1(II) chains that were disulfide-linked to normal mouse pro{alpha}1(II) chains. Therefore, the phenotype is probably explained by depletion of the endogenous mouse type II procollagen through the phenomenon of procollagen suicide.

  2. Partial Deletion of eNOS Gene Causes Hyperinsulinemic State, Unbalance of Cardiac Insulin Signaling Pathways and Coronary Dysfunction Independently of High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Vecoli, Cecilia; Novelli, Michela; Pippa, Anna; Giacopelli, Daniela; Beffy, Pascale; Masiello, Pellegrino; L’Abbate, Antonio; Neglia, Danilo

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in eNOS gene, possibly interacting with high fat diet (HFD), affect peripheral vascular function and glucose metabolism. The relative role of eNOS gene, HFD and metabolic derangement on coronary function has not been fully elucidated. We test whether eNOS gene deficiency per se or in association with HFD modulates coronary function through mechanisms involving molecular pathways related to insulin signaling. Wild type (WT), eNOS−/− and eNOS+/− mice were studied. WT and eNOS+/− mice were fed with either standard or HF diet for 16 weeks and compared with standard diet fed eNOS−/−. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed during the last week of diet. Coronary resistance (CR) was measured at baseline and during infusions of acetylcholine (Ach) or sodium-nitroprusside (SNP) to evaluate endothelium-dependent or independent vasodilation, in the Langendorff isolated hearts. Cardiac expression of Akt and ERK genes as evaluation of two major insulin-regulated signaling pathways involved in the control of vascular tone were assessed by western blot. HFD-fed mice developed an overt diabetic state. Conversely, chow-fed genetically modified mice (in particular eNOS−/−) showed a metabolic pattern characterized by normoglycemia and hyperinsulinemia with a limited degree of insulin resistance. CR was significantly higher in animals with eNOS gene deletions than in WT, independently of diet. Percent decrease in CR, during Ach infusion, was significantly lower in both eNOS−/− and eNOS+/− mice than in WT, independently of diet. SNP reduced CR in all groups except eNOS−/−. The cardiac ERK1-2/Akt ratio, increased in animals with eNOS gene deletions compared with WT, independently of diet. These results suggest that the eNOS genetic deficiency, associated or not with HFD, has a relevant effect on coronary vascular function, possibly mediated by increase in blood insulin levels and unbalance in insulin-dependent signaling in coronary

  3. Hypermethylation of CpG islands in the mouse asparagine synthetase gene: relationship to asparaginase sensitivity in lymphoma cells. Partial methylation in normal cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, H; Shen, N; Qian, L; Sun, X L; Koduru, P; Goodwin, L O; Issa, J P; Broome, J D

    2001-09-14

    We have sequenced the promoter region of the murine asparagine synthetase gene and examined its methylation profile in the CpG islands of L-asparaginase-sensitive 6C3HED cells (asparagine auxotrophs) and resistant variants (prototrophs). In the former, complete methylation of the CpG island is correlated with failure of expression of mRNA: cells of the latter possess both methylated and unmethylated alleles, as do cells of the intrinsically asparagine-independent lines L1210 and EL4. A similar phenomenon was seen in normal splenic cells of adult mice. This was age related: no methylation was found in weanlings, but up to 45% of gene copies in animals 18 weeks or older were methylated. It was also tissue related, with methylation occurring rarely in liver cells. The relationship of these changes to oncogenesis is considered.

  4. In vivo transfer of hepatocyte growth factor gene accelerates proliferation of hepatic oval cells in a 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model in rats.

    PubMed

    Shiota, G; Kunisada, T; Oyama, K; Udagawa, A; Nomi, T; Tanaka, K; Tsutsumi, A; Isono, M; Nakamura, T; Hamada, H; Sakatani, T; Sell, S; Sato, K; Ito, H; Kawasaki, H

    2000-03-31

    To clarify the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on proliferation of hepatic oval cells, we transferred HGF gene into liver of the Solt-Farber rat model. Male Fisher 344 rats were infected with a recombinant adenovirus carrying the cDNA for HGF (pAxCAHGF) from tail vein. HGF mRNA showed its peak at 4 days, and diminished thereafter. The total and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatic oval cells were significantly elevated in HGF-transferred rats, in which stem cell factor and c-kit mRNA increased at each time point. Our results suggest that in vivo transfer of the HGF gene into liver accelerates proliferation of hepatic oval cells in the Solt-Farber model in rats.

  5. Modeling partial monosomy for human chromosome 21q11.2-q21.1 reveals haploinsufficient genes influencing behavior and fat deposition.

    PubMed

    Migdalska, Anna M; van der Weyden, Louise; Ismail, Ozama; White, Jacqueline K; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Logan, Darren W; Arends, Mark J; Adams, David J

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of part of human chromosome 21 results in a rare condition known as Monosomy 21. This disease displays a variety of clinical phenotypes, including intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphology, skeletal and cardiac abnormalities, and respiratory complications. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in this disorder, we used chromosome engineering to generate a mouse model carrying a deletion of the Lipi-Usp25 interval, syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.1 in humans. Haploinsufficiency for the 6 genes in this interval resulted in no gross morphological defects and behavioral analysis performed using an open field test, a test of anxiety, and tests for social interaction were normal in monosomic mice. Monosomic mice did, however, display impaired memory retention compared to control animals. Moreover, when fed a high-fat diet (HFD) monosomic mice exhibited a significant increase in fat mass/fat percentage estimate compared with controls, severe fatty changes in their livers, and thickened subcutaneous fat. Thus, genes within the Lipi-Usp25 interval may participate in memory retention and in the regulation of fat deposition.

  6. Modeling Partial Monosomy for Human Chromosome 21q11.2-q21.1 Reveals Haploinsufficient Genes Influencing Behavior and Fat Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Migdalska, Anna M.; van der Weyden, Louise; Ismail, Ozama; White, Jacqueline K.; Project, Sanger Mouse Genetics; Sánchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Logan, Darren W.; Arends, Mark J.; Adams, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of part of human chromosome 21 results in a rare condition known as Monosomy 21. This disease displays a variety of clinical phenotypes, including intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphology, skeletal and cardiac abnormalities, and respiratory complications. To search for dosage-sensitive genes involved in this disorder, we used chromosome engineering to generate a mouse model carrying a deletion of the Lipi–Usp25 interval, syntenic with 21q11.2-q21.1 in humans. Haploinsufficiency for the 6 genes in this interval resulted in no gross morphological defects and behavioral analysis performed using an open field test, a test of anxiety, and tests for social interaction were normal in monosomic mice. Monosomic mice did, however, display impaired memory retention compared to control animals. Moreover, when fed a high-fat diet (HFD) monosomic mice exhibited a significant increase in fat mass/fat percentage estimate compared with controls, severe fatty changes in their livers, and thickened subcutaneous fat. Thus, genes within the Lipi–Usp25 interval may participate in memory retention and in the regulation of fat deposition. PMID:22276124

  7. GQ-16, a TZD-Derived Partial PPARγ Agonist, Induces the Expression of Thermogenesis-Related Genes in Brown Fat and Visceral White Fat and Decreases Visceral Adiposity in Obese and Hyperglycemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Michella S.; de Lima, Caroline L.; Royer, Carine; Silva, Janaina B.; Oliveira, Fernanda C. B.; Christ, Camila G.; Pereira, Sidney A.; Bao, Sonia N.; Lima, Maria C. A.; Pitta, Marina G. R.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Neves, Francisco A. R.; Amato, Angélica A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Beige adipocytes comprise a unique thermogenic cell type in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of rodents and humans, and play a critical role in energy homeostasis. In this scenario, recruitment of beige cells has been an important focus of interest for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat obesity. PPARγ activation by full agonists (thiazolidinediones, TZDs) drives the appearance of beige cells, a process so-called browning of WAT. However, this does not translate into increased energy expenditure, and TZDs are associated with weight gain. Partial PPARγ agonists, on the other hand, do not induce weight gain, but have not been shown to drive WAT browning. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of GQ-16 on BAT and on browning of WAT in obese mice. Methods Male Swiss mice with obesity and hyperglycemia induced by high fat diet were treated with vehicle, rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg/d) or the TZD-derived partial PPARγ agonist GQ-16 (40 mg/kg/d) for 14 days. Fasting blood glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and lipid profile were measured. WAT and brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots were excised for determination of adiposity, relative expression of Ucp-1, Cidea, Prdm16, Cd40 and Tmem26 by RT-qPCR, histological analysis, and UCP-1 protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. Liver samples were also removed for histological analysis and determination of hepatic triglyceride content. Results GQ-16 treatment reduced high fat diet-induced weight gain in mice despite increasing energy intake. This was accompanied by reduced epididymal fat mass, reduced liver triglyceride content, morphological signs of increased BAT activity, increased expression of thermogenesis-related genes in interscapular BAT and epididymal WAT, and increased UCP-1 protein expression in interscapular BAT and in epididymal and inguinal WAT. Conclusion This study suggests for the first time that a partial PPARγ agonist may

  8. GQ-16, a TZD-Derived Partial PPARγ Agonist, Induces the Expression of Thermogenesis-Related Genes in Brown Fat and Visceral White Fat and Decreases Visceral Adiposity in Obese and Hyperglycemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Michella S; de Lima, Caroline L; Royer, Carine; Silva, Janaina B; Oliveira, Fernanda C B; Christ, Camila G; Pereira, Sidney A; Bao, Sonia N; Lima, Maria C A; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Neves, Francisco A R; Amato, Angélica A

    2016-01-01

    Beige adipocytes comprise a unique thermogenic cell type in the white adipose tissue (WAT) of rodents and humans, and play a critical role in energy homeostasis. In this scenario, recruitment of beige cells has been an important focus of interest for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat obesity. PPARγ activation by full agonists (thiazolidinediones, TZDs) drives the appearance of beige cells, a process so-called browning of WAT. However, this does not translate into increased energy expenditure, and TZDs are associated with weight gain. Partial PPARγ agonists, on the other hand, do not induce weight gain, but have not been shown to drive WAT browning. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of GQ-16 on BAT and on browning of WAT in obese mice. Male Swiss mice with obesity and hyperglycemia induced by high fat diet were treated with vehicle, rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg/d) or the TZD-derived partial PPARγ agonist GQ-16 (40 mg/kg/d) for 14 days. Fasting blood glucose, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and lipid profile were measured. WAT and brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots were excised for determination of adiposity, relative expression of Ucp-1, Cidea, Prdm16, Cd40 and Tmem26 by RT-qPCR, histological analysis, and UCP-1 protein expression analysis by immunohistochemistry. Liver samples were also removed for histological analysis and determination of hepatic triglyceride content. GQ-16 treatment reduced high fat diet-induced weight gain in mice despite increasing energy intake. This was accompanied by reduced epididymal fat mass, reduced liver triglyceride content, morphological signs of increased BAT activity, increased expression of thermogenesis-related genes in interscapular BAT and epididymal WAT, and increased UCP-1 protein expression in interscapular BAT and in epididymal and inguinal WAT. This study suggests for the first time that a partial PPARγ agonist may increase BAT activity and induce the

  9. A computer program for fast and easy typing of a partial endoglucanase gene sequence into genospecies and sequevars 1&2 of the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex.

    PubMed

    Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum is a species complex that contains race 3 biovar 2 strains belonging to phylotype IIB sequevars 1 and 2 that are quarantined or select agent pathogens. Recently, the R. solanacearum species complex strains have been reclassified into three genospecies: R. solanacearum, Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum and Ralstonia syzygii. An unidentified R. solanacearum strain is considered a select agent in the US until proven to be a non-race 3 biovar 2 (non-phylotype IIB sequevars 1&2). Currently, sequevars of R. solanacearum species complex strains can only be determined by phylogenetic analysis of a partial endoglucanase (egl) sequence of approximately 700-bp in length. Such analysis, however, requires expert knowledge to properly trim the sequence, to include the correct reference strains, and to interpret the results. By comparing GenBank egl sequences of representative R. solanacearum species-complex strains, we identified genospecies- and sequevar 1 and 2-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We also designed primers to amplify a shorter, 526-bp, egl fragment from R. solanacearum species complex strains for easy sequencing of the amplicon, and to facilitate direct and specific amplification of egl from R. solanacearum-infected plant samples without the need of bacterial isolation. We wrote a computer program (Ralstonia solanacearum typing program) that analyzes a minimum 400-bp user-input egl sequence from a R. solanacearum strain for egl homology and SNP content to determine 1) whether it belongs to the R. solanacearum species complex, 2) if so, to which genospecies, and 3) whether it is of the sequevar type (sequevars 1 and 2) associated with the select agent/quarantined R. solanacearum strain. The program correctly typed all 371 tested egl sequences with known sequevars, obtained either from GenBank or through personal communication. Additionally, the program successfully typed 25 R. solanacearum strains in our

  10. Attenuated NYCBH vaccinia virus deleted for the E3L gene confers partial protection against lethal monkeypox virus disease in cynomolgus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Denzler, Karen L; Babas, Tahar; Rippeon, Amy; Huynh, Trung; Fukushima, Nobuko; Rhodes, Lowrey; Silvera, Peter M; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2013-01-01

    The New York City Board of Health (NYCBH) vaccinia virus is the currently licensed vaccine for use in the US against smallpox. The vaccine under investigation in this study has been attenuated by deletion of the innate immune evasion gene, E3L, and shown to be protective in homologous virus mouse challenge and heterologous virus mouse and rabbit challenge models. In this study we compared NYCBH deleted for the E3L gene (NYCBHΔE3L) to NYCBH for the ability to induce phosphorylation of proinflammatory signaling proteins and the ability to protect cynomolgous macaques from heterologous challenge with monkeypox virus (MPXV). NYCBHΔE3L induced phosphorylation of PKR and eIF2α as well as p38, SAPK/JNK, and IRF3 which can lead to induction of proinflammatory gene transcription. Vaccination of macaques with two doses of NYCBHΔE3L resulted in negligible pock formation at the site of scarification in comparison to vaccination using a single dose of NYCBH, but still elicited neutralizing antibodies and protected 75% of the animals from mortality after challenge with MPXV. However, NYCBHΔE3L-vaccinated animals developed a high number of secondary skin lesions and blood viral load similar to that seen in unvaccinated controls. The NYCBHΔE3L-vaccinated animals that survived MPXV challenge were able to show resolution of blood viral load, a decrease in number of skin lesions, and an improved clinical score by three weeks post challenge. These results suggest that although the highly attenuated NYCBHΔE3L allows proinflammatory signal transduction to occur, it does not provide full protection against monkeypox challenge. PMID:22001879

  11. Exposure to bisphenol-A during pregnancy partially mimics the effects of a high-fat diet altering glucose homeostasis and gene expression in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    García-Arevalo, Marta; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Rebelo Dos Santos, Junia; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M; Nadal, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT), the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 10 µg/kg/day of BPA or a vehicle from day 9 to 16 of pregnancy. One month old offspring were divided into four different groups: vehicle treated mice that ate a normal chow diet (Control group); BPA treated mice that also ate a normal chow diet (BPA); vehicle treated animals that had a high fat diet (HFD) and BPA treated animals that were fed HFD (HFD-BPA). The BPA group started to gain weight at 18 weeks old and caught up to the HFD group before week 28. The BPA group as well as the HFD and HFD-BPA ones presented fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma compared with the Control one. Glucose stimulated insulin release was disrupted, particularly in the HFD-BPA group. In WAT, the mRNA expression of the genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, Srebpc1, Pparα and Cpt1β was decreased by BPA to the same extent as with the HFD treatment. BPA treatment upregulated Pparγ and Prkaa1 genes in the liver; yet it diminished the expression of Cd36. Hepatic triglyceride levels were increased in all groups compared to control. In conclusion, male offspring from BPA-treated mothers presented symptoms of diabesity. This term refers to a form of diabetes which typically develops in later life and is associated with obesity.

  12. Concurrent speciation in the eastern woodland salamanders (Genus Plethodon): DNA sequences of the complete albumin nuclear and partial mitochondrial 12s genes.

