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Sample records for partial medial meniscectomy

  1. The effects of neuromuscular exercise on medial knee joint load post-arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy: ‘SCOPEX’ a randomised control trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Meniscectomy is a risk factor for knee osteoarthritis, with increased medial joint loading a likely contributor to the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis in this group. Therefore, post-surgical rehabilitation or interventions that reduce medial knee joint loading have the potential to reduce the risk of developing or progressing osteoarthritis. The primary purpose of this randomised, assessor-blind controlled trial is to determine the effects of a home-based, physiotherapist-supervised neuromuscular exercise program on medial knee joint load during functional tasks in people who have recently undergone a partial medial meniscectomy. Methods/design 62 people aged 30–50 years who have undergone an arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomy within the previous 3 to 12 months will be recruited and randomly assigned to a neuromuscular exercise or control group using concealed allocation. The neuromuscular exercise group will attend 8 supervised exercise sessions with a physiotherapist and will perform 6 exercises at home, at least 3 times per week for 12 weeks. The control group will not receive the neuromuscular training program. Blinded assessment will be performed at baseline and immediately following the 12-week intervention. The primary outcomes are change in the peak external knee adduction moment measured by 3-dimensional analysis during normal paced walking and one-leg rise. Secondary outcomes include the change in peak external knee adduction moment during fast pace walking and one-leg hop and change in the knee adduction moment impulse during walking, one-leg rise and one-leg hop, knee and hip muscle strength, electromyographic muscle activation patterns, objective measures of physical function, as well as self-reported measures of physical function and symptoms and additional biomechanical parameters. Discussion The findings from this trial will provide evidence regarding the effect of a home-based, physiotherapist

  2. RNA Microarray Analysis of Macroscopically Normal Articular Cartilage from Knees Undergoing Partial Medial Meniscectomy: Potential Prediction of the Risk for Developing Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Linda J.; Zhang, Bo; Wright, Rick W.; Brophy, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (i) To provide baseline knowledge of gene expression in macroscopically normal articular cartilage, (ii) to test the hypothesis that age, body-mass-index (BMI), and sex are associated with cartilage RNA transcriptome, and (iii) to predict individuals at potential risk for developing “pre-osteoarthritis” (OA) based on screening of genetic risk-alleles associated with OA and gene transcripts differentially expressed between normal and OA cartilage. Design Healthy-appearing cartilage was obtained from the medial femoral notch of 12 knees with a meniscus tear undergoing arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Cartilage had no radiographic, magnetic-resonance-imaging or arthroscopic evidence for degeneration. RNA was subjected to Affymetrix microarrays followed by validation of selected transcripts by microfluidic digital polymerase-chain-reaction. The underlying biological processes were explored computationally. Transcriptome-wide gene expression was probed for association with known OA genetic risk-alleles assembled from published literature and for comparison with gene transcripts differentially expressed between healthy and OA cartilage from other studies. Results We generated a list of 27,641 gene transcripts in healthy cartilage. Several gene transcripts representing numerous biological processes were correlated with age and BMI and differentially expressed by sex. Based on disease-specific Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, gene transcripts associated with aging were enriched for bone/cartilage disease while the gene expression profile associated with BMI was enriched for growth-plate calcification and OA. When segregated by genetic risk-alleles, two clusters of study patients emerged, one cluster containing transcripts predicted by risk studies. When segregated by OA-associated gene transcripts, three clusters of study patients emerged, one of which is remarkably similar to gene expression pattern in OA. Conclusions Our study provides a list of gene

  3. Arthroscopic Meniscectomy for Medial Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears in Patients under Age 45

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Lee, Seung-Yup; Chay, Suhwoo; Lim, Hong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical features, and outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) for isolated medial meniscus horizontal cleavage tears (MMHCTs) in patients under 45 years of age. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 98 patients (100 knees) under 45 years who underwent APM for MMHCTs. Clinical outcomes were assessed using International Knee Document Committee (IKDC) subjective core, Tegner activity scale, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, and a question on the symptom relief. Results 79% were male and 70% had no trauma. The mean symptom duration was 10 months. At arthroscopy, a flap tear was identified in 75%. At a mean of 19-month follow-up, the IKDC subjective score, Tegner activity scale, and VAS pain score were significantly improved compared to the preoperative values (p=0.025, p=0.043, and p=0.032, respectively). While 85% were free of symptoms, 15% had persistent pain. No significant differences in outcomes were observed based on the tear type and the presence of flap tears. No progression or development of radiographic degenerative changes was observed in all knees. Conclusions Demographics of MMHCTs under age 45 showed a male dominance and higher frequency of non-traumatic tears. APM was beneficial to symptomatic HCTs in this cohort during the short-term follow-up. Type of HCTs and combined flap tears did not affect clinical outcomes. PMID:27595077

  4. Arthroscopic Meniscectomy for Medial Meniscus Horizontal Cleavage Tears in Patients under Age 45

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Gyoon; Lee, Seung-Yup; Chay, Suhwoo; Lim, Hong Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the demographics, clinical features, and outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) for isolated medial meniscus horizontal cleavage tears (MMHCTs) in patients under 45 years of age. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 98 patients (100 knees) under 45 years who underwent APM for MMHCTs. Clinical outcomes were assessed using International Knee Document Committee (IKDC) subjective core, Tegner activity scale, visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, and a question on the symptom relief. Results 79% were male and 70% had no trauma. The mean symptom duration was 10 months. At arthroscopy, a flap tear was identified in 75%. At a mean of 19-month follow-up, the IKDC subjective score, Tegner activity scale, and VAS pain score were significantly improved compared to the preoperative values (p=0.025, p=0.043, and p=0.032, respectively). While 85% were free of symptoms, 15% had persistent pain. No significant differences in outcomes were observed based on the tear type and the presence of flap tears. No progression or development of radiographic degenerative changes was observed in all knees. Conclusions Demographics of MMHCTs under age 45 showed a male dominance and higher frequency of non-traumatic tears. APM was beneficial to symptomatic HCTs in this cohort during the short-term follow-up. Type of HCTs and combined flap tears did not affect clinical outcomes.

  5. Rapid chondrolysis after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in athletes: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazunari; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Sakai, Hiroshige; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2006-12-01

    We present a patient with a severe chondrolysis after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy in a 17-year-old high school basketball player. This is a rare but severe complication after arthroscopic partial lateral meniscectomy. At 7 months after the first operation, a second-look arthroscopy showed numerous cartilaginous debris floating in the knee and a high-grade cartilage damage on the lateral compartment of the tibia. This unexpected complication and a consideration of its etiology are shown.

  6. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in middle-aged patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis: a protocol for a double-blind, randomized sham-controlled multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy has been shown to be of no benefit to patients with concomitant knee osteoarthritis, but the optimal treatment of a degenerative meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis is unknown. This article describes the rationale and methodology of a randomized sham-controlled trial to assess the benefit of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy of a medial meniscus tear in patients with mild or no knee osteoarthritis. The objective of the study is to test whether the benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in patients with knee pain, medial meniscus lesion and mild/no knee osteoarthritis, is greater after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy than following sham surgery. Methods We will conduct a randomized controlled trial of treatment for degenerative meniscus tears in middle-aged patients (aged 35–55 years) with an MRI-verified medial meniscus lesion and mild or no knee radiographic osteoarthritis (grade 0–2 on the Kellgren & Lawrence scale). Patients will be randomized to receive either conventional arthroscopic partial meniscectomy or a sham surgery procedure. The primary outcome will be the KOOS5 derived from the ‘Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score’ at 2 years follow-up. Secondary outcomes at 2 years will include all five individual subscales of the KOOS, a global perceived effect score, the Short-Form-36 health status score, EQ-5D for economic appraisal and objective tests of muscle strength and physical function. Radiographic knee osteoarthritis will be evaluated at 5 years. Discussion Demonstration of no additional benefit from arthroscopic partial meniscectomy on pain and function should lead to a change in clinical care of patients with a degenerative meniscus tear. The results of this study will provide empirical evidence for the potential benefit/harm of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy compared to a masked sham-therapeutics intervention. Trial registration NCT01264991 PMID

  7. Torn discoid lateral meniscus treated using partial central meniscectomy and suture of the peripheral tear.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo; Uchio, Yuji; Kuriwaka, Masakazu; Shinomiya, Rikuo

    2004-05-01

    We present the cases of 5 patients with a torn discoid lateral meniscus treated using partial central meniscectomy in conjunction with the suture repair of the tear. The patients were 4 boys and 1 girl with a mean age of 15.4 years (range, 11 to 17). Preoperatively, all patients complained of knee pain during daily or sports activities. At the final follow-up evaluation, more than 2 years later, 4 patients' conditions were graded as excellent and 1 patient's condition was graded as fair according to Ikeuchi's grading scale. The average Lysholm score improved from 83.4 points (range, 70-90) to 95.8 points (range, 89-100) postoperatively. In the 3 patients who underwent second-look arthroscopy, complete healing was seen in 2 patients. One patient had severe degenerative changes in the meniscus; the repaired site was not united and required an additional partial meniscectomy along the tear. We believe that with the current advancement in arthroscopic meniscal repair techniques, a partial central meniscectomy in conjunction with the suture repair of the peripheral tear can be effective treatment for patients with a torn complete or incomplete discoid meniscus.

  8. Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Meniscal Tears: A Review and Commentary on a Study by NEJM.

    PubMed

    Scillia, Anthony J; McDermott, James D; Issa, Kimona; Goljan, Peter; Harwin, Steven F; Festa, Anthony; McInerney, Vincent K

    2016-07-01

    Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) has been demonstrated to be effective when performed in the appropriately indicated patient. However, a recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) questioned whether or not the procedure actually had any clinical benefit whatsoever. Despite being a prospective, Level 1, randomized study, there are several aspects of the study that must be taken into consideration when interpreting the findings, including but not limited to the patient selection criteria, limited sample size, and lack of information regarding meniscal tear patterns. This study will critically review the recently published NEJM article, as well as analyze and assess the current body of APM literature.

  9. A multi-scale finite element model for investigation of chondrocyte mechanics in normal and medial meniscectomy human knee joint during walking.

    PubMed

    Tanska, Petri; Mononen, Mika E; Korhonen, Rami K

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical signals experienced by chondrocytes (articular cartilage cells) modulate cell synthesis and cartilage health. Multi-scale modeling can be used to study how forces are transferred from joint surfaces through tissues to chondrocytes. Therefore, estimation of chondrocyte behavior during certain physical activities, such as walking, could provide information about how cells respond to normal and abnormal loading in joints. In this study, a 3D multi-scale model was developed for evaluating chondrocyte and surrounding peri- and extracellular matrix responses during gait loading within healthy and medial meniscectomy knee joints. The knee joint geometry was based on MRI, whereas the input used for gait loading was obtained from the literature. Femoral and tibial cartilages were modeled as fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic materials, whereas menisci were considered as transversely isotropic. Fluid pressures in the chondrocyte and cartilage tissue increased up to 2MPa (an increase of 30%) in the meniscectomy joint compared to the normal, healthy joint. The elevated level of fluid pressure was observed during the entire stance phase of gait. A medial meniscectomy caused substantially larger (up to 60%) changes in maximum principal strains in the chondrocyte compared to those in the peri- or extracellular matrices. Chondrocyte volume or morphology did not change substantially due to a medial meniscectomy. Current findings suggest that during walking chondrocyte deformations are not substantially altered due to a medial meniscectomy, while abnormal joint loading exposes chondrocytes to elevated levels of fluid pressure and maximum principal strains (compared to strains in the peri- or extracellular matrices). These might contribute to cell viability and the onset of osteoarthritis.

  10. Effects of Viscoseal, a synovial fluid substitute, on recovery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and joint lavage.

    PubMed

    Mathies, B

    2006-01-01

    This was a pilot, single blind, randomised, controlled study in patients requiring partial meniscectomy. The aim was to assess whether replacing the synovial fluid lost during arthroscopy with a hyaluronic acid-containing synovial fluid substitute (Viscoseal) would reduce the severity and duration of post-operative symptoms during the 4 weeks post-surgery, in comparison to the standard arthroscopy procedure alone. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to either undergo arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone (control group: n=25) or to receive 10 ml Viscoseal into the joint at the end of the procedure (Viscoseal group: n=25). Forty patients (20 per group) completed the study. Despite the small patient population in this pilot study, some interesting results were obtained. On Day 1 after surgery, the mean values for pain at rest (VAS) increased in both groups but this increase was lower in the Viscoseal group (8.9+/-23.1 mm) than in the standard therapy group (20.0+/-25.9 mm) (Mann-Whitney statistic MW-S: P=0.0525) and remained in favour of Viscoseal for the first 3 days after surgery. Joint swelling decreased to a greater extent in the Viscoseal group with an observed superiority at Day 7 (MW-S: P=0.1187) and a proven superiority at Days 12 (MW-S: P=0.015) and 28 (MW-S: P=0.0072). Diclofenac intake was lower in the Viscoseal group from Day 3 to Day 28 with a proven superiority (LB-CI > 0.5) in favour of Viscoseal on Days 3 (MW-S: P = 0.0093), 4 (MW-S: P= 0.0075), and 7 (MW-S: P = 0.0195) indicating that the product had an NSAID-sparing effect. Viscoseal was safe and well-tolerated and no adverse reactions occurred during the study. These findings indicate that Viscoseal may be useful as a synovial fluid substitute after arthroscopy.

  11. Combined Effect of Bilateral Ovariectomy and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection With Medial Meniscectomy on the Development of Osteoarthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the combined effect of bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MM) on the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Twenty female 15-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Five rats in each group underwent bilateral OVX (OVX group), bilateral ACLT with MM (ACLT with MM group), bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM (OVX plus ACLT with MM group), and sham surgery (SHAM group). All the rats were subjected to treadmill running for 4 weeks. The behavioral evaluation for induction of OA used the number of rears method, and this was conducted at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-surgery. Bone mineral density (BMD) was calculated with micro-computerized tomography images and the modified Mankin's scoring was used for the histological changes. Results The number of rears in the OVX plus ACLT with MM group decreased gradually and more rapidly in the ACLT with MM group. Histologically, the OVX plus ACLT with MM group had a significantly higher modified Mankin's score than the OVX group (p=0.008) and the SHAM group (p=0.008). BMDs of the OVX plus ACLT with MM group were significantly lower than the SHAM group (p=0.002), and the ACLT with MM group (p=0.003). Conclusion We found that bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM induced definite OA change in terms of histology and BMD compared to bilateral OVX and ACLT with MM alone. Therefore, OVX and ACLT with MM was an appropriate degenerative OA rat model.

  12. Combined Effect of Bilateral Ovariectomy and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Transection With Medial Meniscectomy on the Development of Osteoarthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the combined effect of bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) and anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) with medial meniscectomy (MM) on the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Twenty female 15-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Five rats in each group underwent bilateral OVX (OVX group), bilateral ACLT with MM (ACLT with MM group), bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM (OVX plus ACLT with MM group), and sham surgery (SHAM group). All the rats were subjected to treadmill running for 4 weeks. The behavioral evaluation for induction of OA used the number of rears method, and this was conducted at 1, 2, and 4 weeks post-surgery. Bone mineral density (BMD) was calculated with micro-computerized tomography images and the modified Mankin's scoring was used for the histological changes. Results The number of rears in the OVX plus ACLT with MM group decreased gradually and more rapidly in the ACLT with MM group. Histologically, the OVX plus ACLT with MM group had a significantly higher modified Mankin's score than the OVX group (p=0.008) and the SHAM group (p=0.008). BMDs of the OVX plus ACLT with MM group were significantly lower than the SHAM group (p=0.002), and the ACLT with MM group (p=0.003). Conclusion We found that bilateral OVX plus ACLT with MM induced definite OA change in terms of histology and BMD compared to bilateral OVX and ACLT with MM alone. Therefore, OVX and ACLT with MM was an appropriate degenerative OA rat model. PMID:27606264

  13. Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detects Changes in Meniscal Volume in Vivo After Partial Meniscectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Megan E.; Tung, Glenn A.; Oksendahl, Heidi L.; Hulstyn, Michael J.; Fadale, Paul D.; Machan, Jason T.; Fleming, Braden C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Quantifying changes in meniscal volume in vivo before and after partial meniscectomy (PM) could help elucidate the mechanisms involved in osteoarthritis development after meniscal injury and its surgical treatment. Purpose/Hypothesis To determine whether quantitative MRI (qMRI) could detect the immediate reduction in meniscal volume created by PM, while ruling out changes in unresected structures. We hypothesized that qMRI would be reliable for determining meniscal volume within the repeated images of unresected menisci. Additionally, we expected no significant difference in volume between the uninjured menisci of the injured knees and the same menisci of the uninjured knees. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Ten subjects with meniscal tears were evaluated with 3T MRI before and after arthroscopic PM. Manual segmentation was used to create models of the menisci and to determine the pre- and post-operative meniscal volumes for each subject. The responsiveness and reliability of qMRI for determining meniscal volume in vivo were evaluated using these measurements. We expected a decrease in volume of the resected menisci, but not in the uninjured menisci, after surgery. Results The mean pre-operative volume of the injured menisci was significantly greater than the mean post-operative volume (2896±277mm3 vs. 2480±277mm3; p=0.000). There was no significant difference between the mean pre- and post-operative volumes of the uninjured menisci (2687±256mm3 vs. 2694±256mm3; p=1.000). Conclusions Manual segmentation demonstrated a significant reduction in the volume of the surgically resected menisci after PM, but no significant change in the volume of unresected meniscal tissue, indicating that the manual segmentation method is responsive. Clinical Relevance This approach offers a novel, reliable method to study the relationship between the volume of meniscal tissue removed during PM and subsequent patient outcomes during long-term clinical

  14. Editorial Commentary: Book? … Book Report? … or Just a New Chapter in an Ongoing Story?: Knee Partial Meniscectomy Has Limited Benefit for "Nonobstructive" Meniscal Tears, but We Need to Know if Patients Have Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Knee partial meniscectomy has limited benefit for "nonobstructive" meniscal tears, but we need to know if included patients have osteoarthritis. Research on outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus nonsurgical treatment must consider not only signs and symptoms but also imaging findings, to determine the indications for surgical versus nonsurgical in a selected patient. PMID:27594333

  15. Editorial Commentary: Book? … Book Report? … or Just a New Chapter in an Ongoing Story?: Knee Partial Meniscectomy Has Limited Benefit for "Nonobstructive" Meniscal Tears, but We Need to Know if Patients Have Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Daniel B

    2016-09-01

    Knee partial meniscectomy has limited benefit for "nonobstructive" meniscal tears, but we need to know if included patients have osteoarthritis. Research on outcomes of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy versus nonsurgical treatment must consider not only signs and symptoms but also imaging findings, to determine the indications for surgical versus nonsurgical in a selected patient.

  16. The combined effect of frontal plane tibiofemoral knee angle and meniscectomy on the cartilage contact stresses and strains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nicholas; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid; Canavan, Paul K

    2009-11-01

    Abnormal tibiofemoral alignment can create loading conditions at the knee that may lead to the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). The degenerative changes of the articular cartilage may occur earlier and with greater severity in individuals with abnormal frontal plane tibiofemoral alignment who undergo a partial or total meniscectomy. In this investigation, subject specific 3D finite element knee models were created from magnetic resonance images of two female subjects to study the combined effect of frontal plane tibiofemoral alignment and total and partial meniscectomy on the stress and strain at the knee cartilage. Different amounts of medial and lateral meniscectomies were modeled and subject specific loading conditions were determined from motion analysis and force platform data during single-leg support. The results showed that the maximum stresses and strains occurred on the medial tibial cartilage after medial meniscectomy but a greater percentage change in the contact stresses and strains occurred in the lateral cartilage after lateral meniscectomy for both subjects due to the resultant greater load bearing role of the lateral meniscus. The results indicate that individual's frontal plane knee alignment and their unique local force distribution between the cartilage and meniscus play an important role in the biomechanical effects of total and partial meniscectomy.

  17. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial’s inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider

  18. Finnish Degenerative Meniscal Lesion Study (FIDELITY): a protocol for a randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial on the efficacy of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for patients with degenerative meniscus injury with a novel ‘RCT within-a-cohort’ study design

    PubMed Central

    Sihvonen, Raine; Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Järvinen, Teppo L N

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) to treat degenerative meniscus injury is the most common orthopaedic procedure. However, valid evidence of the efficacy of APM is lacking. Controlling for the placebo effect of any medical intervention is important, but seems particularly pertinent for the assessment of APM, as the symptoms commonly attributed to a degenerative meniscal injury (medial joint line symptoms and perceived disability) are subjective and display considerable fluctuation, and accordingly difficult to gauge objectively. Methods and analysis A multicentre, parallel randomised, placebo surgery controlled trial is being carried out to assess the efficacy of APM for patients from 35 to 65 years of age with a degenerative meniscus injury. Patients with degenerative medial meniscus tear and medial joint line symptoms, without clinical or radiographic osteoarthritis of the index knee, were enrolled and then randomly assigned (1 : 1) to either APM or diagnostic arthroscopy (placebo surgery). Patients are followed up for 12 months. According to the prior power calculation, 140 patients were randomised. The two randomised patient groups will be compared at 12 months with intention-to-treat analysis. To safeguard against bias, patients, healthcare providers, data collectors, data analysts, outcome adjudicators and the researchers interpreting the findings will be blind to the patients’ interventions (APM/placebo). Primary outcomes are Lysholm knee score (a generic knee instrument), knee pain (using a numerical rating scale), and WOMET score (a disease-specific, health-related quality of life index). The secondary outcome is 15D (a generic quality of life instrument). Further, in one of the five centres recruiting patients for the randomised controlled trial (RCT), all patients scheduled for knee arthroscopy due to a degenerative meniscus injury are prospectively followed up using the same protocol as in the RCT to provide an external

  19. Results of meniscectomy and meniscal repair in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DELEDDA, DAVIDE; ROSSO, FEDERICA; COTTINO, UMBERTO; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    Meniscal tears are commonly associated with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. A deficient medial meniscus results in knee instability and could lead to higher stress forces on the ACL reconstruction. Comparison of results in meniscectomy and meniscal repairs revealed worse clinical outcomes in meniscectomy, but higher re-operation rates in meniscal repairs. Our aim was to review the results of ACL reconstruction associated with meniscectomy or meniscal repair. PMID:26889472

  20. Effects of radial tears and partial meniscectomy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics during the stance phase of the gait cycle--A 3D finite element study.

    PubMed

    Mononen, Mika E; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Korhonen, Rami K

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate influences of radial tears and partial meniscectomy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics during normal walking by using computational modeling. A 3D geometry of a knee joint of a healthy patient was obtained from our previous study, whereas the data of normal walking were taken from the literature. Cartilage tissue was modeled as a fibril reinforced poroviscoelastic material, whereas meniscal tissue was modeled as a transverse isotropic elastic material. The realistic gait cycle data were implemented into the computational model and the effects of radial tears and partial meniscectemy of lateral meniscus on the knee joint mechanics were simulated. Middle, posterior, and anterior radial tears in lateral meniscus increased stresses by 300%, 430%, and 1530%, respectively, at the ends of tears compared to corresponding areas in the model with intact lateral meniscus. Meniscus tears did not alter stresses and strains at the tibial cartilage surface, whereas partial meniscectomy increased contact pressures, stresses, strains and pore pressures in the tibial cartilage by 50%, 44%, 21%, and 43%, respectively. Increased stresses and strains were observed primarily during the first ∼50% of the stance phase of the gait cycle. The present study suggests that anterior radial tear causes the highest risk for the development of total meniscal rupture, whereas partial meniscectomy increases the risk for the development of OA in lateral tibial cartilage. Highest risks for meniscus and cartilage failures are suggested to occur during the loading response and mid-stance of the gait cycle. In the future, the present modeling may be further developed to offer a clinical tool for aid in decision making of clinical interventions for patients with knee joint injuries.

  1. Effect of continuous passive motion on the results of TMJ meniscectomy. Part I: Comparison of chewing movement.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; Bessette, R W; Maruyama, T

    1996-07-01

    In order to evaluate the therapeutic effect of continuous passive motion (CPM) on the outcome of TMJ meniscectomy, chewing movement was analyzed before surgery and six months after surgery in 31 patients receiving CPM (CPM group), 26 patients without CPM (non-CPM group), and in ten normal subjects. The surgical procedure consisted of either total meniscectomy or partial meniscectomy with disk repair. It was found that chewing in patients receiving CPM was closer to the normal range than for patients in the non-CPM group. The results from the CPM group demonstrated chewing parameters for patients with partial meniscectomy returning to the normal range. However, for the patients with total meniscectomy, some parameters remained out of the normal range. From these results, we conclude that CPM has a positive influence on the outcome of TMJ surgery. PMID:9110610

  2. Transosseous Medial Meniscal Root Repair Using a Modified Mason-Allen Suture Configuration.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Chad D; Hanzlik, Shane R; Caldwell, Paul E; Pearson, Sara E

    2015-12-01

    Medial meniscal tears are among the most common injuries to the knee joint. Loss of the meniscus has been linked to increased contact pressures on the adjacent articular cartilage and progression of degenerative changes in the knee. A subset of tears known as "root tears" involves the insertion of the posterior horn of the meniscus to the bone. Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for root tears led to undesirable outcomes, which prompted surgeons to explore restorative procedures. Multiple repair techniques have been presented with an emphasis placed on initial secure fixation and stimulation of potential healing. We present an arthroscopic-assisted technique for medial meniscal root repair with these goals in mind. PMID:27284511

  3. Landing adaptations following isolated lateral meniscectomy in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Minning, Stephen J.; Myer, Gregory D.; Mangine, Robert E.; Colosimo, Angelo J.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Objective functional outcomes following isolated radial lateral meniscus tears in the athlete between the ages of 14–25 are not clearly defined. The objective of this study was to determine whether patients following lateral meniscectomy demonstrate lower extremity asymmetries relative to control athletes 3 months after surgery. We hypothesized that following lateral meniscectomy, athletes aged 14–25 years old would demonstrate altered landing biomechanics compared to sex, age, height, weight, and sport-matched controls. Methods A total of 18 subjects were included in this study. Nine patients (7 men and 2 women, 20.1 ± 2.8 years) who had undergone first-time isolated radial lateral meniscus tears were tested 3 months following partial lateral meniscectomies and compared to nine sex, age, height, weight, and sport-matched controls (7 men and 2 women, 19.7 ± 3.1 years). A ten-camera motion analysis system and two force platforms were used to collect three trials of bilateral drop landings. A 2X2 ANOVA was used to test the interaction between side (involved vs. uninvolved) and group (patient vs. control). Results The patient group landed with a decreased internal knee extensor moment compared to the uninvolved side and controls (interaction P < 0.05). The involved limb quadriceps isokinetic torque was not decreased compared to the contralateral or control (n.s.). Decreased knee extensor moments were significantly associated with reduced measures of function (IKDC scores: r = 0.69; P < 0.05). Conclusions Athletes who return to sport at approximately 3 months following a partial lateral meniscectomy may employ compensation strategies during landing as evidenced by reduced quadriceps recruitment and functional outcome scores. Clinicians should focus on improving quadriceps function during landing on the involved leg in an attempt to decrease residual limb asymmetries. Level of evidence Case–control study, Level III. PMID:21468616

  4. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient. PMID:27656305

  5. Symptomatic Bilateral Torn Discoid Medial Meniscus Treated with Saucerization and Suture

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Discoid meniscus is an anatomical congenital anomaly more often found in the lateral meniscus. A discoid medial meniscus is a very rare anomaly, and even more rare is to diagnose a bilateral discoid medial meniscus although the real prevalence of this situation is unknown because not all the discoid medial menisci are symptomatic and if the contralateral knee is not symptomatic then it is not usually studied. The standard treatment of this kind of pathology is partial meniscectomy. Currently the tendency is to be very conservative so suture and saucerization of a torn discoid meniscus when possible are gaining support. We present the case of a 13-year-old patient who was diagnosed with symptomatic torn bilateral discoid medial meniscus treated by suturing the tear and saucerization. To the best of our knowledge this is the first case reported of bilateral torn discoid medial meniscus treated in this manner in the same patient.

  6. Medial meniscal cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Spina, Mauro; Sabbioni, Giacomo; Tigani, Domenico

    2008-12-01

    Meniscal cysts are a rare disease constantly combined with a horizontal meniscal lesion. Currently, nuclear magnetic resonance (MRI) is the main diagnostic tool, because of its high sensitivity and specificity, and decompression arthroscopy combined with selective meniscectomy is the treatment of choice. The Authors report a case of a voluminous medial meniscal cyst where instrumental examination, MRI, was fundamental for the preoperative diagnosis of the horizontal meniscal lesion causing the cystic degeneration of the meniscus. The treatment performed was selective meniscectomy of the body and posterior horn of the medial meniscus and decompression of the voluminous cyst by arthroscopy. Physical examination after six months showed the complete resolution of swelling at the medial hemirima, no walking pain and normal range of motion.

  7. Controversial role of arthroscopic meniscectomy of the knee: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Austin Y; Shalvoy, Robert M; Voisinet, Anne; Racine, Jennifer; Aaron, Roy K

    2016-01-01

    The role of arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) in reducing pain and improving function in patients with meniscal tears remains controversial. Five recent high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared non-operative management of meniscal tears to APM, with four showing no difference and one demonstrating superiority of APM. In this review, we examined the strengths and weaknesses of each of these RCTs, with particular attention to the occurrence of inadvertent biases. We also completed a quantitative analysis that compares treatment successes in each treatment arm, considering crossovers as treatment failures. Our analysis revealed that each study was an excellent attempt to compare APM with non-surgical treatment but suffered from selection, performance, detection, and/or transfer biases that reduce confidence in its conclusions. While the RCT remains the methodological gold standard for establishing treatment efficacy, the use of an RCT design does not in itself ensure internal or external validity. Furthermore, under our alternative analysis of treatment successes, two studies had significantly more treatment successes in the APM arm than the non-operative arm although original intention-to-treat analyses showed no difference between these two groups. Crossovers remain an important problem in surgical trials with no perfect analytical solution. With the studies available at present, no conclusion can be drawn concerning the optimal treatment modality for meniscal tears. Further work that minimizes significant biases and crossovers and incorporates sub-group and cost-benefit analyses may clarify therapeutic indications. PMID:27190756

  8. Regeneration of whole meniscus using meniscal cells and polymer scaffolds in a rabbit total meniscectomy model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Woong; Son, Sun-Mi; Lee, Jae-Sun; Lee, Eung-Seok; Lee, Kwon-Yong; Park, Sang-Guk; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2006-09-01

    The current treatments of meniscal lesion in knee joint are not perfect to prevent adverse effects of meniscus injury. Tissue engineering of meniscus using meniscal cells and polymer scaffolds could be an alternative option to treat meniscus injury. This study reports on the regeneration of whole medial meniscus in a rabbit total meniscectomy model using the tissue engineering technique. Biodegradable scaffolds in a meniscal shape were fabricated from polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber meshes that were mechanically reinforced by bonding PGA fibers at cross points with 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). The compressive modulus of the bonded PGA scaffold was 28-fold higher than that of nonbonded scaffold. Allogeneic meniscal cells were isolated from rabbit meniscus biopsy and cultured in vitro. The expanded meniscal cells were seeded onto the polymer scaffolds, cultured in vitro for 1 week, and transplanted to rabbit knee joints from which medial menisci were removed. Ten or 36 weeks after transplantation, the implants formed neomenisci with the original scaffold shape maintained approximately. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of the sections of the neomenisci at 6 and 10 weeks revealed the regeneration of fibrocartilage. Safranin-O staining showed that abundant proteoglycan was present in the neomenisci at 10 weeks. Masson's trichrome staining indicated the presence of collagen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the presence of type I and II collagen in neomenisci at 10 weeks was similar to that of normal meniscal tissue. Biochemical and biomechanical analyses of the tissue-engineered menisci at 36 weeks were performed to determine the quality of the tissue-engineered menisci. Tissue-engineered meniscus showed differences in collagen content and aggregate modulus in comparison with native meniscus. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the feasibility of regenerating whole meniscal cartilage in a rabbit total meniscectomy model using the tissue engineering

  9. Regeneration of whole meniscus using meniscal cells and polymer scaffolds in a rabbit total meniscectomy model.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sun-Woong; Son, Sun-Mi; Lee, Jae-Sun; Lee, Eung-Seok; Lee, Kwon-Yong; Park, Sang-Guk; Park, Jung-Ho; Kim, Byung-Soo

    2006-06-15

    The current treatments of meniscal lesion in knee joint are not perfect to prevent adverse effects of meniscus injury. Tissue engineering of meniscus using meniscal cells and polymer scaffolds could be an alternative option to treat meniscus injury. This study reports on the regeneration of whole medial meniscus in a rabbit total meniscectomy model using the tissue engineering technique. Biodegradable scaffolds in a meniscal shape were fabricated from polyglycolic acid (PGA) fiber meshes that were mechanically reinforced by bonding PGA fibers at cross points with 75:25 poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). The compressive modulus of the bonded PGA scaffold was 28-fold higher than that of nonbonded scaffold. Allogeneic meniscal cells were isolated from rabbit meniscus biopsy and cultured in vitro. The expanded meniscal cells were seeded onto the polymer scaffolds, cultured in vitro for 1 week, and transplanted to rabbit knee joints from which medial menisci were removed. Ten or 36 weeks after transplantation, the implants formed neomenisci with the original scaffold shape maintained approximately. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of the sections of the neomenisci at 6 and 10 weeks revealed the regeneration of fibrocartilage. Safranin-O staining showed that abundant proteoglycan was present in the neomenisci at 10 weeks. Masson's trichrome staining indicated the presence of collagen. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the presence of type I and II collagen in neomenisci at 10 weeks was similar to that of normal meniscal tissue. Biochemical and biomechanical analyses of the tissue-engineered menisci at 36 weeks were performed to determine the quality of the tissue-engineered menisci. Tissue-engineered meniscus showed differences in collagen content and aggregate modulus in comparison with native meniscus. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the feasibility of regenerating whole meniscal cartilage in a rabbit total meniscectomy model using the tissue engineering

  10. Cytotoxic lesion of the medial prefrontal cortex abolishes the partial reinforcement extinction effect, attenuates prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and induces transient hyperlocomotion, while sparing spontaneous object recognition memory in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yee, B K

    2000-01-01

    The partial reinforcement extinction effect refers to the increase in resistance to extinction of an operant response acquired under partial reinforcement relative to that acquired under continuous reinforcement. Prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response refers to the reduction in startle reactivity towards an intense acoustic pulse stimulus when it is shortly preceded by a weak prepulse stimulus. These two behavioural phenomena appear to be related to different forms of attentional processes. While the prepulse inhibition effect reflects an inherent early attentional gating mechanism, the partial reinforcement extinction effect is believed to involve the development of acquired inattention, i.e. the latter requires the animals to learn about what to and what not to attend. Impairments in prepulse inhibition and the partial reinforcement extinction effect have been independently linked to the neuropsychology of attentional dysfunctions seen in schizophrenia. The proposed neural substrates underlying these behaviourial phenomena also appear to overlap considerably: both focus on the nucleus accumbens and emphasize the functional importance of its limbic afferents, including that originating from the medial prefrontal cortex, on accumbal output/activity. The present study demonstrated that cytotoxic medial prefrontal cortex lesions which typically damaged the prelimbic, the infralimbic and the dorsal anterior cingulate areas could lead to the abolition of the partial reinforcement extinction effect and the attenuation of prepulse inhibition. The lesions also resulted in a transient elevation of spontaneous locomotor activity. In contrast, the same lesions spared performance in a spontaneous object recognition memory test, in which the lesioned animals displayed normal preference for a novel object when the novel object was presented in conjunction with a familiar object seen 10 min earlier within an open field arena. The present results lend support to the

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Krych, Aaron John; Reardon, Patrick J.; Pareek, Ayoosh; Peter, Logan; Dahm, Diane L.; Levy, Bruce A.; Stuart, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Medial meniscus posterior root tears (MMPRTs) present a unique challenge for both patients and surgeons as these tears have shown to be biomechanically equivalent to complete meniscectomy. However, little is known about the natural history of these lesions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to describe the clinical course of MMPRTs with respect to subsequent operative and non-operative treatments, and associated comorbidities. Methods: Over 2600 MRIs were identified by searching radiologist reads for the terms “root” or “root tear” from 2005-2013. Presence or absence of MMPRTs and other associated boney, meniscal, or ligamentous injuries were identified and recorded. Of these MRIs, 102 MRIs from 102 patients who had unrepaired MMPRTs with minimum 2-year follow-up and no prior ligamentous surgery were followed. These MRIs were evaluated to confirm the presence of a meniscal root tear and the presence or absence of associated meniscal or ligamentous injuries, as well as meniscal extrusion, subchondral edema, or insufficiency fractures. Chart review was performed to obtain the treatment summary after diagnosis. Radiographs from before and after the diagnosis of MMPRT were reviewed and Kellgren-Lawrence scores were determined. Finally, the association between concomitant boney, ligamentous, or meniscal injuries, patient factors, and rate of arthroplasty, as well as final Kellgren-Lawrence scores were evaluated. Chi-square analysis was used for categorical variables, and Wilcoxon Rank-Sums was used for continuous variables. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the effect of meniscal extrusion on the time-dependant rate of arthroplasty. Results: 104 patients (43 M:61F) were diagnosed with MMPRTs at a mean age of 54±13. These patients were followed for a mean of 66±26 months. 75 (74%) patients had associated meniscal extrusion, 64 (62%) had associated subchondral edema, and 14 (13%) had associated insufficiency fractures at the time of

  12. Image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ge; Baek, Nakhoon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Techniques that originate in computer graphics and computer vision have found prominent applications in the medical domain. In this paper, we have seamlessly developed techniques from computer graphics and computer vision together with domain knowledge from medicine to develop an image guided surgical system for medialization laryngoplasty. The technical focus of this paper is to register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. With careful analysis of the real-world surgical environment, we have developed an ICP-based partial shape matching algorithm to register the partially visible anatomical structure to the preoperative CT data. We extracted distinguishable features from the human thyroid cartilage surface and applied image space template matching to find the initial guess for the shape matching. The experimental result shows that our feature-based partial shape matching method has better performance and robustness compared with original ICP-based shape matching method. Although this paper concentrates on the medialization laryngoplasty procedure, its generality makes our methods ideal for future applications in other image guided surgical areas. PMID:20664748

  13. Traction apophysitis of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Ishii, T; Miyagawa, S; Hayashi, K

    1994-09-01

    We report the cases of three children with chronic injuries of the medial tibial malleolus caused by traction injuries during sport. All three had the triad of swelling of the medial malleolus, tenderness over its anterior part, and pain on forced valgus movement of the foot. Radiographs showed bilateral accessory ossification centres and MRI demonstrated partial avulsion or avulsion fracture of the apophyseal cartilage and fragmentation of the accessory centres. A review of 134 young basketball players showed that 25% had tenderness of the anterior medial malleolus. This high rate indicates that traction apophysitis of the medial malleolus is not uncommon in children as a sports-related disorder.

  14. Medial dislocation of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Chan, S K L; Robb, C A; Singh, T; Chugh, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the first reported case of symptomatic medial dislocation of the medial meniscus in a patient who had no previous history of trauma and who had an otherwise normal knee. The treatment of instability of the medial meniscus is controversial and studies have indicated that certain individuals without a firm meniscal bony insertion may be predisposed to meniscal dislocation. In our patient, the meniscal instability interfered with daily activities. Operative stabilisation by reconstruction of the meniscotibial ligaments cured the symptoms.

  15. Arthroscopic Medial Meniscus Posterior Root Fixation Using a Modified Mason-Allen Stitch

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyu Sung; Ha, Jeong Ku; Ra, Ho Jong; Kim, Jin Goo

    2016-01-01

    A complete radial tear of the meniscus posterior root, which can effectively cause a state of total meniscectomy via loss of hoop tension, requires that the torn root be repaired. Several methods have been used to repair medial meniscus posterior root tears, most of which are based on a simple stitch technique that is known to have stitch-holding strength. We applied a modified version of the Mason-Allen stitch technique, which is recognized as a method for rotator cuff repair surgery because its locking effect overcomes the potential weakness of simple stitches. This article introduces the medial meniscus posterior root tears repair procedure based on a modified Mason-Allen stitch technique in which 2 strands (i.e., 1 simple horizontal and 1 simple vertical stitch) are used. PMID:27073778

  16. Arthroscopic contact Nd:YAG laser meniscectomy: basic science, surgical technique, and clinical follow up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Stephen J.; Fealy, Stephen V.; Gibney, Mary A.; Miller, Drew V.; Kelly, Anne M.

    1990-06-01

    Recent basic science studies (5) have provided a scientific foundation for the use of the Contact Nd:YAG Laser as an arthroscopic tool for xneniscal resection and acroxnioplasty of the shoulder in a saline medium. This study prospectively evaluates the results of a three stage laboratory investigation as well as the clinical results of arthroscopic xneniscal resection. Fifteen patients with meniscal tears underwent subtotal meniscectomies utilizing a Contact Nd:YAG Laser (Surgical Laser Technologies; Malvern, Pennsylvania) . This was done in a saline medium with an average laser wattage of 25 W, (range 20 W to 30 W). Patients were evaluated postoperatively with reference to subjective and objective parameters at one week and four weeks postoperatively. Patients were evaluated with regard to wound healing, intraarticular swelling and pain. Assessment of technical parameters such as ease of resection, time of resection and instrument access were compared to conventional instruments. All fifteen patients were rated as having clinically excellent results based on pain relief, wound healing and swelling. In addition, although there was increased time with setting up the laser and calibrating it, there was not an increase in time for meniscal resection. Little, or no, secondary "trimmuning" was necessary with the laser. Increased accessibility was noted due to the small size of the laser. Arthroscopic Contact Nd:YAG Laser surgery is a safe and effective tool for menisca]. resection and coagulation in arthroscopic acromioplasties. It provides significant advantages over conventional cutting instruments with regard to accessibility and reduced need for secondary instruments.

  17. Medial subtalar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Kinik, H; Oktay, O; Arikan, M; Mergen, E

    1999-01-01

    We report a medial subtalar dislocation without fracture in an eighteen year old male injured during basketball game. He was successfully treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. At one year follow-up he was symptomless.

  18. Self-efficacy, physical activity and health-related quality of life in middle-aged meniscectomy patients and controls.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Y B; Ringsberg, K; Dahlberg, L E

    2011-12-01

    Our purpose was to examine self-efficacy of knee function, physical activity (PA) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in post-meniscectomy patients and controls as well as to explore the impact of gender and the association between outcomes. Ninety-nine post-meniscectomy patients (27% women), mean age 44.5 years, mean (range) of follow-up time 3 (1-5) years, and 94 controls (34% women), mean age 45 years, completed the following questionnaires: the Knee Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES(ABC) ), the Physical Activity Scale (PAS) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36). Patients scored lower than controls in K-SES(ABC) and in the SF-36 subscales Physical Functioning and Bodily Pain (P≤0.002). Forty-six percent of the patients had resumed pre-injury PA, but current PA did not differ between the groups. In the patients, K-SES(ABC) correlated strongly with four physical SF-36 subscales and one mental scale (Vitality) (r(s) =0.56-0.85, P<0.001) and moderately with three subscales: (r(s) =0.35-0.46, P<0.001) and with PAS (r(s) =0.42, P<0.001). Females scored lower than males in K-SES(ABC) (P=0.006) and in four SF-36 subscales (P<0.04), but reported similar PA as men. We conclude that meniscectomy in middle-aged individuals may lead to lower self-efficacy of knee function, a sedentary lifestyle and poorer HRQoL.

  19. Acute medial elbow ruptures.

    PubMed

    Norwood, L A; Shook, J A; Andrews, J R

    1981-01-01

    Disruption of the ulnar collateral ligament, flexor muscles, and anterior elbow capsule may result from valgus vector forces and subsequently cause difficulty in throwing, pulling, pushing and catching. Complete medial elbow tears were diagnosed acutely in four elbows by abduction stress tests at 15 degrees of flexion. Three elbows had associated ulnar nerve compression. We repaired torn medial structures by direct suture without ligamentous reconstruction. We also decompressed ulnar nerves and performed one anterior transposition. Full range of motion, strength, and return to previous functional level was attained without infection, neurovascular compression, or myositis ossificans.

  20. Medial plica syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sznajderman, Tal; Smorgick, Yossi; Lindner, Dror; Beer, Yiftah; Agar, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Synovial plicae are membranous inward folds of the synovial lining of the knee joint capsula. Such folds are regularly found in the human knee, but most are asymptomatic and of little clinical consequence. However, they can become symptomatic and cause knee pain. In this review, we will discuss medial plica syndrome. Medial plica irritation of the knee is a common source of anterior knee pain. The main complaint is an intermittent, dull, aching pain in the area medial to the patella above the joint line and in the supramedial patellar area. Pain increases with activity, especially when knee flexion and extension are required. Treatment includes physiotherapy, reducing activity, and rest. In cases that do not respond initially to an exercise program, corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal antiinflammatory medication are given. Results of conservative treatment seem to be more appropriate in young patients with a short duration of symptoms. If conservative treatment fails, surgical treatment using arthroscopy is appropriate. During arthroscopy, excision of the whole plica should be achieved. PMID:19344015

  1. Arthroscopic treatment of symptomatic type D medial plica.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Mustafa; Asik, Mehmet; Akpinar, Sercan; Ciftci, Feyyaz; Cesur, Necip; Tandogan, Reha N

    2008-12-01

    We aimed to review the results of subtotal arthroscopic resection of symptomatic type D medial plica. We retrospectively evaluated 23 knees with symptomatic type D medial plica in 22 patients without other intra-articular pathology. All patients complained of chronic knee pain that had not been alleviated by medical treatment or physical therapy. In only three (13%) of the patients studied was the plica diagnosed pre-operatively with magnetic resonance imaging. The type D medial plicae in our series were classified as fenestrated (14 knees), torn (5 knees), or reduplicated (4 knees). Fibrotic changes in the plicae and degenerative changes on the medial femoral condyle were found in 16 knees Patellofemoral chondromalacia was present in three knees Arthroscopic partial resection was performed in all patients. Comparative Lysholm Knee Scale scores before and after surgery revealed a significant clinical improvement (pre-operative status, 67.19 +/- 8.05 vs. post-operative status, 90.57 +/- 9.80; P < 0.001). Type D medial plica should be considered as a possible cause of chronic knee pain. Arthroscopic partial resection of the plicae in symptomatic patients gives satisfactory results.

  2. Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... often occur among active teens, especially athletes. A torn medial collateral ligament (MCL) — a ligament that helps ... the more serious injuries. Teens who have a torn MCL tend to play contact sports, like football ...

  3. Height ridges of oriented medialness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furst, Jacob David

    Shape analysis of objects is an important aspect of medical image processing. Information gained from shape analysis can be used for object segmentation, object- based registration and object visualization. One shape analysis tool is the core, defined to be a height ridge of a medial strength measure made on an image. In this dissertation I present 3D cores, defined here to be optimal scale-orientation height ridges of oriented medial strength measurements. This dissertation covers (1)a medial strength measurement, Blum- like medialness, that is robust, efficient, and insensitive to intrafigural interference, (2)a new definition for a ridge, the optimal parameter height ridge, and its properties, and (3)an algorithm, Marching Ridges, for extracting cores. The medial strength measurement uses Gaussian derivatives, so is insensitive to noise, and responds to object boundaries at points rather than on entire spheres, so is faster to calculate and less sensitive to boundaries of other image figures. The Marching Ridges algorithm uses the grid structure of the image domain to identify ridge points as zero-crossings of first derivatives and to track ridges through the image domain. I include results of this algorithm on medical images of cerebral vasculature, a skull, kidneys, and brain ventricles.

  4. Early seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures and its surgical implication.

    PubMed

    Usui, Naotaka; Mihara, Tadahiro; Baba, Koichi; Matsuda, Kazumi; Tottori, Takayasu; Umeoka, Shuichi; Nakamura, Fumihiro; Terada, Kiyohito; Usui, Keiko; Inoue, Yushi

    2008-12-01

    Intracranial EEG documentation of seizure propagation from the occipital lobe to medial temporal structures is relatively rare. We retrospectively analyzed intracranial EEG recorded with electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe in patients who underwent occipital lobe surgery. Four patients with occipital lesions, who underwent intracranial EEG monitoring with intracerebral electrodes implanted in the medial temporal lobe prior to occipital lobe surgery, were studied. Subdural electrodes were placed over the occipital lobe and adjacent areas. Intracerebral electrodes were implanted into bilateral hippocampi and the amygdala in three patients, and in the hippocampus and amygdala ipsilateral to the lesion in one. In light of the intracranial EEG findings, the occipital lobe was resected but the medial temporal lobe was spared in all patients. The follow-up period ranged from six to 16 years, and seizure outcome was Engel Class I in all patients. Sixty six seizures were analyzed. The majority of the seizures originated from the occipital lobe. In complex partial seizures, ictal discharges propagated to the medial temporal lobe. No seizures originating from the temporal lobe were documented. In some seizures, the ictal-onset zone could not be identified. In these seizures, very early propagation to the medial temporal lobe was observed. Interictal spikes were recorded in the medial temporal lobe in all cases. Intracranial EEG revealed very early involvement of the medial temporal lobe in some seizures. Seizure control was achieved without resection of the medial temporal structures.

  5. Medial elbow stability. Clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Pincivero, D M; Heinrichs, K; Perrin, D H

    1994-08-01

    Medial elbow injuries of athletes, such as baseball pitchers and javelin throwers, can prove to be debilitating and may have a negative effect on performance. The most significant injury to the elbow occurs is an ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) sprain or rupture, which compromises the medial stability of the elbow joint. It has been found that the anterior oblique portion of the UCL is the primary stabiliser of the elbow, and that trauma to this complex may significantly hinder normal elbow function. An accurate diagnosis will dictate the degree of injury to the elbow as well as determine the most appropriate means of treatment.

  6. Medial epicondylitis: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nirav H; Kumar, Neil S; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2015-06-01

    Medial epicondylitis, often referred to as "golfer's elbow," is a common pathology. Flexor-pronator tendon degeneration occurs with repetitive forced wrist extension and forearm supination during activities involving wrist flexion and forearm pronation. A staged process of pathologic change in the tendon can result in structural breakdown and irreparable fibrosis or calcification. Patients typically report persistent medial-sided elbow pain that is exacerbated by daily activities. Athletes may be particularly symptomatic during the late cocking or early acceleration phases of the throwing motion. Nonsurgical supportive care includes activity modification, NSAIDs, and corticosteroid injections. Once the acute symptomology is alleviated, focus is turned to flexor-pronator mass rehabilitation and injury prevention. Surgical treatment via open techniques is typically reserved for patients with persistent symptoms.

  7. Acute and chronic response of meniscal fibrocartilage to holmium:YAG laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horan, Patrick J.; Popovic, Neven A.; Islinger, Richard B.; Kuklo, Timothy R.; Dick, Edward J.

    1997-05-01

    The acute and chronic (10 week) histological effects of the holmium:YAG laser during partial meniscectomy in an in vivo rabbit model were investigated. Twenty-four adult male New Zealand rabbits underwent bilateral parapatellar medial knee arthrotomies. In the right knee, a partial medial meniscectomy was done through the avascular zone using a standard surgical blade. In the left knee, an anatomically similar partial medial meniscectomy was performed using a Ho:YAG laser (Coherent, USA). This study indicates that the laser creates two zones of damage in the meniscal fibrocartilage and that the zone of thermal change may act as a barrier to healing. The zone of thermal change which is eventually debrided was thought at the time of surgery to be viable. In the laser cut menisci, the synovium appears to have greater inflammation early and to be equivalent with the scalpel cut after three weeks. At all time periods there appeared more cellular damage in the laser specimens.

  8. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA.

  9. Medial Compartment Decompression by Fibular Osteotomy to Treat Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-You; Chen, Wei; Li, Cun-Xiang; Wang, Juan; Shao, De-Cheng; Hou, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Shi-Jun; Wang, Fei; Li, Ji-Dong; Hao, Jian-Dong; Chen, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Ying-Ze

    2015-12-01

    Compared with high tibial osteotomy and total knee arthroplasty, the authors found a simpler surgical procedure, partial fibular osteotomy, could effectively relieve knee pain and also correct the varus deformity for patients with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA). From January 1996 to April 2012, a total of 156 patients with medial compartment OA were treated by proximal fibular osteotomy in the authors' hospital. A 2-cm-long section of fibula was resected 6 to 10 cm below the fibular head. A total of 110 patients with follow-up of more than 2 years were included in the study, including 34 males and 76 females with an average age of 59.2 years. Anteroposterior and lateral weight-bearing radiographs, the femorotibial angle (FTA) and lateral joint space, and the American Knee Society Score (KSS) and the visual analog scale (VAS) score of the knee joint were evaluated preoperatively and at final follow-up, respectively. At final follow-up, mean FTA and lateral joint space were 179.4°±1.8° and 6.9±0.7 mm, respectively, which were significantly smaller than those measured preoperatively (182.7°±2.0° and 12.2±1.1 mm, respectively; both P<.001). Mean KSS at final follow-up was 92.3±31.7, significantly higher than the mean preoperative score of 45.0±21.3 (P<.001). Mean VAS score and interquartile range were 2.0 and 2.0, significantly lower than the preoperative data (7 and 1.0, respectively; P<.001). The authors found that proximal fibular osteotomy can significantly improve both the radiographic appearance and function of the affected knee joint and also achieve long-term pain relief. This procedure may be an alternative treatment option for medial compartment OA. PMID:26652332

  10. Sulfasalazine attenuates ACL transection and medial menisectomy-induced cartilage destruction by inhibition of cystine/glutamate antiporter.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Yuan; Tsai, Ru-Yin; Liu, Chih-Chung; Wu, Jia-Lin; Wong, Chih-Shung

    2016-04-01

    We had previously demonstrated that excitatory amino acid glutamate plays a role in the progression and severity of knee osteoarthritis (OA), and early hyaluronic acid injection attenuates the OA progression by attenuation of knee joint glutamate level, which was also related to the cystine/glutamate antiporter system X (system XC-) expression. System XC- uptakes cystine into chondrocytes for glutathione (GSH) synthesis, but the role of system XC- in OA is rarely addressed. Sulfasalazine (SSZ) is a system XC- inhibitor; SSZ was applied intra-articularly to study the function of system XC- in the development of OA in rats subjected to anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscectomy (ACLT + MMx). Moerover, the system XC- activator N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was also applied to verify the role of system XC-. The intra-articular injection of SSZ significantly attenuated knee swelling and cartilage destruction in the knees of ACLT + MMx rats and this effect was blocked by NAC. The results showed that inhibition of system XC- function can attenuate ACLT + MMx-induced cartilage destruction. In the present study, system XC- inhibitor SSZ was shown to reduce glutamate content in synovial fluid and GSH in chondrocytes. It was also showed SSZ could attenuate ACLT + MMx-induced cartilage destruction, and treatment of NAC reversed the protective effect of SSZ.

  11. Bottom-up Visual Integration in the Medial Parietal Lobe.

    PubMed

    Pflugshaupt, Tobias; Nösberger, Myriam; Gutbrod, Klemens; Weber, Konrad P; Linnebank, Michael; Brugger, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Largely based on findings from functional neuroimaging studies, the medial parietal lobe is known to contribute to internally directed cognitive processes such as visual imagery or episodic memory. Here, we present 2 patients with behavioral impairments that extend this view. Both had chronic unilateral lesions of nearly the entire medial parietal lobe, but in opposite hemispheres. Routine neuropsychological examination conducted >4 years after the onset of brain damage showed little deficits of minor severity. In contrast, both patients reported persistent unusual visual impairment. A comprehensive series of tachistoscopic experiments with lateralized stimulus presentation and comparison with healthy participants revealed partial visual hemiagnosia for stimuli presented to their contralesional hemifield, applying inferential single-case statistics to evaluate deficits and dissociations. Double dissociations were found in 4 experiments during which participants had to integrate more than one visual element, either through comparison or formation of a global gestalt. Against the background of recent neuroimaging findings, we conclude that of all medial parietal structures, the precuneus is the most likely candidate for a crucial involvement in such bottom-up visual integration.

  12. Myositis ossificans traumatica of the medial pterygoid.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, A; Vaidhyanathan, A; Narendar, R

    2011-05-01

    Myositis ossificans traumatica (MOT) is a non-neoplastic, heterotopic bone formation within muscle or fascia, presumably due to acute trauma, a burn, surgical manipulation, or repeated injury. A 36-year-old woman presented with progressive limitation of mouth opening over the past 5 months. Computed tomography revealed an irregular ossified mass attached to the medial aspect of the left ramus, extending to the medial and lateral pterygoid plates. MOT of the medial pterygoid is rare, with only four previously reported cases in the English language literature. Surgical excision of the ossification is the main treatment modality. The authors were able to establish a cleavage plane of 3 cm between the bony mass and the medial surface of the ramus. Abdominal fat was placed as an interpositional material to prevent fibrosis and heterotopic bone formation.

  13. Treatment of medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Ryan G; Bosco, Joseph A; Sherman, Orrin H

    2009-03-01

    The medial collateral ligament is the most frequently injured ligament of the knee. The anatomy and biomechanical role of this ligament and the associated posteromedial structures of the knee continue to be explored. Prophylactic knee bracing has shown promise in preventing injury to the medial collateral ligament, although perhaps at the cost of functional performance. Most isolated injuries are treated nonsurgically. Recent studies have investigated ligament-healing variables, including modalities such as ultrasound and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Concomitant damage to the anterior or posterior cruciate ligaments is a common indication to surgically address the high-grade medial collateral ligament injury. The optimal treatment of multiligamentous knee injuries continues to evolve, and controversy exists surrounding the role of medial collateral ligament repair/reconstruction, with data supporting both conservative and surgical management. PMID:19264708

  14. [Tibial periostitis ("medial tibial stress syndrome")].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Etienne

    2003-06-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome is characterised by complaints along the posteromedial tibia. Runners and athletes involved in jumping activities may develop this syndrome. Increased stress to stabilize the foot especially when excessive pronation is present explain the occurrence this lesion.

