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Sample records for partial onset seizures

  1. Characterization of Early Partial Seizure Onset: Frequency, Complexity and Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Jouny, Christophe C.; Bergey, Gregory K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective A clear classification of partial seizures onset features is not yet established. Complexity and entropy have been very widely used to describe dynamical systems, but a systematic evaluation of these measures to characterize partial seizures has never been performed. Methods Eighteen different measures including power in frequency bands up to 300Hz, Gabor atom density (GAD), Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD), Lempel-Ziv complexity, Shannon entropy, sample entropy, and permutation entropy, were selected to test sensitivity to partial seizure onset. Intracranial recordings from forty-five patients with mesial temporal, neocortical temporal and neocortical extratemporal seizure foci were included (331 partial seizures). Results GAD, Lempel-Ziv complexity, HFD, high frequency activity, and sample entropy were the most reliable measures to assess early seizure onset. Conclusions Increases in complexity and occurrence of high-frequency components appear to be commonly associated with early stages of partial seizure evolution from all regions. The type of measure (frequency-based, complexity or entropy) does not predict the efficiency of the method to detect seizure onset. Significance Differences between measures such as GAD and HFD highlight the multimodal nature of partial seizure onsets. Improved methods for early seizure detection may be achieved from a better understanding of these underlying dynamics. PMID:21872526

  2. Lacosamide adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Jennifer J.; Deshpande, Santosh; Jones, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relative efficacy and safety of lacosamide as adjunctive therapy compared to other antiepileptic drugs has not been well established. Objective. To determine if lacosamide provides improved efficacy and safety, reduced length of hospital stay and improved quality of life compared with other anti-epileptic therapies for adults with partial-onset seizures. Data Sources. A systematic review of the medical literature using Medline (1946–Week 4, 2012), EMBASE (1980–Week 3, 2012), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1 of 12, January 2012). Additional studies were identified (through to February 7, 2012) by searching bibliographies, the FDA drug approval files, clinical trial registries and major national and international neurology meeting abstracts. No restrictions on publication status or language were applied. Study Selection. Randomized controlled trials of lacosamide in adults with partial-onset seizures were included. Data Extraction. Study selection, extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed independently by two authors. Authors of studies were contacted for missing data. Data Synthesis. All pooled analyses used the random effects model. Results. Three trials (1311 patients) met inclusion criteria. Lacosamide increased the 50% responder rate compared to placebo (RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.36 to 2.08]; I2 = 0%). Discontinuation due to adverse events was statistically significantly higher in the lacosamide arm (RR3.13 [95% CI 1.94 to 5.06]; I2 = 0%). Individual adverse events (ataxia, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea) were also significantly higher in the lacosamide group. Limitations. All dosage arms from the included studies were pooled to make a single pair-wise comparison to placebo. Selective reporting of outcomes was found in all of the included RCTs. Conclusions. Lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures increases the 50% responder rate but with significantly more adverse events compared to

  3. Lacosamide adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sawh, Sonja C; Newman, Jennifer J; Deshpande, Santosh; Jones, Philip M

    2013-01-01

    Background. The relative efficacy and safety of lacosamide as adjunctive therapy compared to other antiepileptic drugs has not been well established. Objective. To determine if lacosamide provides improved efficacy and safety, reduced length of hospital stay and improved quality of life compared with other anti-epileptic therapies for adults with partial-onset seizures. Data Sources. A systematic review of the medical literature using Medline (1946-Week 4, 2012), EMBASE (1980-Week 3, 2012), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 1 of 12, January 2012). Additional studies were identified (through to February 7, 2012) by searching bibliographies, the FDA drug approval files, clinical trial registries and major national and international neurology meeting abstracts. No restrictions on publication status or language were applied. Study Selection. Randomized controlled trials of lacosamide in adults with partial-onset seizures were included. Data Extraction. Study selection, extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed independently by two authors. Authors of studies were contacted for missing data. Data Synthesis. All pooled analyses used the random effects model. Results. Three trials (1311 patients) met inclusion criteria. Lacosamide increased the 50% responder rate compared to placebo (RR 1.68 [95% CI 1.36 to 2.08]; I(2) = 0%). Discontinuation due to adverse events was statistically significantly higher in the lacosamide arm (RR3.13 [95% CI 1.94 to 5.06]; I(2) = 0%). Individual adverse events (ataxia, dizziness, fatigue, and nausea) were also significantly higher in the lacosamide group. Limitations. All dosage arms from the included studies were pooled to make a single pair-wise comparison to placebo. Selective reporting of outcomes was found in all of the included RCTs. Conclusions. Lacosamide as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial-onset seizures increases the 50% responder rate but with significantly more adverse events compared to

  4. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  5. Development of lacosamide for the treatment of partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Doty, Pamela; Hebert, David; Mathy, Francois-Xavier; Byrnes, William; Zackheim, James; Simontacchi, Kelly

    2013-07-01

    Lacosamide is an antiepileptic drug (AED) available in multiple formulations that was first approved in 2008 as adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults. Unlike traditional sodium channel blockers affecting fast inactivation, lacosamide selectively enhances sodium channel slow inactivation. This mechanism of action results in stabilization of hyperexcitable neuronal membranes, inhibition of neuronal firing, and reduction in long-term channel availability without affecting physiological function. Lacosamide has a well-characterized and favorable pharmacokinetic profile, including a fast absorption rate, minimal or no interaction with cytochrome P-450 izoenzymes, and a low potential for drug-drug interactions. Lacosamide clinical development included three placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trials conducted in more than 1300 patients, each demonstrating safety and efficacy of lacosamide compared to placebo as adjunctive therapy for adults with POS. The clinical use of lacosamide may broaden, pending results of trials evaluating its use as monotherapy for POS in adults, as treatment for epilepsy in pediatric subjects, and as adjunctive treatment for uncontrolled primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures in those with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

  6. Once-daily USL255 as adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures: Randomized phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Steve S; Fakhoury, Toufic A; Hogan, R Edward; Nagaraddi, Venkatesh N; Blatt, Ilan; Lawson, Balduin; Arnold, Stephan; Anders, Bob; Clark, Annie M; Laine, Dawn; Meadows, R Shawn; Halvorsen, Mark B

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of USL255, Qudexy™ XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules, as an adjunctive treatment for refractory partial-onset seizures (POS) in adults taking one to three concomitant antiepileptic drugs. Methods In this global phase III study (PREVAIL; NCT01142193), 249 adults with POS were randomized 1:1 to once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) or placebo. The primary and key secondary efficacy endpoints were median percent reduction in weekly POS frequency and responder rate (proportion of patients with ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency). Seizure freedom was also assessed. Safety (adverse events, clinical and laboratory findings), as well as treatment effects on quality of life (QOLIE-31-P) and clinical global impression of change (CGI-C), were evaluated. Results Across the entire 11-week treatment phase, USL255 significantly reduced the median percent seizure frequency and significantly improved responder rate compared with placebo. Efficacy over placebo was observed early in treatment, in patients with highly refractory POS, and in those with the most debilitating seizure types (i.e., complex partial, partial secondarily generalized). USL255 was safe and generally well tolerated with a low incidence of neurocognitive adverse events. USL255 was associated with significant clinical improvement without adversely affecting quality of life. Significance The PREVAIL phase III clinical study demonstrated that once-daily USL255 (200 mg/day) significantly improved seizure control and was safe and generally well tolerated with few neurocognitive side effects. PMID:24902983

  7. Lacosamide: a review of its use as adjunctive therapy in the management of partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Sheridan M

    2013-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a syrup or tablet) and as an intravenous infusion. It is believed to exert its antiepileptic effect by selectively enhancing the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is approved in several countries worldwide as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures; however, prescribing regulations differ between countries. This article reviews the use of lacosamide as indicated in adults and adolescents (aged 16-18 years) in the EU, where it is approved in this patient population as an adjunctive therapy to other AEDs in the treatment of partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. In three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicentre studies in adults and adolescents (aged 16-18 years) with partial-onset seizures, adjunctive therapy with oral lacosamide (administered for an initial titration period followed by 12 weeks' maintenance therapy) generally reduced the frequency of seizures to a significantly greater extent than placebo, with antiepileptic efficacy sustained following longer-term treatment (up to 8 years) in this patient population. Oral and intravenous lacosamide were generally well tolerated in clinical studies, with the majority of adverse events being mild or moderate in severity. Very common adverse reactions following adjunctive therapy with oral lacosamide included diplopia, dizziness, headache and nausea; the tolerability profile of intravenous lacosamide appeared consistent with that of oral lacosamide, although intravenous administration was associated with local adverse events, such as injection site discomfort or pain, irritation and erythema. Thus, oral and intravenous lacosamide as an adjunctive therapy to other AEDs provides a useful option in the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures.

  8. Efficacy and safety of brivaracetam for partial-onset seizures in 3 pooled clinical studies

    PubMed Central

    Mameniškienė, Rūta; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Klein, Pavel; Gamage, Jessica; Schiemann, Jimmy; Johnson, Martin E.; Whitesides, John; McDonough, Belinda; Eckhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of adjunctive brivaracetam (BRV), a selective, high-affinity ligand for SV2A, for treatment of partial-onset (focal) seizures (POS) in adults. Methods: Data were pooled from patients (aged 16–80 years) with POS uncontrolled by 1 to 2 antiepileptic drugs receiving BRV 50, 100, or 200 mg/d or placebo, without titration, in 3 phase III studies of BRV (NCT00490035, NCT00464269, and NCT01261325, ClinicalTrials.gov, funded by UCB Pharma). The studies had an 8-week baseline and a 12-week treatment period. Patients receiving concomitant levetiracetam were excluded from the efficacy pool. Results: In the efficacy population (n = 1,160), reduction over placebo (95% confidence interval) in baseline-adjusted POS frequency/28 days was 19.5% (8.0%–29.6%) for 50 mg/d (p = 0.0015), 24.4% (16.8%–31.2%) for 100 mg/d (p < 0.00001), and 24.0% (15.3%–31.8%) for 200 mg/d (p < 0.00001). The ≥50% responder rate was 34.2% (50 mg/d, p = 0.0015), 39.5% (100 mg/d, p < 0.00001), and 37.8% (200 mg/d, p = 0.00003) vs 20.3% for placebo (p < 0.01). Across the safety population groups (n = 1,262), 90.0% to 93.9% completed the studies. Treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were reported by 68.0% BRV overall (n = 803) and 62.1% placebo (n = 459). Serious TEAEs were reported by 3.0% (BRV) and 2.8% (placebo); 3 patients receiving BRV and one patient receiving placebo died. TEAEs in ≥5% patients taking BRV (vs placebo) were somnolence (15.2% vs 8.5%), dizziness (11.2% vs 7.2%), headache (9.6% vs 10.2%), and fatigue (8.7% vs 3.7%). Conclusions: Adjunctive BRV was effective and generally well tolerated in adults with POS. Classification of evidence: This analysis provides Class I evidence that adjunctive BRV is effective in reducing POS frequency in adults with epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures. PMID:27335114

  9. Two-year seizure reduction in adults with medically intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with responsive neurostimulation: Final results of the RNS System Pivotal trial

    PubMed Central

    Heck, Christianne N; King-Stephens, David; Massey, Andrew D; Nair, Dileep R; Jobst, Barbara C; Barkley, Gregory L; Salanova, Vicenta; Cole, Andrew J; Smith, Michael C; Gwinn, Ryder P; Skidmore, Christopher; Van Ness, Paul C; Bergey, Gregory K; Park, Yong D; Miller, Ian; Geller, Eric; Rutecki, Paul A; Zimmerman, Richard; Spencer, David C; Goldman, Alica; Edwards, Jonathan C; Leiphart, James W; Wharen, Robert E; Fessler, James; Fountain, Nathan B; Worrell, Gregory A; Gross, Robert E; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Duckrow, Robert B; Hirsch, Lawrence J; Bazil, Carl; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Sun, Felice T; Courtney, Tracy A; Seale, Cairn G; Morrell, Martha J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the safety and effectiveness of responsive stimulation at the seizure focus as an adjunctive therapy to reduce the frequency of seizures in adults with medically intractable partial onset seizures arising from one or two seizure foci. Methods Randomized multicenter double-blinded controlled trial of responsive focal cortical stimulation (RNS System). Subjects with medically intractable partial onset seizures from one or two foci were implanted, and 1 month postimplant were randomized 1:1 to active or sham stimulation. After the fifth postimplant month, all subjects received responsive stimulation in an open label period (OLP) to complete 2 years of postimplant follow-up. Results All 191 subjects were randomized. The percent change in seizures at the end of the blinded period was −37.9% in the active and −17.3% in the sham stimulation group (p = 0.012, Generalized Estimating Equations). The median percent reduction in seizures in the OLP was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years, which represents a progressive and significant improvement with time (p < 0.0001). The serious adverse event rate was not different between subjects receiving active and sham stimulation. Adverse events were consistent with the known risks of an implanted medical device, seizures, and of other epilepsy treatments. There were no adverse effects on neuropsychological function or mood. Significance Responsive stimulation to the seizure focus reduced the frequency of partial-onset seizures acutely, showed improving seizure reduction over time, was well tolerated, and was acceptably safe. The RNS System provides an additional treatment option for patients with medically intractable partial-onset seizures. PMID:24621228

  10. Review of levetiracetam, with a focus on the extended release formulation, as adjuvant therapy in controlling partial-onset seizures

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Carol M; Towfigh, Allen; Safdieh, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Levetiracetam is a second-generation antiepileptic drug (AED) with a unique chemical structure and mechanism of action. The extended release formulation of levetiracetam (Keppra XR™; UCB Pharma) was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients 16 years of age and older with epilepsy. This approval is based on a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter, multinational trial. Levetiracetam XR allows for once-daily dosing, which may increase compliance and, given the relatively constant plasma concentrations, may minimize concentration-related adverse effects. Levetiracetam’s mode of action is not fully elucidated, but it has been found to target high-voltage, N-type calcium channels as well as the synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A). Levetiracetam has nearly ideal pharmacokinetics. It is rapidly and almost completely absorbed after oral ingestion, is <10% protein-bound, demonstrates linear kinetics, is minimally metabolized through a pathway independent of the cytochrome P450 system, has no significant drug–drug interactions, and has a wide therapeutic index. The most common reported adverse events with levetiracetam XR were somnolence, irritability, dizziness, nausea, influenza, and nasopharyngitis. Levetiracetam XR provides an efficacious and well-tolerated treatment option for adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial-onset seizures. PMID:19777068

  11. The value of magnetoencephalography for seizure-onset zone localization in magnetic resonance imaging-negative partial epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Julien; Bouet, Romain; Delpuech, Claude; Ryvlin, Philippe; Isnard, Jean; Guenot, Marc; Bertrand, Olivier; Hammers, Alexander; Mauguière, François

    2013-10-01

    Surgical treatment of epilepsy is a challenge for patients with non-contributive brain magnetic resonance imaging. However, surgery is feasible if the seizure-onset zone is precisely delineated through intracranial electroencephalography recording. We recently described a method, volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes, to delineate the spiking volume of patients with focal epilepsy using magnetoencephalography. We postulated that the extent of the spiking volume delineated with volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes could predict the localizability of the seizure-onset zone by intracranial electroencephalography investigation and outcome of surgical treatment. Twenty-one patients with non-contributive magnetic resonance imaging findings were included. All patients underwent intracerebral electroencephalography investigation through stereotactically implanted depth electrodes (stereo-electroencephalography) and magnetoencephalography with delineation of the spiking volume using volumetric imaging of epileptic spikes. We evaluated the spatial congruence between the spiking volume determined by magnetoencephalography and the localization of the seizure-onset zone determined by stereo-electroencephalography. We also evaluated the outcome of stereo-electroencephalography and surgical treatment according to the extent of the spiking volume (focal, lateralized but non-focal or non-lateralized). For all patients, we found a spatial overlap between the seizure-onset zone and the spiking volume. For patients with a focal spiking volume, the seizure-onset zone defined by stereo-electroencephalography was clearly localized in all cases and most patients (6/7, 86%) had a good surgical outcome. Conversely, stereo-electroencephalography failed to delineate a seizure-onset zone in 57% of patients with a lateralized spiking volume, and in the two patients with bilateral spiking volume. Four of the 12 patients with non-focal spiking volumes were operated upon, none became seizure

  12. Safety and tolerability of different titration rates of retigabine (ezogabine) in patients with partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Biton, Victor; Gil-Nagel, Antonio; Brodie, Martin J; Derossett, Sarah E; Nohria, Virinder

    2013-11-01

    Retigabine (RTG; international nonproprietary name)/ezogabine (EZG; US adopted name) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) that prolongs neuronal voltage-gated potassium-channel KCNQ2-5 (Kv 7.2-7.5) opening. This double-blind study evaluated different RTG/EZG dose-titration rates. Patients (N=73) with partial-onset seizures receiving concomitant AEDs were randomized to one of three titration groups, all of which were initiated at RTG/EZG 300mg/day divided into three equal doses. Fast-, medium-, and slow-titration groups received dose increments of 150mg/day every 2, 4, and 7 days, respectively, achieving the target dose of 1200mg/day after 13, 25, and 43 days, respectively. Safety assessments were performed throughout. Discontinuation rates due to treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were numerically higher in the fast- (10/23) and medium- (7/22) titration groups than in the slow-titration group (3/23) but statistical significance was achieved only for the high-titration group compared with the low-titration group (p=0.024). Stratified analysis, with concomitant AEDs divided into enzyme inducers (carbamazepine, phenytoin, oxcarbazepine) or noninducers, showed that the risk of discontinuation due primarily to TEAEs was significantly higher in the fast- (p=0.010) but not in the medium-titration group (p=0.078) when compared with the slow-titration group. Overall, the slow-titration rate appeared to be best tolerated and was used in further efficacy and safety studies with RTG/EZG.

  13. Efficacy and safety of extended-release oxcarbazepine (Oxtellar XR™) as adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    French, JA; Baroldi, P; Brittain, ST; Johnson, JK

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of once-daily 1200 mg and 2400 mg SPN-804 (Oxtellar XR™, Supernus Pharmaceuticals), an extended-release tablet formulation of oxcarbazepine (OXC), added to 1-3 concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Methods The Prospective, Randomized Study of OXC XR in Subjects with Partial Epilepsy Refractory (PROSPER) study was a multinational, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group Phase 3 study. The primary efficacy endpoint was median percent reduction from baseline in monthly (28-day) seizure frequency for the 16-week double-blind treatment period in the intent-to-treat (ITT) population with analyzable seizure data. Other efficacy analyses included proportion of patients with ≥ 50% seizure reduction, proportion of patients seizure free, and the relationship between clinical response and plasma concentration. Results Median percent reduction was -28.7% for placebo, −38.2% (P = 0.08 vs placebo) for once-daily SPN-804 1200 mg, and −42.9% (P = 0.003) for SPN-804 2400 mg. Responder rates were 28.1%, 36.1% (P = 0.08), and 40.7% (P = 0.02); 16-week seizure-free rates in a pragmatic ITT analysis were 3.3%, 4.9% (P = 0.59), and 11.4% (P = 0.008), respectively. When data were analyzed separately for study site clusters, a post hoc analysis demonstrated that both SPN-804 dosages were significantly superior to placebo in median percent seizure reduction (placebo: −13.3%; 1200 mg: −34.5%, P = 0.02; 2400 mg: −52.7%, P = 0.006) in the North American study site cluster. A concentration–response analysis also supported a clinically meaningful effect for 1200 mg. Adverse event types reflected the drug's established profile. Adverse event frequency was consistent with a pharmacokinetic profile in which SPN-804 produces lower peak plasma concentrations vs immediate-release OXC. Once-daily dosing was not

  14. Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy in patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures: Results of a phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Michael R; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Harvey, Jay; Rogin, Joanne B; Biraben, Arnaud; Galimberti, Carlo A; Kowacs, Pedro A; Hong, Seung Bong; Cheng, Hailong; Blum, David; Nunes, Teresa; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, phase III study was conducted at 173 centers in 19 countries, including the United States and Canada. Eligible patients were aged ≥16 years and had uncontrolled partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). After an 8-week baseline period, patients were randomized to once-daily placebo (n = 226), ESL 800 mg (n = 216), or ESL 1,200 mg (n = 211). Following a 2-week titration period, patients received ESL 800 or 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. Seizure data were captured and documented using event-entry or daily entry diaries. Results Standardized seizure frequency (SSF) during the maintenance period (primary end point) was reduced with ESL 1,200 mg (p = 0.004), and there was a trend toward improvement with ESL 800 mg (p = 0.06), compared with placebo. When data for titration and maintenance periods were combined, ESL 800 mg (p = 0.001) and 1,200 mg (p < 0.001) both reduced SSF. There were no statistically significant interactions between treatment response and geographical region (p = 0.38) or diary version (p = 0.76). Responder rate (≥50% reduction in SSF) was significantly higher with ESL 1,200 mg (42.6%, p < 0.001) but not ESL 800 mg (30.5%, p = 0.07) than placebo (23.1%). Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and TEAEs leading to discontinuation increased with ESL dose. The most common TEAEs were dizziness, somnolence, nausea, headache, and diplopia. Significance Adjunctive ESL 1,200 mg once-daily was more efficacious than placebo in adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. The once-daily 800 mg dose showed a marginal effect on SSF, but did not reach statistical significance. Both doses were well tolerated. Efficacy assessment was not affected by

  15. Brivaracetam: review of its pharmacology and potential use as adjunctive therapy in patients with partial onset seizures

    PubMed Central

    Mumoli, Laura; Palleria, Caterina; Gasparini, Sara; Citraro, Rita; Labate, Angelo; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gambardella, Antonio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Russo, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV), a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10–30-fold more potent than levetiracetam (LEV), is highly effective in a wide range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. BRV and LEV similarly bind to synaptic vesicle protein 2A, while differentiating for other pharmacological effects; in fact, BRV does not inhibit high voltage Ca2+ channels and AMPA receptors as LEV. Furthermore, BRV apparently exhibits inhibitory activity on neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. BRV is currently waiting for approval both in the United States and the European Union as adjunctive therapy for patients with partial seizures. In patients with photosensitive epilepsy, BRV showed a dose-dependent effect in suppressing or attenuating the photoparoxysmal response. In well-controlled trials conducted to date, adjunctive BRV demonstrated efficacy and good tolerability in patients with focal epilepsy. BRV has a linear pharmacokinetic profile. BRV is extensively metabolized and excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged). The metabolites of BRV are inactive, and hydrolysis of the acetamide group is the mainly involved metabolic pathway; hepatic impairment probably requires dose adjustment. BRV does not seem to influence other antiepileptic drug plasma levels. Six clinical trials have so far been completed indicating that BRV is effective in controlling seizures when used at doses between 50 and 200 mg/d. The drug is generally well-tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects; this is confirmed by the low discontinuation rate observed in these clinical studies. The most common side effects are related to central nervous system and include fatigue, dizziness, and somnolence; these apparently disappear during treatment. In this review, we analyzed BRV, focusing on the current evidences from experimental animal models to clinical studies with particular interest on potential use in clinical

  16. Safety and efficacy of adjunctive lacosamide among patients with partial-onset seizures in a long-term open-label extension trial of up to 8 years.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, William; Fountain, Nathan B; Kaubrys, Gintaras; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; McShea, Cindy; Isojarvi, Jouko; Doty, Pamela

    2014-12-01

    Long-term (up to 8 years of exposure) safety and efficacy of the antiepileptic drug lacosamide was evaluated in this open-label extension trial (SP615 [ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00552305]). Patients were enrolled following participation in a double-blind trial or one of two open-label trials of adjunctive lacosamide for partial-onset seizures. Dosage adjustments of lacosamide (100-800 mg/day) and/or concomitant antiepileptic drugs were allowed to optimize tolerability and seizure reduction. Of the 370 enrolled patients, 77%, 51%, and 39% had >1, >3, or >5 years of lacosamide exposure, respectively. Median lacosamide modal dose was 400mg/day. Common treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were dizziness (39.7%), headache (20.8%), nausea (17.3%), diplopia (17.0%), fatigue (16.5%), upper respiratory tract infection (16.5%), nasopharyngitis (16.2%), and contusion (15.4%). Dizziness (2.2%) was the only TEAE that led to discontinuation in >2% of patients. Ranges for median percent reductions in seizure frequency were 47-65%, and those for ≥ 50% responder rates were 49-63% for 1-, 3-, and 5-year completer cohorts. Exposure to lacosamide for up to 8 years was generally well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to previous double-blind trials, and efficacy was maintained.