    PubMed

    Highton, Richard; Hastings, Amy Picard; Palmer, Catherine; Watts, Richard; Hass, Carla A; Culver, Melanie; Arnold, Stevan J

    2012-05-01

    Salamanders of the North American plethodontid genus Plethodon are important model organisms in a variety of studies that depend on a phylogenetic framework (e.g., chemical communication, ecological competition, life histories, hybridization, and speciation), and consequently their systematics has been intensively investigated over several decades. Nevertheless, we lack a synthesis of relationships among the species. In the analyses reported here we use new DNA sequence data from the complete nuclear albumin gene (1818 bp) and the 12s mitochondrial gene (355 bp), as well as published data for four other genes (Wiens et al., 2006), up to a total of 6989 bp, to infer relationships. We relate these results to past systematic work based on morphology, allozymes, and DNA sequences. Although basal relationships show a strong consensus across studies, many terminal relationships remain in flux despite substantial sequencing and other molecular and morphological studies. This systematic instability appears to be a consequence of contemporaneous bursts of speciation in the late Miocene and Pliocene, yielding many closely related extant species in each of the four eastern species groups. Therefore we conclude that many relationships are likely to remain poorly resolved in the face of additional sequencing efforts. On the other hand, the current classification of the 45 eastern species into four species groups is supported. The Plethodon cinereus group (10 species) is the sister group to the clade comprising the other three groups, but these latter groups (Plethodon glutinosus [28 species], Plethodon welleri [5 species], and Plethodon wehrlei [2 species]) probably diverged from each other at approximately the same time. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Inactivation of promoter 1B of APC causes partial gene silencing: evidence for a significant role of the promoter in regulation and causative of familial adenomatous polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Rohlin, A; Engwall, Y; Fritzell, K; Göransson, K; Bergsten, A; Einbeigi, Z; Nilbert, M; Karlsson, P; Björk, J; Nordling, M

    2011-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Two promoters, 1A and 1B, have been recognized in APC, and 1B is thought to have a minor role in the regulation of the gene. We have identified a novel deletion encompassing half of this promoter in the largest family (Family 1) of the Swedish Polyposis Registry. The mutation leads to an imbalance in allele-specific expression of APC, and transcription from promoter 1B was highly impaired in both normal colorectal mucosa and blood from mutation carriers. To establish the significance of promoter 1B in normal colorectal mucosa (from controls), expression levels of specific transcripts from each of the promoters, 1A and 1B, were examined, and the expression from 1B was significantly higher compared with 1A. Significant amounts of transcripts generated from promoter 1B were also determined in a panel of 20 various normal tissues examined. In FAP-related tumors, the APC germline mutation is proposed to dictate the second hit. Mutations leaving two or three out of seven 20-amino-acid repeats in the central domain of APC intact seem to be required for tumorigenesis. We examined adenomas from mutation carriers in Family 1 for second hits in the entire gene without any findings, however, loss of the residual expression of the deleterious allele was observed. Three major conclusions of significant importance in relation to the function of APC can be drawn from this study; (i) germline inactivation of promoter 1B is disease causing in FAP; (ii) expression of transcripts from promoter 1B is generated at considerable higher levels compared with 1A, demonstrating a hitherto unknown importance of 1B; (iii) adenoma formation in FAP, caused by impaired function of promoter 1B, does not require homozygous inactivation of APC allowing for alternative genetic models as basis for adenoma formation. PMID:21643010

  14. AB283. SPR-10 Down-regulation of ryanodine receptor gene expression in murine urinary bladder smooth muscle following partial bladder outlet obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Javed, Elham; Addya, Shankar; Fortina, Paolo; Zderic, Stephen; Wein, Alan; Chacko, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Objective Urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM) displays spontaneous action potentials and this potential is related to the phasic nature of spontaneous contractions in this tissue. The amplitude of a phasic contraction depends on the increase in Ca2+ entry caused by membrane depolarization. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) in UBSM decreases the force production by decreasing the frequency of phasic contractions through interactions with large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) and small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) channels. Microarray and network analysis were employed to determine the changes in mRNA in 14-day obstructed murine bladders. We found that obstruction significantly down-regulated the RyRs in bladder smooth muscle (BSM). Methods Male C57Bl/6 mice were surgically obstructed and kept for 14 days. Sham-operated mice served as a control. Bladders were excised; urothelium scraped off with a scalpel, and the serosa was removed. BSM obtained from PBOO and sham control animals were used for microarray and western blotting Results Pathway-based analysis of these gene signatures showed significant number of under-expressed genes in obstructed bladder and they were mapped to proteins involved in calcium signaling. We focused our work on RyR protein expression in BSM. There was a four-fold reduction of RyR3 in BSM in 14-day obstructed groups as shown by microarray and immunoblotting compared to that of sham-operated animals. Conclusions These results confirm that the RyR gene expression is down-regulated in obstructed murine bladder smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) None

  15. Exposure to Bisphenol-A during Pregnancy Partially Mimics the Effects of a High-Fat Diet Altering Glucose Homeostasis and Gene Expression in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    García-Arevalo, Marta; Alonso-Magdalena, Paloma; Rebelo Dos Santos, Junia; Quesada, Ivan; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Nadal, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the most widespread EDCs used as a base compound in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics. The aim of our research has been to study how the exposure to BPA during pregnancy affects weight, glucose homeostasis, pancreatic β-cell function and gene expression in the major peripheral organs that control energy flux: white adipose tissue (WAT), the liver and skeletal muscle, in male offspring 17 and 28 weeks old. Pregnant mice were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 10 µg/kg/day of BPA or a vehicle from day 9 to 16 of pregnancy. One month old offspring were divided into four different groups: vehicle treated mice that ate a normal chow diet (Control group); BPA treated mice that also ate a normal chow diet (BPA); vehicle treated animals that had a high fat diet (HFD) and BPA treated animals that were fed HFD (HFD-BPA). The BPA group started to gain weight at 18 weeks old and caught up to the HFD group before week 28. The BPA group as well as the HFD and HFD-BPA ones presented fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance and high levels of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) in plasma compared with the Control one. Glucose stimulated insulin release was disrupted, particularly in the HFD-BPA group. In WAT, the mRNA expression of the genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, Srebpc1, Pparα and Cpt1β was decreased by BPA to the same extent as with the HFD treatment. BPA treatment upregulated Pparγ and Prkaa1 genes in the liver; yet it diminished the expression of Cd36. Hepatic triglyceride levels were increased in all groups compared to control. In conclusion, male offspring from BPA-treated mothers presented symptoms of diabesity. This term refers to a form of diabetes which typically develops in later life and is associated with obesity. PMID:24959901

  16. Hb St. Jozef, A Val-->Leu N-terminal mutation leading to retention of the methionine, and partial acetylation found in the globin gene in Cis with a -alpha3.7 thalassemia deletion.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Cornelis L; Versteegh, Florens G A; van Leer, Eduard H G; Starreveld, Jaap S; Kok, Peter J M J; van Rooijen-Nijdam, Irene; van Delft, Peter; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Becchi, Michel; Wajcman, Henri; Giordano, Piero C

    2007-01-01

    We report a new hemoglobin (Hb) variant found in a 6-year-old girl of Moroccan origin, living in the Dutch city of Gouda. The child was referred because of microcytic and hypochromic parameters. A normal zinc protoporphyirin (ZPP) value excluded iron deficiency and gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) revealed a heterozygosity for the common -alpha(3.7) thalassemia deletion, partially justifying the hematological picture. The Hb pattern on alkaline electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis was normal, while a fraction of 9% preceding the Hb A peak, remained visible on different high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) devices. This fraction, located in front of the Hb A peak, is usually considered as a Hb A derivate that becomes more expressed in older samples. However, the sample was freshly collected and the peak unusually evident. Therefore, direct sequencing of the alpha-globin genes was performed revealing a GTG-->CTG transversion at codon 1 of the alpha1-globin gene or of the hybrid gene. This point mutation induces a single amino acid substitution from valine to leucine. Electrospray-mass spectrometry (ES-MS) analysis revealed, in addition to this substitution, that the N-terminal methionine was retained and that about 20% of the variant was acetylated. As expected for an association with a -alpha(3.7)-thalassemia (thal) deletion, the non acetylated and acetylated abnormal alpha chain amounted to 32% of the total alpha chains. Family studies revealed that the mutated codon was located in cis of the deletion.

  17. The Mitochondrial SDHD Gene Is Required for Early Embryogenesis, and Its Partial Deficiency Results in Persistent Carotid Body Glomus Cell Activation with Full Responsiveness to Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Piruat, José I.; Pintado, C. Oscar; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Roche, Marta; López-Barneo, José

    2004-01-01

    The SDHD gene encodes one of the two membrane-anchoring proteins of the succinate dehydrogenase (complex II) of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This gene has recently been proposed to be involved in oxygen sensing because mutations that cause loss of its function produce hereditary familiar paraganglioma, a tumor of the carotid body (CB), the main arterial chemoreceptor that senses oxygen levels in the blood. Here, we report the generation of a SDHD knockout mouse, which to our knowledge is the first mammalian model lacking a protein of the electron transport chain. Homozygous SDHD−/− animals die at early embryonic stages. Heterozygous SDHD+/− mice show a general, noncompensated deficiency of succinate dehydrogenase activity without alterations in body weight or major physiological dysfunction. The responsiveness to hypoxia of CBs from SDHD+/− mice remains intact, although the loss of an SDHD allele results in abnormal enhancement of resting CB activity due to a decrease of K+ conductance and persistent Ca2+ influx into glomus cells. This CB overactivity is linked to a subtle glomus cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. These observations indicate that constitutive activation of SDHD+/− glomus cells precedes CB tumor transformation. They also suggest that, contrary to previous beliefs, mitochondrial complex II is not directly involved in CB oxygen sensing. PMID:15572694

  18. Case report: an unexpected link between partial deletion of the SHANK3 gene and Heller's dementia infantilis, a rare subtype of autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Philippe, Anne; Craus, Yann; Rio, Marlène; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Boddaert, Nathalie; Malan, Valérie; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; Robel, Laurence

    2015-10-21

    Deletions and mutations involving the SHANK3 gene lead to a nonspecific clinical presentation with moderate to profound intellectual disability, severely delayed or absent speech, and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Better knowledge of the clinical spectrum of SHANK3 haploinsufficiency is useful to facilitate clinical care monitoring and to guide molecular diagnosis, essential for genetic counselling. Here, we report a detailed clinical description of a 10-year-old girl carrying a pathogenic interstitial 22q13.3 deletion encompassing only the first 17 exons of SHANK3. The clinical features displayed by the girl strongly suggested the diagnosis of dementia infantilis, described by Heller in 1908, also known as childhood disintegrative disorder. Our present case confirms several observations according to which regression may be part of the clinical phenotype of SHANK3 haploinsufficiency. Therefore, we think it is crucial to look for mutations in the gene SHANK3 in patients diagnosed for childhood disintegrative disorder or any developmental disorder with a regressive pattern involving social and communicative skills as well as cognitive and instinctual functions, with onset around 3 years.

  19. A novel homozygous disruptive mutation in the SRD5A2-gene in a partially virilized patient with 5alpha-reductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hiort, Olaf; Schütt, Snjezana M; Bals-Pratsch, Monika; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Marschke, Christine; Struve, Dagmar

    2002-02-01

    Steroid 5alpha-reductase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the SRD5A2-gene, resulting in diminished dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formation and, hence, in a severe virilization deficit of the external genitalia in patients with 46,XY karyotype. The phenotype of affected individuals is variable and has been reported to range from completely female over genital ambiguity to normal male, depending on the type of mutation and its effect on enzyme activity. Here we report an adolescent 46,XY patient with predominantly female appearance, who had been gonadectomized in early infancy. Genital status revealed a urogenital sinus equivalent to Prader stage III. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated a homozygous point mutation in exon 2 of the SRD5A2-gene, leading to a premature termination in codon position 111 of the 5alpha-reductase 2 enzyme, and not allowing formation of a functional 5alpha-reductase type 2 enzyme. This case demonstrates that even despite a complete loss of function of 5alpha-reductase type 2, marked virilization is possible, most likely the result of a testosterone (T) effect during foetal life.

  20. Genotyping of a miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, based on sequence analysis of the partial 26S ribosomal RNA gene and two internal transcribed spacers.

    PubMed

    Suezawa, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Motofumi; Mori, Haruhiko

    2008-09-01

    We analyzed sequences of the D1D2 domain of the 26S ribosomal RNA gene (26S rDNA sequence), the internal transcribed spacer 1, the 5.8S ribosomal RNA gene, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (the ITS sequence) from 46 strains of miso and soy sauce fermentation yeast, Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and a closely related species, Z. mellis, for typing. Based on the 26S rDNA sequence analysis, the Z. rouxii strains were of two types, and the extent of sequence divergence between them was 2.6%. Based on the ITS sequence analysis, they were divided into seven types (I-VII). Between the type strain (type I) and type VI, in particular, a 12% difference was detected. The occurrence of these nine genotypes with a divergence of more than 1% in these two sequences suggests that Z. rouxii is a species complex including novel species and hybrids. Z. mellis strains were of two types (type alpha and type beta) based on the ITS sequence. Z. rouxii could clearly be distinguished from Z. mellis by 26S rDNA and ITS sequence analyses, but not by the 16% NaCl tolerance, when used as the sole key characteristic for differentiation between the two species.

  1. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    PubMed

    Boccalandro, Cristina; De Mattia, Fabrizio; Guo, Dong-Chuan; Xue, Li; Orlander, Philip; King, Terri M; Gupta, Prateek; Deen, Peter M T; Lavis, Victor R; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2004-05-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria and polydipsia were homozygous for an autosomal recessive missense V168M mutation in the AQP2 gene. Expression in oocytes revealed that, although retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to a great extent, a considerable amount of the partially functional AQP2-V168M was expressed at the plasma membrane, and that its ER retention was less than AQP2-T126M, a functional mutant in severe recessive NDI. None of the affected AQP2-V168M individuals had neurologic deficits, which also suggested a milder form of the disease. The homozygous individuals reported subjective improvement in polyuria and polydipsia with the use of dDAVP (1-desamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin). When clinically tested, infusion of dDAVP at variable doses produced a partial increase in the urinary osmolality in homozygous individuals and decreased their water intake. Heterozygotes were unaffected when compared with controls. Samples were obtained from the population of the Mexican town of origin of the family; 30% of the population was heterozygous for the V168M AQP2 mutation and 1% was homozygous for the mutation. The high frequency of this rare mutation in the town provides evidence for an important health care problem in the village with consequences for future generations.

  2. Phylogenetic position of the genus Gonocerca Manter, 1925 (Trematoda, Hemiuroidea), based on partial sequences of 28S rRNA gene and a reconsideration of taxonomic status of Gonocercinae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Sergey G; Atopkin, Dmitry M; Gordeev, Ilya I; Shedko, Marina B

    2017-03-27

    Adult trematodes of the genus Gonocerca Manter, 1925, are parasites of marine fishes. Identification of the phylogenetic positions and a revision of the taxonomic status of the subfamily Gonocercinae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955 (Derogenidae) are the main purposes of this research article. Four Gonocerca species were used in the study, including the type-species G. phycidis Manter, 1925. Molecular phylogenetic analysis, based on partial sequences of 28S rRNA gene, revealed that Gonocerca spp. are phylogenetically distant from other hemiuroid trematodes, including Derogenes varicus (Müller, 1784), representative of the type-genus of the family Derogenidae. The taxonomic rank of Gonocercinae should be raised to the family level. The generic composition of the family Gonocercidae Skrjabin et Guschanskaja, 1955 stat. nov., requires further clarification as the molecular data do not support the inclusion of the genus Hemipera Nicoll, 1913, in this family. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Partial characterization of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 with a polymerase chain reaction-based approach.

    PubMed

    Gansel, X; Dutreix, M; Hartke, A; Boutibonnes, P; Auffray, Y

    1993-11-01

    With degenerated oligonucleotide primers for conserved regions of bacterial sigma factor proteins, a 117-bp internal DNA fragment of an rpoD-like gene of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis ML3 was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The DNA sequence of this PCR product was determined by cycle sequencing, and the deduced amino acid sequence of this internal fragment showed an extensive homology with the known sigma factor sequences from six other microorganisms and present a 13-amino acid region corresponding to the typical "RpoD box" of primary sigma factors. This PCR product was used as a probe to specifically detect sigma homologs in Pediococcus acidilactici, Leuconostoc lactis, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus thermophilus, and Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris. These data are consistent with the existence of a high similarity between the primary sigma factors from diverse Gram-positive microorganisms.

  4. Miller (Genee-Wiedemann) syndrome represents a clinically and biochemically distinct subgroup of postaxial acrofacial dysostosis associated with partial deficiency of DHODH.

    PubMed

    Rainger, Joe; Bengani, Hemant; Campbell, Leigh; Anderson, Eve; Sokhi, Kishan; Lam, Wayne; Riess, Angelika; Ansari, Morad; Smithson, Sarah; Lees, Melissa; Mercer, Catherine; McKenzie, Kathryn; Lengfeld, Tobias; Gener Querol, Blanca; Branney, Peter; McKay, Stewart; Morrison, Harris; Medina, Bethan; Robertson, Morag; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Gordon, Colin; Kirk, Jean; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Fitzpatrick, David R

    2012-09-15

    Biallelic mutations in the gene encoding DHOdehase [dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH)], an enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, have been identified as the cause of Miller (Genée-Weidemann or postaxial acrofacial dysostosis) syndrome (MIM 263750). We report compound heterozygous DHODH mutations in four additional families with typical Miller syndrome. Complementation in auxotrophic yeast demonstrated reduced pyrimidine synthesis and in vitro enzymatic analysis confirmed reduced DHOdehase activity in 11 disease-associated missense mutations, with 7 alleles showing discrepant activity between the assays. These discrepancies are partly explained by the domain structure of DHODH and suggest both assays are useful for interpretation of individual alleles. However, in all affected individuals, the genotype predicts that there should be significant residual DHOdehase activity. Urine samples obtained from two mutation-positive cases showed elevated levels of orotic acid (OA) but not dihydroorotate (DHO), an unexpected finding since these represent the product and the substrate of DHODH enzymatic activity, respectively. Screening of four unrelated cases with overlapping but atypical clinical features showed no mutations in either DHODH or the other de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis genes (CAD, UMPS), with these cases also showing normal levels of urinary OA and DHO. In situ analysis of mouse embryos showed Dhodh, Cad and Umps to be strongly expressed in the pharyngeal arch and limb bud, supporting a site- and stage-specific requirement for de novo pyrimidine synthesis. The developmental sensitivity to reduced pyrimidine synthesis capacity may reflect the requirement for an exceptional mitogenic response to growth factor signalling in the affected tissues.