  15. Stress fractures of the medial malleolus.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K D; Fisher, D A; Rettig, A C; McCarroll, J R

    1988-01-01

    Six athletes, all engaged in running activities at the time of injury, presented with tenderness over the medial malleolus and ankle effusion. Three patients had a fracture line which could be seen on radiographs. These patients were treated by open reduction and internal fixation using two 4.0 cancellous screws. The other three patients had normal radiographs but bone scans showed increased uptake over the medial malleolus. These patients were treated with cast and immobilization. We believe that each of these patients suffered a stress fracture of the medial malleolus. We suggest that the possibility of a stress fracture be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with 1) chronic or subacute pain over the medial malleolus and ankle effusion, and 2) a history of running activity at the time of injury or running activities aggravating the pain. Bone scans appear to be more sensitive than radiographs in detecting a stress fracture of the medial malleolus. We propose that athletes with radiographic signs of a medial malleolar fracture who desire early return to full participation should be treated by open reduction and internal fixation. For these patients, early motion can be initiated. Other athletes whose fracture cannot be detected on radiographs but whose malleolus shows increased uptake in the area on bone scans can be treated nonsurgically with immobilization and then progressive increase in activity. All of our patients returned to full activity between 6 and 8 weeks after treatment was initiated.

  16. Snapping Knee Syndrome of the Medial Hamstrings.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Conkle, Sean B; Busch, Michael F

    2015-10-01

    Snapping of the medial hamstrings is a rare condition, with few cases reported throughout the literature. The snapping sensation reportedly occurs when a hamstring tendon passes over the medial tibial condyle, a muscle belly, or another tendon. The semitendinosus tendon is frequently involved, but concomitant involvement of the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons has also been described. Although the exact etiology remains unclear, authors have theorized that the condition results from a congenital malformation or degradation of the accessory tendinous expansions of the semitendinosus. Whereas most cases resolve with conservative treatments, select cases require surgical intervention. Both the distal surgical release and tendon harvest have proved viable surgical procedures, achieving symptom alleviation with minimal patient morbidity. In this article, a case of medial snapping hamstring tendons involving both the semitendinosus and gracilis tendons is reviewed. A 17-year-old African American girl presented with extreme pain and snapping on the posteromedial aspect of her knee was appreciated. Radiographs were ordered and showed no acute fracture, no acute dislocation, normal medial joint space, normal lateral joint space, and normal patellofemoral space. Conservative and surgical options were reviewed, and the patient elected to undergo harvest of the tendons. Four weeks postoperatively, the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms. To date, there has been no recurrence of symptoms. The authors hope to increase awareness of this condition and add to the existing body of literature. PMID:26488792

  17. Femoral Neck Version Affects Medial Femorotibial Loading

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, T. A.; Digas, Georgios; Bikos, Ch.; Karamoulas, V.; Magnissalis, E. A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a preliminary evaluation of the possible effect that femoral version may have on the bearing equilibrium conditions developed on the medial tibiofemoral compartment. A digital 3D solid model of the left physiological adult femur was used to create morphological variations of different neck-shaft angles (varus 115, normal 125, and valgus 135 degrees) and version angles (−10, 0, and +10 degrees). By means of finite element modeling and analysis techniques (FEM-FEA), a virtual experiment was executed with the femoral models aligned in a neutral upright position, distally supported on a fully congruent tibial tray and proximally loaded with a vertical only hip joint load of 2800 N. Equivalent stresses and their distribution on the medial compartment were computed and comparatively evaluated. Within our context, the neck-shaft angle proved to be of rather indifferent influence. Reduction of femoral version, however, appeared as the most influencing parameter regarding the tendency of the medial compartment to establish its bearing equilibrium towards posteromedial directions, as a consequence of the corresponding anteroposterior changes of the hip centre over the horizontal tibiofemoral plane. We found a correlation between femoral anteversion and medial tibiofemoral compartment contact pressure. Our findings will be further elucidated by more sophisticated FEM-FEA and by clinical studies that are currently planned. PMID:24959355

  18. Affective Aprosodia from a Medial Frontal Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilman, Kenneth M.; Leon, Susan A.; Rosenbek, John C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and objectives: Whereas injury to the left hemisphere induces aphasia, injury to the right hemisphere's perisylvian region induces an impairment of emotional speech prosody (affective aprosodia). Left-sided medial frontal lesions are associated with reduced verbal fluency with relatively intact comprehension and repetition…

  19. Empty Consonants in Root-Medial Position.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlett, Stephen A.

    This analysis of verb morphology in Seri finds evidence that empty consonants occur in root-medial position. Analysis focuses on the parallel conjugation patterns of the verbs for "know" and "give," finding an empty consonant slot in the middle of each. This position is never preceded by a consonant, so it never appears as a geminated consonant,…

  20. Partial Triceps Disruption

    PubMed Central

    Foulk, David M.; Galloway, Marc T.

    2011-01-01

    Partial triceps tendon disruptions are a rare injury that can lead to debilitating outcomes if misdiagnosed or managed inappropriately. The clinician should have a high index of suspicion when the mechanism involves a fall onto an outstretched arm and there is resultant elbow extension weakness along with pain and swelling. The most common location of rupture is at the tendon-osseous junction. This case report illustrates a partial triceps tendon disruption with involvement of, primarily, the medial head and the superficial expansion. Physical examination displayed weakness with resisted elbow extension in a flexed position over 90°. Radiographs revealed a tiny fleck of bone proximal to the olecranon, but this drastically underestimated the extent of injury upon surgical exploration. Magnetic resonance imaging is essential to ascertain the percentage involvement of the tendon; it can be used for patient education and subsequently to determine treatment recommendations. Although excellent at finding associated pathology, it may misjudge the size of the tear. As such, physicians must consider associated comorbidities and patient characteristics when formulating treatment plans. PMID:23016005

  1. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique.

  2. [SECOT consensus on medial femorotibial osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; Silvestre, A; Carpintero, P

    2013-01-01

    A consensus, prepared by SECOT, is presented on the management of medial knee compartment osteoarthritis, in order to establish clinical criteria and recommendations directed at unifying the criteria in its management, dealing with the factors involved in the pathogenesis of medial femorotibial knee osteoarthritis, the usefulness of diagnostic imaging techniques, and the usefulness of arthroscopy. Conservative and surgical treatments are also analysed. The experts consulted showed a consensus (agreed or disagreed) in 65.8% of the items considered, leaving 14items where no consensus was found, which included the aetiopathogenesis of the osteoarthritis, the value of NMR in degenerative disease, the usefulness of COX-2 and the chondroprotective drugs, as well as on the ideal valgus tibial osteotomy technique. PMID:24169227

  3. Medial Cochlear Efferent Function: A Theoretical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountain, David C.

    2011-11-01

    Since the discovery of the cochlear efferent system, many hypotheses have been put forth for its function. These hypotheses for its function range from protecting the cochlea from over stimulation to improving the detection of sounds in noise. It is known that the medial efferent system innervates the outer hair cells and that stimulation of this system reduces basilar membrane and auditory nerve sensitivity which suggests that this system acts to decrease the gain of the cochlear amplifier. Here I present modeling results as well as analysis of published experimental data that suggest that the function of the medial efferent reflex is to decrease the cochlear amplifier gain by just the right amount so that the nonlinearity in the basilar membrane response lines up perfectly with the inner hair cell nonlinear transduction process to produce a hair cell receptor potential that is proportional to the logarithm of the sound pressure level.

  4. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ∼50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex. PMID:26176924

  5. Speed cells in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    PubMed

    Kropff, Emilio; Carmichael, James E; Moser, May-Britt; Moser, Edvard I

    2015-07-23

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex have spatial firing fields that repeat periodically in a hexagonal pattern. When animals move, activity is translated between grid cells in accordance with the animal's displacement in the environment. For this translation to occur, grid cells must have continuous access to information about instantaneous running speed. However, a powerful entorhinal speed signal has not been identified. Here we show that running speed is represented in the firing rate of a ubiquitous but functionally dedicated population of entorhinal neurons distinct from other cell populations of the local circuit, such as grid, head-direction and border cells. These 'speed cells' are characterized by a context-invariant positive, linear response to running speed, and share with grid cells a prospective bias of ∼50-80 ms. Our observations point to speed cells as a key component of the dynamic representation of self-location in the medial entorhinal cortex.

  6. Implicit medial representation for vessel segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizaine, Guillaume; Angelini, Elsa; Bloch, Isabelle; Makram-Ebeid, Sherif

    2011-03-01

    In the context of mathematical modeling of complex vessel tree structures with deformable models, we present a novel level set formulation to evolve both the vessel surface and its centerline. The implicit function is computed as the convolution of a geometric primitive, representing the centerline, with localized kernels of continuously-varying scales allowing accurate estimation of the vessel width. The centerline itself is derived as the characteristic function of an underlying signed medialness function, to enforce a tubular shape for the segmented object, and evolves under shape and medialness constraints. Given a set of initial medial loci and radii, this representation first allows for simultaneous recovery of the vessels centerlines and radii, thus enabling surface reconstruction. Secondly, due to the topological adaptivity of the level set segmentation setting, it can handle tree-like structures and bifurcations without additional junction detection schemes nor user inputs. We discuss the shape parameters involved, their tuning and their influence on the control of the segmented shapes, and we present some segmentation results on synthetic images, 2D angiographies, 3D rotational angiographies and 3D-CT scans.

  7. Medially constrained deformable modeling for segmentation of branching medial structures: Application to aortic valve segmentation and morphometry.

    PubMed

    Pouch, Alison M; Tian, Sijie; Takebe, Manabu; Yuan, Jiefu; Gorman, Robert; Cheung, Albert T; Wang, Hongzhi; Jackson, Benjamin M; Gorman, Joseph H; Gorman, Robert C; Yushkevich, Paul A

    2015-12-01

    Deformable modeling with medial axis representation is a useful means of segmenting and parametrically describing the shape of anatomical structures in medical images. Continuous medial representation (cm-rep) is a "skeleton-first" approach to deformable medial modeling that explicitly parameterizes an object's medial axis and derives the object's boundary algorithmically. Although cm-rep has effectively been used to segment and model a number of anatomical structures with non-branching medial topologies, the framework is challenging to apply to objects with branching medial geometries since branch curves in the medial axis are difficult to parameterize. In this work, we demonstrate the first clinical application of a new "boundary-first" deformable medial modeling paradigm, wherein an object's boundary is explicitly described and constraints are imposed on boundary geometry to preserve the branching configuration of the medial axis during model deformation. This "boundary-first" framework is leveraged to segment and morphologically analyze the aortic valve apparatus in 3D echocardiographic images. Relative to manual tracing, segmentation with deformable medial modeling achieves a mean boundary error of 0.41 ± 0.10 mm (approximately one voxel) in 22 3DE images of normal aortic valves at systole. Deformable medial modeling is additionally demonstrated on pathological cases, including aortic stenosis, Marfan syndrome, and bicuspid aortic valve disease. This study demonstrates a promising approach for quantitative 3DE analysis of aortic valve morphology.

  8. Epilepsy (partial)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction About 3% of people will be diagnosed with epilepsy during their lifetime, but about 70% of people with epilepsy eventually go into remission. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of starting antiepileptic drug treatment following a single seizure? What are the effects of drug monotherapy in people with partial epilepsy? What are the effects of additional drug treatments in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy? What is the risk of relapse in people in remission when withdrawing antiepileptic drugs? What are the effects of behavioural and psychological treatments for people with epilepsy? What are the effects of surgery in people with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to July 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 83 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antiepileptic drugs after a single seizure; monotherapy for partial epilepsy using carbamazepine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, phenobarbital, phenytoin, sodium valproate, or topiramate; addition of second-line drugs for drug-resistant partial epilepsy (allopurinol, eslicarbazepine, gabapentin, lacosamide, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, losigamone, oxcarbazepine, retigabine, tiagabine, topiramate, vigabatrin, or zonisamide); antiepileptic drug withdrawal for people with partial or

  9. Consensus Statement on Indications and Contraindications for Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Berend, Keith R; Berend, Michael E; Dalury, David F; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Dodd, Chris A; Scott, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Previous work, now nearly 30 years dated, is frequently cited as the "gold standard" for the indications and contraindications for medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). The purpose of this article is to review current literature on the indications and contraindications to UKA and develop a consensus statement based on those data. Six surgeons with a combined experience of performing more than 8,000 partial knee arthroplasties were surveyed. Surgeons then participated in a discussion, emerging proposal, collaborative modification, and final consensus phase. The final consensus on primary indications and contraindications is presented. Notably, the authors provide consensus on previous contraindications, which are no longer considered to be contraindications. The authors provide an updated and concise review of the current indications and contraindications for medial UKA using scientifically based consensus-building methodology. PMID:26731390

  10. [Medial femoral neck fracture. Controversies in treatment].

    PubMed

    Raaymakers, E L F B; Schafroth, M

    2002-02-01

    The treatment of the medial femoral neck fracture remains controversial until today. The goal of this paper is therefore, based on the literature, to show guidelines for optimal treatment: conservative treatment vs. operation, osteosynthesis vs. prosthesis, timing for osteosynthesis, open vs. closed reduction, choice of implant for osteosynthesis, postoperative treatment (weight bearing vs. non weight bearing), Pauwels-Osteotomy vs. prosthesis in cases op pseudarthrosis, femoral head prosthesis vs. total hip arthroplasty, bipolar vs. monopolar femoral head prosthesis, choice of classification. Further we want to point out which statements are evidence based and where we need further investigation.

  11. Area-Based Medial Axis of Planar Curves

    PubMed Central

    Niethammer, Marc; Betelu, Santiago; Sapiro, Guillermo; Tannenbaum, Allen; Giblin, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    A new definition of affine invariant medial axis of planar closed curves is introduced. A point belongs to the affine medial axis if and only if it is equidistant from at least two points of the curve, with the distance being a minimum and given by the areas between the curve and its corresponding chords. The medial axis is robust, eliminating the need for curve denoising. In a dynamical interpretation of this affine medial axis, the medial axis points are the affine shock positions of the affine erosion of the curve. We propose a simple method to compute the medial axis and give examples. We also demonstrate how to use this method to detect affine skew symmetry in real images. PMID:23710110

  12. The medial tibial stress syndrome. A cause of shin splints.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, S J; Gould, R N; Lee, Y F; Schmidt, D A; Hargens, A R

    1982-01-01

    The medial tibial stress syndrome is a symptom complex seen in athletes who complain of exercise-induced pain along the distal posterior-medial aspect of the tibia. Intramuscular pressures within the posterior compartments of the leg were measured in 12 patients with this disorder. These pressures were not elevated and therefore this syndrome is a not a compartment syndrome. Available information suggests that the medial tibial stress syndrome most likely represents a periostitis at this location of the leg.

  13. Medial malleolar stress fractures. Literature review, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Kor, Alex; Saltzman, Andrew T; Wempe, Patrick D

    2003-01-01

    Medial malleolar stress fractures are relatively uncommon injuries that can be quite debilitating and disabling. This article discusses the symptoms, diagnostic aids, pathomechanics, and management of medial malleolar stress fractures. Using three cases, the authors illustrate nonoperative versus operative treatments in an athlete and the influence of an in-season versus an off-season injury. A percutaneous cannulated screw fixation procedure is described that allowed an athlete to return to competition 24 days after sustaining a displaced medial malleolar stress fracture.

  14. [Medial epicondylitis. Etiology, diagnosis, therapeutic modalities].

    PubMed

    Tschantz, P; Meine, J

    1993-01-01

    Medial epicondylitis is rather uncommon, less frequent than external epicondylitis. For this reason, the diagnosis is thought of rather late. While taking the history, one should try to find out the possible causative effects. Symptoms of irritation of the cubital nerve, which are present in one out of five cases should be looked for. Several sports such as baseball, javelin or weight throwing, volleyball, climbing, tennis, golf, which need a strong flexion of the hand and fingers can induce this condition. However, in more than half of our patients, sports or professional activities were not in cause. The majority were housewives and do-it-yourself enthusiasts. Among our 55 operated cases, out of which few had professional or sports activities, we did not encounter during the operation the macroscopic tendinous lesions that are sometimes described by some authors. The treatment should be conservative in all cases. This includes rest, anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, muscular stretching, immobilisation in a cast, steroid infiltrations. One patient out of ten will have to be operated on. The operative techniques differ on some details, but they all include the desinsertion of the flexor muscles on the medial epicondyle. When there are clinical signs of irritation of the cubital nerve, it should be transposed anteriorly. The result of these operations is good in more than 90 per cent of the cases. However, a come back to professional sport can take as long as 8 months.

  15. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in patellar instability

    PubMed Central

    Krishna Kumar, MS; Renganathan, Sankarram; Joseph, Clement J; Easwar, TR; Rajan, David V

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is one of the major static medial stabilising structures of the patella. MPFL is most often damaged in patients with patellar instability. Reconstruction of MPFL is becoming a common surgical procedure in treating patellar instability. We hypothesised that MPFL reconstruction was adequate to treat patients with patellar instability if the tibial tubercle and the centre of the trochlear groove (TT-TG) value was less than 20 mm and without a dysplastic trochlea. Materials and Methods: 30 patients matching our inclusion criteria and operated between April 2009 and May 2011 were included in the study. MPFL reconstruction was performed using gracilis tendon fixed with endobutton on the patellar side and bio absorbable interference screw or staple on the femoral side. Patients were followed up with subjective criteria, Kujala score and Lysholm score. Results: The mean duration of followup was 25 months (range 14-38 months). The mean preoperative Kujala score was 47.5 and Lysholm score was 44.7. The mean postoperative Kujala score was 87 and Lysholm score was 88.06. None of the patients had redislocation. Conclusion: MPFL reconstruction using gracilis tendon gives excellent results in patients with patellar instability with no redislocations. Some patients may have persistence of apprehension. PMID:25298558

  16. MRI Volume of the Medial Frontal Cortex Predicts Financial Capacity in Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stoeckel, Luke E.; Stewart, Christopher C.; Griffith, H. Randall; Triebel, Kristen; C. Okonkwo, Ozioma; den Hollander, Jan A.; Martin, Roy C.; Belue, Katherine; Copeland, Jacquelynn N.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Brockington, John C.; Clark, David G.; Marson, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Persons with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have significant deficits in financial abilities. This study examined the relationship between brain structure volumes, cognition, and financial capacity in patients with mild AD. Sixteen mild AD patients and 16 older adult comparisons completed the Financial Capacity Instrument (FCI), a psychometric measure of financial abilities, and also underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain volumes of the bilateral hippocampi, angular gyri, precunei, and medial and dorsolateral frontal cortices. Mild AD patients performed significantly below comparisons on the FCI and had significantly smaller hippocampi. Among mild AD patients, FCI performance was moderately correlated with frontal (medial and dorsolateral frontal cortex) and posterior (angular gyri and precunei) cortical volumes. Stepwise regression demonstrated that medial frontal cortex volume predicted FCI score. The relationship between medial frontal cortex volume and overall FCI score was partially mediated by two measures of simple attention (DRS Attention, DRS Construction). The findings suggest that medial frontal cortex atrophy and associated declines in simple attention play an increasingly important role in declining financial skills in patients with mild AD. PMID:23504597

  17. Correction of Sunken Upper Eyelids by Anchoring the Central Fat Pad to the Medial Fat Pad during Upper Blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Myeong Su; Lee, Dong Lark; Shin, Hea Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Background Many methods have been proposed for the correction of sunken upper eyelids. These methods include surgical treatments, such as micro-fat, dermofat, or fascia-fat grafts, or the use of alloplastic materials. Here, we present our experience of sunken upper eyelid correction involving the simple addition of anchoring the central fat pad to the medial fat pad during upper blepharoplasty. Methods We performed 74 cases of upper blepharoplasty with sunken upper eyelid correction between October 2013 and September 2014. The lateral portion of the central fat pad was partially dissected to facilitate anchoring. The medial fat pad was gently exposed and then pulled out to facilitate anchoring. After the rotation of the dissected lateral portion of the central fat pad by 180° to the medial side, it was anchored spreading to the medial fat pad. Photographs taken at 6 months postoperatively were presented to three physicians for objective assessment. Of the 74 patients, 54 patients followed at 6 months postoperatively were included in this retrospective, objective assessment. Results Sunken eyelids were effectively corrected in 51 of the 54 patients, but 3 had minimal effect because preaponeurotic fat pads had been removed during previous upper blepharoplasty. In addition to correcting sunken eyelids, lateral bulging was corrected and a better definition of the lateral portion of upper lid creases was obtained. Conclusions Anchoring the central fat pad to the medial fat pad provides an effective means of correcting sunken upper eyelids during upper blepharoplasty. PMID:26217568

  18. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  19. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Lorraine K.; Monsch, Andreas U.; Taylor, Kirsten I.

    2012-01-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  20. Medial perirhinal cortex disambiguates confusable objects.

    PubMed

    Kivisaari, Sasa L; Tyler, Lorraine K; Monsch, Andreas U; Taylor, Kirsten I

    2012-12-01

    Our brain disambiguates the objects in our cluttered visual world seemingly effortlessly, enabling us to understand their significance and to act appropriately. The role of anteromedial temporal structures in this process, particularly the perirhinal cortex, is highly controversial. In some accounts, the perirhinal cortex is necessary for differentiating between perceptually and semantically confusable objects. Other models claim that the perirhinal cortex neither disambiguates perceptually confusable objects nor plays a unique role in semantic processing. One major hurdle to resolving this central debate is the fact that brain damage in human patients typically encompasses large portions of the anteromedial temporal lobe, such that the identification of individual substructures and precise neuroanatomical locus of the functional impairments has been difficult. We tested these competing accounts in patients with Alzheimer's disease with varying degrees of atrophy in anteromedial structures, including the perirhinal cortex. To assess the functional contribution of each anteromedial temporal region separately, we used a detailed region of interest approach. From each participant, we obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans and behavioural data from a picture naming task that contrasted naming performance with living and non-living things as a way of manipulating perceptual and semantic confusability; living things are more similar to one another than non-living things, which have more distinctive features. We manually traced neuroanatomical regions of interest on native-space cortical surface reconstructions to obtain mean thickness estimates for the lateral and medial perirhinal cortex and entorhinal cortex. Mean cortical thickness in each region of interest, and hippocampal volume, were submitted to regression analyses predicting naming performance. Importantly, atrophy of the medial perirhinal cortex, but not lateral perirhinal cortex, entorhinal cortex or

  1. Medial tibial stress syndrome: conservative treatment options.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R Michael; Lavallee, Mark E

    2009-10-07

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), commonly known as "shin splints," is a frequent injury of the lower extremity and one of the most common causes of exertional leg pain in athletes (Willems T, Med Sci Sports Exerc 39(2):330-339, 2007; Korkola M, Amendola A, Phys Sportsmed 29(6):35-50, 2001; Hreljac A, Med Sci Sports Exerc 36(5):845-849, 2004). Although often not serious, it can be quite disabling and progress to more serious complications if not treated properly. Often, the cause of MTSS is multi-factorial and involves training errors and various biomechanical abnormalities. Few advances have been made in the treatment of MTSS over the last few decades. Current treatment options are mostly based on expert opinion and clinical experience. The purpose of this article is to review published literature regarding conservative treatment options for MTSS and provide recommendations for sports medicine clinicians for improved treatment and patient outcomes.

  2. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  3. Medial septum regulates the hippocampal spatial representation

    PubMed Central

    Mamad, Omar; McNamara, Harold M.; Reilly, Richard B.; Tsanov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampal circuitry undergoes attentional modulation by the cholinergic medial septum. However, it is unclear how septal activation regulates the spatial properties of hippocampal neurons. We investigated here what is the functional effect of selective-cholinergic and non-selective septal stimulation on septo-hippocampal system. We show for the first time selective activation of cholinergic cells and their differential network effect in medial septum of freely-behaving transgenic rats. Our data show that depolarization of cholinergic septal neurons evokes frequency-dependent response from the non-cholinergic septal neurons and hippocampal interneurons. Our findings provide vital evidence that cholinergic effect on septo-hippocampal axis is behavior-dependent. During the active behavioral state the activation of septal cholinergic projections is insufficient to evoke significant change in the spiking of the hippocampal neurons. The efficiency of septo-hippocampal processing during active exploration relates to the firing patterns of the non-cholinergic theta-bursting cells. Non-selective septal theta-burst stimulation resets the spiking of hippocampal theta cells, increases theta synchronization, entrains the spiking of hippocampal place cells, and tunes the spatial properties in a timing-dependent manner. The spatial properties are augmented only when the stimulation is applied in the periphery of the place field or 400–650 ms before the animals approached the center of the field. In summary, our data show that selective cholinergic activation triggers a robust network effect in the septo-hippocampal system during inactive behavioral state, whereas the non-cholinergic septal activation regulates hippocampal functional properties during explorative behavior. Together, our findings uncover fast septal modulation on hippocampal network and reveal how septal inputs up-regulate and down-regulate the encoding of spatial representation. PMID:26175674

  4. Proximal Tibia Medial Biplanar Retrotubercle Open Wedge Osteotomy for Varus Knees with Medial Gonarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, İsmail; Esenkaya, İrfan; Ünay, Koray; Türkmensoy, Fatih; Özkut, Afşar Timuçin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early results of proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy for varus gonarthrosis and compare the results with the literatüre. Methods: The results of proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy for 23 knees of 22 patients with medial gonarthrosis were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Results: Twenty of the patients were female and two were male. Mean age of the patients was 56.24; mean boy mass index was 31.95 and preoperative HSS (Hospital for Special Surgery) score was 68.7. Mean tibiofemoral axis was 186.39° and mean Insall-Salvatti index value was 1.04 preoperatively. Mean follow up period was 30.19 months. Mean HSS score was 86.48, femorotibial anatomic axis angle was 175° and Insall-Salvati index value 1.06 during the last follow-up. The improvement of the HSS score and the femorotibial anatomic axis angle was statistically significant. However, the change in Insall Salvati index values was statistically insignificant. Nonfatal pulmonary embolus in 1 patient, and deep vein thrombosis that occured one year after the procedure in 1 patient, rhabdomyolysis in 1 patient and loss of correction (relapse) in 1 patient were encountered as complications. Conclusion: Our results show that proximal tibia medial biplanar retrotubercle open wedge osteotomy improves the frontal and sagittal plane deformities without changing the patellar tendon length. Hence, possible patellofemoral problems are prevented and the clinical results are improved.

  5. Medial Rectus Muscle Injuries after Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Demirayak, Bengi; Altıntaş, Özgül; Ağır, Hakan; Alagöz, Şahin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has improved the treatment of sinus disorders. However, various orbital complications have been reported, including optic nerve damage, orbital hemorrhage, infection, lacrimal drainage system injury, and strabismus. Complications are rare but may cause severe morbidity. We describe two patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery procedures that resulted in trauma to the medial rectus muscle. The first patient had medial rectus paresia due to contusional trauma and showed spontaneous resolution in a month. The other patient had an orbital medial wall defect with medial rectus injury and he underwent orbitotomy. Medial rectus innervation returned at postoperative 8 months. Several extraocular muscles may be traumatized during FESS. Timing and method of treatment are based on the severity and type of injury and the number of muscles involved. Treatment strategies are dependent on accurate interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:27800227

  6. Does location of patellofemoral chondral lesion influence outcome after Oxford medial compartmental knee arthroplasty?

    PubMed Central

    Konan, S.; Haddad, F. S.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is associated with successful outcomes in carefully selected patient cohorts. We hypothesised that severity and location of patellofemoral cartilage lesions significantly influences functional outcome after Oxford medial compartmental knee arthroplasty. Patients and Methods We reviewed 100 consecutive UKAs at minimum eight-year follow-up (96 to 132). A single surgeon performed all procedures. Patients were selected based on clinical and plain radiographic assessment. All patients had end-stage medial compartment osteoarthritis (OA) with sparing of the lateral compartment and intact anterior cruciate ligaments. None of the patients had end-stage patellofemoral OA, but patients with anterior knee pain or partial thickness chondral loss were not excluded. There were 57 male and 43 female patients. The mean age at surgery was 69 years (41 to 82). At surgery the joint was carefully inspected for patellofemoral chondral loss and this was documented based on severity of cartilage loss (0 to 4 Outerbridge grading) and topographic location (medial, lateral, central, and superior or inferior). Functional scores collected included Oxford Knee Score (OKS), patient satisfaction scale and University College Hospital (UCH) knee score. Intraclass correlation was used to compare chondral damage to outcomes. Results All patients documented significant improvement in pain and improved functional scores at mid-term follow-up. There were four revisions (mean 2.9 years, 2 to 4; standard deviation (sd) 0.9) in this cohort, three for tibial loosening and one for femoral loosening. There was one infection that was treated with debridement and insert exchange. The mean OKS improved from 23.2 (sd 7.1) to 39.1 (sd 6.9); p < 0.001. The cohort with central and lateral grade 3 patellofemoral OA documented lower mean satisfaction with pain (90, sd 11.8) and function (87.5, sd 10.3) on the patient satisfaction scale. On the UCH scale, patients

  7. Medial cortex fracture patterns after sagittal split osteotomy using short versus long medial cuts: can we obviate bad splits?

    PubMed

    Zamiri, B; Tabrizi, R; Shahidi, S; Pouzesh, A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the lingual fracture patterns after sagittal split osteotomy (SSO) using short and long medial osteotomy cuts, via three-dimensional (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-six subjects participated in this prospective study. Two types of medial osteotomy line were made: for type I, the medial osteotomy line was finished just before the lingula; for type II, the medial osteotomy line was extended 3-4mm beyond the lingula. Three fracture patterns were observed after SSOs. There were no significant differences in the medial fracture patterns between the two medial osteotomy types (P=0.16). The buccolingual thickness of the ramus was lower in fractures with pattern 3 (bad split) than in the two other fracture patterns. The length of the medial osteotomy line - short or long - did not alter the prevalence of a bad split. The bone thickness of the ramus may affect the type of fracture pattern on the medial side of the ramus.

  8. A 12-week medical exercise therapy program leads to significant improvement in knee function after degenerative meniscectomy: a randomized controlled trial with one year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Østerås, Håvard

    2014-07-01

    There is no consensus in the postoperative rehabilitation regimen for patients who have undergone surgery for medial meniscus damage. The aim of this study was to examine whether it is necessary to undergo postoperative physiotherapy treatment these patients. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was performed. 42 participants (26 males, 16 women) were randomly assigned into an exercise group (EG) (n = 22) or a control group (CG) (n = 20). Prognostic variables were similar between the groups at baseline. The EG achieved significantly better outcome effects than the CG at pain (VAS reduced 1.9 in TG and 0.6 in CG, p < 0.01) and function (KOOS decreased 18.0 in TG and only 6.5 in CG, p < 0.01) during the 12 week intervention period. The results after a 12-month follow-up indicated the same results as at posttest 3 months postoperatively. In patients with surgery for degenerative meniscus damage, postoperative medical exercise therapy - as a model of physiotherapy - is an efficient treatment alternative compared to no systematic rehabilitation.

  9. The medial scaffold of 3D unorganized point clouds.

    PubMed

    Leymarie, Frederic F; Kimia, Benjamin B

    2007-02-01

    We introduce the notion of the medial scaffold, a hierarchical organization of the medial axis of a 3D shape in the form of a graph constructed from special medial curves connecting special medial points. A key advantage of the scaffold is that it captures the qualitative aspects of shape in a hierarchical and tightly condensed representation. We propose an efficient and exact method for computing the medial scaffold based on a notion of propagation along the scaffold itself, starting from initial sources of the flow and constructing the scaffold during the propagation. We examine this method specifically in the context of an unorganized cloud of points in 3D, e.g., as obtained from laser range finders, which typically involve hundreds of thousands of points, but the ideas are generalizable to data arising from geometrically described surface patches. The computational bottleneck in the propagation-based scheme is in finding the initial sources of the flow. We thus present several ideas to avoid the unnecessary consideration of pairs of points which cannot possibly form a medial point source, such as the "visibility" of a point from another given a third point and the interaction of clusters of points. An application of using the medial scaffold for the representation of point samplings of real-life objects is also illustrated.

  10. Optogenetic dissection of medial prefrontal cortex circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Riga, Danai; Matos, Mariana R.; Glas, Annet; Smit, August B.; Spijker, Sabine; Van den Oever, Michel C.

    2014-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is critically involved in numerous cognitive functions, including attention, inhibitory control, habit formation, working memory and long-term memory. Moreover, through its dense interconnectivity with subcortical regions (e.g., thalamus, striatum, amygdala and hippocampus), the mPFC is thought to exert top-down executive control over the processing of aversive and appetitive stimuli. Because the mPFC has been implicated in the processing of a wide range of cognitive and emotional stimuli, it is thought to function as a central hub in the brain circuitry mediating symptoms of psychiatric disorders. New optogenetics technology enables anatomical and functional dissection of mPFC circuitry with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. This provides important novel insights in the contribution of specific neuronal subpopulations and their connectivity to mPFC function in health and disease states. In this review, we present the current knowledge obtained with optogenetic methods concerning mPFC function and dysfunction and integrate this with findings from traditional intervention approaches used to investigate the mPFC circuitry in animal models of cognitive processing and psychiatric disorders. PMID:25538574

  11. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: Fixation Technique Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Russo, Franco; Doan, Joshua; Chase, Derek C; Farnsworth, Christine L; Pennock, Andrew T

    2016-05-01

    Introduction The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the primary soft-tissue stabilizer of the patella and it is often reconstructed in patients with recurrent patella instability. This biomechanical analysis evaluates the integrity of four methods of MPFL reconstruction subjected to cyclic loading using a porcine model. Methods Four techniques of MPFL reconstruction were analyzed using a 4 mm flexor tendon graft, all with two points of patellar fixation to best recreate the native MPFL anatomy. The four techniques were: (1) interference screw technique, (2) suture anchor technique, (3) converging tunnel technique, and (4) two bone tunnel technique. Maximum load, yield load, and stiffness of the graft fixation/bone complex were analyzed, and statistics were performed with SPSS and significance set at a p-value of < 0.05. Results The converging tunnel technique demonstrated the highest maximum load and yield load, significantly higher than the interference screw or suture anchor groups (p = 0.007). In addition, the converging tunnel technique demonstrated the greatest stiffness with significantly greater stiffness than the two bone tunnel techniques (p = 0.016). Conclusion The combination of strength and stiffness, the avoidance of patella implants, and the creation of a single transosseous tunnel make the converging tunnel technique a desirable technique for MPFL reconstructions. PMID:26190788

  12. Subspecialization in the human posterior medial cortex

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Heeger, Adrian; Langner, Robert; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Vogt, Brent A.; Zilles, Karl; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2014-01-01

    The posterior medial cortex (PMC) is particularly poorly understood. Its neural activity changes have been related to highly disparate mental processes. We therefore investigated PMC properties with a data-driven exploratory approach. First, we subdivided the PMC by whole-brain coactivation profiles. Second, functional connectivity of the ensuing PMC regions was compared by task-constrained meta-analytic coactivation mapping (MACM) and task-unconstrained resting-state correlations (RSFC). Third, PMC regions were functionally described by forward/reverse functional inference. A precuneal cluster was mostly connected to the intraparietal sulcus, frontal eye fields, and right temporo-parietal junction; associated with attention and motor tasks. A ventral posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) cluster was mostly connected to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and middle left inferior parietal cortex (IPC); associated with facial appraisal and language tasks. A dorsal PCC cluster was mostly connected to the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, anterior/posterior IPC, posterior midcingulate cortex, and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex; associated with delay discounting. A cluster in the retrosplenial cortex was mostly connected to the anterior thalamus and hippocampus. Furthermore, all PMC clusters were congruently coupled with the default mode network according to task-constrained but not task-unconstrained connectivity. We thus identified distinct regions in the PMC and characterized their neural networks and functional implications. PMID:25462801

  13. Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph in Fitzsimons Army Medial Center Real Property Book (green cloth cover), south and west sides. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Officers Quarters, Northeast Corner of West Harlow Avenue & North Seventh Street, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  14. Variant attachments of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Jakubowicz, Marian; Ratajczak, Wojciech; Pytel, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the occurrence of variants of anomalous insertions of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus in human knee joints. The study was carried out on 78 human lower limbs of both sexes (42 males and 36 females). Out of 78 knee joints, 10 knee joints (12.82%) presented atypical attachments of the anterior horn of the medial meniscus. In 9 cases we found that the anterior horn of the medial meniscus was attached to the transverse ligament of the knee and in 1 case it was attached to the coronary ligament. In the remaining cases the anterior horn of the medial meniscus was attached to the anterior intercondylar area of the tibia.

  15. Anterior cruciate ligament and medial collateral ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Bollier, Matthew; Smith, Patrick A

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries have evolved over the past 30 years. A detailed physical examination along with careful review of the magnetic resonance imaging and stress radiographs will guide decision making. Early ACL reconstruction and acute MCL repair are recommended when there is increased medial joint space opening with valgus stress in extension, a significant meniscotibial deep MCL injury (high-riding medial meniscus), or a displaced tibial-sided superficial MCL avulsion (stener lesion of the knee). Delayed ACL reconstruction to allow for MCL healing is advised when increased valgus laxity is present only at 30 degrees of flexion and not at 0 degree. However, at the time of ACL surgery, medial stability has to be re-assessed after the reconstruction is completed. In patients with neutral alignment in the chronic setting, graft reconstruction of both the ACL and MCL is recommended.

  16. Evaluation of the medial elbow in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Creighton, R Alexander; Bach, Bernard R; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2006-06-01

    The valgus forces generated by throwing athletes can cause injuries and permanently damage the medial elbow structures. Clinicians must have a clear understanding of the ulnar collateral ligament complex and the associated medial elbow structures at risk in these athletes. Taking a detailed history, conducting a physical examination, and obtaining imaging studies will aid in making the correct diagnosis and giving these injuries the appropriate treatment. Pain around the medial elbow is of concern to throwing athletes, coaches, and medical staff. Valgus forces generated by the throwing motion add considerable stress to the medial elbow structures and thus potentially cause injury. Baseball players, particularly pitchers, are most often affected, but athletes participating in sports such as football, volleyball, water polo, tennis, and javelin throwing can also be affected.

  17. Biomechanical Evaluation of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duchman, Kyle R; DeVries, Nicole A; McCarthy, Mark A; Kuiper, Justin J; Grosland, Nicole M; Bollier, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is the most frequently injured soft tissue structure following acute lateral patellar dislocation. MPFL reconstruction has become a popular option to restore patellar stability following lateral patellar dislocation due to the high incidence of recurrent instability following conservative management. Anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL minimizes graft length changes during full knee range of motion and restores patellar stability. Materials & Methods Four fresh frozen cadaver specimens underwent biomechanical testing in a materials testing machine. With the knee fixed in 30° of flexion, the patella was translated laterally a distance of 10 mm and continuous force-displace- ment data was collected with the intact MPFL and again following a newly described MPFL reconstruction technique. Lateral force-displacement and stiffness data were calculated, allowing comparison between the intact and reconstructed MPFL. Results The average lateral restraining force provided by the intact MPFL was 10.6 ± 5.7, 36.6 ± 2.7, and 69.0 ± 5.9 N while the lateral restraining force following MPFL reconstruction was 0.4 ± 4.3, 50.3 ± 16.3, and 110.2 ± 17.5 N at 1, 5, and 10 mm of lateral displacement, respectively. Conclusion Anatomic MPFL reconstruction displays similar lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL at low levels of lateral displacement. At higher levels of displacement, the reconstructed MPFL provides increased lateral restraining force compared to the intact MPFL, improving patellar stability in pathologic knees. PMID:24027463

  18. Neuronal loss in human medial vestibular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, J C; Díaz, C; Suárez, C; Fernández, J A; González del Rey, C; Navarro, A; Tolivia, J

    1998-08-01

    The data concerning the effects of age on the brainstem are inconsistent, and few works are devoted to the human vestibular nuclear complex. The medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) is the largest nucleus of the vestibular nuclear complex, and it seems to be related mainly to vestibular compensation and vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Eight human brainstems have been used in this work. The specimens were embedded in paraffin, sectioned, and stained by the formaldehyde-thionin technique. Neuron profiles were drawn with a camera lucida at x330. Abercrombie's method was used to estimate the total number of neurons. We used the test of Kolmogorov-Smirnov with the correction of Lilliefors to evaluate the fit of our data to a normal distribution, and a regression analysis was performed to determine if the variation of our data with age was statistically significant. The present study clearly shows that neuronal loss occurs with aging. The total number of neurons decreases with age, from 122,241 +/- 651 cells in a 35-year-old individual to 75,915 +/- 453 cells in an 89-year-old individual. Neuron loss was significant in the caudal and intermediate thirds of the nucleus, whereas the changes in the rostral third were not significant. The nuclear diameter of surviving neurons decreased significantly with age. There is a neuron loss in the MVN that seems to be age-related. It could help explain why elderly people find it hard to compensate for unilateral vestibular deficits. The preservation of neurons in the rostral third could be related to the fact that this area primarily innervates the oculolmotor nuclei; these latter neurons do not decrease in number in other species studied.

  19. Medial tibial stress syndrome: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Moen, Maarten H; Tol, Johannes L; Weir, Adam; Steunebrink, Miriam; De Winter, Theodorus C

    2009-01-01

    Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is one of the most common leg injuries in athletes and soldiers. The incidence of MTSS is reported as being between 4% and 35% in military personnel and athletes. The name given to this condition refers to pain on the posteromedial tibial border during exercise, with pain on palpation of the tibia over a length of at least 5 cm. Histological studies fail to provide evidence that MTSS is caused by periostitis as a result of traction. It is caused by bony resorption that outpaces bone formation of the tibial cortex. Evidence for this overloaded adaptation of the cortex is found in several studies describing MTSS findings on bone scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scan and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. The diagnosis is made based on physical examination, although only one study has been conducted on this subject. Additional imaging such as bone, CT and MRI scans has been well studied but is of limited value. The prevalence of abnormal findings in asymptomatic subjects means that results should be interpreted with caution. Excessive pronation of the foot while standing and female sex were found to be intrinsic risk factors in multiple prospective studies. Other intrinsic risk factors found in single prospective studies are higher body mass index, greater internal and external ranges of hip motion, and calf girth. Previous history of MTSS was shown to be an extrinsic risk factor. The treatment of MTSS has been examined in three randomized controlled studies. In these studies rest is equal to any intervention. The use of neoprene or semi-rigid orthotics may help prevent MTSS, as evidenced by two large prospective studies.

  20. Medial rectus muscle anchoring in complete oculomotor nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Si Hyung; Chang, Jee Ho

    2015-10-01

    The management of exotropia resulting from complete oculomotor nerve palsy is challenging. Conventional therapeutic interventions, including supramaximal resection and recession, superior oblique tendon resection and transposition, and several ocular anchoring procedures have yielded less-than-adequate results. Here we describe a novel surgical technique of anchoring the medial rectus muscle to the medial orbital wall in combination with lateral rectus disinsertion and reattachment to the lateral orbital wall. PMID:26486032

  1. Arthrodiastasis of the lateral column with medial fusion: a retrospective examination of medial double and Lapidus arthrodeses.

    PubMed

    Galli, Melissa M; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Arthrodiastasis of the calcaneocuboid joint after medial double arthrodesis has been described, but the extent remains unreported. We present our comparative findings after medial double and Lapidus fusion on the effects of the calcaneocuboid joint. Adults undergoing medial column fusion with internal fixation and a minimal clinical and radiographic follow-up period of 3 months were included. Subjects were excluded for Charcot deformity, previous arthrodesis surgery, and history of calcaneocuboid joint trauma or surgery. Although 52 patients were identified, 32 (mean age 56.69 ± 12.56 years; 11 males) met the study criteria (15 medial double and 17 Lapidus procedures). The height of the calcaneocuboid joint on the lateral radiograph and width of the calcaneocuboid joint on the anteroposterior radiograph were measured postoperatively and fixed, given the overlap often noted preoperatively in flatfoot deformities. The joint depth was measured at 3 points and averaged both preoperatively and postoperatively on lateral and anteroposterior radiographs. The volume of the calcaneocuboid joint (mm(3)) was the primary endpoint. Medial column fusion elicited a statistically significant mean increase of 32% in calcaneocuboid joint diastasis (p < .001). The percent change in diastasis volume was statistically different between the medial double (61.90% ± 40.59%) and the Lapidus (5.71% ± 14.84%, p < .001) fusion procedures. These results confirmed our hypothesis that arthrodesis of the more proximal medial column joints would produce greater lateral column arthrodiastasis. Adding to the published data, medial double arthrodesis increased the volume of the calcaneocuboid joint by 62%.

  2. TCDD alters medial epithelial cell differentiation during palatogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, B.D.; Birnbaum, L.S. )

    1989-06-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is a widely distributed, persistent environmental contaminant that is teratogenic in mice, where it induces hydronephrosis and cleft palate. The incidence of clefting has been shown to be dose dependent after exposure on either gestation Day (GD) 10 or 12, although the embryo is more susceptible on GD 12. TCDD-exposed palatal shelves meet but do not fuse, and programmed cell death of the medial epithelial cells is inhibited. The mechanism of action through which TCDD alters the program of medial cell development has not been examined in earlier studies, and it is not known whether the mechanism is the same regardless of the dose or developmental stage of exposure. In this study, C57BL/6N mice, a strain sensitive to TCDD, were dosed orally on GD 10 or 12 with 0, 6, 12, 24, or 30 micrograms/kg body wt, in 10 ml corn oil/kg. Embryonic palatal shelves were examined on GD 14, 15, or 16. The degree of palatal closure, epithelial surface morphology, and cellular ultrastructure, the incorporation of (3H)TdR, the expression of EGF receptors, and the binding of 125I-EGF were assessed. After exposure on GD 10 or 12, TCDD altered the differentiation pathway of the medial epithelial cells. The palatal shelves were of normal size and overall morphology, but fusion of the medial epithelia of the opposing shelves did not occur. TCDD prevented programmed cell death of the medial peridermal cells. The expression of EGF receptors by medial cells continued through Day 16 and the receptors were able to bind ligand. The medial cells differentiated into a stratified, squamous, keratinizing epithelium. The shift in phenotype to an oral-like epithelium occurred after exposure on either GD 10 or 12. At the lower dose (6 micrograms/kg), fewer cleft palates were produced, but those shelves which did respond had a fully expressed shift in differentiation.

  3. Comparison of medial versus lateral meniscus allograft transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guo; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Li, Yu-Peng; Shang, Zheng-Hui; Chen, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a literature review and meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of medial and lateral meniscus allograft transplantation (MAT). Methods: The literature review and meta-analysis were conducted between August and October 2015 in the People’s Hospital of China Three Gorges University, Yi Chang, China. A systematic search was performed in the Medline and EMBASE databases, and the Cochrane Library for relevant literature published through October 2015. The outcomes of the included studies were analyzed in terms of the Lysholm Score, International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) Score, Knee Injury And Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Tegner Activity Score, MRI results, and failure rates. An adapted version of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used for the methodological quality assessment in the meta-analyses. Results: The literature review identified 12 observational studies, including 7 retrospective studies, 4 prospective studies, and the nature of one study was not reported. Significant differences in the outcomes of the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were observed in the IKDC scores, KOOS pain values, KOOS activities of daily living (ADL) values, and the absolute and relative extrusions observed on MRI, which suggested that the lateral MAT patients experienced superior clinical benefits compared with the medial MAT patients. However, significant differences between the lateral MAT group and the medial MAT group were not observed with regards to the Lysholm Scores, KOOS symptom values, KOOS sports and recreations values, KOOS quality of life (QOL) values, Tegner Activity Scores, VAS for pain values, and failure rates. Conclusion: The analysis results indicated that lateral MAT provides superior clinical outcomes compared with medial MAT according to the KOOS and IKDC scores. In addition, greater graft extrusion was observed in the medial group on MRI. Although significant differences were not

  4. The effects of transection of the anterior cruciate ligament on healing of the medial collateral ligament. A biomechanical study of the knee in dogs.

    PubMed

    Woo, S L; Young, E P; Ohland, K J; Marcin, J P; Horibe, S; Lin, H C

    1990-03-01

    The effect of concurrent injury to the anterior cruciate ligament on the healing of injuries of the medial collateral ligament was studied in dogs. In Group I, isolated transection of the medial collateral ligament was performed; in Group II, transection of the medial collateral ligament with partial transection of the anterior cruciate ligament; and in Group III, complete transection of both the medial collateral ligament and the anterior cruciate ligament. The three groups of animals were examined six and twelve weeks postoperatively with respect to varus-valgus rotation of the knee and tensile properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex. The varus-valgus rotation of the knee was found to be the largest in Group-III specimens at all time-periods and was 3.5 times greater than the control values at twelve weeks. Group-I and Group-II specimens also showed large varus-valgus rotations at time zero, but the rotations returned to the control values by twelve weeks. For the structural properties of the femur-medial collateral ligament-tibia complex, the values for ultimate load for Groups I and II reached the control values by twelve weeks, while that for Group III remained at only 80 per cent of the control value. Both energy absorbed at failure and linear stiffness for all three groups were less than those for the controls at six weeks, and only linear stiffness returned to the control values by twelve weeks. For the mechanical (material) properties of the healed ligament substance, the values for modulus and tensile strength were markedly lower than the control values for all groups at six weeks. By twelve weeks, the tensile strength of Group-I specimens had increased to 52 per cent of the control value, while those of Groups II and III were only 45 and 14 per cent, respectively. Our results demonstrate that healing of the transected medial collateral ligament is adversely affected by concomitant transection of the anterior cruciate ligament

  5. Lateral–Medial Dissociation in Orbitofrontal Cortex–Hypothalamus Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Satoshi; Osada, Takahiro; Ogawa, Akitoshi; Tanaka, Masaki; Wada, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Yasunori; Imai, Yoshio; Machida, Toru; Akahane, Masaaki; Shirouzu, Ichiro; Konishi, Seiki

    2016-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) is involved in cognitive functions, and is also closely related to autonomic functions. The OFC is densely connected with the hypothalamus, a heterogeneous structure controlling autonomic functions that can be divided into two major parts: the lateral and the medial. Resting-state functional connectivity has allowed us to parcellate the cerebral cortex into putative functional areas based on the changes in the spatial pattern of connectivity in the cerebral cortex when a seed point is moved from one voxel to another. In the present high spatial-resolution fMRI study, we investigate the connectivity-based organization of the OFC with reference to the hypothalamus. The OFC was parcellated using resting-state functional connectivity in an individual subject approach, and then the functional connectivity was examined between the parcellated areas in the OFC and the lateral/medial hypothalamus. We found a functional double dissociation in the OFC: the lateral OFC (the lateral orbital gyrus) was more likely connected with the lateral hypothalamus, whereas the medial OFC (the medial orbital and rectal gyri) was more likely connected with the medial hypothalamus. These results demonstrate the fundamental heterogeneity of the OFC, and suggest a potential neural basis of the OFC–hypothalamic functional interaction. PMID:27303281

  6. Giant medial parameniscal cyst in an osteoarthritic knee.

    PubMed

    Choi, Edmund H; Huang, James; Bryk, Diana; Bryk, Eli

    2009-10-01

    Medial parameniscal cysts of the knee are typically 0.3 to 9 mm in diameter. Few cases of unusually large medial parameniscal cysts have been reported. We describe the treatment of a patient with osteoarthritis of the knee who presented with an extraordinarily large, ipsilateral, medial parameniscal cyst, 10 cm in diameter. We believe this to be the largest medial parameniscal cyst reported in the English literature. Based on the patient's severe tricompartmental arthritis and associated symptoms, total knee arthroplasty (TKA) was indicated with simultaneous excision of the parameniscal cyst. Perioperativley, the cyst was found to have penetrated beyond the menisco-capsular attachments that were adjacent to a degenerative posterior horn horizontal medial meniscal tear. Following excision of the cyst, the mass was measured with surgical tape to be 10x10x5 cm. After complete excision of the parameniscal cyst, TKA was performed. Histological examination confirmed a benign parameniscal synovial cyst. At 2-year follow-up, the patient was ambulating unassisted without difficulty. The wound had completely healed with no evidence of recurrence of the cyst. The patient's range of motion was 0 degrees to 110 degrees with no signs of instability. Our patient's pathology was most significant for the heretofore unseen large size of the paramensical cyst. Open excision of this giant parameniscal cyst followed by TKA was effective in treating the patient's degenerative joint disease and extraordinarily large, painful soft tissue mass.

  7. “The Superficial Quad Technique” for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: The Surgical Video Technique

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of the superficial quad technique, there has been a recent revival of interest in the quadriceps tendon as a graft choice for medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction. The superficial quad technique has many anatomic advantages because the length, breadth, and thickness of the graft are similar to those of the native MPFL; moreover, the graft provides a continuous patellar attachment at the superior half of the medial border of the patella. The technique requires neither a patellar bony procedure nor patellar hardware. Biomechanically, the mean strength and stiffness of the graft are very similar to those of the native MPFL. The anatomic and biomechanical advantages depend on correct identification of the anatomic superficial lamina of the quadriceps tendon; hence the correct harvesting technique for the superficial lamina is crucial. Various sub-techniques for harvesting the quadriceps graft have emerged recently, such as superficial strip, pedicled, or partial graft harvesting; these can create confusion for surgeons. Additional confusion related to the preparation and fixation of the graft should also be addressed to avoid any potential complications. A step-by-step video of the superficial quad technique is presented, covering the exact dissection of the graft material and its preparation, delivery, and fixation. PMID:26900556

  8. Tendinopathies Around the Elbow Part 2: Medial Elbow, Distal Biceps and Triceps Tendinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Oliver; Vannet, Nicola; Gosens, Taco; Kulkarni, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    In the second part of this review article the management of medial elbow tendinopathy, distal biceps and distal triceps tendinopathy will be discussed. There is a scarcity of publications concerning any of these tendinopathies. This review will summarise the current best available evidence in their management. Medial elbow tendinopathy, also known as Golfer's elbow, is up to 6 times less common than lateral elbow tendinopathy. The tendinopathy occurs in the insertion of pronator teres and flexor carpi radialis. Diagnosis is usually apparent through a detailed history and examination but care must be made to exclude other conditions affecting the ulnar nerve or less commonly the ulnar collateral ligament complex. If doubt exists then MRI/US and electrophysiology can be used. Treatment follows a similar pattern to that of lateral elbow tendinopathy. Acute management is with activity modification and topical NSAIDs. Injection therapy and surgical excision are utilised for recalcitrant cases. Distal biceps and triceps tendinopathies are very rare and there is limited evidence published. Sequelae of tendinopathy include tendon rupture and so it is vital to manage these tendinopathies appropriately in order to minimise this significant complication. Their management and that of partial tears will be considered. PMID:27582910

  9. Common medial elbow injuries in the adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Ian; Schorpion, Melissa; Ganley, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been increased year-round sports participation among children and adolescents with limited to no rest periods. This has led to increases in pediatric repetitive stress injuries, once considered a rarity. Whether in the throwing athlete or in the athlete that experiences repetitive axial loading; increased medial tension and overload syndromes can lead to stress reactions and fractures. This occurs in the developing athlete due to the bone being weaker than the surrounding tendons and ligaments. The medial elbow is a high stress area and is susceptible to many conditions including apophysitis , avulsion fractures and ulnar collateral ligament disruption. Valgus stress can cause injury to the medial elbow which can lead to increased lateral compression, Panner's disease and osteochondral lesions of the capitellum and olecranon. The purpose of this manuscript is to review common elbow disorders in the adolescent population, outline management and highlight important features of rehabilitation. PMID:25840494

  10. Medial Axis Shape Coding in Macaque Inferotemporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chia-Chun; Carlson, Eric T.; Connor, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The basic, still unanswered question about visual object representation is this: what specific information is encoded by neural signals? Theorists have long predicted that neurons would encode medial axis or skeletal object shape, yet recent studies reveal instead neural coding of boundary or surface shape. Here, we addressed this theoretical/experimental disconnect, using adaptive shape sampling to demonstrate for the first time explicit coding of medial axis shape in high-level object cortex (macaque monkey inferotemporal cortex or IT). Our metric shape analyses revealed a coding continuum, along which most neurons represent a configuration of both medial axis and surface components. Thus IT response functions embody a rich basis set for simultaneously representing skeletal and external shape of complex objects. This would be especially useful for representing biological shapes, which are often characterized by both complex, articulated skeletal structure and specific surface features. PMID:22726839

  11. Medial collateral ligament reconstruction in the baseball Pitcher's elbow.

    PubMed

    Erne, Holger C; Zouzias, Ioannis C; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    2009-08-01

    Pitchers are prone to elbow injuries because of high and repetitive valgus stresses on the elbow. The anterior bundle of the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MCL) of the elbow is the primary restraint and is often attenuated with time, leading to functional incompetence and ultimate failure. Pitchers with a history of medial elbow pain, reduced velocity, and loss of command may have an MCL injury in evolution. Physical examination and imaging can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment begins with rest and activity modification. All medial elbow pain is not MCL injury. Surgery is considered only for talented athletes who wish to return to competitive play and may include elite scholastic and other collegiates and professionals. The technique for MCL reconstruction was first described in 1986. Many variations have been offered since then, which can result in predictable outcomes, allowing many to return to the same level of competitive play.