  17. A long-term noninterventional safety study of adjunctive lacosamide therapy in patients with epilepsy and uncontrolled partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Eckhardt, Klaus; Doty, Pamela; De Backer, Marc; Brunnert, Marcus; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    This noninterventional, observational, postauthorization safety study (SP0942, NCT00771927) evaluated the incidence of predefined cardiovascular- (CV) and psychiatric-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs), in patients with epilepsy and uncontrolled partial-onset seizures, when initiating adjunctive therapy with lacosamide or another approved antiepileptic drug (AED) according to standard medical practice. Active recording of predefined TEAEs of interest took place at three-monthly recommended visits for up to 12months. Of 1004 patients who received at least one dose of adjunctive AEDs, 511 initially added lacosamide therapy, 493 added another AED, 69 were ≥65years of age, and 72 took concomitant antiarrhythmic drugs. Patients in the lacosamide cohort had a higher median frequency of partial-onset seizures (6.0 versus 3.5 per 28days) despite taking more concomitant AEDs (84.9% versus 66.9% took ≥2) at baseline. Patients who added lacosamide took a modal dose of 200mg/day over the treatment period (n=501), and 50.1% (256/511) completed 12months of treatment. Fifty-one point nine percent (256/493) of patients who added another AED completed the study, with the most commonly added AED being levetiracetam (28.4%). Four patients (0.8%) in each cohort, all <65years of age, reported predefined CV-related TEAEs. None were considered serious or led to discontinuation. One event each of sinus bradycardia (lacosamide), atrioventricular block first degree (lacosamide), and syncope (other AED) were judged to be treatment-related. Another patient in the other AED cohort reported bradycardia while taking concomitant antiarrhythmic drugs. Predefined psychiatric-related TEAEs were reported by 21 patients (4.1%) in the lacosamide cohort and 27 patients (5.5%) in the other AED cohort. Depression was the most common to be treatment-related (7/11 and 12/18 of patients reporting treatment-related psychiatric TEAEs, respectively). Serious psychiatric-related TEAEs were

  18. Targeted treatment of migrating partial seizures of infancy with quinidine.

    PubMed

    Bearden, David; Strong, Alanna; Ehnot, Jessica; DiGiovine, Marissa; Dlugos, Dennis; Goldberg, Ethan M

    2014-09-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy is an early onset epileptic encephalopathy syndrome that is typically resistant to treatment. The most common cause is a gain of function mutation in the potassium channel KCNT1. The antiarrhythmic drug quinidine is a partial antagonist of KCNT1 and hence may be a candidate drug for treatment of this condition. We report the case of a child with migrating partial seizures of infancy secondary to an activating mutation in KCNT1 treated with quinidine. Treatment with quinidine was correlated with a marked reduction in seizure frequency and improved psychomotor development.

  19. Brivaracetam as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy: the current evidence base

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Christian; May, Theodor W.; Bien, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Brivaracetam (BRV) is a novel antiepileptic drug recently licensed for the treatment of partial epilepsy in adults and adolescents over 16 years old. Like levetiracetam (LEV), it is a ligand of the synaptic vesicle protein SV2A. BRV has been shown in animal models and in studies using human brain slices to have a higher SV2A affinity and faster penetration into the brain. Its efficacy and safety have been shown in several randomized, controlled studies. The recommended initial dose is 50–100 mg, divided into two daily doses. Up-titration to a 200 mg daily dose is possible. Dizziness and somnolence are frequent side effects. There are some hints that BRV may be less frequently associated with behavioural adverse events than LEV. Long-term efficacy and safety and BRV use in special patient groups have to be assessed in the future. PMID:27800023

  20. A long-term open-label extension study assessing cognition and behavior, tolerability, safety, and efficacy of adjunctive levetiracetam in children aged 4 to 16 years with partial-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Schiemann-Delgado, Jimmy; Yang, Haichen; Loge, Christine de la; Stalvey, Tracy J; Jones, John; Legoff, Daniel; Mintz, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess cognition and behavior in children (4-16 years; n = 103) with partial-onset seizures using the Leiter-R International Performance Scale and Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist. The study was a multicenter, open-label, noncomparative 48-week extension study (NCT00152516) of adjunctive levetiracetam (20-100 mg/kg/d, mean 50.2 mg/kg/d). Improvement from baseline in Leiter-R Memory Screen composite score at weeks 24 and 48 (mean [SD] change, +4.8 [12.6] and +4.5 [15.3]) was similar to changes observed with levetiracetam and placebo in a prior study. Child Behavior Checklist Syndrome scores improved from baseline at weeks 24 and 48 (total problems mean [SD] change, -9.3 [22.2] and -10.4 [23.4]). Adjunctive levetiracetam was well tolerated (most frequently reported central nervous system-related treatment-emergent adverse events: headache [24.3%], aggression [7.8%], irritability [7.8%]). Of the patients, 4.9% discontinued because of treatment-emergent adverse events. Levetiracetam provided good and sustained seizure control (median percentage reduction from baseline in partial-onset seizure frequency/wk during maintenance: 86.4%); 24.7% of patients had continuous seizure freedom from all seizure types for ≥40 weeks. In children, adjunctive levetiracetam was associated with long-term stability in cognitive functioning and improvement in emotional/behavioral functioning over time.

  1. [Efficacy and safety of levetiracetam as adjunctive therapy in Japanese children with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures: multicenter and open-label study (N01223), short term evaluation].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidefumi; Osawa, Makiko; Yokoyama, Terumichi; Yoshida, Katsumi; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    A multicenter, open-label, single-armed study (N01223) was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of levetiracetam (LEV) as an add-on therapy in Japanese pediatric patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures (POS). A total of 73 children aged 4-15 years (mean±SD=10.1±3.4 years) were enrolled in the study, which consisted of an 8-week baseline period and a 14-week treatment period, including a 4-week titration period. A historical placebo control from a pivotal overseas pediatric study in POS add-on therapy was used. A 16.3% median percent reduction from the baseline in POS was observed in this placebo control. Therefore, in the present study, this value (16.3%) was chosen as the predefined threshold for the lower limit of the 95% confident interval (95% CI) of the median percent reduction from the baseline for LEV. In the present study, the percentage reduction (95% CI) in POS during the treatment period was 43.21% (26.19-52.14%), indicating a beneficial impact of LEV. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were 82.2% (60/73 cases) and 56.2% (41/73 cases), respectively. The most common TEAEs were somnolence, nasopharyngitis, upper respiratory tract infection, and pyrexia. Frequent ADRs (more than 3%) were somnolence and feeling jittery. No serious TEAE or death was reported during the study. Our results suggested that adjunctive therapy with LEV is clinically efficacious and well tolerated in Japanese children with uncontrolled POS.

  2. Treatment of partial seizures and seizure-like activity with felbamate in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Ruehlmann, D; Podell, M; March, P

    2001-08-01

    Six dogs with partial seizures or partial seizure-like activity were treated with the antiepileptic drug felbamate between 1993 and 1998. All dogs had a history and results of diagnostic testing suggestive of either primary (idiopathic) or occult secondary epilepsy. Dogs ranged between four months and eight years of age at the onset of seizure activity. The median time period between onset of the first seizure and the start of felbamate therapy was 3.8 months (range 0.75 to 36 months). Median duration of therapy was nine months (range two to 22 months). All dogs experienced a reduction in seizure frequency after felbamate administration. Median total number of seizures post-treatment was two (range 0 to 9). Two dogs had an immediate and prolonged cessation of seizure activity. Steady-state trough serum felbamate concentrations measured at two weeks, and one, 12 and 22 months after the commencement of therapy in four dogs ranged between 13 and 55 mg/litre (median 35 mg/litre). Reversible haematological adverse effects were detected in two dogs, with one dog developing concurrent keratoconjunctivitis sicca. These results suggest that felbamate can be an effective antiepileptic drug without life-threatening complications when used as monotherapy for partial seizures in the dog.

  3. Oxygen desaturations triggered by partial seizures: implications for cardiopulmonary instability in epilepsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A. S.; Ives, J. R.; Goldberger, A. L.; Al-Aweel, I. C.; Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Drislane, F. W.; Schomer, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of hypoxemia in adults with partial seizures has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to study in detail the temporal dynamics of this specific type of ictal-associated hypoxemia. METHODS: During long-term video/EEG monitoring (LTM), patients underwent monitoring of oxygen saturation using a digital Spo2 (pulse oximeter) transducer. Six patients (nine seizures) were identified with oxygen desaturations after the onset of partial seizure activity. RESULTS: Complex partial seizures originated from both left and right temporal lobes. Mean seizure duration (+/-SD) was 73 +/- 18 s. Mean Spo2 desaturation duration was 76 +/- 19 s. The onset of oxygen desaturation followed seizure onset with a mean delay of 43 +/- 16 s. Mean (+/-SD) Spo2 nadir was 83 +/- 5% (range, 77-91%), occurring an average of 35 +/- 12 s after the onset of the desaturation. One seizure was associated with prolonged and recurrent Spo2 desaturations. CONCLUSIONS: Partial seizures may be associated with prominent oxygen desaturations. The comparable duration of each seizure and its subsequent desaturation suggests a close mechanistic (possibly causal) relation. Spo2 monitoring provides an added means for seizure detection that may increase LTM yield. These observations also raise the possibility that ictal ventilatory dysfunction could play a role in certain cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in adults with partial seizures.

  4. Ictal onset zone and seizure propagation delineated on ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhavi; Tripathi, Manjari; Garg, Ajay; Damle, Nishikant; Bal, Chandrasekhar

    2016-01-01

    The present case highlights the utility of ictal F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in delineating the seizure onset zone in a child with complex partial seizures. Although F-18 FDG PET has been successfully used to delineate interictal hypometabolism, planned ictal FDG PET, in cases with prolonged seizure activity, can provide better spatial resolution than single-photon emission CT by delineating the seizure onset zone and propagation pathway.

  5. Ictal flatulence: seizure onset in the nondominant hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Vittal, Nandakumar Bangalore; Singh, Pradumna; Azar, Nabil J

    2009-12-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old woman with frequent simple partial seizures consisting mainly of autonomic manifestations including flatulence. The ictal onset and interictal EEG epileptiform abnormalities were localized to the right frontotemporal region. This localization was supported by structural brain imaging showing recurrence of a right frontotemporal oligodendroglioma with involvement of the insula. We therefore suggest that ictal flatulence is one of several autonomic and gastrointestinal symptoms and signs that may be used clinically in lateralizing to the nondominant hemisphere.

  6. Network dynamics of the brain and influence of the epileptic seizure onset zone.

    PubMed

    Burns, Samuel P; Santaniello, Sabato; Yaffe, Robert B; Jouny, Christophe C; Crone, Nathan E; Bergey, Gregory K; Anderson, William S; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-12-09

    The human brain is a dynamic networked system. Patients with partial epileptic seizures have focal regions that periodically diverge from normal brain network dynamics during seizures. We studied the evolution of brain connectivity before, during, and after seizures with graph-theoretic techniques on continuous electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings (5.4 ± 1.7 d per patient, mean ± SD) from 12 patients with temporal, occipital, or frontal lobe partial onset seizures. Each electrode was considered a node in a graph, and edges between pairs of nodes were weighted by their coherence within a frequency band. The leading eigenvector of the connectivity matrix, which captures network structure, was tracked over time and clustered to uncover a finite set of brain network states. Across patients, we found that (i) the network connectivity is structured and defines a finite set of brain states, (ii) seizures are characterized by a consistent sequence of states, (iii) a subset of nodes is isolated from the network at seizure onset and becomes more connected with the network toward seizure termination, and (iv) the isolated nodes may identify the seizure onset zone with high specificity and sensitivity. To localize a seizure, clinicians visually inspect seizures recorded from multiple intracranial electrode contacts, a time-consuming process that may not always result in definitive localization. We show that network metrics computed from all ECoG channels capture the dynamics of the seizure onset zone as it diverges from normal overall network structure. This suggests that a state space model can be used to help localize the seizure onset zone in ECoG recordings.

  7. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  8. Levetiracetam extended release and levetiracetam immediate release as adjunctive treatment for partial-onset seizures: an indirect comparison of treatment-emergent adverse events using meta-analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Richy, Florent F; Banerjee, Soutrik; Brabant, Yves; Helmers, Sandra

    2009-10-01

    The safety profiles of once-daily adjunctive levetiracetam (LEV) extended release (XR) (1000mg/day) and adjunctive LEV immediate release (IR) (500mg twice daily) were compared using data from three randomized, placebo (PBO)-controlled phase III clinical trials in patients with partial-onset seizures. MedDRA 9.0 treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were indirectly compared using meta-analytic techniques, including calculation of risk difference (RD) and mixed-effects analysis. Statistical significance was set at 10% alpha risk, the normative value for these analyses. Data from 555 patients older than 16 (204 LEV IR, 70 LEV XR, 281 PBO) were analyzed. Following adjustment for incidence of placebo TEAEs, LEV XR showed statistically significantly lower rates of TEAEs than LEV IR across nervous system disorders (RD=-18%, P=0.03), psychiatric disorders (RD=-11%, P=0.08), and metabolism and nutrition disorders (RD=-3%, P=0.08). Among nervous system disorders, the RD for headache favored LEV XR (RD=-11%, P=0.08). These results suggest that adjunctive LEV XR may be associated with a lower incidence of nervous system, psychiatric, and nutritional and metabolic TEAEs as compared with LEV IR. However, this difference was observed at a broad scale and not at a specific TEAE level except for headache.

  9. Generalized versus partial reflex seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Domenico; Ferlazzo, Edoardo; Gasparini, Sara; Spina, Edoardo; Mondello, Stefania; Labate, Angelo; Gambardella, Antonio; Aguglia, Umberto

    2014-08-01

    In this review we assess our currently available knowledge about reflex seizures with special emphasis on the difference between "generalized" reflex seizures induced by visual stimuli, thinking, praxis and language tasks, and "focal" seizures induced by startle, eating, music, hot water, somatosensory stimuli and orgasm. We discuss in particular evidence from animal, clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging studies supporting the concept that "generalized" reflex seizures, usually occurring in the setting of IGE, should be considered as focal seizures with quick secondary generalization. We also review recent advances in genetic and therapeutic approach of reflex seizures.

  10. Long-term treatment with responsive brain stimulation in adults with refractory partial seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bergey, Gregory K.; Mizrahi, Eli M.; Goldman, Alica; King-Stephens, David; Nair, Dileep; Srinivasan, Shraddha; Jobst, Barbara; Gross, Robert E.; Shields, Donald C.; Barkley, Gregory; Salanova, Vicenta; Olejniczak, Piotr; Cole, Andrew; Cash, Sydney S.; Noe, Katherine; Wharen, Robert; Worrell, Gregory; Murro, Anthony M.; Edwards, Jonathan; Duchowny, Michael; Spencer, David; Smith, Michael; Geller, Eric; Gwinn, Ryder; Skidmore, Christopher; Eisenschenk, Stephan; Berg, Michel; Heck, Christianne; Van Ness, Paul; Fountain, Nathan; Rutecki, Paul; Massey, Andrew; O'Donovan, Cormac; Labar, Douglas; Duckrow, Robert B.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Courtney, Tracy; Sun, Felice T.; Seale, Cairn G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The long-term efficacy and safety of responsive direct neurostimulation was assessed in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures. Methods: All participants were treated with a cranially implanted responsive neurostimulator that delivers stimulation to 1 or 2 seizure foci via chronically implanted electrodes when specific electrocorticographic patterns are detected (RNS System). Participants had completed a 2-year primarily open-label safety study (n = 65) or a 2-year randomized blinded controlled safety and efficacy study (n = 191); 230 participants transitioned into an ongoing 7-year study to assess safety and efficacy. Results: The average participant was 34 (±11.4) years old with epilepsy for 19.6 (±11.4) years. The median preimplant frequency of disabling partial or generalized tonic-clonic seizures was 10.2 seizures a month. The median percent seizure reduction in the randomized blinded controlled trial was 44% at 1 year and 53% at 2 years (p < 0.0001, generalized estimating equation) and ranged from 48% to 66% over postimplant years 3 through 6 in the long-term study. Improvements in quality of life were maintained (p < 0.05). The most common serious device-related adverse events over the mean 5.4 years of follow-up were implant site infection (9.0%) involving soft tissue and neurostimulator explantation (4.7%). Conclusions: The RNS System is the first direct brain responsive neurostimulator. Acute and sustained efficacy and safety were demonstrated in adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures arising from 1 or 2 foci over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. This experience supports the RNS System as a treatment option for refractory partial seizures. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class IV evidence that for adults with medically refractory partial onset seizures, responsive direct cortical stimulation reduces seizures and improves quality of life over a mean follow-up of 5.4 years. PMID:25616485

  11. Prolactin and gonadotrophin changes following generalised and partial seizures.

    PubMed Central

    Dana-Haeri, J; Trimble, M r; Oxley, J

    1983-01-01

    Postictal values of prolactin, LH and FSH have been recorded in patients with both generalised tonic-clonic and partial seizures. Elevations of prolactin and LH were seen immediately and at 20 minutes in males and females with generalised attacks. At sixty minutes values for prolactin had fallen to baseline levels, but LH remained elevated. FSH values were increased in females only, at twenty and sixty minutes. Following partial seizures prolactin was elevated, especially with complex partial seizures, at twenty minutes. These results are discussed in the light of known electrophysiological mechanisms relating to partial seizures, and clinical guidelines for the use of neurohormonal tests in the evaluation of seizures are suggested. PMID:6405014

  12. An algorithm for seizure onset detection using intracranial EEG.

    PubMed

    Kharbouch, Alaa; Shoeb, Ali; Guttag, John; Cash, Sydney S

    2011-12-01

    This article addresses the problem of real-time seizure detection from intracranial EEG (IEEG). One difficulty in creating an approach that can be used for many patients is the heterogeneity of seizure IEEG patterns across different patients and even within a patient. In addition, simultaneously maximizing sensitivity and minimizing latency and false detection rates has been challenging as these are competing objectives. Automated machine learning systems provide a mechanism for dealing with these hurdles. Here we present and evaluate an algorithm for real-time seizure onset detection from IEEG using a machine-learning approach that permits a patient-specific solution. We extract temporal and spectral features across all intracranial EEG channels. A pattern recognition component is trained using these feature vectors and tested against unseen continuous data from the same patient. When tested on more than 875 hours of IEEG data from 10 patients, the algorithm detected 97% of 67 test seizures of several types with a median detection delay of 5 seconds and a median false alarm rate of 0.6 false alarms per 24-hour period. The sensitivity was 100% for 8 of 10 patients. These results indicate that a sensitive, specific, and relatively short-latency detection system based on machine learning can be employed for seizure detection from EEG using a full set of intracranial electrodes to individual patients. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  13. Seizure Clustering during Drug Treatment Affects Seizure Outcome and Mortality of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    To provide evidence of whether seizure clustering is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, a prospective, long-term population-based study was performed. One hundred and twenty patients who had been followed since disease onset (average age 37.0 years, SD 7.1, median 40.0, range 11-42; incident cases)…

  14. Pediatric-onset gelastic seizures: clinical data and outcome.

    PubMed

    Shahar, Eli; Kramer, Uri; Mahajnah, Muhammad; Lerman-Sagie, Tallie; Goez, Rachel; Gross, Varda; Kutai, Miriam; Genizi, Jacob

    2007-07-01

    Gelastic seizures are an extremely rare form of epilepsy defined as automatic bouts of laughter without mirth commonly associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. The objective was to survey all Israeli children found to develop recurrent gelastic seizures and report presenting symptoms, electroencephalographic and radiologic data, and response to either antiepileptic drugs or surgery. Ten children who developed gelastic seizures at the age of 1 week to 6.5 years (mean, 25 months) at a frequency from 3 bouts per week to >10 prolonged bouts per day were followed for a period of 1.3-12 years (mean, 6 years). Seven cases were defined as symptomatic: cortical magnetic resonance imaging revealed a hypothalamic hamartoma in four patients and cortical abnormalities in three others. Seizure control was achieved in four patients, including a neonate with status gelasticus and hypothalamic hamartoma, and partial control in one more. Five children remained resistant to polytherapy, including three with hypothalamic hamartoma even after two of them underwent hemartoma excision. Thus, children with gelastic seizures may respond relatively well to drug therapy. Four of the 10 patients became seizure free with drug therapy; in three intractable symptomatic cases, surgery was tried but failed in two of the three.

  15. Consciousness and epilepsy: why are complex-partial seizures complex?

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Why do complex-partial seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) cause a loss of consciousness? Abnormal function of the medial temporal lobe is expected to cause memory loss, but it is unclear why profoundly impaired consciousness is so common in temporal lobe seizures. Recent exciting advances in behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging techniques spanning both human patients and animal models may allow new insights into this old question. While behavioral automatisms are often associated with diminished consciousness during temporal lobe seizures, impaired consciousness without ictal motor activity has also been described. Some have argued that electrographic lateralization of seizure activity to the left temporal lobe is most likely to cause impaired consciousness, but the evidence remains equivocal. Other data correlates ictal consciousness in TLE with bilateral temporal lobe involvement of seizure spiking. Nevertheless, it remains unclear why bilateral temporal seizures should impair responsiveness. Recent evidence has shown that impaired consciousness during temporal lobe seizures is correlated with large-amplitude slow EEG activity and neuroimaging signal decreases in the frontal and parietal association cortices. This abnormal decreased function in the neocortex contrasts with fast polyspike activity and elevated cerebral blood flow in limbic and other subcortical structures ictally. Our laboratory has thus proposed the “network inhibition hypothesis,” in which seizure activity propagates to subcortical regions necessary for cortical activation, allowing the cortex to descend into an inhibited state of unconsciousness during complex-partial temporal lobe seizures. Supporting this hypothesis, recent rat studies during partial limbic seizures have shown that behavioral arrest is associated with frontal cortical slow waves, decreased neuronal firing, and hypometabolism. Animal studies further demonstrate that cortical deactivation and behavioral

  16. Neologistic speech automatisms during complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Bell, W L; Horner, J; Logue, P; Radtke, R A

    1990-01-01

    There are no documented cases of seizures causing reiterative neologistic speech automatisms. We report an 18-year-old right-handed woman with stereotypic ictal speech automatisms characterized by phonemic jargon and reiterative neologisms. Video-EEG during the reiterative neologisms demonstrated rhythmic delta activity, which was most prominent in the left posterior temporal region. At surgery, there was an arteriovenous malformation impinging on the left supramarginal gyrus and the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus. Though intelligible speech automatisms can result from seizure foci in either hemisphere, neologistic speech automatisms may implicate a focus in the language-dominant hemisphere.