  5. Partial correction of the dwarf phenotype by non-viral transfer of the growth hormone gene in mice: Treatment age is critical.

    PubMed

    Higuti, Eliza; Cecchi, Cláudia R; Oliveira, Nélio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Vieira, Daniel P; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2016-02-01

    Non-viral transfer of the growth hormone gene to different muscles of immunodeficient dwarf (lit/scid) mice is under study with the objective of improving phenotypic correction via this particular gene therapy approach. Plasmid DNA was administered into the exposed quadriceps or non-exposed tibialis cranialis muscle of lit/scid mice followed by electroporation, monitoring several growth parameters. In a 6-month bioassay, 50μg DNA were injected three times into the quadriceps muscle of 80-day old mice. A 50% weight increase, with a catch-up growth of 21%, together with a 16% increase for nose-to-tail and tail lengths (catch-up=19-21%) and a 24-28% increase for femur length (catch-up=53-60%), were obtained. mIGF1 serum levels were ~7-fold higher than the basal levels for untreated mice, but still ~2-fold lower than in non-dwarf scid mice. Since treatment age was found to be particularly important in a second bioassay utilizing 40-day old mice, these pubertal mice were compared in a third bioassay with adult (80-day old) mice, all treated twice with 50μg DNA injected into each tibialis cranialis muscle, via a less invasive approach. mIGF1 concentrations at the same level as co-aged scid mice were obtained 15days after administration in pubertal mice. Catch-up growth, based on femur length (77%), nose-to-tail (36%) and tail length (39%) increases was 40 to 95% higher than those obtained upon treating adult mice. These data pave the way for the development of more effective pre-clinical assays in pubertal dwarf mice for the treatment of GH deficiency via plasmid-DNA muscular administration.

  6. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  7. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  8. Molecular Methods for Identification of Acinetobacter Species by Partial Sequencing of the rpoB and 16S rRNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Azar Dokht; Shahraki, Abdolrazagh Hashemi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Sheikhi, Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter spp. is a diverse group of Gram-negative bacteria which are ubiquitous in soil and water, and an important cause of nosocomial infections. The purpose of this study was to identify a collection of Acinetobacter spp. clinical isolates accurately and to investigate their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. Materials and Methods A total of 197 non-duplicate clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. isolates identified using conventional biochemical tests. The molecular technique of PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of rpoB and 16S rRNA genes was applied for species identification. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was performed with a disk diffusion assay. Results Based on 16S rRNA and rpoB genes analysis separately, most of clinical isolates can be identified with high bootstrap values. However, the identity of the isolate 555T was uncertain due to high similarity of A. grimontii and A. junii. Identification by concatenation of 16S rRNA and rpoB confirmed the identity of clinical isolates of Acenitobacer to species level confidently. Accordingly, the isolate 555T assigned as A. grimontii due to 100% similarity to A. grimontii. Moreover, this isolate showed 98.64% to A. junii. Besides, the identity of the isolates 218T and 364T was confirmed as Genomic species 3 and A. calcoaceticus respectively. So, the majority of Acinetobacter spp. isolates, were identified as: A. baumannii (131 isolates, 66%), A. calcoaceticus (9 isolates, 4.5%), and A. genomosp 16 (8 isolates, 4%). The rest of identified species showed the lower frequencies. In susceptibility test, 105 isolates (53%), presented high antibiotic resistance of 90% to ceftriaxone, piperacillin, piperacillin tazobactam, amikacin, and 81% to ciprofloxacin. Conclusion Sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and rpoB spacer simultaneously was able to do identification of Acinetobacter spp. to species level. A.baumannii was identified as the most prevalent species with high antibiotic resistance. Other

  9. The Presence of Clitoromegaly in the Nonclassical Form of 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency Could Be Partially Modulated by the CAG Polymorphic Tract of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Gomes, Larissa; Bugano Diniz Gomes, Diogo; Marcondes, José Antônio Miguel; Madureira, Guiomar; de Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Bachega, Tânia A. Sartori Sanchez

    2016-01-01

    Background In the nonclassical form (NC), good correlation has been observed between genotypes and 17OH-progesterone (17-OHP) levels. However, this correlation was not identified with regard to the severity of hyperandrogenic manifestations, which could depend on interindividual variability in peripheral androgen sensitivity. Androgen action is modulated by the polymorphic CAG tract (nCAG) of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and by polymorphisms in 5α-reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) enzyme, both of which are involved in the severity of hyperandrogenic disorders. Objectives To analyze whether nCAG-AR and SRD5A2 polymorphisms influence the severity of the nonclassical phenotype. Patients NC patients (n = 114) diagnosed by stimulated-17OHP ≥10 ng/mL were divided into groups according to the beginning of hyperandrogenic manifestations (pediatric and adolescent/adult) and CYP21A2 genotypes (C/C: homozygosis for mild mutations; A/C: compound heterozygosis for severe/mild mutations). Methods CYP21A2 mutations were screened by allelic-specific PCR, MLPA and/or sequencing. HpaII-digested and HpaII-undigested DNA samples underwent GeneScan analysis to study nCAG, and the SRD5A2 polymorphisms were screened by RLFP. Results Mean nCAG did not differ among pediatric, adolescent/adult and asymptomatic subjects. In the C/C genotype, we observed a significantly lower frequency of longer CAG alleles in pediatric patients than in adolescent/adults (p = 0.01). In patients carrying the A/C genotype, the frequencies of shorter and longer CAG alleles did not differ between pediatric patients and adolescent/adults (p>0.05). Patients with clitoromegaly had significantly lower weighted CAG biallelic mean than those without it: 19.1±2.7 and 21.6±2.5, respectively (p = 0.007), independent of the CYP21A2 genotype's severity. The SRD5A2 polymorphisms were not associated with the variability of hyperandrogenic NC phenotypes. Conclusions In this series, we observed a modulatory effect of the CAG

  10. Dietary salecan reverts partially the metabolic gene expressions and NMR-based metabolomic profiles from high-fat-diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Li, Minghui; Yang, Xiao; Xu, Xi; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Jianfa

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that dietary salecan (a water-soluble β-glucan) effectively reduces high-fat-diet-induced adiposity through disturbing bile-acid-promoted emulsification in mice. However, the effects of salecan on metabolic genes and metabolites involved in lipid accumulation are mostly unknown. Here, we confirmed that dietary 3% and 6% salecan for 4 weeks markedly decreased fat accumulation in liver and adipose tissue in high-fat-diet rats, displaying a decrease in mRNA levels of SREBP1-C, FAS, SCD1 and ACC1 involved in de novo lipogenesis and a reduction of levels of GPAT1, DGAT1 and DGAT2 related to triglyceride synthesis. Dietary salecan also increased the mRNA levels of PPARα and CYP7A1, which are related to fatty acid oxidation and cholesterol decomposition, respectively. In the (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomic analysis, both the serum and liver metabolite profiles differed among the control groups, and the metabolic profiles of the salecan groups were shifted toward that of the low-fat-diet group. Metabolites analysis showed that salecan significantly increased hepatic glutathione and betaine levels which are related to regulation of cellular reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that dietary salecan not only disturbed fat digestion and absorption but also influenced lipid accumulation and metabolism in diet-induced obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and partial sequence of the A-protein gene of Thermus thermophilus cytochrome c/sub 1/aa/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, J.A.; Mather, M.W.; Springer, P.; Hensel, S.; Buse, G.

    1988-01-01

    Thermus thermophilus is a strictly aerobic eubacterium which grows optimally near 70/degree/C. Its respiratory system is very similar to that of eukaryotic mitochondria, and the organism has proven to be a particularly good source of stable, comparatively simple respiratory enzymes. There are at least two terminal oxidases: The recently discovered cytochrome ba/sub 3//sup 3/ and cytochrome c/sub 1/aa/sub 3//sup 2/. Cytochrome ba/sub 3/ is analog of aa/sub 3/ in which the heme A of cytochrome a is replaced with protoporphyrin IX (heme B) while its order redox components appear to be largely identical to those of the now classical mammalian cytochrome aa/sub 3/; it has only a single 35 kD protein subunit. Cytochrome c/sub 1/aa/sub 3/ consists of two polypeptides. The /approximately/33 kD C-protein covalently binds one heme C, while the /approximately/55 kD protein is thought to bind the four canonical redox centers of aa/sub 3/, two heme A, and two Cu. Toward our goal of unequivocally establishing the distribution of the metal centers in cytochrome c/sub 1/aa/sub 3/, we have isolated the structural gene of the A-protein. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Specific and sensitive detection of Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) in bumble bees (Bombus spp.; Hymenoptera: Apidae) by PCR of partial rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Klee, Julia; Tek Tay, Wee; Paxton, Robert J

    2006-02-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was developed for the specific and sensitive diagnosis of the microsporidian parasite Nosema bombi in bumble bees (Bombus spp.). Four primer pairs, amplifying ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments, were tested on N. bombi and the related microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, both of which infect honey bees. Only primer pair Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 could distinguish N. bombi (323bp amplicon) from these other bee parasites. Primer pairs Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 and ITS-f2/r2 were then tested for their sensitivity with N. bombi spore concentrations from 10(7) down to 10 spores diluted in 100 microl of either (i) water or (ii) host bumble bee homogenate to simulate natural N. bombi infection (equivalent to the DNA from 10(6) spores down to 1 spore per PCR). Though the N. bombi-specific primer pair Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 was relatively insensitive, as few as 10 spores per extract (equivalent to 1 spore per PCR) were detectable using the N. bombi-non-specific primer pair ITS-f2/r2, which amplifies a short fragment of approximately 120 bp. Testing 99 bumble bees for N. bombi infection by light microscopy versus PCR diagnosis with the highly sensitive primer pair ITS-f2/r2 showed the latter to be more accurate. PCR diagnosis of N. bombi using a combination of two primer pairs (Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 and ITS-f2/r2) provides increased specificity, sensitivity, and detection of all developmental stages compared with light microscopy.

  13. Misexpression of AtTX12 encoding a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain induces growth defects and expression of defense-related genes partially independently of EDS1 in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang-Kee

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a tissue-specific GAL4/UAS activation tagging system was used for the characterization of genes which could induce lethality when ubiquitously expressed. A dominant mutant exhibiting stunted growth was isolated and named defective root development 1-D (drd1-D). The T-DNA tag was located within the promoter region of AtTX12, which is predicted to encode a truncated nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) protein, containing a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. The transcript levels of AtTX12 and defense-related genes were elevated in drd1-D, and the misexpression of AtTX12 recapitulated the drd1-D phenotypes. In the presence of ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 (EDS1), a key transducer of signals triggered by TIR-type NLRs, a low-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced strong defective phenotypes including seedling lethality whereas, in the absence of EDS1, a high-level of AtTX12 misexpression induced weak growth defects like dwarfism, suggesting that AtTX12 might function mainly in an EDS1-dependent and partially in an EDS1-independent manner. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(12): 693–698] PMID:27802841

  14. Expression of the cefG gene is limiting for cephalosporin biosynthesis in Acremonium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, S; Velasco, J; Marcos, A T; Fernández, F J; Fierro, F; Barredo, J L; Díez, B; Martín, J F

    1997-11-01

    The conversion of deacetylcephalosporin C to cephalosporin C is inefficient in most Acremonium chrysogenum strains. The cefG gene, which encodes deacetylcephalosporin C acetyltransferase, is expressed very poorly in A. chrysogenum as compared to other genes of the cephalosporin pathway. Introduction of additional copies of the cefG gene with its native promoter (in two different constructions with upstream regions of 1056 bp and 538 bp respectively) did not produce a significant increase of the steady-state level of the cefG transcript. Expression of the cefG gene from the promoters of (i) the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) gene of Aspergillus nidulans, (ii) the glucoamylase (gla) gene of Aspergillus niger, (iii) the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) and (iv) the isopenicillin N synthase (pcbC) genes of Penicillium chrysogenum, led to very high steady-state levels of cefG transcript and to increased deacetylcephalosporin-C acetyltransferase protein concentration (as shown by immunoblotting) and enzyme activity in the transformants. Southern analysis showed that integration of the new constructions occurred at sites different from that of the endogenous cefG gene. Cephalosporin production was increased two- to threefold in A. chrysogenum C10 transformed with constructions in which the cefG gene was expressed from the gdh or gpd promoters as a result of a more efficient acetylation of deacetylcephalosporin C.

  15. Genes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Genes URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  16. A new genus and species of Brachycoeliidae (Digenea) from Chiropterotriton sp. (Caudata: Plethodontidae) in Mexico and its phylogenetic position within the Plagiorchiida based on partial sequences of the 28S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    de León, G Pérez-Ponce; Mendoza-Garfias, B; Razo-Mendivil, U; Parra-Olea, G

    2011-02-01

    Parabrachycoelium longicaecum n. gen., n. sp. (Digenea: Brachycoeliidae) is described from the intestine of a plethodontid salamander Chiropterotriton sp. Hosts were collected in bromeliads at the cloud forest of Tlaquilpa, Veracruz, Mexico. Members of the Brachycoeliidae Looss, 1899 (sensu Yamaguti, 1971) are characterized by having a spined tegument; ceca usually short, not passing level of gonads, but longer in some species; gonads posterior to, or in region of, acetabulum, with ovary anterior to testes; a well developed cirrus pouch containing a bipartite seminal vesicle; and uterus occupying entire hind-body posterior to testes. However, this combination of morphological traits prevents the inclusion of the new taxon in any of the genera in that family; a new genus was, therefore, erected to accommodate the new species. The new taxon is readily distinguished from members belonging to Brachycoelium Dujardin, 1845, Mesocoelium Odhner, 1910, and Tremiorchis Mehra and Negi, 1925, by having long ceca extending into the posterior third of the body, slightly surpassing the testes, and vitellaria extending along the body. The new species morphologically resembles Caudouterina rhyacotritoni Martin, 1966, a digenean parasitizing a plethodontid salamander; however, the latter species lacks spines in the tegument and is actually placed within the Allocreadiidae. To demonstrate further the phylogenetic position of the new taxon, we sequenced the D1-D3 regions of 28S rRNA gene and conducted a phylogenetic analysis of available sequences for the order to which brachycoeliids belong (Plagiorchiida). Sequence divergence of the partial 28S rRNA gene confirms its distinction from the aforementioned brachycoeliids, and the phylogenetic position within the Plagiorchiida places the new species as closely related to a clade formed by Brachycoelium + Mesocoelium. Divergence levels and phylogenetic position within the Plagiorchiida verifies the validity of the new genus and its

  17. Detection of Multiple Budding Yeast Cells and a Partial Sequence of 43-kDa Glycoprotein Coding Gene of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from a Case of Lacaziosis in a Female Pacific White-Sided Dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens).

    PubMed

    Minakawa, Tomoko; Ueda, Keiichi; Tanaka, Miyuu; Tanaka, Natsuki; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Izawa, Takeshi; Konno, Toshihiro; Yamate, Jyoji; Itano, Eiko Nakagawa; Sano, Ayako; Wada, Shinpei

    2016-08-01

    Lacaziosis, formerly called as lobomycosis, is a zoonotic mycosis, caused by Lacazia loboi, found in humans and dolphins, and is endemic in the countries on the Atlantic Ocean, Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean of Japanese coast. Susceptible Cetacean species include the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), the Indian Ocean bottlenose dolphin (T. aduncus), and the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis); however, no cases have been recorded in other Cetacean species. We diagnosed a case of Lacaziosis in a Pacific white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus obliquidens) nursing in an aquarium in Japan. The dolphin was a female estimated to be more than 14 years old at the end of June 2015 and was captured in a coast of Japan Sea in 2001. Multiple, lobose, and solid granulomatous lesions with or without ulcers appeared on her jaw, back, flipper and fluke skin, in July 2014. The granulomatous skin lesions from the present case were similar to those of our previous cases. Multiple budding and chains of round yeast cells were detected in the biopsied samples. The partial sequence of 43-kDa glycoprotein coding gene confirmed by a nested PCR and sequencing, which revealed a different genotype from both Amazonian and Japanese lacaziosis in bottlenose dolphins, and was 99 % identical to those derived from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis; a sister fungal species to L. loboi. This is the first case of lacaziosis in Pacific white-sided dolphin.

  18. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  19. Gene Copy-Number Variations (CNVs) and Protein Levels of Complement C4A and C4B as Novel Biomarkers for Partial Disease Remissions in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kingery, Suzanne E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Zhou, Bi; Hoffman, Robert P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the roles of complement C4A and C4B gene CNVs and their plasma protein concentrations in residual insulin secretion and loss of pancreatic beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes patients. Methods We studied 34 patients of European ancestry with new-onset type 1 diabetes, aged between 3 and 17 years (10.7±3.45), at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Gene copy-number and size variations of complement C4A and C4B were determined by genomic Southern blot analyses. C4A and C4B protein phenotypes were elucidated by immunofixation and radial immunodiffusion. Two-digit HLA-DRB1 genotypes were determined by sequence-specific PCR. At 1 month and 9-month post diagnosis, stimulated C-peptide levels were measured after a standardized mixed-meal tolerance test. Results The diploid gene copy-numbers of C4A varied from 0 to 4, and those of C4B from 0 to 3. Patients with higher copy-number of C4A or higher C4A plasma protein concentrations at diagnosis had higher C-peptide levels at 1 month post diagnosis (p=0.008; p=0.008). When controlled by the Z-score of body-mass index, C4A copy-numbers, C4A protein concentrations, the age of disease-onset, the number of HLA-DR3 but not DR4 alleles were significant parameters in determining C-peptide levels. At 9-month post diagnosis, 42.3% of patients remained in partial remission, and these patients were characterized by lower total C4B copy-numbers or lower C4B protein concentrations (p=0.02, p=0.0004). Conclusions C4A appears to associate with the protection of residual beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes; C4B is correlated with the end of disease remission at 9-month post diagnosis. PMID:22151770

  20. Molecular characterization, function and regulation of ammonium transporters (Amt) and ammonium-metabolizing enzymes (GS, NADP-GDH) in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma cylindrosporum.