  12. Two cases of medial knee pain involving the medial coronary ligament in adolescents treated with conservative rehabilitation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study chronicled the assessment, treatment and management of two adolescent patients presenting with acute knee pain, diagnosed as medial meniscus tear, with or without a medial collateral ligament sprain, with coronary ligament involvement. Cases Patient 1: A 16 year old male football player presented with right medial knee pain of 2 days duration after having been tackled during practice from the left side. Patient 2: A 16 year old female presented with right medial knee pain that began 1 week prior to presentation after a fall down the stairs. Treatment: Treatment was initiated in both cases using inflammatory control techniques of icing and fascial stripping and progressed to rehabilitative exercises including VMO (vastus medialis oblique) exercises and squatting exercises to strengthen the quadriceps femoris musculature and proprioceptive exercise. Rehabilitation occurred over a four week duration in both cases with progression of exercises on an individual basis. Both cases resolved within four weeks and return to normal activities resumed at the three week mark including a return to play in patient 1. Both patients reported complete resolution of symptoms at the four week mark with no recurrence on follow up a number of months later. Summary: Conservative management, including icing, fascial stripping, and rehabilitative exercises may be beneficial in the treatment of medial meniscus tears with coronary ligament involvement in adolescents. PMID:21629464

  13. Medial Meniscal Extrusion Relates to Cartilage Loss in Specific Femorotibial Subregions- Data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Bloecker, K.; Wirth, W.; Guermazi, A.; Hunter, DJ; Resch, H.; Hochreiter, J.; Eckstein, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Medial meniscal extrusion is known to be related to structural progression of knee OA. However, it is unclear whether medial meniscal extrusion is more strongly associated with cartilage loss in certain medial femorotibial subregions than to others. Methods Segmentation of the medial tibial and femoral cartilage (baseline; 1-year follow-up) and the medial meniscus (baseline) was performed in 60 participants with frequent knee pain (age 61.3±9.2y, BMI 31.3±3.9 kg/m2) and with unilateral medial radiographic joint space narrowing (JSN) grade 1–3, using double echo steady state MR-images. Medial meniscal extrusion distance and extrusion area (%) between the external meniscal and tibial margin at baseline, and longitudinal medial cartilage loss in eight anatomical subregions were determined. Results A significant association (Pearson correlation coefficient) was seen between medial meniscus extrusion area in JSN knees and cartilage loss over one year throughout the entire medial femorotibial compartment. The strongest correlation was with cartilage loss in the external medial tibia (r=−0.34 [p<0.01] in JSN, and r=−0.30 [p=0.02] in noJSN knees). Conclusion Medial meniscus extrusion was associated with subsequent medial cartilage loss. The external medial tibial cartilage may be particularly vulnerable to thinning once the meniscus extrudes and its surface is “exposed” to direct, non-physiological, cartilage-cartilage contact. PMID:25988986

  14. Stabilization of medial longitudinal foot arch by peroneus longus transfer.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2016-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of the medial longitudinal arch depends on the dynamic support of muscles and the static support of ligaments. Although the posterior tibial tendon is the main dynamic stabilizer of the arch, the static structures provide the most support especially while the person is standing. After rupture of the posterior tibial tendon, the spring ligament may be compromised under increased stress and leads to talar derotation and peritalar subluxation. Surgical repair of the spring ligament has become an important adjunct to treating posterior tibial tendon abnormalities. A technique of peroneus longus transfer to augment the static stabilizers of the medial column is described in this article. PMID:27058034

  15. Tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula of the medial tentorial artery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Syrone; Lee, Dane C; Tanoura, Tad

    2016-09-01

    The medial tentorial artery arises from the meningohypophyseal trunk, a branch of the cavernous internal carotid artery, and it is poorly visualized on angiography in the absence of pathologically increased blood flow. We present the case of a 38-year-old man with intraventricular hemorrhage from a tentorial dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) singularly supplied by a robust medial tentorial artery. Tentorial DAVFs comprise a rare but high-risk subset of DAVFs. The diagnosis was suggested by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings and confirmed with digital subtraction angiography. PMID:27594958

  16. Medial malleolar stress fracture in an adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Menge, Travis J; Looney, Colin G

    2015-01-01

    A stress fracture of the medial malleolus in adolescent athletes is a rare condition with poorly defined outcomes. Proper management requires early recognition, with treatment directed toward the athlete's safe return to their sport. Failure to assess and manage the fracture properly can result in significant complications, including fracture progression, delayed healing, nonunion, and chronic pain. We present the case of a medial malleolar stress fracture in a 14-year-old football player, who was successfully able to return to competition 4 weeks after surgical treatment. We have also provided a review of the published data regarding the management of these injuries and recommendations for returning athletes to competition.

  17. Pituitary adenoma with seizures: PET demonstration of reduced glucose utilization in the medial temporal lobe

    SciTech Connect

    Bairamian, D.; Di Chiro, G.; Blume, H.; Ehrenberg, B.

    1986-05-01

    A patient with a benign chromophobe adenoma, who had incomplete surgical removal followed by radiotherapy, continued to have epileptic seizures up to two or three times a day. She was studied with positron emission tomography using /sup 18/F-2-deoxyglucose (FDG). This technique showed a high level of glucose utilization in the area of the operated tumor but also clear reduction of glucose utilization in the left medial temporal region adjacent to the sella and the scar tissue from the neoplasm. This area of reduced glucose utilization corresponded well to the same finding observed in other patients with complex partial epilepsy. A left temporal anterior lobectomy was carried out followed by improved control of the epilepsy. Positron emission tomography using FDG, together with electrophysiological examinations, may assist in the management of epilepsy related to pituitary tumors.

  18. Tianeptine and its enantiomers: effects on spatial memory in rats with medial septum lesions.

    PubMed

    Morris, R G; Kelly, S; Burney, D; Anthony, T; Boyer, P A; Spedding, M

    2001-08-01

    Tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant that exhibits clinical efficacy in measures of depression and anxiety, has been reported to enhance learning and memory in rats under certain conditions, an effect not observed with other tricyclic antidepressants. The present study explores further the possibility that tianeptine or its enantiomers (S 16190 and S 16191) can enhance either learning or retention in animals in which the hippocampus has been made partially dysfunctional. The effects of tianeptine and its enantiomers were tested using an open field watermaze test, in rats with partial lesions of the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MSDB). When given to normal rats, tianeptine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not significantly affect learning as compared to animals injected with saline. We therefore created, in other animals, partial ibotenic acid lesions of MSDB and showed histochemically that these lesions reduced but did not abolish the density of acetylcholinesterase staining in the hippocampus. They impaired both the acquisition of place-navigation and the long-term retention of spatial information over 7 days. Against the baseline of impaired performance in animals with these lesions, neither tianeptine (10 mg/kg) nor its enantiomers (5 mg/kg) affected the rate of acquisition of place navigation. However, tianeptine did enhance the retention of spatial memory over 7 days. These results are discussed in relation to different effects that tianeptine may have on learning including its ability to block stress-induced dendritic re-modelling of the hippocampus.

  19. Immediate reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator flaps after breast-conserving surgery.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Ken; Fujikawa, Masakazu; Tashima, Hiroki; Saito, Takuya; Sotsuka, Yohei; Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko

    2013-11-01

    Recent advances in perforator flap surgical techniques have allowed for safe and reliable autologous tissue transfer with minimal donor-site morbidity. Between April 2012 and January 2013, we performed immediate breast reconstruction using free medial circumflex femoral artery perforator (MCFAP) flaps in 15 patients after breast-conserving surgery. The flaps were harvested from patients in the lithotomy position, while a second surgical team simultaneously conducted tumour resection. Of the 15 procedures performed, three flaps were dissected as true perforator flaps, while 12 flaps were dissected as muscle-sparing perforator flaps. The mean flap weight was 138.5 g (range, 77-230 g) and the mean pedicle length was 5.7 cm (range, 3.0-9.0 cm). Recipient vessels for anastomosis were serratus branches in 10 patients, internal mammary vessels in three patients and thoracodorsal vessels in two patients. The mean duration of surgery was 6.74 h (range, 5.65-9.45 h). There were no major complications requiring surgical intervention. Researchers observed partial flap necrosis, which manifested as small firm lesions in two patients, as well as local wound infection and dehiscence in one patient, which resolved spontaneously. There were no instances of donor-site seroma formation or lymphoedema in any of the patients. An objective assessment of postoperative photographs showed that cosmetic results were mostly satisfactory. Donor-site scars along the medial groin crease were inconspicuous and readily concealed by clothing. Given its reliable vascularity and minimal donor-site morbidity, the free MCFAP flap can be a good alternative for partial breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery.

  20. Towards a functional organization of the medial temporal lobe memory system: role of the parahippocampal and medial entorhinal cortical areas.

    PubMed

    Eichenbaum, Howard; Lipton, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Whereas substantial recent evidence has suggested to some that the medial entorhinal cortexá (MEC) plays a specialized role in spatial navigation, here we present evidence consistent with a broader role of the MEC in memory. A consideration of evidence on the anatomy and functional roles of medial temporal cortical areas and the hippocampus, and evidence from recordings from MEC neurons in rats performing a spatial memory task, suggest that the MEC may process information about both spatial and temporal context in support of episodic memory.

  1. Foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform: A case of co-occurrence in a Celtic skeleton from Verona (Italy).

    PubMed

    Laffranchi, Z; Martín Flórez, J S; Jiménez Brobeil, S A; Castellani, V

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of bilateral foot polydactyly and bipartite medial cuneiform in a male individual buried in a Celtic/Roman necropolis (3rd to 1st century BCE) in the city of Verona (Italy). During the construction of an underground garage in the main courtyard of the Bishop's Seminary at Verona between 2005 and 2010, archaeologists uncovered the remains of 174 individuals (108 non-adults and 66 adults). It is thought that these graves could belong to some of the first inhabitants of the urban area of Verona. The individual presented here (US 2807) is a middle-aged male (40-50 years) in a good state of preservation. His estimated stature is 1756 mm (± 32.1 mm). This male presents congenital anomalies in the feet and dental agenesis. We believe this to be the only known archaeological case of bilateral postaxial polydactyly with forked (Y) shape, in which both fifth metatarsals are associated with complete bipartition of the left medial cuneiform and partial bipartition of the right one. Polydactyly is fairly common in modern clinical cases but bipartite medial cuneiform is relatively rare; neither of these congenital conditions is well documented archaeologically.

  2. Medial prefrontal cortical lesions modulate baroreflex sensitivity in the rat.

    PubMed

    Verberne, A J; Lewis, S J; Worland, P J; Beart, P M; Jarrott, B; Christie, M J; Louis, W J

    1987-11-24

    Previous neuroanatomical studies in rats have demonstrated that the medial prefrontal cortex sends projections to the nucleus of the solitary tract which also receives the bulk of baroreceptor information from primary afferents within the IXth and Xth cranial nerves. The present study examines the influence of the prefrontal cortex on baroreceptor heart rate reflex in conscious rats. Baroreceptor reflex activity was examined in rats with bilateral excitotoxin (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-induced lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex and in control rats (artificial cerebrospinal fluid). Seventeen to eighteen days after lesioning, reflex heart rate responses were recorded following intravenous bolus doses of the pressor agent phenylephrine and the depressor agent sodium nitroprusside. Baroreceptor reflex parameters i.e., maximum and average baroreceptor reflex gain (or sensitivity): minimum and maximum heart rate plateaus; heart rate range; upper and lower reflex thresholds, were determined by sigmoidal computerized curve-fitting. Lesioning the medial prefrontal cortex did not affect resting mean arterial pressure and heart rate. However, the lesion reduced maximum and average baroreceptor reflex gain and produced a small reduction in lower reflex threshold. The other parameters were unaffected by the lesion. These observations suggest that although the medial prefrontal cortex does not exert a tonic influence on brainstem vasomotor neurons, there may be a descending excitatory projection from this brain region to medullary neurones involved in the baroreceptor reflex arc. PMID:3319045

  3. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. PMID:26652325

  4. The anatomy of semantic knowledge: medial vs. lateral temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Levy, D A; Bayley, P J; Squire, L R

    2004-04-27

    Semantic knowledge (e.g., long-established knowledge about objects, facts, and word meanings) is known to be severely impaired by damage to the anterolateral temporal lobe. For example, patients with semantic dementia have prominent atrophy in anterolateral temporal cortex and also have significant damage within the medial aspect of the temporal lobe. However, there is uncertainty about the contribution of medial temporal lobe damage, including perirhinal cortex damage, to impaired semantic knowledge. Drawing largely on published material from multiple sources, we compared the performance of severely amnesic patients with large medial temporal lobe lesions and patients with semantic dementia on nine tests of semantic knowledge and two tests of new learning ability. On the tests of semantic knowledge, the amnesic patients performed markedly better than the patients with semantic dementia. By contrast, on the tests of new learning, the patients with semantic dementia performed markedly better than the amnesic patients. We conclude that medial temporal lobe damage impairs the formation of declarative memory, and that semantic knowledge is impaired to the extent that damage extends laterally in the temporal lobe. Reports that the extent of atrophy in perirhinal cortex correlated with the severity of impaired semantic knowledge may be understood by supposing that the extent of damage in many temporal lobe areas is intercorrelated in this progressive disease, and that the extent of atrophy in perirhinal cortex is a proxy for the overall severity of dementia. PMID:15090653

  5. Medial Temporal Lobe Memory in Childhood: Developmental Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  6. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction in a Below-Knee Amputee

    PubMed Central

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Elfons Tawafig, Marian; Miles, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Patellar instability is a common finding in patients with below-knee amputation and yet management options are not commonly described in the literature. We describe the first reported case of a medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction using allograft in a patient with a below-knee amputation. Clinical outcome at two-year follow-up remains very good. PMID:26579321

  7. Proportional inhibition in the cricket medial giant interneuron.

    PubMed

    Baba, Y; Masuda, H; Shimozawa, T

    2001-02-01

    Inhibitory effects on the number of wind-evoked impulses were studied in the medial giant interneuron of the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. The interneuron receives an inhibitory input from wind receptors on cercus ipsilateral to its soma. Using a dual channel wind stimulator, the intensity of inhibitory input was changed over 1,000-fold and effects on the number of spikes were observed. The ipsilateral inhibition reduced the number of outgoing spikes from a level elicited by excitation alone and it did so in proportion to the level of wind responsiveness displayed by each cell. A proportional coefficient of inhibition was derived and its value depended on the level of total excitation of the medial giant interneuron. The medial giant interneurons with high excitation showed a smaller value of the coefficient than those with low excitation. The proportional inhibition of the medial giant interneuron by the ipsilateral cercus suppresses the number of its spikes to a reasonable level for a wide range of stimulus intensities under natural conditions.

  8. Medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher/.

    PubMed

    Chang, Eric Y; Fronek, Jan; Chung, Christine B

    2014-01-01

    We report the occurrence of a medial supracondylar stress fracture in an adolescent pitcher. To our knowledge, this fracture has not been described in the literature, and awareness of this entity allows initiation of therapy and precludes further unnecessary work-up. The radiographic, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging appearances are reviewed and the mechanism of injury is discussed.

  9. Medial temporal N-acetyl aspartate in pediatric major depression

    PubMed Central

    MacMaster, Frank P.; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S. Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R.

    2008-01-01

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD-case control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  10. Medial temporal N-acetyl-aspartate in pediatric major depression.

    PubMed

    MacMaster, Frank P; Moore, Gregory J; Russell, Aileen; Mirza, Yousha; Taormina, S Preeya; Buhagiar, Christian; Rosenberg, David R

    2008-10-30

    The medial temporal cortex (MTC) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pediatric major depressive disorder (MDD). Eleven MDD case-control pairs underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging. N-acetyl-aspartate was lower in the left MTC (27%) in MDD patients versus controls. Lower N-acetyl-aspartate concentrations in MDD patients may reflect reduced neuronal viability. PMID:18703320

  11. Medial Temporal Lobe Structures Contribute to On-Line Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, David

    2009-01-01

    For the last five decades, the medial temporal lobes have been generally understood to facilitate enduring representation of certain kinds of information. In particular, knowledge about the relations among items and concepts appears to rely on that region of the brain. Recent results suggest that those same structures also play a subtle role in…

  12. Acute exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot.

    PubMed

    Blacklidge, D K; Kurek, J B; Soto, A D; Kissel, C G

    1996-01-01

    A review of compartment syndrome, both acute and chronic, is presented. The pathophysiology, anatomy, diagnosis, and treatment are presented in relation to a unique case report. The case is one of acute exertional compartment syndrome of the medial foot treated by fasciotomy. This condition is uncommon in both its nature and location.

  13. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Silson, Edward H.; Steel, Adam D.; Baker, Chris I.

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  14. Scene-Selectivity and Retinotopy in Medial Parietal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Silson, Edward H; Steel, Adam D; Baker, Chris I

    2016-01-01

    Functional imaging studies in human reliably identify a trio of scene-selective regions, one on each of the lateral [occipital place area (OPA)], ventral [parahippocampal place area (PPA)], and medial [retrosplenial complex (RSC)] cortical surfaces. Recently, we demonstrated differential retinotopic biases for the contralateral lower and upper visual fields within OPA and PPA, respectively. Here, using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we combine detailed mapping of both population receptive fields (pRF) and category-selectivity, with independently acquired resting-state functional connectivity analyses, to examine scene and retinotopic processing within medial parietal cortex. We identified a medial scene-selective region, which was contained largely within the posterior and ventral bank of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POS). While this region is typically referred to as RSC, the spatial extent of our scene-selective region typically did not extend into retrosplenial cortex, and thus we adopt the term medial place area (MPA) to refer to this visually defined scene-selective region. Intriguingly MPA co-localized with a region identified solely on the basis of retinotopic sensitivity using pRF analyses. We found that MPA demonstrates a significant contralateral visual field bias, coupled with large pRF sizes. Unlike OPA and PPA, MPA did not show a consistent bias to a single visual quadrant. MPA also co-localized with a region identified by strong differential functional connectivity with PPA and the human face-selective fusiform face area (FFA), commensurate with its functional selectivity. Functional connectivity with OPA was much weaker than with PPA, and similar to that with face-selective occipital face area (OFA), suggesting a closer link with ventral than lateral cortex. Consistent with prior research, we also observed differential functional connectivity in medial parietal cortex for anterior over posterior PPA, as well as a region on the lateral

  15. A Finite Element Analysis of Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    DeVries Watson, Nicole A.; Duchman, Kyle R.; Bollier, Matthew J.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The medial patellofemoral ligament is the primary soft-tissue restraint to lateral patella translation. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction has become a viable surgical option to provide patellar stability in patients with recurrent instability. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effect of medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction on the lateral force-displacement behavior of the patella using finite element analyses. Methods A finite element model of the knee was created using cadaveric image data. Experimental testing was performed to validate the computational model. After validation, the model was modified to study the effect of various medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction insertion sites, allowing comparison of patellofemoral contact force and pressure. Results For the intact anatomic model, the lateral restraining force was 80.0 N with a corresponding patellar contact area of 54.97 mm2. For the anatomic reconstructed medial patellofemoral ligament model, the lateral restraining force increased to 148.9 N with a contact area of 71.78 mm2. This compared favorably to the corresponding experimental study. The force required to laterally displace the patella increased when the femoral insertion site was moved anteriorly or distally. The lateral restraining force decreased when the femoral insertion site moved proximally and the patellar insertion site moved either proximal or distal by 5 mm. Conclusion The line of action was altered with insertion site position, which in turn changed the amount of force it took to displace the patella laterally. Considering the model constraints, an anterior femoral attachment may over constrain the patella and increase cartilage wear due to increase contact area and restraining force. Clinical Relevance A malpositioned femoral tunnel in MPFL reconstruction could increase restraining forces and PF contact pressure, thus it is suggested to use intra-operative fluoroscopy to confirm

  16. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  17. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  18. Island medial plantar artery perforator flap for reconstruction of plantar defects.

    PubMed

    Koshima, Isao; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Mihara, Mokoto; Nakai, Ikuo; Akazawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Norio; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Nakagawa, Masahiro

    2007-11-01

    Three cases in which island medial plantar artery perforator flaps were successfully transferred for coverage of the plantar defects are described. This perforator flap is different from the medial plantar flap based on the medial plantar artery. The flap has no fascial component and is nourished only with the perforator of the medial plantar vessel. Therefore, transection of the medial plantar artery is usually unnecessary. This flap can cover defects on the forefoot and heel without transaction of the medial plantar system. The advantages of this flap are no need for deep or long dissection for the medial plantar vessel, no exposure of the plantar sensory nerve, a short time for flap elevation, minimal donor-site morbidity, relatively large flap survival, and no damage of both the posterior tibial and medial plantar neurovascular systems. PMID:17992152

  19. Clinical study of medial area infarction in the region of posterior inferior cerebellar artery.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Katsuhiko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Oishi, Minoru; Kamei, Satoshi; Shigihara, Shuntaro; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Our objective is to study the neurological characteristics of medial area infarction in the caudal cerebellum. Medial area of the caudal cerebellum is supplied with 2 branches of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA). The medial hemispheric branch of the PICA distributes to the medial area of the caudal cerebellar hemisphere. The medial branch of the PICA (mPICA) distributes to the inferior vermis. We studied the neurological characteristics of 18 patients with medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. The infarction was located in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere and vermis (medial ch/vermis) in 11 patients and in the medial area of the cerebellar hemisphere (medial ch) in 7 patients. All the 18 patients showed acute vertigo and disturbance of standing and gait at onset. On admission, the lateropulsion and wide-based gait were present in 13 patients, respectively. Mild ataxia of the extremities was shown in 7 patients. Acute vertigo and unsteadiness were prominent at onset in the 18 patients, although their ataxia of the extremities was mild or none. This result was consistent with the characteristics of medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum. Comparing the neurological symptoms between the medial ch/vermis group and medial ch group, both lateropulsion and wide-based gait were significantly infrequent in medial ch group. This result indicated that the vermis was spared because the mPICA was not involved in the medial ch group. It is necessary to make a careful diagnosis when we encounter patients who present acute vertigo because truncal and gait ataxia are unremarkable on admission in patients with the medial area infarction of the caudal cerebellum without vermis involvement.

  20. Medial Auditory Thalamus Inactivation Prevents Acquisition and Retention of Eyeblink Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Hunter E.; Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) pathway that is necessary for delay eyeblink conditioning was investigated using reversible inactivation of the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN) consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate (MGm), suprageniculate (SG), and posterior intralaminar nucleus (PIN). Rats were given saline or…

  1. Dynamic Changes in Acetylcholine Output in the Medial Striatum during Place Reversal Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragozzino, Michael E.; Choi, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The present studies explored the role of the medial striatum in learning when task contingencies change. Experiment 1 examined whether the medial striatum is involved in place reversal learning. Testing occurred in a modified cross-maze across two consecutive sessions. Injections of the local anesthetic, bupivacaine, into the medial striatum, did…

  2. Operative treatment improves patient function in recalcitrant medial epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Shahid, M; Wu, F; Deshmukh, S C

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess the outcome of open surgery for patients with recalcitrant medial epicondylitis following failed conservative management. The clinical results are presented for 15 patients (17 elbows) who were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 66 months. Operative treatment improved patient function significantly with a mean increase in grip strength of 10kg and a mean decrease (improvement) in DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score of 25.7. All but one patient experienced little or no residual elbow discomfort and had excellent Mayo elbow performance scores postoperatively. Eleven of the twelve patients who were previously in employment were able to return to work within eight weeks of surgery. This study demonstrates that operative treatment for recalcitrant medial epicondylitis is effective in restoring patient function and strength.

  3. Taiwanese life scientists less "medialized" than their Western colleagues.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yin-Yueh; Peters, Hans Peter

    2015-01-01

    The article presents results from surveys of life scientists in Taiwan (n=270) and in Germany (n=326). Fewer Taiwanese than German researchers have frequent contact with the media and they rate their experiences with journalists less positively. Furthermore, they are less prepared to adapt to journalistic expectations and to a greater extent than German researchers they expect journalists to consider scientific criteria in their reporting. These findings are interpreted in Weingart's "medialization of science" framework as indicators of lower medialization of science in Taiwan than in Germany. However, Taiwanese scientists are more willing than German scientists to accept journalistic simplification at the expense of accuracy. This is explained as an adaptation to the media system and to the perceived scientific literacy of the media audience. We hypothesize that cultural differences regarding the relative priority of relational vs. rational communication goals may also contribute to more tolerance of journalistic simplification in Taiwan.

  4. MEDIAL PATELLOFEMORAL LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION TO TREAT RECURRENT PATELLAR DISLOCATION

    PubMed Central

    Gonçaives, Matheus Braga Jacques; Júnior, Lúcio Honório de Carvalho; Soares, Luiz Fernando Machado; Gonçaives, Tiago Jacques; dos Santos, Rogério Luciano; Pereira, Marcelo Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present a new technique for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) in patients with recurrent patellar dislocation and to evaluate the clinical findings from this. Methods: Between January 2007 and January 2008, 23 patients underwent reconstruction of the MPFL with a free graft from the semitendinosus tendon. After a minimum of 24 months of follow-up, 22 patients were evaluated using the Kujala and Lysholm clinical protocols. Results: The mean follow up was 26.2 months. According to the Lysholm protocol, the patients had a mean score of 53.72 points preoperatively and 93.36 points postoperatively (p = 0.000006). According to the Kujala protocol, the mean score was 59.81 points preoperatively and 83.54 points postoperatively (p = 0.002173). Conclusion: Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the proposed technique showed excellent results over the short term, when evaluated by means of clinical protocols. PMID:27027005

  5. Vascularized Nasoseptal Flap for Medial Orbital Wall Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Turel, Mazda K; Chin, Christopher J; Vescan, Allan D; Gentili, Fred

    2016-09-01

    With the use and efficacy of the vascularized nasoseptal flap, its indications are also expanding. Due to its relative ease of harvesting and no significant impairment in the long-term sinonasal quality of life, the flap has been used for a number of other purposes apart from its originally proposed use in reconstruction of the anterior cranial fossa, sella, and the clivus. Its use may negate the need of another incision to obtain fat or fascia. The authors describe the case of a 47-year-old lady who underwent endoscopic excision of a medially placed orbital intraconal hemangioma who presented to us with very poor vision in the left eye. The large medial orbital defect was reconstructed with a vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap from the ipsilateral side. The patient made an excellent visual and sino-nasal recovery. This patient highlights a unique use for the proliferating indications for the use of the nasoseptal flap. PMID:27428902

  6. Multiple Running Speed Signals in Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hinman, James R; Brandon, Mark P; Climer, Jason R; Chapman, G William; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Grid cells in medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) can be modeled using oscillatory interference or attractor dynamic mechanisms that perform path integration, a computation requiring information about running direction and speed. The two classes of computational models often use either an oscillatory frequency or a firing rate that increases as a function of running speed. Yet it is currently not known whether these are two manifestations of the same speed signal or dissociable signals with potentially different anatomical substrates. We examined coding of running speed in MEC and identified these two speed signals to be independent of each other within individual neurons. The medial septum (MS) is strongly linked to locomotor behavior, and removal of MS input resulted in strengthening of the firing rate speed signal, while decreasing the strength of the oscillatory speed signal. Thus, two speed signals are present in MEC that are differentially affected by disrupted MS input. PMID:27427460

  7. Medial prefrontal D1 dopamine neurons control food intake.

    PubMed

    Land, Benjamin B; Narayanan, Nandakumar S; Liu, Rong-Jian; Gianessi, Carol A; Brayton, Catherine E; Grimaldi, David M; Sarhan, Maysa; Guarnieri, Douglas J; Deisseroth, Karl; Aghajanian, George K; DiLeone, Ralph J

    2014-02-01

    Although the prefrontal cortex influences motivated behavior, its role in food intake remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate a role for D1-type dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the regulation of feeding. Food intake increases activity in D1 neurons of the mPFC in mice, and optogenetic photostimulation of D1 neurons increases feeding. Conversely, inhibition of D1 neurons decreases intake. Stimulation-based mapping of prefrontal D1 neuron projections implicates the medial basolateral amygdala (mBLA) as a downstream target of these afferents. mBLA neurons activated by prefrontal D1 stimulation are CaMKII positive and closely juxtaposed to prefrontal D1 axon terminals. Finally, photostimulating these axons in the mBLA is sufficient to increase feeding, recapitulating the effects of mPFC D1 stimulation. These data describe a new circuit for top-down control of food intake.

  8. The medial tibial syndrome. The role of surgery.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, A J; Schepsis, A; McArthur, C

    1994-11-01

    Among authors over the past 35 years, medial tibial syndrome, or "shin splints," has been interpreted to mean many different things. We present a review of the literature to attempt to ascribe one definition to this clinical entity, and to clearly define its symptoms, signs, pathophysiology, biomechanics, and treatment. In addition, we describe our results with five patients whose seven affected limbs eventually required surgery for this condition, and we compare them to the results in the literature.

  9. Medial rectus re-recession in undercorrected esotropia.

    PubMed

    Biedner, B; Yassur, Y; David, R

    1992-01-01

    Conventional surgical management of surgically undercorrected esotropia includes bilateral lateral rectus resection, marginal myotomy, and Faden operation. During a 3-year period, 10 patients with surgically undercorrected esotropia had medial rectus re-recession 13.5 mm from the limbus. Successful binocular realignment (to 10 prism diopters or less residual binocular misalignment) was achieved in 9 of the 10 cases for both near and distance measurements.

  10. TRIMALLEOLAR FRACTURES—A Convenient Medial Approach for Surgical Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Alonzo J.

    1960-01-01

    In dealing surgically with trimalleolar fracture of the ankle joint in which the comminution is not severe, the medial approach is convenient and practicable. In the process of reducing the fracture the alignment can be directly observed. The fixation of the posterior fragment is done from the front rather than from the back of the tibia, Removal of the screws used for fixation is made considerably easier. PMID:13728499

  11. Case report: comprehensive management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krenner, Bernard John

    2002-01-01

    Activity or exercise-induced leg pain is a common complication among competitive and "weekend warrior" athletes. Shin splints is a term that has been used to describe all lower leg pain as a result of activity. There are many different causes of "shin splints," one of which is medial tibial stress syndrome, and the treating clinician must be aware of potentially serious causes of activity related leg pain. Restoring proper biomechanics to the entire kinetic chain and rehabilitation of the injured area should be the primary aim of treatment to optimize shock absorption. The role inflammation plays in medial tibial stress syndrome is controversial, but in this case, seemed to be a causative factor as symptomatology was dramatically decreased with the addition of proteolytic enzymes. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be quite difficult to treat and keeping athletes away from activities that will slow healing or aggravate the condition can be challenging. "Active" rest is the best way in which to allow proper healing while allowing the athlete to maintain their fitness.

  12. Soft-Tissue Loop for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Miswan, Mohd Fairudz Bin Mohd; Al-Fayyadh, Mohamed Zubair Mohamed; Seow Hui, Teo; Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Razif Bin; Ng, Wuey Min

    2016-04-01

    A patient with patellar instability frequently presents with anterior knee pain, patellar subluxation, or dislocation. Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has a key role for normal patella tracking and stability. Reconstruction of the MPFL using a hamstring graft is a commonly used procedure for the treatment of chronic lateral subluxation of patella. Anchor sutures and bony tunnels are used for the patellar attachment of the graft. This can be associated with complications such as patella fracture; besides, it does not produce an anatomical reconstruction for the native MPFL that can alter the direction of tension applied on the patella. To overcome these problems, a soft-tissue loop technique is used for MPFL reconstruction. During this procedure, a semitendinosus graft was passed through the prepatellar extensor retinaculum and secured with sutures. The free ends of the graft were then passed between the second and third layers of the medial patellofemoral retinaculum and fixed to a femoral tunnel on the medial femoral condyle with an interference screw. The desired amount of tension on the graft is achieved under direct vision of patella tracking arthroscopically. We found this method to be relatively safe and fast. It is more anatomical and can avoid the complications during the conventional bony procedures. PMID:27354953

  13. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  14. Analysis of 3D strain in the human medial meniscus.

    PubMed

    Kolaczek, S; Hewison, C; Caterine, S; Ragbar, M X; Getgood, A; Gordon, K D

    2016-10-01

    This study presents a method to evaluate three-dimensional strain in meniscal tissue using medical imaging. Strain is calculated by tracking small teflon markers implanted within the meniscal tissue using computed tomography imaging. The results are presented for strains in the middle and posterior third of the medial menisci of 10 human cadaveric knees, under simulated physiologically relevant loading. In the middle position, an average compressive strain of 3.4% was found in the medial-lateral direction, and average tensile strains of 1.4% and 3.5% were found in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions respectively at 5° of knee flexion with an applied load of 1× body weight. In the posterior position, under the same conditions, average compressive strains of 2.2% and 6.3% were found in the medial-lateral and superior-inferior directions respectively, and an average tensile strain of 3.8% was found in the anterior-posterior direction. No statistically significant difference between strain in the middle or posterior of the meniscus or between the global strains is uncovered. PMID:27484043

  15. Volition and conflict in human medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rees, Geraint; Parton, Andrew; Kennard, Christopher; Husain, Masud

    2005-01-26

    Controversy surrounds the role of human medial frontal cortex in controlling actions. Although damage to this area leads to severe difficulties in spontaneously initiating actions, the precise mechanisms underlying such "volitional" deficits remain to be established. Previous studies have implicated the medial frontal cortex in conflict monitoring and the control of voluntary action, suggesting that these key processes are functionally related or share neural substrates. Here, we combine a novel behavioral paradigm with functional imaging of the oculomotor system to reveal, for the first time, a functional subdivision of the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) into anatomically distinct areas that respond exclusively to either volition or conflict. We also demonstrate that activity in the supplementary eye field (SEF) distinguishes between success and failure in changing voluntary action plans during conflict, suggesting a role for the SEF in implementing the resolution of conflicting actions. We propose a functional architecture of human medial frontal cortex that incorporates the generation of action plans and the resolution of conflict.

  16. Apamin improves spatial navigation in medial septal-lesioned mice.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, S; Schmidt, B; Riekkinen, P

    1998-04-17

    We investigated the effects of acute i.p. injections of the Ca2+-dependent K+ channel blocker, apamin, on water maze spatial navigation, Y-maze and passive avoidance behavior in intact and medial septal-lesioned mice. Apamin 0.02, 0.06 or 0.2 mg/kg (i.p.) administered 30 min before or immediately after the training did not affect the performance of intact mice. Apamin 0.02 or 0.06 mg/kg (i.p.) administered immediately after the daily training did not affect the performance of medial septal-lesioned mice. Apamin 0.02 and 0.06 mg/kg (i.p.) administered 30 min before daily training reversed the navigation failure present in medial septal-lesioned mice during the initial and reversal learning stages of the water maze task. Apamin had no effect on the cognitive performance in Y-maze or passive avoidance tests. The results indicate that blockade of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels may facilitate acquisition of spatial navigation performance, but has no effect on consolidation, inhibitory avoidance and spontaneous alternation behavior in mice.

  17. A combinatorial optogenetic approach to medial habenula function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Eric E.; Hsu, Yun-Wei; Wang, Si; Morton, Glenn; Zeng, Hongkui

    2013-03-01

    The habenula is a brain region found in all vertebrate species. It consists of medial and lateral subnuclei which make complex descending connections to the brainstem. Although the medial habenula (MHb) and its projection, the fasciculus retroflexus (FR), have been recognized for decades, their function remains obscure. The small size of the MHb in rodents, and the cellular and molecular complexity of this region, have made it difficult to study the function of this region with high specificity. Here we describe a Cre-mediated genetic system for expressing the microbial opsin channelrhodopsin (ChR2) specifically in the dorsal (dMHb) and ventral (vMHb) medial habenula. Genetically targeted expression of ChR2 allows MHb neurons to be selectively activated with light in acute brain slices with electrophysiological readouts, and in vivo by means of custom-built fiber optic cannulas. These tools will allow highly specific studies of MHb circuitry and the role of the MHb in behaviors related to addiction and mood regulation.

  18. NMDA receptors in the medial zona incerta stimulate luteinizing hormone and prolactin release.

    PubMed

    Bregonzio, Claudia; Moreno, Griselda N; Cabrera, Ricardo J; Donoso, Alfredo O

    2004-06-01

    1. The aim of the present work is to demonstrate the interaction between the glutamatergic/NMDA and dopaminergic systems in the medial zona incerta on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin secretion and the influence of reproductive hormones. 2. Proestrus and ovariectomized rats were primed with estrogen and progesterone to induce high or low levels of luteinizing hormone and prolactin. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, an NMDA receptor antagonist, and dopamine were injected in the medial zona incerta. Blood samples were withdrawn every hour between 1,600 and 2,000 hours or 2,200 hours via intracardiac catheter from conscious rats. Additional groups of animals injected with the NMDA receptor antagonist were killed 1 or 4 h after injection. Dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid were measured in different hypothalamic regions. 3. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid blocked the ovulatory luteinizing hormone surge in proestrus rats. 2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid also blocked the increase in luteinizing hormone induced by ovarian hormones in ovariectomized rats, an effect that was partially reversed by dopamine injection. Conversely, the increased release of luteinizing hormone and prolactin induced by dopamine was prevented by 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid. We found that the NMDA antagonist injection decreased the dopaminergic activity--as evaluated by the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid/dopamine ratio--in the medio basal hypothalamus and increased in the preoptic area. 4. Our results show an stimulatory role of NMDA receptors on the ovulatory luteinizing hormone release and on luteinizing hormone release induced by sexual hormones and demonstrate that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on luteinizing hormone and prolactin is mediated by the NMDA receptors. These results suggest a close interaction between the glutamatergic and dopaminergic incertohypothalamic systems on the control of luteinizing hormone and prolactin release

  19. A Novel Medial Soft Tissue Release Method for Varus Deformity during Total Knee Arthroplasty: Femoral Origin Release of the Medial Collateral Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Yup; Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Lee, Yong-In

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Numerous methods of medial soft tissue release for severe varus deformity during total knee arthroplasty (TKA) have been reported. These include tibial stripping of the superficial medial collateral ligament (MCL), pie-crusting technique, and medial epicondylar osteotomy. However, there are inherent disadvantages in these techniques. Authors hereby present a novel quantitative method: femoral origin release of the medial collateral ligament (FORM). Surgical Technique For medial tightness remaining even after the release of the deep MCL and semimembranosus, the FORM is initiated with identification of the femoral insertion area of the MCL with the knee in flexion. Starting from the most posterior part of the femoral insertion, one third of the MCL femoral insertion is released from its attachment. If necessary, further sequential medial release is performed. Materials and Methods Seventeen knees that underwent the FORM were evaluated for radiological and clinical outcomes. Results Regardless of the extent of the FORM, no knees showed residual valgus instability at 24 weeks after surgery. Conclusions As the FORM is performed in a stepwise manner, fine adjustment during medial release might be beneficial to prevent inadvertent over-release of the medial structures of the knee. PMID:27274473

  20. Postero-medial approach for complex tibial plateau injuries with a postero-medial or postero-lateral shear fragment.

    PubMed

    Berber, Reshid; Lewis, Charlotte P; Copas, David; Forward, Daren P; Moran, Christopher G

    2014-04-01

    This study demonstrates the utility of a modified postero-medial surgical approach to the knee in treating a series of patients with complex tibial plateau injuries with associated postero-medial and postero-lateral shear fractures. Posterior coronal shear fractures are underappreciated and their clinical relevance has recently been characterised. Less-invasive surgery and indirect reduction techniques are inadequate for treating these coronal plane fractures. Our approach includes an inverted 'L'-shaped incision situated within the posterior flexor knee crease, followed by the retraction or incision of the medial head of the gastrocnemius tendon, while protecting the neurovascular structures. This provides a more extensile exposure, as far as the postero-lateral corner, than previously described. Our case series included eight females and eight males. The average age was 53 years. The majority of these injuries were sustained through high-energy trauma. All patients' fractures were classified as Schatzker grade 4, or above, with a postero-medial split depression. Eight patients had associated postero-lateral corner fractures. Two were open, two had vascular compromise and one had neurological injury. The average time to surgery was 6.4 days (range 0-12), operative time 142 min (range 76-300) and length of stay 17 days (range 7-46). A total of 11 patients were treated using the postero-medial approach alone and in five the treatment was combined with an antero-lateral approach. Two patients suffered a reduced range of movement requiring manipulation and physiotherapy, and three patients had a 5-degree fixed flexion deformity. Two patients developed superficial wound infections treated with antibiotics alone. Anatomical reduction and fracture union was achieved in 15 patients. These are complex fractures to treat, and our modified posterior approach allows direct reduction and optimal positioning of plates to act as buttress devices. It can be extended across the

  1. Partial facetectomy for lumbar foraminal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kevin; Rodriguez-Olaverri, Juan Carlos; Schwab, Frank; Hashem, Jenifer; Razi, Afshin; Farcy, Jean Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Background. Several different techniques exist to address the pain and disability caused by isolated nerve root impingement. Failure to adequately decompress the lumbar foramen may lead to failed back surgery syndrome. However, aggressive treatment often causes spinal instability or may require fusion for satisfactory results. We describe a novel technique for decompression of the lumbar nerve root and demonstrate its effectiveness in relief of radicular symptoms. Methods. Partial facetectomy was performed by removal of the medial portion of the superior facet in patients with lumbar foraminal stenosis. 47 patients underwent the procedure from 2001 to 2010. Those who demonstrated neurogenic claudication without spinal instability or central canal stenosis and failed conservative management were eligible for the procedure. Functional level was recorded for each patient. These patients were followed for an average of 3.9 years to evaluate outcomes. Results. 27 of 47 patients (57%) reported no back pain and no functional limitations. Eight of 47 patients (17%) reported moderate pain, but had no limitations. Six of 47 patients (13%) continued to experience degenerative symptoms. Five of 47 patients (11%) required additional surgery. Conclusions. Partial facetectomy is an effective means to decompress the lumbar nerve root foramen without causing spinal instability.

  2. Clinical Outcomes After Suture Anchor Repair of Recalcitrant Medial Epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Grawe, Brian M; Fabricant, Peter D; Chin, Christopher S; Allen, Answorth A; DePalma, Brian J; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical and patient-reported outcomes and return to sport after surgical treatment of medial epicondylitis with suture anchor fixation. Consecutive patients were evaluated after undergoing debridement and suture anchor repair of the flexor-pronator mass for the treatment of medial epicondylitis. Demographic variables, a short version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) score, Oxford Elbow Score (OES), and 10-point pain and satisfaction scales were collected. Ability and time to return to sport after surgery were evaluated, and the relationship between predictor variables and both elbow function and return to sport was investigated. Median age at the time of surgery was 55 years (range, 29-65 years), with median follow-up of 40 months (range, 12-67 months). Median QuickDASH score and OES at final follow-up were 2.3 (range, 0-38.6) and 45 (range, 22-48), respectively. Most patients returned to premorbid sporting activities at a median of 4.5 months (range, 2.5-12 months), whereas 4 patients (14%) reported significant limitations at final follow-up. Older age at the time of surgery was predictive of better QuickDASH score and OES (P=.05 and P=.02, respectively). Patients who underwent surgery after a shorter duration of symptoms had better outcomes, but the difference did not reach statistical significance (QuickDASH, P=.09; OES, P=.10). Surgical treatment of recalcitrant medial epicondylitis with suture anchor fixation offers good pain relief and patient satisfaction, with little residual disability. Older age at the time of surgery predicts a better outcome.

  3. Voice Outcome after Gore-Tex Medialization Thyroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Elnashar, Ismail; El-Anwar, Mohammad; Amer, Hazem; Quriba, Amal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex (Gore and Associates, Newark, Delaware, United States) has been discussed in the literature, few reports have assessed voice quality afterward, and they did not use a full assessment protocol. Objective To assess the improvement in voice quality after medialization thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex in patients with glottic insufficiency of variable etiology. Methods Eleven patients with glottic insufficiency of different etiologies that failed compensation were operated by type 1 thyroplasty utilizing Gore-Tex. Pre- and postoperative (1 week, 3 months, and 6 months) voice assessment was done and statistical analysis was performed on the results. Results In all postoperative assessments, there was significant improvement in the grade of dysphonia (p < 0.004) and highly significant reduction in the size of glottic gap and prolongation of maximum phonation time (p < 0.0001). The difference in voice parameters in the early (1 week) and the late (3 and 6 months) postoperative period was not significant. None of the patients developed stridor or shortness of breath necessitating tracheotomy, and there was no implant extrusion in any patient during the study period. Conclusion Gore-Tex medialization provides reliable results for both subjective and objective voice parameters. It leads to a satisfactory restoration of voice whatever the etiology of glottic incompetence is. This technique is relatively easy and does not lead to major complications. Further studies with larger number of patients and more extended periods of follow-up are still required to assess the long-term results of the technique regarding voice quality and implant extrusion. PMID:26157500

  4. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  5. [Chondropathy of the patella. Experiences with 100 medializations].

    PubMed

    Villiger, K J

    1976-10-01

    After a brief reference to the biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, the anamnesis and the clinical and the radiologic symptomatology of chondropathia and the possibilities of its therapy are described. Patellofemoral arthrography is very helpful for the diagnosis. The technique of our operation is also described. After close study of current available literature and careful control of our 100 medialization cases, the results after 6, 12, 24, and 36 months are shown in tabular form. The operation is recommended for primary chondropathia patellae with lateroposition or lateral-tipped patella.

  6. Considerations for the Management of Medial Orbital Wall Blowout Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsoo; Chung, Kyu Jin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, diagnoses of and operations for medial orbital blowout fracture have increased because of the development of imaging technology. In this article, the authors review the literature, and overview the accumulated knowledge about the orbital anatomy, fracture mechanisms, surgical approaches, reconstruction materials, and surgical methods. In terms of surgical approaches, transcaruncular, transcutaneous, and transnasal endoscopic approaches are discussed. Reconstruction methods including onlay covering, inlay implantation, and repositioning methods are also discussed. Consideration and understanding of these should lead to more optimal outcomes. PMID:27218019

  7. Evaluation and treatment of medial instability of the knee.

    PubMed

    Stannard, James P

    2015-06-01

    Medial knee ligament injury and instability has frequently been treated by bracing and physical therapy. That has worked well in many instances and patients have been able to resume preinjury activities. However, there is a subset of patients that remain unstable when treated with conservative measures. A critical question we face is why these knees fail when the majority heal well and regain function? What are the differences that lead to failure and how can surgeons recognize these differences and determine which patients will benefit from primary surgical repair or reconstruction?

  8. Plantar and medial heel pain: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lareau, Craig R; Sawyer, Gregory A; Wang, Joanne H; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-06-01

    Heel pain is commonly encountered in orthopaedic practice. Establishing an accurate diagnosis is critical, but it can be challenging due to the complex regional anatomy. Subacute and chronic plantar and medial heel pain are most frequently the result of repetitive microtrauma or compression of neurologic structures, such as plantar fasciitis, heel pad atrophy, Baxter nerve entrapment, calcaneal stress fracture, and tarsal tunnel syndrome. Most causes of inferior heel pain can be successfully managed nonsurgically. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who do not respond to nonsurgical measures. Although corticosteroid injections have a role in the management of select diagnoses, they should be used with caution.

  9. Bilateral medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction in high-level athletes.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yuichi; Matsushita, Takehiko; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Kawakami, Yohei; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke

    2014-10-01

    This report presents two cases of high-level athletes with bilateral patellar dislocations who were able to return to their preinjury level of activity after bilateral medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction, without any major complications. Patient 1 was a 19-year-old male volleyball player for a top-level college volleyball team, and patient 2 was a 24-year-old woman who was a member of a national-level adult softball team. MPFL reconstruction could be an effective treatment for bilateral patellar dislocation in high-level athletes. Level of evidence V.

  10. Contralateral breast dose from partial breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R Cole; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kisling, Kelly D; Mason, Bryan E; Fisher, Gary D; Kirsner, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dose to the contralateral breast during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare it to external beam-published values. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) packets were used to measure the dose to the most medial aspect of the contralateral breast during APBI simulation, daily quality assurance (QA), and treatment. All patients in this study were treated with a single-entry, multicatheter device for 10 fractions to a total dose of 34 Gy. A mark was placed on the patient's skin on the medial aspect of the opposite breast. Three TLD packets were taped to this mark during the pretreatment simulation. Simulations consisted of an AP and Lateral scout and a limited axial scan encompassing the lumpectomy cavity (miniscan), if rotation was a concern. After the simulation the TLD packets were removed and the patients were moved to the high-dose-rate (HDR) vault where three new TLD packets were taped onto the patients at the skin mark. Treatment was administered with a Nucletron HDR afterloader using Iridium-192 as the treatment source. Post-treatment, TLDs were read (along with the simulation and QA TLD and a set of standards exposed to a known dose of 6 MV photons). Measurements indicate an average total dose to the contralateral breast of 70 cGy for outer quadrant implants and 181 cGy for inner quadrant implants. Compared to external beam breast tangents, these results point to less dose being delivered to the contralateral breast when using APBI. PMID:26699549

  11. Characterizing functional integrity: intraindividual brain signal variability predicts memory performance in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Protzner, Andrea B; Kovacevic, Natasa; Cohn, Melanie; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2013-06-01

    Computational modeling suggests that variability in brain signals provides important information regarding the system's capacity to adopt different network configurations that may promote optimal responding to stimuli. Although there is limited empirical work on this construct, a recent study indicates that age-related decreases in variability across the adult lifespan correlate with less efficient and less accurate performance. Here, we extend this construct to the assessment of cerebral integrity by comparing fMRI BOLD variability and fMRI BOLD amplitude in their ability to account for differences in functional capacity in patients with focal unilateral medial temporal dysfunction. We were specifically interested in whether either of these BOLD measures could identify a link between the affected medial temporal region and memory performance (as measured by a clinical test of verbal memory retention). Using partial least-squares analyses, we found that variability in a set of regions including the left hippocampus predicted verbal retention and, furthermore, this relationship was similar across a range of cognitive tasks measured during scanning (i.e., the same pattern was seen in fixation, autobiographical recall, and word generation). In contrast, signal amplitude in the hippocampus did not predict memory performance, even for a task that reliably activates the medial temporal lobes (i.e., autobiographical recall). These findings provide a powerful validation of the concept that variability in brain signals reflects functional integrity. Furthermore, this measure can be characterized as a robust biomarker in this clinical setting because it reveals the same pattern regardless of cognitive challenge or task engagement during scanning.

  12. Characterizing functional integrity: intraindividual brain signal variability predicts memory performance in patients with medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Protzner, Andrea B; Kovacevic, Natasa; Cohn, Melanie; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2013-06-01

    Computational modeling suggests that variability in brain signals provides important information regarding the system's capacity to adopt different network configurations that may promote optimal responding to stimuli. Although there is limited empirical work on this construct, a recent study indicates that age-related decreases in variability across the adult lifespan correlate with less efficient and less accurate performance. Here, we extend this construct to the assessment of cerebral integrity by comparing fMRI BOLD variability and fMRI BOLD amplitude in their ability to account for differences in functional capacity in patients with focal unilateral medial temporal dysfunction. We were specifically interested in whether either of these BOLD measures could identify a link between the affected medial temporal region and memory performance (as measured by a clinical test of verbal memory retention). Using partial least-squares analyses, we found that variability in a set of regions including the left hippocampus predicted verbal retention and, furthermore, this relationship was similar across a range of cognitive tasks measured during scanning (i.e., the same pattern was seen in fixation, autobiographical recall, and word generation). In contrast, signal amplitude in the hippocampus did not predict memory performance, even for a task that reliably activates the medial temporal lobes (i.e., autobiographical recall). These findings provide a powerful validation of the concept that variability in brain signals reflects functional integrity. Furthermore, this measure can be characterized as a robust biomarker in this clinical setting because it reveals the same pattern regardless of cognitive challenge or task engagement during scanning. PMID:23739982

  13. Observing accidental and intentional unusual actions is associated with different subregions of the medial frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Desmet, Charlotte; Brass, Marcel

    2015-11-15

    The literature on action observation revealed contradictory results regarding the activation of different subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex when observing unusual behaviour. Error observation research has shown that the posterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when observing unusual behaviour compared to usual behaviour while action understanding research has revealed some mixed results concerning the role of the anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex during the observation of unusual actions. Here, we resolve this discrepancy in the literature by showing that different parts of the medial prefrontal cortex are active depending on whether an observed unusual behaviour is intentional or not. While the posterior medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual accidental actions compared to unusual intentional actions, a more anterior part of the medial prefrontal cortex is more active when we observe unusual intentional actions compared to unusual accidental actions.

  14. A geometric morphometric analysis of the medial tibial condyle of African hominids.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Adam D

    2013-10-01

    Although the hominid knee has been heavily scrutinized, shape variation of the medial tibial condyle has yet to be described. Humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas differ in the shape of their medial femoral condyles and in their capacity for external and internal rotation of the tibia relative to the femur. I hypothesize that these differences should be reflected in the shape of the medial tibial condyle of these hominids. Here I use geometric morphometric techniques to uncover shape differences between the medial tibial condyles of humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas. Humans are distinguished from the other two species by having a much more oval-shaped medial tibial condyle, while those of chimpanzees and gorillas are more triangular in outline. Gorillas (especially males) are distinguished by having more concavely-curved condyles (mediolateral direction), which is interpreted as an effect of heavy loading through the medial compartment of the knee in conjunction with differences in the degree of arboreality.

  15. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  16. The Mechanical Benefit of Medial Support Screws in Locking Plating of Proximal Humerus Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pan, Yao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Changqing; Zeng, Bingfang; Chen, Yunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical advantages of medial support screws (MSSs) in the locking proximal humeral plate for treating proximal humerus fractures. Methods Thirty synthetic left humeri were randomly divided into 3 subgroups to establish two-part surgical neck fracture models of proximal humerus. All fractures were fixed with a locking proximal humerus plate. Group A was fixed with medial cortical support and no MSSs; Group B was fixed with 3 MSSs but without medial cortical support; Group C was fixed with neither medial cortical support nor MSSs. Axial compression, torsional stiffness, shear stiffness, and failure tests were performed. Results Constructs with medial support from cortical bone showed statistically higher axial and shear stiffness than other subgroups examined (P<0.0001). When the proximal humerus was not supported by medial cortical bone, locking plating with medial support screws exhibited higher axial and torsional stiffness than locking plating without medial support screws (P≤0.0207). Specimens with medial cortical bone failed primarily by fracture of the humeral shaft or humeral head. Specimens without medial cortical bone support failed primarily by significant plate bending at the fracture site followed by humeral head collapse or humeral head fracture. Conclusions Anatomic reduction with medial cortical support was the stiffest construct after a simulated two-part fracture. Significant biomechanical benefits of MSSs in locking plating of proximal humerus fractures were identified. The reconstruction of the medial column support for proximal humerus fractures helps to enhance mechanical stability of the humeral head and prevent implant failure. PMID:25084520

  17. Reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon combined with reconstruction of medial patellotibial ligament using patellar tendon: initial experience☆

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a surgical technique for anatomical reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using the quadriceps tendon, combined with reconstruction of the medial patellotibial ligament using the patellar tendon; and to present the initial results from a case series. Method The proposed technique was used on a series of cases of patients with diagnoses of patellofemoral instability and indications for surgical treatment, who were attended by the Knee Group of HC-IOT, University of São Paulo. The following were evaluated before and after the operation: range of motion (ROM), apprehension test, lateral translation test, patellar inclination test, inverted J sign, subluxation upon extension, pain from compression of the patella and pain from contraction of the quadriceps. After the operation, the patients were asked whether any new episode of dislocation had occurred, what their degree of satisfaction with the surgery was (on a scale from 0 to 10) and whether they would be prepared to go through this operation again. Results Seven knees were operated, in seven patients, with a mean follow-up of 5.46 months (±2.07). Four patients who presented apprehension before the operation did not show this after the operation. The lateral translation test became normal for all the patients, while the patellar inclination test remained positive for two patients. The patients with an inverted J sign continued to be positive for this sign. Five patients were positive for subluxation upon extension before the operation, but all patients were negative for this after the operation. None of the patients presented any new episode of dislocation of the patella. All of them stated that they were satisfied: five gave a satisfaction score of 9 and two, a score of 10. All of them said that they would undergo the operation again. Only one patient presented a postoperative complication: dehiscence of the wound. Conclusion Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament

  18. Iatrogenic Injury to Medial Rectus After Endoscopic Sinus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bipasha; Priyadarshini, Omega; Ramasubramanian, Srikanth; Agarkar, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) is the mainstay of the treatment in sinus disorders, to re-establish the drainage of the affected sinus. The close proximity of the orbital structures to paranasal sinuses makes them vulnerable to inadvertent injury during the sinus surgery. Medial rectus (MR) muscle is the most commonly injured extraocular muscle during ESS due to its anatomic proximity to the thin medial wall of the orbit. This is a non-comparative, retrospective, interventional case series of six patients presenting with MR injury after ESS. We discuss the management, outcome and review the published literature. A total of six patients met the inclusion criteria. The presenting complaints were diplopia, squinting and limitation of ocular movements. Two patients underwent surgical exploration of the MR muscle and reattachment of the muscle along with injection botulinum to the antagonist lateral rectus muscle. Two patients who had small angle strabismus and who were able to fuse were advised orthoptic exercises and prisms as management. Remaining two patients were advised surgical intervention to correct strabismus but they declined further surgical intervention. Management of MR injury following ESS is complex, often resulting in suboptimal outcomes. Since early intervention is associated with better outcomes, early referral by otolaryngologists to ophthalmologists would result in better outcome. PMID:26693458

  19. Medial prefrontal cortex role in recognition memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan Facundo; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-10-01

    The study of the neurobiology of recognition memory, defined by the integration of the different components of experiences that support recollection of past experiences have been a challenge for memory researches for many years. In the last twenty years, with the development of the spontaneous novel object recognition task and all its variants this has started to change. The features of recognition memory include a particular object or person ("what"), the context in which the experience took place, which can be the arena itself or the location within a particular arena ("where") and the particular time at which the event occurred ("when"). This definition instead of the historical anthropocentric one allows the study of this type of episodic memory in animal models. Some forms of recognition memory that require integration of different features recruit the medial prefrontal cortex. Focusing on findings from spontaneous recognition memory tasks performed by rodents, this review concentrates on the description of previous works that have examined the role that the medial prefrontal cortex has on the different steps of recognition memory. We conclude that this structure, independently of the task used, is required at different memory stages when the task cannot be solved by a single item strategy. PMID:26115848

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex role in recognition memory in rodents.

    PubMed

    Morici, Juan Facundo; Bekinschtein, Pedro; Weisstaub, Noelia V

    2015-10-01

    The study of the neurobiology of recognition memory, defined by the integration of the different components of experiences that support recollection of past experiences have been a challenge for memory researches for many years. In the last twenty years, with the development of the spontaneous novel object recognition task and all its variants this has started to change. The features of recognition memory include a particular object or person ("what"), the context in which the experience took place, which can be the arena itself or the location within a particular arena ("where") and the particular time at which the event occurred ("when"). This definition instead of the historical anthropocentric one allows the study of this type of episodic memory in animal models. Some forms of recognition memory that require integration of different features recruit the medial prefrontal cortex. Focusing on findings from spontaneous recognition memory tasks performed by rodents, this review concentrates on the description of previous works that have examined the role that the medial prefrontal cortex has on the different steps of recognition memory. We conclude that this structure, independently of the task used, is required at different memory stages when the task cannot be solved by a single item strategy.

  1. Medial-lateral organization of the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rich, Erin L; Wallis, Jonathan D

    2014-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that specific cognitive functions localize to different subregions of OFC, but the nature of these functional distinctions remains unclear. One prominent theory, derived from human neuroimaging, proposes that different stimulus valences are processed in separate orbital regions, with medial and lateral OFC processing positive and negative stimuli, respectively. Thus far, neurophysiology data have not supported this theory. We attempted to reconcile these accounts by recording neural activity from the full medial-lateral extent of the orbital surface in monkeys receiving rewards and punishments via gain or loss of secondary reinforcement. We found no convincing evidence for valence selectivity in any orbital region. Instead, we report differences between neurons in central OFC and those on the inferior-lateral orbital convexity, in that they encoded different sources of value information provided by the behavioral task. Neurons in inferior convexity encoded the value of external stimuli, whereas those in OFC encoded value information derived from the structure of the behavioral task. We interpret these results in light of recent theories of OFC function and propose that these distinctions, not valence selectivity, may shed light on a fundamental organizing principle for value processing in orbital cortex.