  17. Features and futures: seizure detection in partial epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Harnod, Tomor; Liu, Wentai

    2011-10-01

    Many factors underlying basic epileptic conditions determine the characteristics of epileptic seizures and the therapeutic outcome. Diagnosis and treatment rely on the clinical manifestations as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic activities. This article briefly reviews the fundamentals of the EEG, interictal, and ictal electrical activities of both extracranial and intracranial EEG of partial epilepsies, based on the information obtained from epilepsy patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery. The authors also present the status of their current research, focusing on decomposed seizure sources and the rendered spatial-temporal transitions in focal seizure.

  18. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals.

  19. Gelastic epilepsy and dysprosodia in a case of late-onset right frontal seizures.

    PubMed

    Cercy, Steven P; Kuluva, Joshua E

    2009-10-01

    Gelastic epilepsy (GE) is an uncommon type of seizure disorder characterized by stereotyped, unprovoked, inappropriate ictal laughter. GE is most frequently associated with hypothalamic hamartoma, with onset almost invariably occurring during childhood. GE also occurs occasionally with temporal and frontal cortical seizure foci. We describe an unusual case of senescent-onset GE with a right frontal seizure focus. In addition to laughter, dysprosodia was a clinical feature. Clinical and electroencephalographic evidence of seizure activity ceased on levetiracetam, and the patient showed concurrent improvement in cognitive function. We review the evidence for the cerebral representation of laughter and prosody, and discuss issues bearing on the differential diagnosis and management of GE.

  20. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Hauf, Martinus; Pollo, Claudio; Müller, Markus; Weisstanner, Christian; Wiest, Roland; Schindler, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure. Methods Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels. Results In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings). The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied. Conclusions We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent

  1. A minimum of 3 months of dietary fish oil supplementation is required to raise amygdaloid afterdischarge seizure thresholds in rats--implications for treating complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Taha, Ameer Y; Trepanier, Marc-Olivier; Ciobanu, Flaviu A; Taha, Nadeen M; Ahmed, Muaz; Zeng, Qiudi; Cheuk, Waiyin I; Ip, Bryan; Filo, Elvis; Scott, Brian W; Burnham, W M; Bazinet, Richard P

    2013-04-01

    Complex partial seizures, which typically originate in limbic structures such as the amygdala, are often resistant to antiseizure medications. Our goal was to investigate the effects of chronic dietary supplementation with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) derived from fish oil on seizure thresholds in the amygdala, as well as on blood and brain PUFA levels. The acute effects of injected n-3 PUFAs--eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)--were also tested in the maximal pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure model. In amygdala-implanted subjects, fish oil supplementation significantly increased amygdaloid afterdischarge thresholds, as compared with controls at 3, 5, and 7 months after the start of supplementation. Fish oil supplementation also increased serum EPA and DHA concentrations. DHA concentration in the pyriform-amygdala area increased in the fish-oil treated group by 17-34%, but this effect did not reach statistical significance (P=0.065). DHA significantly increased the latency to seizure onset in the PTZ seizure model, whereas EPA had no significant effect. These observations suggest that chronic dietary fish oil supplementation can raise focal amygdaloid seizure thresholds and that this effect is likely mediated by DHA rather than by EPA.

  2. The causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shasha; Yu, Weihua; Lü, Yang

    2016-01-01

    With increasing age, the prevalence and incidence of epilepsy and seizures increases correspondingly. New-onset epilepsy in elderly people often has underlying etiology, including cerebrovascular diseases, primary neuron degenerative disorders, intracerebral tumors, and traumatic head injury. In addition, an acute symptomatic seizure cannot be called epilepsy, which manifests usually as a common symptom secondary to metabolic or toxicity factors in older people. In this review, we have mainly focused on the causes of new-onset epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. This knowledge will certainly help us to understand the reasons for high incidences of epilepsy and seizures in elderly people. We look forward to controlling epileptic seizures via the treatment of primary diseases in the future. PMID:27382285

  3. Line Length: An Efficient Feature for Seizure Onset Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    feature was evaluated over a total of 1,215 hours of intracranial EEG signal from 10 patients. Results confirmed this feature as being useful for...of 111 seizures analyzed of which 23 were subclinical. Keywords – seizure detection, fractal dimension . I. INTRODUCTION There is a lot of...Olsen [4], and later referred to as curve length in [3]. This feature can be derived from the fractal dimension by Katz [5] studied in [6]-[7]; however

  4. Cerebral blood flow during paroxysmal EEG activation induced by sleep in patients with complex partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Gozukirmizi, E.; Meyer, J.S.; Okabe, T.; Amano, T.; Mortel, K.; Karacan, I.

    1982-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements were combined with sleep polysomnography in nine patients with complex partial seizures. Two methods were used: the 133Xe method for measuring regional (rCBF) and the stable xenon CT method for local (LCBF). Compared to nonepileptic subjects, who show diffuse CBF decreases during stages I-II, non-REM sleep onset, patients with complex partial seizures show statistically significant increases in CBF which are maximal in regions where the EEG focus is localized and are predominantly seen in one temporal region but are also propagated to other cerebral areas. Both CBF methods gave comparable results, but greater statistical significance was achieved by stable xenon CT methodology. CBF increases are more diffuse than predicted by EEG paroxysmal activity recorded from scalp electrodes. An advantage of the 133Xe inhalation method was achievement of reliable data despite movement of the head. This was attributed to the use of a helmet which maintained the probes approximated to the scalp. Disadvantages were poor resolution (7 cm3) and two-dimensional information. The advantage of stable xenon CT method is excellent resolution (80 mm3) in three dimensions, but a disadvantage is that movement of the head in patients with seizure disorders may limit satisfactory measurements.

  5. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Convulsiones (Seizures) Although seizures can be frightening, many last only ...

  6. Comparison of fractal dimension estimation algorithms for epileptic seizure onset detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polychronaki, G. E.; Ktonas, P. Y.; Gatzonis, S.; Siatouni, A.; Asvestas, P. A.; Tsekou, H.; Sakas, D.; Nikita, K. S.

    2010-08-01

    Fractal dimension (FD) is a natural measure of the irregularity of a curve. In this study the performances of three waveform FD estimation algorithms (i.e. Katz's, Higuchi's and the k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) algorithm) were compared in terms of their ability to detect the onset of epileptic seizures in scalp electroencephalogram (EEG). The selection of parameters involved in FD estimation, evaluation of the accuracy of the different algorithms and assessment of their robustness in the presence of noise were performed based on synthetic signals of known FD. When applied to scalp EEG data, Katz's and Higuchi's algorithms were found to be incapable of producing consistent changes of a single type (either a drop or an increase) during seizures. On the other hand, the k-NN algorithm produced a drop, starting close to the seizure onset, in most seizures of all patients. The k-NN algorithm outperformed both Katz's and Higuchi's algorithms in terms of robustness in the presence of noise and seizure onset detection ability. The seizure detection methodology, based on the k-NN algorithm, yielded in the training data set a sensitivity of 100% with 10.10 s mean detection delay and a false positive rate of 0.27 h-1, while the corresponding values in the testing data set were 100%, 8.82 s and 0.42 h-1, respectively. The above detection results compare favourably to those of other seizure onset detection methodologies applied to scalp EEG in the literature. The methodology described, based on the k-NN algorithm, appears to be promising for the detection of the onset of epileptic seizures based on scalp EEG.

  7. Comparison of fractal dimension estimation algorithms for epileptic seizure onset detection.

    PubMed

    Polychronaki, G E; Ktonas, P Y; Gatzonis, S; Siatouni, A; Asvestas, P A; Tsekou, H; Sakas, D; Nikita, K S

    2010-08-01

    Fractal dimension (FD) is a natural measure of the irregularity of a curve. In this study the performances of three waveform FD estimation algorithms (i.e. Katz's, Higuchi's and the k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) algorithm) were compared in terms of their ability to detect the onset of epileptic seizures in scalp electroencephalogram (EEG). The selection of parameters involved in FD estimation, evaluation of the accuracy of the different algorithms and assessment of their robustness in the presence of noise were performed based on synthetic signals of known FD. When applied to scalp EEG data, Katz's and Higuchi's algorithms were found to be incapable of producing consistent changes of a single type (either a drop or an increase) during seizures. On the other hand, the k-NN algorithm produced a drop, starting close to the seizure onset, in most seizures of all patients. The k-NN algorithm outperformed both Katz's and Higuchi's algorithms in terms of robustness in the presence of noise and seizure onset detection ability. The seizure detection methodology, based on the k-NN algorithm, yielded in the training data set a sensitivity of 100% with 10.10 s mean detection delay and a false positive rate of 0.27 h(-1), while the corresponding values in the testing data set were 100%, 8.82 s and 0.42 h(-1), respectively. The above detection results compare favourably to those of other seizure onset detection methodologies applied to scalp EEG in the literature. The methodology described, based on the k-NN algorithm, appears to be promising for the detection of the onset of epileptic seizures based on scalp EEG.

  8. Clinical analysis of leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody associated with limbic encephalitis onset with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhimei; Cui, Tao; Shi, Weixiong; Wang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We summarized the clinical characteristics of patients presenting with seizures and limbic encephalitis (LE) associated with leucine-rich glioma inactivated-1 protein antibody (LGI1) in order help recognize and treat this condition at its onset. We analyzed clinical, video electroencephalogram (VEEG), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and laboratory data of 10 patients who presented with LGI1-LE and followed up their outcomes from 2 to 16 (9.4 ± 4.2) months. All patients presented with seizures onset, including faciobrachial dystonic seizure (FBDS), partial seizure (PS), and generalized tonic-clonic seizure (GTCS). Four patients (Cases 3, 5, 7, and 8) had mild cognitive deficits. Interictal VEEG showed normal patterns, focal slowing, or sharp waves in the temporal or frontotemporal lobes. Ictal VEEG of Cases 4, 5, and 7 showed diffuse voltage depression preceding FBDS, a left frontal/temporal origin, and a bilateral temporal origin, respectively. Ictal foci could not be localized in other cases. MRI scan revealed T2/fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensity and evidence of edema in the right medial temporal lobe in Case 3, left hippocampal atrophy in Case 5, hyperintensities in the bilateral medial temporal lobes in Case 7, and hyperintensities in the basal ganglia and frontal cortex in Case 10. All 10 serum samples were positive for LGI1 antibody, but it was only detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 7 patients. Five patients (Cases 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8) presented with hyponatremia. One patient (Case 2) was diagnosed with small cell lung cancer. While responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were poor, most patients (except Case 2) responded favorably to immunotherapy. LGI1-LE may initially manifest with various types of seizures, particularly FBDS and complex partial seizures (CPS) of mesial temporal origin, and slowly progressive cognitive involvement. Clinical follow-up, VEEG monitoring, and MRI scan are helpful in early

  9. Yield of Emergent Neuroimaging in Children with New-Onset Seizure and Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Todd W.; Johnson, Kara B.; Michelson, Kenneth A.; Nigrovic, Lise E.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Kimia MD, Amir A.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the yield of emergent neuroimaging among children with new-onset seizures presenting with status epilepticus. METHOD We performed a cross-sectional study of children seen at a single ED between 1995–2012 with new-onset seizure presenting with status epilepticus. We defined status epilepticus as a single seizure or multiple seizures without regaining consciousness lasting 30 minutes or longer. Our primary outcome was urgent or emergent intracranial pathology identified on neuroimaging. We categorized neuroimaging results as emergent if they would have changed acute management as assessed by a blinded neuroradiologist and neurologist. To ensure abnormalities were not missed, we review neuroimaging results for 30 days following the initial episode of SE. RESULTS We included 177 children presenting with new-onset seizure with status epilepticus, of whom 170 (96%) had neuroimaging performed. Abnormal findings were identified on neuroimaging in 64/177 (36%, 95% confidence interval 29–43%) children with 15 (8.5%, 95% confidence interval 5.2–14%) children having urgent or emergent pathology. Four (27%) of the 15 children with urgent or emergent findings had a normal non-contrast computed tomography scan and a subsequently abnormal magnetic resonance image. Longer seizure duration and older age were associated with urgent or emergent intracranial pathology. CONCLUSION A substantial minority of children with new-onset seizures presenting with status epilepticus have urgent or emergent intracranial pathology identified on neuroimaging. Clinicians should strongly consider emergent neuroimaging in these children. Magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred imaging modality when available and safe. PMID:26773658

  10. Giant Intradural Mucocele in a Patient with Adult Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kechagias, E.; Georgakoulias, N.; Ioakimidou, C.; Kyriazi, S.; Kontogeorgos, G.; Seretis, A.

    2009-01-01

    A rare case of mucopyocele in a patient who presented with epileptic seizures is reported. The computed tomography scan (CT) and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed an intradural extension of a giant fronto-ethmoidal mucopyocele, eroding the cribriform plate and compressing both frontal lobes. The lesion was removed by craniotomy with elimination of the mass effect and reconstruction of the anterior skull base. An intracranial-intradural mucopyocele is an extremely rare cause of generalized convulsion as a presenting symptom, with only 6 cases reported in the literature. The total removal of the lesion associated with anterior fossa reconstruction is the treatment of choice. PMID:20847833

  11. Hippocampal body changes in pure partial onset sleep and pure partial onset waking epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Mahmood; Zandieh, Ali; Hajimirzabeigi, Alireza; Tahsini, Majid; Vakhshiteh, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Elham

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate for the first time the hippocampal changes in patients with pure sleep and pure waking epilepsy. A total of 35 patients with pure partial onset sleep epilepsy and 35 patients with pure partial onset waking epilepsy matched for age and sex ratio were enrolled. MR images were analyzed to determine hippocampal body changes. Rounding ratio of hippocampal body was defined as short axis divided by long axis and hippocampal bodies with ratios ≥ 0.70 were considered rounded. Hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy were found in nine (25.7 %) and seven (20.0 %) patients with pure sleep epilepsy, and in 12 (34.3 %) and 11 (31.4 %) patients with pure waking epilepsy, respectively (P > 0.05 for the comparison between sleep and waking epilepsy). However, proportion of subjects with rounded hippocampal bodies (15, 42.9 % vs. 3, 8.6 % for patients with sleep and waking epilepsy, respectively) and rounding ratios of both left and right hippocampal bodies (0.66 ± 0.13 and 0.61 ± 0.12, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in sleep epileptic patients vs. 0.57 ± 0.11 and 0.55 ± 0.11, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in waking epileptic patients) were increased in patients with sleep epilepsy (P < 0.05). Further, in sleep epileptic patients with left sided hippocampal body rounding, epileptiform discharges were more readily lateralized to the left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy are not different between pure partial onset sleep and waking epileptic patients. However, rounding ratio and frequency of hippocampal body rounding are increased in sleep epileptic patients.

  12. Microwave oven injuries in patients with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    DeToledo, John C; Lowe, Merredith R

    2004-10-01

    Microwave ovens are often recommended as a safe cooking alternative for persons with epilepsy. We report four patients who suffered serious burns to their hands while handling microwave-heated liquids during a complex partial seizure (CPS). Injuries were due to the contact of the skin with a very hot container. The fact that all patients held on to the hot containers despite being burned and that they did not remember experiencing any pain at the time of the accident indicates that neither high temperatures nor pain will prevent patients who are having a CPS from suffering this type of injury. Unfortunately, there is no foolproof way to prevent the individual from opening the oven and removing its contents during a CPS. The only solution for this problem is "prevention"-individuals with poorly controlled CPS should be cautioned about these risks. The use of microwave settings that permit the heating but not boiling of liquids and the use of gloves while heating food and liquids to scalding temperatures may minimize the risk of this type of injury.

  13. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster.

  14. Partial complex seizures in children: an analysis of 69 seizures in 24 patients using EEG FM radiotelemetry and videotape recording.

    PubMed

    Holmes, G L

    1984-01-01

    The electroencephalographic and clinical manifestations of 69 partial complex seizures in 24 pediatric patients recorded during EEG-FM radiotelemetry and videotape monitoring were reviewed. The seizure could be divided into 3 electro-clinical types. Type I attacks were characterized by an initial motionless stare often followed by automatisms and associated with initial lateralized EEG changes. Type II attacks began with automatic behavior and had bilateral, diffuse changes on the EEG initially. Type II attacks began with a loss of body tone followed by automatisms and with bilateral EEG changes initially. This study demonstrates that both the clinical and electroencephalographic aspects of partial complex seizures in children are similar to those reported in adults. This similarity may be secondary to the early maturation of the limbic structures.

  15. Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas A; Glyn, Sarah E; Akiyama, Satoshi; Hill, Thomas D M; Hill, Andrew J; Weston, Samantha E; Burnett, Matthew D A; Yamasaki, Yuki; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2012-06-01

    Cannabis sativa has been associated with contradictory effects upon seizure states despite its medicinal use by numerous people with epilepsy. We have recently shown that the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduces seizure severity and lethality in the well-established in vivo model of pentylenetetrazole-induced generalised seizures, suggesting that earlier, small-scale clinical trials examining CBD effects in people with epilepsy warrant renewed attention. Here, we report the effects of pure CBD (1, 10 and 100mg/kg) in two other established rodent seizure models, the acute pilocarpine model of temporal lobe seizure and the penicillin model of partial seizure. Seizure activity was video recorded and scored offline using model-specific seizure severity scales. In the pilocarpine model CBD (all doses) significantly reduced the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe seizures. In the penicillin model, CBD (≥ 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the percentage mortality as a result of seizures; CBD (all doses) also decreased the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe tonic-clonic seizures. These results extend the anti-convulsant profile of CBD; when combined with a reported absence of psychoactive effects, this evidence strongly supports CBD as a therapeutic candidate for a diverse range of human epilepsies.

  16. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V; Hussaini, Jamal; Hussaini, Jalal; Delaviz, Ali; Delaviz, Fatemeh; Habibi, Shaghayegh; Ramezanpoor, Sara

    2016-01-05

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence.

  17. A signal processing based analysis and prediction of seizure onset in patients with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Hamidreza; Kulish, Vladimir V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main areas of behavioural neuroscience is forecasting the human behaviour. Epilepsy is a central nervous system disorder in which nerve cell activity in the brain becomes disrupted, causing seizures or periods of unusual behaviour, sensations and sometimes loss of consciousness. An estimated 5% of the world population has epileptic seizure but there is not any method to cure it. More than 30% of people with epilepsy cannot control seizure. Epileptic seizure prediction, refers to forecasting the occurrence of epileptic seizures, is one of the most important but challenging problems in biomedical sciences, across the world. In this research we propose a new methodology which is based on studying the EEG signals using two measures, the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension. In order to validate the proposed method, it is applied to epileptic EEG signals of patients by computing the Hurst exponent and fractal dimension, and then the results are validated versus the reference data. The results of these analyses show that we are able to forecast the onset of a seizure on average of 25.76 seconds before the time of occurrence. PMID:26586477

  18. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  19. Emerging drugs for partial-onset epilepsy: a review of brivaracetam

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lan; Li, Shuchuen

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 12 new antiepileptic drugs approved in the last 2 decades. Even with these newer agents, seizure remission is still unachievable in around 30% of patients with partial-onset seizures (POS). Brivaracetam (BRV) is chemically related to levetiracetam (LEV) and possesses a strong binding affinity for the synaptic vesicle protein 2A tenfold above that of LEV, and other possible modes of antiepileptic actions. BRV is now under Phase III development for POS, but data from one Phase III trial also suggested its potential efficacy for primary generalized seizures. The purpose of this review is to provide updated information on the mechanisms of action of the available antiepileptic drugs, with a focus on BRV to assess its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability in patients with uncontrolled POS. To date, six Phase IIb and III clinical trials have been performed to investigate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of BRV as an adjunctive treatment for patients with POS. Generally, BRV was well tolerated and did not show significant difference in safety profile, compared to placebo. The efficacy outcomes of BRV, although not consistent across trials, did indicate that BRV was a promising add-on therapy for patients with POS. In conclusion, the many favorable attributes of BRV, like its high oral efficacy, good tolerability, dosing regimen, and minimal drug interaction, make it a promising antiepileptic therapy for patients with uncontrolled partial-onset epilepsy. PMID:27217762

  20. Treatment approach in a child with hysterical seizures superimposed on partial complex seizures.

    PubMed

    Parraga, H C; Kashani, J H

    1981-03-01

    This article reports the case of a 9 1/2 year old child with a history of psychomotor epilepsy which was uncontrolled by multiple anticonvulsant medications. When admitted to the psychiatric inpatient service, he was treated with a combination of pharmacological, behavioural and psychodynamically oriented approaches. A period of intensive family counseling was conducted to clarify the parents' concerns about causality of the seizures and methods for dealing with them. This combined approach led to a complete cessation of reported seizures and a decreased number and dosage of anticonvulsant medications. The authors discuss the reluctance of some physicians to accept the co-existence of neurogenic and psychogenic seizures in a given patient. Patients with pharmacologically uncontrolled seizures must be identified and accurately diagnosed (neurogenic and/or psychogenic) to prevent complication such as over-medication and to administer appropriate treatment. Multiple disciplinary therapy including psychodynamic, pharmacological, behavioural and educational approaches should be implemented.

  1. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... often with a loss of or change in consciousness. Seizures can be frightening, but most last only ... unusual sensations, uncontrollable muscle spasms, and loss of consciousness. Some seizures may be due to another medical ...

  2. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... because of sudden, abnormal electrical activity in the brain. When people think of seizures, they often think of convulsions in which a person's body shakes rapidly and uncontrollably. Not all seizures ... part of the brain. Generalized seizures are a result of abnormal activity ...

  3. Rapid eye movement sleep and hippocampal theta oscillations precede seizure onset in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sedigh-Sarvestani, Madineh; Thuku, Godfrey I; Sunderam, Sridhar; Parkar, Anjum; Weinstein, Steven L; Schiff, Steven J; Gluckman, Bruce J

    2014-01-22

    Improved understanding of the interaction between state of vigilance (SOV) and seizure onset has therapeutic potential. Six rats received injections of tetanus toxin (TeTX) in the ventral hippocampus that resulted in chronic spontaneous seizures. The distribution of SOV before 486 seizures was analyzed for a total of 19 d of recording. Rapid eye movement sleep (REM) and exploratory wake, both of which express prominent hippocampal theta rhythm, preceded 47 and 34%, for a total of 81%, of all seizures. Nonrapid eye movement sleep (NREM) and nonexploratory wake, neither of which expresses prominent theta, preceded 6.8 and 13% of seizures. We demonstrate that identification of SOV yields significant differentiation of seizure susceptibilities, with the instantaneous seizure rate during REM nearly 10 times higher than baseline and the rate for NREM less than half of baseline. Survival analysis indicated a shorter duration of preseizure REM bouts, with a maximum transition to seizure at ∼90 s after the onset of REM. This study provides the first analysis of a correlation between SOV and seizure onset in the TeTX model of temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the first demonstration that hippocampal theta rhythms associated with natural behavioral states can serve a seizure-promoting role. Our findings are in contrast with previous studies suggesting that the correlations between SOV and seizures are primarily governed by circadian oscillations and the notion that hippocampal theta rhythms inhibit seizures. The documentation of significant SOV-dependent seizure susceptibilities indicates the potential utility of SOV and its time course in seizure prediction and control.