    PubMed

    Javelle, Arnaud; Morel, Mélanie; Rodríguez-Pastrana, Blanca-Rosa; Botton, Bernard; André, Bruno; Marini, Anne-Marie; Brun, Annick; Chalot, Michel

    2003-01-01

    External hyphae, which play a key role in nitrogen nutrition of trees, are considered as the absorbing structures of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, we have cloned and characterized Hebeloma cylindrosporum AMT1, GLNA and GDHA genes, which encode a third ammonium transporter, a glutamine synthetase and an NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase respectively. Amt1 can fully restore the pseudohyphal growth defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mep2 mutant, and this is the first evidence that a heterologous member of the Mep/Amt family complements this dimorphic change defect. Dixon plots of the inhibition of methylamine uptake by ammonium indicate that Amt1 has a much higher affinity than the two previously characterized members (Amt2 and Amt3) of the Amt/Mep family in H. cylindrosporum. We also identified the intracellular nitrogen pool(s) responsible for the modulation of expression of AMT1, AMT2, AMT3, GDHA and GLNA. In response to exogenously supplied ammonium or glutamine, AMT1, AMT2 and GDHA were downregulated and, therefore, these genes are subjected to nitrogen repression in H. cylindrosporum. Exogenously supplied nitrate failed to induce a downregulation of the five mRNAs after transfer of mycelia from a N-starved condition. Our results demonstrate that glutamine is the main effector for AMT1 and AMT2 repression, whereas GDHA repression is controlled by intracellular ammonium, independently of the intracellular glutamine or glutamate concentration. Ammonium transport activity may be controlled by intracellular NH4+. AMT3 and GLNA are highly expressed but not highly regulated. A model for ammonium assimilation in H. cylindrosporum is presented.

  1. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  2. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  3. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  4. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, Jie

    2010-07-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  5. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Parul; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT), ammonium transporters (AMT), nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), asparagines synthetase (ASN) were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl), osmotic (250 mM Mannitol), cold (4°C) and heat (42°C) stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h), which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses. PMID:26605918

  6. Abiotic Stresses Downregulate Key Genes Involved in Nitrogen Uptake and Assimilation in Brassica juncea L.

    PubMed

    Goel, Parul; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought and extreme temperatures affect nitrogen (N) uptake and assimilation in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of N pathway genes at transcriptional level under abiotic stress conditions in Brassica juncea. In the present work, genes encoding nitrate transporters (NRT), ammonium transporters (AMT), nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase (NiR), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutamate synthase (GOGAT), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), asparagines synthetase (ASN) were cloned from Brassica juncea L. var. Varuna. The deduced protein sequences were analyzed to predict their subcellular localization, which confirmed localization of all the proteins in their respective cellular organelles. The protein sequences were also subjected to conserved domain identification, which confirmed presence of characteristic domains in all the proteins, indicating their putative functions. Moreover, expression of these genes was studied after 1h and 24h of salt (150 mM NaCl), osmotic (250 mM Mannitol), cold (4°C) and heat (42°C) stresses. Most of the genes encoding nitrate transporters and enzymes responsible for N assimilation and remobilization were found to be downregulated under abiotic stresses. The expression of BjAMT1.2, BjAMT2, BjGS1.1, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 1hr, while expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT2.1, BjNiR1, BjAMT2, BjGDH1 and BjASN2 was downregulated after 24h of all the stress treatments. However, expression of BjNRT1.1, BjNRT1.5 and BjGDH2 was upregulated after 1h of all stress treatments, while no gene was found to be upregulated after 24h of stress treatments, commonly. These observations indicate that expression of most of the genes is adversely affected under abiotic stress conditions, particularly under prolonged stress exposure (24h), which may be one of the reasons of reduction in plant growth and development under abiotic stresses.

  7. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  8. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  9. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  10. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  11. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  12. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  13. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  14. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  15. Cloning of a yeast gene coding for the glutamate synthase small subunit (GUS2) by complementation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs.

    PubMed

    González, A; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Olivera, H; Aranda, C; Macino, G; Ballario, P

    1992-02-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate auxotroph, lacking NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities, was complemented with a yeast genomic library. Clones were obtained which still lacked NADP-GDH but showed GOGAT activity. Northern analysis revealed that the DNA fragment present in the complementing plasmids coded for a 1.5kb mRNA. Since the only GOGAT enzyme so far purified from S. cerevisiae is made up of a small and a large subunit, the size of the mRNA suggested that the cloned DNA fragment could code for the GOGAT small subunit. Plasmids were purified and used to transform Escherichia coli glutamate auxotrophs. Transformants were only recovered when the recipient strain was an E. coli GDH-less mutant lacking the small GOGAT subunit. These data show that we have cloned the structural gene coding for the yeast small subunit (GUS2). Evidence is also presented indicating that the GOGAT enzyme which is synthesized in the E. coli transformants is a hybrid comprising the large E. coli subunit and the small S. cerevisiae subunit.

  16. Partial gravity habitat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capps, Stephen; Lorandos, Jason; Akhidime, Eval; Bunch, Michael; Lund, Denise; Moore, Nathan; Murakawa, Kiosuke

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate comprehensive design requirements associated with designing habitats for humans in a partial gravity environment, then to apply them to a lunar base design. Other potential sites for application include planetary surfaces such as Mars, variable-gravity research facilities, and a rotating spacecraft. Design requirements for partial gravity environments include locomotion changes in less than normal earth gravity; facility design issues, such as interior configuration, module diameter, and geometry; and volumetric requirements based on the previous as well as psychological issues involved in prolonged isolation. For application to a lunar base, it is necessary to study the exterior architecture and configuration to insure optimum circulation patterns while providing dual egress; radiation protection issues are addressed to provide a safe and healthy environment for the crew; and finally, the overall site is studied to locate all associated facilities in context with the habitat. Mission planning is not the purpose of this study; therefore, a Lockheed scenario is used as an outline for the lunar base application, which is then modified to meet the project needs. The goal of this report is to formulate facts on human reactions to partial gravity environments, derive design requirements based on these facts, and apply the requirements to a partial gravity situation which, for this study, was a lunar base.

  17. Swallowed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Syed; Walter, John; Smith, Wendy; Latis, Sergios

    2004-01-01

    Swallowed or inhaled partial dentures can present a diagnostic challenge. Three new cases are described, one of them near-fatal because of vascular erosion and haemorrhage. The published work points to the importance of good design and proper maintenance. The key to early recognition is awareness of the hazard by denture-wearers, carers and clinicians. PMID:14749401

  18. Dilemmas of partial cooperation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    Related to the often applied cooperation models of social dilemmas, we deal with scenarios in which defection dominates cooperation, but an intermediate fraction of cooperators, that is, "partial cooperation," would maximize the overall performance of a group of individuals. Of course, such a solution comes at the expense of cooperators that do not profit from the overall maximum. However, because there are mechanisms accounting for mutual benefits after repeated interactions or through evolutionary mechanisms, such situations can constitute "dilemmas" of partial cooperation. Among the 12 ordinally distinct, symmetrical 2 x 2 games, three (barely considered) variants are correspondents of such dilemmas. Whereas some previous studies investigated particular instances of such games, we here provide the unifying framework and concisely relate it to the broad literature on cooperation in social dilemmas. Complementing our argumentation, we study the evolution of partial cooperation by deriving the respective conditions under which coexistence of cooperators and defectors, that is, partial cooperation, can be a stable outcome of evolutionary dynamics in these scenarios. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such models for research on the large biodiversity and variation in cooperative efforts both in biological and social systems.

  19. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  20. L-Theanine Content and Related Gene Expression: Novel Insights into Theanine Biosynthesis and Hydrolysis among Different Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.) Tissues and Cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hui; Wang, Yong-Xin; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    L-Theanine content has tissues and cultivars specificity in tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.), the correlations of theanine metabolic related genes expression profiles with theanine contents were explored in this study. L-theanine contents in the bud and 1st leaf, 2nd leaf, 3rd leaf, old leaf, stem, and lateral root were determined by HPLC from three C. sinensis cultivars, namely ‘Huangjinya’, ‘Anjibaicha’, and ‘Yingshuang’, respectively. The theanine contents in leaves and root of ‘Huangjinya’ were the highest, followed by ‘Anjibaicha’, and ‘Yingshuang’. The theanine contents in the leaves reduced as the leaf mature gradually, and in stem were the least. Seventeen genes encoding enzymes involved in theanine metabolism were identified from GenBank and our tea transcriptome database, including CsTS1, CsTS2, CsGS1, CsGS2, CsGOGAT-Fe, CsGOGAT-NAD(P)H, CsGDH1, CsGDH2, CsALT, CsSAMDC, CsADC, CsCuAO, CsPAO, CsNiR, CsNR, CsGGT1, and CsGGT3. The transcript profiles of those seventeen genes in the different tissues of three tea plant cultivars were analyzed comparatively. Among the different cultivars, the transcript levels of most selected genes in ‘Huangjinya’ were significantly higher than that in the ‘Anjibaicha’ and ‘Yingshuang’. Among the different tissues, the transcript levels of CsTS2, CsGS1, and CsGDH2 almost showed positive correlation with the theanine contents, while the other genes showed negative correlation with the theanine contents in most cases. The theanine contents showed correlations with related genes expression levels among cultivars and tissues of tea plant, and were determined by the integrated effect of the metabolic related genes. PMID:28439281

  1. L-Theanine Content and Related Gene Expression: Novel Insights into Theanine Biosynthesis and Hydrolysis among Different Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.) Tissues and Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Li, Hui; Wang, Yong-Xin; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    L-Theanine content has tissues and cultivars specificity in tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.), the correlations of theanine metabolic related genes expression profiles with theanine contents were explored in this study. L-theanine contents in the bud and 1st leaf, 2nd leaf, 3rd leaf, old leaf, stem, and lateral root were determined by HPLC from three C. sinensis cultivars, namely 'Huangjinya', 'Anjibaicha', and 'Yingshuang', respectively. The theanine contents in leaves and root of 'Huangjinya' were the highest, followed by 'Anjibaicha', and 'Yingshuang'. The theanine contents in the leaves reduced as the leaf mature gradually, and in stem were the least. Seventeen genes encoding enzymes involved in theanine metabolism were identified from GenBank and our tea transcriptome database, including CsTS1, CsTS2, CsGS1, CsGS2, CsGOGAT-Fe, CsGOGAT-NAD(P)H, CsGDH1, CsGDH2, CsALT, CsSAMDC, CsADC, CsCuAO, CsPAO, CsNiR, CsNR, CsGGT1, and CsGGT3. The transcript profiles of those seventeen genes in the different tissues of three tea plant cultivars were analyzed comparatively. Among the different cultivars, the transcript levels of most selected genes in 'Huangjinya' were significantly higher than that in the 'Anjibaicha' and 'Yingshuang'. Among the different tissues, the transcript levels of CsTS2, CsGS1, and CsGDH2 almost showed positive correlation with the theanine contents, while the other genes showed negative correlation with the theanine contents in most cases. The theanine contents showed correlations with related genes expression levels among cultivars and tissues of tea plant, and were determined by the integrated effect of the metabolic related genes.

  2. Partial correction of the CNS lysosomal storage defect in a mouse model of juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis by neonatal CNS administration of an adeno-associated virus serotype rh.10 vector expressing the human CLN3 gene.

    PubMed

    Sondhi, Dolan; Scott, Emma C; Chen, Alvin; Hackett, Neil R; Wong, Andrew M S; Kubiak, Agnieszka; Nelvagal, Hemanth R; Pearse, Yewande; Cotman, Susan L; Cooper, Jonathan D; Crystal, Ronald G

    2014-03-01

    Juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL or CLN3 disease) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disease resulting from mutations in the CLN3 gene that encodes a lysosomal membrane protein. The disease primarily affects the brain with widespread intralysosomal accumulation of autofluorescent material and fibrillary gliosis, as well as the loss of specific neuronal populations. As an experimental treatment for the CNS manifestations of JNCL, we have developed a serotype rh.10 adeno-associated virus vector expressing the human CLN3 cDNA (AAVrh.10hCLN3). We hypothesized that administration of AAVrh.10hCLN3 to the Cln3(Δex7/8) knock-in mouse model of JNCL would reverse the lysosomal storage defect, as well as have a therapeutic effect on gliosis and neuron loss. Newborn Cln3(Δex7/8) mice were administered 3 × 10(10) genome copies of AAVrh.10hCLN3 to the brain, with control groups including untreated Cln3(Δex7/8) mice and wild-type littermate mice. After 18 months, CLN3 transgene expression was detected in various locations throughout the brain, particularly in the hippocampus and deep anterior cortical regions. Changes in the CNS neuronal lysosomal accumulation of storage material were assessed by immunodetection of subunit C of ATP synthase, luxol fast blue staining, and periodic acid-Schiff staining. For all parameters, Cln3(Δex7/8) mice exhibited abnormal lysosomal accumulation, but AAVrh.10hCLN3 administration resulted in significant reductions in storage material burden. There was also a significant decrease in gliosis in AAVrh.10hCLN3-treated Cln3(Δex7/8) mice, and a trend toward improved neuron counts, compared with their untreated counterparts. These data demonstrate that AAVrh.10 delivery of a wild-type cDNA to the CNS is not harmful and instead provides a partial correction of the neurological lysosomal storage defect of a disease caused by a lysosomal membrane protein, indicating that this may be an effective therapeutic strategy for JNCL and

  3. Identification and characterization of rhizospheric microbial diversity by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Naveed, Muhammad; Mubeen, Samavia; khan, SamiUllah; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Khalid, Nauman; Suleria, Hafiz Ansar Rasul; Bano, Asghari; Mumtaz, Abdul Samad

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, samples of rhizosphere and root nodules were collected from different areas of Pakistan to isolate plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Identification of bacterial isolates was made by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and taxonomical confirmation on EzTaxon Server. The identified bacterial strains were belonged to 5 genera i.e. Ensifer, Bacillus, Pseudomona, Leclercia and Rhizobium. Phylogenetic analysis inferred from 16S rRNA gene sequences showed the evolutionary relationship of bacterial strains with the respective genera. Based on phylogenetic analysis, some candidate novel species were also identified. The bacterial strains were also characterized for morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and glucose dehydrogenase (gdh) gene that involved in the phosphate solublization using cofactor pyrroloquinolone quinone (PQQ). Seven rhizoshperic and 3 root nodulating stains are positive for gdh gene. Furthermore, this study confirms a novel association between microbes and their hosts like field grown crops, leguminous and non-leguminous plants. It was concluded that a diverse group of bacterial population exist in the rhizosphere and root nodules that might be useful in evaluating the mechanisms behind plant microbial interactions and strains QAU-63 and QAU-68 have sequence similarity of 97 and 95% which might be declared as novel after further taxonomic characterization. PMID:25477935

  4. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  5. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  6. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  7. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  8. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  9. Activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is a commonly used coagulation assay that is easy to perform, is affordable, and is therefore performed in most coagulation laboratories, both clinical and research, worldwide. The APTT is based on the principle that in citrated plasma, the addition of a platelet substitute, factor XII activator, and CaCl2 allows for formation of a stable clot. The time required for the formation of a stable clot is recorded in seconds and represents the actual APTT result.

  10. GDH Integral on the Proton from Asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Prok, Yelena

    2004-05-01

    Inclusive double spin electron asymmetries have been measured by scattering polarized electrons off the solid polarized 15NH3 target in Hall B of Jefferson Lab in 2000-2001. The virtual photon asymmetry A1 (x), the longitudinal spin structure function, g1 (x, Q2), and the first moment, γ1p, have been evaluated for a kinematic range of 0.05 ≥ Q2 ≥ 4.5 GeV2. The extracted results complement the existing data in the resonance region, extending it to lower and higher Q2 regions. The results are important in the study of Q2 evolution of nucleon structure from the hadronic to partonic degrees of freedom.