  2. Medial Orbitofrontal Cortex Is Associated with Fatigue Sensation

    PubMed Central

    Tajima, Seiki; Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Masaaki; Kataoka, Yosky; Iwase, Masao; Yoshikawa, Etsuji; Okada, Hiroyuki; Onoe, Hirotaka; Tsukada, Hideo; Kuratsune, Hirohiko; Ouchi, Yasuomi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Fatigue is an indispensable bioalarm to avoid exhaustive state caused by overwork or stresses. It is necessary to elucidate the neural mechanism of fatigue sensation for managing fatigue properly. We performed H2 15O positron emission tomography scans to indicate neural activations while subjects were performing 35-min fatigue-inducing task trials twice. During the positron emission tomography experiment, subjects performed advanced trail-making tests, touching the target circles in sequence located on the display of a touch-panel screen. In order to identify the brain regions associated with fatigue sensation, correlation analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping method. The brain region exhibiting a positive correlation in activity with subjective sensation of fatigue, measured immediately after each positron emission tomography scan, was located in medial orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann's area 10/11). Hence, the medial orbitofrontal cortex is a brain region associated with mental fatigue sensation. Our findings provide a new perspective on the neural basis of fatigue. PMID:21188225

  3. Mapping the human cerebral cortex using 3-D medial manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekely, Gabor; Brechbuehler, Christian; Kuebler, Olaf; Ogniewicz, Robert; Budinger, Thomas F.

    1992-09-01

    Novel imaging technologies provide a detailed look at structure and function of the tremendously complex and variable human brain. Optimal exploitation of the information stored in the rapidly growing collection of acquired and segmented MRI data calls for robust and reliable descriptions of the individual geometry of the cerebral cortex. A mathematical description and representation of 3-D shape, capable of dealing with form of variable appearance, is at the focus of this paper. We base our development on the Medial Axis Transformation (MAT) customarily defined in 2-D although the concept generalizes to any number of dimensions. Our implementation of the 3-D MAT combines full 3-D Voronoitesselation generated by the set of all border points with regularization procedures to obtain geometrically and topologically correct medial manifolds. The proposed algorithm was tested on synthetic objects and has been applied to 3-D MRI data of 1 mm isotropic resolution to obtain a description of the sulci in the cerebral cortex. Description and representation of the cortical anatomy is significant in clinical applications, medical research, and instrumentation developments.

  4. Deep Transverse Lateral Retinaculum Reconstruction for Medial Patellar Instability.

    PubMed

    Sanchis-Alfonso, Vicente; Montesinos-Berry, Erik; Monllau, Joan Carles; Andrish, Jack

    2015-06-01

    Medial patellar instability can be a disabling complication of an extensive lateral retinaculum release. It is often overlooked, and for the diagnosis, it is necessary to have a high index of suspicion. Typically, the patient feels a new pain and new instability after the lateral retinaculum release that are distinct from, and much worse than, those before surgery. All of our patients had significant relief from their pain with "reverse" McConnell taping. If there is a significant improvement in symptoms after this taping and stress radiographs or stress axial computed tomography scans show an objective pathologic medial patellar displacement, reconstruction of the lateral retinaculum should be considered. This article details our technique for reconstruction of the deep transverse layer of the lateral retinaculum using an anterior strip of the iliotibial band. This strip is detached from its insertion onto the Gerdy tubercle and then reflected proximally beyond the level of the lateral femoral epicondyle. Finally, it is attached either by direct suture to the remaining prepatellar and peripatellar retinaculum if there is adequate tissue present or by a suture anchor. PMID:26258038

  5. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes.

  6. Medial-lateral organization of the orbitofrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rich, Erin L; Wallis, Jonathan D

    2014-07-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that specific cognitive functions localize to different subregions of OFC, but the nature of these functional distinctions remains unclear. One prominent theory, derived from human neuroimaging, proposes that different stimulus valences are processed in separate orbital regions, with medial and lateral OFC processing positive and negative stimuli, respectively. Thus far, neurophysiology data have not supported this theory. We attempted to reconcile these accounts by recording neural activity from the full medial-lateral extent of the orbital surface in monkeys receiving rewards and punishments via gain or loss of secondary reinforcement. We found no convincing evidence for valence selectivity in any orbital region. Instead, we report differences between neurons in central OFC and those on the inferior-lateral orbital convexity, in that they encoded different sources of value information provided by the behavioral task. Neurons in inferior convexity encoded the value of external stimuli, whereas those in OFC encoded value information derived from the structure of the behavioral task. We interpret these results in light of recent theories of OFC function and propose that these distinctions, not valence selectivity, may shed light on a fundamental organizing principle for value processing in orbital cortex. PMID:24405106

  7. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Lesions Abolish Contextual Control of Competing Responses

    PubMed Central

    Haddon, J.E; Killcross, A.S

    2005-01-01

    There is much debate as to the extent and nature of functional specialization within the different subregions of the prefrontal cortex. The current study was undertaken to investigate the effect of damage to medial prefrontal cortex subregions in the rat. Rats were trained on two biconditional discrimination tasks, one auditory and one visual, in two different contexts. At test, they received presentations of audiovisual compounds of these training stimuli in extinction. These compounds had dictated either the same (congruent trials) or different (incongruent trials) responses during training. In sham-operated controls, contextual cues came to control responding to conflicting information provided by incongruent stimulus compounds. Experiment 1 demonstrated that this contextual control of responding was not evident in individual rats with large amounts of damage that included the prelimbic and cingulate subregions of the prefrontal cortex. Experiment 2 further dissociated the result of Experiment 1, demonstrating that lesions specific to the anterior cingulate cortex were sufficient to produce a deficit early on during presentation of an incongruent stimulus compound but that performance was unimpaired as presentation progressed. This early deficit suggests a role for the anterior cingulate cortex in the detection of response conflict, and for the medial prefrontal cortex in the contextual control of competing responses, providing evidence for functional specialization within the rat prefrontal cortex. PMID:16596976

  8. MRI parcellation of ex vivo medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Augustinack, Jean C; Magnain, Caroline; Reuter, Martin; van der Kouwe, André J W; Boas, David; Fischl, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Recent advancements in radio frequency coils, field strength and sophisticated pulse sequences have propelled modern brain mapping and have made validation to biological standards - histology and pathology - possible. The medial temporal lobe has long been established as a pivotal brain region for connectivity, function and unique structure in the human brain, and reveals disconnection in mild Alzheimer's disease. Specific brain mapping of mesocortical areas affected with neurofibrillary tangle pathology early in disease progression provides not only an accurate description for location of these areas but also supplies spherical coordinates that allow comparison between other ex vivo cases and larger in vivo datasets. We have identified several cytoarchitectonic features in the medial temporal lobe with high resolution ex vivo MRI, including gray matter structures such as the entorhinal layer II 'islands', perirhinal layer II-III columns, presubicular 'clouds', granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus as well as lamina of the hippocampus. Localization of Brodmann areas 28 and 35 (entorhinal and perirhinal, respectively) demonstrates MRI based area boundaries validated with multiple methods and histological stains. Based on our findings, both myelin and Nissl staining relate to contrast in ex vivo MRI. Precise brain mapping serves to create modern atlases for cortical areas, allowing accurate localization with important applications to detecting early disease processes. PMID:23702414

  9. Complementary Roles of Hippocampus and Medial Entorhinal Cortex in Episodic Memory

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, P. A.; Eichenbaum, H.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial mapping and navigation are figured prominently in the extant literature that describes hippocampal function. The medial entorhinal cortex is likewise attracting increasing interest, insofar as evidence accumulates that this area also contributes to spatial information processing. Here, we discuss recent electrophysiological findings that offer an alternate view of hippocampal and medial entorhinal function. These findings suggest complementary contributions of the hippocampus and medial entorhinal cortex in support of episodic memory, wherein hippocampal networks encode sequences of events that compose temporally and spatially extended episodes, whereas medial entorhinal networks disambiguate overlapping episodes by binding sequential events into distinct memories. PMID:18615199

  10. Medial tibial pain. A prospective study of its cause among military recruits.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Giladi, M; Stein, M; Kashtan, H; Margulies, J; Chisin, R; Steinberg, R; Swissa, A; Aharonson, Z

    1986-12-01

    In a prospective study of 295 infantry recruits during 14 weeks of basic training, 41% had medial tibial pain. Routine scintigraphic evaluation in cases of medial tibial bone pain showed that 63% had abnormalities. A stress fracture was found in 46%. Only two patients had periostitis. None had ischemic medial compartment syndrome. Physical examination could not differentiate between cases with medial tibial bone pain secondary to stress fractures and those with scintigraphically normal tibias. When both pain and swelling were localized in the middle one-third of the tibia, the lesion most likely proved to be a stress fracture.

  11. Preserved Self-Awareness following Extensive Bilateral Brain Damage to the Insula, Anterior Cingulate, and Medial Prefrontal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Khalsa, Sahib S.; Damasio, Antonio; Tranel, Daniel; Landini, Gregory; Williford, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that self-awareness (SA), a multifaceted phenomenon central to human consciousness, depends critically on specific brain regions, namely the insular cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Such a proposal predicts that damage to these regions should disrupt or even abolish SA. We tested this prediction in a rare neurological patient with extensive bilateral brain damage encompassing the insula, ACC, mPFC, and the medial temporal lobes. In spite of severe amnesia, which partially affected his “autobiographical self”, the patient's SA remained fundamentally intact. His Core SA, including basic self-recognition and sense of self-agency, was preserved. His Extended SA and Introspective SA were also largely intact, as he has a stable self-concept and intact higher-order metacognitive abilities. The results suggest that the insular cortex, ACC and mPFC are not required for most aspects of SA. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that SA is likely to emerge from more distributed interactions among brain networks including those in the brainstem, thalamus, and posteromedial cortices. PMID:22927899

  12. A Case of Spontaneous Osteonecrosis of the Knee with Early and Simultaneous Involvement of the Medial Femoral Condyle and Medial Tibial Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Shinya; Arai, Yuji; Honjo, Kuniaki; Nakagawa, Shuji; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SPONK) usually involves a single condyle, most often the medial femoral condyle (MFC). Involvement of the medial tibial plateau (MTP) is less common, occurring in about 2% of knees with SPONK. Early onset SPONK on the ipsilateral side of the medial compartment is very rare, with, to our knowledge, only four cases reported to date. We describe a very rare case of SPONK with early simultaneous development in the MFC and MTP. Serial plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging showed that SPONK in both condyles followed a similar progressive course. The pathological findings in these lesions were similar to those observed in subchondral insufficiency fractures. PMID:27242941

  13. The medial prefrontal cortex and the emergence of self-conscious emotion in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Somerville, Leah H; Jones, Rebecca M; Ruberry, Erika J; Dyke, Jonathan P; Glover, Gary; Casey, B J

    2013-08-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationship between developmental modulation of socioaffective brain systems and adolescents' preoccupation with social evaluation. Child, adolescent, and adult participants viewed cues indicating that a camera was alternately off, warming up, or projecting their image to a peer during the acquisition of behavioral-, autonomic-, and neural-response (functional MRI) data. Believing that a peer was actively watching them was sufficient to induce self-conscious emotion that rose in magnitude from childhood to adolescence and partially subsided into adulthood. Autonomic arousal was uniquely heightened in adolescents. These behavioral patterns were paralleled by emergent engagement of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) and striatum-MPFC connectivity during adolescence, which are thought to promote motivated social behavior in adolescence. These findings demonstrate that adolescents' self-consciousness is related to age-dependent sensitivity of brain systems critical to socioaffective processes. Further, unique interactions between the MPFC and striatum may provide a mechanism by which social-evaluation contexts influence adolescent behavior.

  14. Transient optogenetic inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex biases the active population of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Rueckemann, Jon W; DiMauro, Audrey J; Rangel, Lara M; Han, Xue; Boyden, Edward S; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2016-02-01

    The mechanisms that enable the hippocampal network to express the appropriate spatial representation for a particular circumstance are not well understood. Previous studies suggest that the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) may have a role in reproducibly selecting the hippocampal representation of an environment. To examine how ongoing MEC activity is continually integrated by the hippocampus, we performed transient unilateral optogenetic inactivations of the MEC while simultaneously recording place cell activity in CA1. Inactivation of the MEC caused a partial remapping in the CA1 population without diminishing the degree of spatial tuning across the active cell assembly. These changes remained stable irrespective of intermittent disruption of MEC input, indicating that while MEC input is integrated over long time scales to bias the active population, there are mechanisms for stabilizing the population of active neurons independent of the MEC. We find that MEC inputs to the hippocampus shape its ongoing activity by biasing the participation of the neurons in the active network, thereby influencing how the hippocampus selectively represents information.

  15. Synaptic plasticity in the medial superior olive of hearing, deaf, and cochlear-implanted cats.

    PubMed

    Tirko, Natasha N; Ryugo, David K

    2012-07-01

    The medial superior olive (MSO) is a key auditory brainstem structure that receives binaural inputs and is implicated in processing interaural time disparities used for sound localization. The deaf white cat, a proven model of congenital deafness, was used to examine how deafness and cochlear implantation affected the synaptic organization at this binaural center in the ascending auditory pathway. The patterns of axosomatic and axodendritic organization were determined for principal neurons from the MSO of hearing, deaf, and deaf cats with cochlear implants. The nature of the synapses was evaluated through electron microscopy, ultrastructure analysis of the synaptic vesicles, and immunohistochemistry. The results show that the proportion of inhibitory axosomatic terminals was significantly smaller in deaf animals when compared with hearing animals. However, after a period of electrical stimulation via cochlear implants the proportion of inhibitory inputs resembled that of hearing animals. Additionally, the excitatory axodendritic boutons of hearing cats were found to be significantly larger than those of deaf cats. Boutons of stimulated cats were significantly larger than the boutons in deaf cats, although not as large as in the hearing cats, indicating a partial recovery of excitatory inputs to MSO dendrites after stimulation. These results exemplify dynamic plasticity in the auditory brainstem and reveal that electrical stimulation through cochlear implants has a restorative effect on synaptic organization in the MSO. PMID:22237661

  16. Are Early Results of Robotic Assisted Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty Successful?

    PubMed Central

    Haklar, Uğur; Ulusoy, Ertuğrul; Şimşek, Tayfun; Terzi, Nuray

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Robotic surgery studies have been increasing in literature in the past years due to its operative advantages on reducing error and improving functional success in partial knee arthroplasty. Methods: Data were prospectively collected in 21 patients (31 knees) who underwent MAKOplasty, robotic assisted unicondylar medial knee arthroplasty, between June 2013 – January 2014 in our clinic with an average follow-up time of 5.5 months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with American Knee Society Scoring System. Additionally, intra-operative digitally planned implant positions on the robot’s software were compared with post-operative radiographic component alignment. In the radiographic evaluation; anatomic axis of the tibia was observed in the coronal plane. Tibial posterior slope and flexion angle of the femoral component were observed in the sagittal plane. Results: Pre-operatively 1 patient was scored fair (60 points) and 20 patients were scored poor (mean, 46.6 points) on American Knee Society Scoring System. Post-operatively all 21 patients had excellent knee scores (mean, 99.67 points). Function-wise 7 patients were scored fair (mean, 60 points) and 14 patients were scored poor (mean, 30.7 points) again on American Knee Society Functional Scoring System. Post-operatively all 21 patients exhibited excellent function scores (mean, 99.04 points). In the radiological evaluation, intra-operative robotic analyses were compared with post-operative radiographic alignment. No significant difference was observed statistically (paired t-test, p < 0.05). This comparison is valuable as Lonner, Hernigou, Collier report that mal-alignment by as little as 2° may predispose to implant failures. Conclusion: Robotic assistance greatly improves clinical and functional outcomes and may help prevent implant failures due to surgical error and mal-alignment in partial knee arthroplasty.

  17. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients’ ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29–71 years) and 30 years (range: 14–62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is

  18. Comparison of Medial and Lateral Meniscus Root Tears.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ji Hyun; Choi, Sang-Hee; Lee, Seung Ah; Wang, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    The meniscus root plays an essential role in maintaining the circumferential hoop tension and preventing meniscal displacement. Studies on meniscus root tears have investigated the relationship of osteoarthritis and an anterior cruciate ligament tear. However, few studies have directly compared the medial and lateral root tears. To assess the prevalence of meniscal extrusion and its relationship with clinical features in medial and lateral meniscus root tears, we performed a retrospective review of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results of 42 knee patients who had meniscus posterior horn root tears and who had undergone arthroscopic operations. The presence of meniscal extrusion was evaluated and the exact extent was measured from the tibial margin. The results were correlated with arthroscopic findings. Clinical features including patients' ages, joint abnormalities, and previous trauma histories were evaluated. Twenty-two patients had medial meniscus root tears (MMRTs) and twenty patients had lateral meniscus root tears (LMRTs). Meniscal extrusion was present in 18 MMRT patients and one LMRT patient. The mean extent of extrusion was 4.2mm (range, 0.6 to 7.8) in the MMRT group and 0.9mm (range, -1.9 to 3.4) in the LMRT group. Five patients with MMRT had a history of trauma, while 19 patients with LMRT had a history of trauma. Three patients with MMRT had anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, while 19 patients with LMRT had ACL tears. The mean age of the patients was 52 years (range: 29-71 years) and 30 years (range: 14-62 years) in the MMRT and LMRT group, respectively. There was a significant correlation between a MMRT and meniscal extrusion (p<0.0001), and between an ACL tear and LMRT (p<0.0001). A history of trauma was significantly common in LMRT (p<0.0001). LMRT patients were significantly younger than MMRT patients (p<0.0001). Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) grade differed significantly between MMRT and LMRT group (p<0.0001). Meniscal extrusion is common in

  19. Variance Components: Partialled vs. Common.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Ervin W.

    1985-01-01

    A new approach to partialling components is used. Like conventional partialling, this approach orthogonalizes variables by partitioning the scores or observations. Unlike conventional partialling, it yields a common component and two unique components. (Author/GDC)

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  4. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  5. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  6. Dynamics of partial control.

    PubMed

    Sabuco, Juan; Sanjuán, Miguel A F; Yorke, James A

    2012-12-01

    Safe sets are a basic ingredient in the strategy of partial control of chaotic systems. Recently we have found an algorithm, the sculpting algorithm, which allows us to construct them, when they exist. Here we define another type of set, an asymptotic safe set, to which trajectories are attracted asymptotically when the partial control strategy is applied. We apply all these ideas to a specific example of a Duffing oscillator showing the geometry of these sets in phase space. The software for creating all the figures appearing in this paper is available as supplementary material. PMID:23278093

  7. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Baarini, Omar; Gilheany, Mark

    2016-07-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area. PMID:27630899

  8. Galanin neurons in the medial preoptic area govern parental behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zheng; Autry, Anita E; Bergan, Joseph F; Watabe-Uchida, Mitsuko; Dulac, Catherine G

    2014-05-15

    Mice display robust, stereotyped behaviours towards pups: virgin males typically attack pups, whereas virgin females and sexually experienced males and females display parental care. Here we show that virgin males genetically impaired in vomeronasal sensing do not attack pups and are parental. Furthermore, we uncover a subset of galanin-expressing neurons in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) that are specifically activated during male and female parenting, and a different subpopulation that is activated during mating. Genetic ablation of MPOA galanin neurons results in marked impairment of parental responses in males and females and affects male mating. Optogenetic activation of these neurons in virgin males suppresses inter-male and pup-directed aggression and induces pup grooming. Thus, MPOA galanin neurons emerge as an essential regulatory node of male and female parenting behaviour and other social responses. These results provide an entry point to a circuit-level dissection of parental behaviour and its modulation by social experience.

  9. Medial prefrontal cortex as an action-outcome predictor.

    PubMed

    Alexander, William H; Brown, Joshua W

    2011-10-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and especially anterior cingulate cortex is central to higher cognitive function and many clinical disorders, yet its basic function remains in dispute. Various competing theories of mPFC have treated effects of errors, conflict, error likelihood, volatility and reward, using findings from neuroimaging and neurophysiology in humans and monkeys. No single theory has been able to reconcile and account for the variety of findings. Here we show that a simple model based on standard learning rules can simulate and unify an unprecedented range of known effects in mPFC. The model reinterprets many known effects and suggests a new view of mPFC, as a region concerned with learning and predicting the likely outcomes of actions, whether good or bad. Cognitive control at the neural level is then seen as a result of evaluating the probable and actual outcomes of one's actions.

  10. Medial prefrontal cortex predicts internally driven strategy shifts

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Nicolas W.; Gaschler, Robert; Wenke, Dorit; Heinzle, Jakob; Frensch, Peter A.; Haynes, John-Dylan; Reverberi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many daily behaviors require us to actively focus on the current task and ignore all other distractions. Yet, ignoring everything else might hinder the ability to discover new ways to achieve the same goal. Here, we studied the neural mechanisms that support the spontaneous change to better strategies while an established strategy is executed. Multivariate neuroimaging analysis showed that before the spontaneous change to an alternative strategy, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) encoded information that was irrelevant for the current strategy but necessary for the later strategy. Importantly, this neural effect was related to future behavioral changes: information encoding in MPFC was changed only in participants who eventually switched their strategy and started before the actual strategy change. This allowed us to predict spontaneous strategy shifts ahead of time. These findings suggest that MPFC might internally simulate alternative strategies and sheds new light on the organization of PFC. PMID:25819613

  11. Medial temporal lobe memory in childhood: Developmental transitions

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Elise L.; Richmond, Jenny L.; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa K.; Thomas, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) support declarative memory and mature structurally and functionally during the postnatal years in humans. Although recent work has addressed the development of declarative memory in early childhood, less is known about continued development beyond this period of time. The purpose of this investigation was to explore MTL-dependent memory across middle childhood. Children (6 – 10 years old) and adults completed two computerized tasks, place learning (PL) and transitive inference (TI), that each examined relational memory, as well as the flexible use of relational learning. Findings suggest that the development of relational memory precedes the development of the ability to use relational knowledge flexibly in novel situations. Implications for the development of underlying brain areas and ideas for future neuroimaging investigations are discussed. PMID:20712740

  12. Primary Aneurysm of the Medial Marginal Vein of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Casian, D.; Culiuc, V.

    2015-01-01

    The primary superficial venous aneurysms of the foot are very rare. A 34-year-old female patient developed a dorsal foot mass during the second trimester of pregnancy with no history of previous trauma, puncture, or infection. One year later, she was referred to the surgical department for excision of “foot hygroma.” Based on the clinical findings, the venous aneurysm was suspected and duplex ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of the aneurysm of the medial marginal vein of the foot. Excision of aneurysm with bipolar ligation of marginal vein was performed under local anesthesia. The postoperative evolution was uneventful. The authors hope that the presented case report will increase the awareness of general practitioners, dermatologists, and surgeons regarding the superficial venous aneurysms of lower limbs. PMID:26576318

  13. Angioleiomyoma of the Plantar-Medial Arch: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gilheany, Mark

    2016-01-01

    An angioleiomyoma is a benign soft tissue tumour that arises from smooth muscle layer of blood vessels. The true aetiology of these masses is largely unknown and quite often may not be associated with pain. This paper illustrates the occurrence of an angioleiomyoma in the medial arch of the foot, a previously unreported location. Significant delay occurred in the patient being referred for specialist consultation, after attending numerous general practitioners for management. This highlighted the need for ongoing publication for case reports of this nature. The patient underwent excision with no recurrence of the lesion reported at 12 months. Often masses of this type may be left alone. However, when symptomatic simple excision will suffice where no other surrounding complication exists and where the mass is well encapsulated in the sub cutaneous area. PMID:27630899

  14. Medial temporal lobe dysgenesis in Muenke syndrome and hypochondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Salvatore; Farnetani, Maria Angela; Berardi, Rosario; Bartalini, Gabriella; Carpentieri, Marilisa; Galluzzi, Paolo; Mostardini, Rosa; Morgese, Guido; Balestri, Paolo

    2003-07-01

    Hypochondroplasia (HCH) and Muenke syndrome (MS) are caused by mutations on FGFR3 gene. FGFR3 is known to play a role in controlling nervous system development. We describe the clinical and neuroradiological findings of the first two patients, to our knowledge, affected by HCH and MS, respectively, in whom bilateral dysgenesis of the medial temporal lobe structures has been observed. In both patients diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis. They were mentally normal and showed similarities in early-onset temporal lobe-related seizures. In both patients EEG recorded bilateral temporal region discharges. MRI detected temporal lobe anomalies with inadequate differentiation between white and gray matter, defective gyri, and abnormally shaped hippocampus. PMID:12794698

  15. Lateral and medial epicondylitis: role of occupational factors.

    PubMed

    Shiri, Rahman; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2011-02-01

    Epicondylitis is a common upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorder. It is most common at the age of 40-60 years. Epicondylitis seems to affect women more frequently than men. Diagnosis of epicondylitis is clinical and based on symptoms and findings of physical examination. The prevalence of lateral epicondylitis in the general populations is approximately 1.0-1.3% in men and 1.1-4.0% in women and that of medial epicondylitis is nearly 0.3-0.6% in men and 0.3-1.1% in women. The incidence rate of medical consultations has been estimated at 0.3-1.1 for lateral and 0.1 for medial epicondylitis per year per 100 subjects of general practice populations. Of occupational risk factors, forceful activities, high force combined with high repetition or awkward posture and awkward postures are associated with epicondylitis. The number of studies is limited to work-related psychosocial factors and the effects are not as consistent as those of physical load factors. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroid injections and acupuncture provide short-term beneficial effects. Workload modification should be considered, especially in manually strenuous jobs. According to clinical case series, surgical treatment has shown fair to good results; however, the efficacy of surgical treatment has not been evaluated in randomised controlled trials. Poorer prognosis of epicondylitis has been reported for individuals with high level of physical strain at work, non-neutral wrist postures during work activity and for those with the condition on the dominant elbow. Modification of physical factors could reduce the risk or improve the prognosis of epicondylitis.

  16. Functional connectivity based parcellation of the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Fang; Ritchey, Maureen; Libby, Laura A; Ranganath, Charan

    2016-10-01

    Regional differences in large-scale connectivity have been proposed to underlie functional specialization along the anterior-posterior axis of the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus (HC) and the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG). However, it is unknown whether functional connectivity (FC) can be used reliably to parcellate the human MTL. The current study aimed to differentiate subregions of the HC and the PHG based on patterns of whole-brain intrinsic FC. FC maps were calculated for each slice along the longitudinal axis of the PHG and the HC. A hierarchical clustering algorithm was then applied to these data in order to group slices according to the similarity of their connectivity patterns. Surprisingly, three discrete clusters were identified in the PHG. Two clusters corresponded to the parahippocampal cortex (PHC) and the perirhinal cortex (PRC), and these regions showed preferential connectivity with previously described posterior-medial and anterior-temporal networks, respectively. The third cluster corresponded to an anterior PRC region previously described as area 36d, and this region exhibited preferential connectivity with auditory cortical areas and with a network involved in visceral processing. The three PHG clusters showed different profiles of activation during a memory-encoding task, demonstrating that the FC-based parcellation identified functionally dissociable sub-regions of the PHG. In the hippocampus, no sub-regions were identified via the parcellation procedure. These results indicate that connectivity-based methods can be used to parcellate functional regions within the MTL, and they suggest that studies of memory and high-level cognition need to differentiate between PHC, posterior PRC, and anterior PRC.

  17. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation.

  18. Dopaminergic projections to the medial preoptic area of postpartum rats

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stephanie M.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine receptor activity in the rodent medial preoptic area (mPOA) is crucial for the display of maternal behaviors, as well as numerous other physiological and behavioral functions. However, the origin of dopaminergic input to the mPOA has not been identified through neuroanatomical tracing. To accomplish this, the retrograde tracer Fluorogold was iontophoretically applied to the mPOA of postpartum laboratory rats, and dual-label immunocytochemistry for Fluorogold and tyrosine hydroxylase later performed to identify dopaminergic cells of the forebrain and midbrain projecting to the mPOA. Results indicate that the number of dopaminergic cells projecting to the mPOA is moderate (~90 cells to one hemisphere), and that these cells have an unexpectedly wide distribution. Even so, more than half of the dual-labeled cells were found in what has been considered extensions of the A10 dopamine group (particularly the ventrocaudal posterior hypothalamus and adjacent medial supramammillary nucleus), or in the A10 cells of the ventral tegmental area. The rostral hypothalamus and surrounding region also contained numerous dual-labeled cells, with the greatest number found within the mPOA itself (including in the AVPV and PVpo). Notably, dual-labeled cells were rare in the zona incerta (A13), a site previously suggested to provide dopaminergic input to the mPOA. This study is the first to use anatomical tracing to detail the dopaminergic projections to the mPOA in the laboratory rat, and indicates that much of this projection originates more caudally than previously suggested. PMID:19409227

  19. Medialized Versus Lateralized Center of Rotation in Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Streit, Jonathan J; Shishani, Yousef; Gobezie, Reuben

    2015-12-01

    Reverse shoulder arthroplasty may be performed using components that medialize or lateralize the center of rotation. The purpose of this prospective study was to directly compare 2 reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs. Two treatment groups and 1 control group were identified. Group I comprised 9 patients using a medialized Grammont-style (GRM) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 155°. Group II comprised 9 patients using a lateralized (LAT) prosthesis with a neck-shaft angle of 135°. Pre- and postoperative assessment of range of motion, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, and visual analog scale pain score were performed. Radiographic measurements of lateral humeral offset and acromiohumeral distance were compared. The GRM prosthesis achieved greater forward flexion (143.9° vs 115.6°; P=.05), whereas the LAT achieved greater external rotation (35.0° vs 28.3°; P=.07). The lateral humeral offset was greater for the LAT prosthesis compared with the GRM prosthesis, but this distance was not significantly different from that found in the control group. The acromiohumeral distance was significantly greater in the GRM prosthesis group compared with both the LAT and the control groups. The results of this study confirm that different reverse shoulder arthroplasty designs produce radiographically different anatomy. Whereas the GRM prosthesis significantly alters the anatomy of the shoulder, the LAT design can preserve some anatomic relationships found in the normal shoulder. The clinical outcomes indicate that this may have an effect on range of motion, with traditional designs achieving greater forward flexion and lateralized designs achieving greater external rotation. PMID:26652330

  20. Feasibility of the Medial Temporal lobe Atrophy index (MTAi) and derived methods for measuring atrophy of the medial temporal lobe

    PubMed Central

    Conejo Bayón, Francisco; Maese, Jesús; Fernandez Oliveira, Aníbal; Mesas, Tamara; Herrera de la Llave, Estibaliz; Álvarez Avellón, Tania; Menéndez-González, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Medial Temporal-lobe Atrophy index (MTAi), 2D-Medial Temporal Atrophy (2D-MTA), yearly rate of MTA (yrRMTA) and yearly rate of relative MTA (yrRMTA) are simple protocols for measuring the relative extent of atrophy in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in relation to the global brain atrophy. Albeit preliminary studies showed interest of these methods in the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) and correlation with cognitive impairment in Parkinson’s disease (PD), formal feasibility and validity studies remained pending. As a first step, we aimed to assess the feasibility. Mainly, we aimed to assess the reproducibility of measuring the areas needed to compute these indices. We also aimed to assess the efforts needed to start using these methods correctly. Methods: A series of 290 1.5T-MRI studies from 230 subjects ranging 65–85 years old who had been studied for cognitive impairment were used in this study. Six inexperienced tracers (IT) plus one experienced tracer (ET) traced the three areas needed to compute the indices. Finally, tracers underwent a short survey on their experience learning to compute the MTAi and experience of usage, including items relative to training time needed to understand and apply the MTAi, time to perform a study after training and overall satisfaction. Results: Learning to trace the areas needed to compute the MTAi and derived methods is quick and easy. Results indicate very good intrarater Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) for the MTAi, good intrarater ICC for the 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA and also good interrater ICC for the MTAi, 2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRMTA. Conclusion: Our data support that MTAi and derived methods (2D-MTA, yrMTA and yrRTMA) have good to very good intrarater and interrater reproducibility and may be easily implemented in clinical practice even if new users have no experience tracing the area of regions of interest. PMID:25414666

  1. Supinated forearm is correlated with the onset of medial epicondylitis in professional slalom water-skiers

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Donato; Di Donato, Sigismondo Luca; Balato, Giovanni; D’Addona, Alessio; Schonauer, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background prolonged and laborious activities involving wrists and forearms has been long associated with the onset of epicondylitis. Slalom water-skiing can be included in this category. The purpose of the study is to analyse the correlation between the pronated or supinated position of forearms during water-skiing practice and the presence respectively of lateral and medial epicondylitis. Methods sixty-six pro and semi-pro slalom water-skiers were enrolled in the study. A questionnaire was submitted to each athlete. Diagnosis of lateral or medial epicondylitis was made through anamnesis and clinical exam by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Chi-squared were performed for categorical variables, and Mann-Whitney U test for continuous ones. Results from 116 upper limbs examined, we observed 15 (12.9%) cases of lateral epicondylitis, 30 (25.9%) cases of medial epicondylitis, 10 (8.6%) were affected by both lateral and medial epicondylitis. Lateral and medial epicondylitis were associated (95% C.I.=2,489–26,355; P=<0,001) and the supinated position was correlated with medial epicondylitis (95% C.I.=1,529–9,542; P=0.003). Conclusion slalom water-skiing can be considered a high-risk sport for epicondylitis. In slalom water-skiers there is a correlation between development of lateral and medial epicondylitis in the same upper limb. Supinated position of forearms is strongly associated with the diagnosis of medial epicondylitis. PMID:27331043

  2. Brief Report: Medial Temporal Lobe and Autism: A Putative Animal Model in Primates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    1996-01-01

    Research on humans and monkeys is reviewed that supports the view that the medial temporal lobe, and, perhaps more specifically the amygdala, is the neural substrate underlying social deficits in autism. The relationship of early medial temporal lobe lesions to memory and socioemotional behavior is reviewed, as are the roles of the amygdala and…

  3. Partial hue-matching.

    PubMed

    Logvinenko, Alexander D; Beattie, Lesley L

    2011-01-01

    It is widely believed that color can be decomposed into a small number of component colors. Particularly, each hue can be described as a combination of a restricted set of component hues. Methods, such as color naming and hue scaling, aim at describing color in terms of the relative amount of the component hues. However, there is no consensus on the nomenclature of component hues. Moreover, the very notion of hue (not to mention component hue) is usually defined verbally rather than perceptually. In this paper, we make an attempt to operationalize such a fundamental attribute of color as hue without the use of verbal terms. Specifically, we put forth a new method--partial hue-matching--that is based on judgments of whether two colors have some hue in common. It allows a set of component hues to be established objectively, without resorting to verbal definitions. Specifically, the largest sets of color stimuli, all of which partially match each other (referred to as chromaticity classes), can be derived from the observer's partial hue-matches. A chromaticity class proves to consist of all color stimuli that contain a particular component hue. Thus, the chromaticity classes fully define the set of component hues. Using samples of Munsell papers, a few experiments on partial hue-matching were carried out with twelve inexperienced normal trichromatic observers. The results reinforce the classical notion of four component hues (yellow, blue, red, and green). Black and white (but not gray) were also found to be component colors. PMID:21742961

  4. Partial knee replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... You will need to understand what surgery and recovery will be like. Partial knee arthroplasty may be a good choice if you have arthritis in only one side or part of the knee and: You are older, thin, and not very active. You do not ...

  5. Conservative management of a case of medial epicondylosis in a recreational squash player

    PubMed Central

    Hudes, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This case study was conducted to evaluate the treatment and management of a patient presenting with medial elbow pain diagnosed as medial epicondylosis. Case: A 35 year old male presented with medial elbow pain of 4–6 weeks duration that worsened after playing squash. Treatment: A course of fascial stripping techniques was initiated, including: cross friction massage, instrument assisted fascial stripping to the medial epicondyle area and over the belly of the pronator teres muscle, ischemic compression of a trigger point in the pronator teres, active assisted compressions to the trigger point noted in the pronator teres, and mobilizations of the carpals, specifically the scaphoid. Instructions were given to the patient regarding icing the elbow and daily eccentric exercises. At a one year follow up, the patient reported complete resolution of symptoms with no recurrence. Conclusion: Conservative management, including eccentric exercises, mobilizations, and fascial stripping appear to be beneficial in the treatment of medial epicondylosis. PMID:21403779

  6. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  7. Multiple unilateral variations in medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus and their branches

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shivi; Kumar, Ashwani; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During routine dissection of the upper extremity of an adult male cadaver, multiple variations in branches of medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus were encountered. Three unique findings were observed. First, intercordal neural communications between the lateral and medial cords were observed. Second, two lateral pectoral nerves and one medial pectoral nerve were seen to arise from the lateral and medial cord respectively. The musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce the coracobrachialis. Finally, the ulnar nerve arose by two roots from the medial cord. Knowledge of such variations is of interest to anatomists, radiologists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The aim of our study is to provide additional information about abnormal brachial plexus and its clinical implications. PMID:24693486

  8. Multiple unilateral variations in medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus and their branches.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shivi; Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Kumar, Ashwani; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    During routine dissection of the upper extremity of an adult male cadaver, multiple variations in branches of medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus were encountered. Three unique findings were observed. First, intercordal neural communications between the lateral and medial cords were observed. Second, two lateral pectoral nerves and one medial pectoral nerve were seen to arise from the lateral and medial cord respectively. The musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce the coracobrachialis. Finally, the ulnar nerve arose by two roots from the medial cord. Knowledge of such variations is of interest to anatomists, radiologists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The aim of our study is to provide additional information about abnormal brachial plexus and its clinical implications.

  9. Transcaruncular Approach for Treatment of Medial Wall and Large Orbital Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Dennis C; Shahzad, Farooq; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Patel, Kamlesh B; Woo, Albert S

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the safety and efficacy of the transcaruncular approach for reconstruction of medial orbital wall fractures and the combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach for reconstruction of large orbital defects involving the medial wall and floor. A retrospective review of the clinical and radiographic data of patients who underwent either a transcaruncular or a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach by a single surgeon for orbital fractures between June 2007 and June 2013 was undertaken. Seven patients with isolated medial wall fractures underwent a transcaruncular approach, and nine patients with combined medial wall and floor fractures underwent a transcaruncular-transconjunctival approach with a lateral canthotomy. Reconstruction was performed using a porous polyethylene implant. All patients with isolated medial wall fractures presented with enophthalmos. In the combined medial wall and floor group, five out of eight patients had enophthalmos with two also demonstrating hypoglobus. The size of the medial wall defect on preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan ranged from 2.6 to 4.6 cm(2); the defect size of combined medial wall and floor fractures was 4.5 to 12.7 cm(2). Of the 11 patients in whom postoperative CT scans were obtained, all were noted to have acceptable placement of the implant. All patients had correction of enophthalmos and hypoglobus. One complication was noted, with a retrobulbar hematoma having developed 2 days postoperatively. The transcaruncular approach is a safe and effective method for reconstruction of medial orbital floor fractures. Even large fractures involving the orbital medial wall and floor can be adequately exposed and reconstructed with a combined transcaruncular-transconjunctival-lateral canthotomy approach. The level of evidence of this study is IV (case series with pre/posttest). PMID:26889348

  10. Connections of the medial telencephalic wall in the spotted African Lungfish.

    PubMed

    Northcutt, R Glenn; Westhoff, Guido

    2011-01-01

    The extent and boundaries of the roof, or pallium, of the telencephalon in lungfishes have been debated for over 30 years, and two hypotheses exist. Proponents of a restricted pallium claim that the medial border of the pallium occurs in a dorsal position and that the entire medial hemispheric wall is formed by the septal nuclei. Proponents of an extended pallium claim that the medial border of the pallium occurs in a more ventral position and that the medial hemispheric wall is divided into a dorsal medial pallium and ventral septal nuclei, as in amphibians. Immunohistochemical data have generally been interpreted to support the hypothesis of an extended pallium, but disagreement still exists. To clarify the extent of the pallium in lungfishes, the connections of the dorsal and ventral divisions of the medial hemispheric wall in the Spotted African Lungfish were examined using a number of neuronal tracers. In amphibians and other tetrapods, the afferent projections to the medial pallium and the septal nuclei differ extensively, as do the commissural routes taken by decussating interhemispheric connections. Although the descending projections of the medial pallium and septal nuclei are very similar to one another in amphibians and other tetrapods, they do differ in that the septal nuclei and the ventral thalamus are extensively interlinked, whereas the medial pallium lacks such connections. These differences also characterize the connections of the dorsal and ventral divisions of the medial hemispheric wall in the Spotted African Lungfish, which supports the hypothesis of an extended pallium. The telencephalic organization in lungfishes thus appears remarkably similar to that in amphibians and reflects a pattern that almost certainly existed in the last common ancestor of lungfishes and tetrapods.

  11. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  12. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  13. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  14. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  15. Location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Huan, Fan; Nam, Yong Seok; Han, Seung Ho; Kim, Dae Joong

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the precise anatomic location and tension of the medial palpebral ligament (MPL). Eleven hemifaces of 10 fresh Korean adult cadavers were used in this study. Nine specimens were used for measurement of dissection and tension, and 2 were used for histologic study. Measurements of tensile strength of each part of the MPL and Horner muscle were performed using a force gauge.The MPL consisted of 2 layers in all specimens dissected. The superficial layer of the palpebral ligament (SMPL) was observed from the anterior lacrimal crest to the upper and lower tarsal plates. The deep layer of the palpebral ligament (DMPL) lay from the anterior lacrimal crest to the posterior lacrimal crest, covering the lacrimal sac. The Horner muscle was observed at the posterior lacrimal crest just lateral to the attachment of the DMPL and ran laterally to the tarsal plate deep to the SMPL. The SMPL began at 4.5 ± 2.3 mm lateral to the nasomaxillary suture line to the upper and lower tarsal plates. Its transverse length was 9.6 ± 1.5 mm, and vertical width was 2.4 ± 0.7 mm, and its thickness was 4.5 ± 2.3 mm. The transverse length of the DMPL was 3.7 ± 0.4 mm, and its vertical width was 2.9 ± 1.3 mm, with a thickness of 0.3 ± 0.1 mm. The transverse length of the Horner muscle was 7.6 ± 1.9 mm, and its vertical width was 4.06 ± 1.5 mm, with a thickness of 0.4 ± 0.1 mm. The tensile strength of the SMPL was 13.4 ± 3.2 N, that of the DMPL was 4.1 ± 1.7 N, and that for Horner muscle was 9.0 ± 3.1 N. The tensile strength of the SMPL was significantly higher than that of the DMPL (P = 0.003).We reconfirmed that the MPL consisted of 2 layers: superficial layer and deep layer. Our results might be of use in surgeries of the medial canthi.

  16. Medial collateral ligament bursitis in a 12-year-old girl.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Caroline; Springgay, Gemma; van Beek, Edwin J R; Rolf, Christer G

    2005-06-01

    A 12-year-old female athlete, training for an international career in pentathlon, was referred to our clinic because of 2 years of recurrent localized swelling and activity-related pain in the medial aspect of her right knee, since falling from a horse and hitting her knees on the ground. She had been examined by a number of doctors over this period and treated with physiotherapy without a proper diagnosis and with no improvement. She could run only very limited distances before excruciating pain and swelling, and she had to abandon participation in competitions. During rest, the swelling decreased but never disappeared entirely. Clinical examination revealed minor effusion and localized tenderness on palpation around the medial joint line. Magnetic resonance imaging showed fluid between the medial capsule and medial collateral ligament, but could not identify any connection to the joint. Arthroscopy revealed a cleavage in the posterior medial joint capsule, superior and close to the medial meniscus, that was connected to the medial collateral ligament bursa. The cleavage was simply expanded, which emptied the bursa, followed by compression bandage and ice for 2 weeks. An immediate positive effect was observed and she could run pain free without swelling within 3 weeks of surgery. Six months after surgery, there has been no recurrence. To our knowledge, this is the first time this injury has been described in a child.

  17. Medial Calcar Support and Radiographic Outcomes of Plate Fixation for Proximal Humeral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Jie; Tsai, Yao-Hung; Yang, Tien-Yu; Shen, Shih-Hsun; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Lee, Mel S.

    2015-01-01

    Plate fixation remains one of the most popular surgical procedures for treating proximal humeral fractures (PHFx); however, substantial rates of complications have been reported in the literature. The objectives of the study were to examine how medial calcar support (MCS) affects the radiographic outcomes and to determine the prognostic factors predicting treatment failure. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 89 adult patients who had PHFx and were treated with plate fixation at our institution in 2007–2011. The enrolled patients were separated into two groups according to disruption of medial calcar. Our results revealed an increased rate of poor radiographic outcomes in patients with disrupted medial calcar. Osteonecrosis of the humeral head and redisplacement were the two radiographic outcomes which had a positive causality with disruption of medial calcar (P = 0.008 and 0.050, resp.). Deficient medial calcar, inadequate reduction, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and chronic liver disease were all significant predictors for the development of osteonecrosis in patients after PHFx surgery. Inadequate reduction was also a predictor for redisplacement. We confirmed that the restoration of medial calcar as well as comorbid conditions plays key roles in treatment of patients having PHFx with disrupted medial calcar. PMID:25692132

  18. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard K; Chapman, Graham J; Parkes, Matthew J; Forsythe, Laura; Felson, David T

    2015-11-01

    Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three-dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading.

  19. The effect of different types of insoles or shoe modifications on medial loading of the knee in persons with medial knee osteoarthritis: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Graham J.; Parkes, Matthew J.; Forsythe, Laura.; Felson, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many conservative treatments exist for medial knee osteoarthritis (OA) which aims to reduce the external knee adduction moment (EKAM). The objective of this study was to determine the difference between different shoes and lateral wedge insoles on EKAM, knee adduction angular impulse (KAAI), external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort when walking in individuals with medial knee OA. Seventy individuals with medial knee OA underwent three‐dimensional walking gait analysis in five conditions (barefoot, control shoe, typical wedge, supported wedge, and mobility shoe) with pain and comfort recorded concurrently. The change in EKAM, KAAI, external knee flexion moment, pain, and comfort were assessed using multiple linear regressions and pairwise comparisons. Compared with the control shoe, lateral wedge insoles and barefoot walking significantly reduced early stance EKAM and KAAI. The mobility shoe showed no effect. A significant reduction in latter stance EKAM was seen in the lateral wedge insoles compared to the other conditions, with only the barefoot condition reducing the external knee flexion moment. However, the mobility shoe showed significant immediate knee pain reduction and improved comfort scores. Different lateral wedge insoles show comparable reductions in medial knee loading and in our study, the mobility shoe did not affect medial loading. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Orthopaedic Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:1646–1654, 2015. PMID:25991385

  20. Medial prefrontal cortex depressor response: role of the solitary tract nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Owens, N C; Sartor, D M; Verberne, A J

    1999-01-01

    The depressor response elicited by unilateral low intensity electrical stimulation of the rat ventral medial prefrontal cortex may be mediated by a connection with the solitary tract nucleus. We tested this hypothesis by (i) examining the influence of medial prefrontal cortex stimulation on the induction of Fos-like immunoreactivity in neurons in the medulla oblongata, and (ii) by testing the effect of inhibition of solitary tract nucleus neurons on the medial prefrontal cortex stimulation-evoked depressor response. Depressor responses (>10 mmHg) were elicited by electrical stimulation of the medial prefrontal cortex every minute for 1 h ('Stimulated' group). Control animals were treated identically but did not receive electrical stimulation ('Unstimulated' group). Neurons exhibiting Fos-like immunoreactivity were abundant at the stimulation site which included the infralimbic area, and dorsal peduncular cortex. Medullary Fos-like immunoreactivity observed in the 'Stimulated' and 'Unstimulated' groups exceeded levels observed in untreated rats and was detected in the rostral, caudal and intermediate areas of the ventrolateral medulla, and the commissural, intermediate, medial and lateral regions of the solitary tract nucleus, as well as the medial vestibular nucleus, and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. The number of neurons displaying Fos-like immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral solitary tract nucleus and caudal ventrolateral medulla of the 'Stimulated' group was found to be significantly elevated compared to the contralateral side (P<0.05), and the 'Unstimulated' group bilaterally. Inhibition of solitary tract nucleus neurons using bilateral injections of the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (44 pmol/25 nl) inhibited the sympathetic vasomotor baroreflex and attenuated the depressor and sympathoinhibitory response to medial prefrontal cortex stimulation by 62% and 65%, respectively. These findings suggest that the projection from the medial prefrontal

  1. Correlation between the knee adduction torque and medial contact force for a variety of gait patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong; Banks, Scott A; Mitchell, Kim H; D'Lima, Darryl D; Colwell, Clifford W; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2007-06-01

    The external knee adduction torque has been proposed as a surrogate measure for medial compartment load during gait. However, a direct link between these two quantities has not been demonstrated using in vivo measurement of medial compartment load. This study uses in vivo data collected from a single subject with an instrumented knee implant to evaluate this link. The subject performed five different overground gait motions (normal, fast, slow, wide, and toe-out) with simultaneous collection of instrumented implant, video motion, and ground reaction data. For each trial, the knee adduction torque was measured externally while the total axial force applied to the tibial insert was measured internally. Based on data collected from the same subject performing treadmill gait under fluoroscopic motion analysis, a regression equation was developed to calculate medial contact force from the implant load cell measurements. Correlation analyses were performed for the stance phase and entire gait cycle to quantify the relationship between the knee adduction torque and both the medial contact force and the medial to total contact force ratio. When the entire gait cycle was analyzed, R(2) for medial contact force was 0.77 when all gait trials were analyzed together and between 0.69 and 0.93 when each gait trial was analyzed separately (p < 0.001 in all cases). For medial to total force ratio, R(2) was 0.69 for all trials together and between 0.54 and 0.90 for each trial separately (p < 0.001 in all cases). When only the stance phase was analyzed, R(2) values were slightly lower. These results support the hypothesis that the knee adduction torque is highly correlated with medial compartment contact force and medial to total force ratio during gait.

  2. Medial amygdalar aromatase neurons regulate aggression in both sexes

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Elizabeth K.; Burke, Kenneth J.; Yang, Cindy F.; Bender, Kevin J.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Shah, Nirao M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) regulate components of aggression but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations. PMID:25620703

  3. Calcification of medial elastic fibers and aortic elasticity.

    PubMed

    Niederhoffer, N; Lartaud-Idjouadiene, I; Giummelly, P; Duvivier, C; Peslin, R; Atkinson, J

    1997-04-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a simple change in wall composition (medial calcium overload of elastic fibers) can decrease aortic elasticity. Calcium overload was produced by hypervitaminosis D plus nicotine (VDN) in the young rat. Two months later, measurement of central aortic mean blood pressure in the unanesthetized, unrestrained rat showed that the VDN rat suffered from isolated systolic hypertension but that mean blood pressure was normal. Wall thickness and internal diameter determined after in situ pressurized fixation were unchanged, as was calculated wall stress. Wall stiffness was estimated from (1) elastic modulus (determined with the Moens-Korteweg equation and values for aortic pulse wave velocity in the unanesthetized, unrestrained rat and arterial dimensions) and (2) isobaric elasticity (= slope relating pulse wave velocity to mean intraluminal pressure in the phenylephrine-infused, pithed rat preparation). Both increased after VDN, and both were significantly correlated to the wall content of calcium and the elastin-specific amino acids desmosine and isodesmosine. Left ventricular hypertrophy occurred in the VDN model, and left ventricular mass was related to isobaric elasticity. In conclusion, elastocalcinosis induces destruction of elastic fibers, which leads to arterial stiffness, and the latter may be involved in the development of left ventricular hypertrophy in a normotensive model.

  4. Frequency modulated sweep responses in the medial geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lui, B; Mendelson, J R

    2003-12-01

    A basic feature of communication signals is a dynamic change in frequency. One stimulus that lends itself well to investigating the frequency changes contained in these signals is the frequency modulated (FM) sweep. While many studies have investigated FM sweep responses in the auditory midbrain and cortex, relatively few have examined them in the thalamus. To this end, we investigated the responses of single units in the ventral division of the medial geniculate nucleus (MGNv) of the rat to FM sweeps. Both upward- (changing from low to high frequency) and downward-directed (changing from high to low frequency) FM sweeps were presented at four rates of frequency modulation (i.e., speed). Results showed that the majority (76%) of the cells preferred fast or medium FM sweeps. For direction selectivity, just under half of the units (47%) exhibited a preference for the direction of FM sweep. The results suggest that there is a greater degree of direction but not speed selectivity at progressively higher levels in the auditory pathway.

  5. The anterolateral projections of the medial basal hypothalamus affect sleep.

    PubMed

    Peterfi, Zoltan; Makara, Gábor B; Obál, Ferenc; Krueger, James M

    2009-04-01

    The role of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) and the anterior hypothalamus/preoptic area (AH/POA) in sleep regulation was investigated using the Halász knife technique to sever MBH anterior and lateral projections in rats. If both lateral and anterior connections of the MBH were cut, rats spent less time in non-rapid eye movement sleep (NREMS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). In contrast, if the lateral connections remained intact, the duration of NREMS and REMS was normal. The diurnal rhythm of NREMS and REMS was altered in all groups except the sham control group. Changes in NREMS or REMS duration were not detected in a group with pituitary stalk lesions. Water consumption was enhanced in three groups of rats, possibly due to the lesion of vasopressin fibers entering the pituitary. EEG delta power during NREMS and brain temperatures (Tbr) were not affected by the cuts during baseline or after sleep deprivation. In response to 4 h of sleep deprivation, only one group, that with the most anterior-to-posterior cuts, failed to increase its NREMS or REMS time during the recovery sleep. After deprivation, Tbr returned to baseline in most of the treatment groups. Collectively, results indicate that the lateral projections of the MBH are important determinants of duration of NREMS and REMS, while more anterior projections are concerned with the diurnal distribution of sleep. Further, the MBH projections involved in sleep regulation are distinct from those involved in EEG delta activity, water intake, and brain temperature.

  6. Medial Temporal Lobe Roles in Human Path Integration

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Philbeck, John W.; Woods, Adam J.; Gajewski, Daniel A.; Arthur, Joeanna C.; Potolicchio, Samuel J.; Levy, Lucien; Caputy, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Path integration is a process in which observers derive their location by integrating self-motion signals along their locomotion trajectory. Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is thought to take part in path integration, the scope of its role for path integration remains unclear. To address this issue, we administered a variety of tasks involving path integration and other related processes to a group of neurosurgical patients whose MTL was unilaterally resected as therapy for epilepsy. These patients were unimpaired relative to neurologically intact controls in many tasks that required integration of various kinds of sensory self-motion information. However, the same patients (especially those who had lesions in the right hemisphere) walked farther than the controls when attempting to walk without vision to a previewed target. Importantly, this task was unique in our test battery in that it allowed participants to form a mental representation of the target location and anticipate their upcoming walking trajectory before they began moving. Thus, these results put forth a new idea that the role of MTL structures for human path integration may stem from their participation in predicting the consequences of one's locomotor actions. The strengths of this new theoretical viewpoint are discussed. PMID:24802000

  7. The Necessity of the Medial Temporal Lobe for Statistical Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Anna C.; Gregory, Emma; Landau, Barbara; McCloskey, Michael; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2014-01-01

    The sensory input that we experience is highly patterned, and we are experts at detecting these regularities. Although the extraction of such regularities, or statistical learning (SL), is typically viewed as a cortical process, recent studies have implicated the medial temporal lobe (MTL), including the hippocampus. These studies have employed fMRI, leaving open the possibility that the MTL is involved but not necessary for SL. Here, we examined this issue in a case study of LSJ, a patient with complete bilateral hippocampal loss and broader MTL damage. In Experiments 1 and 2, LSJ and matched control participants were passively exposed to a continuous sequence of shapes, syllables, scenes, or tones containing temporal regularities in the co-occurrence of items. In a subsequent test phase, the control groups exhibited reliable SL in all conditions, successfully discriminating regularities from recombinations of the same items into novel foil sequences. LSJ, however, exhibited no SL, failing to discriminate regularities from foils. Experiment 3 ruled out more general explanations for this failure, such as inattention during exposure or difficulty following test instructions, by showing that LSJ could discriminate which individual items had been exposed. These findings provide converging support for the importance of the MTL in extracting temporal regularities. PMID:24456393

  8. Functional specialization in the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Barense, Morgan D; Bussey, Timothy J; Lee, Andy C H; Rogers, Timothy T; Davies, R Rhys; Saksida, Lisa M; Murray, Elisabeth A; Graham, Kim S

    2005-11-01

    Investigations of memory in rats and nonhuman primates have demonstrated functional specialization within the medial temporal lobe (MTL), a set of heavily interconnected structures including the hippocampal formation and underlying entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices. Most studies in humans, however, especially in patients with brain damage, suggest that the human MTL is a unitary memory system supporting all types of declarative memory, our conscious memory for facts and events. To resolve this discrepancy, amnesic patients with either selective hippocampal damage or more extensive MTL damage were tested on variations of an object discrimination task adapted from the nonhuman primate literature. Although both groups were equally impaired on standard recall-based memory tasks, they exhibited different profiles of performance on the object discrimination test, arguing against a unitary view of MTL function. Cases with selective hippocampal damage performed normally, whereas individuals with broader MTL lesions were impaired. Furthermore, deficits in this latter group were related not to the number of discriminations to be learned and remembered, but to the degree of "feature ambiguity," a property of visual discriminations that can emerge when features are part of both rewarded and unrewarded stimuli. These findings resolve contradictions between published studies in humans and animals and introduce a new way of characterizing the impairments that arise after damage to the MTL. PMID:16267231

  9. Behavioral control, the medial prefrontal cortex, and resilience

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Steven F.; Amat, Jose; Baratta, Michael V.; Paul, Evan; Watkins, Linda R.