  4. Seizure-Onset Mapping Based on Time-Variant Multivariate Functional Connectivity Analysis of High-Dimensional Intracranial EEG: A Kalman Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Lie, Octavian V; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2017-01-01

    The visual interpretation of intracranial EEG (iEEG) is the standard method used in complex epilepsy surgery cases to map the regions of seizure onset targeted for resection. Still, visual iEEG analysis is labor-intensive and biased due to interpreter dependency. Multivariate parametric functional connectivity measures using adaptive autoregressive (AR) modeling of the iEEG signals based on the Kalman filter algorithm have been used successfully to localize the electrographic seizure onsets. Due to their high computational cost, these methods have been applied to a limited number of iEEG time-series (<60). The aim of this study was to test two Kalman filter implementations, a well-known multivariate adaptive AR model (Arnold et al. 1998) and a simplified, computationally efficient derivation of it, for their potential application to connectivity analysis of high-dimensional (up to 192 channels) iEEG data. When used on simulated seizures together with a multivariate connectivity estimator, the partial directed coherence, the two AR models were compared for their ability to reconstitute the designed seizure signal connections from noisy data. Next, focal seizures from iEEG recordings (73-113 channels) in three patients rendered seizure-free after surgery were mapped with the outdegree, a graph-theory index of outward directed connectivity. Simulation results indicated high levels of mapping accuracy for the two models in the presence of low-to-moderate noise cross-correlation. Accordingly, both AR models correctly mapped the real seizure onset to the resection volume. This study supports the possibility of conducting fully data-driven multivariate connectivity estimations on high-dimensional iEEG datasets using the Kalman filter approach.

  5. A new algorithm for epilepsy seizure onset detection and spread estimation from EEG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero-Rincón, Antonio; Pereyra, Marcelo; D'Giano, Carlos; Batatia, Hadj; Risk, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy is a main public health issue. Patients suffering from this disease often exhibit different physical characterizations, which result from the synchronous and excessive discharge of a group of neurons in the cerebral cortex. Extracting this information using EEG signals is an important problem in biomedical signal processing. In this work we propose a new algorithm for seizure onset detection and spread estimation in epilepsy patients. The algorithm is based on a multilevel 1-D wavelet decomposition that captures the physiological brain frequency signals coupled with a generalized gaussian model. Preliminary experiments with signals from 30 epilepsy crisis and 11 subjects, suggest that the proposed methodology is a powerful tool for detecting the onset of epilepsy seizures with his spread across the brain.

  6. Case report of a patient with complex partial frontal lobe seizures as a complication of bifrontal lobotomy.

    PubMed

    Engelborghs, S; Borggreve, F; Pickut, B A; Michiels, K; Van de Mosselaer, W; De Deyn, P P

    1998-06-01

    This case report describes an 85 year-old woman who underwent a bilateral frontal lobotomy for presumed schizophrenia 50 years ago. The patient presented with sudden alterations of consciousness accompanied by motionless staring and speech and movement arrest. After 5 to 10 seconds, contact recovered briskly. As there was electrophysiological evidence for a frontal epileptic focus, these fits were classified as complex partial frontal lobe seizures with impairment of consciousness at onset. An aetiological link with the bifrontal lobotomy is probable. At the occasion of this case report, complications of frontal lobotomy are reviewed.

  7. Menkes disease – An important cause of early onset refractory seizures

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Puneet; Kannan, Lakshminarayanan; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop; Kumar, Atin; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Gulati, Sheffali

    2014-01-01

    Context: Menkes disease is an X-linked multisystem disorder characterized by early onset of cerebral and cerebellar neurodegeneration, fair skin, hypopigmented sparse hair and connective tissue abnormalities. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the clinical, electrophysiological and radiological features of children with Menkes disease seen at our institute. Setting/Design: The medical records of children diagnosed with Menkes disease admitted in the pediatric neurology ward or attending the special pediatric neurology clinic at a tertiary care and a referral hospital in North India, from January 2010 to December 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. The clinical data of each case was subsequently summarized and reported. Statistical analysis used: Descriptive statistics were used. Results: During the study period, 1174 children were seen. Out of these, 6 cases were diagnosed as Menkes disease on the basis of clinical phenotype, low serum copper and ceruloplasmin and supportive neuroimaging. All the children were males and had disease onset within 3 months of age, with 4 children presenting in the neonatal period. Global developmental delay and refractory seizures were the predominant clinical symptoms. Two children had symptomatic West syndrome. Other seizure semiologies included tonic-clonic (4), myoclonic (2) and tonic seizures (1). The electroencephalographic abnormalities included hypsarrythmia (2) and multifocal epileptiform discharges (3). The salient radiological features included white matter changes, temporal lobe abnormalities, global atrophy, subdural hygromas and tortuous cerebral blood vessels. Conclusions: Menkes disease should be suspected in a case of refractory early onset seizures especially in the presence of subtle clinical clues. The neuroimaging findings may further support the diagnosis. PMID:24891895

  8. CDKL5 mutations cause infantile spasms, early onset seizures, and severe mental retardation in female patients

    PubMed Central

    Archer, H L; Evans, J; Edwards, S; Colley, J; Newbury‐Ecob, R; O'Callaghan, F; Huyton, M; O'Regan, M; Tolmie, J; Sampson, J; Clarke, A; Osborne, J

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine the frequency of mutations in CDKL5 in both male and female patients with infantile spasms or early onset epilepsy of unknown cause, and to consider whether the breadth of the reported phenotype would be extended by studying a different patient group. Methods Two groups of patients were investigated for CDKL5 mutations. Group 1 comprised 73 patients (57 female, 16 male) referred to Cardiff for CDKL5 analysis, of whom 49 (42 female, 7 male) had epileptic seizure onset in the first six months of life. Group 2 comprised 26 patients (11 female, 15 male) with infantile spasms previously recruited to a clinical trial, the UK Infantile Spasms Study. Where a likely pathogenic mutation was identified, further clinical data were reviewed. Results Seven likely pathogenic mutations were found among female patients from group 1 with epileptic seizure onset in the first six months of life, accounting for seven of the 42 in this group (17%). No mutations other than the already published mutation were found in female patients from group 2, or in any male patient from either study group. All patients with mutations had early signs of developmental delay and most had made little developmental progress. Further clinical information was available for six patients: autistic features and tactile hypersensitivity were common but only one had suggestive Rett‐like features. All had a severe epileptic seizure disorder, all but one of whom had myoclonic jerks. The EEG showed focal or generalised changes and in those with infantile spasms, hypsarrhythmia. Slow frequencies were seen frequently with a frontal or fronto‐temporal predominance and high amplitudes. Conclusions The spectrum of the epileptic seizure disorder, and associated EEG changes, in those with CDKL5 mutations is broader than previously reported. CDKL5 mutations are a significant cause of infantile spasms and early epileptic seizures in female patients, and of a later intractable seizure disorder

  9. Usefulness of ketogenic diet in a girl with migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuo; Imai, Katsumi; Oboshi, Taikan; Fujiwara, Yuh; Takeshita, Saoko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi

    2016-06-01

    Migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI) are an age-specific epilepsy syndrome characterized by migrating focal seizures, which are intractable to various antiepileptic drugs and cause severe developmental delay. We report a case of MPSI with heterozygous missense mutation in KCNT1, which was successfully managed by ketogenic diet. At age 2months, the patient developed epilepsy initially manifesting focal seizures with eye deviation and apnea, then evolving to secondarily generalized clonic convulsion. Various antiepileptic drugs including phenytoin, valproic acid, zonisamide, clobazam, levetiracetam, vitamin B6, and carbamazepine were not effective, but high-dose phenobarbital allowed discontinuation of midazolam infusion. Ictal scalp electroencephalogram showed migrating focal seizures. MPSI was suspected and she was transferred to our hospital for further treatment. Potassium bromide (KBr) was partially effective, but the effect was transient. High-dose KBr caused severe adverse effects such as over-sedation and hypercapnia, with no further effects on the seizures. At age 9months, we started a ketogenic diet, which improved seizure frequency and severity without obvious adverse effects, allowing her to be discharged from hospital. Ketogenic diet should be tried in patients with MPSI unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs. In MPSI, the difference in treatment response in patients with and those without KCNT1 mutation remains unknown. Accumulation of case reports would contribute to establish effective treatment options for MPSI.

  10. Migrating partial seizures of infancy: expansion of the electroclinical, radiological and pathological disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    McTague, Amy; Appleton, Richard; Avula, Shivaram; Cross, J Helen; King, Mary D; Jacques, Thomas S; Bhate, Sanjay; Cronin, Anthony; Curran, Andrew; Desurkar, Archana; Farrell, Michael A; Hughes, Elaine; Jefferson, Rosalind; Lascelles, Karine; Livingston, John; Meyer, Esther; McLellan, Ailsa; Poduri, Annapurna; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Spinty, Stefan; Kurian, Manju A; Kneen, Rachel

    2013-05-01

    Migrating partial seizures of infancy, also known as epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures, is a rare early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with poor prognosis, presenting with focal seizures in the first year of life. A national surveillance study was undertaken in conjunction with the British Paediatric Neurology Surveillance Unit to further define the clinical, pathological and molecular genetic features of this disorder. Fourteen children with migrating partial seizures of infancy were reported during the 2 year study period (estimated prevalence 0.11 per 100,000 children). The study has revealed that migrating partial seizures of infancy is associated with an expanded spectrum of clinical features (including severe gut dysmotility and a movement disorder) and electrographic features including hypsarrhythmia (associated with infantile spasms) and burst suppression. We also report novel brain imaging findings including delayed myelination with white matter hyperintensity on brain magnetic resonance imaging in one-third of the cohort, and decreased N-acetyl aspartate on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Putaminal atrophy (on both magnetic resonance imaging and at post-mortem) was evident in one patient. Additional neuropathological findings included bilateral hippocampal gliosis and neuronal loss in two patients who had post-mortem examinations. Within this cohort, we identified two patients with mutations in the newly discovered KCNT1 gene. Comparative genomic hybridization array, SCN1A testing and genetic testing for other currently known early infantile epileptic encephalopathy genes (including PLCB1 and SLC25A22) was non-informative for the rest of the cohort.

  11. A fuzzy logic system for seizure onset detection in intracranial EEG.

    PubMed

    Rabbi, Ahmed Fazle; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2012-01-01

    We present a multistage fuzzy rule-based algorithm for epileptic seizure onset detection. Amplitude, frequency, and entropy-based features were extracted from intracranial electroencephalogram (iEEG) recordings and considered as the inputs for a fuzzy system. These features extracted from multichannel iEEG signals were combined using fuzzy algorithms both in feature domain and in spatial domain. Fuzzy rules were derived based on experts' knowledge and reasoning. An adaptive fuzzy subsystem was used for combining characteristics features extracted from iEEG. For the spatial combination, three channels from epileptogenic zone and one from remote zone were considered into another fuzzy subsystem. Finally, a threshold procedure was applied to the fuzzy output derived from the final fuzzy subsystem. The method was evaluated on iEEG datasets selected from Freiburg Seizure Prediction EEG (FSPEEG) database. A total of 112.45 hours of intracranial EEG recordings was selected from 20 patients having 56 seizures was used for the system performance evaluation. The overall sensitivity of 95.8% with false detection rate of 0.26 per hour and average detection latency of 15.8 seconds was achieved.

  12. Possible induction of West syndrome by oxcarbazepine therapy in a patient with complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Veerapandiyan, Aravindhan; Singh, Piyush; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2012-03-01

    Oxcarbazepine has been reported to precipitate myoclonic, generalised tonic-clonic, absence, and complex partial seizures, and carbamazepine to precipitate absences, myoclonic seizures and spasms. Here, we report a one-year, six-month-old girl with complex partial seizures who developed infantile spasms, developmental regression, and hypsarrhythmia during the two weeks directly following initiation of oxcarbazepine (14 mg/kg/day). All of these resolved within a few days after discontinuation of this medication. Although we cannot rule out that the above association may have been coincidental, or that the improvement may have been due to concurrent therapy, this case raises the possibility that oxcarbazepine, like carbamazepine, may precipitate infantile spasms and West syndrome.

  13. Efficacy and Safety of Levetiracetam and Carbamazepine as Monotherapy in Partial Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Swaroop Hassan; Chakraborty, Ananya; Virupakshaiah, Akash; Kumar, Nithin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Levetiracetam (LEV) is a newer antiepileptic drug with better pharmacokinetic profile. Currently, it is frequently used for the treatment of partial seizures. The present study was undertaken to compare the efficacy and safety of LEV and Carbamazepine (CBZ) in partial epilepsy. Methods. This was a prospective, open labeled, randomized study. It was conducted in participants suffering from partial seizures after the approval of ethics committee and written informed consent. The first group received Tab LEV (500 to 3000 mg/day) and the second group received Tab CBZ (300 to 600 mg/day). The primary outcomes were efficacy and safety. The secondary outcome was the Quality of Life (QOL). Efficacy was assessed by comparing the seizure freedom rates at the end of 6 months. Safety profile was evaluated by comparing the adverse effects. QOL was assessed by QOLIE-10 scale. Results. The overall seizure freedom rate at the end of 6 months was 71.42% in CBZ group compared to 78.57% in LEV group (p = 0.2529). Both LEV and CBZ reported a similar incidence of adverse reactions. LEV group reported more behavioral changes like increased aggression and anxiety. Also, it showed better QOL compared to the CBZ group. Conclusion. LEV monotherapy and CBZ monotherapy demonstrated similar efficacy for treatment of partial epilepsy and were found to be well tolerated. PMID:26798511

  14. Characterization of two de novoKCNT1 mutations in children with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Francesca; Ambrosino, Paolo; Guacci, Anna; Chetta, Massimiliano; Marchese, Giovanna; Rocco, Teresa; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Manocchio, Laura; Mosca, Ilaria; Casara, Gianluca; Vecchi, Marilena; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Coppola, Giangennaro; Weisz, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The KCNT1 gene encodes for subunits contributing to the Na(+)-activated K(+) current (KNa), expressed in many cell types. Mutations in KCNT1 have been found in patients affected with a wide spectrum of early-onset epilepsies, including Malignant Migrating Partial Seizures in Infancy (MMPSI), a severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by pharmacoresistant focal seizures migrating from one brain region or hemisphere to another and neurodevelopment arrest or regression, resulting in profound disability. In the present study we report identification by whole exome sequencing (WES) of two de novo, heterozygous KCNT1 mutations (G288S and, not previously reported, M516V) in two unrelated MMPSI probands. Functional studies in a heterologous expression system revealed that channels formed by mutant KCNT1 subunits carried larger currents when compared to wild-type KCNT1 channels, both as homo- and heteromers with these last. Both mutations induced a marked leftward shift in homomeric channel activation gating. Interestingly, the KCNT1 blockers quinidine (3-1000μM) and bepridil (0.03-10μM) inhibited both wild-type and mutant KCNT1 currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with mutant channels showing higher sensitivity to blockade. This latter result suggests two genotype-tailored pharmacological strategies to specifically counteract the dysfunction of KCNT1 activating mutations in MMPSI patients.

  15. Successful treatment of migrating partial seizures in Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome with bromide.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Ayako; Saito, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Yoko; Okazaki, Tetsuya; Ohno, Koyo; Sejima, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Maegaki, Yoshihiro

    2016-08-01

    A girl with mild psychomotor developmental delay developed right or left hemiclonic convulsion at 10months of age. One month later, clusters of hemiclonic or bilateral tonic seizures with eyelid twitching emerged, resulting in status epilepticus. Treatment with phenobarbital and potassium bromide completely terminated the seizures within 10days. Ictal electroencephalography revealed a migrating focus of rhythmic 3-4Hz waves from the right temporal to right frontal regions and then to the left frontal regions. Genetic analysis was conducted based on the characteristic facial appearance of the patient, which identified a 2.1-Mb terminal deletion on chromosome 4p. This is the first case of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome complicated by epilepsy with migrating partial seizures.

  16. Biventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy in a patient presenting with new onset seizure: case report.

    PubMed

    Odiete, Oghenerukevwe; Nagendra, Ramanna; Lawson, Mark A; Okafor, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Ventricular noncompaction (VNC) of the myocardium is a rare genetic cardiomyopathy caused by a disorder during endocardial morphogenesis and could be accompanied by life-threatening complications. The major clinical manifestations of VNC are heart failure, arrhythmias, and embolic events. The left ventricle is the most commonly reported affected site, but a few cases of right ventricular involvement have also been reported. We report a case of biventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy in a 31-year-old woman presenting with a new onset seizure. On the second day of her telemetry-monitored hospitalization, she suffered a witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrest requiring emergency direct-current cardioversion and induced hypothermia. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed isolated left ventricular (LV) noncompaction and depressed LV systolic function. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed both left and right ventricular noncompaction. This unusual presentation highlights the importance of a complete and thorough evaluation of patients even when presenting with apparently noncardiac symptom(s).

  17. Mutational scanning of potassium, sodium and chloride ion channels in malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Del Giudice, Emanuele Miraglia; Bellini, Giulia; Longaretti, Francesca; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Pascotto, Antonio

    2006-03-01

    The mutational analysis of potassium (KCNQ2, KCNQ3), sodium (SCN1A, SCN2A), and chloride (CLCN2) ion channels was performed in three children with typical features of the recently described syndrome of migrating partial seizures in infancy. Mutational analysis was performed by PCR and automatic sequencing. The coding regions, including the exon-intron boundaries, were amplified in the patients using appropriate primers sets. No mutations associated to migrating partial seizures have been found. Mutational screening of CLCN2 gene, revealed a homozygous mutation G2003C (exon 17), leading to a Ser/Thr substitution at the codon 668, in two of the three patients. The same variation has been found in 38 out of 100 control alleles. The identification of the genetic basis of this new epileptic encephalopathy requires further studies that might be enforced by familial cases.

  18. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Tambucci, Renato; Basti, Claudia; Maresca, Maria; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine – a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic) neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency) and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration) as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea, diplopia, and vomiting. Adverse events can be minimized by appropriate titration. In conclusion, ESL seems to overcome some drawbacks of the previous antiepileptic drugs, suggesting a major role of ESL in the management of focal onset epilepsy for both new onset and

  19. Update on the role of eslicarbazepine acetate in the treatment of partial-onset epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tambucci, Renato; Basti, Claudia; Maresca, Maria; Coppola, Giangennaro; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once daily new third generation antiepileptic drug that shares the basic chemical structure of carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine - a dibenzazepine nucleus with the 5-carboxamide substituent, but is structurally different at the 10,11-position. ESL is a pro-drug metabolized to its major active metabolite eslicarbazepine. Despite the fact that the exact mechanism of action has not been fully elucidated, it is thought to involve inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSC). ESL inhibits sodium currents in a voltage-dependent way by an interaction predominantly with the inactivated state of the VGSC, thus selectively reducing the activity of rapidly firing (epileptic) neurons. ESL reduces VGSC availability through enhancement of slow inactivation. In Phase III studies, adjunctive therapy with ESL 800 or 1,200 mg/day leads to a significant decrease in the seizure frequency in adults with refractory partial onset epilepsy. Based on these results, ESL has been approved in Europe (by the European Medicines Agency) and in the United States (by the US Food and Drug Administration) as add-on therapy. Data on efficacy and safety have been confirmed by 1-year extension and real life observational studies. Recently, based on results from two randomized, double-blind, historical control Phase III trials, ESL received US Food and Drug Administration approval also as a monotherapy for patients with partial onset epilepsy. In the pediatric setting, encouraging results have been obtained suggesting its potential role in the management of epileptic children. Overall ESL was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events were dizziness, somnolence, headache, nausea, diplopia, and vomiting. Adverse events can be minimized by appropriate titration. In conclusion, ESL seems to overcome some drawbacks of the previous antiepileptic drugs, suggesting a major role of ESL in the management of focal onset epilepsy for both new onset and

  20. Design and Implementation of an On-Chip Patient-Specific Closed-Loop Seizure Onset and Termination Detection System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Bin Altaf, Muhammad Awais; Yoo, Jerald

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the design of an area- and energy-efficient closed-loop machine learning-based patient-specific seizure onset and termination detection algorithm, and its on-chip hardware implementation. Application- and scenario-based tradeoffs are compared and reviewed for seizure detection and suppression algorithm and system which comprises electroencephalography (EEG) data acquisition, feature extraction, classification, and stimulation. Support vector machine achieves a good tradeoff among power, area, patient specificity, latency, and classification accuracy for long-term monitoring of patients with limited training seizure patterns. Design challenges of EEG data acquisition on a multichannel wearable environment for a patch-type sensor are also discussed in detail. Dual-detector architecture incorporates two area-efficient linear support vector machine classifiers along with a weight-and-average algorithm to target high sensitivity and good specificity at once. On-chip implementation issues for a patient-specific transcranial electrical stimulation are also discussed. The system design is verified using CHB-MIT EEG database [1] with a comprehensive measurement criteria which achieves high sensitivity and specificity of 95.1% and 96.2%, respectively, with a small latency of 1 s. It also achieves seizure onset and termination detection delay of 2.98 and 3.82 s, respectively, with seizure length estimation error of 4.07 s.

  1. A recurrent KCNT1 mutation in two sporadic cases with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Atsushi; Shioda, Mutsuki; Okumura, Akihisa; Kidokoro, Hiroyuki; Sakauchi, Masako; Shimada, Shino; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Osawa, Makiko; Hirose, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    We performed analysis of KCNT1 in two unrelated patients with malignant migrating partial seizures in infancy. Both patients had intractable focal seizures since two months of age. Their seizures were characterized by a shift of epileptic focus during a single seizure and were resistant to most antiepileptic drugs but responded to vagus nerve stimulation in one and clorazepate in the other. Bidirectional sequencing for KCNT1 was analyzed by standard Sanger sequencing method. A de novo c.862G>A (p.Gly288Ser) missense mutation was identified at the pore region of KCNT1 channel in both patients, whereas all KCNT1 mutations in the previous reports were identified mostly in the intracellular C-terminal region. Computational analysis suggested possible changes in the molecular structure and the ion channel property induced by the Gly288Ser mutation. Because the G-to-A transition was located at CG dinucleotide sequences as previously reported for KCNT1 mutations, the recurrent occurrence of de novo KCNT1 mutations indicated the hot spots of these locations.

  2. Seizure Onset Zone Localization from Ictal High-Density EEG in Refractory Focal Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Staljanssens, Willeke; Strobbe, Gregor; Holen, Roel Van; Birot, Gwénaël; Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vulliémoz, Serge; van Mierlo, Pieter

    2017-03-01

    Epilepsy surgery is the most efficient treatment option for patients with refractory epilepsy. Before surgery, it is of utmost importance to accurately delineate the seizure onset zone (SOZ). Non-invasive EEG is the most used neuroimaging technique to diagnose epilepsy, but it is hard to localize the SOZ from EEG due to its low spatial resolution and because epilepsy is a network disease, with several brain regions becoming active during a seizure. In this work, we propose and validate an approach based on EEG source imaging (ESI) combined with functional connectivity analysis to overcome these problems. We considered both simulations and real data of patients. Ictal epochs of 204-channel EEG and subsets down to 32 channels were analyzed. ESI was done using realistic head models and LORETA was used as inverse technique. The connectivity pattern between the reconstructed sources was calculated, and the source with the highest number of outgoing connections was selected as SOZ. We compared this algorithm with a more straightforward approach, i.e. selecting the source with the highest power after ESI as the SOZ. We found that functional connectivity analysis estimated the SOZ consistently closer to the simulated EZ/RZ than localization based on maximal power. Performance, however, decreased when 128 electrodes or less were used, especially in the realistic data. The results show the added value of functional connectivity analysis for SOZ localization, when the EEG is obtained with a high-density setup. Next to this, the method can potentially be used as objective tool in clinical settings.