  11. Comparison of growth on mannitol salt agar, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, VITEK(®) 2 with partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Ayeni, Funmilola A; Andersen, Camilla; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2017-04-01

    Mannitol salt agar (MSA) is often used in resources' limited laboratories for identification of S. aureus however, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) grows and ferments mannitol on MSA. 171 strains of CoNS which have been previously misidentified as S. aureus due to growth on MSA were collected from different locations in Nigeria and two methods for identification of CoNS were compared i.e. ViTEK 2 and MALDI-TOF MS with partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing as gold standard. Partial tuf gene sequencing was used for contradicting identification. All 171 strains (13 species) grew on MSA and ferments mannitol. All tested strains of S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. nepalensis, S. pasteuri, S. sciuri,, S. warneri, S. xylosus, S. capitis were correctly identified by MALDI-TOF while variable identification were observed in S. saprophyticus and S. cohnii (90%, 81%). There was low identification of S. arlettae (14%) while all strains of S. kloosii and S. gallinarum were misidentified. There is absence of S. gallinarum in the MALDI-TOF database at the period of this study. All tested strains of S. epidermidis, S. gallinarum, S. haemolyticus, S. sciuri,, S. warneri, S. xylosus and S. capitis were correctly identified by ViTEK while variable identification were observed in S. saprophyticus, S. arlettae, S. cohnii, S. kloosii, (84%, 86%, 75%, 60%) and misidentification of S. nepalensis, S. pasteuri. Partial sequencing of 16S rRNA gene was used as gold standard for most strains except S. capitis and S. xylosus where the two species were misidentified by partial sequencing of 16S rRNA contrary to MALDI-TOF and ViTEK identification. Tuf gene sequencing was used for correct identification. Characteristic growth on MSA for CoNS is also identical to S. aureus growth on the media and therefore, MSA could not differentiate between S. aureus and CoNS. The percentage accuracy of ViTEK was better than MALDI-TOF in identification of CoNS. Although partial sequencing of

  12. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Kwak, Dong Shin; Jung, In Sub; Kwak, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Hwan; Hong, Sang Mo; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Dong Sun; Choi, Woong Hwan; Ahn, You Hern

    2015-06-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation.

  13. Partial Southwest Elevation Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (with Section of Courtyard) (Parts 1 & 2) - Boott Cotton Mills, John Street at Merrimack River, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  14. Paternalism and partial autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, O

    1984-01-01

    A contrast is often drawn between standard adult capacities for autonomy, which allow informed consent to be given or withheld, and patients' reduced capacities, which demand paternalistic treatment. But patients may not be radically different from the rest of us, in that all human capacities for autonomous action are limited. An adequate account of paternalism and the role that consent and respect for persons can play in medical and other practice has to be developed within an ethical theory that does not impose an idealised picture of unlimited autonomy but allows for the variable and partial character of actual human autonomy. PMID:6520849

  15. Heterologous expression of pyrroloquinoline quinone (pqq) gene cluster confers mineral phosphate solubilization ability to Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z67.

    PubMed

    Wagh, Jitendra; Shah, Sonal; Bhandari, Praveena; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2014-06-01

    Gluconic acid secretion mediated by the direct oxidation of glucose by pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) is responsible for mineral phosphate solubilization in Gram-negative bacteria. Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z67 (ATCC 35892) genome encodes GDH apoprotein but lacks genes for the biosynthesis of its cofactor PQQ. In this study, pqqE of Erwinia herbicola (in plasmid pJNK1) and pqq gene clusters of Pseudomonas fluorescens B16 (pOK53) and Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (pSS2) were over-expressed in H. seropedicae Z67. Transformants Hs (pSS2) and Hs (pOK53) secreted micromolar levels of PQQ and attained high GDH activity leading to secretion of 33.46 mM gluconic acid when grown on 50 mM glucose while Hs (pJNK1) was ineffective. Hs (pJNK1) failed to solubilize rock phosphate, while Hs (pSS2) and Hs (pOK53) liberated 125.47 μM and 168.07 μM P, respectively, in minimal medium containing 50 mM glucose under aerobic conditions. Moreover, under N-free minimal medium, Hs (pSS2) and Hs (pOK53) not only released significant P but also showed enhanced growth, biofilm formation, and exopolysaccharide (EPS) secretion. However, indole acetic acid (IAA) production was suppressed. Thus, the addition of the pqq gene cluster, but not pqqE alone, is sufficient for engineering phosphate solubilization in H. seropedicae Z67 without compromising growth under nitrogen-fixing conditions.

  16. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  17. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  18. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  19. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  1. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  2. Influence of Partial Pressure of Oxygen in Blood Samples on Measurement Performance in Glucose-Oxidase-Based Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Baumstark, Annette; Schmid, Christina; Pleus, Stefan; Haug, Cornelia; Freckmann, Guido

    2013-01-01

    Background Partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in blood samples can affect blood glucose (BG) measurements, particularly in systems that employ the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme reaction on test strips. In this study, we assessed the impact of different pO2 values on the performance of five GOx systems and one glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) system. Two of the GOx systems are labeled by the manufacturers to be sensitive to increased blood oxygen content, while the other three GOx systems are not. Methods Aliquots of 20 venous samples were adjusted to the following pO2 values: <45, ~70, and ≥150 mmHg. For each system, five consecutive measurements on each sample aliquot were performed using the same test strip lot. Relative differences between the mean BG results at pO2 ~70 mmHg, which is considered to be similar to pO2 in capillary blood samples, and the mean BG result at pO2 <45 and ≥150 mmHg were calculated. Results For all tested GOx systems, mean relative differences in the BG measurement results were between 6.1% and 22.6% at pO2 <45 mmHg and between -7.9% and -14.9% at pO2 ≥150 mmHg. For both pO2 levels, relative differences of all tested GOx systems were significant (p < .0001). The GDH system showed mean relative differences of -1.0% and -0.4% at pO2 values <45 and ≥150 mmHg, respectively, which were not significant. Conclusions These data suggest that capillary blood pO2 variations lead to clinically relevant BG measurement deviations in GOx systems, even in GOx systems that are not labeled as being oxygen sensitive. PMID:24351177

  3. Influence of partial pressure of oxygen in blood samples on measurement performance in glucose-oxidase-based systems for self-monitoring of blood glucose.

    PubMed

    Baumstark, Annette; Schmid, Christina; Pleus, Stefan; Haug, Cornelia; Freckmann, Guido

    2013-11-01

    Partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in blood samples can affect blood glucose (BG) measurements, particularly in systems that employ the glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme reaction on test strips. In this study, we assessed the impact of different pO2 values on the performance of five GOx systems and one glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) system. Two of the GOx systems are labeled by the manufacturers to be sensitive to increased blood oxygen content, while the other three GOx systems are not. Aliquots of 20 venous samples were adjusted to the following pO2 values: <45, ~70, and ≥150 mmHg. For each system, five consecutive measurements on each sample aliquot were performed using the same test strip lot. Relative differences between the mean BG results at pO2 ~70 mmHg, which is considered to be similar to pO2 in capillary blood samples, and the mean BG result at pO2 <45 and ≥150 mmHg were calculated. For all tested GOx systems, mean relative differences in the BG measurement results were between 6.1% and 22.6% at pO2 <45 mmHg and between -7.9% and -14.9% at pO2 ≥150 mmHg. For both pO2 levels, relative differences of all tested GOx systems were significant (p < .0001). The GDH system showed mean relative differences of -1.0% and -0.4% at pO2 values <45 and ≥150 mmHg, respectively, which were not significant. These data suggest that capillary blood pO2 variations lead to clinically relevant BG measurement deviations in GOx systems, even in GOx systems that are not labeled as being oxygen sensitive. © 2013 Diabetes Technology Society.

  4. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  5. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  6. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  7. Improvement of a Sulfolobus-E. coli shuttle vector for heterologous gene expression in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sungmin; Choi, Kyoung-Hwa; Yoon, Naeun; Cha, Jaeho

    2015-02-01

    A Sulfolobus-E. coli shuttle vector for an efficient expression of the target gene in S. acidocaldarius strain was constructed. The plasmid-based vector pSM21 and its derivative pSM21N were generated based on the pUC18 and Sulfolobus cryptic plasmid pRN1. They carried the S. solfataricus P2 pyrEF gene for the selection marker, a multiple cloning site (MCS) with C-terminal histidine tag, and a constitutive promoter of the S. acidocaldarius gdhA gene for strong expression of the target gene, as well as the pBR322 origin and ampicillin-resistant gene for E. coli propagation. The advantage of pSM21 over other Sulfolobus shuttle vectors is that it contains a MCS and a histidine tag for the simple and easy cloning of a target gene as well as one-step purification by histidine affinity chromatography. For successful expression of the foreign genes, two genes from archaeal origins (PH0193 and Ta0298) were cloned into pSM21N and the functional expression was examined by enzyme activity assay. The recombinant PH0193 was successfully expressed under the control of the gdhA promoter and purified from the cultures by His-tag affinity chromatography. The yield was approximately 1 mg of protein per liter of cultures. The enzyme activity measurements of PH0913 and Ta0298 revealed that both proteins were expressed as an active form in S. acidocaldarius. These results indicate that the pSM21N shuttle vector can be used for the functional expression of foreign archaeal genes that form insoluble aggregates in the E. coli system.

  8. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  9. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  10. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Benjamin F; Beard, Hunter; Brewer, Eric; Kabir, Sara; MacDonald, Margaret H; Youssef, Reham M

    2014-04-16

    Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes.

  11. NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase is essential for the survival of Arabidopsis thaliana during dark-induced carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yo; Good, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Interconversion between glutamate and 2-oxoglutarate, which can be catalysed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), is a key reaction in plant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism. However, the physiological role of plant GDH has been a controversial issue for several decades. To elucidate the function of GDH, the expression of GDH in various tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied. Results suggested that the expression of two Arabidopsis GDH genes was differently regulated depending on the organ/tissue types and cellular C availability. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants defective in GDH genes were identified and characterized. The two isolated mutants, gdh1-2 and gdh2-1, were crossed to make a double knockout mutant, gdh1-2/gdh2-1, which contained negligible levels of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity. Phenotypic analysis on these mutants revealed an increased susceptibility of gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants to C-deficient conditions. This conditional phenotype of the double knockout mutant supports the catabolic role of GDH and its role in fuelling the TCA cycle during C starvation. The reduced rate of glutamate catabolism in the gdh2-1 and gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants was also evident by the growth retardation of these mutants when glutamate was supplied as the alternative N source. Furthermore, amino acid profiles during prolonged dark conditions were significantly different between WT and the gdh mutant plants. For instance, glutamate levels increased in WT plants but decreased in gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants, and aberrant accumulation of several amino acids was detected in the gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants. These results suggest that GDH plays a central role in amino acid breakdown under C-deficient conditions.

  12. Partial disassembly of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rat liver peroxisomes were subjected to a variety of procedures intended to partially disassemble or damage them; the effects were analyzed by recentrifugation into sucrose gradients, enzyme analyses, electron microscopy, and SDS PAGE. Freezing and thawing or mild sonication released some matrix proteins and produced apparently intact peroxisomal "ghosts" with crystalloid cores and some fuzzy fibrillar content. Vigorous sonication broke open the peroxisomes but the membranes remained associated with cores and fibrillar and amorphous matrix material. The density of both ghosts and more severely damaged peroxisomes was approximately 1.23. Pyrophosphate (pH 9) treatment solubilized the fibrillar content, yielding ghosts that were empty except for cores. Some matrix proteins such as catalase and thiolase readily leak from peroxisomes. Other proteins were identified that remain in mechanically damaged peroxisomes but are neither core nor membrane proteins because they can be released by pyrophosphate treatment. These constitute a class of poorly soluble matrix proteins that appear to correspond to the fibrillar material observed morphologically. All of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes are located in the matrix, but they vary greatly in how easily they leak out. Palmitoyl coenzyme A synthetase is in the membrane, based on its co-distribution with the 22-kilodalton integral membrane polypeptide. PMID:2989301

  13. Partially solidified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The evolution of magmas is a topic of considerable importance in geology and geophysics because it affects volcanology, igneous petrology, geothermal energy sources, mantle convection, and the thermaland chemical evolution of the earth. The dynamics and evolution of magmas are strongly affected by the presence of solid crystals that occur either in suspension in liquid or as a rigid porous matrix through which liquid magma can percolate. Such systems are physically complex and difficult to model mathematically. Similar physical situations are encountered by metallurgists who study the solidification of molten alloys, and applied mathematicians have long been interested in such moving boundary problems. Clearly, it would be of mutual benefit to bring together scientists, engineers, and mathematicians with a common interest in such systems. Such a meeting is being organized as a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advanced Research Workshop on the Structure and Dynamics of Partially Solidified Systems, to be held at Stanford University's Fallen Leaf Lodge at Tahoe, Calif., May 12-16, 1986 The invited speakers and their topics are

  14. Removable partial denture occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, John R; Plummer, Kevin D

    2004-07-01

    No single occlusal morphology, scheme, or material will successfully treat all patients. Many patients have been treated, both successfully and unsuccessfully, using widely varying theories of occlusion, choices of posterior tooth form, and restorative materials. Therefore, experience has demonstrated that there is no one righ r way to restore the occlusion of all patients. Partially edentulous patients have many and varied needs. Clinicians must understand the healthy physiologic gnathostomatic system and properly diagnose what is or may become pathologic. Henderson [3] stated that the occlusion of the successfully treated patient allows the masticating mechanism to carry out its physiologic functions while the temporomandibular joints, the neuromuscular mechanism, the teeth and their supporting structures remain in a good state of health. Skills in diagnosis and treatment planning are of utmost importance in treating these patients, for whom the clinician's goals are not only an esthetic and functional restoration but also a lasting harmonious state. Perhaps this was best state by DeVan [55] more than 60 years ago in his often-quoted objective. "The patient's fundamental need is the continued meticulous restoration of what is missing, since what is lost is in a sense irretrievably lost." Because it is clear that there is no one method, no one occlusal scheme, or one material that guarantees success for all patients, recommendations for consideration when establishing or reestablishing occlusal schemes have been presented. These recommendations must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic and technical skills.

  15. [Post traumatic partial seizures].

    PubMed

    Carvajal, P; Almárcegui, C; Pablo, M J; Peralta, P; Bernal, M; Valdizán, J R

    Post traumatic epilepsy represents 4% of the prevalence of the disorder and is one of the sequelas which is most difficult to prevent. Risk factors have been described to predict the appearance of seizures. A seven year old boy with a severe head injury was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit. On neuroimaging studies there were multiple foci of contusion, mainly in the left hemisphere, and blood in the III and IV ventricles and frontal horn of the left lateral ventricle. The patient had severe sequelae of head injury with a right spastic hemiplegia and hemiparesia with hypertony of the left side, together with complete blindness of both eyes due to bilateral atrophy of the optic nerve. Serial EEG were done, in which a recording showed alternating periods of hypervoltage grapho elements superimposed on a trace of very low voltage, with continuous activity of low voltage and low frequency. There were no grapho elements with acute morphology. However, the patient had a first partial seizure a year and a half after his head injury. On the EEG an epileptogenic focus was identified in the left hemisphere. Within two years of his head injury he had seven seizures. He had not received prophylactic antiepileptic treatment after the head injury. We report a case of epilepsy secondary to a head injury, in which the first seizure occurred one and a half years after injury. In view of the risk factors, we discuss whether prophylactic anti epileptic treatment might have been beneficial.

  16. [Lymphocyte metabolism in patients with acute pancreatitis with different genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes].

    PubMed

    Markova, E V; Zotova, N V; Savchenko, A A; Titova, N M; Slepov, E V; Cherdantsev, D V; Konovalenko, A N

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated correlation between enzymatic activity of NAD(P)-dependent dehydrogenases of lymphocytes and polymorphic variants of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) genes in the group of unrelated patients with acute pancreatitis in comparison with healthy Russians from Krasnoyarsk. Thus, genotype GSTM1 0/0 is the marker of predisposition to the acute pancreatitis, wheras polymorphism of the GSTT1 gene is not involved in the development of the pancreatitis, at least in our group. The bioluminescence analysis showed statistically significant decrease of the levels of G3PD, NAD(+)MDH and the increase of NADH(+)LDH, NAD(+)GDH, NADH(+)GDH in lymphocytes of pancreatic group. Development of pancreatitis in patients with different genotypes GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes showed the rearrangement of the basic intracellular processes: dominance of a plastic metabolism in the patients with GSTM1--deletions and predominance of energetic processes at GSTT1 0 - pancreatitis.

  17. Phylogenetic position of Rhizobium sp. strain Or 191, a symbiont of both Medicago sativa and Phaseolus vulgaris, based on partial sequences of the 16S rRNA and nifH genes.

    PubMed Central

    Eardly, B D; Young, J P; Selander, R K

    1992-01-01

    Phenotypic and DNA sequence comparisons are presented for eight Rhizobium isolates that were cultured from field-grown alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Oregon. These isolates were previously shown to nodulate both alfalfa and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris (L.) Savi.). The objective of the present study was to determine their phylogenetic relationships to the normal symbionts of these plants, Rhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, respectively. Phenotypically, the Oregon isolates more nearly resemble strains from P. vulgaris than those from M. sativa. For example, even though nitrogen fixation levels were low with both host species, the symbiotic efficiency of a representative Rhizobium isolate (Or 191) with common bean was twice that observed with alfalfa. Comparative sequencing of a 260-bp segment of the 16S rRNA gene (directly sequenced after amplification by the polymerase chain reaction) demonstrated that Or 191 is not closely related to the type strain of R. meliloti (ATCC 9930), R. leguminosarum (ATCC 10004), or Rhizobium tropici (CIAT 899). Instead, sequence comparisons of the 16S gene indicated that Or 191 belongs to a distinct and previously unrecognized taxonomic group that includes strains that have previously been called R. leguminosarum bv. phaseoli type I. Unlike type I strains, however, Or 191 has only a single copy of the nifH gene (type I strains have three), and the nucleotide sequence of this gene is substantially different from those of other rhizobial and nonrhizobial nifH genes examined thus far. Images PMID:1377901

  18. Algebraic Comparison of Partial Lists in Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Jurman, Giuseppe; Riccadonna, Samantha; Visintainer, Roberto; Furlanello, Cesare

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of a functional genomics pipeline is usually a partial list of genomic features, ranked by their relevance in modelling biological phenotype in terms of a classification or regression model. Due to resampling protocols or to a meta-analysis comparison, it is often the case that sets of alternative feature lists (possibly of different lengths) are obtained, instead of just one list. Here we introduce a method, based on permutations, for studying the variability between lists (“list stability”) in the case of lists of unequal length. We provide algorithms evaluating stability for lists embedded in the full feature set or just limited to the features occurring in the partial lists. The method is demonstrated by finding and comparing gene profiles on a large prostate cancer dataset, consisting of two cohorts of patients from different countries, for a total of 455 samples. PMID:22615778

  19. Partial breast radiation therapy - external beam

    MedlinePlus

    Carcinoma of the breast - partial radiation therapy; Partial external beam radiation - breast; Intensity-modulated radiation therapy - breast cancer; IMRT - breast cancer WBRT; Adjuvant partial breast - IMRT; APBI - ...