    2006-01-01

    The degree of control that an organism has over a stressor potently modulates the impact of the stressor, with uncontrollable stressors producing a constellation of outcomes that do not occur if the stressor is behaviorally controllable. It has generally been assumed that this occurs because uncontrollability actively potentiates the effects of stressors. Here it will be suggested that in addition, or instead, the presence of control actively inhibits the impact of stressors. At least in part this occurs because (i) the presence of control is detected by regions of the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFCv); and (ii) detection of control activates mPFCv output to stress-responsive brain stem and limbic structures that actively inhibit stress-induced activation of these structures, Furthermore, an initial experience with control over stress alters the mPFCv response to subsequent stressors so that mPFCv output is activated even if the subsequent stressor is uncontrollable, thereby making the organism resilient. The general implications of these results for understanding resilience in the face of adversity are discussed. PMID:17290798

  10. Structural development and dorsoventral maturation of the medial entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Saikat; Brecht, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the structural development of superficial-layers of medial entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum in rats. The grid-layout and cholinergic-innervation of calbindin-positive pyramidal-cells in layer-2 emerged around birth while reelin-positive stellate-cells were scattered throughout development. Layer-3 and parasubiculum neurons had a transient calbindin-expression, which declined with age. Early postnatally, layer-2 pyramidal but not stellate-cells co-localized with doublecortin – a marker of immature neurons – suggesting delayed functional-maturation of pyramidal-cells. Three observations indicated a dorsal-to-ventral maturation of entorhinal cortex and parasubiculum: (i) calbindin-expression in layer-3 neurons decreased progressively from dorsal-to-ventral, (ii) doublecortin in layer-2 calbindin-positive-patches disappeared dorsally before ventrally, and (iii) wolframin-expression emerged earlier in dorsal than ventral parasubiculum. The early appearance of calbindin-pyramidal-grid-organization in layer-2 suggests that this pattern is instructed by genetic information rather than experience. Superficial-layer-microcircuits mature earlier in dorsal entorhinal cortex, where small spatial-scales are represented. Maturation of ventral-entorhinal-microcircuits – representing larger spatial-scales – follows later around the onset of exploratory behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13343.001 PMID:27036175

  11. Medial amygdalar aromatase neurons regulate aggression in both sexes.

    PubMed

    Unger, Elizabeth K; Burke, Kenneth J; Yang, Cindy F; Bender, Kevin J; Fuller, Patrick M; Shah, Nirao M

    2015-02-01

    Aromatase-expressing neuroendocrine neurons in the vertebrate male brain synthesize estradiol from circulating testosterone. This locally produced estradiol controls neural circuits underlying courtship vocalization, mating, aggression, and territory marking in male mice. How aromatase-expressing neuronal populations control these diverse estrogen-dependent male behaviors is poorly understood, and the function, if any, of aromatase-expressing neurons in females is unclear. Using targeted genetic approaches, we show that aromatase-expressing neurons within the male posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) regulate components of aggression, but not other estrogen-dependent male-typical behaviors. Remarkably, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons in females are specifically required for components of maternal aggression, which we show is distinct from intermale aggression in pattern and execution. Thus, aromatase-expressing MeApd neurons control distinct forms of aggression in the two sexes. Moreover, our findings indicate that complex social behaviors are separable in a modular manner at the level of genetically identified neuronal populations.

  12. Basket-Weave Technique for Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kodkani, Pranjal S.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomy of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been well defined, with parts of its uppermost fibers having a soft-tissue insertion onto the vastus intermedius. Bone tunnels and implants on the patellar side therefore cannot replicate this anatomic construct precisely. Because of implants and tunnels, complications have been reported with bone tunnel fracture. Similarly, on the femoral side, rigid fixation with implants can result in over-constraint with compromised results. Moreover, bone tunnels cannot be used in skeletally immature cases. To overcome issues related to bone tunneling and implants, as well as to reconstruct the MPFL in a precise anatomic manner, an all–soft-tissue fixation technique was devised. Bony landmarks were used as reference points instead of radiologic markers to achieve a more precise construct and to eliminate intraoperative radiography. Hamstring graft was used to reconstruct the MPFL. Special suturing techniques were used to achieve optimal graft fixation with minimal suture knots. A special tissue elevator–suture passer device was designed to facilitate graft passage and ease in performing the procedure. This technique permits differential tensioning, and therefore one achieves stability throughout the range of motion. PMID:26258044

  13. Troubleshooting the Femoral Attachment During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Burrus, M. Tyrrell; Werner, Brian C.; Conte, Evan J.; Diduch, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) has been recognized as an important soft tissue restraint in preventing lateral patellar translation. As many patients with acute or chronic patellar instability will have a deficient MPFL, reconstruction of this ligament is becoming more common. Appropriately, significant research has been undertaken regarding graft biomechanics and techniques, as intraoperative errors in graft placement often result in poor patient outcomes. Although the research has not answered all of the dilemmas encountered during reconstruction, publications consistently emphasize the importance of re-establishing an anatomic femoral attachment. The purpose of this study was to briefly review the current literature on MPFL reconstruction. Graft selection and patellar graft attachment and fixation are discussed, but the main focus is the femoral attachment as this is where most errors are seen and, unfortunately, where getting it right appears to matter the most. Using a sawbones knee model, the concepts of an MPFL graft that is “high and tight” or “low and loose” are presented, with the goal of providing physicians with intraoperative tools to adjust an incorrectly placed femoral MPFL attachment. This model is also used to justify the recommendation of graft fixation in 30° to 45° of knee flexion. PMID:26535373

  14. Decoding Representations of Scenes in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Heidi M; Kumaran, Dharshan; Chadwick, Martin J; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Hassabis, Demis; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2012-01-01

    Recent theoretical perspectives have suggested that the function of the human hippocampus, like its rodent counterpart, may be best characterized in terms of its information processing capacities. In this study, we use a combination of high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging, multivariate pattern analysis, and a simple decision making task, to test specific hypotheses concerning the role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in scene processing. We observed that while information that enabled two highly similar scenes to be distinguished was widely distributed throughout the MTL, more distinct scene representations were present in the hippocampus, consistent with its role in performing pattern separation. As well as viewing the two similar scenes, during scanning participants also viewed morphed scenes that spanned a continuum between the original two scenes. We found that patterns of hippocampal activity during morph trials, even when perceptual inputs were held entirely constant (i.e., in 50% morph trials), showed a robust relationship with participants' choices in the decision task. Our findings provide evidence for a specific computational role for the hippocampus in sustaining detailed representations of complex scenes, and shed new light on how the information processing capacities of the hippocampus may influence the decision making process. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21656874

  15. Anterior medial prefrontal cortex implements social priming of mimicry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yin; Hamilton, Antonia F de C

    2015-04-01

    The neural and cognitive mechanisms by which primed constructs can impact on social behavior are poorly understood. In the present study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore how scrambled sentence priming can impact on mimicry behavior. Sentences involving pro/antisocial events from a first/third-person point of view were presented in short blocks, followed by a reaction-time assessment of mimicry. Behavioral results showed that both prosociality and viewpoint impact on mimicry, and fMRI analysis showed this effect is implemented by anterior medial prefrontal cortex (amPFC). We suggest that social primes may subtly modulate processing in amPFC in a manner linked to the later behavior, and that this same region also implements the top-down control of mimicry responses. This priming may be linked to processing of self-schemas in amPFC. Our findings demonstrate how social priming can be studied with fMRI, and have important implications for our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of prime-to-behavior effects as well as for current theories in social psychology.

  16. Reverse Medial Hemisoleus Flaps for Coverage of Distal Third Leg Wounds: A Technical Trick.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Wagner, Eric R; Wyles, Cody C; Sems, Stephen A; Moran, Steven L

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, free tissue transfer has been used to cover wounds of the distal third of the leg. Advances in flap anatomy, elevation, and surgical techniques have allowed the use of pedicled flaps to avoid the use of free tissue transfer in certain situations. The authors describe a technique for using a reversed medial hemisoleus flap to provide soft tissue coverage for wounds of the medial distal leg. In the senior authors experience, the use of this flap has achieved wound coverage in 100% of patients with smaller wounds (≤50 cm) of the medial leg.

  17. An animal model of recognition memory and medial temporal lobe amnesia: history and current issues.

    PubMed

    Clark, Robert E; Squire, Larry R

    2010-07-01

    The medial temporal lobe includes a system of anatomically connected structures that are essential for declarative memory (conscious memory for facts and events). A prominent form of declarative memory is recognition memory (the ability to identify a recently encountered item as familiar). Recognition memory has been frequently assessed in humans and in the experimental animal. This article traces the successful development of an animal model of human medial temporal lobe amnesia, which eventually identified the structures in the medial temporal lobe important for memory. Attention is given to two prominent behavioral paradigms (delayed nonmatching to sample and tests of spontaneous novelty preference).

  18. Miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw fixation for displaced medial malleolus fractures – A novel technique

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Pramod; Aggrawal, Abhinav; Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Mittal, Samarth

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe here a technique of miniarthrotomy assisted percutaneous screw insertion for displaced Herscovici type B and C medial malleolar fractures. Method Incision was made centred over the superomedial angle of the ankle mortise, about half a cm medial to tibialis anterior. Arthrotomy was done and reduction obtained. Percuntaneously, two 4 mm cancellous cannulated screws were inserted through medial malleolus. Results and conclusion This approach allows direct visualization of reduction, removal of entrapped soft tissue and preservation of saphenous vein and nerve. PMID:25983507

  19. Discoid medial meniscus with a horizontal cleavage tear: a juvenile who suffered for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingqing; Gao, Shijun; Chen, Baicheng

    2012-09-01

    It is very rare to see medial discoid meniscus, and there have been only 82 knees in 61 cases reported to date. The investigators found discoid medial meniscus with horizontal cleavage tear in a 13-year-old juvenile who had been injured while playing basketball, and endured for 3 years. Both magnetic resonance images and the arthroscopic findings were presented. Saucerization of the torn discoid medial meniscus was performed successfully, and the clinical outcomes were satisfying according to the follow-up of 14 months.

  20. Medial cervical facetectomy for radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis: 71 personal consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Tan

    1999-05-01

    Medial cervical facetectomy performed on patients using a high speed drill and microscope represents an effective way for treatment of patients with radiculopathy due to multi-level, either uni- or bilateral, foraminal stenosis. The author presents the results of medial cervical facetectomy performed in 71 cases during a 4 year period. Medial cervical facetectomy appears to provide significant benefits to patients with radiculopathy secondary to foraminal stenosis. The procedure also appears to be superior to complete foraminotomy for relief of radiculopathy as the lateral third to half of the facet joint is still preserved and there is no instability problem. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  1. Melancholia and partial insanity.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S W

    1983-04-01

    In the medical literature of the eighteenth century melancholia came to be defined as partial insanity. Seventeenth-century English law introduced the term and influenced later forensic concerns about the concept. But the history of melancholia reveals a gradual development of such a concept of limited derangement associated with the delusions usually cited in accounts of this disease. In the early nineteenth century the relationship of melancholia and this concept weakened and was gradually abandoned, the content of the syndrome of melancholia was reduced, and out of this complex process emerged the notion of monomania.

  2. Esthetic removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Ancowitz, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This article provides information regarding the many ways that removable partial dentures (RPDs) may be used to solve restorative problems in the esthetic zone without displaying metal components or conspicuous acrylic resin flanges. The esthetic zone is defined and described, as are methods for recording it. Six dental categories are presented that assist the dentist in choosing a variety of RPD design concepts that may be used to avoid metal display while still satisfying basic principles of RPDs. New materials that may be utilized for optimal esthetics are presented and techniques for contouring acrylic resin bases and tinting denture bases are described.

  3. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  4. Animal models of osteoarthritis in an era of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Bendele, A M

    2002-12-01

    Animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) are used to study the pathogenesis of cartilage degeneration and to evaluate potential anti-arthritic drugs for clinical use. In general, these models fall into 2 categories, spontaneous and induced (surgical instability or genetic manipulation). Animal models of naturally occurring OA occur in knee joints of guinea pigs, mice and Syrian hamsters. Commonly utilized surgical instability models include medial meniscal tear in guinea pigs and rats, medial or lateral partial meniscectomy in rabbits, medial partial or total meniscectomy or anterior cruciate transection in dogs. Transgenic models have been developed in mice. These models all have potential use in the study of molecular mechanisms associated with OA development via use of immunohistochemistry, biochemistry and molecular probes to identify altered matrix molecules at different stages in disease progression. Testing of specific types of inhibitors developed through evaluation of matrix changes in the disease process will ultimately help identify key processes which initiate and perpetuate the disease and will lead to discovery of new disease modifying pharmaceutical agents for OA patients. This paper will focus on the discussion of several models which are likely to be useful in the molecular dissection of processes involved in cartilage degeneration. PMID:15758375

  5. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Bimodal processing of olfactory information in an amphibian nose: odor responses segregate into a medial and a lateral stream.

    PubMed

    Gliem, Sebastian; Syed, Adnan S; Sansone, Alfredo; Kludt, Eugen; Tantalaki, Evangelia; Hassenklöver, Thomas; Korsching, Sigrun I; Manzini, Ivan

    2013-06-01

    In contrast to the single sensory surface present in teleost fishes, several spatially segregated subsystems with distinct molecular and functional characteristics define the mammalian olfactory system. However, the evolutionary steps of that transition remain unknown. Here we analyzed the olfactory system of an early diverging tetrapod, the amphibian Xenopus laevis, and report for the first time the existence of two odor-processing streams, sharply segregated in the main olfactory bulb and partially segregated in the olfactory epithelium of pre-metamorphic larvae. A lateral odor-processing stream is formed by microvillous receptor neurons and is characterized by amino acid responses and Gαo/Gαi as probable signal transducers, whereas a medial stream formed by ciliated receptor neurons is characterized by responses to alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones, and Gαolf/cAMP as probable signal transducers. To reveal candidates for the olfactory receptors underlying these two streams, the spatial distribution of 12 genes from four olfactory receptor gene families was determined. Several class II and some class I odorant receptors (ORs) mimic the spatial distribution observed for the medial stream, whereas a trace amine-associated receptor closely parallels the spatial pattern of the lateral odor-processing stream. Other olfactory receptors (some class I odorant receptors and vomeronasal type 1 receptors) and odor responses (to bile acids, amines) were not lateralized, the latter not even in the olfactory bulb, suggesting an incomplete segregation. Thus, the olfactory system of X. laevis exhibits an intermediate stage of segregation and as such appears well suited to investigate the molecular driving forces behind olfactory regionalization.

  7. Distal arterial occlusive disease in diabetes is related to medial arterial calcification.

    PubMed

    Chantelau, E; Lee, K M; Jungblut, R

    1997-01-01

    In diabetes mellitus, peripheral arterial occlusive disease predominantly affects the lower leg (tibial and peroneal vessel disease). Our study suggests that this feature is related to the presence of forefoot medial arterial calcification.

  8. Editorial Commentary: Medial Collateral Ligament and Posteromedial Corner Reconstruction Techniques Vary and Indications Are Not Clear.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) and posteromedial corner (PMC) reconstruction techniques vary. Anatomic reconstruction results in outcomes superior to nonanatomic reconstruction, but it remains unclear as to when reconstruction is indicated versus MCL and PMC primary repair. PMID:26542207

  9. Unilateral Resection of the Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Impairs Odor Identification and Valence Perception

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Stephanie A.; Lundström, Johan N.; Geigant, Michael; Kumlien, Eva; Fredrikson, Mats; Åhs, Fredrik; Olsson, Mats J.

    2016-01-01

    The anterior medial temporal lobe (TL), including the amygdala, has been implicated in olfactory processing, e.g., coding for intensity and valence, and seems also involved in memory. With this background, the present study evaluated whether anterior medial TL-resections in TL epilepsy affected intensity and valence ratings, as well as free and cued identification of odors. These aspects of odor perception were assessed in 31 patients with unilateral anterior medial TL-resections (17 left, 14 right) and 16 healthy controls. Results suggest that the anterior medial TL is in particular necessary for free, but also cued, odor identification. TL resection was also found to impair odor valence, but not intensity ratings. Left resected patients rated nominally pleasant and unpleasant odors as more neutral suggesting a special role for the left anterior TL in coding for emotional saliency in response to odors. PMID:26779109

  10. Where the brain grows old: decline in anterior cingulate and medial prefrontal function with normal aging.

    PubMed

    Pardo, José V; Lee, Joel T; Sheikh, Sohail A; Surerus-Johnson, Christa; Shah, Hemant; Munch, Kristin R; Carlis, John V; Lewis, Scott M; Kuskowski, Michael A; Dysken, Maurice W

    2007-04-15

    Even healthy adults worry about declines in mental efficiency with aging. Subjective changes in mental flexibility, self-regulation, processing speed, and memory are often cited. We show here that focal decreases in brain activity occur with normal aging as measured with fluorodeoxyglucose and positron emission tomography. The largest declines localize to a medial network including the anterior cingulate/medial prefrontal cortex, dorsomedial thalamus, and sugenual cingulate/basal forebrain. Declining metabolism in this network correlates with declining cognitive function. The medial prefrontal metabolic changes with aging are similar in magnitude to the hypometabolism found in Mild Cognitive Impairment or Alzheimer's disease. These results converge with data from healthy elderly indicating dysfunction in the anterior attention system. The interaction of attention in the anterior cingulate cortex with memory in the medial temporal lobe may explain the global impairment that defines dementia. Despite the implications for an aging population, the neurophysiologic mechanisms of these metabolic decreases remain unknown. PMID:17321756

  11. Recruitment of the Rhesus soleus and medial gastrocnemius before, during and after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Aragon, J.; Day, M. K.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1996-01-01

    Electromyograms were recorded from the soleus and medial gastrocnemius muscles and tendon force from the medial gastrocnemius muscle of 2 juvenile Rhesus monkeys before, during and after Cosmos flight 2229 and of ground control animals. Recording sessions were made while the Rhesus were performing a foot pedal motor task. Preflight testing indicated normal patterns of recruitment between the soleus and medial gastrocnemius, i.e. a higher level of recruitment of the soleus compared to the medial gastrocnemius during the task. Recording began two days into the spaceflight and showed that the media gastrocnemius was recruited preferentially over the soleus. This observation persisted throughout the flight and for the 2 week period of postflight testing. These data indicate a significant change in the relative recruitment of slow and fast extensor muscles under microgravity conditions. The appearance of clonic-like activity in one muscle of each Rhesus during flight further suggests a reorganization in the neuromotor system in a microgravity environment.

  12. Medial thigh pain: An unusual presentation of giant calculi in sigmoid neobladder

    PubMed Central

    Abrol, Nitin; Gupta, Narmada; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-01-01

    Calculi in a neobladder usually present with irritative lower urinary tract symptoms, flank pain, and haematuria. We report a case of giant stones in a sigmoid neobladder, who presented with medial thigh pain. PMID:21814323

  13. Fear Expression Suppresses Medial Prefrontal Cortical Firing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Giustino, Thomas F.; Fitzgerald, Paul J.; Maren, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a crucial role in emotional learning and memory in rodents and humans. While many studies suggest a differential role for the prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subdivisions of mPFC, few have considered the relationship between neural activity in these two brain regions recorded simultaneously in behaving animals. Importantly, how concurrent PL and IL activity relate to conditioned freezing behavior is largely unknown. Here we used single-unit recordings targeting PL and IL in awake, behaving rats during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear. On Day 1, rats received either signaled or unsignaled footshocks in the recording chamber; an auditory conditioned stimulus (CS) preceded signaled footshocks. Twenty-four hours later, animals were returned to the recording chamber (modified to create a novel context) where they received 5 CS-alone trials. After fear conditioning, both signaled and unsignaled rats exhibited high levels of post-shock freezing that was associated with an enduring suppression of mPFC spontaneous firing, particularly in the IL of signaled rats. Twenty-four hours later, CS presentation produced differential conditioned freezing in signaled and unsignaled rats: freezing increased in rats that had received signaled shocks, but decreased in animals in the unsignaled condition (i.e., external inhibition). This group difference in CS-evoked freezing was mirrored in the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in both PL and IL. Interestingly, differences in PL and IL firing rate highly correlated with freezing levels. In other words, in the signaled group IL spontaneous rates were suppressed relative to PL, perhaps limiting IL-mediated suppression of fear and allowing PL activity to dominate performance, resulting in high levels of freezing. This was not observed in the unsignaled group, which exhibited low freezing. These data reveal that the activity of mPFC neurons is modulated by both associative and

  14. Synaptic reorganisation of the medial amygdala during puberty.

    PubMed

    Cooke, B M

    2011-01-01

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is an important site for the gonadal hormone control of several socio-sexual behaviours that emerge during puberty, including aggression, mating and parental behaviour. We have previously shown that rising levels of pubertal androgens increase the regional volume and mean soma size of neurones in the posterodorsal subnucleus of the MeA, the MePD. The present study aimed to determine some of the constituents of pubertal volumetric growth. Using computer-guided unbiased stereology, we compared the regional volume, mean somal volume and the overall number of neurones and glia in 45-day-old male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Half of the hamsters had completed puberty, whereas the remainder were prepubertal as a result of photoinhibition of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Puberty significantly increased MePD regional volume and mean somal volume, as previously observed. We also compared the number of puncta immunoreactive for vesicular glutamate transporter-2 (vGlut2) and post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95), which are both markers of glutamatergic pre- and post-synaptic specialisations, as well as glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD-65), which is a marker of GABAergic terminals. Puberty increased the number of vGlut2 and PSD-95 immunoreactive puncta by two- and three-fold, respectively, whereas the number of GAD-65 immunoreactive puncta was unchanged. These results suggest that numerous excitatory synapses are added to the MeA during puberty. More broadly, they show that the pubertal emergence of sexual behaviour is accompanied by synaptic reorganisation of a key network involved in the expression of sexual behaviour.

  15. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Marcelo S.; Jin, Lu E.; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23–29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5–10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  16. The medial parietal occipital areas in the macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Michela; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The number, location, extent, and functional properties of the cortical areas that occupy the medial parieto-occipital cortex (mPOC) have been, and still is, a matter of scientific debate. The mPOC is a convoluted region of the brain that presents a high level of individual variability, and the fact that many areas of mPOC are located within very deep sulci further limits the possibility to investigate their anatomo-functional properties. In the present review, we summarize the location and extent of mPOC areas in the macaque brain as obtained by architectural, connectional, and functional data. The different approaches lead to a subdivision of mPOC that includes areas V2, V3, V6, V6Av, and V6Ad. Extrastriate areas V2 and V3 occupy the posterior wall of the parieto-occipital sulcus (POs). The fundus of POs and the ventralmost part of the anterior wall of the sulcus are occupied by a retinotopically organized visual area, called V6, which represents the contralateral part of the visual field and emphasizes its periphery. The remaining part of the anterior wall of POs is occupied by two areas, V6Av and V6Ad, which contain visual as well as arm reaching neurons. Our analyses suggest that areas V6 and V6Av, together, occupy the cortical territory previously described as area PO. Functionally, area V6 is a motion area particularly sensitive to the real motion of objects in the animal's field of view, while V6Av and V6Ad are visuomotor areas likely involved in the visual guidance of arm movement and object prehension. PMID:26241957

  17. [Medial posteroventral pallidotomy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Krauss, J K; Grossman, R G; Lai, E C; Schwartz, K; Jankovic, J

    1997-01-01

    Stereotactic medial posteroventral pallidotomy for treatment of Parkinson's disease attracts increasing attention. We report on the preliminary results of 12 patients at 1 year after microelectrode-guided unilateral pallidotomy. The primary indications were severe bradykinesia and levodopa-induced dyskinesias. After radiofrequency lesioning all patients had immediate improvement of contralateral parkinsonian signs. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the localization of the lesions. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients had sustained benefit. The global improvement was rated as moderate in six cases, and as marked in six other cases. The mean values of various subscores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) showed highly significant changes in the "off" state (pre/postoperatively): UPDRS Motor score (60.3/31). UPDRS Activities of Daily Living (ADL) score (33.2/18.3), gait/postural stability score (13.8/7.0), and subscores for contralateral rigidity (4.9/2.1), tremor (7.1/1.4) and bradykinesia (11.6/5.3). There was also significant improvement of ipsilateral bradykinesia and rigidity. Furthermore, we found significant changes of the mean values of the UPDRS ADL and motor "on" scores, an increase of the percentage of "on" time with reduced on-off fluctuations, and a decrease of the percentage of levodopa-induced dyskinesias, with marked improvement or complete abolition of contralateral dyskinesias in particular. The preoperative levodopa regimen was maintained, in general, or only slightly modified, if necessary. Two patients had transient complications: one patient suffered postoperative pneumonia and altered mental status; another patient displayed mild Broca's aphasia secondary to a small stroke involving the dorsal thalamus and the adjacent white matter. There were no persistent side effects at the 1-year follow-up. Contemporary unilateral pallidotomy is an effective and promising therapeutical option for surgical treatment of

  18. Segregation of the human medial prefrontal cortex in social cognition

    PubMed Central

    Bzdok, Danilo; Langner, Robert; Schilbach, Leonhard; Engemann, Denis A.; Laird, Angela R.; Fox, Peter T.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2013-01-01

    While the human medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is widely believed to be a key node of neural networks relevant for socio-emotional processing, its functional subspecialization is still poorly understood. We thus revisited the often assumed differentiation of the mPFC in social cognition along its ventral-dorsal axis. Our neuroinformatic analysis was based on a neuroimaging meta-analysis of perspective-taking that yielded two separate clusters in the ventral and dorsal mPFC, respectively. We determined each seed region's brain-wide interaction pattern by two complementary measures of functional connectivity: co-activation across a wide range of neuroimaging studies archived in the BrainMap database and correlated signal fluctuations during unconstrained (“resting”) cognition. Furthermore, we characterized the functions associated with these two regions using the BrainMap database. Across methods, the ventral mPFC was more strongly connected with the nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, and retrosplenial cortex, while the dorsal mPFC was more strongly connected with the inferior frontal gyrus, temporo-parietal junction, and middle temporal gyrus. Further, the ventral mPFC was selectively associated with reward related tasks, while the dorsal mPFC was selectively associated with perspective-taking and episodic memory retrieval. The ventral mPFC is therefore predominantly involved in bottom-up-driven, approach/avoidance-modulating, and evaluation-related processing, whereas the dorsal mPFC is predominantly involved in top–down-driven, probabilistic-scene-informed, and metacognition-related processing in social cognition. PMID:23755001

  19. Medial Frontal White and Gray Matter Contributions to General Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Bouix, Sylvain; Kubicki, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) and rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) are part of a wider neural network that plays an important role in general intelligence and executive function. We used structural brain imaging to quantify magnetic resonance gray matter volume and diffusion tensor white matter integrity of the mOFC-rACC network in 26 healthy participants who also completed neuropsychological tests of intellectual abilities and executive function. Stochastic tractography, the most effective Diffusion Tensor Imaging method for examining white matter connections between adjacent gray matter regions, was employed to assess the integrity of mOFC-rACC pathways. Fractional anisotropy (FA), which reflects the integrity of white matter connections, was calculated. Results indicated that higher intelligence correlated with greater gray matter volumes for both mOFC and rACC, as well as with increased FA for left posterior mOFC-rACC connectivity. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that DTI-derived FA of left posterior mOFC-rACC uniquely accounted for 29%–34% of the variance in IQ, in comparison to 11%–16% uniquely explained by gray matter volume of the left rACC. Together, left rACC gray matter volume and white matter connectivity between left posterior mOFC and rACC accounted for up to 50% of the variance in general intelligence. This study is to our knowledge the first to examine white matter connectivity between OFC and ACC, two gray matter regions of interests that are very close in physical proximity, and underscores the important independent contributions of variations in rACC gray matter volume and mOFC-rACC white matter connectivity to individual differences in general intelligence. PMID:25551572

  20. Medial Prefrontal Cortex: Adding Value to Imagined Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Jing; Horner, Aidan J; Bisby, James A; Burgess, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is consistently implicated in the network supporting autobiographical memory. Whereas more posterior regions in this network have been related to specific processes, such as the generation of visuospatial imagery or the association of items and contexts, the functional contribution of the mPFC remains unclear. However, the involvement of mPFC in estimation of value during decision-making suggests that it might play a similar role in memory. We investigated whether mPFC activity reflects the subjective value of elements in imagined scenarios. Participants in an MRI scanner imagined scenarios comprising a spatial context, a physiological state of need (e.g., thirst), and two items that could be congruent (e.g., drink) or incongruent (e.g., food) with the state of need. Memory for the scenarios was tested outside the scanner. Our manipulation of subjective value by imagined need was verified by increased subjective ratings of value for congruent items and improved subsequent memory for them. Consistent with our hypothesis, fMRI signal in mPFC reflected the modulation of an item's subjective value by the imagined physiological state, suggesting the mPFC selectively tracked subjective value within our imagination paradigm. Further analyses showed uncorrected effects in non-mPFC regions, including increased activity in the insula when imagining states of need, the caudate nucleus when imagining congruent items, and the anterior hippocampus/amygdala when imagining subsequently remembered items. We therefore provide evidence that the mPFC plays a role in constructing the subjective value of the components of imagined scenarios and thus potentially in reconstructing the value of components of autobiographical recollection.

  1. ANTIDEPRESSANT EFFECT OF OPTOGENETIC STIMULATION OF THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Herbert E.; Lobo, Mary Kay; Maze, Ian; Vialou, Vincent; Hyman, James M; Zaman, Samir; LaPlant, Quincey; Mouzon, Ezekiel; Ghose, Subroto; Tamminga, Carol A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Nestler, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Brain stimulation and imaging studies in humans have highlighted a key role for the prefrontal cortex in clinical depression, however, it remains unknown whether excitation or inhibition of prefrontal cortical neuronal activity is associated with antidepressant responses. Here, we examined cellular indicators of functional activity, including the immediate early genes (IEG), zif268 (egr1), c-fos and arc, in the prefrontal cortex of clinically depressed humans obtained postmortem. We also examined these genes in the ventral portion of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of mice after chronic social defeat stress, a mouse model of depression. In addition, we used viral vectors to overexpress channel rhodopsin 2 (a light-activated cation channel) in mouse mPFC in order to optogenetically drive “burst” patterns of cortical firing in-vivo and examine the behavioral consequences. Prefrontal cortical tissue derived from clinically depressed humans displayed significant reductions in IEG expression, consistent with a deficit in neuronal activity within this brain region. Mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress exhibited similar reductions in levels of IEG expression in mPFC. Interestingly, some of these changes were not observed in defeated mice that escape the deleterious consequences of the stress, i.e., resilient animals. In those mice that expressed a strong depressive-like phenotype, i.e., susceptible animals, optogenetic stimulation of mPFC exerted potent antidepressant-like effects, without affecting general locomotor activity, anxiety-like behaviors, or social memory. These results indicate that the activity of the mPFC is a key determinant of depression-like behavior, as well as antidepressant responses. PMID:21123555

  2. Stimulation of the medial plantar nerve for complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mobbs, Ralph J; Lazarro, Amanda

    2010-11-01

    We describe a 47-year old male with complex regional pain syndrome II in the distribution of the medial plantar nerve following metatarsal fracture, which was treated with peripheral nerve stimulation. Using a new technique of nerve stimulation with a percutaneous-type electrode, the patient experienced sustained relief at 12 months follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of peripheral neurostimulation effectively managing pain for the medial plantar nerve. PMID:20708936

  3. Sexual experience enhances cognitive flexibility and dendritic spine density in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Glasper, Erica R; LaMarca, Elizabeth A; Bocarsly, Miriam E; Fasolino, Maria; Opendak, Maya; Gould, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex is important for cognitive flexibility, a capability that is affected by environmental conditions and specific experiences. Aversive experience, such as chronic restraint stress, is known to impair performance on a task of cognitive flexibility, specifically attentional set-shifting, in rats. Concomitant with this performance decrement, chronic stress reduces the number of dendritic spines on pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex. No previous studies have examined whether a rewarding experience, namely mating, affects cognitive flexibility and dendritic spines in the medial prefrontal cortex of male rats. To test this possibility, we exposed adult male rats to sexual receptive females once daily for one week, assessed attentional set-shifting performance, and then analyzed their brains for changes in dendritic spines. We found that sexual experience improved performance on extradimensional set-shifting, which is known to require the medial prefrontal cortex. Additionally, we observed increased dendritic spine density on apical and basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, but not the orbitofrontal cortex, after sexual experience. We also found that sexual experience enhanced dendritic spine density on granule neurons of the dentate gyrus. The ventral hippocampus sends a direct projection to the medial prefrontal cortex, raising the possibility that experience-dependent changes in the hippocampus are necessary for alterations in medial prefrontal cortex structure and function. As a first attempt at investigating this, we inactivated the ventral hippocampus with the GABA agonist muscimol, after each daily bout of sexual experience to observe whether the beneficial effects on cognitive flexibility were abolished. Contrary to our hypothesis, blocking hippocampal activity after sexual experience had no impact on enhanced cognitive flexibility. Taken together, these findings indicate that sexual

  4. Increased GABA Levels in Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Young Adults with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seog Ju; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Yujin S.; Sung, Young Hoon; Kim, Hengjun J.; Kim, Jihyun H.; Kim, Kye Hyun; Jeong, Do-Un

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore absolute concentrations of brain metabolites including gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) in the medial prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia of young adults with narcolepsy. Design: Proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy centered on the medial prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia was acquired. The absolute concentrations of brain metabolites including GABA and glutamate were assessed and compared between narcoleptic patients and healthy comparison subjects. Setting: Sleep and Chronobiology Center at Seoul National University Hospital; A high strength 3.0 Tesla MR scanner in the Department of Radiology at Seoul National University Hospital. Patients or Participants: Seventeen young adults with a sole diagnosis of HLA DQB1 0602 positive narcolepsy with cataplexy (25.1 ± 4.6 years old) and 17 healthy comparison subjects (26.8 ± 4.8 years old). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relative to comparison subjects, narcoleptic patients had higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex (t = 4.10, P <0.001). Narcoleptic patients with nocturnal sleep disturbance had higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex than those without nocturnal sleep disturbance (t = 2.45, P= 0.03), but had lower GABA concentration than comparison subjects (t = 2.30, P = 0.03). Conclusions: The current study reports that young adults with narcolepsy had a higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex, which was more prominent in patients without nocturnal sleep disturbance. Our findings suggest that the medial prefrontal GABA level may be increased in narcolepsy, and the increased medial prefrontal GABA might be a compensatory mechanism to reduce nocturnal sleep disturbances in narcolepsy. Citation: Kim SJ; Lyoo IK; Lee YS; Sung YH; Kim HJ; Kim JH; Kim KH; Jeong DU. Increased GABA levels in medial prefrontal cortex of young adults with narcolepsy. SLEEP 2008;31(3):342-347. PMID:18363310

  5. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  6. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  7. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  8. Anconeus epitrochlearis as a source of medial elbow pain in baseball pitchers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinning; Dines, Joshua S; Gorman, Matthew; Limpisvasti, Orr; Gambardella, Ralph; Yocum, Lou

    2012-07-01

    Medial elbow pain is reported in 18% to 69% of baseball players aged of 9 and 19 years. This is due to the large valgus stresses focused on the medial side of the elbow during overhead activities. In overhead throwers and pitchers, pain can be attributed to valgus extension overload with resultant posteromedial impingement, overuse of the flexor-pronator musculature resulting in medial epicondylitis, or occasional muscle tears or ruptures. The anconeus epitrochlearis is a known cause of cubital tunnel syndrome and has been postulated as a source of medial elbow pain in overhead athletes. This article describes the cases of 3 right-handed baseball pitchers with persistent right-sided medial elbow pain during throwing despite a prolonged period of rest, physical therapy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Two patients had symptoms of cubital tunnel syndrome as diagnosed by electromyogram and nerve conduction studies and the presence of the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle per magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent isolated release of the anconeus muscle without ulnar nerve transposition and returned to their previous levels of activity. The diagnosis and treatment of pitchers who present with medial-sided elbow pain can be complex. The differential should include an enlarged or inflamed anconeus epitrochlearis muscle as a possible cause. Conservative management should be the first modality. However, surgical excision with isolated release of the muscle can be successful in returning patients with persistent pain despite a trial of conservative management to their previous levels of function.

  9. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤ 20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo. PMID:26991588

  10. In Vivo Measurement of Rotator Cuff Tear Tension: Medial Versus Lateral Footprint Position.

    PubMed

    Dierckman, Brian D; Wang, David W; Bahk, Michael S; Burns, Joseph P; Getelman, Mark H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to evaluate in vivo tension applied to the rotator cuff tendon positioned at the medial versus lateral footprint during arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. We evaluated 20 consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. During repair, a grasper was inserted through a lateral portal, and a digital weigh scale was attached. The tendon was grasped and translated to the medial footprint, and tension recorded. After a relaxation period, the tendon edge was translated to the lateral footprint, and tension recorded. Mean (SD) tension was 0.41 (0.33) pound when tendons were positioned at the medial footprint and 2.21 (1.20) pounds when they were positioned at the lateral footprint, representing a 5.4-fold difference (P < .0001). For smaller tears (≤ 20 mm anterior-posterior), 7.6 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. For larger tears, 4.1 times less tension was applied to the tendons when pulled to the medial versus lateral footprint. This study demonstrated a significant, 5.4-fold increase in tension when the tendon edge was reduced to the lateral as opposed to the medial footprint in vivo.

  11. Effects of medial meniscal posterior horn avulsion and repair on meniscal displacement.

    PubMed

    Hein, Christopher N; Deperio, Jennifer Gurske; Ehrensberger, Mark T; Marzo, John M

    2011-06-01

    Medial meniscal posterior root avulsion (MMRA) leads to deleterious alteration of medial joint compartment loading profiles and increased risk of medial degenerative changes. Surgical repair restores more normal biomechanics to the knee. Our hypothesis is that MMRA will cause medial meniscal (MM) extrusion and gap formation between the root attachment site and MM. Meniscal root repair will restore the ability of the meniscus to resist extrusion, and reduce gap formation at the defect. Seven fresh frozen human cadaveric knees were dissected and mechanically loaded using a servo-hydraulic load frame (MTS ®) with 0 and 1800 N. The knees were tested under three conditions: native, avulsed, and repaired. Four measurements were obtained: meniscal displacement anteriorly, medially, posteriorly, and gap distance between the root attachment site and MM after transection and repair. The medial displacement of the avulsed MM (3.28 mm) was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than the native knee (1.60mm) and repaired knee (1.46 mm). Gap formation is significantly larger in the avulsed compared to repaired state at 0 (p < 0.02) and 1800N (p < 0.02) and also larger with loading in both avulsed (p < 0.05) and repaired (p < 0.02) conditions. Therefore, MMRA results in MM extrusion from the joint and gap formation between the MM root and the MM. Subsequent surgical repair reduces meniscal displacement and gap formation at the defect. PMID:20684881

  12. Dual role of medial A10 dopamine neurons in affective encoding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhong-Hua; Shin, Rick; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the activation of medial A10 neurons mediates positive affective encoding. However, little is known about the functions of the inhibition of midbrain dopamine neurons. Here we show evidence suggesting that the inhibition of medial A10 neurons mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding, whereas blunting the activation of medial A10 neurons disrupts positive affective encoding involving food reward. We used a microinjection procedure, in which the D(2) dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was administered into the cell body region of the dopamine neurons, a procedure that reduces dopamine cell firing. Microinjections of quinpirole into the posteromedial ventral tegmental area, but not its more lateral counterparts, led to conditioned place aversion. Quinpirole administration to this site also decreased food intake and basal dopamine concentration in the ventromedial striatum, a major projection area of medial A10 neurons. In addition, moderate quinpirole doses that did not lead to conditioned place aversion or disrupt food intake abolished food-conditioned place preference, suggesting that blunting dopamine impulse activity in response to food reward disrupts positive affective encoding in associated external stimuli. Our data support the hypothesis that activation of medial A10 dopamine neurons mediates a positive affective state, leading to positive affective encoding, while their inhibition mediates a negative affective state, leading to negative affective encoding. Together with previous findings, we propose that medial A10 neurons are an important component of the mechanism via which animals learn to avoid negative incentive stimuli. PMID:18256592

  13. An electromyographic analysis of the elbow in normal and injured pitchers with medial collateral ligament insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Glousman, R E; Barron, J; Jobe, F W; Perry, J; Pink, M

    1992-01-01

    Electromyography and high-speed film were used to examine the muscle activity in the elbows of pitchers with medial collateral ligament insufficiency compared to the activity in uninjured elbows. Ten competitive baseball pitchers with medial collateral insufficiency and 30 uninjured competitive pitchers were tested while throwing the fastball and the curveball. The extensor carpi radialis brevis and longus in the injured pitchers showed greater activity than in the uninjured pitchers for both pitches. The triceps, flexor carpi radialis, and pronator teres all showed less activity in the injured pitchers during the fastball, but only the triceps had less activity during the curveball. The differences were seen during the late cocking and acceleration phases, which place the greatest stress on the medial collateral ligament. If the flexor carpi radialis and pronator teres were substituting for the deficient medial collateral ligament and functioning as dynamic stabilizers, one would expect enhanced muscle activity. However, the opposite was found. This pattern of asynchronous muscle action with medial collateral ligament injury may predispose the joint to further injury. The muscular differences seen are critical to the understanding of the pathomechanics of patients with medial collateral ligament deficiency, and provide a basis for rehabilitation.

  14. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing. PMID:24847225

  15. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  16. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  17. Influence of aging on medial olivocochlear system function

    PubMed Central

    Lisowska, Grażyna; Namyslowski, Grzegorz; Orecka, Boguslawa; Misiolek, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Background There is still controversy regarding the influence of aging on medial olivocochlear (MOC) system function. The main objective of this study is to measure age-related changes of MOC system function in people with normal hearing thresholds. Method Bilateral assessment of the MOC effect for click-evoked otoacoustic emissions (CEOAEs; at 70±3 dB peak sound pressure level [pSPL], click at 50/second, 260 repeats, 2.5–20 millisecond window) and for distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs; with [frequencies] f2/f1=1.22, [levels of primary tones] L1=65 dB SPL and L2=55 dB SPL; DP-grams for 2f1–f2 were collected for the f1 frequencies varying from 977 Hz to 5,164 kHz, with the resolution of four points per octave) was performed in a group of 146 (n=292 ears) healthy, right-handed subjects aged from 10–60 years with a bilateral hearing threshold from 0.25–4.0 kHz, not exceeding 20 dB hearing level; normal tympanograms; and a threshold of the contralateral stapedial reflex for broadband noise (BBN) of 75 dB SPL or higher. The MOC inhibition was assessed on the basis of changes in OAE level during BBN contralateral stimulation at 50 dB sensation level (mean, 65±3 dB SPL). Results Comparative analysis of the MOC effect for CEOAE and DPOAE showed the weakest effect in the oldest age group (41–60 years) at almost all tested frequencies. Moreover, a weak, albeit significant, positive correlation between the level of OAE and the size of the MOC effect was documented. Conclusion On the basis of our study, we have found a decrease in the strength of the MOC system with increasing age in normally hearing subjects, as reflected by a decrease of the OAE suppression effects in older individuals and an increase of the number of CEOAE and DPOAE enhancements during contralateral acoustic stimulation in the elderly, especially in the high-frequency range. PMID:24959071

  18. How Tibiofemoral Alignment and Contact Locations Affect Predictions of Medial and Lateral Tibiofemoral Contact Forces

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Zachary F.; DeMers, Matthew S.; Delp, Scott L.; Browning, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding degeneration of biological and prosthetic knee joints requires knowledge of the in-vivo loading environment during activities of daily living. Musculoskeletal models can estimate medial/lateral tibiofemoral compartment contact forces, yet anthropometric differences between individuals make accurate predictions challenging. We developed a full-body OpenSim musculoskeletal model with a knee joint that incorporates subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment (i.e. knee varus-valgus) and geometry (i.e. contact locations). We tested the accuracy of our model and determined the importance of these subject-specific parameters by comparing estimated to measured medial and lateral contact forces during walking in an individual with an instrumented knee replacement and post-operative genu valgum (6°). The errors in the predictions of the first peak medial and lateral contact force were 12.4% and 11.9%, respectively, for a model with subject-specific tibiofemoral alignment and contact locations determined via radiographic analysis, vs. 63.1% and 42.0%, respectively, for a model with generic parameters. We found that each degree of tibiofemoral alignment deviation altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 51N (r2=0.99), while each millimeter of medial-lateral translation of the compartment contact point locations altered the first peak medial compartment contact force by 41N (r2=0.99). The model, available at www.simtk.org/home/med-lat-knee/, enables the specification of subject-specific joint alignment and compartment contact locations to more accurately estimate medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces in individuals with non-neutral alignment. PMID:25595425

  19. CONTRIBUTION TO THE ANATOMICAL STUDY OF THE CORTICOPERIOSTEAL FLAP OF THE MEDIAL FEMORAL CONDYLE

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Rômulo Guimarães; Bufáiçal, Henrique Gubert; Oliveira, Leandro Alves de; Souza, Fabiano Inácio de; Kuwae, Mário Yoshihide; Teixeira da Silva, João Alírio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to perform the anatomical study, in cadavers, of the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle, based on the medial genicular artery, evaluating challenges in dissection and the topographic patterns. Materials and methods: fifteen limbs from eight cadavers were studied, ages ranging from 19 to 74 years old. They were placed at supine position, and a longitudinal incision on the medial face of the lower part of the thigh was performed, exposing medial vastus and sartorius muscles, with descendent genicular vessels being also exposed. The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee, the diameter of the vessel, the length of the pedicle, and the presence of the fasciocutaneous branch and its location were analyzed. Results: the distance between the origin of the descendent genicular artery and the medial articular line of the knee ranged from 11.2cm to 14.5cm, with an average of 12.63cm. The mean artery diameter was 2.5mm (from 2.25mm to 2.75mm). The distance between the descendent genicular artery and the fasciocutaneous branch ranged from 1.0 to 1.5cm. The mean length of the vascular pedicle was 7.01cm, ranging from 5.6cm to 8.6cm. Conclusion: the corticoperiosteal flap of the medial femoral condyle of the knee is easy to dissect, presents a constant vascular pedicle, with average length of 7.0cm and diameter of 2.5mm, enabling it to be indicated for microsurgical transplants. PMID:27004187

  20. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  1. A Technique of Improved Medial Meniscus Visualization by Anterior Cruciate Ligament Graft Placement in Chronic Anterior Cruciate Deficient Knees.

    PubMed

    Vertullo, Christopher J; Wijenayake, Lahann; Grayson, Jane E

    2016-04-01

    It is customary to perform medial meniscus repair before anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft placement when undertaken as a combined procedure. However, in chronic ACL-deficient knees, intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can cause the medial meniscus repair to be more technically challenging. Intraoperative anterior tibiofemoral translation can both reduce the visualization of the medial meniscus and make its reduction unstable. An operative sequence alteration of ACL graft placement and tensioning before medial meniscal repair improves medial meniscus visualization in chronically ACL-deficient knees by using the ACL graft's ability to prevent anterior tibiofemoral translation. The technique sequence is as follows: (a) the medial meniscus is reduced, (b) ACL reconstruction is undertaken using a hamstring graft without final tibia fixation, PMID:27354950

  2. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  3. Does medial support decrease major complications of unstable proximal humerus fractures treated with locking plate?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of medial support and clinical factors responsible on outcomes and major complications associated with treatment of unstable proximal humerus fractures using a locking plate and suture augmentation. Methods Sixty-three cases in 62 patients (42 female, 20 male) were evaluated between September 2004 and October 2008. Cases were divided into either a medial support group (36 cases) or non-medial support group (27 cases). Clinical and radiographic evaluations included Neer’s evaluation criteria, the neck-shaft angle using the Paavolainen method, and complications. We analyzed the correlation between bone- and fracture- related complications and three independent clinical variables, such as the presence of medial support, fracture type, and osteoporosis by way of multivariate logistic regression. Results There were statistically significant differences in the overall incidence of complications based on the presence of medial support (p = 0.014) and preoperative fracture type (p = 0.018), but no differences based on the presence of osteoporosis (p = 0.157). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, the restoration of medial support was the most reliable factor to prevent bone- and fracture- related complications. In addition, when we compared the incidence of bone- and fracture-related complications in the presence or absence of medial support among 30 patients with osteoporosis, the group with restoration of medial support had only one complication of humeral head osteonecrosis despite the presence of osteoporosis (5.9% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.025). According to Neer’s criteria, excellent or satisfactory clinical results accounted for seventy-three percent of the total cases (46 of 63 cases). Seventy-eight percent (49 of 55 cases) showed good radiographic results by the Paavolainen method. There were 14 complications in 13 of 63 cases (20.6%). Conclusions In the treatment of unstable proximal

  4. Novel air-injection technique to locate the medial cut end of lacerated canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqian; Li, Yonghao; Long, Chongde; Wang, Zhonghao; Liang, Xuanwei; Ge, Jian; Wang, Zhichong

    2013-12-01

    Locating the medial cut end of the severed canaliculus is the most difficult aspect of canalicular repair, especially in patients with more medial laceration, severe oedema, persistent errhysis and a narrow canaliculus. Irrigation is a widely used technique to identify the cut end; however, we found that air injected through the intact canaliculus with a straight needle failed to reflux when the common canaliculus or lacrimal sac was not blocked. We describe a simple, safe and efficient air-injection technique to identify the medial cut edge of a lacerated canaliculus. In this method, we initially submersed the medial canthus under normal saline, then injected filtered air through the intact canaliculus using a side port stainless steel probe with a closed round tip. The tip was designed to block the common canaliculus to form a relatively closed system. The efficiency of this novel air-injection technique was equivalent to the traditional technique but does not require the cooperation of the patient to blow air. Using this technique, the medial cut end was successfully identified by locating the air-bubble exit within minutes in 19 cases of mono-canalicular laceration without any complication.

  5. Developmental Changes in Medial Auditory Thalamic Contributions to Associative Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ka H.; Freeman, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Eyeblink conditioning (EBC) was used in the current study to examine the mechanisms underlying the ontogeny of associative motor learning in rats. Eyeblink conditioning emerges ontogenetically between postnatal days (P) 17 and 24 in rats. Previous studies used electrical stimulation to show that the ontogeny of EBC is influenced by developmental changes in input from the medial auditory thalamus to the pontine nuclei, which in turn affects input to the cerebellum. The current study used tetrode recordings to examine the ontogeny of medial auditory thalamic sensory responses to the conditioned stimulus (CS) and learning-related activity during EBC. Rat pups were implanted with multiple tetrodes in the medial nucleus of the medial geniculate (MGm) and suprageniculate (SG) and trained on delay EBC on P17–19, P24–26, or P31–33 while recording spike activity. Developmental changes in MGm and SG sensory-related activity were found during a pre-training session with unpaired presentations of the auditory CS and periorbital stimulation US. Substantial developmental changes were observed in learning-related activity in the MGm and SG during CS-US paired training. The ontogenetic changes in learning-related activity may be related to developmental changes in input to the medial auditory thalamus from the amygdala and cerebellum. The findings suggest that the ontogeny of associative motor learning involves developmental changes in sensory input to the thalamus, amygdala input to the thalamus, thalamic input to the pontine nuclei, and cerebellar feedback to the thalamus. PMID:22593053

  6. Contributions of Medial Temporal Lobe and Striatal Memory Systems to Learning and Retrieving Overlapping Spatial Memories

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thackery I.; Stern, Chantal E.

    2014-01-01

    Many life experiences share information with other memories. In order to make decisions based on overlapping memories, we need to distinguish between experiences to determine the appropriate behavior for the current situation. Previous work suggests that the medial temporal lobe (MTL) and medial caudate interact to support the retrieval of overlapping navigational memories in different contexts. The present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to test the prediction that the MTL and medial caudate play complementary roles in learning novel mazes that cross paths with, and must be distinguished from, previously learned routes. During fMRI scanning, participants navigated virtual routes that were well learned from prior training while also learning new mazes. Critically, some routes learned during scanning shared hallways with those learned during pre-scan training. Overlap between mazes required participants to use contextual cues to select between alternative behaviors. Results demonstrated parahippocampal cortex activity specific for novel spatial cues that distinguish between overlapping routes. The hippocampus and medial caudate were active for learning overlapping spatial memories, and increased their activity for previously learned routes when they became context dependent. Our findings provide novel evidence that the MTL and medial caudate play complementary roles in the learning, updating, and execution of context-dependent navigational behaviors. PMID:23448868

  7. Hypertonic fluids are secreted by medial and lateral segments in duck (Anas platyrhynchos) nasal salt glands.

    PubMed

    Butler, David G

    2002-05-01

    Indwelling catheters were used to collect fluid directly from the medial and lateral segments of duck nasal salt glands showing, for the first time, that the secretions are fully hypertonic before reaching the medial and lateral drainage ducts. Using this method it was possible to show that (a) there is a functional symmetry between the left and right salt glands, (b) the medial segment always secretes fluid at approximately twice the rate of the lateral segment and (c) fluid secreted by the medial segment has the same ionic composition but variable ion concentrations when compared with fluid from the lateral segment. A 12 % increase in post-segmental fluid osmolality was probably due to the evaporation of water from epithelial surfaces in the nasal cavities during breathing. A post-segmental outflux of Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and Cl(-) in the medial and lateral collecting ducts and/or nasal epithelium may be of adaptive significance when birds inhabit calcium- and magnesium-rich marine environments. PMID:11986388

  8. TopMaker: A Technique for Automatic Multi-Block Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D. (Technical Monitor); Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    A two-dimensional multi-block topology generation technique has been developed. Very general configurations are addressable by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, the multiblock topology is generated with no user intervention required. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in the area of computational fluid dynamics where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid generation process.

  9. TopMaker: Technique Developed for Automatic Multiblock Topology Generation Using the Medial Axis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, David L.

    2004-01-01

    The TopMaker technique was developed in an effort to reduce the time required for grid generation in complex numerical studies. Topology generation accounts for much of the man-hours required for structured multiblock grids. With regard to structured multiblock grids, topology refers to how the blocks are arranged and connected. A two-dimensional multiblock topology generation technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Very general configurations can be addressed by the technique. A configuration is defined by a collection of non-intersecting closed curves, which will be referred to as loops. More than a single loop implies that holes exist in the domain, which poses no problem. This technique requires only the medial vertices and the touch points that define each vertex. From the information about the medial vertices, the connectivity between medial vertices is generated. The physical shape of the medial edge is not required. By applying a few simple rules to each medial edge, a multiblock topology can be generated without user intervention. The resulting topologies contain only the level of complexity dictated by the configurations. Grid lines remain attached to the boundary except at sharp concave turns, where a change in index family is introduced as would be desired. Keeping grid lines attached to the boundary is especially important in computational fluid dynamics, where highly clustered grids are used near no-slip boundaries. This technique is simple and robust and can easily be incorporated into the overall grid-generation process.

  10. Medial accumbens lesions attenuate testosterone-dependent aggression in male rats.

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Petrovic, D M; Walsh, M L; Jonik, R H

    1989-10-01

    Male hooded rats were castrated and implanted with testosterone-filled Silastic tubes appropriate for maintaining a normal average serum testosterone concentration. They were then given lesions of the medial accumbens nucleus or sham lesions. Twenty-four hours postoperatively each male was housed with a female. Beginning 7 days following pairing and continuing once each week for 4 weeks, each lesioned or sham-lesioned male was observed for aggression toward an unfamiliar male intruder. On the day following each test of aggression toward an unfamiliar male, each lesioned and sham-lesioned male was assessed for defensiveness toward an experimenter. Rats with medial accumbens lesions displayed significantly less aggression toward an unfamiliar male intruder during each of the weekly tests than did sham-lesioned animals. The attenuation was most pronounced in animals with lesions damaging the posterior part of the medial accumbens nucleus (also designated as anterior portion of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis) in the region of the crossover of the anterior commissure. Although medial accumbens lesions are known to make individually housed rats hyperdefensive toward an experimenter, lesion-induced hyperdefensiveness was not observed in the pair-housed animals in the present experiment. It is argued that the medial accumbens/bed nucleus of the stria terminalis area is an important region in the anterior forebrain for the modulation of hormone-dependent aggression.

  11. Effect of center of pressure modulation on knee adduction moment in medial compartment knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Haim, Amir; Wolf, Alon; Rubin, Guy; Genis, Yulya; Khoury, Mona; Rozen, Nimrod

    2011-11-01

    The knee adduction moment (KAM) provides a major contribution to the elevated load in the medial compartment of the knee. An abnormally high KAM has been linked with the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Footwear-generated biomechanical manipulations reduce the magnitude of this moment by conveying a more laterally shifted trajectory of the foot's center of pressure (COP), reducing the distance between the ground reaction force and the center of the knee joint, thus lowering the magnitude of the torque. We sought to examine the outcome of a COP shift in a cohort of female patients suffering from medial knee OA. Twenty-two female patients suffering from medial compartment knee OA underwent successive gait analysis testing and direct pedobarographic examination of the COP trajectory with a foot-worn biomechanical device allowing controlled manipulation of the COP. Modulation of the COP coronal trajectory from medial to lateral offset resulted in a significant reduction of the KAM. This trend was demonstrated in subjects with mild-to-moderate OA and in patients suffering from severe stages of the disease. Our results indicate that controlled manipulation of knee coronal kinetics in individuals suffering from medial knee OA can be facilitated by customized COP modification.

  12. Displaced Medial and Lateral Bucket Handle Meniscal Tears With Intact ACL and PCL.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Omar, Imran M; Hill, James A

    2015-08-01

    Bucket handle lesions are vertical longitudinal tears in the meniscus that may displace centrally into the respective medial or lateral compartment, frequently causing mechanical symptoms, including pain, perceived instability, and mechanical locking. Bucket handle meniscal tears are most commonly from a traumatic etiology and are frequently found with concomitant anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Multiple imaging signs and associations have been described for the diagnosis of bucket handle meniscus tears, including coronal truncation, absent bow tie sign, double posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), double ACL, displacement of the bucket handle fragment, and disproportionate posterior horn signs. Among meniscal pathology encountered on magnetic resonance imaging or during arthroscopy, bucket handle meniscal tears are infrequent occurrences. Furthermore, the occurrence of displaced medial and lateral bucket handle tears found on imaging and during arthroscopy is very uncommon and is only sparsely reported in the literature. When displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal segments are visualized within the intercondylar notch along with the ACL and PCL, the radiologic findings are referred to as the "quadruple cruciate" sign or the "Jack and Jill lesion." Of the few case reports described in the literature, only one noted displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscus tears with an intact ACL and PCL. The current case report outlines a similar rare case of the quadruple cruciate sign: displaced medial and lateral bucket handle meniscal tears located within the intercondylar notch and an intact ACL and PCL.

  13. Physical examination and imaging of medial collateral ligament and posteromedial corner of the knee.

    PubMed

    Craft, Jason A; Kurzweil, Peter R

    2015-06-01

    The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured knee ligament. Most will heal well with nonoperative treatment. However, not all medial knee injuries are the same. A detailed physical examination can help determine the severity of the medial-sided injury. When combined with advanced imaging, the examination will delineate damage to associated medial knee structures, including the location of MCL damage, posteromedial capsule injuries, and combined cruciate injuries. Failure to recognize MCL injuries that may be prone to chronic laxity can lead to significant disability, joint damage, and failure of concomitant cruciate ligament reconstructions. Magnetic resonance imaging is the mainstay of diagnostic imaging, with coronal sequences allowing full assessment of the MCL complex. Tangential views aid in the diagnosis of concomitant injuries. Stress radiography can play a role in evaluating MCL healing and subtle chronic laxity. Ultrasonography is also gaining acceptance as a means to assess MCL injuries. Use of a detailed examination and advanced imaging will allow optimal treatment of medial knee injuries and improve clinical outcomes.