  3. The Cause of the Imbalance in the Neuronal Network Leading to Seizure Activity Can Be Predicted by the Electrographic Pattern of the Seizure Onset

    PubMed Central

    Bragin, Anatol; Azizyan, Avetis; Almajano, Joyel; Engel, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the temporal dynamics of ictal electrical activity induced by injection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline, and the glutamate agonist kainic acid, into the CA3 area of hippocampus. Experiments were conducted in freely moving adult Wistar rats implanted with microelectrodes in multiple brain areas. Wide-band electrical activity (0.1–3000 Hz) was recorded, and the latency of seizure onset as well as the pattern of electrical activity were investigated for each drug. The latencies between injection and the occurrence of first epileptiform events were 3.93 ± 2.76 (±STD) min for bicuculline and 6.37 ± 7.66 min for kainic acid, suggesting the existence of powerful seizure-suppressive mechanisms in the brain. Bicuculline evoked high-amplitude rhythmic epileptiform events at the site of injection which resembled interictal EEG spikes and rapidly propagated to adjacent and remote brain areas. Kainic acid evoked a completely different pattern with a gradual increase in the amplitude of 30–80 Hz activity. Whereas there was strong temporal correlation between EEG events at the site of bicuculline injection and discharges in distant areas, much less correlation was seen with kainic acid injection. Both patterns were followed by generalized ictal EEG discharges and behavioral seizures. Our results illustrate that the same area of the brain can trigger seizures with different electrographic patterns. The knowledge of the network mechanisms underlying these two distinct electrographic patterns might be helpful in designing differential strategies for preventing seizure occurrence. PMID:19295168

  4. New developments in the management of partial-onset epilepsy: role of brivaracetam.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Iapadre, Giulia; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Currently, a number of novel anticonvulsant drugs, the so-called third generation, are in various stages of development. Several of them are already available or in ongoing clinical trials. These new compounds should take advantage of new insights into the basic pathophysiology of epileptogenesis, drug metabolism and drug interactions. Many of them still need to be further evaluated mainly in real-world observational trials and registries. Among newer anticonvulsant drugs for partial-onset seizures (POSs), rufinamide, lacosamide, eslicarbazepine and perampanel are those new treatment options for which more substantial clinical evidence is currently available, both in adults and, to some extent, in children. Among the newest anticonvulsant drugs, brivaracetam, a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10- to 30-fold more potent than levetiracetam, is highly effective in a broad range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. Unlike levetiracetam, brivaracetam does not inhibit high-voltage Ca(2+) channels and AMPA receptors and appears to inhibit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. Brivaracetam has a linear pharmacokinetic profile, is extensively metabolized and is excreted by urine (only 8%-11% unchanged). It does not seem to influence the pharmacokinetics of other antiepileptic drugs. It was approved in the European Union in January 2016 and in the US in February 2016 as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of POS in patients older than 16 years of age. To date, its clinical efficacy as adjunctive antiepileptic treatment in adults with refractory POS at doses between 50 and 200 mg daily has been extensively assessed in two Phase IIb and four Phase III randomized controlled studies. Long-term extension studies show sustained efficacy of brivaracetam. Overall, the drug is generally well tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects. This is true also by intravenous route

  5. New developments in the management of partial-onset epilepsy: role of brivaracetam

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Iapadre, Giulia; Operto, Francesca Felicia; Verrotti, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Currently, a number of novel anticonvulsant drugs, the so-called third generation, are in various stages of development. Several of them are already available or in ongoing clinical trials. These new compounds should take advantage of new insights into the basic pathophysiology of epileptogenesis, drug metabolism and drug interactions. Many of them still need to be further evaluated mainly in real-world observational trials and registries. Among newer anticonvulsant drugs for partial-onset seizures (POSs), rufinamide, lacosamide, eslicarbazepine and perampanel are those new treatment options for which more substantial clinical evidence is currently available, both in adults and, to some extent, in children. Among the newest anticonvulsant drugs, brivaracetam, a high-affinity synaptic vesicle protein 2A ligand, reported to be 10- to 30-fold more potent than levetiracetam, is highly effective in a broad range of experimental models of focal and generalized seizures. Unlike levetiracetam, brivaracetam does not inhibit high-voltage Ca2+ channels and AMPA receptors and appears to inhibit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channels playing a role as a partial antagonist. Brivaracetam has a linear pharmacokinetic profile, is extensively metabolized and is excreted by urine (only 8%–11% unchanged). It does not seem to influence the pharmacokinetics of other antiepileptic drugs. It was approved in the European Union in January 2016 and in the US in February 2016 as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of POS in patients older than 16 years of age. To date, its clinical efficacy as adjunctive antiepileptic treatment in adults with refractory POS at doses between 50 and 200 mg daily has been extensively assessed in two Phase IIb and four Phase III randomized controlled studies. Long-term extension studies show sustained efficacy of brivaracetam. Overall, the drug is generally well tolerated with only mild-to-moderate side effects. This is true also by intravenous route

  6. Effects of tianeptine on onset time of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice: possible role of adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun I; Kayir, Hakan; Ceyhan, Mert

    2007-02-01

    Depression is a common psychiatric problem in epileptic patients. Thus, it is important that an antidepressant agent has anticonvulsant activity. This study was organized to investigate the effects of tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant, on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure in mice. A possible contribution of adenosine receptors was also evaluated. Adult male Swiss-Webster mice (25-35 g) were subjects. PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to mice 30 min after tianeptine (2.5-80 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline administration. The onset times of 'first myoclonic jerk' (FMJ) and 'generalized clonic seizures' (GCS) were recorded. Duration of 600 s was taken as a cutoff time in calculation of the onset time of the seizures. To evaluate the contribution of adenosine receptors in the effect of tianeptine, a nonspecific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, a specific A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a specific A2A receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or their vehicles were administered to the mice 15 min before tianeptine (80 mg/kg) or saline treatments. Tianeptine (40 and 80 mg/kg) pretreatment significantly delayed the onset time of FMJ and GCS. Caffeine (10-60 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently blocked the retarding effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on the onset times of FMJ and GCS. DPCPX (20 mg/kg) but not CSC (1-8 mg/kg) blocked the effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on FMJ. Our results suggest that tianeptine delayed the onset time of PTZ-induced seizures via adenosine A1 receptors in mice. Thus, this drug may be a useful choice for epileptic patients with depression.

  7. Early Seizure Frequency and Aetiology Predict Long-Term Medical Outcome in Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    In clinical practice, it is important to predict as soon as possible after diagnosis and starting treatment, which children are destined to develop medically intractable seizures and be at risk of increased mortality. In this study, we determined factors predictive of long-term seizure and mortality outcome in a population-based cohort of 102…

  8. Intranasal Delivery of miR-146a Mimics Delayed Seizure Onset in the Lithium-Pilocarpine Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianghao; Liu, Tingting; Cai, Yujie; Zhou, Xu; Xing, Huaijie; Wang, Yan; Yin, Mingkang; Zhong, Wangtao; Liu, Zhou; Li, Keshen

    2017-01-01

    Unveiling the key mechanism of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) for the development of novel treatments is of increasing interest, and anti-inflammatory miR-146a is now considered a promising molecular target for TLE. In the current study, a C57BL/6 TLE mouse model was established using the lithium-pilocarpine protocol. The seizure degree was evaluated according to the Racine scale, and level 5 was considered the threshold for generalized convulsions. Animals were sacrificed to analyze the hippocampus at three time points (2 h and 4 and 8 weeks after pilocarpine administration to evaluate the acute, latent, and chronic phases, resp.). After intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics (30 min before pilocarpine injection), the percent of animals with no induced seizures increased by 6.7%, the latency to generalized convulsions was extended, and seizure severity was reduced. Additionally, hippocampal damage was alleviated. While the relative miR-146a levels significantly increased, the expression of its target mRNAs (IRAK-1 and TRAF-6) and typical inflammatory modulators (NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) decreased, supporting an anti-inflammatory role of miR-146a via the TLR pathway. This study is the first to demonstrate that intranasal delivery of miR-146a mimics can improve seizure onset and hippocampal damage in the acute phase of lithium-pilocarpine-induced seizures, which provides inflammation-based clues for the development of novel TLE treatments. PMID:28242958

  9. [Tetraplegia, resuscitation and epileptic seizures after partial colon resection in a 41-year-old woman].

    PubMed

    Wagner, W

    2014-01-01

    A 41-year-old woman, suffering from continuous abdominal pain, only presented a non-specific inflammation of the whole colon and an unclaryfied hyponatriaemia; in spite of the only doubtful explanation by an enormous elongation of the colon, it was partially resected. Thereafter, the patient's decline, hypaesthesia, areflexia and tetraparesis required intensive care. Despite immunoglobulin therapy, assuming a Guillain-Barré syndrome, the patient needed resuscitation, followed by signs of severe hypoxia (high level of neuron-specific enolase, hippocampal lesions). The abdominal pain, hyponatriaemia, persistent tachycardia, sensory deficits, tetraplegia, circulation arrest, later epileptic seizures and unusual urine color were finally explained by an acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Although the symptoms were classic, the disease was recognized only very late. Indeed, it is so rare that most physicians will never be confronted with an AIP or only once or twice.

  10. Clinical use of an herbal-derived compound (Huperzine A) to treat putative complex partial seizures in a dog.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Barbara M; Dodman, Nicholas H; Faissler, Dominik; Ogata, Niwako

    2009-08-01

    A Bernese mountain dog was diagnosed with complex partial seizures that were supported by electroencephalographic findings. Clinical signs of the problem included "star gazing," fly snapping, licking, vacuous chewing, and ongoing anxiety. Treatment with Huperzine A, a compound isolated from Chinese club moss with NMDA receptor blocking activity, anticholinesterase activity, and anticonvulsant properties, produced useful suppression of the abnormal behavior for more than months. A relapse occurred when the dog was treated with tramadol for joint pain and the improvement that had been made was not recaptured with Huperzine A. At this stage, phenobarbital therapy was instituted and the dog improved greatly. The role of Huperzine A in controlling seizures is discussed.

  11. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  12. Improving diagnosis and broadening the phenotypes in early-onset seizure and severe developmental delay disorders through gene panel analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trump, Natalie; McTague, Amy; Brittain, Helen; Papandreou, Apostolos; Meyer, Esther; Ngoh, Adeline; Palmer, Rodger; Morrogh, Deborah; Boustred, Christopher; Hurst, Jane A; Jenkins, Lucy; Kurian, Manju A; Scott, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    Background We sought to investigate the diagnostic yield and mutation spectrum in previously reported genes for early-onset epilepsy and disorders of severe developmental delay. Methods In 400 patients with these disorders with no known underlying aetiology and no major structural brain anomaly, we analysed 46 genes using a combination of targeted sequencing on an Illumina MiSeq platform and targeted, exon-level microarray copy number analysis. Results We identified causative mutations in 71/400 patients (18%). The diagnostic rate was highest among those with seizure onset within the first two months of life (39%), although overall it was similar in those with and without seizures. The most frequently mutated gene was SCN2A (11 patients, 3%). Other recurrently mutated genes included CDKL5, KCNQ2, SCN8A (six patients each), FOXG1, MECP2, SCN1A, STXBP1 (five patients each), KCNT1, PCDH19, TCF4 (three patients each) and ATP1A3, PRRT2 and SLC9A6 (two patients each). Mutations in EHMT1, GABRB3, LGI1, MBD5, PIGA, UBE3A and ZEB2 were each found in single patients. We found mutations in a number of genes in patients where either the electroclinical features or dysmorphic phenotypes were atypical for the identified gene. In only 11 cases (15%) had the clinician sufficient certainty to specify the mutated gene as the likely cause before testing. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the considerable utility of a gene panel approach in the diagnosis of patients with early-onset epilepsy and severe developmental delay disorders., They provide further insights into the phenotypic spectrum and genotype–phenotype correlations for a number of the causative genes and emphasise the value of exon-level copy number testing in their analysis. PMID:26993267

  13. Loss of SYNJ1 dual phosphatase activity leads to early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline.

    PubMed

    Hardies, Katia; Cai, Yiying; Jardel, Claude; Jansen, Anna C; Cao, Mian; May, Patrick; Djémié, Tania; Hachon Le Camus, Caroline; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Deconinck, Tine; Bhambhani, Vikas; Long, Catherine; Sajan, Samin A; Helbig, Katherine L; Suls, Arvid; Balling, Rudi; Helbig, Ingo; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; De Camilli, Pietro; Weckhuysen, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    SYNJ1 encodes a polyphosphoinositide phosphatase, synaptojanin 1, which contains two consecutive phosphatase domains and plays a prominent role in synaptic vesicle dynamics. Autosomal recessive inherited variants in SYNJ1 have previously been associated with two different neurological diseases: a recurrent homozygous missense variant (p.Arg258Gln) that abolishes Sac1 phosphatase activity was identified in three independent families with early onset parkinsonism, whereas a homozygous nonsense variant (p.Arg136*) causing a severe decrease of mRNA transcript was found in a single patient with intractable epilepsy and tau pathology. We performed whole exome or genome sequencing in three independent sib pairs with early onset refractory seizures and progressive neurological decline, and identified novel segregating recessive SYNJ1 defects. A homozygous missense variant resulting in an amino acid substitution (p.Tyr888Cys) was found to impair, but not abolish, the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1, whereas three premature stop variants (homozygote p.Trp843* and compound heterozygote p.Gln647Argfs*6/p.Ser1122Thrfs*3) almost completely abolished mRNA transcript production. A genetic follow-up screening in a large cohort of 543 patients with a wide phenotypical range of epilepsies and intellectual disability revealed no additional pathogenic variants, showing that SYNJ1 deficiency is rare and probably linked to a specific phenotype. While variants leading to early onset parkinsonism selectively abolish Sac1 function, our results provide evidence that a critical reduction of the dual phosphatase activity of SYNJ1 underlies a severe disorder with neonatal refractory epilepsy and a neurodegenerative disease course. These findings further expand the clinical spectrum of synaptic dysregulation in patients with severe epilepsy, and emphasize the importance of this biological pathway in seizure pathophysiology.

  14. Optimized Seizure Detection Algorithm: A Fast Approach for Onset of Epileptic in EEG Signals Using GT Discriminant Analysis and K-NN Classifier

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Kh.; Azizi, E.; Haddadnia, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a severe disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes the person to recurrent seizures. Fifty million people worldwide suffer from epilepsy; after Alzheimer’s and stroke, it is the third widespread nervous disorder. Objective In this paper, an algorithm to detect the onset of epileptic seizures based on the analysis of brain electrical signals (EEG) has been proposed. 844 hours of EEG were recorded form 23 pediatric patients consecutively with 163 occurrences of seizures. Signals had been collected from Children’s Hospital Boston with a sampling frequency of 256 Hz through 18 channels in order to assess epilepsy surgery. By selecting effective features from seizure and non-seizure signals of each individual and putting them into two categories, the proposed algorithm detects the onset of seizures quickly and with high sensitivity. Method In this algorithm, L-sec epochs of signals are displayed in form of a third-order tensor in spatial, spectral and temporal spaces by applying wavelet transform. Then, after applying general tensor discriminant analysis (GTDA) on tensors and calculating mapping matrix, feature vectors are extracted. GTDA increases the sensitivity of the algorithm by storing data without deleting them. Finally, K-Nearest neighbors (KNN) is used to classify the selected features. Results The results of simulating algorithm on algorithm standard dataset shows that the algorithm is capable of detecting 98 percent of seizures with an average delay of 4.7 seconds and the average error rate detection of three errors in 24 hours. Conclusion Today, the lack of an automated system to detect or predict the seizure onset is strongly felt. PMID:27672628

  15. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  16. Standing waves as an explanation for generic stationary correlation patterns in noninvasive EEG of focal onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Franziskus; Rummel, Christian; Goodfellow, Marc; Schindler, Kaspar

    2014-03-01

    Cerebral electrical activity is highly nonstationary because the brain reacts to ever changing external stimuli and continuously monitors internal control circuits. However, a large amount of energy is spent to maintain remarkably stationary activity patterns and functional inter-relations between different brain regions. Here we examine linear EEG correlations in the peri-ictal transition of focal onset seizures, which are typically understood to be manifestations of dramatically changing inter-relations. Contrary to expectations we find stable correlation patterns with a high similarity across different patients and different frequency bands. This skeleton of spatial correlations may be interpreted as a signature of standing waves of electrical brain activity constituting a dynamical ground state. Such a state could promote the formation of spatiotemporal neuronal assemblies and may be important for the integration of information stemming from different local circuits of the functional brain network.

  17. ONSET OF FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN PARTIALLY IONIZED GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Zweibel, Ellen G. E-mail: zweibel@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-10-01

    We consider quasi-stationary two-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a partially ionized incompressible plasma. We find that when the plasma is weakly ionized and the collisions between the ions and the neutral particles are significant, the transition to fast collisionless reconnection due to the Hall effect in the generalized Ohm's law is expected to occur at much lower values of the Lundquist number, as compared to a fully ionized plasma case. We estimate that these conditions for fast reconnection are satisfied in molecular clouds and in protostellar disks.

  18. Non-invasive PET imaging of brain inflammation at disease onset predicts spontaneous recurrent seizures and reflects comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bertoglio, Daniele; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Santermans, Eva; Amhaoul, Halima; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Wyffels, Leonie; Van Der Linden, Annemie; Hens, Niel; Staelens, Steven; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie

    2017-03-01

    Brain inflammation is an important factor in the conversion of a healthy brain into an epileptic one, a phenomenon known as epileptogenesis, offering a new entry point for prognostic tools. The development of anti-epileptogenic therapies to treat before or at disease onset is hampered by our inability to predict the severity of the disease outcome. In a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy we aimed to assess whether in vivo non-invasive imaging of brain inflammation at disease onset was predictive of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) frequency and severity of depression-like and sensorimotor-related comorbidities. To this end, translocator protein, a biomarker of inflammation, was imaged by means of positron emission tomography (PET) 2 and 4weeks post-status epilepticus using [(18)F]-PBR111. Translocator protein was highly upregulated 2weeks post-status epilepticus in limbic structures (up to 2.1-fold increase compared to controls in temporal lobe, P<0.001), whereas 4weeks post-status epilepticus, upregulation decreased (up to 1.6-fold increase compared to controls in temporal lobe, P<0.01) and was only apparent in a subset of these regions. Animals were monitored with video-electroencephalography during all stages of disease (acute, latent - first seizures appearing around 2weeks post-status epilepticus - and chronic phases), for a total of 12weeks, in order to determine SRS frequency for each subject (range 0.00-0.83SRS/day). We found that regional PET uptake at 2 and 4weeks post-status epilepticus correlated with the severity of depression-like and sensorimotor-related comorbidities during chronic epilepsy (P<0.05 for each test). Regional PET imaging did not correlate with SRS frequency, however, by applying a multivariate data-driven modeling approach based on translocator protein PET imaging at 2weeks post-status epilepticus, we accurately predicted the frequency of SRS (R=0.92; R(2)=0.86; P<0.0001) at the onset of epilepsy. This study not only demonstrates

  19. De novo gain-of-function KCNT1 channel mutations cause malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy.

    PubMed

    Barcia, Giulia; Fleming, Matthew R; Deligniere, Aline; Gazula, Valeswara-Rao; Brown, Maile R; Langouet, Maeva; Chen, Haijun; Kronengold, Jack; Abhyankar, Avinash; Cilio, Roberta; Nitschke, Patrick; Kaminska, Anna; Boddaert, Nathalie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Desguerre, Isabelle; Munnich, Arnold; Dulac, Olivier; Kaczmarek, Leonard K; Colleaux, Laurence; Nabbout, Rima

    2012-11-01

    Malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy (MMPSI) is a rare epileptic encephalopathy of infancy that combines pharmacoresistant seizures with developmental delay. We performed exome sequencing in three probands with MMPSI and identified de novo gain-of-function mutations affecting the C-terminal domain of the KCNT1 potassium channel. We sequenced KCNT1 in 9 additional individuals with MMPSI and identified mutations in 4 of them, in total identifying mutations in 6 out of 12 unrelated affected individuals. Functional studies showed that the mutations led to constitutive activation of the channel, mimicking the effects of phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain by protein kinase C. In addition to regulating ion flux, KCNT1 has a non-conducting function, as its C terminus interacts with cytoplasmic proteins involved in developmental signaling pathways. These results provide a focus for future diagnostic approaches and research for this devastating condition.

  20. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Epilepsy-Topion-Bioplasma, (the Seizure Onset Area) Upon the Action of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions in the brain bioplasma and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. A novel method is based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy-topion-bioplasma, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion-bioplasma lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure-excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas.

  1. Ictal tachycardia: its discriminating potential between temporal and extratemporal seizure foci.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M; D'Giano, C; Estellés, S; Leiguarda, R; Rabinowicz, A

    2001-09-01

    A wide variety of CNS lesions have been associated with changes in heart rate (HR). However, in epileptic patients their value to lateralize seizure onset remains controversial. This study aims to assess if HR changes associated with partial onset seizures could be useful in lateralizing seizure onset. We analysed HR changes on 100 seizures from 38 consecutive patients (mean age: 27.5 years) admitted for video-EEG telemetry monitoring. We evaluated the R-R interval 30 seconds before the seizure onset and 10, 20 and 120 seconds after the onset. We assessed whether there was a correlation between HR changes and seizure type, left/right differences and different semiological components for each seizure. We recorded 100 seizures. Three non-lateralized seizures were excluded from the analysis; 63/97 (65%) had left hemisphere onset, mainly from the temporal lobe (57.7%). The mean baseline HR was 77 beats per minute Ictal tachycardia (HR: > or = 107.06 beats per minute) was detected in 32 seizures, with ictal onset from the mesial temporal lobe structures in 23/32; 16/32 occurred during the first 10 seconds and 16/32 during the next 20 seconds from the seizure onset independently of the site of origin. Among the different semiological components for each seizure, only dystonic posturing and automatism correlated with HR increments. We did not find bradycardia in our series. Ictal tachycardia occurs most frequently with seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe and it may not reliably predict the lateralization of seizure onset.

  2. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  3. Community Structure Analysis of Transcriptional Networks Reveals Distinct Molecular Pathways for Early- and Late-Onset Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Childhood Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system’s constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  4. Novel Loss-of-Function Variants in DIAPH1 Associated With Syndromic Microcephaly, Blindness, and Early Onset Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Barry, Brenda J.; Rajab, Anna; El-Quessny, Malak; Seman, Ann; Coury, Stephanie Newton; Barkovich, A. James; Yang, Edward; Walsh, Christopher A.; Mochida, Ganeshwaran H.; Stoler, Joan M.