  20. Partial proximal tibia fractures

    PubMed Central

    Raschke, Michael J.; Kittl, Christoph; Domnick, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Partial tibial plateau fractures may occur as a consequence of either valgus or varus trauma combined with a rotational and axial compression component. High-energy trauma may result in a more complex and multi-fragmented fracture pattern, which occurs predominantly in young people. Conversely, a low-energy mechanism may lead to a pure depression fracture in the older population with weaker bone density. Pre-operative classification of these fractures, by Müller AO, Schatzker or novel CT-based methods, helps to understand the fracture pattern and choose the surgical approach and treatment strategy in accordance with estimated bone mineral density and the individual history of each patient. Non-operative treatment may be considered for non-displaced intra-articular fractures of the lateral tibial condyle. Intra-articular joint displacement ⩾ 2 mm, open fractures or fractures of the medial condyle should be reduced and fixed operatively. Autologous, allogenic and synthetic bone substitutes can be used to fill bone defects. A variety of minimally invasive approaches, temporary osteotomies and novel techniques (e.g. arthroscopically assisted reduction or ‘jail-type’ screw osteosynthesis) offer a range of choices for the individual and are potentially less invasive treatments. Rehabilitation protocols should be carefully planned according to the degree of stability achieved by internal fixation, bone mineral density and other patient-specific factors (age, compliance, mobility). To avoid stiffness, early functional mobilisation plays a major role in rehabilitation. In the elderly, low-energy trauma and impression fractures are indicators for the further screening and treatment of osteoporosis. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160067. Originally published online at www.efortopenreviews.org PMID:28630761

  1. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    PubMed

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  2. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  3. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  4. Controllability of the better chosen partial networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueming; Pan, Linqiang

    2016-08-01

    How to control large complex networks is a great challenge. Recent studies have proved that the whole network can be sufficiently steered by injecting control signals into a minimum set of driver nodes, and the minimum numbers of driver nodes for many real networks are high, indicating that it is difficult to control them. For some large natural and technological networks, it is impossible and not feasible to control the full network. For example, in biological networks like large-scale gene regulatory networks it is impossible to control all the genes. This prompts us to explore the question how to choose partial networks that are easy for controlling and important in networked systems. In this work, we propose a method to achieve this goal. By computing the minimum driver nodes densities of the partial networks of Erdös-Rényi (ER) networks, scale-free (SF) networks and 23 real networks, we find that our method performs better than random method that chooses nodes randomly. Moreover, we find that the nodes chosen by our method tend to be the essential elements of the whole systems, via studying the nodes chosen by our method of a real human signaling network and a human protein interaction network and discovering that the chosen nodes from these networks tend to be cancer-associated genes. The implementation of our method shows some interesting connections between the structure and the controllability of networks, improving our understanding of the control principles of complex systems.

  5. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  6. Arabidopsis genes, AtNPR1, AtTGA2 and AtPR-5, confer partial resistance to soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines) when overexpressed in transgenic soybean roots

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extensive studies using the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate plant defense signaling and pathway networks indicate that salicylic acid (SA) is the key hormone triggering the plant defense response against biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens, while jasmonic acid (JA) and derivatives are critical to the defense response against necrotrophic pathogens. Several reports demonstrate that SA limits nematode reproduction. Results Here we translate knowledge gained from studies using Arabidopsis to soybean. The ability of thirty-one Arabidopsis genes encoding important components of SA and JA synthesis and signaling in conferring resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN: Heterodera glycines) are investigated. We demonstrate that overexpression of three of thirty-one Arabidoposis genes in transgenic soybean roots of composite plants decreased the number of cysts formed by SCN to less than 50% of those found on control roots, namely AtNPR1(33%), AtTGA2 (38%), and AtPR-5 (38%). Three additional Arabidopsis genes decreased the number of SCN cysts by 40% or more: AtACBP3 (53% of the control value), AtACD2 (55%), and AtCM-3 (57%). Other genes having less or no effect included AtEDS5 (77%), AtNDR1 (82%), AtEDS1 (107%), and AtPR-1 (80%), as compared to control. Overexpression of AtDND1 greatly increased susceptibility as indicated by a large increase in the number of SCN cysts (175% of control). Conclusions Knowledge of the pathogen defense system gained from studies of the model system, Arabidopsis, can be directly translated to soybean through direct overexpression of Arabidopsis genes. When the genes, AtNPR1, AtGA2, and AtPR-5, encoding specific components involved in SA regulation, synthesis, and signaling, are overexpressed in soybean roots, resistance to SCN is enhanced. This demonstrates functional compatibility of some Arabidopsis genes with soybean and identifies genes that may be used to engineer resistance to nematodes. PMID:24739302

  7. Overexpression and lack of degradation of thaumatin in an aspergillopepsin A-defective mutant of Aspergillus awamori containing an insertion in the pepA gene.

    PubMed

    Moralejo, F J; Cardoza, R E; Gutiérrez, S; Sisniega, H; Faus, I; Martín, J F

    2000-12-01

    A gene encoding the sweet-tasting protein thaumatin (tha) with optimized codon usage was expressed in Aspergillus awamori. Mutants of A. awamori with reduced proteolytic activity were isolated. One of these mutants, named lpr66, contained an insertion of about 200 bp in the pepA gene, resulting in an inactive aspergillopepsin A. In vitro thaumatin degradation tests confirmed that culture broths of mutant lpr66 showed only a small thaumatin-degrading activity. A. awamori lpr66 has been used as host strain for thaumatin expression cassettes containing the tha gene under the control of either the cahB (cephalosporin acetylhydrolase) promoter of Acremonium chrysogenum or the gdhA (glutamate dehydrogenase) promoter of Aspergillus awamori. Residual proteolytic activities were repressed by using a mixture of glucose and sucrose as carbon sources and L-asparagine as nitrogen source. Degradation of thaumatin by acidic proteases was prevented by maintaining the pH value at 6.2 in the fermentor. Expression of cassettes containing the gdhA promoter was optimal in ammonium sulfate as nitrogen source, whereas transformants expressing the tha gene from the cahB promoter yielded higher thaumatin levels using L-asparagine as nitrogen source. Under optimal fermentation conditions, yields of 105 mg thaumatin/l were obtained, thus making this fermentation a process of industrial interest.

  8. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis caused by defects in AIPL1: effective rescue of mouse models of partial and complete Aipl1 deficiency using AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 vectors

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Mei Hong; Smith, Alexander J.; Pawlyk, Basil; Xu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Bainbridge, James B.; Basche, Mark; McIntosh, Jenny; Tran, Hoai Viet; Nathwani, Amit; Li, Tiansen; Ali, Robin R.

    2009-01-01

    Defects in the photoreceptor-specific gene encoding aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein-like 1 (AIPL1) are clinically heterogeneous and present as Leber Congenital Amaurosis, the severest form of early-onset retinal dystrophy and milder forms of retinal dystrophies such as juvenile retinitis pigmentosa and dominant cone-rod dystrophy. [Perrault, I., Rozet, J.M., Gerber, S., Ghazi, I., Leowski, C., Ducroq, D., Souied, E., Dufier, J.L., Munnich, A. and Kaplan, J. (1999) Leber congenital amaurosis. Mol. Genet. Metab., 68, 200–208.] Although not yet fully elucidated, AIPL1 is likely to function as a specialized chaperone for rod phosphodiesterase (PDE). We evaluate whether AAV-mediated gene replacement therapy is able to improve photoreceptor function and survival in retinal degeneration associated with AIPL1 defects. We used two mouse models of AIPL1 deficiency simulating three different rates of photoreceptor degeneration. The Aipl1 hypomorphic (h/h) mouse has reduced Aipl1 levels and a relatively slow degeneration. Under light acceleration, the rate of degeneration in the Aipl1 h/h mouse is increased by 2–3-fold. The Aipl1−/− mouse has no functional Aipl1 and has a very rapid retinal degeneration. To treat the different rates of degeneration, two pseudotypes of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) exhibiting different transduction kinetics are used for gene transfer. We demonstrate restoration of cellular function and preservation of photoreceptor cells and retinal function in Aipl1 h/h mice following gene replacement therapy using an AAV2/2 vector and in the light accelerated Aipl1 h/h model and Aipl1−/− mice using an AAV2/8 vector. We have thus established the potential of gene replacement therapy in varying rates of degeneration that reflect the clinical spectrum of disease. This is the first gene replacement study to report long-term rescue of a photoreceptor-specific defect and to demonstrate effective rescue of a rapid photoreceptor

  9. The microbial gene diversity along an elevation gradient of the Tibetan grassland.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunfeng; Gao, Ying; Wang, Shiping; Xu, Depeng; Yu, Hao; Wu, Linwei; Lin, Qiaoyan; Hu, Yigang; Li, Xiangzhen; He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Zhou, Jizhong

    2014-02-01

    Tibet is one of the most threatened regions by climate warming, thus understanding how its microbial communities function may be of high importance for predicting microbial responses to climate changes. Here, we report a study to profile soil microbial structural genes, which infers functional roles of microbial communities, along four sites/elevations of a Tibetan mountainous grassland, aiming to explore the potential microbial responses to climate changes via a strategy of space-for-time substitution. Using a microarray-based metagenomics tool named GeoChip 4.0, we showed that microbial communities were distinct for most but not all of the sites. Substantial variations were apparent in stress, N and C-cycling genes, but they were in line with the functional roles of these genes. Cold shock genes were more abundant at higher elevations. Also, gdh converting ammonium into urea was more abundant at higher elevations, whereas ureC converting urea into ammonium was less abundant, which was consistent with soil ammonium contents. Significant correlations were observed between N-cycling genes (ureC, gdh and amoA) and nitrous oxide flux, suggesting that they contributed to community metabolism. Lastly, we found by Canonical correspondence analysis, Mantel tests and the similarity tests that soil pH, temperature, NH4(+)-N and vegetation diversity accounted for the majority (81.4%) of microbial community variations, suggesting that these four attributes were major factors affecting soil microbial communities. On the basis of these observations, we predict that climate changes in the Tibetan grasslands are very likely to change soil microbial community functional structure, with particular impacts on microbial N-cycling genes and consequently microbe-mediated soil N dynamics.

  10. The gibberellin biosynthetic genes AtGA20ox1 and AtGA20ox2 act, partially redundantly, to promote growth and development throughout the Arabidopsis life cycle.

    PubMed

    Rieu, Ivo; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Griffiths, Jayne; Powers, Stephen J; Gong, Fan; Linhartova, Terezie; Eriksson, Sven; Nilsson, Ove; Thomas, Stephen G; Phillips, Andrew L; Hedden, Peter

    2008-02-01

    The activity of the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic enzymes GA 20-oxidases (GA20ox) is of particular importance in determining GA concentration in many plant species. In Arabidopsis these enzymes are encoded by a family of five genes: AtGA20ox1-AtGA20ox5. Transcript analysis indicated that they have different expression patterns and may thus participate differentially in GA-regulated developmental processes. We have used reverse genetics to determine the physiological roles of AtGA20ox1 and AtGA20ox2, the most highly expressed GA20ox genes during vegetative and early reproductive development. AtGA20ox1 and AtGA20ox2 act redundantly to promote hypocotyl and internode elongation, flowering time, elongation of anther filaments, the number of seeds that develop per silique and elongation of siliques, with AtGA20ox1 making the greater contribution to internode and filament elongation, and AtGA20ox2 making the greater contribution to flowering time and silique length. Pollination of the double mutant with wild-type pollen indicated that the GA promoting silique elongation is of maternal origin. The ga20ox2 phenotype revealed that GA promotes the number of stem internodes that elongate upon bolting, and does so independently of its effect on internode elongation. Comparison of the phenotype of the double mutant with that of the highly GA-deficient ga1-3 mutant indicates that other GA20ox genes contribute to all the developmental processes examined, and, in some cases such as root growth and leaf expansion, make major contributions, as these processes were unaffected in the double mutant. In addition, the effects of the mutations are mitigated by the homeostatic mechanism that acts on expression of other GA dioxygenase and GID1 receptor genes.

  11. Characterization and Structure Prediction of Partial Length Protein Sequences of pcoA, pcoR and chrB Genes from Heavy Metal Resistant Bacteria from the Klip River, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Chihomvu, Patience; Stegmann, Peter; Pillay, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Klip River has suffered from severe anthropogenic effects from industrial activities such as mining. Long-term exposure to heavy metal pollution has led to the development of heavy metal resistant strains of Pseudomonas sp. KR23, Lysinibacillus sp. KR25, and E. coli KR29. The objectives of this study were to characterize the genetics of copper and chromate resistance of the isolates. Copper and chromate resistance determinants were cloned and sequenced. Open reading frames (ORFs) related to the genes CopA and CopR were identified in E. coli KR29, PcoA in Lysinibacillus sp. KR25 and none related to chromate resistance were detected. The 3D-models predicted by I-TASSER disclose that the PcoA proteins consist of β-sheets, which form a part of the cupredoxin domain of the CopA copper resistance family of genes. The model for PcoR_29 revealed the presence of a helix turn helix; this forms part of a DNA binding protein, which is part of a heavy metal transcriptional regulator. The bacterial strains were cured using ethidium bromide. The genes encoding for heavy metal resistance and antibiotic resistance were found to be located on the chromosome for both Pseudomonas sp. (KR23) and E. coli (KR29). For Lysinibacillus (KR25) the heavy metal resistance determinants are suspected to be located on a mobile genetic element, which was not detected using gel electrophoresis. PMID:25837632

  12. Organization and partial sequence of a DNA region of the Rhizobium leguminosarum symbiotic plasmid pRL6JI containing the genes fixABC, nifA, nifB and a novel open reading frame.

    PubMed Central

    Grönger, P; Manian, S S; Reiländer, H; O'Connell, M; Priefer, U B; Pühler, A

    1987-01-01

    By hybridization and heteroduplex studies the fixABC and nifA genes of the Rhizobium leguminosarum symbiotic plasmid pRL6JI have been identified. DNA sequencing of the region containing nifA showed an open reading frame of 1557 bp encoding a protein of 56, 178 D. Based on sequence homology, this ORF was confirmed to correspond to the nifA gene. Comparison of three nifA proteins (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Rhizobium meliloti, Rhizobium leguminosarum) revealed only a weak relationship in their N-terminal regions, whereas the C-terminal parts exhibited strong homology. Sequence analysis also showed that the R. leguminosarum nifA gene is followed by nifB and preceded by fixC with an open reading frame inserted in between. This novel ORF of 294 bp was found to be highly conserved also in R. meliloti. No known promoter and termination signals could be defined on the sequenced R. leguminosarum fragment. Images PMID:3029674

  13. Age-related changes in the gene expression profile of antigen-specific mouse CD8+ T cells can be partially reversed by blockade of the BTLA/CD160 pathways during vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Dawany, Noor; Parzych, Elizabeth M; Showe, Louise C; Ertl, Hildegund CJ

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed gene expression profiles of young and aged mouse CD8+ T cells specific for the nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza A/PR8/34 virus. CD8+ T cells were stimulated either by the NP antigen expressed in its native form or fused into the herpes virus (HSV)-1 glycoprotein D (gD) protein, which blocks signaling through the immunoinhibitory B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and CD160 pathways. We show that NP-specific CD8+ T cells from aged mice exhibit numerous differences in gene expression compared to NP-specific CD8+ T cells from young mice, including a significant reduction of expression in genes involved in T cell receptor (TcR) and CD28 signaling. We also show that these changes can be reversed in a sub-population (∼50%) of the aged mice by a BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade. These results suggest that BTLA/CD160 checkpoint blockade has potential value as a vaccine additive to induce better CD8+ T cell responses in the aged. PMID:27922818

  14. Partial reversion at the bobbed locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Terracol, R; Iturbide, Y; Prud'Homme, N

    1990-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster the tandemly arranged repetitive sequences coding for 18S and 28S rRNA are heterogenous at the level of the spacers between units and insertions that interrupt many 28S rRNA genes. This heterogeneity contrasts with the homogeneity of the regions transcribed into 18S and 28S rRNA. Homogenization and evolution of repetitive genes are usually explained by conversion, amplification events or unequal crossovers. In this paper we studied the change in rDNA patterns associated with partial reversion of bobbed mutations. In most cases, no increase in rDNA gene number, but a new repartition of gene types were found.

  15. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  16. Coherent-mode decomposition of partially polarized, partially coherent sources.