  14. Oscillatory activity and phase-amplitude coupling in the human medial frontal cortex during decision making.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Elger, Christian E; Fell, Juergen

    2009-02-01

    Electroencephalogram oscillations recorded both within and over the medial frontal cortex have been linked to a range of cognitive functions, including positive and negative feedback processing. Medial frontal oscillatory characteristics during decision making remain largely unknown. Here, we examined oscillatory activity of the human medial frontal cortex recorded while subjects played a competitive decision-making game. Distinct patterns of power and cross-trial phase coherence in multiple frequency bands were observed during different decision-related processes (e.g., feedback anticipation vs. feedback processing). Decision and feedback processing were accompanied by a broadband increase in cross-trial phase coherence at around 220 msec, and dynamic fluctuations in power. Feedback anticipation was accompanied by a shift in the power spectrum from relatively lower (delta and theta) to higher (alpha and beta) power. Power and cross-trial phase coherence were greater following losses compared to wins in theta, alpha, and beta frequency bands, but were greater following wins compared to losses in the delta band. Finally, we found that oscillation power in alpha and beta frequency bands were synchronized with the phase of delta and theta oscillations ("phase-amplitude coupling"). This synchronization differed between losses and wins, suggesting that phase-amplitude coupling might reflect a mechanism of feedback valence coding in the medial frontal cortex. Our findings link medial frontal oscillations to decision making, with relations among activity in different frequency bands suggesting a phase-utilizing coding of feedback valence information.

  15. Hypertonic fluids are secreted by medial and lateral segments in duck (Anas platyrhynchos) nasal salt glands

    PubMed Central

    Butler, David G

    2002-01-01

    Indwelling catheters were used to collect fluid directly from the medial and lateral segments of duck nasal salt glands showing, for the first time, that the secretions are fully hypertonic before reaching the medial and lateral drainage ducts. Using this method it was possible to show that (a) there is a functional symmetry between the left and right salt glands, (b) the medial segment always secretes fluid at approximately twice the rate of the lateral segment and (c) fluid secreted by the medial segment has the same ionic composition but variable ion concentrations when compared with fluid from the lateral segment. A 12 % increase in post-segmental fluid osmolality was probably due to the evaporation of water from epithelial surfaces in the nasal cavities during breathing. A post-segmental outflux of Ca2+, Mg2+ and Cl− in the medial and lateral collecting ducts and/or nasal epithelium may be of adaptive significance when birds inhabit calcium- and magnesium-rich marine environments. PMID:11986388

  16. [Morphological rationale for medial facetectomy during microsurgical removal of herniated lumbar disks].

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, P I; dreval', O N

    2006-01-01

    The study was undertaken to provide an anatomic and morphological rationale for the use of medial facetectomy in the microsurgical treatment of herniated lumbar disks and to assess the results of performed operations. Morphological studies were conducted on corpses, by comparing coronal and transverse sections of the lumbar spine. The concept "nervous root canal" was used during the study. The detected features of the anatomical and topographic structure of the nervous root canal permitted the substantiation of the necessity and volume of medial facetectomy at different levels. When an approach is applied into the discal area, the highest and least volume of bone resection at medial facetectomy is required at the levels of L3-L4 and L5-S1, respectively. The clinical study involved an analysis of the results of microsurgical treatment of 530 patients with herniated lumbar disks. The analysis of clinical findings revealed that medial facetectomy had been used during 382 (72%) operations. When the operations were performed at different levels, the usage of this technique differs: at the levels of L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 in 30 (100%), 206 (91%), and 145 (53%) cases, respectively. The data on the usage of medial facetectomy during operations correspond to the revealed specific features of the anatomic and topographic structure of the nervous root canal at each of the operated levels. PMID:16739929

  17. Effects of neonatal medial versus lateral temporal cortex injury: theoretical comment on Malkova et al. (2010).

    PubMed

    Kolb, Bryan

    2010-12-01

    The article by Malkova, Mishkin, Suomo, and Bachevalier (2010, this issue) adds an important piece to our understanding of the role of the medial versus lateral temporal regions in socioemotional behavior. In their paper, they evaluate the effect of infant and adult amygdala lesions and infant inferotemporal cortex lesions on the social interactions of monkeys in infancy and adulthood. The results show that medial temporal lesions performed in infants produce greater effects on socioaffective behavior than similar lesions in adulthood and that infant monkeys with inferotemporal lesions exhibit social deficits that are resolved by adulthood. These results are relevant to three significant issues: (1) the role of the medial temporal and lateral temporal cortex in the symptoms of the Kluver-Bucy syndrome; (2) the role of age at injury in behavioral change after cerebral injuries; and (3) the importance of lesion locus and behavioral measure for recovery from infant and adult cerebral injury.

  18. Unintended Rotational Changes of the Distal Tibia After Biplane Medial Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ki-Mo; Lee, Jong-Hee; Park, Hyung-Jun; Kim, Jeong Lae; Han, Seung-Beom

    2016-01-01

    This study involved 35 knees undergoing biplane medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) to assess the axial rotation of the distal tibia. The distal tibiae were internally rotated by 3.0° ± 7.1° after OWHTO. The opening width showed a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.743 (P < .001), and the tuberosity osteotomy angle showed that of -0.678 (P < .001) with distal tibial rotation. However, changes in hip-knee-ankle angle, medial proximal tibial angle, and posterior tibial slope were not significantly correlated with the change in distal tibial rotation. In conclusion, there was an unintended tendency of increasing internal rotation of the distal tibia after biplane medial OWHTO, and this tendency was positively related to the opening width and tuberosity osteotomy angle.

  19. Familial medial telangiectatic nevus: variant of nevus flammeus--port-wine stain.

    PubMed

    Pasyk, K A; Wlodarczyk, S R; Jakobczak, M M; Kurek, M; Aughton, D J

    1993-05-01

    Six families in which a few members, in three generations, were affected with medial telangiectatic nevus (salmon patch, stork bite, angel's kiss) on the forehead, glabella, upper eyelids, upper lip, nose, and nuchal and occipital areas are presented. This is a mild variant of lateral telangiectatic nevus (nevus flammeus, port-wine stain) that disappears in about 50 percent of patients during the first years of life. In one family, lateral telangiectatic nevus (nevus flammeus, port-wine stain) and superficial (strawberry) hemangioma coexisted with medial telangiectatic nevus. This paper discusses the familial incidence of medial telangiectatic nevus and a new modality of treatment. Moreover, the paper presents a classification of vascular malformations and proposes a new terminology. PMID:8479968

  20. Fornix and medial temporal lobe lesions lead to comparable deficits in complex visual perception.

    PubMed

    Lech, Robert K; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Suchan, Boris

    2016-05-01

    Recent research dealing with the structures of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) has shifted away from exclusively investigating memory-related processes and has repeatedly incorporated the investigation of complex visual perception. Several studies have demonstrated that higher level visual tasks can recruit structures like the hippocampus and perirhinal cortex in order to successfully perform complex visual discriminations, leading to a perceptual-mnemonic or representational view of the medial temporal lobe. The current study employed a complex visual discrimination paradigm in two patients suffering from brain lesions with differing locations and origin. Both patients, one with extensive medial temporal lobe lesions (VG) and one with a small lesion of the anterior fornix (HJK), were impaired in complex discriminations while showing otherwise mostly intact cognitive functions. The current data confirmed previous results while also extending the perceptual-mnemonic theory of the MTL to the main output structure of the hippocampus, the fornix. PMID:26994782

  1. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain. PMID:26311991

  2. Panmedullary edema with inferior olivary hypertrophy in bilateral medial medullary infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuteru; Miyashita, Fumio; Koga, Masatoshi; Yamada, Naoaki; Toyoda, Kazunori; Minematsu, Kazuo

    2014-03-01

    Bilateral medial medullary infarction (MMI) is a rare type of stroke with poor outcomes. Inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy results from a pathologic lesion in the Guillain-Mollaret triangle. The relationship between inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and the medullary lesion is obscure. To the best of our knowledge, only 1 autopsy case with unilateral medial medullary infarction that was associated with ipsilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy has been reported. We describe a rare case with acute infarction in the bilateral medial medulla oblongata accompanied by subacute bilateral inferior olivary nucleus hypertrophy and panmedullary edema. The hypertrophy appeared to have been caused by local ischemic damage to the termination of the central tegmental tract at the bilateral inferior olivary nucleus.

  3. Kin recognition between medial Golgi enzymes in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Hoe, M H; Slusarewicz, P; Rabouille, C; Watson, R; Hunte, F; Watzele, G; Berger, E G; Warren, G

    1994-01-01

    The medial Golgi enzymes, N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I (NAGT I) and mannosidase II (Mann II), and the trans Golgi enzyme, beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT) were each retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by grafting on the cytoplasmic tail of the p33 invariant chain. Transient and stable expression of p33/NAGT I in HeLa cells caused relocation of endogenous Mann II to the ER and transient expression of p33/Mann II had a similar effect on endogenous NAGT I. Neither of these endogenous medial enzymes were affected by transient expression of p33/GalT. These data provide strong evidence for kin recognition between medial Golgi enzymes and suggest a role for them in the organization of the Golgi stack. Images PMID:8313901

  4. Ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape for treating medial ankle sprain in an amateur soccer player.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Min; Lee, Jung-Hoon

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to report the effects of ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape in a patient with a medial ankle sprain. [Subject] A 28-year-old amateur soccer player suffered a Grade 2 medial ankle sprain during a match. [Methods] Ankle inversion taping was applied to the sprained ankle every day for 2 months. [Results] His symptoms were reduced after ankle inversion taping application for 2 months. The self-reported function score, the reach distances in the Star Excursion Balance Test, and the weight-bearing ankle dorsiflexion were increased. [Conclusion] This study showed that ankle inversion taping using kinesiology tape may be an effective therapy for a patient with a medial ankle sprain.

  5. Hypertensive response to stress: the role of histaminergic H1 and H2 receptors in the medial amygdala.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Daniela Oliveira; Ferreira, Hilda Silva; Pereira, Luana Bomfim; Fregoneze, Josmara Bartolomei

    2015-05-15

    Different brain areas seem to be involved in the cardiovascular responses to stress. The medial amygdala (MeA) has been shown to participate in cardiovascular control, and acute stress activates the MeA to a greater extent than any of the other amygdaloid structures. It has been demonstrated that the brain histaminergic system may be involved in behavioral, autonomic and neuroendocrine responses to stressful situations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the histaminergic receptors H1 and H2 in cardiovascular responses to acute restraint stress. Wistar rats (280-320g) received bilateral injections of cimetidine, mepyramine or saline into the MeA and were submitted to 45min of restraint stress. Mepyramine microinjections at doses of 200, 100 and 50nmol promoted a dose-dependent blockade of the hypertensive response induced by the restraint stress. Cimetidine (200 and 100nmol) promoted a partial blockade of the hypertensive response to stress only at the highest dose administered. Neither drugs altered the typical stress-evoked tachycardiac responses. Furthermore, mepyramine and cimetidine were unable to modify the mean arterial pressure or heart rate of freely moving rats under basal conditions (non-stressed rats). The data suggest that in the MeA the histaminergic H1 receptors appear to be more important than H2 receptors in the hypertensive response to stress. Furthermore, there appears to be no histaminergic tonus in the MeA controlling blood pressure during non-stress conditions.

  6. Improvements in Memory after Medial Septum Stimulation Are Associated with Changes in Hippocampal Cholinergic Activity and Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Un; Lee, Ji Eun; Lee, Sung Eun; Chang, Won Seok; Kim, Sung June; Chang, Jin Woo

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been found to have therapeutic effects in patients with dementia, but DBS mechanisms remain elusive. To provide evidence for the effectiveness of DBS as a treatment for dementia, we performed DBS in a rat model of dementia with intracerebroventricular administration of 192 IgG-saporins. We utilized four groups of rats, group 1, unlesioned control; group 2, cholinergic lesion; group 3, cholinergic lesion plus medial septum (MS) electrode implantation (sham stimulation); group 4, cholinergic lesions plus MS electrode implantation and stimulation. During the probe test in the water maze, performance of the lesion group decreased for measures of time spent and the number of swim crossings over the previous platform location. Interestingly, the stimulation group showed an equivalent performance to the normal group on all measures. And these are partially reversed by the electrode implantation. Acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus was decreased in lesion and implantation groups, whereas activity in the stimulation group was not different from the normal group. Hippocampal neurogenesis was increased in the stimulation group. Our results revealed that DBS of MS restores spatial memory after damage to cholinergic neurons. This effect is associated with an increase in hippocampal cholinergic activity and neurogenesis. PMID:25101288

  7. Pregnancy affects cellular activity, but not tissue mechanical properties, in the healing rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hart, D A; Reno, C; Frank, C B; Shrive, N G

    2000-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been accumulating that ligament and joint laxity is altered in women and rabbits during pregnancy. Furthermore, many female adolescents injure ligaments through participation in athletics and other activities. Therefore, to determine whether pregnancy has different effects on the injured and uninjured medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee, we investigated cellular changes (mRNA levels) and alterations in tissue properties (biomechanics) accompanying pregnancy in animals with the medial collateral ligament injured during adolescence and bred for their primigravid pregnancy as young adults. Assessment of mRNA levels for matrix molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, growth factors and sex hormone receptors, inflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that pregnancy had different impacts on scar and uninjured tissue for six of 15 genes assessed. A pregnancy-associated increase in laxity of the medial collateral ligament was observed for rabbits in the uninjured primigravida group; however, no increase was observed for injured rabbits during pregnancy. The injured ligament was already significantly more lax than the normal counterpart, and pregnancy did not lead to additional laxity or prevent the normal decline in laxity as the scar matured in nonpregnant animals. These results indicate that the impact of pregnancy on laxity and cell activity of the medial collateral ligament is dependent on whether the ligament is uninjured or injured. Pregnancy had no significant effect on structural (stiffness and failure load), material (stress at failure and Young's modulus), or viscoelastic (cyclic and static relaxation) properties of tissue from uninjured or injured medial collateral ligament. Therefore, the properties of the healing ligament were not adversely affected during pregnancy in this

  8. Experience Rate of Elbow Pain and Morphological Abnormality of Humeral Medial Epicondyle among Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Kotoura, Yoshihiro; Morihara, Toru; Kida, Yoshikazu; Sukenari, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Ryuhei; Kabuto, Yukichi; MInami, Masataka; Onishi, Okihiro; Tsujihara, Takashi; Hojo, Tatsuya; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the experience rate of elbow pain and to clarify the relationship between morphological abnormality of the humeral medial epicondyle and positions among baseball players in elementary school (ES), junior high school (JHS) and high school (HS). Methods: In this study, 4353 baseball players who participated in our medical screening (2008-2015) were enrolled. There were 1545 players from ES, 1934 players from JHS, and 874 players from HS. We asked them to answer the questionnaire to investigate the experience of elbow pain, and the position they played. Ultrasonography of the humeral medial epicondyle was examined and irregularity, fragmentation, and malunion of the humeral medial epicondyle. The results were analyzed statistically. P < 0.05 was considered significant for all statistical analyses. Results: The experience rates of elbow pain among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 26.0%, 27.0%, and 68.3%. The rates of abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among players in ES, JHS, and HS were 18.2%, 36.3%, and 39.9% (Table 1). The experience rate of elbow pain among pitchers and catchers was significantly higher than the fielders in ES (Table 2), however, there were no significant differences between positions in JHS and HS (Table 3,4). According to the rate of morphological abnormalities of humeral medial epicondyle, pitchers and catchers were significantly higher than fielders in ES, while only pitchers were significantly higher than the fielders in JHS and HS (Table 2,3,4). Conclusion: The experience rate of elbow pain among baseball players rose as the age increased, and the rate in HS was almost 70%. The rates of morphological abnormality of humeral medial epicondyle among pitchers and catchers were high and the tendency was observed from a young age. The primary prevention of elbow injuries in youth baseball players of all ages should be considered.

  9. In vivo kinematics of medial unicompartmental osteoarthritic knees during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fiacchi, Francesco; Zambianchi, Francesco; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Ricchiuto, Ippazio; Mugnai, Raffaele; Catani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Few studies exist describing unicompartmental osteoarthritic knee kinematics. Moreover, the role of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the determination of knee kinematics has not been fully described. The objective of the current study was to analyze the in vivo kinematics of knees with medial osteoarthritis (OA) and intact ACL during closed and open chained motion. Eight patients scheduled for UKA diagnosed with primary medial OA underwent knee CT-scans and video-fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic analysis included stair climbing, chair rising and leg extension. Three-dimensional bone positions were obtained from each image by iterative procedures using a CAD-model-based shape-matching technique. Patterns of axial rotation and anterior-posterior (AP) motion of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were obtained with specific software. The femur reported an overall external rotation relative to the tibia from extension to flexion in all tasks. Average AP translation of the medial femoral condyle were smaller in open-chained tasks than in weight-bearing conditions. Average AP motion of the lateral femoral condyle reported an overall posterior translation with knee flexion. The absent natural "screw-home" mechanism and the lack of medial condyle posterior translation was explained by bone-cartilage defects and meniscal degeneration. Relevant findings were the kinematic pattern differences between weight-bearing and open chained activities, suggesting that in biphasic muscle contraction and unloaded conditions, the function of the cruciate ligaments was not physiological. The kinematics of knees with medial OA and intact ACL differed from healthy knees. PMID:25382361

  10. In vivo kinematics of medial unicompartmental osteoarthritic knees during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Fiacchi, Francesco; Zambianchi, Francesco; Digennaro, Vitantonio; Ricchiuto, Ippazio; Mugnai, Raffaele; Catani, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Few studies exist describing unicompartmental osteoarthritic knee kinematics. Moreover, the role of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the determination of knee kinematics has not been fully described. The objective of the current study was to analyze the in vivo kinematics of knees with medial osteoarthritis (OA) and intact ACL during closed and open chained motion. Eight patients scheduled for UKA diagnosed with primary medial OA underwent knee CT-scans and video-fluoroscopy. Fluoroscopic analysis included stair climbing, chair rising and leg extension. Three-dimensional bone positions were obtained from each image by iterative procedures using a CAD-model-based shape-matching technique. Patterns of axial rotation and anterior-posterior (AP) motion of the medial and lateral femoral condyle were obtained with specific software. The femur reported an overall external rotation relative to the tibia from extension to flexion in all tasks. Average AP translation of the medial femoral condyle were smaller in open-chained tasks than in weight-bearing conditions. Average AP motion of the lateral femoral condyle reported an overall posterior translation with knee flexion. The absent natural "screw-home" mechanism and the lack of medial condyle posterior translation was explained by bone-cartilage defects and meniscal degeneration. Relevant findings were the kinematic pattern differences between weight-bearing and open chained activities, suggesting that in biphasic muscle contraction and unloaded conditions, the function of the cruciate ligaments was not physiological. The kinematics of knees with medial OA and intact ACL differed from healthy knees.

  11. Organization of multisynaptic circuits within and between the medial and the central extended amygdala.

    PubMed

    Bienkowski, Michael S; Wendel, Elizabeth S; Rinaman, Linda

    2013-10-15

    The central and medial extended amygdala comprises the central (CEA) and medial nuclei of the amygdala (MEA), respectively, together with anatomically connected regions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST). To reveal direct and multisynaptic connections within the central and medial extended amygdala, monosynaptic and transneuronal viral tracing experiments were performed in adult male rats. In the first set of experiments, a cocktail of anterograde and retrograde tracers was iontophoretically delivered into the medial CEA (CEAm), anterodorsal MEA (MEAad), or posterodorsal MEA (MEApd), revealing direct, topographically organized projections between distinct amygdalar and BST subnuclei. In the second set of experiments, the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) was microinjected into the CEAm or MEAad. After 48 hours of survival, there were no significant differences between monosynaptic and PRV cases in the subnuclear distribution or proportions of retrogradely labeled BST neurons. However, after 60 hours of survival, CEAm-injected cases displayed an increased proportion of labeled neurons within the anteromedial group of BST subnuclei (amgBST) and within the posterior BST, which do not directly innervate the CEA. MEApd-injected 60-hour cases displayed a significantly increased proportion of retrograde labeling in the amgBST compared with monosynaptic and 48-hour cases, whereas MEAad-injected cases displayed no proportional changes over time. Thus, multisynaptic circuits within the medial extended amygdala overlap the direct connections making up this anatomical unit, whereas the multisynaptic boundaries of the central extended amygdala extend into BST subnuclei previously identified as part of the medial extended amygdala.

  12. Medial Tibiofemoral-Joint Stiffness in Males and Females Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Patricia; Rijke, Arie; Hertel, Jay; Ingersoll, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Analyzing ligament stiffness between males and females at 3 maturational stages across the lifespan may provide insight into whether changes in ligament behavior with aging may contribute to joint laxity. Objective: To compare the stiffness of the medial structures of the tibiofemoral joint and the medial collateral ligament to determine if there are differences at 3 distinct ages and between the sexes. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 108 healthy and physically active volunteers with no previous knee surgery, no acute knee injury, and no use of exogenous hormones in the past 6 months participated. They were divided into 6 groups based on sex and age (8–10, 18–40, 50–75 years). Main Outcome Measure(s): Ligament stiffness of the tibiofemoral joint was measured with an arthrometer in 0° and 20° of tibiofemoral-joint flexion. The slope values of the force-strain line that represents stiffness of the medial tibiofemoral joint at 0° and the medial collateral ligament at 20° of flexion were obtained. Results: When height and mass were controlled, we found a main effect (P < .001) for age group: the 8- to 10-year olds were less stiff than both the 18- to 40- and the 50- to 75-year-old groups. No effects of sex or tibiofemoral-joint position on stiffness measures were noted when height and mass were included as covariates. Conclusions: Prepubescent medial tibiofemoral-joint stiffness was less than postpubescent knee stiffness. Medial tibiofemoral-joint stiffness was related to height and mass after puberty in men and women. PMID:24955624

  13. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity.

  14. Medial Tibiofemoral-Joint Stiffness in Males and Females Across the Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Aronson, Patricia; Rijke, Arie; Hertel, Jay; Ingersoll, Christopher D

    2014-02-12

    Context : Analyzing ligament stiffness between males and females at 3 maturational stages across the lifespan may provide insight into whether changes in ligament behavior with aging may contribute to joint laxity. Objective : To compare the stiffness of the medial structures of the tibiofemoral joint and the medial collateral ligament to determine if there are differences at 3 distinct ages and between the sexes. Design : Cross-sectional study. Setting : Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants : A total of 108 healthy and physically active volunteers with no previous knee surgery, no knee injury, and no use of exogenous hormones in the past 6 months participated. They were divided into 6 groups based on sex and age (8-10, 18-40, 50-75 years). Main Outcome Measure(s) : Ligament stiffness of the tibiofemoral joint was measured with an arthrometer in 0° and 20° of tibiofemoral-joint flexion. The slope values of the force-strain line that represents stiffness of the medial tibiofemoral joint at 0° and the medial collateral ligament at 20° of flexion were obtained. Results : When height and mass were controlled, we found a main effect (P < .001) for age group: the 8- to 10-year olds were less stiff than both the 18- to 40- and the 50- to 75-year-old groups. No effects of sex or tibiofemoral-joint position on stiffness measures were noted when height and mass were included as covariates. Conclusions : Prepubescent medial tibiofemoral-joint stiffness was less than postpubescent knee stiffness. Medial tibiofemoral-joint stiffness was related to height and mass after puberty in men and women.

  15. Management of Vascular Invasion During Radical Resection of Medial Sphenoid Wing Meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Kattner, Keith A.; Fukushima, Takanori

    2001-01-01

    Invasive meningiomas involving the medial sphenoid wing are difficult tumors to resect completely. They often have invaded the surrounding arteries at the time of diagnosis making total resection challenging. Attempts at removing these tumors from adherent carotid or middle cerebral arteries have resulted in high complication rates. Nine cases of medial sphenoid wing meningiomas with arterial invasion were operated between March 1994 and August 1998. Total resection was possible in only four cases. Two arterial-related complications occurred during resection with one resulting in permanent hemiplegia. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17167608

  16. Beauty in a smile: the role of medial orbitofrontal cortex in facial attractiveness.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, J; Winston, J; Critchley, H; Perrett, D; Burt, D M; Dolan, R J

    2003-01-01

    The attractiveness of a face is a highly salient social signal, influencing mate choice and other social judgements. In this study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain regions that respond to attractive faces which manifested either a neutral or mildly happy face expression. Attractive faces produced activation of medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), a region involved in representing stimulus-reward value. Responses in this region were further enhanced by a smiling facial expression, suggesting that the reward value of an attractive face as indexed by medial OFC activity is modulated by a perceiver directed smile.

  17. Misdiagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of the medial plantar nerve: case report.

    PubMed

    D'Orazi, Valerio; Venditto, Teresa; Panunzi, Andrea; Anichini, Silvia; Manzini, Gabriele; Tallarico, Arturo; Bernetti, Andrea; Paoloni, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors of the peripheral nerve. Diagnosis may be challenging, if they present mimicking other peripheral nerve pathologies. We report the case of a patient who had severe foot pain, which progressively hampered her walking ability, erroneously attributed to recurrent Morton's neuroma. Diagnosis of plexiform neurofibroma of her right medial plantar nerve was made 15 years after the appearance of symptoms. Pain and function recovered after radical neurotomy of the medial plantar nerve. A correct diagnosis is an essential starting point in the treatment of neurofibromas and a misdiagnosis may lead to an inappropriate treatment.

  18. A Medial Meniscal Root Pullout Repair With the Use of a Tibial Tunnel Suturing Technique.

    PubMed

    Apivatgaroon, Adinun; Chernchujit, Bancha

    2016-06-01

    A meniscal root tear is one of the common knee injuries that can lead to degenerative changes in the knee joint. Meniscal root repairs can restore proper biomechanics of the knee joint. We have developed a suturing technique that uses a tibial tunnel for a pullout suture medial meniscal root repair. This is a straightforward technique that helps to promote simple suturing of the medial meniscal root, avoid iatrogenic injuries to the articular cartilage, and produce an additional working portal during a meniscal root repair. PMID:27656383

  19. Perforator arteries of the medial upper arm: anatomical basis of a new flap donor site.

    PubMed

    Perignon, D; Havet, E; Sinna, R

    2013-01-01

    The development of perforator flaps' concept based on knowledge on vascular anatomy of the skin represents a major improvement in reconstructive surgery. Succeeding description about vascular territories and anatomical basics of the main donor sites, the study of hidden donor sites, such as medial upper arm, constitutes a new step and an additional refinement. 20 upper limbs of 10 fresh adult cadavers were studied with colored latex injections. The origin and distribution of the perforator arteries of the superior ulnar collateral artery and the brachial artery were investigated. We have noted constant perforator arteries and described the limits of vascular territories of the medial upper arm.

  20. Mechanism of the Rapid Effect of 17β -Estradiol on Medial Amygdala Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabekura, Junichi; Oomura, Yutaka; Minami, Taketsugu; Mizuno, Yuji; Fukuda, Atsuo

    1986-07-01

    The mechanism by which sex steroids rapidly modulate the excitability of neurons was investigated by intracellular recording of neurons in rat medial amygdala brain slices. Brief hyperpolarization and increased potassium conductance were produced by 17β - estradiol. This effect persisted after elimination of synaptic input and after suppression of protein synthesis. Thus, 17β -estradiol directly changes the ionic conductance of the postsynaptic membrane of medial amygdala neurons. In addition, a greater proportion of the neurons from females than from males responded to 17β -estradiol.

  1. Medial malleolus fracture of the ankle combined with rupture of the Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jike; Maruo Holledge, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old man fell off a 60-cm-high step, with his ankle in a twisted position, and sustained a closed fracture of the medial malleolus, with an ipsilateral complete Achilles tendon (TA) rupture. The TA rupture was initially missed but diagnosed by ultrasound examination, 2 weeks post-operatively. The ankle fracture was diagnosed from routine radiographs. Such a combination of injuries has been reported infrequently in the literature, but significant similarities have been described in the mechanism of injury and fracture patterns. Nevertheless, three of five reported cases with combined medial malleolus fractures were initially misdiagnosed. PMID:27141047

  2. Partial confinement photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, S.; Hong, C.-Y.; Pfaff, N.; Kimerling, L. C.; Michel, J.

    2008-12-29

    One-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides with an incomplete photonic band gap are modeled and proposed for an integration application that exploits their property of partial angular confinement. Planar apodized photonic crystal structures are deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by reflectivity as a function of angle and polarization, validating a partial confinement design for light at 850 nm wavelength. Partial confinement identifies an approach for tailoring waveguide properties by the exploitation of conformal film deposition over a substrate with angularly dependent topology. An application for an optoelectronic transceiver is demonstrated.

  3. Local Control of Extracellular Dopamine Levels in the Medial Nucleus Accumbens by a Glutamatergic Projection from the Infralimbic Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Orrú, Marco; Rea, William; Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Yepes, Gabriel; Britt, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    It is generally assumed that infralimbic cortex (ILC) and prelimbic cortex, two adjacent areas of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rodents, provide selective excitatory glutamatergic inputs to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, respectively. It is also generally believed that mPFC influences the extracellular levels of dopamine in the NAc primarily by an excitatory collateral to the ventral tegmental area (VTA). In the present study, we first established the existence of a selective functional connection between ILC and the posteromedial portions of the VTA (pmVTA) and the mNAc shell (pmNAc shell), by measuring striatal neuronal activation (immunohistochemical analysis of ERK1/2 phosphorylation) and glutamate release (in vivo microdialysis) upon ILC electrical stimulation. A novel optogenetic-microdialysis approach allowed the measurement of extracellular concentrations of glutamate and dopamine in the pmNAc shell upon local light-induced stimulation of glutamatergic terminals from ILC. Cortical electrical and local optogenetic stimulation produced significant increases in the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and dopamine in the pmNAc shell. Local blockade of glutamate release by perfusion of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist in the pmNAc shell blocked the dopamine release induced by local optogenetic stimulation but only partially antagonized dopamine release induced by cortical electrical stimulation. The results demonstrate that ILC excitatory afferents directly modulate the extracellular concentration of dopamine in the pmNAc shell, but also support the involvement of an indirect mechanism of dopamine control, through a concomitant ILC-mediated activation of the pmVTA. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We established the existence of a functional connection between the infralimbic cortex (ILC) and the posteromedial portions of the ventral tegmental area (pmVTA) and the medial nucleus acumbens shell (pmNAc shell). A novel optogenetic

  4. Local Control of Extracellular Dopamine Levels in the Medial Nucleus Accumbens by a Glutamatergic Projection from the Infralimbic Cortex.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, César; Orrú, Marco; Rea, William; Ciudad-Roberts, Andrés; Yepes, Gabriel; Britt, Jonathan P; Ferré, Sergi

    2016-01-20

    It is generally assumed that infralimbic cortex (ILC) and prelimbic cortex, two adjacent areas of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rodents, provide selective excitatory glutamatergic inputs to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, respectively. It is also generally believed that mPFC influences the extracellular levels of dopamine in the NAc primarily by an excitatory collateral to the ventral tegmental area (VTA). In the present study, we first established the existence of a selective functional connection between ILC and the posteromedial portions of the VTA (pmVTA) and the mNAc shell (pmNAc shell), by measuring striatal neuronal activation (immunohistochemical analysis of ERK1/2 phosphorylation) and glutamate release (in vivo microdialysis) upon ILC electrical stimulation. A novel optogenetic-microdialysis approach allowed the measurement of extracellular concentrations of glutamate and dopamine in the pmNAc shell upon local light-induced stimulation of glutamatergic terminals from ILC. Cortical electrical and local optogenetic stimulation produced significant increases in the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and dopamine in the pmNAc shell. Local blockade of glutamate release by perfusion of an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist in the pmNAc shell blocked the dopamine release induced by local optogenetic stimulation but only partially antagonized dopamine release induced by cortical electrical stimulation. The results demonstrate that ILC excitatory afferents directly modulate the extracellular concentration of dopamine in the pmNAc shell, but also support the involvement of an indirect mechanism of dopamine control, through a concomitant ILC-mediated activation of the pmVTA. Significance statement: We established the existence of a functional connection between the infralimbic cortex (ILC) and the posteromedial portions of the ventral tegmental area (pmVTA) and the medial nucleus acumbens shell (pmNAc shell). A novel optogenetic

  5. Gender moderates the association between dorsal medial prefrontal cortex volume and depressive symptoms in a subclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joshua M; Depetro, Emily; Maxwell, Joshua; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-08-30

    Major depressive disorder is associated with lower medial prefrontal cortex volumes. The role that gender might play in moderating this relationship and what particular medial prefrontal cortex subregion(s) might be implicated is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess dorsal, ventral, and anterior cingulate regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in a normative sample of male and female adults. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) was used to measure these three variables. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for correlations between medial prefrontal gray matter volume and depressive traits. The dorsal medial frontal cortex was correlated with greater levels of depression, but not anxiety and stress. Gender moderates this effect: in males greater levels of depression were associated with lower dorsal medial prefrontal volumes, but in females no relationship was observed. The results indicate that even within a non-clinical sample, male participants with higher levels of depressive traits tend to have lower levels of gray matter volume in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding is consistent with low dorsal medial prefrontal volume contributing to the development of depression in males. Future longitudinal work is needed to substantiate this possibility.

  6. Gender moderates the association between dorsal medial prefrontal cortex volume and depressive symptoms in a subclinical sample.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joshua M; Depetro, Emily; Maxwell, Joshua; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Hajcak, Greg

    2015-08-30

    Major depressive disorder is associated with lower medial prefrontal cortex volumes. The role that gender might play in moderating this relationship and what particular medial prefrontal cortex subregion(s) might be implicated is unclear. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess dorsal, ventral, and anterior cingulate regions of the medial prefrontal cortex in a normative sample of male and female adults. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS) was used to measure these three variables. Voxel-based morphometry was used to test for correlations between medial prefrontal gray matter volume and depressive traits. The dorsal medial frontal cortex was correlated with greater levels of depression, but not anxiety and stress. Gender moderates this effect: in males greater levels of depression were associated with lower dorsal medial prefrontal volumes, but in females no relationship was observed. The results indicate that even within a non-clinical sample, male participants with higher levels of depressive traits tend to have lower levels of gray matter volume in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex. Our finding is consistent with low dorsal medial prefrontal volume contributing to the development of depression in males. Future longitudinal work is needed to substantiate this possibility. PMID:26166620

  7. [Primary recurrent medial subdislocation of both patellae. Long-term review of an exceptional case of miserably malalignment syndrome].

    PubMed

    García-Mata, S; Hidalgo-Ovejero, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a long-term review of a girl aged 11 years and 4 months with medial primary recurrent subluxation of both patellae of several months evolution associated with miserably malalignment syndrome. Not one case of medial recurrent dislocation of the patellae has been described previously. Three years previously following a jump she had suffered a right patellar luxation - self-reduced and not immobilised - followed by 10 subsequent episodes of subluxation and three more medial luxations. She could hardly walk autonomously due to persistent or habitual subluxation and patellofemoral pain, mainly in the right knee. Physical examination revealed habitual medial subluxation of both patellae, with clear medial patellar displacement, quadriceps amyotrophy and medial instability. The medial subluxation suppression test was positive. She showed excessive femoral anteversion of the hips (IR: 90 degrees, ER: 30 degrees), genu varum, neutral tibial torsion, patella alta, dysplastic trochlear grooves with medial condyle hipoplasia and both patellae were dysplastic (Wiberg type III). We performed a derotation subtrochanteric femoral osteotomy and bilateral proximal patellar realignment. Following surgery, bilateral stability of both sides permitted normal walking and running, as well as apprehension and the Smillie test (-), with a hip mobility of 65 degrees ER and 50 degrees IR. Fifteen years after the surgery the patient complains of antero-external knee pain in the right knee during prolonged walking, in getting up and down stairs and when in a prolonged sitting position, diagnosed as excessive lateral pressure syndrome.

  8. Clinical and surgical implications regarding morphometric variations of the medial wall of the orbit in relation to age and gender.

    PubMed

    Morales-Avalos, Rodolfo; Santos-Martínez, Arlette Gabriela; Ávalos-Fernández, Cesia Gisela; Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Sánchez-Mejorada, Gabriela; Montemayor-Alatorre, Adolfo; Martínez-Fernández, David A; Espinosa-Uribe, Abraham G; Mohamed-Noriega, Jibran; Cuervo-Lozano, Edgar E; Mohamed-Hamsho, Jesús; Quiroga-García, Oscar; Lugo-Guillen, Roberto A; Guzmán-López, Santos; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo E

    2016-09-01

    The ethmoidal foramens are located on the medial wall of the orbit and are key reference points for intraoperative orientation. Detailed knowledge of the anatomy, bony landmarks and morphometric characteristics of the medial wall of the orbit is essential for various surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to determine the morphometric variations in the medial wall of the orbit and establish significant variations regarding age and gender. A total of 110 orbits were analyzed and subdivided by age (over or under 40 years) and gender. The distances of the medial wall of the orbit between the anterior lacrimal crest, the ethmoidal foramen, the optic canal and the interforamina were determined. Safe surgical areas were sought. Statistical tests were used to determine the differences between groups. In men, there is a safe surgical area proximal to the anterior and posterior ethmoidal foramen. In women, this area is in the posterior third of the medial wall of the orbit between the posterior ethmoidal foramen and the optic canal. Regarding variation according to age, the results of this study suggested that the anteroposterior diameter of the medial wall increases with age. This study showed that the anteroposterior total length of the medial orbit wall is similar between genders of similar age, increases with age, and has significant variations in the distances between the various structures that make up the medial orbit wall with regard to gender and age.

  9. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  10. Complex partial status and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ardila, A; Gómez, J

    1988-04-01

    Three cases of complex partial status which were diagnosed as psychotic episodes are presented. The scans of two of these cases show structural abnormalities in the left temporal lobe. It is proposed that there are similar neurophysiological mechanisms in primary schizophrenia and in the perceptual, affective and cognitive phenomena apparent is some complex and psychic partial seizures. The hippocampal-amygdaline system plays a central role in both cases.

  11. Dissociated Roles for the Lateral and Medial Septum in Elemental and Contextual Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calandreau, Ludovic; Jaffard, Robert; Desmedt, Aline

    2007-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that the septum plays a predominant role in fear learning, yet the direction of this control is still a matter of debate. Increasing data suggest that the medial (MS) and lateral septum (LS) would be differentially required in fear conditioning depending on whether a discrete conditional stimulus (CS) predicts, or not,…

  12. Dissociable Contributions within the Medial Temporal Lobe to Encoding of Object-Location Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Tobias; Rose, Michael; Glascher, Jan; Wolbers, Thomas; Buchel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    The crucial role of the medial temporal lobe (MTL) in episodic memory is well established. Although there is little doubt that its anatomical subregions--the hippocampus, peri-, entorhinal and parahippocampal cortex (PHC)--contribute differentially to mnemonic processes, their specific functions in episodic memory are under debate. Data from…

  13. Attention, Emotion, and Deactivation of Default Activity in Inferior Medial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geday, Jacob; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Attention deactivates the inferior medial prefrontal cortex (IMPC), but it is uncertain if emotions can attenuate this deactivation. To test the extent to which common emotions interfere with attention, we measured changes of a blood flow index of brain activity in key areas of the IMPC with positron emission tomography (PET) of labeled water…

  14. Working Memory, Long-Term Memory, and Medial Temporal Lobe Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeneson, Annette; Squire, Larry R.

    2012-01-01

    Early studies of memory-impaired patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage led to the view that the hippocampus and related MTL structures are involved in the formation of long-term memory and that immediate memory and working memory are independent of these structures. This traditional idea has recently been revisited. Impaired performance…

  15. An Unusual Metallic Foreign Body inside the Knee Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the knee joint are uncommon, particularly those not related to surgical procedures. In this paper, we present a case of an intraosseous metallic foreign body situated in the medial femoral condyle for one year, causing pain, which was removed with complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25506452

  16. Detection of defects in formed sheet metal using medial axis transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murmu, Naresh C.; Velgan, Roman

    2003-05-01

    In the metal forming processes, the sheet metals are often prone to various defects such as thinning, dents, wrinkles etc. In the present manufacturing environments with ever increasing demand of higher quality, detecting the defects of formed sheet metal using an effective and objective inspection system is the foremost norm to remain competitive in market. The defect detection using optical techniques aspire to satisfy its needs to be non-contact and fast. However, the main difficulties to achieve this goal remain essentially on the development of efficient evaluation technique and accurate interpretation of extracted data. The defect like thinning is detected by evaluating the deviations of the thickness in the formed sheet metal against its nominal value. The present evaluation procedure for determination of thickness applied on the measurements data is not without deficiency. To improve this procedure, a new evaluation approach based on medial axis transformation is proposed here. The formed sheet metals are digitized using fringe projection systems in different orientations, and afterwards registered into one coordinate frame. The medial axis transformation (MAT) is applied on the point clouds, generating the point clouds of MAT. This data is further processed and medial surface is determined. The thinning defect is detected by evaluating local wall thickness and other defects like wrinkles are determined using the shape recognition on the medial surface. The applied algorithm is simple, fast and robust.

  17. Diagnosis of hyperostosis of the medial calcaneal tubercle similar to a heel spur.

    PubMed

    Altan, Egemen; Senaran, Hakan; Can, Nuray; Aydin, Bahattin Kerem; Erkocak, Omer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    Calcaneal osteochondromas are rare conditions. To our knowledge, we present the first report of a calcaneal osteochondroma in an adolescent patient that was surprisingly similar to a heel spur, and, in addition, symptoms due to compression of the medial plantar nerve were present.

  18. Multiple routes to memory: distinct medial temporal lobe processes build item and source memories.

    PubMed

    Davachi, Lila; Mitchell, Jason P; Wagner, Anthony D

    2003-02-18

    A central function of memory is to permit an organism to distinguish between stimuli that have been previously encountered and those that are novel. Although the medial temporal lobe (which includes the hippocampus and surrounding perirhinal, parahippocampal, and entorhinal cortices) is known to be crucial for recognition memory, controversy remains regarding how the specific subregions within the medial temporal lobe contribute to recognition. We used event-related functional MRI to examine the relation between activation in distinct medial temporal lobe subregions during memory formation and the ability (i) to later recognize an item as previously encountered (item recognition) and (ii) to later recollect specific contextual details about the prior encounter (source recollection). Encoding activation in hippocampus and in posterior parahippocampal cortex predicted later source recollection, but was uncorrelated with item recognition. In contrast, encoding activation in perirhinal cortex predicted later item recognition, but not subsequent source recollection. These outcomes suggest that the subregions within the medial temporal lobe subserve distinct, but complementary, learning mechanisms. PMID:12578977

  19. Medial Prefrontal Cortex Is Selectively Involved in Response Selection Using Visual Context in the Background

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Inah; Shin, Ji Yun

    2012-01-01

    The exact roles of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in conditional choice behavior are unknown and a visual contextual response selection task was used for examining the issue. Inactivation of the mPFC severely disrupted performance in the task. mPFC inactivations, however, did not disrupt the capability of perceptual discrimination for visual…

  20. Distinct medial temporal networks encode surprise during motivation by reward versus punishment.

    PubMed

    Murty, Vishnu P; LaBar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires predictive internal representations of the environment, and surprising events are indications for encoding new representations of the environment. The medial temporal lobe memory system, including the hippocampus and surrounding cortex, encodes surprising events and is influenced by motivational state. Because behavior reflects the goals of an individual, we investigated whether motivational valence (i.e., pursuing rewards versus avoiding punishments) also impacts neural and mnemonic encoding of surprising events. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants encountered perceptually unexpected events either during the pursuit of rewards or avoidance of punishments. Despite similar levels of motivation across groups, reward and punishment facilitated the processing of surprising events in different medial temporal lobe regions. Whereas during reward motivation, perceptual surprises enhanced activation in the hippocampus, during punishment motivation surprises instead enhanced activation in parahippocampal cortex. Further, we found that reward motivation facilitated hippocampal coupling with ventromedial PFC, whereas punishment motivation facilitated parahippocampal cortical coupling with orbitofrontal cortex. Behaviorally, post-scan testing revealed that reward, but not punishment, motivation resulted in greater memory selectivity for surprising events encountered during goal pursuit. Together these findings demonstrate that neuromodulatory systems engaged by anticipation of reward and punishment target separate components of the medial temporal lobe, modulating medial temporal lobe sensitivity and connectivity. Thus, reward and punishment motivation yield distinct neural contexts for learning, with distinct consequences for how surprises are incorporated into predictive mnemonic models of the environment. PMID:26854903

  1. Multi-digit contracture release using medial sural artery perforator flap with syndactylization-desyndactylization method

    PubMed Central

    Eren, F; Oksuz, S; Karagöz, H; Melikoğlu, C; Ulkur, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: The medial sural artery perforator flap, with a long pedicle, has tremendous potential for applications in a variety of soft tissue defects. It can be used for reconstruction of multi-digit contractures of the palmar region. Materials and Methods: We present herein the key features of the management of postburn multi-digit volar contractures, using medial sural artery perforator flaps with the syndactylization and desyndactylization method. We describe the use of the free medial sural artery perforator flap in two patients, to reconstruct complex composite hand defects including the second, third, fourth and fifth digits following thermal burns. Results: Both flaps healed uneventfully. In both patients, the hand contractures released completely and adequate joint motion was achieved after a 3-month period of physiotherapy. Conclusions: The thin medial sural artery perforator flap permits high accuracy of soft tissue reconstruction of the hand and reduces the morbidity at the donor site. The MSAPF is a useful flap in areas such as the hands, in the case of soft tissue deficiency and tendon exposition. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 366-368.

  2. Hippocampus and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Contributions to Trace and Contextual Fear Memory Expression over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeman, Christopher L.; Bauer, Philip S.; Pierson, Jamie L.; Quinn, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Previous work has shown that damage to the dorsal hippocampus (DH) occurring at recent, but not remote, timepoints following acquisition produces a deficit in trace conditioned fear memory expression. The opposite pattern has been observed with lesions to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The present studies address: (1) whether these lesion…

  3. Contributions of the Medial Temporal Lobe to Declarative Memory Retrieval: Manipulating the Amount of Contextual Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tendolkar, Indira; Arnold, Jennifer; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Weis, Susanne; Brockhaus-Dumke, Anke; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Fernandez, Guillen

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how the hippocampus and its adjacent mediotemporal structures contribute to contextual and noncontextual declarative memory retrieval by manipulating the amount of contextual information across two levels of the same contextual dimension in a source memory task. A first analysis identified medial temporal lobe (MTL) substructures…

  4. Arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming or repair under nerve blocks: Which nerves should be blocked?

    PubMed Central

    Taha, AM; Abd-Elmaksoud, AM

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to determine the role of the sciatic and obturator nerve blocks (in addition to femoral block) in providing painless arthroscopic medial meniscus trimming/repair. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients with medial meniscus tear, who had been scheduled to knee arthroscopy, were planned to be included in this controlled prospective double-blind study. The patients were randomly allocated into three equal groups; FSO, FS, and FO. The femoral, sciatic, and obturator nerves were blocked in FSO groups. The femoral and sciatic nerves were blocked in FS group, while the femoral and obturator nerves were blocked in FO group. Intraoperative pain and its causative surgical maneuver were recorded. Results: All the patients (n = 7, 100%) in FO group had intraoperative pain. The research was terminated in this group but completed in FS and FSO groups (40 patients each). During valgus positioning of the knee for surgical management of the medial meniscus tear, the patients in FS group experienced pain more frequently than those in FSO group (P = 0.005). Conclusion: Adding a sciatic nerve block to the femoral nerve block is important for painless knee arthroscopy. Further adding of an obturator nerve block may be needed when a valgus knee position is required to manage the medial meniscus tear. PMID:27375382

  5. Distinct medial temporal networks encode surprise during motivation by reward versus punishment.

    PubMed

    Murty, Vishnu P; LaBar, Kevin S; Adcock, R Alison

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive motivated behavior requires predictive internal representations of the environment, and surprising events are indications for encoding new representations of the environment. The medial temporal lobe memory system, including the hippocampus and surrounding cortex, encodes surprising events and is influenced by motivational state. Because behavior reflects the goals of an individual, we investigated whether motivational valence (i.e., pursuing rewards versus avoiding punishments) also impacts neural and mnemonic encoding of surprising events. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), participants encountered perceptually unexpected events either during the pursuit of rewards or avoidance of punishments. Despite similar levels of motivation across groups, reward and punishment facilitated the processing of surprising events in different medial temporal lobe regions. Whereas during reward motivation, perceptual surprises enhanced activation in the hippocampus, during punishment motivation surprises instead enhanced activation in parahippocampal cortex. Further, we found that reward motivation facilitated hippocampal coupling with ventromedial PFC, whereas punishment motivation facilitated parahippocampal cortical coupling with orbitofrontal cortex. Behaviorally, post-scan testing revealed that reward, but not punishment, motivation resulted in greater memory selectivity for surprising events encountered during goal pursuit. Together these findings demonstrate that neuromodulatory systems engaged by anticipation of reward and punishment target separate components of the medial temporal lobe, modulating medial temporal lobe sensitivity and connectivity. Thus, reward and punishment motivation yield distinct neural contexts for learning, with distinct consequences for how surprises are incorporated into predictive mnemonic models of the environment.

  6. Stability of the Medial Olivocochlear Reflex as Measured by Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Srikanta K.; Abdala, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a fine-resolution, distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE)-based assay of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) reflex in normal-hearing adults. Method: Data were collected during 36 test sessions from 4 normal-hearing adults to assess short-term stability and 5 normal-hearing…

  7. Adaptation to Cognitive Context and Item Information in the Medial Temporal Lobes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Rachel A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2012-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTL) play an essential role in episodic memory, and accumulating evidence indicates that two MTL subregions--the perirhinal (PRc) and parahippocampal (PHc) cortices--might have different functions. According to the binding of item and context theory ( [16] and [21]), PRc is involved in processing item information, the…

  8. Medial Temporal Lobe Activity during Source Retrieval Reflects Information Type, Not Memory Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Rachel A.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.; Ranganath, Charan

    2010-01-01

    The medial temporal lobes (MTLs) are critical for episodic memory but the functions of MTL subregions are controversial. According to memory strength theory, MTL subregions collectively support declarative memory in a graded manner. In contrast, other theories assert that MTL subregions support functionally distinct processes. For instance, one…

  9. Role of Medial Prefrontal Cortex Narp in the Extinction of Morphine Conditioned Place Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blouin, Ashley M.; Han, Sungho; Pearce, Anne M.; Cheng, KaiLun; Lee, JongAh J.; Johnson, Alexander W.; Wang, Chuansong; During, Matthew J.; Holland, Peter C.; Shaham, Yavin; Baraban, Jay M.; Reti, Irving M.

    2013-01-01

    Narp knockout (KO) mice demonstrate an impaired extinction of morphine conditioned place preference (CPP). Because the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been implicated in extinction learning, we tested whether Narp cells in this region play a role in the extinction of morphine CPP. We found that intracranial injections of adenoassociated virus…

  10. Material-Specific Lateralization of Working Memory in the Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Dylan D.; Sziklas, Viviane; Garver, Krista E.; Jones-Gotman, Marilyn

    2009-01-01

    Mnemonic deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage arising from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) are traditionally constrained to long-term episodic memory, sparing short-term and working memory (WM). This view of WM as being independent of MTL structures has recently been challenged by a small number of patient and neuroimaging…

  11. Content-Specific Source Encoding in the Human Medial Temporal Lobe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awipi, T.; Davachi, L.

    2008-01-01

    Although the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is known to be essential for episodic encoding, the contributions of individual MTL subregions remain unclear. Data from recognition memory studies have provided evidence that the hippocampus supports relational encoding important for later episodic recollection, whereas the perirhinal cortex has been linked…

  12. Auditory/visual Duration Bisection in Patients with Left or Right Medial-Temporal Lobe Resection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melgire, Manuela; Ragot, Richard; Samson, Severine; Penney, Trevor B.; Meck, Warren H.; Pouthas, Viviane

    2005-01-01

    Patients with unilateral (left or right) medial temporal lobe lesions and normal control (NC) volunteers participated in two experiments, both using a duration bisection procedure. Experiment 1 assessed discrimination of auditory and visual signal durations ranging from 2 to 8 s, in the same test session. Patients and NC participants judged…

  13. Distinct Roles for Medial Temporal Lobe Structures in Memory for Objects and Their Locations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalo, Elizabeth A.; Bellgowan, Patrick S. F.; Martin, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The ability to learn and retain novel information depends on a system of structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) including the hippocampus and the surrounding entorhinal, perirhinal, and parahippocampal cortices. Damage to these structures produces profound memory deficits; however, the unique contribution to memory of each of these…

  14. Anterior Medial Temporal Lobe Activation during Encoding of Words: FMRI Methods to Optimize Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael W.; Haut, Marc W.; Lemieux, Susan K.; Moran, Maria T.; Leach, Sharon G.

    2006-01-01

    The existence of a rostrocaudal gradient of medial temporal lobe (MTL) activation during memory encoding has historically received support from positron emission tomography studies, but less so from functional MRI (FMRI) studies. More recently, FMRI studies have demonstrated that characteristics of the stimuli can affect the location of activation…

  15. The Human Medial Temporal Lobe Processes Online Representations of Complex Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barense, Morgan D.; Gaffan, David; Graham, Kim S.

    2007-01-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether structures in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) support both memory and perception, in particular whether the perirhinal cortex may be involved in the perceptual discrimination of complex objects with a large number of overlapping features. Similar experiments testing the discrimination of blended…

  16. Performance-Related Activity in Medial Rostral Prefrontal Cortex (Area 10) during Low-Demand Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Sam J.; Simons, Jon S.; Frith, Christopher D.; Burgess, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have frequently observed relatively high activity in medial rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC) during rest or baseline conditions. Some accounts have attributed this high activity to the occurrence of unconstrained stimulus-independent and task-unrelated thought processes during baseline conditions. Here, the authors investigated…

  17. Lateral and Medial Ventral Occipitotemporal Regions Interact During the Recognition of Images Revealed from Noise

    PubMed Central

    Nordhjem, Barbara; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Meppelink, Anne Marthe; Renken, Remco J.; de Jong, Bauke M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; van Laar, Teus; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Several studies suggest different functional roles for the medial and the lateral sections of the ventral visual cortex in object recognition. Texture and surface information is processed in medial sections, while shape information is processed in lateral sections. This begs the question whether and how these functionally specialized sections interact with each other and with early visual cortex to facilitate object recognition. In the current research, we set out to answer this question. In an fMRI study, 13 subjects viewed and recognized images of objects and animals that were gradually revealed from noise while their brains were being scanned. We applied dynamic causal modeling (DCM)—a method to characterize network interactions—to determine the modulatory effect of object recognition on a network comprising the primary visual cortex (V1), the lingual gyrus (LG) in medial ventral cortex and the lateral occipital cortex (LO). We found that object recognition modulated the bilateral connectivity between LG and LO. Moreover, the feed-forward connectivity from V1 to LG and LO was modulated, while there was no evidence for feedback from these regions to V1 during object recognition. In particular, the interaction between medial and lateral areas supports a framework in which visual recognition of objects is achieved by networked regions that integrate information on image statistics, scene content and shape—rather than by a single categorically specialized region—within the ventral visual cortex. PMID:26778997

  18. LOCAL ORTHOGONAL CUTTING METHOD FOR COMPUTING MEDIAL CURVES AND ITS BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiangmin; Einstein, Daniel R; Dyedov, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    Medial curves have a wide range of applications in geometric modeling and analysis (such as shape matching) and biomedical engineering (such as morphometry and computer assisted surgery). The computation of medial curves poses significant challenges, both in terms of theoretical analysis and practical efficiency and reliability. In this paper, we propose a definition and analysis of medial curves and also describe an efficient and robust method called local orthogonal cutting (LOC) for computing medial curves. Our approach is based on three key concepts: a local orthogonal decomposition of objects into substructures, a differential geometry concept called the interior center of curvature (ICC), and integrated stability and consistency tests. These concepts lend themselves to robust numerical techniques and result in an algorithm that is efficient and noise resistant. We illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach with some highly complex, large-scale, noisy biomedical geometries derived from medical images, including lung airways and blood vessels. We also present comparisons of our method with some existing methods.

  19. An Unusual Metallic Foreign Body inside the Knee Medial Femoral Condyle.

    PubMed

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pecora, Jose Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis; Demange, Marco Kawamura

    2014-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the knee joint are uncommon, particularly those not related to surgical procedures. In this paper, we present a case of an intraosseous metallic foreign body situated in the medial femoral condyle for one year, causing pain, which was removed with complete resolution of the symptoms. PMID:25506452

  20. Estrogen receptor-a in medial amygdala neurons regulates body weight

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor–a (ERa) activity in the brain prevents obesity in both males and females. However, the ERa-expressing neural populations that regulate body weight remain to be fully elucidated. Here we showed that single-minded–1 (SIM1) neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) express abundant levels ...

  1. Local Orthogonal Cutting Method for Computing Medial Curves and Its Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Xiangmin; Einstein, Daniel R.; Dyedov, Volodymyr

    2010-03-24

    Medial curves have a wide range of applications in geometric modeling and analysis (such as shape matching) and biomedical engineering (such as morphometry and computer assisted surgery). The computation of medial curves poses significant challenges, both in terms of theoretical analysis and practical efficiency and reliability. In this paper, we propose a definition and analysis of medial curves and also describe an efficient and robust method for computing medial curves. Our approach is based on three key concepts: a local orthogonal decomposition of objects into substructures, a differential geometry concept called the interior center of curvature (ICC), and integrated stability and consistency tests. These concepts lend themselves to robust numerical techniques including eigenvalue analysis, weighted least squares approximations, and numerical minimization, resulting in an algorithm that is efficient and noise resistant. We illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach with some highly complex, large-scale, noisy biomedical geometries derived from medical images, including lung airways and blood vessels. We also present comparisons of our method with some existing methods.