    2017-01-01

    Exome sequencing identified homozygous loss-of-function variants in DIAPH1 (c.2769delT; p.F923fs and c.3145C>T; p.R1049X) in four affected individuals from two unrelated consanguineous families. The affected individuals in our report were diagnosed with postnatal microcephaly, early-onset epilepsy, severe vision impairment, and pulmonary symptoms including bronchiectasis and recurrent respiratory infections. A heterozygous DIAPH1 mutation was originally reported in one family with autosomal dominant deafness. Recently, however, a homozygous nonsense DIAPH1 mutation (c.2332C4T; p.Q778X) was reported in five siblings in a single family affected by microcephaly, blindness, early onset seizures, developmental delay, and bronchiectasis. The role of DIAPH1 was supported using parametric linkage analysis, RNA and protein studies in their patients’ cell lines and further studies in human neural progenitors cells and a diap1 knockout mouse. In this report, the proband was initially brought to medical attention for profound metopic synostosis. Additional concerns arose when his head circumference did not increase after surgical release at 5 months of age and he was diagnosed with microcephaly and epilepsy at 6 months of age. Clinical exome analysis identifieda homozygous DIAPH1 mutation. Another homozygous DIAPH1 mutation was identified in the research exome analysis of a second family with three siblings presenting with a similar phenotype. Importantly, no hearing impairment is reported in the homozygous affected individuals or in the heterozygous carrier parents in any of the families demonstrating the autosomal recessive microcephaly phenotype. These additional families provide further evidence of the likely causal relationship between DIAPH1 mutations and a neurodevelopmental disorder. PMID:26463574

  5. Application of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Feucht, M; Möller, U; Witte, H; Benninger, F; Asenbaum, S; Prayer, D; Friedrich, M H

    1999-03-01

    For many patients who are candidates for epilepsy surgery, non-invasive evaluation fails to provide sufficient information to permit surgical treatment. Since there are also definite risks and considerable costs associated with invasive procedures, new (non-invasive) techniques are required. This study provides empirical evidence that a non-linear approach applied to ictal surface electroencephalograms (EEGs) can help to delineate the area of seizure onset and may prove useful in complementing visual analysis of the EEG. Multichannel EEGs, recorded from eight patients with different drug-resistant localisation-related epilepsies, were analysed using the concept of correlation dimension and two extensions based on the pointwise dimension. The latter also provided results in cases where assessment of the correlation dimension was not feasible. Comparative values between 2 and 6 were accepted as the result of the algorithms, mostly 3-4 for the EEG channels strongly reflecting epileptic activity, and 4-6 for the other signals. The proportion of accepted pointwise values was usually 200-800% for strong epileptic EEG activity compared to the other data. The approach permitted the characterisation of the scalp area reflecting epileptic activity. The results obtained were in perfect concordance with those obtained during pre-surgical work-up and confirmed by the post-operative outcome.

  6. Vigabatrin pediatric dosing information for refractory complex partial seizures: results from a population dose-response analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jace C; Tolbert, Dwain; Patel, Mahlaqa; Kowalski, Kenneth G; Wesche, David L

    2014-12-01

    We predicted vigabatrin dosages for adjunctive therapy for pediatric patients with refractory complex partial seizures (rCPS) that would produce efficacy comparable to that observed for approved adult dosages. A dose-response model related seizure-count data to vigabatrin dosage to identify dosages for pediatric rCPS patients. Seizure-count data were obtained from three pediatric and two adult rCPS clinical trials. Dosages were predicted for oral solution and tablet formulations. Predicted oral solution dosages to achieve efficacy comparable to that of a 1 g/day adult dosage were 350 and 450 mg/day for patients with body weight ranges 10-15 and >15-20 kg, respectively. Predicted oral solution dosages for efficacy comparable to a 3 g/day adult dosage were 1,050 and 1,300 mg/day for weight ranges 10-15 and >15-20 kg, respectively. Predicted tablet dosage for efficacy comparable to a 1 g/day adult dosage was 500 mg/day for weight ranges 25-60 kg. Predicted tablet dosage for efficacy comparable to a 3 g/day adult dosage was 2,000 mg for weight ranges 25-60 kg. Vigabatrin dosages were identified for pediatric rCPS patients with body weights ≥10 kg.

  7. Acute onset of focal seizures, psychiatric features and confusion: a case of autoimmune encephalitis?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Diwani, Adam; Butterworth, Richard J; Nibber, Anjan; Lang, Bethan; Vincent, Angela; Irani, Sarosh R

    2012-01-01

    An elderly woman presented with disorganised thinking, unusual behaviour and clustered episodes of speech arrest accompanied by right-sided face and arm twitching. The following investigations were normal: interictal electroencephalography, brain MRI, cerebrospinal fluid viral PCR and cell count and voltage-gated potassium channel-complex, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, gamma-aminobutyric acid (B) receptor, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor, glycine receptor, glutamic acid decarboxylase and paraneoplastic antibodies. The syndrome showed partial spontaneous resolution but 1 year later, typical postencephalopathic features persisted including disinhibition and alteration of sleep–wake cycle. The most likely clinical diagnosis was autoimmune encephalitis and the broader differential diagnoses are discussed within the article. This case demonstrates the need to be aware of this under-recognised and potentially treatable entity. PMID:23112257

  8. The similarities between the hallucinations associated with the partial epileptic seizures of the occipital lobe and ball lightning observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, G. K.; Cooray, V.

    2007-12-01

    Ball Lightning was seen and described since antiquity and recorded in many places. Ball lightning is usually observed during thunderstorms but large number of ball lightning observations is also reported during fine weather without any connection to thunderstorms or lightning. However, so far no one has managed to generate them in the laboratory. It is photographed very rarely and in many cases the authenticity of them is questionable. It is possible that many different phenomena are grouped together and categorized simply as ball lightning. Indeed, the visual hallucinations associated with simple partial epileptic seizures, during which the patient remains conscious, may also be categorized by a patient unaware of his or her condition as ball lightning observation. Such visual hallucinations may occur as a result of an epileptic seizure in the occipital, temporo-occipital or temporal lobes of the cerebrum [1,2,3]. In some cases the hallucination is perceived as a coloured ball moving horizontally from the periphery to the centre of the vision. The ball may appear to be rotating or spinning. The colour of the ball can be red, yellow, blue or green. Sometimes, the ball may appear to have a solid structure surrounded by a thin glow or in other cases the ball appears to generate spark like phenomena. When the ball is moving towards the centre of the vision it may increase its intensity and when it reaches the centre it can 'explode' illuminating the whole field of vision. During the hallucinations the vision is obscured only in the area occupied by the apparent object. The hallucinations may last for 5 to 30 seconds and rarely up to a minute. Occipital seizures may spread into other regions of the brain giving auditory, olfactory and sensory sensations. These sensations could be buzzing sounds, the smell of burning rubber, pain with thermal perception especially in the arms and the face, and numbness and tingling sensation. In some cases a person may experience only

  9. Cytochrome c oxidase deficit is associated with the seizure onset zone in young patients with focal cortical dysplasia Type II.

    PubMed

    Miles, Lili; Greiner, Hansel M; Mangano, Francesco T; Horn, Paul S; Leach, James L; Miles, Michael V

    2015-10-01

    It has been postulated that mitochondrial dysfunction may be an important factor in epileptogenesis of intractable epilepsy. The current study tests the hypothesis that mitochondrial Complex IV (CIV) or cytochrome c oxidase dysfunction is associated with the seizure onset zone (SOZ) in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Subjects were selected based on: age <19y; epilepsy surgery between May, 2010 and October, 2011; pathological diagnosis of isolated focal cortical dysplasia Type I (FCDI) or Type II (FCDII); and sufficient residual cortical tissue to conduct analysis of electron transport chain complex (ETC) activity in SOZ and adjacent cortical regions. In this retrospective study, patients were identified who had sufficient unfixed, frozen brain tissue for biochemical analysis in tissue homogenates. Specimens were subtyped using ILAE classification for FCD, and excluded if diagnosed with FCD Type III or dual pathology. Analysis of ETC activity in resected tissues was conducted independently and without knowledge of the identity, diagnosis, or clinical status of individual subjects. Seventeen patients met the inclusion criteria, including 6 FCDI and 11 FCDII. Comparison of adjacent cortical resections showed decreased CIV activity in the SOZ of the FCDII group (P = 0.003), but no significant CIV difference in adjacent tissues of the FCDI group. Because of the importance of CIV as the terminal and rate-limiting complex in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, these authors conclude that 1) a deficit of CIV is associated with the SOZ of patients with FCDII; 2) CIV deficiency may contribute to the spectrum of FCD neuropathology; and 3) further investigation of CIV in FCD may lead to the discovery of new targets for neuroprotective therapies for patients with intractable epilepsy.

  10. Phase-Amplitude Coupling Is Elevated in Deep Sleep and in the Onset Zone of Focal Epileptic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mina; Frauscher, Birgit; Gotman, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The interactions between different EEG frequency bands have been widely investigated in normal and pathologic brain activity. Phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) is one of the important forms of this interaction where the amplitude of higher frequency oscillations is modulated by the phase of lower frequency activity. Here, we studied the dynamic variations of PAC of high (gamma and ripple) and low (delta, theta, alpha, and beta) frequency bands in patients with focal epilepsy in different sleep stages during the interictal period, in an attempt to see if coupling is different in more or less epileptogenic regions. Sharp activities were excluded to avoid their effect on the PAC. The results revealed that the coupling intensity was generally the highest in stage N3 of sleep and the lowest in rapid eye movement sleep. We also compared the coupling strength in different regions [seizure onset zone (SOZ), exclusively irritative zone, and normal zone]. PAC between high and low frequency rhythms was found to be significantly stronger in the SOZ compared to normal regions. Also, the coupling was generally more elevated in spiking channels outside the SOZ than in normal regions. We also examined how the power in the delta band correlates to the PAC, and found a mild but statistically significant correlation between slower background activity in epileptic channels and the elevated coupling in these channels. The results suggest that an elevated PAC may reflect some fundamental abnormality, even after exclusion of sharp activities and even in the interictal period. PAC may therefore contribute to understanding the underlying dynamics of epileptogenic brain regions. PMID:27536227

  11. Early Onset of Hypersynchronous Network Activity and Expression of a Marker of Chronic Seizures in the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bezzina, Charlotte; Verret, Laure; Juan, Cécile; Remaud, Jessica; Halley, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Cortical and hippocampal hypersynchrony of neuronal networks seems to be an early event in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis. Many mouse models of the disease also present neuronal network hypersynchrony, as evidenced by higher susceptibility to pharmacologically-induced seizures, electroencephalographic seizures accompanied by spontaneous interictal spikes and expression of markers of chronic seizures such as neuropeptide Y ectopic expression in mossy fibers. This network hypersynchrony is thought to contribute to memory deficits, but whether it precedes the onset of memory deficits or not in mouse models remains unknown. The earliest memory impairments in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease have been observed at 3 months of age. We thus assessed network hypersynchrony in Tg2576 and non-transgenic male mice at 1.5, 3 and 6 months of age. As soon as 1.5 months of age, Tg2576 mice presented higher seizure susceptibility to systemic injection of a GABAA receptor antagonist. They also displayed spontaneous interictal spikes on EEG recordings. Some Tg2576 mice presented hippocampal ectopic expression of neuropeptide Y which incidence seems to increase with age among the Tg2576 population. Our data reveal that network hypersynchrony appears very early in Tg2576 mice, before any demonstrated memory impairments. PMID:25768013

  12. The influence of manganese supplementation on seizure onset and severity, and brain monoamines in the genetically epilepsy prone rat.

    PubMed

    Critchfield, J W; Carl, G F; Keen, C L

    1993-01-01

    Human and experimental animal studies suggest a relationship between low Mn status and seizures. The genetically epilepsy prone rat (GEPR), which has low tissue Mn levels, was studied in the context of Mn supplementation. Manganese was provided at 45 micrograms/g diet (control) or 1000 micrograms/g diet (supplemented) to dams during pregnancy and lactation, then to the offspring after weaning. Offspring were tested for seizure susceptibility as young adults; tissue trace elements, brain monoamines and brain glutamine synthetase activity were measured as endpoint biochemical indices. Supplementation, although developmentally encompassing and highly effective in elevating tissue Mn levels, had no effect on seizure latency or severity. Similarly, brain monoamine concentrations and glutamine synthetase activities were resistant to Mn supplementation. Notably, the GEPR was confirmed to have low whole brain glutamine synthetase activity. These findings suggest that seizure activity in the GEPR does not stem from an increased nutritional/metabolic need for Mn.

  13. Parvalbumin disappears from GABAergic CA1 neurons of the gerbil hippocampus with seizure onset while its presence persists in the perforant path.

    PubMed

    Scotti, A L; Kalt, G; Bollag, O; Nitsch, C

    1997-06-20

    Mongolian gerbils are epilepsy prone animals, a trait observable at the behavioural level during the 2nd month of life. As a unique species difference, gerbils express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) in the perforant path from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus. In this study, we determined the time of appearance of PV in the layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex and the perforant path terminals in gerbils between post-natal days 30 and 50. Signs of low grade seizures were observed in few animals from P40 onward. PV stain in the entorhinal cortex and perforant path terminals was already detectable at P30, well before the onset of behavioural seizures and did not change with age. It is suggested that the presence of PV in this pathway may be related to the generation early in life of an epileptogenic focus in the limbic forebrain. Altered inhibitory hippocampal circuits have also been suggested as a cause of seizures in the gerbil. Therefore, we quantitated hippocampal GABA-immunoreactive neurons and the PV-immunoreactive subpopulation. A group of gerbils with a high density of stained pyramidal interneurons in CA1 and one lacking PV-stained perikarya could be distinguished at P40 and P50. The density of GABA-immunoreactive nerve cells however, remained the same in both groups and through the ages studied. Thus, perikaryal PV is lost from intact GABAergic nerve cells at the same time as behavioural seizures are observed. The loss of PV from GABAergic neurons may affect their functional properties and be instrumental for the maintainance of behavioural seizures.

  14. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment.

  15. Peri-ictal yawning lateralizes the seizure onset zone to the nondominant hemisphere in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Robert; Musilová, Klára; Brázdil, Milan; Rektor, Ivan

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the incidence and lateralizing value of peri-ictal yawning in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) who underwent successful surgery for epilepsy (Engel class I outcome at the 2-year follow-up visit). We reviewed a total of 97 patients (59 men and 38 women). Fifty-three patients had TLE arising from the nondominant temporal lobe, and 44 had TLE arising from the dominant temporal lobe. In total, we reviewed 380 seizures. Of those, 202 seizures arose from the nondominant temporal lobe and 178 from the dominant one. Peri-ictal yawning was observed in 4 of 97 patients (4.1%) and in 7 of 380 seizures (1.8%), in the postictal period in all cases. Peri-ictal yawning occurred only in patients with right-sided, nondominant TLE. It may have a lateralizing value.

  16. The association between Chiari-like malformation, ventriculomegaly and seizures in cavalier King Charles spaniels.

    PubMed

    Driver, C J; Chandler, K; Walmsley, G; Shihab, N; Volk, H A

    2013-02-01

    Cavalier King Charles spaniels (CKCSs) with Chiari-like malformation (CM) and associated seizures are frequently diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy. There could be an association between ventriculomegaly (V) or caudal fossa overcrowding (CCFP) and seizures. A retrospective case-control study was performed using MRI to investigate the possible association between these morphological abnormalities and seizures. Seizure semiology and, where possible, electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities were documented. Eighty-five CKCS with CM were included, 27 with seizures. There was no association between V or CCFP and seizures (P=0.10 and 0.71, respectively). Seizures were classified as having partial onset in 61% of individuals in the study population (95% CI 42.41-76.43%). Another cause of recurrent seizures in CKCS (such as familial epilepsy) is suspected, as previously reported.

  17. Cardiovascular responses at the onset of exercise with partial neuromuscular blockade in cat and man.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, G A; Mitchell, J H; Mizuno, M; Secher, N H

    1987-01-01

    1. In decerebrated cats the cardiovascular, heart rate and blood pressure responses to static muscle contractions were followed from the onset of stimulation of the cut L7-S1 ventral roots. Heart rate and blood pressure were also followed during maximal voluntary and electrically induced static muscle contractions in man using one leg. In both cat and man contractions were performed under control conditions and tubocurarine-induced neuromuscular blockade. 2. In the cat, heart rate and blood pressure increased 1.7 s after the onset of the contraction. No cardiovascular responses were seen when the muscle contraction was blocked by tubocurarine. 3. In man, both heart rate and blood pressure increased at the onset of voluntary contractions. Partial curarization reduced strength to 39% of control. The heart rate response was unaffected by tubocurarine while the blood pressure response was reduced from 61 to 32 mmHg. 4. Electrical stimulation of the muscles resulted in 75% of voluntary strength in man. The heart rate response was delayed one R-R interval in the electrocardiogram but was as large as during voluntary contractions. During partial curarization the heart rate response was significantly smaller and the blood pressure response was reduced from 11 to 8 mmHg. 5. In conclusion, processes in active muscles elicit an increase in heart rate and blood pressure which depends on the intensity of the muscle contraction developed. However, the immediate cardiovascular responses at the onset of voluntary muscle contractions cannot be accounted for by reflexes generated in the working muscles alone. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3656150

  18. Operational classification of seizure types by the International League Against Epilepsy: Position Paper of the ILAE Commission for Classification and Terminology.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; French, Jacqueline A; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) presents a revised operational classification of seizure types. The purpose of such a revision is to recognize that some seizure types can have either a focal or generalized onset, to allow classification when the onset is unobserved, to include some missing seizure types, and to adopt more transparent names. Because current knowledge is insufficient to form a scientifically based classification, the 2017 Classification is operational (practical) and based on the 1981 Classification, extended in 2010. Changes include the following: (1) "partial" becomes "focal"; (2) awareness is used as a classifier of focal seizures; (3) the terms dyscognitive, simple partial, complex partial, psychic, and secondarily generalized are eliminated; (4) new focal seizure types include automatisms, behavior arrest, hyperkinetic, autonomic, cognitive, and emotional; (5) atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, and tonic seizures can be of either focal or generalized onset; (6) focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizure replaces secondarily generalized seizure; (7) new generalized seizure types are absence with eyelid myoclonia, myoclonic absence, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic; and (8) seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified. The new classification does not represent a fundamental change, but allows greater flexibility and transparency in naming seizure types.

  19. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES AFTER SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE: MULTIMODAL DETECTION AND OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Perotte, Adler; Albers, David; Kleinberg, Samantha; Schmidt, J. Michael; Tu, Bin; Badjatia, Neeraj; Lantigua, Hector; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Connolly, E. Sander; Hripcsak, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective Seizures have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury, but the systemic and cerebral physiologic effects of seizures after acute brain injury are poorly understood. Methods We analyzed intracortical EEG and multimodality physiological recordings in 48 comatose subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to better characterize the physiological response to seizures after acute brain injury. Results Intracortical seizures were seen in 38% of patients and 8% had surface seizures. Intracortical seizures were accompanied by elevated heart rate (P=0.001), blood pressure (P<0.001), and respiratory rate (P<0.001). There were trends for rising cerebral perfusion pressure (P=0.03) and intracranial pressure (P =0.06) seen after seizure onset. Intracortical seizure associated increases in global brain metabolism, partial brain tissue oxygenation, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) did not reach significance, but a trend for a pronounced delayed rCBF rise was seen for surface seizures (P=0.08). Functional outcome was very poor for patients with severe background attenuation without seizures and best for those without severe attenuation or seizures (77% vs. 0% dead or severely disabled, respectively). Outcome was intermediate for those with seizures independent of the background EEG and worse for those with intracortical only seizures when compared to those with intracortical and scalp seizures (50% and 25% death or severe disability, respectively). Interpretation We replicated in humans complex physiologic processes associated with seizures after acute brain injury previously described in laboratory experiments and illustrated differences such as the delayed increase in regional cerebral blood flow. These real-world physiologic observations may permit more successful translation of laboratory research to the bedside. PMID:23813945

  20. Epileptic Seizures From Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. PMID:22169211

  1. Single Nucleotide Variations in CLCN6 Identified in Patients with Benign Partial Epilepsies in Infancy and/or Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Sangu, Noriko; Komoike, Yuta; Ishii, Atsushi; Abe, Shinpei; Yamashita, Shintaro; Imai, Katsumi; Kubota, Tetsuo; Fukasawa, Tatsuya; Okanishi, Tohru; Enoki, Hideo; Tanabe, Takuya; Saito, Akira; Furukawa, Toru; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Milligan, Carol J.; Petrou, Steven; Heron, Sarah E.; Dibbens, Leanne M.; Hirose, Shinichi; Okumura, Akihisa

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide alterations in the gene encoding proline-rich transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) have been identified in most patients with benign partial epilepsies in infancy (BPEI)/benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE). However, not all patients harbor these PRRT2 mutations, indicating the involvement of genes other than PRRT2. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing analysis for a large family affected with PRRT2-unrelated BPEI. We identified a non-synonymous single nucleotide variation (SNV) in the voltage-sensitive chloride channel 6 gene (CLCN6). A cohort study of 48 BPEI patients without PRRT2 mutations revealed a different CLCN6 SNV in a patient, his sibling and his father who had a history of febrile seizures (FS) but not BPEI. Another study of 48 patients with FS identified an additional SNV in CLCN6. Chloride channels (CLCs) are involved in a multitude of physiologic processes and some members of the CLC family have been linked to inherited diseases. However, a phenotypic correlation has not been confirmed for CLCN6. Although we could not detect significant biological effects linked to the identified CLCN6 SNVs, further studies should investigate potential CLCN6 variants that may underlie the genetic susceptibility to convulsive disorders. PMID:25794116

  2. Neuronal heterotopia with capillary penetration of neurons and cortical dysplasia in a patient with complex partial seizures. Case report.

    PubMed

    Jay, V; Becker, L E; Otsubo, H; Hwang, P; Hoffman, H J; Armstrong, D C

    1993-04-01

    Unusual pathological findings were encountered in a temporal lobectomy specimen from a 9-year-old boy with intractable complex partial seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enlarged left temporal lobe, with diffuse high signal intensity over the cortex and poor gray-white differentiation on T2-weighted imaging; single-photon emission computerized tomography showed decreased blood flow. Active epileptiform discharges were identified in the left temporal lobe with focal slow waves and generalized epileptiform paroxysms. Pathologically, the cortex revealed changes of focal cortical dysplasia with extensive disorganization of neuronal morphology, layering, and orientation as well as focal polymicrogyria. The cortical-white matter junction was indistinct with extensive neuronal heterotopias in the white matter. Large pale balloon cells akin to those seen in tuberous sclerosis were found scattered within the cortex and white matter. The most striking finding was that of a heterotopic nodule in the white matter, which revealed abnormal neurons with penetration of cell bodies by capillaries. Ultrastructurally, there were no degenerative changes in these neurons, and this unusual phenomenon is attributed to a developmental disturbance affecting neuronal, glial, and vascular elements.