    PubMed

    Gori, Franco; Santarsiero, Massimo; Simon, Raja; Piquero, Gemma; Borghi, Riccardo; Guattari, Giorgio

    2003-01-01

    It is shown that any partially polarized, partially coherent source can be expressed in terms of a suitable superposition of transverse coherent modes with orthogonal polarization states. Such modes are determined through the solution of a system of two coupled integral equations. An example, for which the modal decomposition is obtained in closed form in terms of fully linearly polarized Hermite Gaussian modes, is given.

  17. Experimental generating the partially coherent and partially polarized electromagnetic source.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey S; Rodríguez-Zurita, Gustavo; Meneses-Fabián, Cruz; Olvera-Santamaría, Miguel A; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina

    2010-06-07

    The technique for generating the partially coherent and partially polarized source starting from the completely coherent and completely polarized laser source is proposed and analyzed. This technique differs from the known ones by the simplicity of its physical realization. The efficiency of the proposed technique is illustrated with the results of physical experiment in which an original technique for characterizing the coherence and polarization properties of the generated source is employed.

  18. Analysis of gene expression changes, caused by exposure to nitrite, in metabolic and antioxidant enzymes in the red claw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qichen; Zhang, Wenyi; Tan, Hongyue; Pan, Dongmei; Yang, Yuanhao; Ren, Qian; Yang, Jiaxin

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated the effect of acute exposure to nitrite on expression of antioxidant and metabolic enzyme genes in gill tissue of advanced juvenile Cherax quadricarinatus. A 48h nitrite exposure was conducted, using four test concentrations (NO2-N=0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2mg L(-1)) plus a control group. The relative mRNA expression of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mMnSOD), cytosolic MnSOD (cMnSOD), extracellular copper/zinc SOD (exCu/ZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), arginine kinase (AK), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH), Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in gill tissue was measured. Significantly increased mRNA expression was observed for all the antioxidant enzymes after 12 and 24h. After 48h, they all decreased at high nitrite concentrations. The gene expression levels of AK, GDH, mMDH and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α-subunit showed similar trends as the antioxidant enzymes. Significant depression of gene expression levels of PEPCK occurred throughout the experimental time at high nitrite concentrations. The results indicated that nitrite could induce oxidative and metabolic stress in C. quadricarinatus, in a time dependent manner, which suggests they could be helpful in predicting sublethal nitrite toxicity and useful in environmental monitoring studies. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  20. Partial arthrodeses of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Cristiani, G; Castagnini, L; Castagnetti, C; Caroli, A

    1995-01-01

    The authors report 16 cases of partial arthrodeses of the wrist for the treatment of Kienboeck's disease, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Based on the good results obtained (76.6%) the authors believe that partial arthrodeses constitute the type of treatment indicated for the treatment of pathologies that involve only some of the carpal bones, and they also emphasize that this type of surgery represents a valid alternative to total arthrodesis of the wrist.

  1. Partial metamorphosis in Anomia simplex.

    PubMed

    LOOSANOFF, V L

    1961-06-30

    Many larvae of the common bivalve, Anomia simplex, when grown under laboratory conditions, exhibited a partial metamorphosis. They attained a considerably larger size than that at which larvae normally set. The partial metamorphosis was also characterized by the disappearance of velum, but the retention of a functional foot. Moreover, these organisms were not able to attach to the substratum, and their shells showed a distinct demarcation line between larval and adult portions

  2. Global analysis of saliva as a source of bacterial genes for insights into human population structure and migration studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of the human microbiome holds great potential for shedding light on the history of our ancestors. Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent example as its analysis allowed a fine-scale resolution of past migration patterns including some that could not be distinguished using human genetic markers. However studies of H. pylori require stomach biopsies, which severely limits the number of samples that can be analysed. By focussing on the house-keeping gene gdh (coding for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), on the virulence gene gtf (coding for the glucosyltransferase) of mitis-streptococci and on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum-group we here tested the hypothesis that bacterial genes from human saliva have the potential for distinguishing human populations. Results Analysis of 10 individuals from each of seven geographic regions, encompassing Africa, Asia and Europe, revealed that the genes gdh and ITS exhibited the highest number of polymorphic sites (59% and 79%, respectively) and most OTUs (defined at 99% identity) were unique to a given country. In contrast, the gene gtf had the lowest number of polymorphic sites (21%), and most OTUs were shared among countries. Most of the variation in the gdh and ITS genes was explained by the high clonal diversity within individuals (around 80%) followed by inter-individual variation of around 20%, leaving the geographic region as providing virtually no source of sequence variation. Conversely, for gtf the variation within individuals accounted for 32%, between individuals for 57% and among geographic regions for 11%. This geographic signature persisted upon extension of the analysis to four additional locations from the American continent. Pearson correlation analysis, pairwise Fst-cluster analysis as well as UniFrac analyses consistently supported a tree structure in which the European countries clustered tightly

  3. Global analysis of saliva as a source of bacterial genes for insights into human population structure and migration studies.

    PubMed

    Henne, Karsten; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark; Kessler, Olga; Schilling, Hildegard; Sonanini, Anne; Conrads, Georg; Horz, Hans-Peter

    2014-08-22

    The genetic diversity of the human microbiome holds great potential for shedding light on the history of our ancestors. Helicobacter pylori is the most prominent example as its analysis allowed a fine-scale resolution of past migration patterns including some that could not be distinguished using human genetic markers. However studies of H. pylori require stomach biopsies, which severely limits the number of samples that can be analysed. By focussing on the house-keeping gene gdh (coding for the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), on the virulence gene gtf (coding for the glucosyltransferase) of mitis-streptococci and on the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the Fusobacterium nucleatum/periodonticum-group we here tested the hypothesis that bacterial genes from human saliva have the potential for distinguishing human populations. Analysis of 10 individuals from each of seven geographic regions, encompassing Africa, Asia and Europe, revealed that the genes gdh and ITS exhibited the highest number of polymorphic sites (59% and 79%, respectively) and most OTUs (defined at 99% identity) were unique to a given country. In contrast, the gene gtf had the lowest number of polymorphic sites (21%), and most OTUs were shared among countries. Most of the variation in the gdh and ITS genes was explained by the high clonal diversity within individuals (around 80%) followed by inter-individual variation of around 20%, leaving the geographic region as providing virtually no source of sequence variation. Conversely, for gtf the variation within individuals accounted for 32%, between individuals for 57% and among geographic regions for 11%. This geographic signature persisted upon extension of the analysis to four additional locations from the American continent. Pearson correlation analysis, pairwise Fst-cluster analysis as well as UniFrac analyses consistently supported a tree structure in which the European countries clustered tightly together and branched

  4. Analysis of yeast isolates related to Metschnikowia pulcherrima using the partial sequences of the large subunit rDNA and the actin gene; description of Metschnikowia andauensis sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Orsolya; Prillinger, Hansjörg

    2005-10-01

    Thirty-two yeast isolates were cultured from guts or excrements of three different pests of corn or from the stem of healthy corn. The strains were analyzed using MSP-PCR (micro/minisatellite-primed polymerase chain reaction), sequences of the D1/D2 region of the large subunit rDNA and a 979 bp long part of the actin gene (act-1). They seem to belong to three groups that are all sister groups of Metschnikowia pulcherrima, M. fructicola and M. chrysoperlae. A new species, Metschnikowia andauensis (HA 1657T) is described. In contrast to M. pulcherrima and M. fructicola, M. andauensis is well separated in the act-1 phylogenetic tree too.

  5. Characterization of Pseudomonas putida Genes Responsive to Nutrient Limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, Chris K.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Kingsley, Mark T.; Swarup, Sanjay

    2004-06-01

    The low bioavailability of nutrients and oxygen in the soil environment has hampered successful expression of biodegradation/biocontrol genes that are driven by promoters highly active during routine laboratory conditions of high nutrient- and oxygen-availability. Hence, in the present study, expression of the gus-tagged genes in 12 Tn5-gus mutants of the soil microbe Pseudomonas putida PNL-MK25 was examined under various conditions chosen to mimic the soil environment: low carbon, phosphate, nitrate, or oxygen, and in the rhizosphere. Based on their expression profiles, three nutrient-responsive mutant (NRM) strains, NRM5, NRM7, and NRM17, were selected for identification of the tagged genes. In the mutant strain NRM5, expression of the glutamate dehydrogenase (gdhA) gene was increased between 4.9- to 26.4-fold under various low nutrient conditions. In NRM7, expression of the novel NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase-like (nql) gene was consistently amongst the highest and was synergistically upregulated by low nutrient and anoxic conditions. The cyoD gene in NRM17, which encodes the fourth subunit of the cytochrome o ubiquinol oxidase complex, had decreased expression in low nutrient conditions but its absolute expression levels was still amongst the highest. Additionally, it was independent of oxygen availability, in contrast to that in E. coli.

  6. Partial Correlation Estimation by Joint Sparse Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Wang, Pei; Zhou, Nengfeng; Zhu, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient approach —space(Sparse PArtial Correlation Estimation)— for selecting non-zero partial correlations under the high-dimension-low-sample-size setting. This method assumes the overall sparsity of the partial correlation matrix and employs sparse regression techniques for model fitting. We illustrate the performance of space by extensive simulation studies. It is shown that space performs well in both non-zero partial correlation selection and the identification of hub variables, and also outperforms two existing methods. We then apply space to a microarray breast cancer data set and identify a set of hub genes which may provide important insights on genetic regulatory networks. Finally, we prove that, under a set of suitable assumptions, the proposed procedure is asymptotically consistent in terms of model selection and parameter estimation. PMID:19881892

  7. Partial synchronization and partial amplitude death in mesoscale network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poel, Winnie; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-02-01

    We study the interplay between network topology and complex space-time patterns and introduce a concept to analytically predict complex patterns in networks of Stuart-Landau oscillators with linear symmetric and instantaneous coupling based solely on the network topology. These patterns consist of partial amplitude death and partial synchronization and are found to exist in large variety for all undirected networks of up to 5 nodes. The underlying concept is proved to be robust with respect to frequency mismatch and can also be extended to larger networks. In addition it directly links the stability of complete in-phase synchronization to only a small subset of topological eigenvalues of a network.

  8. Partial synchronization and partial amplitude death in mesoscale network motifs.

    PubMed

    Poel, Winnie; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-02-01

    We study the interplay between network topology and complex space-time patterns and introduce a concept to analytically predict complex patterns in networks of Stuart-Landau oscillators with linear symmetric and instantaneous coupling based solely on the network topology. These patterns consist of partial amplitude death and partial synchronization and are found to exist in large variety for all undirected networks of up to 5 nodes. The underlying concept is proved to be robust with respect to frequency mismatch and can also be extended to larger networks. In addition it directly links the stability of complete in-phase synchronization to only a small subset of topological eigenvalues of a network.

  9. Partial heterologous protection by low pathogenic H9N2 virus against natural H9N2-PB1 gene reassortant highly pathogenic H5N1 virus in chickens.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kataria, Jag Mohan; Nagarajan, Shanmugasundaram; Tosh, Chakradhar; Murugkar, Harshad V; Kulkarni, Diwakar D

    2016-06-01

    Low pathogenic avian influenza H9N2 and highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 viruses continue to co-circulate in chickens. Prior infection with low pathogenic avian influenza can modulate the outcome of H5N1 infection. In India, low pathogenic H9N2 and highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza viruses are co-circulating in poultry. Herein, by using chickens with prior infection of A/chicken/India/04TI05/2012 (H9N2) virus we explored the outcome of infection with H5N1 virus A/turkey/India/10CA03/2012 natural PB1 gene reassortant from H9N2. Four groups (E1-E4) of SPF chickens (n = 6) prior inoculated with 10(6) EID50 of H9N2 virus were challenged with 10(6) EID50 of H5N1 natural reassortant (PB1-H9N2) virus at days 1 (group E1); 3 (group E2); 7 (group E3) and 14 (group E4) post H9N2 inoculation. The survival percentage in groups E1-E4 was 0, 100, 66.6 and 50%, respectively. Virus shedding periods for groups E1-E4 were 3, 4, 7 and 9 days, respectively post H5N1 challenge. Birds of group E1 and E2 were shedding both H9N2 and H5N1 viruses and mean viral RNA copy number was higher in oropharyngeal swabs than cloacal swabs. In group, E3 and E4 birds excreted only H5N1 virus and mean viral RNA copy number was higher in most cloacal swabs than oral swabs. These results indicate that prior infection with H9N2 virus could protect from lethal challenge of reassortant H5N1 virus as early as with three days prior H9N2 inoculation and protection decreased in groups E3 and E4 as time elapsed. However, prior infection with H9N2 did not prevent infection with H5N1 virus and birds continue to excrete virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs. Amino acid substitution K368E was found in HA gene of excreted H5N1 virus of group E3. Hence, concurrent infection can also cause emergence of viruses with mutations leading to virus evolution. The results of this study are important for the surveillance and epidemiological data analysis where both H9N2 and H5N1 viruses are co-circulating.

  10. Detection of Cryptosporidium species in feces or gastric contents from snakes and lizards as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis and partial sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

    PubMed

    Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a well-known gastrointestinal disease of snakes and lizards. In the current study, 672 samples (feces and/or gastric contents or regurgitated food items) of various snakes and lizards were examined for the presence of cryptosporidia by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. A consecutive sequencing reaction was used to identify the cryptosporidian species present in PCR-positive samples. Cryptosporidium varanii (saurophilum) was detected in 17 out of 106 (16%) samples from corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) and in 32 out of 462 (7%) samples from leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). Cryptosporidium serpentis was found in 8 out of 462 (2%) leopard gecko samples, but in no other reptile. The Cryptosporidium sp. "lizard genotype" was present in 1 leopard gecko sample, and 1 sample from a corn snake showed a single nucleotide mismatch to this genotype. Pseudoparasitic cryptosporidian species were identified in 5 out of 174 (3%) ophidian samples, but not in lizards. Other sequences did not show complete similarity to previously published Cryptosporidium sequences. The results stress the importance for diagnostic methods to be specific for Cryptosporidium species especially in snakes and show a relatively high prevalence of C. varanii in leopard geckos and corn snakes. © 2011 The Author(s)

  11. [Complex temporal partial status epilepticus].

    PubMed

    Béquet, D; Bodiguel, E; Renard, J L; Goasguen, J

    1990-01-01

    The cases of non convulsive, complex, partial ailment are a cause of a confusional state. Such a case on an adult is here reported, and its clinical presentation was a unvarying forgetfulness together with elements of a frontal syndrome. The aetiology was most probably a viral meningo-encephalitis. Clinical semiology of these "EMPC" is variable, either made of partial, recurrent attacks, sometimes with automatisms, or made of a continuous, possibly fluctuating, confusional state. Attacks shown on the EEG are partial or generalized with a variable start, sometimes bilateral, even continuous or discontinuous. The onset is most often temporal or frontal. The cause is very rarely found out. The evolution is usually good, but extended deficiencies of memory are described, linked to the duration (more than 12 hours) of EMPC. Therefore, the treatment must be precocious using diazepam or phenytoin.

  12. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Partial Priapism Treated with Pentoxifylline

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Meghan A.; Carrion, Rafael E.; Yang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Main findings: A 26-year-old man suffering from partial priapism was successfully treated with a regimen including pentoxifylline, a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor that is often used to conservatively treat Peyronie's disease. Case hypothesis: Partial priapism is an extremely rare urological condition that is characterized by thrombosis within the proximal segment of a single corpus cavernosum. There have only been 36 reported cases to date. Although several factors have been associated with this unusual disorder, such as trauma or bicycle riding, the etiology is still not completely understood. Treatment is usually conservative and consists of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic. Promising future implications: This case report supports the utilization of pentoxifylline in patients with partial priapism due to its anti-fibrogenic and anti-thrombotic properties. PMID:26401875

  14. Designing successful removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Daher, Tony; Hall, Dan; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-03-01

    In today's busy dental offices, removable partial denture design is often abdicated by dentists, both as a result of a lack of experience and consensus of design and because of educational failure on the part of dental schools. The result is delegation of the clinical design process to the lab technician. The lack of clinical data provided to the dental technician jeopardizes the quality of care. This article will focus on a logical and simple approach to this problem, making removable partial denture design simple and predictably achievable. The clinical evidence related to removable partial denture design will be described, along with a checklist to simplify the process and make it practical and applicable to everyday clinical practice.

  15. [Indications for removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    van Waas, M A J

    2009-11-01

    Since there are many ways of preserving a natural dentition, if necessary with support of solitary crowns and fixed partial dentures, sometimes on dental implants, removable partial dentures are nowadays primarily indicated in patients with complaints about missing teeth in the aesthetic zone, which cannot be solved in another way. In addition to this, a removable partial denture is indicated in patients with extremely reduced dentitions or large or multiple edentulous areas, in patients with severe periodontitis or excessive loss of alveolar bone, in patients who are physically or emotionally vulnerable, as an interim solution on the way to edentulousness, as a temporary solution waiting for more extensive treatment and for patients who cannot afford an alternative.

  16. Overexpression of a partial fragment of the salt-responsive gene OsNUC1 enhances salt adaptation in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa L.) during salt stress.