  2. LOCAL ORTHOGONAL CUTTING METHOD FOR COMPUTING MEDIAL CURVES AND ITS BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiangmin; Einstein, Daniel R; Dyedov, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    Medial curves have a wide range of applications in geometric modeling and analysis (such as shape matching) and biomedical engineering (such as morphometry and computer assisted surgery). The computation of medial curves poses significant challenges, both in terms of theoretical analysis and practical efficiency and reliability. In this paper, we propose a definition and analysis of medial curves and also describe an efficient and robust method called local orthogonal cutting (LOC) for computing medial curves. Our approach is based on three key concepts: a local orthogonal decomposition of objects into substructures, a differential geometry concept called the interior center of curvature (ICC), and integrated stability and consistency tests. These concepts lend themselves to robust numerical techniques and result in an algorithm that is efficient and noise resistant. We illustrate the effectiveness and robustness of our approach with some highly complex, large-scale, noisy biomedical geometries derived from medical images, including lung airways and blood vessels. We also present comparisons of our method with some existing methods. PMID:20628546

  3. Biomechanical effects of plate area and locking screw on medial open tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chu-An; Lin, Shang-Chih; Hwa, Su-Yang; Chen, Chun-Ming; Tseng, Ching-Shiow

    2015-01-01

    Medial open high tibial osteotomy (HTO) has been used to treat osteoarthritis of the medial compartment of the knee. However, weaker plate strength, unstable plate/screw junction and improper surgery technique are highly related to the HTO outcomes. Two π-shape plates were designed and eight variations (two supporting area × four locking stiffness) were compared by finite-element method. The computed tomography-based tibia was reconstructed and both wedge micromotion and implant stresses were chosen as the comparison indices. The construct was subjected to surgical and physiological loads. The medial-posterior region is the most loaded region and the load through the posterior leg is about four times that through the anterior leg. This indicates that the two-leg design can form a force-couple mechanism to effectively reduce the implant stresses. The use of locking screws significantly decrease the screw and hole stresses. However, the extending plate reduces the stresses of screws and holes above the wedge but makes the distal screws and holes much stressed. Wedge micromotion is affected by extending plate rather than locking screw. Three factors contribute to effective stabilisation of unstable HTO wedge: (1) intimate tibia-plate contact at medial-posterior regions, (2) sufficient rigidity at plate-screw junctions and (3) effective moment-balancing design at distal tibia-plate interfaces.

  4. Hierarchical error evaluation: the role of medial-frontal cortex in postural control.

    PubMed

    Hassall, Cameron D; MacLean, Stephane; Krigolson, Olave E

    2014-01-01

    Motor error evaluation appears to be a hierarchically organized process subserved by 2 distinct systems: a higher level system within medial-frontal cortex responsible for movement outcome evaluation (high-level error evaluation) and a lower level posterior system(s) responsible for the mediation of within-movement errors (low-level error evaluation). While a growing body of evidence suggests that a reinforcement learning system within medial-frontal cortex plays a crucial role in the evaluation of high-level errors made during discrete reaching movements and continuous motor tracking, the role of this system in postural control is currently unclear. Participants learned a postural control task via a feedback-driven trial-and-error shaping process. In line with previous findings, electroencephalographic recordings revealed that feedback about movement outcomes elicited a feedback error-related negativity: a component of the human event-related brain potential associated with high-level outcome evaluation within medial-frontal cortex. Thus, the data provide evidence that a high-level error-evaluation system within medial-frontal cortex plays a key role in learning to control our body posture.

  5. Cognitive Functioning after Medial Frontal Lobe Damage Including the Anterior Cingulate Cortex: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Amee; Dewar, Bonnie-Kate; Critchley, Hugo; Gilbert, Sam J.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Cipolotti, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Two patients with medial frontal lobe damage involving the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) performed a range of cognitive tasks, including tests of executive function and anterior attention. Both patients lesions extended beyond the ACC, therefore caution needs to be exerted in ascribing observed deficits to the ACC alone. Patient performance was…

  6. Frontal lobe syndrome reassessed: comparison of patients with lateral or medial frontal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, S; Chemerinski, E; Yazici, K M; Tartaro, A; Robinson, R G

    1999-11-01

    Examination of mood and behaviour changes after frontal damage may contribute to understanding the functional role of distinct prefrontal areas in depression and anxiety. Depression and anxiety disorders, symptoms, and behaviour were compared in eight patients with single lateral and eight patients with single medial frontal lesions matched for age, sex, race, education, socioeconomic status, side, and aetiology of lesion 2 weeks and 3 months after brain injury. DSM IV major depressive and generalised anxiety disorders were more frequent in patients with lateral compared with medial lesions at 2 weeks but not at 3 months. At 3 months, however, patients with lateral damage showed greater severity of depressive symptoms, and greater impairment in both activities of daily living and social functioning. At initial evaluation depressed mood and slowness were more frequent, whereas at 3 months slowness, lack of energy, and social unease were more frequent in the lateral than the medial group. Patients with lateral lesions showed greater reduction of emotion and motivation (apathy) during both examinations. Medial frontal injury may fail to produce emotional dysregulation or may inhibit experience of mood changes, anxiety, or apathy. Lateral prefrontal damage may disrupt mood regulation and drive while leaving intact the ability to experience (negative) emotions. PMID:10519877

  7. Network Alterations Supporting Word Retrieval in Patients with Medial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protzner, Andrea B.; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    Although the hippocampus is not considered a key structure in semantic memory, patients with medial-temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) have deficits in semantic access on some word retrieval tasks. We hypothesized that these deficits reflect the negative impact of focal epilepsy on remote cerebral structures. Thus, we expected that the networks that…

  8. Medial elbow joint laxity in professional baseball pitchers. A bilateral comparison using stress radiography.

    PubMed

    Ellenbecker, T S; Mattalino, A J; Elam, E A; Caplinger, R A

    1998-01-01

    Injuries to the ulnar collateral ligament frequently occur in throwing athletes because of large, repetitive valgus stresses to the elbow during the cocking and acceleration phases of throwing. Identification of injury to this ligament is important in evaluating the throwing elbow. The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences in medial elbow laxity exist between the dominant and nondominant extremities in uninjured baseball pitchers. Forty uninjured professional baseball pitchers were tested bilaterally with a Telos GA-IIE stress radiography device. Joint space width between the trochlea of the humerus and the coronoid process of the ulna was measured on anteroposterior radiographs obtained with no stress applied and with a 15-daN valgus stress. Results showed significant differences between the medial joint space opening of the dominant and nondominant elbows with no stress applied. With stress, the dominant elbow opened 1.20 +/- 0.97 mm, while the nondominant elbow opened 0.88 +/- 0.55 mm. A significantly greater difference in medial joint space opening between the stressed and unstressed elbows was measured in the dominant elbow compared with the nondominant elbow (0.32 +/- 0.42 mm). This study identifies increased medial elbow laxity in the dominant arm in uninjured pitchers.

  9. Disruption of the Perineuronal Net in the Hippocampus or Medial Prefrontal Cortex Impairs Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hylin, Michael J.; Orsi, Sara A.; Moore, Anthony N.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2013-01-01

    The perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds neurons in the central nervous system and is thought to regulate developmental plasticity. A few studies have shown an involvement of the PNN in hippocampal plasticity and memory storage in adult animals. In addition to the hippocampus, plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been demonstrated to…

  10. Exercise-induced stress resistance is independent of exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Benjamin N; Spence, Katie G; Crevling, Danielle M; Clark, Peter J; Craig, Wendy C; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-02-01

    Exercise increases resistance against stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Similarly, the perception of control is a powerful predictor of neurochemical and behavioral responses to stress, but whether the experience of choosing to exercise, and exerting control over that exercise, is a critical factor in producing exercise-induced stress resistance is unknown. The current studies investigated whether the protective effects of exercise against the anxiety- and depression-like consequences of stress are dependent on exercise controllability and a brain region implicated in the protective effects of controllable experiences, the medial prefrontal cortex. Adult male Fischer 344 rats remained sedentary, were forced to run on treadmills or motorised running wheels, or had voluntary access to wheels for 6 weeks. Three weeks after exercise onset, rats received sham surgery or excitotoxic lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats were exposed to home cage or uncontrollable tail shock treatment three weeks later. Shock-elicited fear conditioning and shuttle box escape testing occurred the next day. Both forced and voluntary wheel running, but not treadmill training, prevented the exaggerated fear conditioning and interference with escape learning produced by uncontrollable stress. Lesions of the medial prefrontal cortex failed to eliminate the protective effects of forced or voluntary wheel running. These data suggest that exercise controllability and the medial prefrontal cortex are not critical factors in conferring the protective effects of exercise against the affective consequences of stressor exposure, and imply that exercise perceived as forced may still benefit affect and mental health.

  11. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  12. Chondroblastoma of the Medial Malleolus: A Case Report of A Rare Tumor at an Extremely Uncommon Site

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Mukesh; Chaturvedi, Hemant; Patel, Vaibhav; Matti, Rajarshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tumors of the medial malleolus are rare. Chondrogenic tumors of the medial malleolus are extremely rare. Chondroblastoma of the medial malleolus has not been reported previously in the English literature. The purpose is to present a rare tumor occurring at an unusual site and its successful management. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 30 years old female with chondroblastoma of the medial malleolus with its clinical features, radiographic features, differential diagnosis, and management at an unusual site. Treatment comprised of an open biopsy followed by aggressive curettage, phenolization and bone cement. Symptoms resolved after treatment with resumption of normal activities and no signs of recurrence at 1 year follow-up. Conclusion: This case appears to be the first reported case of chondroblastoma occurring at medial malleolus. The present case report will increase the awareness of this rare tumor occurring at this unusual site thereby avoiding any chance of misdiagnosis. PMID:27299121

  13. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  14. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  15. A Positive Association Between Foot Posture Index and Medial Compartment Knee Osteoarthritis in Moroccan People

    PubMed Central

    F.E, Abourazzak; N, Kadi; H, Azzouzi; F, Lazrak; A, Najdi; C, Nejjari; T, Harzy

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : To compare foot posture in people with and without medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA), and to assess association between its abnormalities and medial compartment knee OA. Methods : We compared the foot posture of patients with clinically and radiographically-confirmed medial compartment knee OA and asymptomatic healthy controls using the foot posture index (FPI), navicular height, and the medial arch. Results : We included 100 patients and 80 asymptomatic controls. The mean age of patients was 59 ± 7 (44-76) years and 48 ± 9 (28-60) years in the control (p=0.06). Patients group have more pronated foot for FPI (1.50 ± 2.68 vs 0.72 ± 2.63; p=0.05), more flat foot (42% vs 22%; p=0.03), and less pes cavus than the control group (58% vs 77%; p=0.004). However, there was no significant difference between the groups in the navicular height (3.90 ± 0.85 cm vs 4.00 ± 0.76 cm; p=0.41). In multivariate statistical analysis, after adjusting for age and body mass index, pronated foot in FPI (OR=1.22, 95%IC= [1.06-1.40], p=0.005), and pes cavus (OR=0.32, 95%IC= [0.11-0.93], p=0.03) had a significant correlation with the knee osteoarthritis. Conclusion : Pronated foot posture and flat foot are significantly associated with medial compartment knee osteoarthritis. PMID:25553141

  16. The medial approach for the treatment of children with developmental dysplasia of the hip.

    PubMed

    Tarassoli, P; Gargan, M F; Atherton, W G; Thomas, S R Y W

    2014-03-01

    The medial approach for the treatment of children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in whom closed reduction has failed requires minimal access with negligible blood loss. In the United Kingdom, there is a preference for these children to be treated using an anterolateral approach after the appearance of the ossific nucleus. In this study we compared these two protocols, primarily for the risk of osteonecrosis. Data were gathered prospectively for protocols involving the medial approach (26 hips in 22 children) and the anterolateral approach (22 hips in 21 children) in children aged < 24 months at the time of surgery. Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was assessed with validated scores. The acetabular index (AI) and centre-edge angle (CEA) were also measured. The mean age of the children at the time of surgery was 11 months (3 to 24) for the medial approach group and 18 months (12 to 24) for the anterolateral group, and the combined mean follow-up was 70 months (26 to 228). Osteonecrosis of the femoral head was evident or asphericity predicted in three of 26 hips (12%) in the medial approach group and four of 22 (18%) in the anterolateral group (p = 0.52). The mean improvement in AI was 8.8° (4° to 12°) and 7.9° (6° to 10°), respectively, at two years post-operatively (p = 0.18). There was no significant difference in CEA values of affected hips between the two groups. Children treated using an early medial approach did not have a higher risk of developing osteonecrosis at early to mid-term follow-up than those treated using a delayed anterolateral approach. The rates of acetabular remodelling were similar for both protocols. PMID:24589800

  17. Septum and medial frontal cortex contribution to spatial problem-solving.

    PubMed

    Poucet, B; Herrmann, T

    1990-03-26

    An attempt was made to contrast the effects of lesions to the medial frontal cortex and septum in two spatial tasks. In the fixed-goal (FG) task, the food was located on the same table throughout testing, and the start table was randomly varied from day to day. In the variable-goal (VG) task, the start table remained constant but the food was randomly distributed on one or the other of the two remaining tables. In both tasks, normal animals performed better than frontal and septal rats whose performance, however, improved over days in the FG, but not in the VG, task. In both tasks, significant improvement within days was found in medial frontal animals, but not in septal animals. Additional analyses revealed that septal animals had a general pattern of disrupted exploration and a tendency to use a response strategy (i.e. to repeat the same response both within and between days) which decreased over days in the FG task. In contrast, medial frontal animals did not demonstrate disrupted exploration nor any response tendency. It is concluded that both septal and medial frontal cortical damage produce a common spatial working memory impairment. However, there is some evidence to suggest that this common memory impairment could result from disruption of distinct mechanisms in septal and frontal animals. It is proposed that medial frontal lesions could affect some specific mechanism related either to attentional processes or to the ability to anticipate future events, whereas septal damage would interfere with the building of comprehensive and flexible spatial memories. PMID:2340101

  18. Transitions of the 3D medial axis under a one-parameter family of deformations.

    PubMed

    Giblin, Peter J; Kimia, Benjamin B; Pollitt, Anthony J

    2009-05-01

    The instabilities of the medial axis of a shape under deformations have long been recognized as a major obstacle to its use in recognition and other applications. These instabilities, or transitions, occur when the structure of the medial axis graph changes abruptly under deformations of shape. The recent classification of these transitions in 2D for the medial axis and for the shock graph was a key factor in the development of an object recognition system where the classified instabilities were utilized to represent deformation paths. The classification of generic transitions of the 3D medial axis could likewise potentially lead to a similar representation in 3D. In this paper, these transitions are classified by examining the order of contact of spheres with the surface, leading to an enumeration of possible transitions which are then examined on a case-by-case basis. Some cases are ruled out as never occurring in any family of deformations, while others are shown to be nongeneric in a one-parameter family of deformations. Finally, the remaining cases are shown to be viable by developing a specific example for each. Our work is inspired by that of Bogaevsky, who obtained the transitions as part of an investigation of viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations. Our contribution is to give a more down-to-earth approach, bringing this work to the attention of the computer vision community, and to provide explicit constructions for the various transitions using simple surfaces. We believe that the classification of these transitions is vital to the successful regularization of the medial axis in its use in real applications. PMID:19299863

  19. Medial patellar taping changes the peak plantar force location and timing of female basketball players.

    PubMed

    Nyland, J A; Ullery, L R; Caborn, David N M

    2002-04-01

    Subtle changes in patellofemoral joint biomechanics may influence lower extremity function. The McConnell method of patellar taping has become an increasingly popular method of managing patients with various patellofemoral joint disorders. The purpose of this order effect controlled study was to assess medial patellar taping (McConnell Method) for changes in peak plantar force location and timing while running and dribbling a basketball prior to the performance of a basketball lay-up. Sixteen non-impaired, right hand dominant members of a female junior varsity basketball team (age=14.6 +/- 2 years) participated in this study. Subject bodyweight and height were 607.8 +/- 99 N and 1.67 +/- 0.10 m, respectively. All data were collected from the preferred stance limb. A series of two way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (condition, trial) were used to determine statistical significance (P < or = 0.05). During medial patellar taping, subjects displayed a more forefoot directed peak plantar force location 89.9 +/- 18 versus 81.3 +/- 21 mm and delayed peak plantar force onset 141 +/ - 23 versus 130 +/- 29 ms following initial ground contact. Medial-lateral peak plantar force location and peak plantar force magnitude did not differ between conditions, however, medial-lateral peak plantar force location displayed significant trial sequence influences with the latter trials displaying more lateral center of plantar force locations (30.4 +/- 2 vs. 32.5 +/- 3 mm). The results of this study suggest that medial patellar taping influences distal lower extremity function by shifting peak plantar force location toward the forefoot, and delaying its onset. These changes with consideration for known synergistic ankle plantar flexor-subtalar joint invertor and knee extensor function during weight bearing suggest the presence of increased muscular stiffness acting through a more rigid foot to improve the impact force attenuating capability of the lower extremity.

  20. Reasonable partiality in professional relationships.

    PubMed

    Almond, Brenda

    2005-04-01

    First, two aspects of the partiality issue are identified: (1) Is it right/reasonable for professionals to favour their clients' interests over either those of other individuals or those of society in general? (2) Are special non-universalisable obligations attached to certain professional roles? Second, some comments are made on the notions of partiality and reasonableness. On partiality, the assumption that only two positions are possible--a detached universalism or a partialist egoism--is challenged and it is suggested that partiality, e.g. to family members, lies between these two positions, being neither a form of egoism, nor of impersonal detachment. On reasonableness, it is pointed out that 'reasonable' is an ambiguous concept, eliding the notions of the 'morally right' and the 'rational.' Third, a series of practical examples are taken from counselling, medicine, law, education and religious practice and some common principles are abstracted from the cases and discussed. These include truth-telling, confidentiality, conflicts of interest between clients and particular others and between clients and society. It is concluded that while partiality can be justified as a useful tool in standard cases, particular circumstances can affect the final verdict.

  1. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Alrowaili, Majed

    2016-04-26

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status.

  2. Transient Superficial Peroneal Nerve Palsy After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A 19-year-old male subject was diagnosed with medial meniscal, lateral meniscal and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear. The symptoms did not subside after 4 months of physical therapy, and he underwent arthroscopic partial medial and lateral meniscectomy and ACL reconstruction. Immediately after the patient woke up from general anesthesia, he started experience loss of sensation in the area of superficial peroneal nerve with inverted dorsiflexion of foot and ankle. Instantly, the bandage and knee brace was removed and a diagnosis of compartment syndrome was ruled out. After eight hours, post-operatively, the patient started receiving physiotherapy. He complained of numbness and tingling in the same area. After 24 h, post-operatively, the patient started to regain dorsiflexion and eversion gradually. Two days after the surgery, the patient exhibited complete recovery of neurological status. PMID:27478579

  3. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godt, Jonathan W.; Baum, Rex L.; Lu, Ning

    2009-01-01

    Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials.

  4. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Epidemiologic study of dogs with the displacement or deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinji; Edamura, Kazuya; Tanegashima, Koji; Kai, Hirotaka; Higuchi, Go; Nagasawa, Momoyo; Teshima, Kenji; Asano, Kazushi; Nakayama, Tomohiro

    2016-02-01

    The prevalences of displacement and deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae in dogs were investigated. This was a retrospective epidemiologic study. Radiographs of canine stifle joints (1022 limbs, 534 dogs) were obtained. The images were taken at the Nihon University Animal Medical Center and three private animal hospitals from January 2003 to July 2012. The position and morphology of the medial or lateral fabella were evaluated on the radiographs. The prevalence of displacement of the medial and lateral fabellae was 1.7% and 0.3%, respectively. The prevalence of deformity of the medial and lateral fabellae was 6.9% and 4.6%, respectively. Aplasia or hypoplasia of the fabella was detected more frequently in the medial fabella. On the other hand, a bipartite or multipartite fabella was observed more frequently in the lateral fabella. Nearly all cases of displacement or deformity of the fabella occurred in dogs weighing less than 10 kg. Abnormalities of the fabella were observed in the medial and lateral fabella. We found that abnormal fabellae were closely associated with medial patellar luxation and to a lesser extent with cranial cruciate ligament rupture. No clinical signs were associated with an abnormality of the fabella, with the exception of two dogs with traumatic avulsion of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle. PMID:27348887

  6. A More Informed Evaluation of Medial Compartment Loading: the Combined Use of the Knee Adduction and Flexor Moments

    PubMed Central

    Manal, Kurt; Gardinier, Emily; Buchanan, Thomas S.; Snyder-Mackler, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate if the peak knee flexor moment provides unique and meaningful information about peak medial compartment loading above and beyond what is obtained from the peak knee adduction moment. Methods Standard video-based motion capture and EMG recordings were collected for 10 ACL reconstructed subjects walking at a self-selected speed. Knee joint moments were obtained using inverse dynamics and medial contact force was computed using an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model. Linear regression with the peak adductor moment entered first was implemented to isolate the unique contribution of the peak flexor moment to peak medial loading. Results Peak moments and medial contact force occurred during weight acceptance at approximately 23% of stance. The peak adduction moment (pKAM) was a significant predictor of peak medial loading (p = 0.004) accounting for approximately 63% of the variance. The peak knee flexor moment (pKFM) was also a significant predictor (p = 0.009) accounting for an additional 22% of the variance. When entered together pKAM and pKFM accounted for more than 85% of the variance in peak medial compartment loading. Conclusion The combined use of the peak knee flexor and adductor moments provides a significantly more accurate estimate of peak medial joint loading than the peak adduction moment alone. More accurate inferences of joint contact force will assist clinicians and researchers investigating relationships between joint loading and the onset and progression of knee OA. PMID:25862486

  7. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  8. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  9. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J.; Kis, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Diverse types of GABAergic interneurons coordinate the firing of cortical principal cells required for memory

  10. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  11. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-02-22

    Techniques for generating partially coherent radiation and particularly for converting effectively coherent radiation from a synchrotron to partially coherent EUV radiation suitable for projection lithography.

  12. Parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular fat pad on the dog heart selectively decrease ventricular contractility.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, L W; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Massari, V J; McKenzie, J C; Gillis, R A

    1998-05-28

    We hypothesized that selective control of ventricular contractility might be mediated by postganglionic parasympathetic neurons in the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion plexus located in a fat pad at the base of the aorta. Sinus rate, atrioventricular (AV) conduction (ventricular rate during atrial pacing), and left ventricular contractile force (LV dP/dt during right ventricular pacing) were measured in eight chloralose-anesthetized dogs both before and during bilateral cervical vagus stimulation (20-30 V, 0.5 ms pulses, 15-20 Hz). Seven of these dogs were tested under beta-adrenergic blockade (propranolol, 0.8 mg kg(-1) i.v.). Control responses included sinus node bradycardia or arrest during spontaneous rhythm, high grade AV block or complete heart block, and a 30% decrease in contractility from 2118 +/- 186 to 1526 +/- 187 mm Hg s(-1) (P < 0.05). Next, the ganglionic blocker trimethaphan (0.3-1.0 ml of a 50 microg ml(-1) solution) was injected into the CMV fat pad. Then vagal stimulation was repeated, which now produced a relatively small 5% (N.S., P > 0.05) decrease in contractility but still elicited the same degree of sinus bradycardia and AV block (N = 8, P < 0.05). Five dogs were re-tested 3 h after trimethaphan fat pad injection, at which time blockade of vagally-induced negative inotropy was partially reversed, as vagal stimulation decreased LV dP/dt by 19%. The same dose of trimethaphan given either locally into other fat pads (PVFP or IVC-ILA) or systemically (i.v.) had no effect on vagally-induced negative inotropy. Thus, parasympathetic ganglia located in the CMV fat pad mediated a decrease in ventricular contractility during vagal stimulation. Blockade of the CMV fat pad had no effect on vagally-mediated slowing of sinus rate or AV conduction.

  13. Dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex each contribute to the retrieval of a recent spatial memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Cholvin, Thibault; Loureiro, Michaël; Cassel, Raphaelle; Cosquer, Brigitte; Herbeaux, Karin; de Vasconcelos, Anne Pereira; Cassel, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Systems-level consolidation models propose that recent memories are initially hippocampus-dependent. When remote, they are partially or completely dependent upon the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). An implication of the mPFC in recent memory, however, is still debated. Different amounts of muscimol (MSCI 0, 30, 50, 80 and 250 ng in 1 µL PBS) were used to assess the impact of inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus (dHip) or the mPFC (targeting the prelimbic cortex) on a 24-h delayed retrieval of a platform location that rats had learned drug-free in a water maze. The two smallest amounts of MSCI (30 and 50 ng) did not affect recall, whatever the region. 80 ng MSCI infused into the dHip disrupted spatial memory retrieval, as did the larger amount. Infusion of MSCI into the mPFC did not alter performance in the 0-80 ng range. At 250 ng, it induced an as dramatic memory impairment as after efficient dHip inactivation. Stereological quantifications showed that 80 ng MSCI in the dHip and 250 ng MSCI in the mPFC induced a more than 80% reduction of c-Fos expression, suggesting that, beyond the amounts infused, it is the magnitude of the neuronal activity decrease which is determinant as to the functional outcome of the inactivation. Because, based on the literature, even 250 ng MSCI is a small amount, our results point to a contribution of the mPFC to the recall of a recently acquired spatial memory and thereby extend our knowledge about the functions of this major actor of cognition.

  14. Decreased synaptic plasticity in the medial prefrontal cortex underlies short-term memory deficits in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Matheus, Filipe C; Rial, Daniel; Real, Joana I; Lemos, Cristina; Ben, Juliana; Guaita, Gisele O; Pita, Inês R; Sequeira, Ana C; Pereira, Frederico C; Walz, Roger; Takahashi, Reinaldo N; Bertoglio, Leandro J; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-03-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by motor dysfunction associated with dopaminergic degeneration in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). However, motor symptoms in PD are often preceded by short-term memory deficits, which have been argued to involve deregulation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). We now used a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat PD model to explore if alterations of synaptic plasticity in DLS and mPFC underlie short-term memory impairments in PD prodrome. The bilateral injection of 6-OHDA (20μg/hemisphere) in the DLS caused a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (>80%) and decreased monoamine levels in the striatum and PFC, accompanied by motor deficits evaluated after 21 days in the open field and accelerated rotarod. A lower dose of 6-OHDA (10μg/hemisphere) only induced a partial degeneration (about 60%) of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra with no gross motor impairments, thus mimicking an early premotor stage of PD. Notably, 6-OHDA (10μg)-lesioned rats displayed decreased monoamine levels in the PFC as well as short-term memory deficits evaluated in the novel object discrimination and in the modified Y-maze tasks; this was accompanied by a selective decrease in the amplitude of long-term potentiation in the mPFC, but not in DLS, without changes of synaptic transmission in either brain regions. These results indicate that the short-term memory dysfunction predating the motor alterations in the 6-OHDA model of PD is associated with selective changes of information processing in PFC circuits, typified by persistent changes of synaptic plasticity.

  15. Deep Brain Stimulation of Medial Dorsal and Ventral Anterior Nucleus of the Thalamus in OCD: A Retrospective Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lenartz, Doris; Kuhn, Jens; Sturm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Background The current notion that cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuits are involved in the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has instigated the search for the most suitable target for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, despite extensive research, uncertainty about the ideal target remains with many structures being underexplored. The aim of this report is to address a new target for DBS, the medial dorsal (MD) and the ventral anterior (VA) nucleus of the thalamus, which has thus far received little attention in the treatment of OCD. Methods In this retrospective trial, four patients (three female, one male) aged 31–48 years, suffering from therapy-refractory OCD underwent high-frequency DBS of the MD and VA. In two patients (de novo group) the thalamus was chosen as a primary target for DBS, whereas in two patients (rescue DBS group) lead implantation was performed in a rescue DBS attempt following unsuccessful primary stimulation. Results Continuous thalamic stimulation yielded no significant improvement in OCD symptom severity. Over the course of thalamic DBS symptoms improved in only one patient who showed “partial response” on the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive (Y-BOCS) Scale. Beck Depression Inventory scores dropped by around 46% in the de novo group; anxiety symptoms improved by up to 34%. In the de novo DBS group no effect of DBS on anxiety and mood was observable. Conclusion MD/VA-DBS yielded no adequate alleviation of therapy-refractory OCD, the overall strategy in targeting MD/VA as described in this paper can thus not be recommended in DBS for OCD. The magnocellular portion of MD (MDMC), however, might prove a promising target in the treatment of mood related and anxiety disorders. PMID:27504631

  16. Partially Opened Oven on Phoenix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This view from the Robotic Arm Camera on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows partial opening of doors to one of the tiny ovens of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer.

    Each oven has a pair of spring-loaded doors. Near the center of the image, the partial opening of a pair of doors reveals screen over the opening where a soil sample will be delivered. The door to the right is fully opened and the one to the left is partially deployed. The doors are 10 centimeters (4 inches) long. The opening is 4 centimeters (1.5 inches) wide.

    Tests on the Phoenix testbed at the University of Arizona, Tucson, indicate that a soil sample could be delivered into the oven through the partially opened doors. Engineers are also exploring possibilities for opening the doors more completely.This image was taken during Phoenix's eighth Martian day, or sol (June 2, 2008).

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  17. Assessing Partial Knowledge in Vocabulary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard M.

    1987-01-01

    Partial knowledge was assessed in a multiple choice vocabulary test. Test reliability and concurrent validity were compared using Rasch-based dichotomous and polychotomous scoring models. Results supported the polychtomous scoring model, and moderately supported J. O'Connor's theory of vocabulary acquisition. (Author/GDC)

  18. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  19. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  20. Leadership in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Inter-organizational collaboration is becoming more common. When organizations collaborate they often do so in partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT is a hybrid team that has at least one collocated subteam and at least two subteams that are geographically distributed and communicate primarily through electronic media. While PDTs share many…

  1. Paediatric medial epicondyle fracture without elbow dislocation associated with intra-articular ulnar nerve entrapment

    PubMed Central

    Elbashir, Mohamed; Domos, Peter; Latimer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Elbow fractures are not uncommon in children, and some are associated with neurovascular injuries. Having a nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation is rare and was not described in the literature. Here, we have reported probably the first case of an ulnar nerve injury in an elbow fracture without dislocation. A 9-year-old female presented to the emergency department after falling off a monkey bar. She had a painful, swollen and tender right elbow with no history or clinical signs of an elbow dislocation but had complete ulnar nerve palsy. She was managed initially with analgesia and plaster application and was taken directly to the operating theatre. Examination under anaesthesia revealed no elbow joint instability. The ulnar nerve was found entrapped between the trochlea and proximal ulna, intra-articularly. The medial epicondyle was also found avulsed from the humerus, with an incarcerated medial epicondylar fragment in the elbow joint. PMID:26546588

  2. Neural mechanisms of economic commitment in the human medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Wyart, Valentin; Shorkey, S Paul; Summerfield, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Neurobiologists have studied decisions by offering successive, independent choices between goods or gambles. However, choices often have lasting consequences, as when investing in a house or choosing a partner. Here, humans decided whether to commit (by acceptance or rejection) to prospects that provided sustained financial return. BOLD signals in the rostral medial prefrontal cortex (rmPFC) encoded stimulus value only when acceptance or rejection was deferred into the future, suggesting a role in integrating value signals over time. By contrast, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) encoded stimulus value only when participants rejected (or deferred accepting) a prospect. dACC BOLD signals reflected two decision biases-to defer commitments to later, and to weight potential losses more heavily than gains-that (paradoxically) maximised reward in this task. These findings offer fresh insights into the pressures that shape economic decisions, and the computation of value in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:25333687

  3. Challenges of High Resolution Diffusion Imaging of the Human Medial Temporal Lobe in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zeineh, Michael M.; Holdsworth, Samantha; Skare, Stefan; Atlas, Scott W.; Bammer, Roland

    2011-01-01

    The human medial temporal lobe performs an essential role in memory formation and retrieval. Diseases involving the hippocampus such as Alzheimer's disease present a unique opportunity for advanced imaging techniques to detect abnormalities at an early stage. In particular, it is possible that diffusion imaging may measure abnormal microarchitecture beyond the realm of macroscopic imaging. However, this task is formidable because of the detailed anatomy of the medial temporal lobe, the difficulties in obtaining high quality diffusion images of adequate resolution, and challenges in diffusion data processing. Moreover, it is unclear if any differences will be significant for an individual patient or simply groups of patients. Successful endeavors will need to address each of these challenges in an integrated fashion. The rewards of such analysis may be detection of microscopic disease in vivo, which could represent a landmark accomplishment for the field of neuroradiology. PMID:22158129

  4. Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy for treatment of bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

    PubMed

    Gorphe, Philippe; Hartl, Dana; Primov-Fever, Adi; Hans, Stephane; Crevier-Buchman, Lise; Brasnu, Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy for bilateral vocal fold paralysis has the advantage of preserving the structure and the position of the vocal fold, contrary to a transverse cordotomy or total arytenoidectomy. Our objective was to evaluate the functional results of this procedure. This is a prospective non-randomized study. Twenty patients were included: five patients had a tracheotomy preoperatively and 15 patients had dyspnea on exertion. Acoustic voice measurements, spirometric parameters and the voice handicap index 120 (VHI), were evaluated 1 week before surgery and 3 months after. All the five patients with tracheotomy were successfully decannulated. Acoustic records and VHI were available for eight patients. Jitter and shimmer were worse (p = 0.0078), whereas the VHI was not significantly different after surgery. Spirometric records, available for six patients, were not modified. Endoscopic laser medial arytenoidectomy allowed decannulation and subjective improvement of quality of life in patients with bilateral vocal fold paralysis.

  5. Sports, Physical Activity and Patient-Reported Outcomes After Medial Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty in Young Patients.

    PubMed

    Walker, Tilman; Streit, Julia; Gotterbarm, Tobias; Bruckner, Thomas; Merle, Christian; Streit, Marcus R

    2015-11-01

    One hundred-and-one patients age 60 or younger following medial mobile bearing UKA were reviewed retrospectively with a minimum follow-up of 2 years using the Schulthess activity score, Tegner, UCLA and SF-36 score to assess their level of physical activity and quality of life. Patients showed a rapid recovery and resumption of their activities with a return-to-activity rate of 93%. Most common activities were low impact, whereas high-impact activities showed a significant decrease. Precaution was found to be the main reason for a decrease in the level of activity. The results of this study demonstrate that patients age 60 or younger following medial UKA were able to return to regular physical activities with almost two-thirds of the patients reaching a high activity level (UCLA≥7).

  6. Evaluation and treatment of chronic medial collateral ligament injuries of the knee.

    PubMed

    Azar, Frederick M

    2006-06-01

    Injuries to the medial collateral ligament (MCL) can occur as isolated injuries or in conjunction with injuries to other structures about the knee. Most grade I and II MCL injuries without meniscal avulsion, alone or in combination with anterior or posterior cruciate ligament injuries, can be treated nonoperatively. Grade III or complete tears also can be treated nonoperatively, but only after careful exclusion of any associated injuries that may require surgical treatment. Treatment recommendations also have been based on the location of the MCL tear and the associated injuries. Surgical treatment may include reconstruction of the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments with primary repair of the MCL. Chronic medial knee injuries often are associated with concomitant ligament injuries, which also must be treated. Treatment options include nonoperative (bracing, activity modification, and rehabilitation) and operative reconstruction. PMID:17135952

  7. Endovascular embolization of a giant aneurysm in medial posterior choroidal artery with associated arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    Alshumrani, Ghazi Adlan; Al-Qahtani, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    A 16-year-old male adolescent who presented with vomiting and headache and in the emergency department had a loss of consciousness, was discovered to have a large mass compressing the brainstem. CT scan showed two adjacent mass lesions. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) revealed a giant aneurysm in the posterior medial choroidal artery, subsequently embolized with Guglielmi detachable coils (GDCs). Ten GDCs were used to embolize the aneurysm and the distal aspect of its parent artery. Postembolization DSA confirmed complete embolization of the aneurysm. Endovasular embolization of giant aneurysms in the medial posterior choroidal artery with GDCs is technically feasible and represents a successful therapeutic option. In unruptured giant intracranial aneurysms, simultaneous packing of the aneurysm with coils and occlusion of the distal parent artery can have a good outcome.

  8. Optogenetic activation of septal GABAergic afferents entrains neuronal firing in the medial habenula

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuhyun; Lee, Youngin; Lee, Changwoo; Hong, Seokheon; Lee, Soonje; Kang, Shin Jung; Shin, Ki Soon

    2016-01-01

    The medial habenula (MHb) plays an important role in nicotine-related behaviors such as nicotine aversion and withdrawal. The MHb receives GABAergic input from the medial septum/diagonal band of Broca (MS/DB), yet the synaptic mechanism that regulates MHb activity is unclear. GABA (γ -aminobutyric acid) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter activating both GABAA receptors and GABAB receptors. Depending on intracellular chloride concentration, however, GABAA receptors also function in an excitatory manner. In the absence of various synaptic inputs, we found that MHb neurons displayed spontaneous tonic firing at a rate of about ~4.4 Hz. Optogenetic stimulation of MS/DB inputs to the MHb evoked GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic currents, which produced stimulus-locked neuronal firing. Subsequent delayed yet lasting activation of GABAB receptors attenuated the intrinsic tonic firing. Consequently, septal GABAergic input alone orchestrates both excitatory GABAA and inhibitory GABAB receptors, thereby entraining the firing of MHb neurons. PMID:27703268

  9. Local and Distant Input Controlling Excitation in Layer II of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Elke C; Neitz, Angela; Pinna, Roberta; Melzer, Sarah; Caputi, Antonio; Monyer, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Layer II (LII) of the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) comprises grid cells that support spatial navigation. The firing pattern of grid cells might be explained by attractor dynamics in a network, which requires either direct excitatory connectivity between phase-specific grid cells or indirect coupling via interneurons. However, knowledge regarding local networks that support in vivo activity is incomplete. Here we identified essential components of LII networks in the MEC. We distinguished four types of excitatory neurons that exhibit cell-type-specific local excitatory and inhibitory connectivity. Furthermore, we found that LII neurons contribute to the excitation of contralateral neurons in the corresponding layer. Finally, we demonstrated that the medial septum controls excitation in the MEC via two subpopulations of long-range GABAergic neurons that target distinct interneurons in LII, thereby disinhibiting local circuits. We thus identified local connections that could support attractor dynamics and external inputs that likely govern excitation in LII. PMID:26711115

  10. Shape similarity comparison of protein CPK models based on improved L₁-medial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Qin, S W; Li, Z; Jin, Y; Zhang, S P

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new method to analyse the similarity of protein CPK models. In the proposed method we first construct the skeleton of protein models by an improved L1-medial skeleton extraction. The skeleton information is then used to form a local radius descriptor. Finally, the shape similarity of protein models is compared by using the local radius descriptor based on the absolute degree of grey incidence. Experimental results show that the improved L1-medial skeleton of protein models can describe the shapes of the protein models well. The local descriptor based on the skeleton combined with the absolute degree of grey incidence shows satisfactory performance for comparing the shape similarity of protein CPK models.

  11. A computational model of the cat medial geniculate body ventral division

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    The medial geniculate body of the thalamus receives input from a variety of sources, both auditory and non-auditory. The ventral division (MGv), however, appears to be a purely auditory center, that is, it receives from lower (and higher) centers which are primarily involved in encoding auditory stimuli. It has some of the characteristics of auditory cortex, e.g., layering of neurons and EE/EI bands, but has a much simpler architecture. The MGv plays a central role in analyzing auditory stimuli. A wealth of data is available now on its anatomy, connectivity and responses. A detailed computational model of the ventral division of the cat medial geniculate body has been constructed. This model is being compared to physiological recordings for validation purposes, and should prove useful tool for testing theories of auditory sensory representation and functioning.

  12. A computational model of the cat medial geniculate body ventral division

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, B.J.

    1992-08-01

    The medial geniculate body of the thalamus receives input from a variety of sources, both auditory and non-auditory. The ventral division (MGv), however, appears to be a purely auditory center, that is, it receives from lower (and higher) centers which are primarily involved in encoding auditory stimuli. It has some of the characteristics of auditory cortex, e.g., layering of neurons and EE/EI bands, but has a much simpler architecture. The MGv plays a central role in analyzing auditory stimuli. A wealth of data is available now on its anatomy, connectivity and responses. A detailed computational model of the ventral division of the cat medial geniculate body has been constructed. This model is being compared to physiological recordings for validation purposes, and should prove useful tool for testing theories of auditory sensory representation and functioning.

  13. Anatomic Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Using the Fascia Lata as an Autograft

    PubMed Central

    Haupert, Alexander; Lorbach, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) ensures stability of the patella against lateral forces. In cases of recurrent lateral patellar luxation, surgical reconstruction of the MPFL has an important role in treating lateral patellar instability. Several biomechanical studies have presented valuable pieces of information about various techniques for re-creating this medial patellofemoral complex mainly using the gracilis tendon as an autograft. However, with the increasing number of MPFL reconstructions, there are also an increasing number of patients requiring revision MPFL reconstruction. Therefore alternative graft options may become more relevant. Furthermore, the gracilis tendon as a tubular graft may not be able to fully restore patellofemoral kinematics compared with the native MPFL. This article introduces a surgical technique using the fascia lata as an alternative graft option for the anatomic reconstruction of the MPFL. PMID:25973375

  14. Evaluation and treatment of medial ulnar collateral ligament injuries in the throwing athlete.

    PubMed

    Nassab, Paul F; Schickendantz, Mark S

    2006-12-01

    Medial ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) injuries are common and are seen most frequently in baseball pitchers. Appropriate recognition, treatment, and rehabilitation are necessary to ensure the best chance for return to preinjury levels of participation. Participation in competitive sports may be disrupted for 6 months to 1 year when treated optimally. Abstinence from play may be prolonged when treatment is delayed or if conservative treatment fails; this delay carries significant consequences to the professional, collegiate, and high school athlete. The orthopedic literature is replete with recommendations for the care of these athletes. These recommendations are generally based on retrospective reviews. The purposes of this paper are 3-fold: to provide background knowledge on this injury, to synthesize the current knowledge on the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of athletes with medial UCL injuries, and lastly, to provide a treatment algorithm for athletes with UCL injuries.

  15. Acute bilateral cerebellar infarction in the territory of the medial branches of posterior inferior cerebellar arteries.

    PubMed

    Gurer, G; Sahin, G; Cekirge, S; Tan, E; Saribas, O

    2001-10-01

    The most frequent type of cerebellar infarcts involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) and superior cerebellar artery territories but bilateral involvement of lateral or medial branches of PICA is extremely rare. In this report, we present a 55-year-old male who admitted to hospital with vomiting, nausea and dizziness. On examination left-sided hemiparesia and ataxic gait were detected. Infarct on bilateral medial branch of PICA artery territories was found out with cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and 99% stenosis of the left vertebral artery was found out with digital subtraction arteriography. The patient was put on heparin treatment. After 3 weeks, his complaints and symptoms had disappeared except for mild gait ataxia. PMID:11532563

  16. Single-cell responses to face adaptation in the human medial temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Kraskov, Alexander; Mormann, Florian; Fried, Itzhak; Koch, Christof

    2014-10-22

    We used a face adaptation paradigm to bias the perception of ambiguous images of faces and study how single neurons in the human medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond to the same images eliciting different percepts. The ambiguous images were morphs between the faces of two familiar individuals, chosen because at least one MTL neuron responded selectively to one but not to the other face. We found that the firing of MTL neurons closely followed the subjects' perceptual decisions--i.e., recognizing one person or the other. In most cases, the response to the ambiguous images was similar to the one obtained when showing the pictures without morphing. Altogether, these results show that many neurons in the medial temporal lobe signal the subjects' perceptual decisions rather than the visual features of the stimulus.

  17. The partial-birth stratagem.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    In Wisconsin, physicians stopped performing abortions when a Federal District Court Judge refused to issue a temporary restraining order against the state's newly enacted "partial birth" abortion ban that was couched in such vague language it actually covered all abortions. While ostensibly attempting to ban late-term "intact dilation and extraction," the language of the law did not refer to that procedure or to late terms. Instead, it prohibited all abortions in which a physician "partially vaginally delivers a living child, causes the death of the partially delivered child with the intent to kill the child and then completes the delivery of the child." The law also defined "child" as "a human being from the time of fertilization" until birth. It is clear that this abortion ban is unconstitutional under Row v. Wade, and this unconstitutionality is compounded by the fact that the law allowed no exception to protect a woman's health, which is required by Roe for abortion bans after fetal viability. Wisconsin is only one of about 28 states that have enacted similar laws, and only two have restricted the ban to postviability abortions. Many of these laws have been struck down in court, and President Clinton has continued to veto the Federal partial-birth bill. The Wisconsin Judge acknowledged that opponents of the ban will likely prevail when the case is heard, but his action in denying the temporary injunction means that many women in Wisconsin will not receive timely medical care. The partial birth strategy is really only another anti-abortion strategy.

  18. Activation of Notch1 inhibits medial edge epithelium apoptosis in all-trans retinoic acid-induced cleft palate in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yadong; Dong, Shiyi; Wang, Weicai; Wang, Jianning; Wang, Miao; Chen, Mu; Hou, Jinsong; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-08-26

    Administration of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on E12.0 (embryonic day 12.0) leads to failure of medial edge epithelium (MEE) disappearance and cleft palate. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between atRA and MEE remains to be identified. In this study, atRA (200 mg/kg) administered by gavage induced a 75% incidence of cleft palate in C57BL/6 mice. Notch1 was up-regulated in MEE cells in the atRA-treated group compared with the controls at E15.0, together with reduced apoptosis and elevated proliferation. Next, we investigated the mechanisms underlying atRA, Notch1 and MEE degradation in palate organ culture. Our results revealed that down-regulation of Notch1 partially rescued the inhibition of atRA-induced palate fusion. Molecular analysis indicated that atRA increased the expression of Notch1 and Rbpj and decreased the expression of P21. In addition, depletion of Notch1 expression decreased the expression of Rbpj and increased the expression of P21. Moreover, inhibition of Rbpj expression partially reversed atRA-induced MEE persistence and increased P21 expression. These findings demonstrate that atRA inhibits MEE degradation, which in turn induces a cleft palate, possibly through the Notch1/RBPjk/P21 signaling pathway. PMID:27343556

  19. Glutamate co-transmission from developing medial nucleus of the trapezoid body - Lateral superior olive synapses is cochlear dependent in kanamycin-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Ho; Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Hong, Sung Hwa; Suh, Myung-Whan; Kim, Myeung Ju; Ahn, Seung Cheol

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Glutamate co-transmission is enhanced in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} VGLUT3 expression is increased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR expression is decreased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR, VGLUT3 expression patterns are asymmetric in unilaterally cochlear ablated rat. -- Abstract: Cochlear dependency of glutamate co-transmission at the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) - the lateral superior olive (LSO) synapses was investigated using developing rats treated with high dose kanamycin. Rats were treated with kanamycin from postnatal day (P) 3 to P8. A scanning electron microscopic study on P9 demonstrated partial cochlear hair cell damage. A whole cell voltage clamp experiment demonstrated the increased glutamatergic portion of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) elicited by MNTB stimulation in P9-P11 kanamycin-treated rats. The enhanced VGLUT3 immunoreactivities (IRs) in kanamycin-treated rats and asymmetric VGLUT3 IRs in the LSO of unilaterally cochlear ablated rats supported the electrophysiologic data. Taken together, it is concluded that glutamate co-transmission is cochlear-dependent and enhanced glutamate co-transmission in kanamycin-treated rats is induced by partial cochlear damage.

  20. [Experiences and results of 1300 indentation operations for proximal medialization of the patella].

    PubMed

    Villiger, K J

    1980-07-01

    Of 1039 patients, 1300 knee joints were operated on for chondropathia patellae or patellofemoral osteoarthrosis; the results are arranged in tabular form. The basic operation was proximal medialization of the patella by indent operation. Additional interventions like retropatellar should be indicated by an experienced surgeon. The excellent results found 6, 12, 40, and 60 months after the operation recommmend this procedure for the treatment of chondropathia patellae or osteoarthrosis.

  1. Medial femoral condyle fracture following traumatic allogenic bone transfer – A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kondreddi, Vamsi; Roy, Kishore; Yalamanchili, Ranjith Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Open fractures can cause an “out-in” injury, wherein a foreign body can penetrate the skin causing fracture. There are few reports of allogenic bone getting embedded in soft tissue, but one causing fracture to the host bone has not been reported till date. We present a case, wherein a large cortical bony fragment from one individual penetrated the thigh of another person causing fracture of medial femoral condyle during a head-on collision involving two motorbikes. PMID:26155058

  2. Human Choice Strategy Varies with Anatomical Projections from Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex to Medial Striatum.

    PubMed

    Piray, Payam; Toni, Ivan; Cools, Roshan

    2016-03-01

    Two distinct systems, goal-directed and habitual, support decision making. It has recently been hypothesized that this distinction may arise from two computational mechanisms, model-based and model-free reinforcement learning, neuronally implemented in frontostriatal circuits involved in learning and behavioral control. Here, we test whether the relative strength of anatomical connectivity within frontostriatal circuits accounts for variation in human individuals' reliance on model-based and model-free control. This hypothesis was tested by combining diffusion tensor imaging with a multistep decision task known to distinguish model-based and model-free control in humans. We found large interindividual differences in the degree of model-based control, and those differences are predicted by the structural integrity of white-matter tracts from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex to the medial striatum. Furthermore, an analysis based on masking out of bottom-up tracts suggests that this effect is driven by top-down influences from ventromedial prefrontal cortex to medial striatum. Our findings indicate that individuals with stronger afferences from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex to the medial striatum are more likely to rely on a model-based strategy to control their instrumental actions. These findings suggest a mechanism for instrumental action control through which medial striatum determines, at least partly, the relative contribution of model-based and model-free systems during decision-making according to top-down model-based information from the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings have important implications for understanding the neural circuitry that might be susceptible to pathological computational processes in impulsive/compulsive psychiatric disorders. PMID:26961942

  3. Lesions of the orbitofrontal but not medial prefrontal cortex disrupt conditioned reinforcement in primates.

    PubMed

    Pears, Andrew; Parkinson, John A; Hopewell, Lucy; Everitt, Barry J; Roberts, Angela C

    2003-12-01

    The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (PFC) is implicated in affective and motivated behaviors. Damage to this region, which includes the orbitofrontal cortex as well as ventral sectors of medial PFC, causes profound changes in emotional and social behavior, including impairments in certain aspects of decision making. One reinforcement mechanism that may well contribute to these behaviors is conditioned reinforcement, whereby previously neutral stimuli in the environment, by virtue of their association with primary rewards, take on reinforcing value and come to support instrumental action. Conditioned reinforcers are powerful determinants of behavior and can maintain responding over protracted periods of time in the absence of and potentially in conflict with primary reinforcers. It has already been shown that conditioned reinforcement is dependent on the amygdala, and because the amygdala projects to both the orbitofrontal cortex and the medial PFC, the present study determined whether conditioned reinforcement was also dependent on one or the other of these prefrontal regions. Comparison of the behavioral effects of selective excitotoxic lesions of the PFC in the common marmoset revealed that orbitofrontal but not medial PFC lesions disrupted two distinct measures of conditioned reinforcement: (1) acquisition of a new response and (2) sensitivity to conditioned stimulus omission on a second-order schedule. In contrast, the orbitofrontal lesion did not affect sensitivity to primary reinforcement as measured by responding on a progressive-ratio schedule and a home cage consumption test. Together, these findings demonstrate the critical and specific involvement of the orbitofrontal cortex but not the medial PFC in conditioned reinforcement. PMID:14657178

  4. A difficult surgical approach for primary orbital hydatid cyst: transconjunctival medial orbitotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sendul, Selam Yekta; Ucgul, Cemile; Dirim, Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Acar, Zeynep; Guven, Dilek

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cysts rarely appear isolated in the orbital cavity without involvement of other organs. The cysts are usually located in the retrobulbar region, and may be extraconal or intraconal. Herein we present a case of primary orbital cyst hydatid that is adjacent to the medial rectus muscle and optic nerve in the intraconal space and the difficulties during the surgical and medical treatment period. PMID:26655075

  5. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J; Kis, Viktor; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. PMID:26631464

  6. Late Occurring Medial Migration of a Lag Screw in Gamma Nailing

    PubMed Central

    van Hoef, S.; Fuchs, M. C. H. W.; ten Broeke, R. H. M.

    2016-01-01

    An 81-year-old female was treated for a pertrochanteric multifragmentary fracture of the proximal femur with a third-generation Gamma nail. After 3 months she presented herself again with acute pain and inability to bear weight on the leg. Radiographs showed medial migration of the lag screw. She was treated with a total hip arthroplasty, after which she was successfully discharged. In this case report the possible causes of this late and unusual complication are discussed. PMID:27313926

  7. High tibial osteotomy in the ACL-deficient knee with medial compartment osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Herman, Benjamin V; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) has traditionally been used to treat varus gonarthrosis in younger, active patients. Varus malalignment increases the risk of progression of medial compartment osteoarthritis and an HTO can be performed to realign the mechanical axis of the lower limb towards the lateral compartment, thereby decreasing contact pressures in the medial compartment. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) insufficiency may lead to post-traumatic arthritis due to altered joint loading and associated injuries to the menisci and articular cartilage. Understanding the importance of posterior tibial slope and its role in sagittal knee stability has led to the development of biplane osteotomies designed to flatten the posterior tibial slope in the ACL deficient knee. Altering the alignment in both the sagittal and coronal planes helps improve stability as well as alter the load in the medial compartment. Detailed history, physical exam and radiographic analysis guide treatment decisions in this high demand patient population. Lateral closing wedge (LCW) and medial opening wedge (MOW) HTOs have been performed and their potential advantages and disadvantages have been well described. Given the triangular shape of the proximal tibia, it is imperative that the surgeon pay close attention to the geometry of the osteotomy "gap" when performing MOW HTO to avoid inadvertently increasing the posterior tibial slope. Simultaneous ACL reconstruction may require technique modifications depending on the type of HTO and ACL graft chosen. With appropriate patient selection and good surgical technique, it is reasonable to expect patients to return to activities of daily living and recreational sports without debilitating pain or instability. PMID:27358200

  8. Medial subtalar dislocation associated with fracture of the posterior process of the talus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Zhao, Qun; Zhang, Lijun

    2012-09-01

    A 17-year-old male sustained a medial subtalar fracture dislocation while playing basketball. The dislocation of the subtalar joint was reduced by closed means, but a large, comminuted, displaced posterior process fracture remained. Open reduction and internal fixation through a posteromedial approach was used to restore congruity to the subtalar joint. MRI at 12 months after injury showed no signs of avascular necrosis in the talus.

  9. Cardiorespiratory fitness and preserved medial temporal lobe volume in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Thomas, George P.; Harsha, Amith; Anderson, Heather S.; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Brooks, William M.; Burns, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise and cardiorespiratory (CR) fitness may moderate age-related regional brain changes in nondemented older adults (ND). The relationship of fitness to Alzheimer's disease (AD) related brain change is understudied, particularly in the hippocampus which is disproportionately affected in early AD. The role of apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) genotype in modulating this relationship is also unknown. Nondemented (n=56) and early-stage AD subjects (n=61) over age 65 had MRI and CR fitness assessments. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) techniques were utilized to identify AD-related atrophy. We analyzed the relationship of CR fitness with white and gray matter within groups, assessed fitness-related brain volume change in areas most affected by AD-related atrophy, and then analyzed differential fitness-brain relationships between apoE4 carriers. Atrophy was present in the medial temporal, temporal, and parietal cortices in subjects with mild AD. There was a significant positive correlation of CR fitness with parietal and medial temporal volume in AD subjects. ND subjects did not have a significant relationship between brain volume and CR fitness in the global or SVC analyses. There was not a significant interaction for fitness × apoE4 genotype in either group. In early-stage AD, cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with regional brain volumes in the medial temporal and parietal cortices suggesting that maintaining cardiorespiratory fitness may modify AD-related brain atrophy. PMID:19812458

  10. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  11. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment.