  3. Prevention of epileptic seizures by taurine.

    PubMed

    El Idrissi, Abdeslem; Messing, Jeffrey; Scalia, Jason; Trenkner, Ekkhart

    2003-01-01

    Parenteral injection of kainic acid (KA), a glutamate receptor agonist, causes severe and stereotyped behavioral convulsions in mice and is used as a rodent model for human temporal lobe epilepsy. The goal of this study is to examine the potential anti-convulsive effects of the neuro-active amino acid taurine, in the mouse model of KA-induced limbic seizures. We found that taurine (43 mg/Kg, s.c.) had a significant antiepileptic effect when injected 10 min prior to KA. Acute injection of taurine increased the onset latency and reduced the occurrence of tonic seizures. Taurine also reduced the duration of tonic-clonic convulsions and mortality rate following KA-induced seizures. Furthermore, taurine significantly reduced neuronal cell death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, the most susceptible region to KA in the limbic system. On the other hand, supplementation of taurine in drinking water (0.05%) for 4 continuous weeks failed to decrease the number or latency of partial or tonic-clonic seizures. To the contrary, we found that taurine-fed mice showed increased susceptibility to KA-induced seizures, as demonstrated by a decreased latency for clonic seizures, an increased incidence and duration of tonic-clonic seizures, increased neuronal death in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and a higher post-seizure mortality of the animals. We suggest that the reduced susceptibility to KA-induced seizures in taurine-injected mice is due to an increase in GABA receptor function in the brain which increases the inhibitory drive within the limbic system. This is supported by our in vitro data obtained in primary neuronal cultures showing that taurine acts as a low affinity agonist for GABA(A) receptors, protects neurons against kainate excitotoxic insults and modulates calcium homeostasis. Therefore, taurine is potentially capable of treating seizure-associated brain damage.

  4. Mutations in SLC13A5 Cause Autosomal-Recessive Epileptic Encephalopathy with Seizure Onset in the First Days of Life

    PubMed Central

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy. PMID:24995870

  5. Mutations in SLC13A5 cause autosomal-recessive epileptic encephalopathy with seizure onset in the first days of life.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Julien; Milh, Mathieu; Feillet, François; St-Onge, Judith; Duffourd, Yannis; Jugé, Clara; Roubertie, Agathe; Héron, Delphine; Mignot, Cyril; Raffo, Emmanuel; Isidor, Bertrand; Wahlen, Sandra; Sanlaville, Damien; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Darmency-Stamboul, Véronique; Toutain, Annick; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Chouchane, Mondher; Huet, Frédéric; Lafon, Arnaud; de Saint Martin, Anne; Lesca, Gaetan; El Chehadeh, Salima; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Masurel-Paulet, Alice; Odent, Sylvie; Villard, Laurent; Philippe, Christophe; Faivre, Laurence; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste

    2014-07-03

    Epileptic encephalopathy (EE) refers to a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of severe disorders characterized by seizures, abnormal interictal electro-encephalogram, psychomotor delay, and/or cognitive deterioration. We ascertained two multiplex families (including one consanguineous family) consistent with an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern of EE. All seven affected individuals developed subclinical seizures as early as the first day of life, severe epileptic disease, and profound developmental delay with no facial dysmorphism. Given the similarity in clinical presentation in the two families, we hypothesized that the observed phenotype was due to mutations in the same gene, and we performed exome sequencing in three affected individuals. Analysis of rare variants in genes consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance led to identification of mutations in SLC13A5, which encodes the cytoplasmic sodium-dependent citrate carrier, notably expressed in neurons. Disease association was confirmed by cosegregation analysis in additional family members. Screening of 68 additional unrelated individuals with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy for SLC13A5 mutations led to identification of one additional subject with compound heterozygous mutations of SLC13A5 and a similar clinical presentation as the index subjects. Mutations affected key residues for sodium binding, which is critical for citrate transport. These findings underline the value of careful clinical characterization for genetic investigations in highly heterogeneous conditions such as EE and further highlight the role of citrate metabolism in epilepsy.

  6. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Refractory Status Epilepticus in a Child with Malignant Migrating Partial Seizures of Infancy and SCN1A Mutation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shein, Steven L.; Reynolds, Thomas Q.; Gedela, Satyanarayana; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a common indication for neurocritical care and can be refractory to standard measures. Refractory SE (RSE) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Unconventional therapies may be utilized in certain cases, including therapeutic hypothermia (TH), bumetanide, and the ketogenic diet. However, the literature describing the use of such therapies in RSE is limited. Details of a case of TH for RSE in an infant with malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy were obtained from the medical record. A 4-month-old child developed SE that was refractory to treatment with concurrent midazolam, phenobarbital, fosphenytoin, topiramate, levetiracetam, folinic acid, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate. This led to progressive implementation of three unconventional therapies: TH, bumetanide, and the ketogentic diet. Electrographic seizures ceased for the entirety of a 43-hour period of TH with a target rectal temperature of 33.0°C–34.0°C. No adverse effects of hypothermia were noted other than a single episode of asymptomatic hypokalemia. Seizures recurred 10 hours after rewarming was begun and did not abate with reinstitution of hypothermia. No effect was seen with administration of bumetanide. Seizures were controlled long-term within 48 hours of institution of the ketogenic diet. TH and the ketogenic diet may be effective for treating RSE in children. PMID:23667778

  7. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  8. Adjunctive pregabalin vs gabapentin for focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Glue, Paul; Friedman, Daniel; Almas, Mary; Yardi, Nandan; Knapp, Lloyd; Pitman, Verne; Posner, Holly B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the comparative safety and adjunctive efficacy of pregabalin and gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency in patients with partial-onset seizures based on prestudy modeling showing superior efficacy for pregabalin. Methods: The design of this comparative efficacy and safety study of pregabalin and gabapentin as adjunctive treatment in adults with refractory partial-onset seizures was randomized, flexible dose, double blind, and parallel group. The study included a 6-week baseline and a 21-week treatment phase. The primary endpoint was the percentage change from baseline in 28-day seizure rate to the treatment phase. Results: A total of 484 patients were randomized to pregabalin (n = 242) or gabapentin (n = 242). Of these, 359 patients (187 pregabalin, 172 gabapentin) completed the treatment phase. The observed median and mean in percentage change from baseline was −58.65 and −47.7 (SD 48.3) for pregabalin and −57.43 and −45.28 (SD 60.6) for gabapentin. For the primary endpoint, there was no significant difference between treatments. The Hodges-Lehman estimated median difference was 0.0 (95% confidence interval −6.0 to 7.0). Safety profiles were comparable and consistent with prior trials. Conclusions: The absence of the anticipated efficacy difference based on modeling of prior, nearly identical trials and the larger-than-expected response rates of the 2 antiepileptic drugs were unexpected. These findings raise questions that are potentially important to consider in future comparative efficacy trials. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00537940. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that for patients with partial seizures enrolled in this study, pregabalin is not superior to gabapentin in reducing seizure frequency. Because of the atypical response rates, the results of this study are poorly generalizable to other epilepsy populations. PMID:27521437

  9. Impaired Facial Expression Recognition in Children with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Impact of Early Seizure Onset on Fear Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golouboff, Nathalie; Fiori, Nicole; Delalande, Olivier; Fohlen, Martine; Dellatolas, Georges; Jambaque, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    The amygdala has been implicated in the recognition of facial emotions, especially fearful expressions, in adults with early-onset right temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The present study investigates the recognition of facial emotions in children and adolescents, 8-16 years old, with epilepsy. Twenty-nine subjects had TLE (13 right, 16 left) and…

  10. Game-related seizures presenting with two types of clinical features.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung; Chang, Wen-Neng; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Lu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Shang-Der; Huang, Chi-Ren

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated 22 patients with epileptic seizures in which the seizures were triggered by various games or game-related materials. Based on whether spontaneous seizure coexisted or not, these 22 patients were divided into two groups. Ten patients who experienced seizures exclusively while playing or watching specific games were referred to as Group I, while 12 patients that had both game-induced and spontaneous seizures were classified as Group II. The patients in Group I had a middle-age onset (39.1 years) with a male predominance (90%). The electroencephalogram (EEG) or brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed non-specific abnormalities in 60%, and the partial onset seizure was recognized in 30% of patients. Antiepileptic drugs had uncertain benefits in this group. In Group II, patients had a male predominance (67%), with onset during adolescence (16.3 years). Most of them had generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences, and 42% showed epileptiform discharge on EEG. These 12 patients were categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Although photosensitivity was an important factor, higher mental activity seemed to be significant precipitants of seizures in Group II. Antiepileptic drugs were necessary and valproic acid alone or combined with clonazepam was effective in this group. The results showed that game-related seizures are not a unique and homogeneous syndrome and may consist of different mechanisms. Teenage onset, coexistent spontaneous seizure, and associated idiopathic generalized epilepsies were crucial factors in the determination of antiepileptic drug therapy. Moreover, avoiding the related games altogether may be a more productive preventive measure.

  11. Early and late age of seizure onset have a differential impact on brain resting-state organization in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Gaëlle E; Sharan, Ashwini; Pustina, Dorian; Skidmore, Christopher; Sperling, Michael R; Tracy, Joseph I

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is associated with abnormalities which extend into the entire brain. While the age of seizure onset (SO) has a large impact on brain plasticity, its effect on brain connectivity at rest remains unclear, especially, in interaction with factors such as the presence of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS). In this context, we investigated whole-brain and regional functional connectivity (FC) organization in 50 TLE patients who underwent a resting-state fMRI scan, in comparison to healthy controls, using graph-theory measures. We first classified TLE patients according to the presence of MTS or not. Then, we categorized the patients based on their age of SO into two subgroups (early or late age of SO). Results revealed whole-brain differences with both reduced functional segregation and increased integration in the patients, regardless of the age of SO and MTS, relative to the controls. At a local level, we revealed that the connectivity of the ictal hippocampus remains the most impaired for an early SO, even in the absence of MTS. Importantly, we showed that the impact of age of SO on whole-brain and regional resting-state FC depends on the presence of MTS. Overall, our results highlight the importance of investigating the effect of age of SO when examining resting-state activity in TLE, as this factor leads different perturbations of network modularity and connectivity at the global and local level, with different implications for regional plasticity and adaptive organization.

  12. Control of seizures in different stages of partial epilepsy: LACO-EXP, a Spanish retrospective study of lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Vicente; López, Francisco Javier; Serratosa, José María; González-Giraldez, Beatriz; Campos, Dulce; Molins, Albert; Rodriguez Uranga, Juan; Mauri, José Angel; Salas-Puig, Javier; Toledo, Manuel; Sánchez-Alvarez, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Antonio; Serrano-Castro, Pedro J; Saiz-Diaz, Rosa Ana; González de la Aleja, Jesús; de la Peña, Pilar; Asensio, Montserrat

    2013-11-01

    Lacosamide is approved as adjunctive therapy for focal epilepsies. The number of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) tried is associated with prognosis. This multicenter, retrospective, observational study (LACO-EXP) in Spain in 500 adult patients with focal epilepsies examined the efficacy and tolerability of add-on lacosamide. Factors associated with better efficacy/tolerability were analyzed. After 12months, the responder rate (≥50% reduction in seizure frequency) was 57.1%, and the seizure-free rate was 14.9%. Efficacy was better when lacosamide was the first or second add-on AED, although there was a small chance to be seizure-free even for patients who had received ≤10 prior AEDs. The mechanism of action of concomitant AEDs is important in all the stages, but differences are smaller in the early stages. Lacosamide was generally well tolerated. A slower dosage-titration schedule was associated with a lower adverse event rate. Further investigation of the timing of initiation of lacosamide add-on therapy and ideal combinations of AEDs is required.

  13. Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff Absence seizures involve brief, sudden lapses of consciousness. They're more common in children than adults. ... have seizures, the brain's usual electrical activity is altered. During an absence seizure, these electrical signals repeat ...

  14. A review of sleepwalking (somnambulism): the enigma of neurophysiology and polysomnography with differential diagnosis of complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2007-12-01

    The goal of this report is to review all aspects of sleepwalking (SW), also known as somnambulism. Various factors seem to initiate SW, especially drugs, stress, and sleep deprivation. As an etiology, heredity is important, but other conditions include thyrotoxicosis, stress, and herpes simplex encephalitis. Psychological characteristics of sleepwalkers often include aggression, anxiety, panic disorder, and hysteria. Polysomnographic characteristics emphasize abnormal deep sleep associated with arousal and slow wave sleep fragmentation. In the differential diagnosis, the EEG is important to properly identify a seizure disorder, rather than SW. Associated disorders are Tourette's syndrome, sleep-disordered breathing, and migraine. Various kinds of treatment are discussed, as are legal considerations, especially murder during sleepwalking.

  15. [Ecstatic seizures].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Astapenko, A V; Osos, E L; Zmachynskaya, O L; Gvishch, T G

    2015-01-01

    Ecstatic seizures is a rare manifestation of epilepsy. They were described for the first time by F.M. Dostoevsky. Currently, the description of ecstatic seizures is possible to find in the scientific literature. The description of the own observation of a patient with emotional-affective seizures is presented. A role of the anterior insular cortex in the ecstatic seizures origin is discussed. The similarities between the feelings reported during ecstatic seizures and the feelings experienced under the effect of stimulant addictive drugs are described. The possible reasons of the low frequency of emotional-affective seizures are considered.

  16. Ketogenic diet in the treatment of seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Kevin E; Kim, Do-Young; Rho, Jong M; Ng, Yu-Tze; Kerrigan, John F

    2011-05-01

    Seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) are notoriously intractable to medical therapy, and while surgical resection affords most affected patients with complete or near seizure-freedom, there remains a need to identify alternative treatments. In this retrospective study, we identified six patients from a large cohort of 220 patients with HH who were treated with the ketogenic diet (KD). Four patients had a 50-90% reduction in multiple seizure types (including gelastic, partial-onset and atonic seizures), and two individuals failed to respond. In order to study possible mechanisms, we then performed microelectrode recordings of small neurons in surgically resected HH tissue slices. Exposure to ketone bodies decreased spontaneous firing in 5 of 7 small HH neurons. These preliminary results suggest that seizures associated with HH may respond favorably to the KD, and that ketone bodies might directly modulate the intrinsic epileptogenicity of HH tissue.

  17. Using Lorenz plot and Cardiac Sympathetic Index of heart rate variability for detecting seizures for patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Jesper; Beniczky, Sandor; Johansen, Peter; Sidenius, Per; Fuglsang-Frederiksen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Tachycardia is often seen during epileptic seizures, but it also occurs during physical exercise. In order to assess whether focal epileptic seizures can be detected by short term moving window Heart Rate Variability (HRV) analysis, we modified the geometric HRV method, Lorenz plot, to consist of only 30, 50 or 100 R-R intervals per analyzed window. From each window we calculated the longitudinal (L) and transverse (T) variability of Lorenz plot to retrieve the Cardiac Sympathetic Index (CSI) as (L/T) and "Modified CSI" (described in methods), and compared the maximum during the patient's epileptic seizures with that during the patient's own exercise and non-seizure sessions as control. All five analyzed patients had complex partial seizures (CPS) originating in the temporal lobe (11 seizures) during their 1-5 days long term video-EEG monitoring. All CPS with electroencephalographic correlation were selected for the HRV analysis. The CSI and Modified CSI were correspondently calculated after each heart beat depicting the prior 30, 50 and 100 R-R intervals at the time. CSI (30, 50 and 100) and Modified CSI (100) showed a higher maximum peak during seizures than exercise/non-seizure (121-296%) for 4 of the 5 patients within 4 seconds before till 60 seconds after seizure onset time even though exercise maximum HR exceeded that of the seizures. The results indicate a detectable, sudden and inordinate shift towards sympathetic overdrive in the sympathovagal balance of the autonomic nervous system just around seizure-onset for certain patients. This new modified moving window Lorenz plot method seems promising way of constructing a portable ECG-based epilepsy alarm for certain patients with epilepsy who needs aid during seizure.

  18. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  19. Characterising seizures in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis with dynamic causal modelling.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela; Englund, Marita; Wickstrom, Ronny; Friston, Karl

    2015-09-01

    We characterised the pathophysiology of seizure onset in terms of slow fluctuations in synaptic efficacy using EEG in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis. EEG recordings were obtained from two female patients with anti-NMDA-R encephalitis with recurrent partial seizures (ages 19 and 31). Focal electrographic seizure activity was localised using an empirical Bayes beamformer. The spectral density of reconstructed source activity was then characterised with dynamic causal modelling (DCM). Eight models were compared for each patient, to evaluate the relative contribution of changes in intrinsic (excitatory and inhibitory) connectivity and endogenous afferent input. Bayesian model comparison established a role for changes in both excitatory and inhibitory connectivity during seizure activity (in addition to changes in the exogenous input). Seizures in both patients were associated with a sequence of changes in inhibitory and excitatory connectivity; a transient increase in inhibitory connectivity followed by a transient increase in excitatory connectivity and a final peak of excitatory-inhibitory balance at seizure offset. These systematic fluctuations in excitatory and inhibitory gain may be characteristic of (anti NMDA-R encephalitis) seizures. We present these results as a case study and replication to motivate analyses of larger patient cohorts, to see whether our findings generalise and further characterise the mechanisms of seizure activity in anti-NMDA-R encephalitis.

  20. Ictal scalp EEG recording during sleep and wakefulness: diagnostic implications for seizure localization and lateralization.

    PubMed

    Buechler, Robbie D; Rodriguez, Alcibiades J; Lahr, Brian D; So, Elson L

    2008-02-01

    To determine the localizing value of electroencephalography (EEG) for seizures during sleep versus seizures during wakefulness, we compared scalp EEG for 58 seizures that occurred during sleep with 76 seizures during wake in 28 consecutive patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Regression analysis showed that seizures during sleep are 2.5 times more likely to have focal EEG onset (p = 0.01) and 4 times more likely to correctly localize seizure onset (p = 0.04) than seizures during wake. EEG seizure onset preceded clinical onset by a longer duration in sleep seizures (mean, 4.69 s) than in wake seizures (mean, 1.23 s; p < 0.01). Sleep seizures showed fewer artifacts, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.07). For temporal lobectomy candidates undergoing video-EEG monitoring, the recording of seizures during sleep may be favored.

  1. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  2. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism.

  3. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - fever induced; Febrile convulsions ... an illness. It may not occur when the fever is highest. A cold or viral illness may ... other than symptoms of the illness causing the fever. Often, the child will not need a full ...

  4. Gelastic seizures and low-grade hypothalamic astrocytoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Giangennaro; Spagnoli, Diego; Sciscio, Nicola; Russo, Francesco; Villani, Roberto Matteo

    2002-04-01

    The typical, well recognized childhood epilepsy syndrome caused by hypothalamic hamartoma is characterized by early-onset, stereotyped attacks of uncontrollable laughter, frequent refractory seizures with progressive cognitive deterioration and severe behavioral problems. Here, we report a 17-year-old patient with gelastic phenomenon started in the neonatal period, later on associated with drug resistant polymorphic seizures, intellectual deficit and behavioral disorders, who improved by partial resection of an expected hypothalamic hamartoma that, in turn, resulted to be a hypothalamic low-grade astrocytoma.

  5. Treatment of seizures in subcortical laminar heterotopia with corpus callosotomy and lamotrigine.

    PubMed

    Vossler, D G; Lee, J K; Ko, T S

    1999-05-01

    Focal and generalized cortical dysgeneses are sometimes seen on the magnetic resonance images (MRI) of patients with epilepsy. Subcortical laminar heterotopia are bilateral collections of gray matter in the centrum semiovale that resemble a band or "double cortex" on MRI. We studied one male and two female patients with subcortical laminar heterotopia who had moderate to severe developmental delay, early-onset epilepsy, and medically refractory seizures. Atonic, atypical absence, tonic, myoclonic, complex partial, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures were recorded. Interictal and ictal electroencephalographic patterns were generalized and, less commonly, multifocal. Two years after corpus callosotomy, one patient was free of generalized tonic-clonic and atonic seizures, but the other patient who had undergone callosotomy had no significant reduction in seizure frequency. With lamotrigine treatment, the patient who had not had surgery had complete cessation of monthly episodes of status epilepticus and a dramatic reduction of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the other patient who received lamotrigine had a 50% reduction of her atonic seizures. In patients with subcortical laminar heterotopia, atonic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures can be substantially reduced or eliminated by corpus callosotomy or treatment with lamotrigine.

  6. Safe Treatment of Seizures in the Setting of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Birbeck, Gretchen L.

    2013-01-01

    OPINION STATEMENT HIV+ patients are at increased risk for developing seizures due to the vulnerability of the central nervous system to HIV-associated diseases, immune dysfunction and metabolic disturbances. In patients with acute seizures, standard protocols still apply with urgent seizure cessation being the priority. Management of the person with established epilepsy who contracts HIV is challenging, but the decision to initiate chronic antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy in an HIV+ patient is also difficult. Chronic treatment guidelines emphasize the interactions between AEDs and antiretroviral (ARV) medications, but provide no explicit advice regarding when to initiate an AED, what medication to select, and/or the duration of treatment. Epidemiologic data regarding seizure recurrence risk in HIV+ individuals is not available. The risk of further seizures likely depends upon the underlying etiology for the seizure(s) and patients’ immune status and may be increased by the use of efavirenz (an ARV). The issues for consideration include AED-ARV interactions, organ dysfunction, seizure type, and drug side effects which may worsen or be confused with symptoms of HIV and/or epilepsy. Co-administration of enzyme inducing (EI)-AEDs and ARVs can result in virological failure, breakthrough seizure activity, AED toxicity and/or ARV toxicity. Where available, the AED of choice in HIV+ patients is levetiracetam due to its broad spectrum activity, ease of use, minimal drug interactions, and favorable side effect profile. Lacosamide, gabapentin, and pregabalin are also favored choices in patients with partial onset seizures and/or those failing levetiracetam. Where newer AEDs are not available, valproic acid may be the treatment of choice in terms of an AED which will not cause enzyme induction-associated ARV failure, but its side effect profile causes other obvious problems. In resource-limited settings (RLS) where only EI-AEDs are available, there are no good treatment

  7. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizure - grand mal; Grand mal seizure; Seizure - generalized; Epilepsy - generalized seizure ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  8. Seizure Prediction: Methods

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Paul R.; Myers, Stephen; Geyer, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases, affects over 50 million people worldwide. Epilepsy can have a broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Although antiepileptic drugs have helped treat millions of patients, roughly a third of all patients have seizures that are refractory to pharmacological intervention. The evolution of our understanding of this dynamic disease leads to new treatment possibilities. There is great interest in the development of devices that incorporate algorithms capable of detecting early onset of seizures or even predicting them hours before they occur. The lead time provided by these new technologies will allow for new types of interventional treatment. In the near future, seizures may be detected and aborted before physical manifestations begin. In this chapter we discuss the algorithms that make these devices possible and how they have been implemented to date. We also compare and contrast these measures, and review their individual strengths and weaknesses. Finally, we illustrate how these techniques can be combined in a closed-loop seizure prevention system. PMID:22078526

  9. Frontal Lobe Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    Frontal lobe seizures Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Frontal lobe seizures are a common form of epilepsy, a ... seizures originate in the front of the brain. Frontal lobe seizures may also be caused by abnormal brain ...

  10. Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.

    PubMed

    Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

    2012-12-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted.