    PubMed

    Sripinyowanich, Siriporn; Chamnanmanoontham, Nontalee; Udomchalothorn, Thanikarn; Maneeprasopsuk, Somporn; Santawee, Panudda; Buaboocha, Teerapong; Qu, Li-Jia; Gu, Hongya; Chadchawan, Supachitra

    2013-12-01

    The rice (Oryza sativa L.) nucleolin gene, OsNUC1, transcripts were expressed in rice leaves, flowers, seeds and roots but differentially expressed within and between two pairs of salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rice lines when subjected to salt stress. Salt-resistant lines exhibited higher OsNUC1 transcript expression levels than salt-sensitive lines during 0.5% (w/v) NaCl salt stress for 6d. Two sizes of OsNUC1 full-length cDNA were found in the rice genome database and northern blot analysis confirmed their existence in rice tissues. The longer transcript (OsNUC1-L) putatively encodes for a protein with a serine rich N-terminal, RNA recognition motifs in the central domain and a glycine- and arginine-rich repeat in the C-terminal domain, while the shorter one (OsNUC1-S) putatively encodes for the similar protein without the N-terminus. Without salt stress, OsNUC1-L expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Atnuc1-L1 plants displayed a substantial but incomplete revertant phenotype, whereas OsNUC1-S expression only induced a weak effect. However, under 0.5% (w/v) NaCl salt stress they displayed a higher relative growth rate, longer root length and a lower H2O2 level than the wild type plants, suggesting a higher salt resistance. Moreover, they displayed elevated AtSOS1 and AtP5CS1 transcript levels. We propose that OsNUC1-S plays an important role in salt resistance during salt stress, a new role for nucleolin in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Identification of Sibling Species of Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) That Parasitize Buprestid and Cerambycid Beetles by Using Partial Sequences of Mitochondrial DNA Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1 and 28S Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Yang, Zhongqi; Wang, Xiaoyi; Hou, Yuxia

    2015-01-01

    The species belonging to Sclerodermus (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) are currently the most important insect natural enemies of wood borer pests, mainly buprestid and cerambycid beetles, in China. However, some sibling species of this genus are very difficult to distinguish because of their similar morphological features. To address this issue, we conducted phylogenetic and genetic analyses of cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and 28S RNA gene sequences from eight species of Sclerodermus reared from different wood borer pests. The eight sibling species were as follows: S. guani Xiao et Wu, S. sichuanensis Xiao, S. pupariae Yang et Yao, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1–5). A 594-bp fragment of COI and 750-bp fragment of 28S were subsequently sequenced. For COI, the G-C content was found to be low in all the species, averaging to about 30.0%. Sequence divergences (Kimura-2-parameter distances) between congeneric species averaged to 4.5%, and intraspecific divergences averaged to about 0.09%. Further, the maximum sequence divergences between congeneric species and Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) averaged to about 16.5%. All 136 samples analyzed were included in six reciprocally monophyletic clades in the COI neighbor-joining (NJ) tree. The NJ tree inferred from the 28S rRNA sequence yielded almost identical results, but the samples from S. guani, S. sichuanensis, S. pupariae, and Sclerodermus spp. (Nos. 1–4) clustered together and only Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) clustered separately. Our findings indicate that the standard barcode region of COI can be efficiently used to distinguish morphologically similar Sclerodermus species. Further, we speculate that Sclerodermus sp. (No. 5) might be a new species of Sclerodermus. PMID:25782000

  18. Phylogenetic relationships among the Braconidae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonoidea) inferred from partial 16S rDNA, 28S rDNA D2, 18S rDNA gene sequences and morphological characters.

    PubMed

    Shi, M; Chen, X X; van Achterberg, C

    2005-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the Braconidae were examined using homologous 16S rDNA, 28S rDNA D2 region, and 18S rDNA gene sequences and morphological data using both PAUP* 4.0 and MRBAYES 3.0B4 from 88 in-group taxa representing 35 subfamilies. The monophyletic nature of almost all subfamilies, of which multiple representatives are present in this study, is well-supported except for two subfamilies, Cenocoelinae and Neoneurinae that should probably be treated as tribal rank taxa in the subfamily Euphorinae. The topology of the trees generated in the present study supported the existence of three large generally accepted lineage or groupings of subfamilies: two main entirely endoparasitic lineages of this family, referred to as the "helconoid complex" and the "microgastroid complex," and the third "the cyclostome." The Aphidiinae was recovered as a member of the non-cyclostomes, probably a sister group of Euphorinae or Euphorinae-complex. The basal position of the microgastroid complex among the non-cyclostomes has been found in all our analyses. The cyclostomes were resolved as a monophyletic group in all analyses if two putatively misplaced groups (Mesostoa and Aspilodemon) were excluded from them. Certain well-supported relationships evident in this family from the previous analyses were recovered, such as a sister-group relationships of Alysiinae+Opiinae, of Braconinae+Doryctinae, and a close relationship between Macrocentrinae, Xiphozelinae, Homolobinae, and Charmontinae. The relationships of "Ichneutinae + ((Adeliinae + Cheloninae) + (Miracinae + (Cardiochilinae + Microgastrinae)))" was confirmed within the microgastroid complex. The position of Acampsohelconinae, Blacinae, and Trachypetinae is problematic.

  19. Partially coherent vectorial nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-10-01

    Generalized vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integrals are developed for the cross-spectral-density matrices of spatially partially coherent beams. Using the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam as an example, we derive the expressions for the propagation of cross-spectral-density matrices and intensity of partially coherent vectorial nonparaxial beams, and the corresponding far-field asymptotic forms, beyond the paraxial approximation. The propagation of the vectorial nonparaxial GSM beams are evaluated and analyzed. It is shown that a 3 x 3 cross-spectral-density matrix or a vector theory is required for the exact description of nonparaxial GSM beams.

  20. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  1. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding catalytic subunit of thermostable glucose dehydrogenase from Burkholderia cepacia in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Inose, Ken; Fujikawa, Masako; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Sode, Koji

    2003-02-21

    We have cloned a 1620-nucleotide gene encoding the catalytic subunit (alpha subunit) of a thermostable glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) from Burkholderia cepacia. The FAD binding motif was found in the N-terminal region of the alpha subunit. The deduced primary structure of the alpha subunit showed about 48% identity to the catalytic subunits of sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) from Gluconobacter oxydans and 2-keto-D-gluconate dehydrogenases (2KGDH) from Erwinia herbicola and Pantoea citrea. The alpha subunit of B. cepacia was expressed in Escherichia coli in its active water-soluble form, showing maximum dye-mediated GDH activity at 70 degrees C, retaining high thermal stability. A putative open reading frame (ORF) of 507 nucleotides was also found upstream of the alpha subunit encoding an 18-kDa peptide, designated as gamma subunit. The deduced primary structure of gamma subunit showed about 30% identity to the small subunits of the SDH from G. oxydans and 2KGDHs from E. herbicola and P. citrea.

  2. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-02-22

    Techniques for generating partially coherent radiation and particularly for converting effectively coherent radiation from a synchrotron to partially coherent EUV radiation suitable for projection lithography.

  3. Transcriptional inhibition of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} gene (CDKN1) expression by survivin is at least partially p53-dependent: Evidence for survivin acting as a transcription factor or co-factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lei; Ling, Xiang; Liu, Wensheng; Das, Gokul M.; Li, Fengzhi

    2012-05-04

    } expression at least in part by neutralizing p53-mediated transcriptional activation of the p21 gene.

  4. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  5. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  6. Leadership in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Inter-organizational collaboration is becoming more common. When organizations collaborate they often do so in partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT is a hybrid team that has at least one collocated subteam and at least two subteams that are geographically distributed and communicate primarily through electronic media. While PDTs share many…

  7. Outcomes after Partial Endograft Explantation.

    PubMed

    Steenberge, Sean P; Lyden, Sean P; Turney, Eric J; Kelso, Rebecca L; Srivastava, Sunita D; Eagleton, Matthew J; Clair, Daniel G

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the aneurysm-related complications and device issues in patients who underwent partial endograft explantation during late conversion of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) to open repair. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients who had partially explanted endografts during late conversion between 1999 and 2012. Medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, subsequent operations, and aneurysm-related complications. Postoperative abdominal X-ray films and computed tomography scans were analyzed for endograft migration, component separation, device fracture, and arterial growth or aneurysm issues. Between 1999 and 2012, 22 patients had late conversion after EVAR with portions of the device left in situ. Five of the partially removed devices were Zenith, 6 Talent, 5 Ancure, 3 AneuRx, 2 Excluder endografts, and 1 Cook Aorto uni-iliac (AUI) graft. There were 4 in hospital mortalities. There were no graft migrations, component separations, device fractures, new aneurysmal degeneration, or ruptures with a median follow-up of 26.5 months. Partial endograft removal during late conversion is not associated with complications from the remaining device pieces during follow-up. We recommend further study of this patient population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Segmentation given partial grouping constraints.

    PubMed

    Yu, Stella X; Shi, Jianbo

    2004-02-01

    We consider data clustering problems where partial grouping is known a priori. We formulate such biased grouping problems as a constrained optimization problem, where structural properties of the data define the goodness of a grouping and partial grouping cues define the feasibility of a grouping. We enforce grouping smoothness and fairness on labeled data points so that sparse partial grouping information can be effectively propagated to the unlabeled data. Considering the normalized cuts criterion in particular, our formulation leads to a constrained eigenvalue problem. By generalizing the Rayleigh-Ritz theorem to projected matrices, we find the global optimum in the relaxed continuous domain by eigendecomposition, from which a near-global optimum to the discrete labeling problem can be obtained effectively. We apply our method to real image segmentation problems, where partial grouping priors can often be derived based on a crude spatial attentional map that binds places with common salient features or focuses on expected object locations. We demonstrate not only that it is possible to integrate both image structures and priors in a single grouping process, but also that objects can be segregated from the background without specific object knowledge.

  9. Variable Selection via Partial Correlation.

    PubMed

    Li, Runze; Liu, Jingyuan; Lou, Lejia

    2017-07-01

    Partial correlation based variable selection method was proposed for normal linear regression models by Bühlmann, Kalisch and Maathuis (2010) as a comparable alternative method to regularization methods for variable selection. This paper addresses two important issues related to partial correlation based variable selection method: (a) whether this method is sensitive to normality assumption, and (b) whether this method is valid when the dimension of predictor increases in an exponential rate of the sample size. To address issue (a), we systematically study this method for elliptical linear regression models. Our finding indicates that the original proposal may lead to inferior performance when the marginal kurtosis of predictor is not close to that of normal distribution. Our simulation results further confirm this finding. To ensure the superior performance of partial correlation based variable selection procedure, we propose a thresholded partial correlation (TPC) approach to select significant variables in linear regression models. We establish the selection consistency of the TPC in the presence of ultrahigh dimensional predictors. Since the TPC procedure includes the original proposal as a special case, our theoretical results address the issue (b) directly. As a by-product, the sure screening property of the first step of TPC was obtained. The numerical examples also illustrate that the TPC is competitively comparable to the commonly-used regularization methods for variable selection.

  10. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans lacking nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Kinghorn, J R; Pateman, J A

    1976-01-01

    Ten mutants of Aspergillus nidulans lacking nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) have been isolated, and their mutations (gdhB1 through gdhB10) have been shown to lie in the gdhB gene. In addition, a temperature-sensitive gdhB mutant (gdhB11) has been isolated. A revertant (designated R-5) of the mutant gdhB1 bears an additional lesion in the gdhB gene and has altered NAD-GDH activity with altered Km values for ammonia or ammonium ions and for alpha-ketoglutarate. These results suggest that gdhB specifies a structural component for NAD-GDH. The growth characteristics of gdhB mutants indicate the routes by which amino acids are utilized as nitrogen and carbon energy sources. The properties are described of the double mutants bearing the mutations gdhB1 and gdhA1 or tamA119, which have low NADP-GDH activity. PMID:173707

  11. 32 CFR 751.13 - Partial payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Claims Against the United States § 751.13 Partial payments. (a) Partial payments when hardship exists... payment by message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MRP-2). (c) Effect of partial payment. Partial... claim when final payment is made. (b) Marine hardship payments. The Marine claimant's Transportation...

  12. 32 CFR 751.13 - Partial payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Claims Against the United States § 751.13 Partial payments. (a) Partial payments when hardship exists... payment by message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MRP-2). (c) Effect of partial payment. Partial... claim when final payment is made. (b) Marine hardship payments. The Marine claimant's Transportation...

  13. 32 CFR 751.13 - Partial payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Claims Against the United States § 751.13 Partial payments. (a) Partial payments when hardship exists... payment by message from the Commandant of the Marine Corps (MRP-2). (c) Effect of partial payment. Partial... claim when final payment is made. (b) Marine hardship payments. The Marine claimant's Transportation...

  14. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; ...

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  15. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.

  16. Interview accuracy in partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Besocke, Ana Gabriela; Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Valiensi, Stella Maris; Cristiano, Edgardo; Garcia, María del Carmen

    2009-11-01

    The statistical concept of accuracy has never been applied to verify the history data collected on seizure disorders by open format interview. We compared patients'/witnesses' descriptions of epileptic seizures with videotaped seizure characteristics and analyzed the accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), specificity (SP), false-positive rate (FPR), and false-negative rate (FNR) of various components of the semiology in patients with partial epilepsy. Language disturbances, complex automatisms, and autonomic signs have high ACC and intermediate FNRs. This means that these manifestations are most obvious to the witness/patient and, therefore, are memorized easily. Dystonic posturing and upper limb automatisms have the highest FNRs, leading to low ACC. These are very subtle signs, not vigorous enough to be paid attention to, but their predictive value in partial epilepsy syndromes is relatively high. We believe these signs need to be directly sought in the interview, because often the patient/witness pays limited attention to them.

  17. The marketing of partial hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Millsap, P; Brown, E; Kiser, L; Pruitt, D

    1987-09-01

    Health-care professionals are currently operating in the context of a rapidly changing health-care delivery system, including the move away from inpatient services to outpatient services in order to control costs. Those who practice in partial-hospital settings are in a position to offer effective, cost-efficient services; however, there continue to be obstacles which hinder appropriate utilization of the modality. The development and use of a well-designed marketing plan is one strategy for removing these obstacles. This paper presents a brief overview of the marketing process, ideas for developing a marketing plan, and several examples of specific marketing strategies as well as ways to monitor their effectiveness. Partial-hospital providers must take an active role in answering the calls for alternative sources of psychiatric care. A comprehensive, education-oriented marketing approach will increase the public's awareness of such alternatives and enable programs to survive in a competitive environment.

  18. Partial polarization by quantum distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Hochrainer, Armin; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-03-01

    We establish that a connection exists between wave-particle duality of photons and partial polarization of a light beam. We perform a two-path lowest-order (single photon) interference experiment and demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the degree of polarization of the light beam emerging from an output of the interferometer depends on path distinguishability. In our experiment, we are able to change the quantum state of the emerging photon from a pure state to a fully mixed state without any direct interaction with the photon. Although most lowest-order interference experiments can be explained by classical theory, our experiment has no genuine classical analog. Our results show that a case exists where the cause of partial polarization is beyond the scope of classical theory.

  19. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  20. Microflora of partially processed lettuce.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, J A; King, A D; Török, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria, yeasts, and molds isolated from partially processed iceberg lettuce were taxonomically classified. The majority of bacterial isolates were gram-negative rods. Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Serratia species were commonly found. Yeasts most frequently isolated from lettuce included members of the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Pichia, Torulaspora, and Trichosporon. Comparatively few molds were isolated; members of the genera Rhizopus, Cladosporium, Phoma, Aspergillus, and Penicillium were identified.

  1. Matching games with partial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laureti, Paolo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2003-06-01

    We analyze different ways of pairing agents in a bipartite matching problem, with regard to its scaling properties and to the distribution of individual “satisfactions”. Then we explore the role of partial information and bounded rationality in a generalized Marriage Problem, comparing the benefits obtained by self-searching and by a matchmaker. Finally we propose a modified matching game intended to mimic the way consumers’ information makes firms to enhance the quality of their products in a competitive market.

  2. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K. ); Warnow, T.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n[sup 3]) time and from POM experiments in O(n[sup 4]) time.

  3. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K.; Warnow, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n{sup 3}) time and from POM experiments in O(n{sup 4}) time.

  4. Highly expressed amino acid biosynthesis genes revealed by global gene expression analysis of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis during growth in whole egg are not essential for this growth.

    PubMed

    Jakočiūnė, Džiuginta; Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Jelsbak, Lotte; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-05-02

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is the most common cause of egg borne salmonellosis in many parts of the world. This study analyzed gene expression of this bacterium during growth in whole egg, and whether highly expressed genes were essential for the growth. High quality RNA was extracted from S. Enteritidis using a modified RNA-extraction protocol. Global gene expression during growth in whole egg was compared to growth in LB-medium using DNA array method. Twenty-six genes were significantly upregulated during growth in egg; these belonged to amino acid biosynthesis, di/oligopeptide transport system, biotin synthesis, ferrous iron transport system, and type III secretion system. Significant downregulation of 15 genes related to formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) and trehalose metabolism was observed. The results suggested that S. Enteritidis is starved for amino-acids, biotin and iron when growing in egg. However, site specific mutation of amino acid biosynthesis genes asnA (17.3 fold upregulated), asnB (18.6 fold upregulated), asnA/asnB and, serA (12.0 fold upregulated) and gdhA (3.7 fold upregulated), did not result in growth attenuation, suggesting that biosynthesis using the enzymes encoded from these genes may represent the first choice for S. Enteritidis when growing in egg, but when absent, the bacterium could use alte