  12. Medial prefrontal depressor response: involvement of the rostral and caudal ventrolateral medulla in the rat.

    PubMed

    Owens, N C; Verberne, A J

    2000-01-14

    The importance of neurones of the caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla (CVLM and RVLM, respectively) in mediation of the medial prefrontal cortex depressor response was studied in halothane-anaesthetised rats. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the RVLM produced by microinjection of bicuculline (50 nl, 2 mM, n = 6) resulted in reversal of the depressor (-9.5 +/- 1.2 mm Hg) and lumbar sympathetic (-6.5 +/- 5.7 units) responses to pressor (+7.8 +/- 3.5 mm Hg) and sympathoexcitatory (+19.3 +/- 12.5 units) responses and simultaneous blockade of baroreceptor reflex-mediated sympathoinhibition. Baroreflex blockade was reflected by a significant reduction in the gain (slope of the blood pressure vs. lumbar sympathetic nerve discharge regression line) of the reflex. Microinjection of the excitatory amino acid antagonist kynurenic acid (100 nl, 50 mM, n = 6) into the CVLM blocked the baroreflex and significantly reduced the depressor (-9.6 +/- 0.4 to -6.9 +/- 0.6 mm Hg) and lumbar sympathetic (-4.0 +/- 2.1 to 2.9 +/- 1.9 units) responses to medial prefrontal cortex stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that the medial prefrontal cortex depressor response is mediated by a pathway which converges at the level of the RVLM and which is only partly dependent on an excitatory input to caudal ventrolateral medullary neurones. PMID:10789686

  13. Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment

    PubMed Central

    Goedert, Kelly M.; Shah, Priyanka; Foundas, Anne L.; Barrett, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Prism adaptation treatment (PAT) is a promising rehabilitative method for functional recovery in persons with spatial neglect. Previous research suggests that PAT improves motor-intentional “aiming” deficits that frequently occur with frontal lesions. To test whether presence of frontal lesions predicted better improvement of spatial neglect after PAT, the current study evaluated neglect-specific improvement in functional activities (assessment with the Catherine Bergego Scale) over time in 21 right-brain-damaged stroke survivors with left-sided spatial neglect. The results demonstrated that neglect patients' functional activities improved after two weeks of PAT and continued improving for four weeks. Such functional improvement did not occur equally in all of the participants: Neglect patients with lesions involving the frontal cortex (n=13) experienced significantly better functional improvement than did those without frontal lesions (n=8). More importantly, voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) revealed that in comparison to the group of patients without frontal lesions, the frontal-lesioned neglect patients had intact regions in the medial temporal areas, the superior temporal areas, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The medial cortical and subcortical areas in the temporal lobe were especially distinguished in the “frontal lesion” group. The findings suggest that the integrity of medial temporal structures may play an important role in supporting functional improvement after PAT. PMID:22941243

  14. Explicit memory in frontotemporal dementia: the role of medial temporal atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lavenu, I; Pasquier, F; Lebert, F; Pruvo, J P; Petit, H

    1998-01-01

    In our memory clinic experience, memory impairment differs widely in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We searched for a correlation between explicit memory disturbance assessed with the Grober and Buschke test and medial temporal atrophy on CT scan in 22 consecutive patients with FTD. Five of the 22 patients had a medial temporal lobe (MTL) atrophy. There was no significant difference between the two groups for the demographic characteristics. Free recall, cued recall and the learning curve were significantly better in patients without MTL atrophy. The patients with MTL atrophy made more intrusions. We found a positive correlation between total recall and cued recall and the mean of medial temporal lobe measurement. These results are in agreement with the role of the hippocampal formation in the memory process. In our group, the ratio of patients with MTL atrophy is similar to the ratio of Pick's disease in frontotemporal dementia. In histological series more severe hippocampal atrophy are reported in Pick's disease. Therefore MTL atrophy on CT scan could be a marker of Pick's disease in FTD. PMID:9524801

  15. Minimally invasive reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament using quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Fink, Christian; Veselko, Matjaz; Herbort, Mirco; Hoser, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) for the treatment of patellar instability has received increased attention over the past few years. Most operative techniques use hamstring grafts fixed with bone tunnels and/or anchors on the patella. Despite good clinical results using these techniques, complications such as implant breakage, patellar fractures through bone tunnels, and loss of knee motion have occurred. We present a minimally invasive technique for MPFL reconstruction using a strip of quadriceps tendon. With the use of specially designed instruments, the graft is harvested through a 3-cm transverse incision at the proximal pole of the patella. The tendon strip is then dissected distally on the patella, left attached, and diverged 90° medially underneath the medial prepatellar tissue. The graft is fixed on the femur in 20° of knee flexion in a bone tunnel with a bioabsorbable interference screw (adults) or a bone anchor (children). We think that this technique presents a valuable alternative to common hamstring techniques for primary MPFL reconstruction in children and adults, as well as for MPFL revision surgery. PMID:25126496

  16. Posterior femoral translation in medial pivot total knee arthroplasty of posterior cruciate ligament retaining type

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Su Hyun; Cho, Hyung Lae; Lee, Soo Ho; Jin, Hong Ki

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report clinical results and demonstrate posterior femoral translation (PFT) in medial pivot total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) retaining type. Materials and methods A prospective study was performed upon thirty consecutive subjects who were operated on with medial pivot TKA of PCL retaining type between March 2009 and March 2010 and had been followed up for at least 2 years. Clinically, the knee society knee score and function score were used. In full extension and active flexion lateral radiograph, anteroposterior (AP) condylar position and magnitude of PFT was determined. Results At last follow-up, the mean knee society knee score and function score improved significantly compared to preoperative scores. The AP condylar positions were consistently posterior to midline throughout the entire range of flexion. The PFTs averaged 0.31 (±0.12) of half length of tibial base plate and were greater in higher flexion cases (r = 0.56, p = 0.0012). There were no cases having either component migration or radiolucent line wider than 2 mm except for one case showing instability related to trauma. Conclusions In medial pivot TKA of PCL retaining type, clinical outcomes were satisfactory and posterior femoral translations were consistently observed during progressive flexions of knees at two- to three-year follow-up. PMID:24403754

  17. The extended supracerebellar transtentorial approach for resection of medial tentorial meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shaheryar F.; Young, Ronald L.; Bohnstedt, Bradley N.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The supracerebellar transtentorial (SCTT) approach has been established as a safe corridor to access the posteriomedial basal temporal region. Previous reports have demonstrated the efficacy of this route in the resection of intrinsic tumors and small arteriovenous malformations. Only one report in the English literature has described its use to resect a medial tentorial meningioma. Methods: The authors discuss the relevant surgical anatomy of this approach and its advantages compared with more traditional routes, and illustrate its application to remove medial tentorial meningiomas through two operative cases with accompanying videos. Results: In illustrative case one, the patient recovered from surgery with no deficits. All his preoperative symptoms had resolved at 3-month follow-up. At the 4-year follow-up, MRI did not demonstrate any growth of the residual tumor. In case two, gross total resection was achieved and the patient did not suffer any postoperative language or visual deficit. At 2-year follow-up, no tumor recurrence was present. Conclusion: The SCTT approach has a potential to safely access extra-axial lesions located around the medial tentorial incisura. As demonstrated in these two cases, the approach merits consideration in patients with tentorial meningiomas as an alternative to more widely utilized skull base approaches and subtemporal routes. PMID:24778923

  18. Medial auditory thalamus is necessary for acquisition and retention of eyeblink conditioning to cochlear nucleus stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Poremba, Amy; Freeman, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Associative learning tasks commonly involve an auditory stimulus, which must be projected through the auditory system to the sites of memory induction for learning to occur. The cochlear nucleus (CN) projection to the pontine nuclei has been posited as the necessary auditory pathway for cerebellar learning, including eyeblink conditioning. However, the medial auditory thalamic nuclei (MATN), consisting of the medial division of the medial geniculate, suprageniculate, and posterior interlaminar nucleus have also been implicated as a critical auditory relay to the pontine nuclei for cerebellum-dependent motor learning. The MATN also conveys auditory information to the amygdala necessary for avoidance and fear conditioning. The current study used CN stimulation to increase activity in the pontine nuclei, relative to a tone stimulus, and possibly provide sufficient input to the cerebellum for acquisition or retention of eyeblink conditioning during MATN inactivation. Primary and secondary effects of CN stimulation and MATN inactivation were examined using 2-deoxy-glucose autoradiography. Stimulation of CN increased activity in the pontine nuclei, however, this increase was not sufficient for cerebellar learning during MATN inactivation. Results of the current experiment provide additional evidence indicating the MATN may be the critical auditory relay for many associative learning tasks. PMID:25878138

  19. Making sense: Dopamine activates conscious self-monitoring through medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Joensson, Morten; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Andersen, Lau M; Gross, Joachim; Mouridsen, Kim; Sandberg, Kristian; Østergaard, Leif; Lou, Hans C

    2015-05-01

    When experiences become meaningful to the self, they are linked to synchronous activity in a paralimbic network of self-awareness and dopaminergic activity. This network includes medial prefrontal and medial parietal/posterior cingulate cortices, where transcranial magnetic stimulation may transiently impair self-awareness. Conversely, we hypothesize that dopaminergic stimulation may improve self-awareness and metacognition (i.e., the ability of the brain to consciously monitor its own cognitive processes). Here, we demonstrate improved noetic (conscious) metacognition by oral administration of 100 mg dopamine in minimal self-awareness. In a separate experiment with extended self-awareness dopamine improved the retrieval accuracy of memories of self-judgment (autonoetic, i.e., explicitly self-conscious) metacognition. Concomitantly, magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed increased amplitudes of oscillations (power) preferentially in the medial prefrontal cortex. Given that electromagnetic activity in this region is instrumental in self-awareness, this explains the specific effect of dopamine on explicit self-awareness and autonoetic metacognition.

  20. Making sense: Dopamine activates conscious self‐monitoring through medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Joensson, Morten; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Andersen, Lau M.; Gross, Joachim; Mouridsen, Kim; Sandberg, Kristian; Østergaard, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When experiences become meaningful to the self, they are linked to synchronous activity in a paralimbic network of self‐awareness and dopaminergic activity. This network includes medial prefrontal and medial parietal/posterior cingulate cortices, where transcranial magnetic stimulation may transiently impair self‐awareness. Conversely, we hypothesize that dopaminergic stimulation may improve self‐awareness and metacognition (i.e., the ability of the brain to consciously monitor its own cognitive processes). Here, we demonstrate improved noetic (conscious) metacognition by oral administration of 100 mg dopamine in minimal self‐awareness. In a separate experiment with extended self‐awareness dopamine improved the retrieval accuracy of memories of self‐judgment (autonoetic, i.e., explicitly self‐conscious) metacognition. Concomitantly, magnetoencephalography (MEG) showed increased amplitudes of oscillations (power) preferentially in the medial prefrontal cortex. Given that electromagnetic activity in this region is instrumental in self‐awareness, this explains the specific effect of dopamine on explicit self‐awareness and autonoetic metacognition. Hum Brain Mapp 36:1866–1877, 2015. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. PMID:25627861

  1. Development of the medial hypothalamus: forming a functional hypothalamic-neurohypophyseal interface.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Caroline Alayne; Placzek, Marysia

    2013-01-01

    The medial hypothalamus is composed of nuclei of the tuberal hypothalamus, the paraventricular nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus, and the neurohypophysis. Its arrangement, around the third ventricle of the brain, above the adenohypophysis, and in direct contact with the vasculature, means that it serves as an interface with circulating systems, providing a key conduit through which the brain can sample, and control, peripheral body systems. Through these interfaces, and interactions with other parts of the brain, the medial hypothalamus centrally governs diverse homeostatic processes, including energy and fluid balance, stress responses, growth, and reproductive behaviors. Here, we summarize recent studies that reveal how the diverse cell types within the medial hypothalamus are assembled in an integrated manner to enable its later function. In particular, we discuss how the temporally protracted operation of signaling pathways and transcription factors governs the appearance and regionalization of the hypothalamic primordium from the prosencephalic territory, the specification and differentiation of progenitors into neurons in organized nuclei, and the establishment of interfaces. Through analyses of mouse, chick, and zebrafish, a picture emerges of an evolutionarily conserved and highly coordinated developmental program. Early indications suggest that deregulation of this program may underlie complex human pathological conditions and dysfunctional behaviors, including stress and eating disorders.

  2. Snow skiing combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament disruptions.

    PubMed

    Barber, F A

    1994-02-01

    Recent reports indicate that combined anterior cruciate ligament/medial collateral ligament (ACL/MCL) knee injuries are usually associated with a lateral meniscus tear. In our center, snow skiing is the athletic activity most frequently associated with this double-ligament injury complex. A sports-specific analysis was undertaken to evaluate the hypothesis that the snow skiing ligament injury is different from similar injuries caused by other athletic activities. Of a total of 64 acute arthroscopically confirmed tears of both the MCL and ACL, 23 were caused by snow skiing and 41 by nonskiing activities. There were fewer lateral meniscus tears in skiers (43%) when compared with the nonskiers (88%). Skiers also had fewer medial meniscus tears (13%) than did nonskiers (37%). No medial meniscus tears occurred in the absence of a lateral meniscus tear. Although 78% of the skiers were women, only 12% of the nonskiers were women. Skiers were older (average age 35 years) than the nonskiers (average age 28 years). The right knee was injured almost twice as frequently as the left. These data suggest that the double (ACL/MCL) ligament injury in skiers might be distinctly different from that in nonskiers.

  3. Single-stage medial open reduction and Pemberton acetabuloplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    PubMed Central

    Baki, Celal; Aydin, Hafiz; Ari, Bünyamin; Özcan, Murat

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the long-term clinical and radiological results of single-stage open reduction through a medial approach and Pemberton acetabuloplasty in developmental dysplasia of the hip. We treated 32 hips (22 patients) with developmental dysplasia by a single-stage open reduction through Ferguson’s medial approach and Pemberton acetabuloplasty. The procedure was performed bilaterally in 10 patients. The mean age of the patients at the time of the operation was 19.8 months (16–24 months). The mean follow-up period was 10.9 years (7–19 years). Group I avascular necrosis according to the Kalamchi and MacEwen classification was observed in two hips and group II in one hip. Radiologically, 90.6% of the hips were classified as Severin class I and 9.4% of the hips were classified as Severin class II. At the latest follow-up, 30 hips were assessed clinically as excellent and two hips as good. No patient required subsequent surgery. We conclude that single-stage medial open reduction and Pemberton acetabuloplasty represent an effective method for developmental dysplasia of the hip in children older than 15 months of age. PMID:27379670

  4. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful.

  5. Abnormal functional connectivity of the medial cortex in euthymic bipolar II disorder.

    PubMed

    Marchand, William R; Lee, James N; Johnson, Susanna; Gale, Phillip; Thatcher, John

    2014-06-01

    This project utilized functional MRI (fMRI) and a motor activation paradigm to investigate neural circuitry in euthymic bipolar II disorder. We hypothesized that circuitry involving the cortical midline structures (CMS) would demonstrate abnormal functional connectivity. Nineteen subjects with recurrent bipolar disorder and 18 controls were studied using fMRI and a motor activation paradigm. We used functional connectivity analyses to identify circuits with aberrant connectivity. We found increased functional connectivity among bipolar subjects compared to healthy controls in two CMS circuits. One circuit included the medial aspect of the left superior frontal gyrus and the dorsolateral region of the left superior frontal gyrus. The other included the medial aspect of the right superior frontal gyrus, the dorsolateral region of the left superior frontal gyrus and the right medial frontal gyrus and surrounding region. Our results indicate that CMS circuit dysfunction persists in the euthymic state and thus may represent trait pathology. Future studies should address whether these circuits contribute to relapse of illness. Our results also suggest the possibility that aberrations of superior frontal circuitry may impact default mode network and cognitive processes.

  6. Management of Acute Combined ACL-Medial and Posteromedial Instability of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Medvecky, Michael J; Tomaszewski, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injuries are the most common ligamentous injury of the knee. The extent of injury can range from a minor first-degree (1-degree) sprain to an extensive third-degree (3-degree) sprain that can propagate across the knee, rupturing one or both cruciate ligaments, and result in a knee subluxation or dislocation. A common pattern involves the combined anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and MCL injury that is the focus of this chapter. The vast majority of these combined medial-sided injuries are treated nonoperatively with delayed reconstruction of the ACL injury in athletically active individuals. The MCL and associated medial structures are carefully assessed on physical examination, and classification of injury is based upon abnormal limits of joint motion. In vitro cadaveric biomechanical testing has given us a better understanding of ligament deficiency and altered joint motion. Consistency in terminology is necessary for proper classification of injury and reproducible categorization of injury patterns to be able to compare both nonoperative and operative treatment of various injury patterns.

  7. Posterior sternoclavicular Salter-Harris fracture-dislocation in a patient with unossified medial clavicle epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Nicholas; Crawford, Lindsay

    2016-08-01

    Sternoclavicular injuries are relatively rare, composing less than 1 % of all musculoskeletal fractures or dislocations. When sternoclavicular injuries do occur, they typically present as an isolated dislocation of the sternoclavicular joint without associated fracture of the clavicle or manubrium. However, in patients with unfused medial clavicle physis, sternoclavicular joint injuries can present as a fracture-dislocation through the unfused physis. These physeal injuries are important to recognize as the displaced epiphysis can block reduction of the sternoclavicular joint. We present a case of a 15-year-old female basketball player presenting with suspected sternoclavicular joint injury after sustaining a direct blow to the left shoulder. An initial shoulder CT confirmed the presence of the clinically suspected posterior sternoclavicular dislocation without fracture identified. An MRI of the left sternoclavicular joint was then performed for suspected physeal fracture, which confirmed the presence of a fracture through the medial clavicle physis with anterior displacement of the unossified epiphysis, blocking reduction of the metaphysis. Given the findings on MRI, the pediatric orthropedic surgeon was able to counsel the family of the high likelihood of failed closed reduction of the sternoclavicular joint requiring conversion to open reduction and internal fixation. The patient underwent successful open reduction and internal fixation of the medial clavical physeal fracture after an initial gentle attempt at closed reduction was unsuccessful. PMID:27107998

  8. New Semantic Learning in Patients With Large Medial Temporal Lobe Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, P.J.; O'Reilly, R.C.; Curran, T.; Squire, L.R.

    2008-01-01

    Two patients with large lesions of the medial temporal lobe were given four tests of semantic knowledge that could only have been acquired after the onset of their amnesia. In contrast to previous studies of postmorbid semantic learning, correct answers could be based on a simple, nonspecific sense of familiarity about single words, faces, or objects. According to recent computational models (for example, Norman and O'Reilly (2003) Psychol Rev 110:611–646), this characteristic should be optimal for detecting the kind of semantic learning that might be supported directly by the neocortex. Both patients exhibited some capacity for new learning, albeit at a level substantially below control performances. Notably, the correct answers appeared to reflect declarative memory. It was not the case that the correct answers simply popped out in some automatic way in the absence of any additional knowledge about the items. Rather, the few correct choices made by the patients tended to be accompanied by additional information about the chosen items, and the available knowledge appeared to be similar qualitatively to the kind of factual knowledge that healthy individuals gradually acquire over the years. The results are consistent with the idea that neocortical structures outside the medial temporal lobe are able to support some semantic learning, albeit to a very limited extent. Alternatively, the small amount of learning detected in the present study could depend on tissue within the posterior medial temporal lobe that remains intact in both patients. PMID:18306299

  9. Estimation of forensic age using substages of ossification of the medial clavicle in living individuals.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan; Can, Ismail Ozgur; Aksoy, Sema; Sayin, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    Forensic age estimation based on staging of ossification of the medial clavicular bone is one of the methods recommended by the Study Group on Forensic Age Diagnostics of the German Association of Forensic Medicine. In the present study, we analyzed the stages of ossification of the medial clavicular epiphyses on thin-sliced (1 mm) computed tomography (CT) images using the substages defined within stages 2 and 3. The retrospective CT analysis involved 193 subjects (129 males, 64 females) ranging in age from 13 to 28 years. Spearman's correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation between age and ossification stage in both male and female subjects. Stage 3c was first observed at 19 years of age in both sexes and may thus serve as a valuable forensic marker for determining an age of 18 years. Although further research is needed on the ossification stages of the medial clavicular epiphyses, the present findings could contribute to existing reports on observers' experiences using CT analysis of ossification combined with analysis of substages.

  10. The medial sural artery perforator flap and its application in electrical injury to the hand.

    PubMed

    Jeevaratnam, J A; Nikkhah, D; Nugent, N F; Blackburn, A V

    2014-11-01

    We describe the use of a free medial sural artery perforator flap to reconstruct a complex composite defect to the dorsum of the right index finger following a low voltage electrical injury. The resulting defect was a 3.5 × 5 cm full thickness wound, with segmental tendon loss and loss of underlying periosteum. Due to both size and local vascular injury related to the mechanism, free tissue transfer was felt to be the most reliable option to resurface the composite defect in a single stage. The medial sural artery perforator flap, for reasons outlined below, was felt to be the best option: 1. Thin profile. 2. Vascularised fascia can be taken as a tongue, adjacent to the skin paddle: a gliding surface to prevent the tendon graft sticking to exposed bone. 3. Long pedicle: micro-anastomosis away from zone of injury. 4. Little donor site morbidity: can be closed directly (if <6 cm wide) and does not require sacrifice of any major blood vessel. 5. Can be harvested with nerve and tendon from the same wound. 6. Can include as little or as much tissue required and compared to other fasciocutaneous flaps matches the texture and thickness of the hand most closely. We describe the reconstruction of the composite defect on day 42 post-injury, following one prior debridement. This case highlights the versatility and suitability of the medial sural artery flap in the reconstruction of complex hand burns with resulting composite defects.

  11. Integrity of medial temporal structures may predict better improvement of spatial neglect with prism adaptation treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peii; Goedert, Kelly M; Shah, Priyanka; Foundas, Anne L; Barrett, A M

    2014-09-01

    Prism adaptation treatment (PAT) is a promising rehabilitative method for functional recovery in persons with spatial neglect. Previous research suggests that PAT improves motor-intentional "aiming" deficits that frequently occur with frontal lesions. To test whether presence of frontal lesions predicted better improvement of spatial neglect after PAT, the current study evaluated neglect-specific improvement in functional activities (assessment with the Catherine Bergego Scale) over time in 21 right-brain-damaged stroke survivors with left-sided spatial neglect. The results demonstrated that neglect patients' functional activities improved after two weeks of PAT and continued improving for four weeks. Such functional improvement did not occur equally in all of the participants: Neglect patients with lesions involving the frontal cortex (n = 13) experienced significantly better functional improvement than did those without frontal lesions (n = 8). More importantly, voxel-based lesion-behavior mapping (VLBM) revealed that in comparison to the group of patients without frontal lesions, the frontal-lesioned neglect patients had intact regions in the medial temporal areas, the superior temporal areas, and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. The medial cortical and subcortical areas in the temporal lobe were especially distinguished in the "frontal lesion" group. The findings suggest that the integrity of medial temporal structures may play an important role in supporting functional improvement after PAT.

  12. Acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot after playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Lauchlan; Hame, Sharon L; Levine, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Compartment syndrome of the foot is an uncommon event. The most common cause of compartment syndrome of the foot is a crush injury. Exceedingly rare is acute compartment syndrome of the foot occurring in the absence of trauma. We describe the clinical scenario involving a 23-year-old healthy male who developed acute exertional compartment syndrome isolated to the medial compartment of the foot after playing basketball. The patient had no evidence of injury nor trauma, and the diagnosis was made based on physical exam, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and compartment pressure measurements. The patient did undergo successful fasciotomy on the day of presentation to the emergency department and has since completely recovered. We found four cases reported in the literature of acute exertional medial compartment syndrome of the foot in the absence of trauma or injury. This is the second case reported after playing basketball, while the others occurred after aerobics, a long distance run, and football. The most recent case was reported by Miozzari et al. [Am J Sports Med. 36(5):983-6, 2008] and involved a marathon runner who developed an isolated medial compartment syndrome of the foot. We would like to increase awareness of this uncommon clinical presentation in the absence of trauma and present the dramatic radiographic findings.

  13. CRF alters the infundibular LHRH secretory system from the medial preoptic area of female rats: possible involvement of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Rivest, S; Plotsky, P M; Rivier, C

    1993-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a potent factor involved in the antireproductive effects of various stressors. However, the central mechanisms by which CRF modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis are not well understood. In order to verify whether CRF is able to directly influence luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretory activity at the level of the medial preoptic area (MPOA), CRF was chronically or acutely injected bilaterally into this hypothalamic area. Ten days before the experiments, female rats were implanted with a permanent double-guide cannula which was stereotaxically positioned close to the MPOA. Chronic administration of rat CRF (rCRF) was accomplished by means of two miniosmotic pumps connected to double internal cannula. Acute bilateral infusion of rCRF into the MPOA was performed in unrestrained ovariectomized (OVX) rats and during the afternoon of proestrus. Ten minutes before rCRF treatment, antagonists of opioid receptors (mu, mu 1, or kappa) were infused bilaterally into the MPOA. Hypothalamic LHRH release as well as circulating gonadotropins were determined using a push-pull cannula implanted into the median eminence (ME), and a catheter connected to the jugular vein, respectively. Chronic rCRF treatment in the MPOA decreased (p < 0.05) plasma LH levels but did not modify follicle-stimulating hormone release in OVX rats. A significant inhibition of LH secretion was first observed 80 min after the acute rCRF infusion into the MPOA; pretreatment with nor-Binaltorphimine (antagonist of kappa-receptors) did not measurably attenuate this effect. In contrast, bilateral administration of beta-Funaltrexamine (antagonist of mu-opioid receptors) or naloxonazine (mu 1-antagonist) partially attenuated the inhibitory effect of rCRF on plasma LH levels. Similarly, injections of rCRF bilaterally into the MPOA suppressed hypothalamic LHRH release into the ME and this effect was partially reversed by a previous

  14. D1 receptor-mediated inhibition of medial prefrontal cortex neurons is disrupted in adult rats exposed to amphetamine in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Paul, K; Hankosky, E R; Cox, C L; Gulley, J M

    2016-06-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) exposure leads to changes in behavior and dopamine receptor function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since dopamine plays an important role in regulating GABAergic transmission in the PFC, we investigated if AMPH exposure induces long-lasting changes in dopamine's ability to modulate inhibitory transmission in the PFC as well as whether the effects of AMPH differed depending on the age of exposure. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given saline or 3 mg/kg AMPH (i.p.) repeatedly during adolescence or adulthood and following a withdrawal period of up to 5 weeks (Experiment 1) or up to 14 weeks (Experiment 2), they were sacrificed for in vitro whole-cell recordings in layer V/VI of the medial PFC. We found that in brain slices from either adolescent- or adult-exposed rats, there was an attenuation of dopamine-induced increases in inhibitory synaptic currents in pyramidal cells. These effects did not depend on age of exposure, were mediated at least partially by a reduced sensitivity of D1 receptors in AMPH-treated rats, and were associated with an enhanced behavioral response to the drug in a separate group of rats given an AMPH challenge following the longest withdrawal period. Together, these data reveal a prolonged effect of AMPH exposure on medial PFC function that persisted for up to 14 weeks in adolescent-exposed animals. These long-lasting neurophysiological changes may be a contributing mechanism to the behavioral consequences that have been observed in those with a history of amphetamine abuse. PMID:26946269

  15. Inversion/Eversion Strength Dysbalance in Patients With Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Oguz; Özgürbüz, Cengizhan; Ergün, Metin; Işlegen, Çetin; Taskiran, Emin; Denerel, Nevzad; Ertat, Ahmet

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of the study is to investigate the inversion/eversion muscle strength balance of the ankle in patients with medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). A dysbalance of these muscles may play a role in the pathophysiology of MTSS. Another aim is to measure the medial longitudinal arch and navicular drop in patients with MTSS. A total of 11 patients diagnosed with MTSS in the outpatient clinic of Ege University School of Medicine Sports Medicine Department were enrolled in this study. The control group consisted of 11 regularly exercising individuals. The mean age of the patient group and the control group was 21. 0 ± 1.9 years (18-23 years) and 23.2 ± 2.9 years (18-27 years), respectively. A detailed exercise questionnaire was administered to all subjects. Isokinetic muscle strength testing was performed at 30°/sec and 120°/sec to assess invertor and evertor muscle strength of the ankle. Photographs of the weight bearing and non-weight bearing foot were taken to measure the medial longitudinal arch deformation and the navicular drop. At 30°/sec, the average eversion concentric strength was significantly higher in the patient group, and the inversion/eversion strength ratio was significantly higher in the control group (p < 0.05). At 120°/sec velocity, average concentric eversion strength was significantly higher in the patient group (p < 0.05). The measurements of pronation indicators did not reveal any statistically significant differences between the two groups (p > 0.05). MTSS may occur without an increase of pronation indicators like medial longitudinal arch deformation or navicular drop. In such cases, one of the predisposing factors may be the strength dysbalance of the invertor/evertor muscles in favour of the evertor muscles. This observation may be of additional value in the prevention and therapy of MTSS. Key points At 30°/sec, the average eversion concentric strength was significantly higher in the MTSS group, and the inversion

  16. Dynamic Simulation of the Effects of Graft Fixation Errors During Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Elias, John J.; Kelly, Michael J.; Smith, Kathryn E.; Gall, Kenneth A.; Farr, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is performed to prevent recurrent instability, but errors in femoral fixation can elevate graft tension. Hypothesis: Errors related to femoral fixation will overconstrain the patella and increase medial patellofemoral pressures. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Five knees with patellar instability were represented with computational models. Kinematics during knee extension were characterized from computational reconstruction of motion performed within a dynamic computed tomography (CT) scanner. Multibody dynamic simulation of knee extension, with discrete element analysis used to quantify contact pressures, was performed for the preoperative condition and after MPFL reconstruction. A standard femoral attachment and graft resting length were set for each knee. The resting length was decreased by 2 mm, and the femoral attachment was shifted 5 mm posteriorly. The simulated errors were also combined. Root-mean-square errors were quantified for the comparison of preoperative patellar lateral shift and tilt between computationally reconstructed motion and dynamic simulation. Simulation output was compared between the preoperative and MPFL reconstruction conditions with repeated-measures Friedman tests and Dunnett comparisons against a control, which was the standard MPFL condition, with statistical significance set at P < .05. Results: Root-mean-square errors for simulated patellar tilt and shift were 5.8° and 3.3 mm, respectively. Patellar lateral tracking for the preoperative condition was significantly larger near full extension compared with the standard MPFL reconstruction (mean differences of 8 mm and 13° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°), and lateral tracking was significantly smaller for a posterior femoral attachment (mean differences of 3 mm and 4° for shift and tilt, respectively, at 0°). The maximum medial pressure was also larger for the short graft with a

  17. Medial thalamic 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock correlates with subsequent learned helpless behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mirrione,M.M.; Mirrione, M.M.; Schulz, D.; Dewey, S.L.; Henn, F.A.

    2009-12-06

    The learned helplessness paradigm has been repeatedly shown to correlate with neurobiological aspects of depression in humans. In this model, rodents are exposed inescapable foot-shock in order to reveal susceptibility to escape deficit, defined as 'learned helplessness' (LH). Few methods are available to probe the neurobiological aspects underlying the differences in susceptibility in the living animal, thus far being limited to studies examining regional neurochemical changes with microdialysis. With the widespread implementation of small animal neuroimaging methods, including positron emission tomography (PET), it is now possible to explore the living brain on a systems level to define regional changes that may correlate with vulnerability to stress. In this study, 12 wild type Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 minutes of inescapable foot-shock followed by metabolic imaging using 2-deoxy-2[{sup 18}F]fluoro-D-glucose (18-FDG) 1 hour later. The escape test was performed on these rats 48 hours later (to accommodate radiotracer decay), where they were given the opportunity to press a lever to shut off the shock. A region of interest (ROI) analysis was used to investigate potential correlations (Pearson Regression Coefficients) between regional 18-FDG uptake following inescapable shock and subsequent learned helpless behavior (time to finish the test; number of successful lever presses within 20 seconds of shock onset). ROI analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between time to finish and 18-FDG uptake, and a negative correlation between lever presses and uptake, in the medial thalamic area (p=0.033, p=0.036). This ROI included the paraventricular thalamus, mediodorsal thalamus, and the habenula. In an effort to account for possible spillover artifact, the posterior thalamic area (including ventral medial and lateral portions) was also evaluated but did not reveal significant correlations (p=0.870, p=0.897). No other significant correlations were

  18. Neural tube closure in Xenopus laevis involves medial migration, directed protrusive activity, cell intercalation and convergent extension.

    PubMed

    Davidson, L A; Keller, R E

    1999-10-01

    We have characterized the cell movements and prospective cell identities as neural folds fuse during neural tube formation in Xenopus laevis. A newly developed whole-mount, two-color fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization method, visualized with confocal microscopy, shows that the dorsal neural tube gene xpax3 and the neural-crest-specific gene xslug are expressed far lateral to the medial site of neural fold fusion and that expression moves medially after fusion. To determine whether cell movements or dynamic changes in gene expression are responsible, we used low-light videomicroscopy followed by fluorescent in situ and confocal microscopy. These methods revealed that populations of prospective neural crest and dorsal neural tube cells near the lateral margin of the neural plate at the start of neurulation move to the dorsal midline using distinctive forms of motility. Before fold fusion, superficial neural cells apically contract, roll the neural plate into a trough and appear to pull the superficial epidermal cell sheet medially. After neural fold fusion, lateral deep neural cells move medially by radially intercalating between other neural cells using two types of motility. The neural crest cells migrate as individual cells toward the dorsal midline using medially directed monopolar protrusions. These movements combine the two lateral populations of neural crest into a single medial population that form the roof of the neural tube. The remaining cells of the dorsal neural tube extend protrusions both medially and laterally bringing about radial intercalation of deep and superficial cells to form a single-cell-layered, pseudostratified neural tube. While ours is the first description of medially directed cell migration during neural fold fusion and re-establishment of the neural tube, these complex cell behaviors may be involved during cavitation of the zebrafish neural keel and secondary neurulation in the posterior axis of chicken and mouse.

  19. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  20. Partial stabilization-based guidance.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, M H; Binazadeh, T

    2012-01-01

    A novel nonlinear missile guidance law against maneuvering targets is designed based on the principles of partial stability. It is demonstrated that in a real approach which is adopted with actual situations, each state of the guidance system must have a special behavior and asymptotic stability or exponential stability of all states is not realistic. Thus, a new guidance law is developed based on the partial stability theorem in such a way that the behaviors of states in the closed-loop system are in conformity with a real guidance scenario that leads to collision. The performance of the proposed guidance law in terms of interception time and control effort is compared with the sliding mode guidance law by means of numerical simulations.

  1. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  2. Medial transposition of split lateral rectus augmented with fixation sutures in cases of complete third nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Rohit; Sharma, Medha; Singh, Digvijay; Dhiman, Rebika; Sharma, Pradeep

    2016-05-01

    Surgical management of complete third nerve paralysis is a challenge. While several techniques have been described over the years, they result in less than satisfactory outcomes with residual deviations in primary gaze or postoperative drifts. One of the described techniques for management of oculomotor palsy has been medial transposition of the lateral rectus muscle which provides a good surgical alternative but often can result in undercorrection. We describe a modification of the existing technique of medial transposition of the split lateral rectus by force augmentation through the use of equatorial fixation sutures resulting in an improved outcome in primary gaze alignment. The modified technique involves splitting of the lateral rectus into two halves followed by transposing the superior half from below the superior oblique and superior rectus and inferior half from below the inferior oblique and inferior rectus to attach them at the superior and inferior edge of the medial rectus insertion, respectively. This is followed by placing non-absorbable sutures to fix each split belly of the transposed muscles to the sclera at the equator adjacent to the medial rectus such that the split muscles lie nearly parallel to the medial rectus till the equator before reflecting away. These sutures augment the force of the transposed muscles by redirecting the force vectors in the direction of action of the medial rectus. Satisfactory postoperative primary gaze alignment was achieved in three cases of complete third nerve paralysis.

  3. Individual Differences in Some (But Not All) Medial Prefrontal Regions Reflect Cognitive Demand While Regulating Unpleasant Emotion

    PubMed Central

    Urry, Heather L.; van Reekum, Carien M.; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the premise that individual differences in autonomic physiology could be used to specify the nature and consequences of information processing taking place in medial prefrontal regions during cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant emotion. Neural (blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) and autonomic (electrodermal, pupil diameter, cardiac acceleration) signals were recorded simultaneously as twenty-six older people (ages 64-66 years) used reappraisal to increase, maintain, or decrease their responses to unpleasant pictures. EDA was higher when increasing and lower when decreasing compared to maintaining. This suggested modulation of emotional arousal by reappraisal. By contrast, pupil diameter and cardiac acceleration were higher when increasing and decreasing compared to maintaining. This suggested modulation of cognitive demand. Importantly, reappraisal-related activation (increase, decrease > maintain) in two medial prefrontal regions (dorsal medial frontal gyrus and dorsal cingulate cortex) was correlated with greater cardiac acceleration (increase, decrease > maintain) and monotonic changes in EDA (increase > maintain > decrease). These data indicate that these two medial prefrontal regions are involved in the allocation of cognitive resources to regulate unpleasant emotion, and that they modulate emotional arousal in accordance with the regulatory goal. The emotional arousal effects were mediated by the right amygdala. Reappraisal-related activation in a third medial prefrontal region (subgenual anterior cingulate cortex) was not associated with similar patterns of change in any of the autonomic measures, thus highlighting regional specificity in the degree to which cognitive demand is reflected in medial prefrontal activation during reappraisal. PMID:19486944

  4. A reduced progenitor pool population accounts for the rudimentary appearance of the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium in birds.

    PubMed

    Charvet, Christine J

    2010-01-01

    To date, most studies comparing birds and mammals have focused on the similarities in brain development, architecture and connectivity. However, major differences in size, anatomy and organization exist in the telencephalon of adult birds and mammals. For instance, the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium of birds appear rudimentary compared with those of mammals. To identify the developmental processes that give rise to this difference in size and anatomy of the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium, the thickness of the ventricular zone that encompasses these regions was measured in embryonic birds (i.e. chickens, sparrows) and mammals (i.e. rabbits, hedgehogs, shrews, platypus). Cumulative bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling in chickens at embryonic day 7 and 8 was also used to examine levels of cell proliferation in the ventricular zone of the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium. The study's main finding is that the ventricular zone of the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium is thinner in birds than in mammals. In chickens, the septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium ventricular zone harbor few proliferating (i.e. BrdU+) cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that a reduced progenitor pool population account for the 'rudimentary' appearance of the avian septum, medial pallium and dorsal pallium. PMID:21135539

  5. Individual differences in some (but not all) medial prefrontal regions reflect cognitive demand while regulating unpleasant emotion.

    PubMed

    Urry, Heather L; van Reekum, Carien M; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J

    2009-09-01

    The present study investigated the premise that individual differences in autonomic physiology could be used to specify the nature and consequences of information processing taking place in medial prefrontal regions during cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant pictures. Neural (blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging) and autonomic (electrodermal [EDA], pupil diameter, cardiac acceleration) signals were recorded simultaneously as twenty-six older people (ages 64-66 years) used reappraisal to increase, maintain, or decrease their responses to unpleasant pictures. EDA was higher when increasing and lower when decreasing compared to maintaining. This suggested modulation of emotional arousal by reappraisal. By contrast, pupil diameter and cardiac acceleration were higher when increasing and decreasing compared to maintaining. This suggested modulation of cognitive demand. Importantly, reappraisal-related activation (increase, decrease>maintain) in two medial prefrontal regions (dorsal medial frontal gyrus and dorsal cingulate gyrus) was correlated with greater cardiac acceleration (increase, decrease>maintain) and monotonic changes in EDA (increase>maintain>decrease). These data indicate that these two medial prefrontal regions are involved in the allocation of cognitive resources to regulate unpleasant emotion, and that they modulate emotional arousal in accordance with the regulatory goal. The emotional arousal effects were mediated by the right amygdala. Reappraisal-related activation in a third medial prefrontal region (subgenual anterior cingulate cortex) was not associated with similar patterns of change in any of the autonomic measures, thus highlighting regional specificity in the degree to which cognitive demand is reflected in medial prefrontal activation during reappraisal. PMID:19486944

  6. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal but not saggital plane motion during jump landing in highly trained women athletes

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Michael F; Denegar, Craig R; Horn, Elaine; MacDougall, Bradley; Rahl, Michael; Sheehan, Jessica; Trojian, Thomas; Anderson, Jeffery M; Clark, James E; Kraemer, William J

    2010-01-01

    Lower extremity mechanics during landing have been linked to traumatic and nontraumatic knee injuries, particularly in women’s athletics. The effects of efforts to mitigate these risks have not been fully elucidated. We previously reported that a 5° medial wedge reduced ankle eversion and knee valgus. In the present report we further investigated the effect of a 5° medial wedge inserted in the shoes of female athletes on frontal plane hip motion, as well as ankle, knee, hip, and trunk saggital plane motion during a jump landing task. Kinematic data were obtained from 10 intercollegiate female athletes during jump landings from a 31 cm platform with and without a 5° medial wedge. Hip adduction was reduced 1.98° (95% CI 0.97–2.99°) by the medial wedge but saggital plane motions were unaffected. A 5° medial wedge reduces frontal plane motion and takes the knee away from a position associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Although frontal plane motion was not captured it is unlikely to have increased in a bilateral landing task. Thus, it is likely that greater muscle forces were generated in these highly trained athletes to dissipate ground reaction forces when a medial wedge was in place. Additional investigation in younger and lesser trained athletes is warranted to assess the impact of orthotic devices on knee joint mechanics. PMID:24198539

  7. Can complex visual discrimination deficits in amnesia be attributed to the medial temporal lobe? An investigation into the effects of medial temporal lobe damage on brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rudebeck, Sarah R; Filippini, Nicola; Lee, Andy C H

    2013-01-01

    It has been suggested that complex visual discrimination deficits in patients with medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage may be explained by damage or dysfunction beyond the MTL. We examined the resting functional networks and white matter connectivity of two amnesic patients who have consistently demonstrated discrimination impairments for complex object and/or spatial stimuli across a number of studies. Although exploratory analyses revealed some significant differences in comparison with neurologically healthy controls (more specifically in the patient with a larger MTL lesion), there were no obvious findings involving posterior occipital or posterior temporal regions, which can account entirely for their discrimination deficits. These findings converge with previous work to support the suggestion that the MTL does not subserve long-term declarative memory exclusively.

  8. Knee extensor loss and proximal tibial soft tissue defect managed successfully with simultaneous medial gastrocnemius flap, saphenous fasciocutaneous flap and medial hemisoleus flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Open fractures of the proximal tibia often pose serious challenges to the treating orthopedic surgeon. Management of these complex injuries becomes difficult if they are associated with damage to the extensor mechanism and an exposed knee joint. The scenario becomes more difficult to manage when the soft tissue defect extends to the middle third of the leg. We report a case where we used an extended medial gastrocnemius flap in combination with a saphenous artery fasciocutaneous flap and a medial hemisoleus flap for treatment of an infected proximal tibia fracture with loss of the extensor mechanism and soft tissue defect. To the best of our knowledge, combined use of these three flaps for the management of such injuries has not been reported elsewhere to date. Case presentation A 28-year-old Indian man presented to our Out-patient Department with complaints of pain and pus discharge from his left proximal leg for four weeks. He had sustained an open fracture of his left proximal tibia in a road traffic accident five weeks ago and had been operated on elsewhere. He had a stiff, painful knee with an infected wound of 4×4cm over the proximal third of his leg exposing infected, necrotic patellar tendon. He was successfully managed with debridement and simultaneously elevated flaps as described. Conclusions This procedure avoids the donor site morbidity associated with free flaps harvested from sites distant from the site of injury, and also does not need the expertise of microvascular reconstruction. To the best of our knowledge, this is also the first report of the combined use of three local flaps for knee extensor reconstruction and soft tissue coverage around the knee. PMID:23506268

  9. Effects of Prepubertal or Adult Site-Specific Knockdown of Estrogen Receptor β in the Medial Preoptic Area and Medial Amygdala on Social Behaviors in Male Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Mariko; Sano, Kazuhiro; Musatov, Sergei; Sakamoto, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Testosterone, after being converted to estradiol in the brain, acts on estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) and controls the expression of male-type social behavior. Previous studies in male mice have revealed that ERα expressed in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) and medial amygdala (MeA) are differently involved in the regulation of sexual and aggressive behaviors by testosterone action at the time of testing in adult and/or on brain masculinization process during pubertal period. However, a role played by ERβ in these brain regions still remains unclear. Here we examined the effects of site-specific knockdown of ERβ (βERKD) in the MPOA and MeA on male social behaviors with the use of adeno-associated viral mediated RNA interference methods in ICR/Jcl mice. Prepubertal βERKD in the MPOA revealed that continuous suppression of ERβ gene expression throughout the pubertal period and adulthood decreased aggressive but not sexual behavior tested as adults. Because βERKD in the MPOA only in adulthood did not affect either sexual or aggressive behaviors, it was concluded that pubertal ERβ in the MPOA might have an essential role for the full expression of aggressive behavior in adulthood. On the other hand, although neither prepubertal nor adult βERKD in the MeA had any effects on sexual and aggressive behavior, βERKD in adulthood disrupted sexual preference of receptive females over nonreceptive females. Collectively, these results suggest that ERβ in the MPOA and MeA are involved in the regulation of male sexual and aggressive behavior in a manner substantially different from that of ERα. PMID:27066533

  10. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  11. Damage to the medial motor system in stroke patients with motor neglect

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Raffaella; Bouhali, Florence; Rastelli, Federica; Ferrieux, Sophie; Arbizu, Celine; Vincent, Stephane; Pradat-Diehl, Pascale; Bartolomeo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives: Motor neglect (MN) is a clinically important condition whereby patients with unilateral brain lesions fail to move their contralateral limbs, despite normal muscle strength, reflexes, and sensation. MN has been associated with various lesion sites, including the parietal and frontal cortex, the internal capsule, the lenticulostriate nuclei, and the thalamus. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that MN depends on a dysfunction of the medial motor system by performing a detailed anatomical analysis in four patients with MN. Methods: Ten patients participated in the study: four with MN, four with left visual neglect but without MN, and three patients with left hemiplegia without MN. We used specific scales for clinical and neuropsychological assessment. We drew the lesion borders directly onto the original brain images of each patient, and plotted the lesions on anatomical atlases for gray and white matter. Results: Lesion locations were highly heterogeneous in our MN patients, and included frontal and parietal sites, basal ganglia, and white matter. The only consistently damaged structure across all MN patients was the cingulum bundle, a major pathway of the medial motor system important for motor initiative, and a key connection with limbic structures crucial for motivational aspects of actions. Three MN patients with additional damage to lateral fronto-parietal networks had also signs of contralesional visual neglect. The cingulum bundle was intact in all the control patients with visual neglect or hemiplegia. Conclusions: Cingulum damage may induce MN through unilateral dysfunction of the medial motor system. Additional lateral fronto-parietal dysfunction can result in the association with visual neglect. PMID:24966826

  12. Chronic shin splints. Classification and management of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Detmer, D E

    1986-01-01

    A clinical classification and treatment programme has been developed for chronic medial tibial stress syndrome. Medial tibial stress syndrome has been reported to be either tibial stress fracture or microfracture, tibial periostitis, or distal deep posterior chronic compartment syndrome. Three chronic types exist and may coexist: Type I (tibial microfracture, bone stress reaction or cortical fracture); type II (periostalgia from chronic avulsion of the periosteum at the periosteal-fascial junction); and type III (chronic compartment syndrome syndrome). Type I disease is treated nonoperatively. Operations for resistant types II and III medial tibial stress syndrome were performed in 41 patients. Bilaterality was common (type II, 50% type III, 88%). Seven had coexistent type II/III; one had type I/II. Preoperative symptoms averaged 24 months in type II, 6 months in type III, and 33 months in types II/III. Mean age was 22 years (15 to 51). Resting compartment pressures were normal in type II (mean 12 mm Hg) and elevated in type III and type II/III (mean 23 mm Hg). Type II and type II/III patients received fasciotomy plus periosteal cauterisation. Type III patients had fasciotomy only. All procedures were performed on an outpatient basis using local anaesthesia. Follow up was complete and averaged 6 months (2 to 14 months). Improved performance was as follows: type II, 93%, type III, 100%; type II/III, 86%. Complete cures were as follows: type II, 78%; type III, 75%; and type II/III, 57%. This experience suggests that with precise diagnosis and treatment involving minimal risk and cost the athlete has a reasonable chance of return to full activity.

  13. Conserved size and periodicity of pyramidal patches in layer 2 of medial/caudal entorhinal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Robert K.; Ray, Saikat; Prokop, Stefan; Las, Liora; Heppner, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand the structural basis of grid cell activity, we compare medial entorhinal cortex architecture in layer 2 across five mammalian species (Etruscan shrews, mice, rats, Egyptian fruit bats, and humans), bridging ∼100 million years of evolutionary diversity. Principal neurons in layer 2 are divided into two distinct cell types, pyramidal and stellate, based on morphology, immunoreactivity, and functional properties. We confirm the existence of patches of calbindin‐positive pyramidal cells across these species, arranged periodically according to analyses techniques like spatial autocorrelation, grid scores, and modifiable areal unit analysis. In rodents, which show sustained theta oscillations in entorhinal cortex, cholinergic innervation targeted calbindin patches. In bats and humans, which only show intermittent entorhinal theta activity, cholinergic innervation avoided calbindin patches. The organization of calbindin‐negative and calbindin‐positive cells showed marked differences in entorhinal subregions of the human brain. Layer 2 of the rodent medial and the human caudal entorhinal cortex were structurally similar in that in both species patches of calbindin‐positive pyramidal cells were superimposed on scattered stellate cells. The number of calbindin‐positive neurons in a patch increased from ∼80 in Etruscan shrews to ∼800 in humans, only an ∼10‐fold over a 20,000‐fold difference in brain size. The relatively constant size of calbindin patches differs from cortical modules such as barrels, which scale with brain size. Thus, selective pressure appears to conserve the distribution of stellate and pyramidal cells, periodic arrangement of calbindin patches, and relatively constant neuron number in calbindin patches in medial/caudal entorhinal cortex. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:783–806, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26223342

  14. Mini-open Muscle Resection Procedure under Local Anesthesia for Lateral and Medial Epicondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Byung-Ki; Kim, Dong-Soo; Choi, Eui-Sung; Shon, Hyun-Chul; Park, Kyoung-Jin; Lee, Eun-Myung

    2009-01-01

    Background This study examined the clinical results of surgical treatment using a mini-open muscle resection procedure under local anesthesia for intractable lateral or medial epicondylitis. Methods Forty two elbows (41 patients) were treated surgically for lateral or medial epicondylitis. The indication for surgery was refractory pain after six months of conservative treatment, or a history of more than three local injections of steroid, or severe functional impairment in the occupational activities. The treatment results were assessed in terms of the pain using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roles & Maudsley score, and Nirschl & Pettrone grade. Results The preoperative VAS scores of pain were an average of 5.36 at rest, 6.44 at daily activities, and 8.2 at sports or occupational activities. After surgery, the VAS scores improved significantly (p < 0.01): 0.3 at rest, 1.46 at daily activities, and 2.21 at sports or occupational activities. The preoperative Roles & Maudsley score was acceptable in 6 cases, and poor in 36 cases, which was changed to excellent in 23 cases, good in 16 cases, acceptable in 3 cases after surgery. According to the grading system by Nirschl & Pettrone, 23 cases were excellent, 18 cases were good, and the remaining 1 case was fair. Overall, 41 cases (97.6%) achieved satisfactory results. Postoperative complications were encountered in three cases. Subcutaneous seroma due to the leakage of joint fluid in two patients was managed by additional surgery and suction drainage, and resulted in a satisfactory outcome. One patient complained of continuous pain on occupational activity, but her pain at rest was improved greatly. Conclusions The mini-open muscle resection procedure under local anesthesia appears to be one of effective methods for intractable lateral or medial epicondylitis. PMID:19885046

  15. Effectiveness of Initial Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy on the Newly Diagnosed Lateral or Medial Epicondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Seok; Park, Noh Kyoung; Lee, Chan Woo; Song, Ho Sup; Sohn, Min Kyun; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Jung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of initial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) for patients newly diagnosed with lateral or medial epicondylitis, compared to local steroid injection. Method An analysis was conducted of twenty-two patients who were newly confirmed as lateral or medial epicondylitis through medical history and physical examination. The ESWT group (n=12) was treated once a week for 3 weeks using low energy (0.06-0.12 mJ/mm2, 2,000 shocks), while the local steroid injection group (n=10) was treated once with triamcinolone 10 mg mixed with 1% lidocaine solution. Nirschl score and 100 point score were assessed before and after the treatments of 1st, 2nd, 4th and 8th week. And Roles and Maudsley score was assessed one and eight weeks after the treatments. Results Both groups showed significant improvement in Nirschl score and 100 point score during the entire period. The local steroid injection group improved more in Nirschl score at the first week and in 100 point score at the first 2 weeks, compared to those of the ESWT group. But the proportion of excellent and good grades of Roles and Maudsley score in the ESWT group increased more than that of local steroid injection group by the final 8th week. Conclusion The ESWT group improved as much as the local steroid injection group as treatment for medial and lateral epicondylitis. Therefore, ESWT can be a useful treatment option in patients for whom local steroid injection is difficult. PMID:23185733

  16. Subject-specific knee joint geometry improves predictions of medial tibiofemoral contact forces

    PubMed Central

    Gerus, Pauline; Sartori, Massimo; Besier, Thor F.; Fregly, Benjamin J.; Delp, Scott L.; Banks, Scott A.; Pandy, Marcus G.; D’Lima, Darryl D.; Lloyd, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating tibiofemoral joint contact forces is important for understanding the initiation and progression of knee osteoarthritis. However, tibiofemoral contact force predictions are influenced by many factors including muscle forces and anatomical representations of the knee joint. This study aimed to investigate the influence of subject-specific geometry and knee joint kinematics on the prediction of tibiofemoral contact forces using a calibrated EMG-driven neuromusculoskeletal model of the knee. One participant fitted with an instrumented total knee replacement walked at a self-selected speed while medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces, ground reaction forces, whole-body kinematics, and lower-limb muscle activity were simultaneously measured. The combination of generic and subject-specific knee joint geometry and kinematics resulted in four different OpenSim models used to estimate muscle-tendon lengths and moment arms. The subject-specific geometric model was created from CT scans and the subject-specific knee joint kinematics representing the translation of the tibia relative to the femur was obtained from fluoroscopy. The EMG-driven model was calibrated using one walking trial, but with three different cost functions that tracked the knee flexion/extension moments with and without constraint over the estimated joint contact forces. The calibrated models then predicted the medial and lateral tibiofemoral contact forces for five other different walking trials. The use of subject-specific models with minimization of the peak tibiofemoral contact forces improved the accuracy of medial contact forces by 47% and lateral contact forces by 7%, respectively compared with the use of generic musculoskeletal model. PMID:24074941

  17. Sulcus vocalis: excision, primary suture and medialization laryngoplasty: personal experience with 44 cases.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Taner

    2012-11-01

    This is a prospective, cohort study to present personal experience on excision of sulcus, primary suture of defect and medialization laryngoplasty. An article about this subject is not present in medical literature. Forty-four patients with sulcus vocalis who were operated on by excision, primary suture of epithelial defect and medialization laryngoplasty were included. Pre- and postoperative evaluations included GRBAS, VHI-30, stroboscopy, aerodynamic and acoustic analysis. Grade, roughness and breathiness of GRBAS were significantly better postoperatively (p < 0.05), whereas asthenia and strain were not (p > 0.05). All VHI-30 results decreased significantly after surgery (p < 0.01). Glottal closure and mucosal wave amplitude during stroboscopy improved significantly postoperatively (p < 0.05), whereas symmetry and periodicity did not (p > 0.05). Maximum phonation time, mean airflow rate, mean efficiency and mean pressure of aerodynamic analysis improved significantly after surgery (p < 0.05). However, mean resistance and mean power were not significantly different (p > 0.05). All parameters, except F (0) and soft phonation index during acoustic analysis with /a/, and except F (0), voice turbulence index and soft phonation index during acoustic analysis with constant phrase improved significantly after surgery (p < 0.05). Surgical treatments of sulcus vocalis are not satisfactory enough, yet. Excision of sulcus, primary suture of epithelial defect and medialization laryngoplasty is one of the successful surgical options. Intact vocal ligament at the bottom of sulcus is a good prognostic sign for good postoperative voice result. Success appears to depend on how long, how wide and how deep sulcus is. Good patient selection may increase the percentage of happy patients.

  18. Complementary Functional Organization of Neuronal Activity Patterns in the Perirhinal, Lateral Entorhinal, and Medial Entorhinal Cortices

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Christopher S.; Bladon, John; McKenzie, Sam; Liu, Cindy D.; O'Keefe, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly conceived that the cortical areas of the hippocampal region are functionally divided into the perirhinal cortex (PRC) and the lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), which selectively process object information; and the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), which selectively processes spatial information. Contrary to this notion, in rats performing a task that demands both object and spatial information processing, single neurons in PRC, LEC, and MEC, including those in both superficial and deep cortical areas and in grid, border, and head direction cells of MEC, have a highly similar range of selectivity to object and spatial dimensions of the task. By contrast, representational similarity analysis of population activity reveals a key distinction in the organization of information in these areas, such that PRC and LEC populations prioritize object over location information, whereas MEC populations prioritize location over object information. These findings bring to the hippocampal system a growing emphasis on population analyses as a powerful tool for characterizing neural representations supporting cognition and memory. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Contrary to the common view that brain regions in the “what” and “where” streams distinctly process object and spatial cues, respectively, we found that both streams encode both object and spatial information but distinctly organize memories for objects and space. Specifically, perirhinal cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex represent objects and, within the object-specific representations, the locations where they occur. Conversely, medial entorhinal cortex represents relevant locations and, within those spatial representations, the objects that occupy them. Furthermore, these findings reach beyond simple notions of perirhinal cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex neurons as object detectors and MEC neurons as position detectors, and point to a more complex organization of memory representations within the medial

  19. Impaired Varus-Valgus Proprioception and Neuromuscular Stabilization in Medial Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Alison H.; Lee, Song Joo; Zhao, Heng; Ren, Yupeng; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2014-01-01

    Impaired proprioception and poor muscular stabilization in the frontal plane may lead to knee instability during functional activities, a common complaint in persons with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Understanding these frontal plane neuromechanical properties in KOA will help elucidate the factors contributing to knee instability and aid in the development of targeted intervention strategies. The study objectives were to compare knee varus-valgus proprioception, isometric muscle strength, and active muscular contribution to stability between persons with medial KOA and healthy controls. We evaluated knee frontal plane neuromechanical parameters in 14 participants with medial KOA and 14 age- and gender-matched controls, using a joint driving device (JDD) with a customized motor and a 6-axis force sensor. Analysis of covariance with BMI as a covariate was used to test the differences in varus-valgus neuromechanical parameters between these two groups. The KOA group had impaired varus proprioception acuity (1.08 ± 0.59° vs. 0.69 ± 0.49°, p < 0.05), decreased normalized varus muscle strength (1.31 ± 0.75% vs. 1.79 ± 0.84% body weight, p < 0.05), a trend toward decreased valgus strength (1.29 ± 0.67% vs. 1.88 ± 0.99%, p = 0.054), and impaired ability to actively stabilize the knee in the frontal plane during external perturbation (4.67 ± 2.86 vs. 8.26 ± 5.95 Nm/degree, p < 0.05). The knee frontal plane sensorimotor control system is compromised in persons with medial KOA. Our findings suggest varus-valgus control deficits in both the afferent input (proprioceptive acuity) and muscular effectors (muscle strength and capacity to stabilize the joint). PMID:24321442

  20. Kinematics and Kinetics of Single-Limb Heel Rise in Diabetes Related Medial Column Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J.; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Sinacore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related medial column foot deformities contribute to high plantar pressure, joint instability, ulceration and amputation. Impaired foot function may be an early indicator of foot structural incompetence and contribute to deformity progression. This study examines the ability of single-limb heel rise multi-segmental kinematics and kinetics to identify midfoot and hindfoot dysfunction in those with diabetes-related medial column foot deformity. Methods Single-limb heel rise foot kinematics and kinetics were examined in adults with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with and without medial column foot deformity and age-, weight-matched controls. Findings Hindfoot relative to shank plantarflexion, peak and excursion, were reduced in bothdiabetes groups compared to controls (P<0.017). Controls' initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position was plantarflexed 31 degrees and plantarflexed an additional 13 degrees during heel rise. The initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position for the diabetes group without deformity was similarly plantarflexed as controls (34 degrees) while the diabetes deformity group was less plantarflexed (lower arch position: 23 degrees, P<0.017). During the heel rise task both diabetes groups demonstrated less ability to plantarflex the forefoot relative to the hindfoot compared to controls (2 and 5 degrees respectively, P<0.017). Ankle plantarflexion power was reduced in the diabetes deformity group compared to controls (P<0.017). Interpretation The single-limb heel rise task identified movement dysfunction in those with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Failure to plantarflex the forefoot relative to hindfoot may compromise midfoot joint stability and increase the risk of injury and arch collapse. PMID:25218437