  11. Genetic effects on sleep/wake variation of seizures

    PubMed Central

    Winawer, Melodie R.; Shih, Jerry; Beck, Erin S.; Hunter, Jessica E.; Epstein, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective There is a complex bidirectional relationship between sleep and epilepsy. Sleep/wake timing of seizures has been investigated for several individual seizure types and syndromes, but few large-scale studies of the timing of seizures exist in people with varied epilepsy types. In addition, the genetic contributions to seizure timing have not been well studied. Methods Sleep/wake timing of seizures was determined for 1,395 subjects in 546 families enrolled in the Epilepsy Phenome/Genome Project (EPGP). We examined seizure timing among subjects with different epilepsy types, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, and localization. We also examined the familial aggregation of sleep/wake occurrence of seizures. Results Seizures in nonacquired focal epilepsy (NAFE) were more likely to occur during sleep than seizures in generalized epilepsy (GE), for both convulsive (odds ratio [OR] 5.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–7.52) and nonconvulsive seizures (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.48–7.21). Seizures occurring within 1 h of awakening were more likely to occur in patients with GE than with NAFE for both convulsive (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.54– 3.39) and nonconvulsive (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.04–2.66) seizures. Frontal onset seizures were more likely than temporal onset seizures to occur during sleep. Sleep/wake timing of seizures in first-degree relatives predicted timing of seizures in the proband. Significance We found that sleep/wake timing of seizures is associated with both epilepsy syndrome and seizure type. In addition, we provide the first evidence for a genetic contribution to sleep/wake timing of seizures in a large group of individuals with common epilepsy syndromes. PMID:26948972

  12. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies.

  13. Patient-Specific Early Seizure Detection from Scalp EEG

    PubMed Central

    Minasyan, Georgiy R.; Chatten, John B.; Chatten, Martha Jane; Harner, Richard N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Develop a method for automatic detection of seizures prior to or immediately after clinical onset using features derived from scalp EEG. Methods This detection method is patient-specific. It uses recurrent neural networks and a variety of input features. For each patient we trained and optimized the detection algorithm for two cases: 1) during the period immediately preceding seizure onset, and 2) during the period immediately following seizure onset. Continuous scalp EEG recordings (duration 15 – 62 h, median 25 h) from 25 patients, including a total of 86 seizures, were used in this study. Results Pre-onset detection was successful in 14 of the 25 patients. For these 14 patients, all of the testing seizures were detected prior to seizure onset with a median pre-onset time of 51 sec and false positive rate was 0.06/h. Post-onset detection had 100% sensitivity, 0.023/hr false positive rate and median delay of 4 sec after onset. Conclusions The unique results of this study relate to pre-onset detection. Significance Our results suggest that reliable pre-onset seizure detection may be achievable for a significant subset of epilepsy patients without use of invasive electrodes. PMID:20461014

  14. The Sac1 domain of SYNJ1 identified mutated in a family with early-onset progressive parkinsonism with generalized seizures

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Catharine E.; Karkheiran, Siamak; Powell, James C.; Cao, Mian; Makarov, Vladimir; Darvish, Hossein; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Walker, Ruth H.; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; De Camilli, Pietro; Yue, Zhenyu; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the genetic causes underlying early-onset parkinsonism (EOP) in a consanguineous Iranian family. To attain this, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed. As a result, a homozygous mutation (c.773G>A; p.Arg258Gln) lying within the NH2-terminal Sac1-like inositol phosphatase domain of polyphosphoinositide phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (SYNJ1), which has been implicated in the regulation of endocytic traffic at synapses, was identified as the disease-segregating mutation. This mutation impaired the phosphatase activity SYNJ1 against its Sac1 domain substrates in vitro. We concluded that the SYNJ1 mutation identified here is responsible for the EOP phenotype seen in our patients probably due to deficiencies in its phosphatase activity and consequent impairment of its synaptic functions. Our finding not only opens new avenues of investigation in the synaptic dysfunction mechanisms associated with parkinsonism, but also suggests phosphoinositide metabolism as a novel therapeutic target for parkinsonism. PMID:23804563

  15. Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Mishra, Asht M.; Mansuripur, Peter K.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2008-01-01

    Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. While propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation, however we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multi-modal studies of partial and secondarily-generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast poly-spike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) weighted for blood oxygenation (BOLD) and blood volume (CBV), demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures; and increases in all these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness. PMID:18768701

  16. In silico validation and structure activity relationship study of a series of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide derivatives as potential anticonvulsants in generalized and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Reema; Sara, Udai Vir Singh; Khosa, Ratan Lal; Stables, James; Jain, Jainendra

    2013-06-01

    A series of twelve compounds (Compounds RNH1-RNH12) of acid hydrazones of pyridine-3-carbohydrazide or nicotinic acid hydrazide was synthesized and evaluated for anticonvulsant activity by MES, scPTZ, minimal clonic seizure and corneal kindling seizure test. Neurotoxicity was also determined for these compounds by rotarod test. Results showed that halogen substitution at meta and para position of phenyl ring exhibited better protection than ortho substitution. Compounds RNH4 and RNH12, were found to be the active analogs displaying 6Hz ED50 of 75.4 and 14.77 mg/kg while the corresponding MES ED50 values were 113.4 and 29.3 mg/kg respectively. In addition, compound RNH12 also showed scPTZ ED50 of 54.2 mg/kg. In the series, compound RNH12 with trifluoromethoxy substituted phenyl ring was the most potent analog exhibiting protection in all four animal models of epilepsy. Molecular docking study has also shown significant binding interactions of these two compounds with 1OHV, 2A1H and 1PBQ receptors. Thus, N-[(meta or para halogen substituted) benzylidene] pyridine-3-carbohydrazides could be used as lead compounds in anticonvulsant drug design and discovery.

  17. Oral baclofen in cerebral palsy: possible seizure potentiation?

    PubMed

    Hansel, Donna E; Hansel, Christian R W; Shindle, Michael K; Reinhardt, Elsie M; Madden, LaVerne; Levey, Eric B; Johnston, Michael V; Hoon, Alexander H

    2003-09-01

    Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist, is widely used to treat spasticity of cerebral and spinal origin. Patients with both acute baclofen overdose and withdrawal have developed seizures. After several reports of new-onset seizures in children treated with oral baclofen at our institution, we reviewed our experience regarding possible effects of baclofen on seizure induction in a childhood movement disorders program over a 2-year period. Of 54 children (ages 1-10) treated with oral baclofen, 19 (35%) had a prior history of seizures. Five children (14%) developed new-onset seizures after starting baclofen. Although epilepsy is very common in children with cerebral palsy, these findings raise the possibility that baclofen may potentiate seizures in certain young children with cerebral palsy. Further study of the effects of baclofen on seizures is warranted.

  18. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  19. Acute provoked reflex seizures induced by thinking.

    PubMed

    Nevler, Naomi; Gandelman-Marton, Revital

    2012-11-01

    Thinking epilepsy is a rare form of reflex epilepsy that can be induced by specific cognitive tasks, and occurs mainly in idiopathic generalized epilepsies. We report a case of complex partial seizures triggered by thinking in a young man with acute bacterial meningitis and a remote head injury. This case illustrates that thinking-induced reflex seizures can be partial and can be provoked by an acute brain insult.

  20. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  1. Reflex Seizures Triggered by Diaper Change in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Subki, Ahmed H; Alasmari, Aishah S; Jan, Fadi M; Moria, Feras A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2016-07-01

    Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by early onset of multiple types of seizures. We report the first case of reflex seizures triggered by diaper change in a girl at 9 months old and 2 years old with a mutation in the SCN1A gene causing DS. Reflex seizures have been reported in patients with DS provoked by increased body temperature or visual stimulation. The case we report widens the spectrum of triggers causing reflex seizures in children with DS. Cortical hyperexcitability resulting from the genetic defect explains the tendency to experience such reflex seizures.

  2. Nerve agent-induced seizures and their pharmacological modulation

    SciTech Connect

    McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.; Adams, N.L.; Koviak, T.A.; Cook, L.A.

    1993-05-13

    Intoxication with nerve agents produces prolonged central nervous system seizures (status epilepticus) that can produce irreversible brain pathology (15). This report summarizes our recent findings regarding the neurotransmitter changes that occur in discrete brain regions as a function of seizure duration and the differential effectiveness of anticholinergic, benzodiazepine and excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonist drugs in terminating soman-induced seizures when given at different times after seizure onset. These results are discussed in relation to a model we have proposed to explain the sequence of electrophysiological, biochemical and neurochemical events and mechanisms controlling nerve agent-induced seizures.

  3. Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome with Seizures.

    PubMed

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-04-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene.

  4. Hallervorden–Spatz Syndrome with Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Gothwal, Sunil; Nayan, Swati

    2016-01-01

    Hallervorden-Spatz syndrome is a disorder characterized by dystonia, parkinsonism, and iron accumulation in the brain. The disease is caused by mutations in gene encoding pantothenate kinase 2 (PANK2) and patients have pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We present an 8-year-old boy with progressive muscle dystonia, neuroregression, frequent fall and multiple injury marks of different stages. Seizures are rare with PANK2. This child had seizure onset at 4 years of age and seizure free on valproate and levetricetam. The CT scan showed tiger eye appearance and mutations on PANK2 gene. PMID:27303611

  5. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be.

  6. Seizure Anticipation Techniques: State of the Art and Future Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    pattern recognition tech- niques such as recurrent neuronal networks [23], cellular neu- ronal networks [24], or fuzzy clustering [25]. Usually these...open and reprogrammable analysis systems based on e.g. field programmable generic arrays (FPGA) or cellular neuronal networks (CNN, [24,29]) appear to be...occurrence of seizures. 110100100010000100000 electrical seizure onset duration of pre-seizure state [s] FFT AR/ARMA wavelet decomposition + neuronal

  7. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  8. Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Cross, J Helen; D'Souza, Carol; French, Jacqueline A; Haut, Sheryl R; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirsch, Edouard; Jansen, Floor E; Lagae, Lieven; Moshé, Solomon L; Peltola, Jukka; Roulet Perez, Eliane; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Somerville, Ernest; Sperling, Michael; Yacubian, Elza Márcia; Zuberi, Sameer M

    2017-04-01

    This companion paper to the introduction of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2017 classification of seizure types provides guidance on how to employ the classification. Illustration of the classification is enacted by tables, a glossary of relevant terms, mapping of old to new terms, suggested abbreviations, and examples. Basic and extended versions of the classification are available, depending on the desired degree of detail. Key signs and symptoms of seizures (semiology) are used as a basis for categories of seizures that are focal or generalized from onset or with unknown onset. Any focal seizure can further be optionally characterized by whether awareness is retained or impaired. Impaired awareness during any segment of the seizure renders it a focal impaired awareness seizure. Focal seizures are further optionally characterized by motor onset signs and symptoms: atonic, automatisms, clonic, epileptic spasms, or hyperkinetic, myoclonic, or tonic activity. Nonmotor-onset seizures can manifest as autonomic, behavior arrest, cognitive, emotional, or sensory dysfunction. The earliest prominent manifestation defines the seizure type, which might then progress to other signs and symptoms. Focal seizures can become bilateral tonic-clonic. Generalized seizures engage bilateral networks from onset. Generalized motor seizure characteristics comprise atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, myoclonic-atonic, myoclonic-tonic-clonic, tonic, or tonic-clonic. Nonmotor (absence) seizures are typical or atypical, or seizures that present prominent myoclonic activity or eyelid myoclonia. Seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified as motor, nonmotor, tonic-clonic, epileptic spasms, or behavior arrest. This "users' manual" for the ILAE 2017 seizure classification will assist the adoption of the new system.

  9. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  10. Sheehan's syndrome presenting as postpartum seizures.

    PubMed

    Jain, G; Singh, D; Kumar, S

    2010-05-01

    We report a case where a patient presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures secondary to nausea, vomiting and dehydration. She had suffered a postpartum haemorrhage six months previously. On laboratory assessment hyponatraemia and low hormone concentrations suggested pituitary failure. The diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the head, which showed a partially empty sella turcica. Given the severity of the morbidity in this case we emphasise that Sheehan's syndrome should be suspected in women presenting with postpartum seizures.

  11. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a “pre-seizure” state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways. PMID:24445927

  12. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle.

  13. Grand Mal Seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... generalized tonic-clonic seizure — features a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions. It's the type of ... seizures have two stages: Tonic phase. Loss of consciousness occurs, and the muscles suddenly contract and cause ...

  14. Dreaming of seizures.

    PubMed

    Vercueil, Laurent

    2005-08-01

    Could some dreams and temporal lobe seizures share an intrinsic neuronal network? At the interplay of emotion, memory, dream, and temporal lobe seizure, we report on a patient with a left dysplastic amygdala and temporal lobe epilepsy who presented with a typical seizure while dreaming. Neuronal networks subserving affective states are suggested to be involved in emotional dream, memory recall, and amygdalo-hippocampal seizures.

  15. Ionic changes during experimentally induced seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Lux, H D; Heinemann, U

    1978-01-01

    Changes in intra- and extracellular ionic activity and their relation to generation and termination of seizure phenomena can be studied with the help of ion-selective microelectrodes. Transient changes in extracellular potassium activity (aK) of the cortex regularly accompany paroxysmal activity induced by electrical stimulation and pentylenetetrazol injections or occur within active penicillin and aluminum foci. A rise of aK from baseline levels of about 3 mmoles/l up to ceiling levels of 8--12 mmoles/l, followed by subnormal K activity, is typically found during seizure discharge. Extracellular K accumulation during seizures facilitates the spread into extrafocal regions. Ceiling levels of extracellular aK are characterized by pronounced K reabsorption which is probably a limiting mechanism for the rise in extracellular aK. It may be a consequence of a simultaneous rise in intracellular Na activity that an electrogenic Na--K exchange process is involved in the termination of ictal activity. Seizures are also accompanied by significant reductions in extracellular Ca2+ activity (aCa) to as low as 0.7 mmoles/l (resting aCa 1.25 mmoles/l). There is no critical level of lowered aCa at which a seizure ultimately results. However, unlike changes in aK reductions in aCa can precede ictal activity. Thus, a fall of aCa occurs before the onset of paroxysmal periods during cyclical spike driving in a penicillin focus and before seizures induced by pentylenetetrazol. Ca2+-dependent mechanisms may contribute to seizure generation. In addition to changes in aK and aCa, intracellular chloride activity (aCl) can increase during seizure activity, as a result of an impaired chloride extrusion mechanism, which would lead to a reduced efficacy of inhibitory synaptic transmission and, therefore, to facilitation of seizure generation.

  16. Partial tandem duplication of mtDNA-tRNA(Phe) impairs mtDNA translation in late-onset mitochondrial myopathy.

    PubMed

    Arzuffi, Paola; Lamperti, Costanza; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Tonin, Paola; Morandi, Lucia; Zeviani, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    An 80-year-old woman (PI) has been suffering of late onset progressive weakness and wasting of lower-limb muscles, accompanied by high creatine kinase levels in blood. A muscle biopsy, performed at 63 years, showed myopathic features with partial deficiency of cytochrome c oxidase. A second biopsy taken 7 years later confirmed the presence of a mitochondrial myopathy but also of vacuolar degeneration and other morphological features resembling inclusion body myopathy. Her 46-year-old daughter (PII) and 50-year-old son (PIII) are clinically normal, but the creatine kinase levels were moderately elevated and the EMG was consistently myopathic in both. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequence revealed in all three patients a novel, homoplasmic 15 bp tandem duplication adjacent to the 5' end of mitochondrial tRNA(Phe) gene, encompassing the first 11 nucleotides of this gene and the four terminal nucleotides of the adjacent D-loop region. Both mutant fibroblasts and cybrids showed low oxygen consumption rate, reduced mitochondrial protein synthesis, and decreased mitochondrial tRNA(Phe) amount. These findings are consistent with an unconventional pathogenic mechanism causing the tandem duplication to interfere with the maturation of the mitochondrial tRNA(Phe) transcript.

  17. Optogenetic activation of superior colliculus neurons suppresses seizures originating in diverse brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Soper, Colin; Wicker, Evan; Kulick, Catherine V.; N’Gouemo, Prosper; Forcelli, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Because sites of seizure origin may be unknown or multifocal, identifying targets from which activation can suppress seizures originating in diverse networks is essential. We evaluated the ability of optogenetic activation of the deep/intermediate layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC) to fill this role. Optogenetic activation of DLSC suppressed behavioral and electrographic seizures in the pentylenetetrazole (forebrain+brainstem seizures) and Area Tempestas (forebrain/complex partial seizures) models; this effect was specific to activation of DLSC, and not neighboring structures. DLSC activation likewise attenuated seizures evoked by gamma butyrolactone (thalamocortical/absence seizures), or acoustic stimulation of genetically epilepsy prone rates (brainstem seizures). Anticonvulsant effects were seen with stimulation frequencies as low as 5 Hz. Unlike previous applications of optogenetics for the control of seizures, activation of DLSC exerted broad-spectrum anticonvulsant actions, attenuating seizures originating in diverse and distal brain networks. These data indicate that DLSC is a promising target for optogenetic control of epilepsy. PMID:26721319

  18. Hypnotic induction of an epileptic seizure: a brief communication.

    PubMed

    Bryant, R A; Somerville, E

    1995-07-01

    This case study investigated the utility of hypnosis to precipitate a seizure in a patient with refractory epilepsy. The patient was twice administered a hypnotic induction and a suggestion to age regress to a day when he was distressed and suffered repeated seizures. The patient did not respond to the first hypnotic suggestion; however, an epileptic seizure was observed in the second hypnotic session. Videorecording and subdural electroencephalograph recording confirmed that he suffered an epileptic seizure. Postexperimental inquiry revealed that the patient used deliberate cognitive strategies to avoid seizure onset in the first session but adopted a more constructive cognitive style in the second session. Findings are discussed in terms of emotions, hypnosis, and cognitive style as mediating factors in the experimental precipitation of epileptic seizures.

  19. Traumatic brain injury and epilepsy: Underlying mechanisms leading to seizure.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Chen, Yi-Wen; Smith, Kelly E; Huber, Jason D; Matsumoto, Rae; Rosen, Charles L; Tucker, Eric S; Richter, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy continues to be a major concern for those experiencing traumatic brain injury. Post-traumatic epilepsy accounts for 10-20% of epilepsy cases in the general population. While seizure prophylaxis can prevent early onset seizures, no available treatments effectively prevent late-onset seizure. Little is known about the progression of neural injury over time and how this injury progression contributes to late onset seizure development. In this comprehensive review, we discuss the epidemiology and risk factors for post-traumatic epilepsy and the current pharmacologic agents used for treatment. We highlight limitations with the current approach and offer suggestions for remedying the knowledge gap. Critical to this pursuit is the design of pre-clinical models to investigate important mechanistic factors responsible for post-traumatic epilepsy development. We discuss what the current models have provided in terms of understanding acute injury and what is needed to advance understanding regarding late onset seizure. New model designs will be used to investigate novel pathways linking acute injury to chronic changes within the brain. Important components of this transition are likely mediated by toll-like receptors, neuroinflammation, and tauopathy. In the final section, we highlight current experimental therapies that may prove promising in preventing and treating post-traumatic epilepsy. By increasing understanding about post-traumatic epilepsy and injury expansion over time, it will be possible to design better treatments with specific molecular targets to prevent late-onset seizure occurrence following traumatic brain injury.

  20. Unsupervised EEG analysis for automated epileptic seizure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birjandtalab, Javad; Pouyan, Maziyar Baran; Nourani, Mehrdad

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder which can, if not controlled, potentially cause unexpected death. It is extremely crucial to have accurate automatic pattern recognition and data mining techniques to detect the onset of seizures and inform care-givers to help the patients. EEG signals are the preferred biosignals for diagnosis of epileptic patients. Most of the existing pattern recognition techniques used in EEG analysis leverage the notion of supervised machine learning algorithms. Since seizure data are heavily under-represented, such techniques are not always practical particularly when the labeled data is not sufficiently available or when disease progression is rapid and the corresponding EEG footprint pattern will not be robust. Furthermore, EEG pattern change is highly individual dependent and requires experienced specialists to annotate the seizure and non-seizure events. In this work, we present an unsupervised technique to discriminate seizures and non-seizures events. We employ power spectral density of EEG signals in different frequency bands that are informative features to accurately cluster seizure and non-seizure events. The experimental results tried so far indicate achieving more than 90% accuracy in clustering seizure and non-seizure events without having any prior knowledge on patient's history.

  1. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports.

  2. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  3. Long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes of vagus nerve stimulation for intractable epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Schultz, Lonni; Mohanarangan, Karthik; Gaddam, Aryamaan; Schwalb, Jason M; Spanaki-Varelas, Marianna

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a widely used adjunctive treatment option for intractable epilepsy. Most studies have demonstrated short-term seizure outcomes, usually for up to 5 years, and thus far, none have reported psychosocial outcomes in adults. We aimed to assess long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes in patients with intractable epilepsy on VNS therapy for more than 15 years. We identified patients who had VNS implantation for treatment of intractable epilepsy from 1997 to 2013 at our Comprehensive Epilepsy Program and gathered demographics including age at epilepsy onset and VNS implantation, epilepsy type, number of antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs) and seizure frequency before VNS implantation and at the last clinic visit, and the most recent stimulation parameters from electronic medical records (EMR). Phone surveys were conducted by research assistants from May to November 2014 to determine patients' current seizure frequency and psychosocial metrics, including driving, employment status, and use of antidepressants. Seizure outcomes were based on modified Engel classification (I: seizure-free/rare simple partial seizures; II: >90% seizure reduction (SR), III: 50-90% SR, IV: <50% SR; classes I to III (>50% SR)=favorable outcome). A total of 207 patients underwent VNS implantation, 15 of whom were deceased at the time of the phone survey, and 40 had incomplete data for medical abstraction. Of the remaining 152, 90 (59%) were contacted and completed the survey. Of these, 51% were male, with the mean age at epilepsy onset of 9.4 years (range: birth to 60 years). There were 35 (39%) patients with extratemporal epilepsy, 19 (21%) with temporal, 18 (20%) with symptomatic generalized, 5 (6%) with idiopathic generalized, and 13 (14%) with multiple types. Final VNS settings showed 16 (18%) patients with an output current >2 mA and 14 (16%) with rapid cycling. Of the 80 patients with seizure frequency information, 16 (20%) had a modified Engel class I outcome, 14

  4. Ictal Spread of Medial Temporal Lobe Seizures With and Without Secondary Generalization: An Intracranial EEG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Yeoun; Farooque, Pue; Chen, William; Youngblood, Mark W.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Gerrard, Jason L.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Secondary generalization of seizures has devastating consequences for patient safety and quality of life. The aim of this intracranial EEG (icEEG) study was to investigate the differences in onset and propagation patterns of temporal lobe seizures that remained focal vs. those with secondary generalization in order to better understand the mechanism of secondary generalization. Methods A total of 39 seizures were analyzed in 9 patients who met the following criteria: 1) icEEG-video monitoring with at least 1 secondarily generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTC), 2) pathologically proven hippocampal sclerosis, and 3) no seizures for at least 1 year after anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Seizures were classified as focal or secondary generalized by behavioral analysis of video. Onset and propagation patterns were compared by analysis of icEEG. Results We obtained data from 22 focal seizures without generalization (FS), and 17 GTC. Seizure onset patterns did not differ between FS and GTCs, but there were differences in later propagation. All seizures started with low voltage fast activity except 7 seizures in one patient (6 FS, 1 GTC), which started with sharply contoured theta activity. 15 of 39 seizures started from the hippocampus and 24 seizures (including 6 seizures in a patient without hippocampal contacts) started from other medial temporal lobe areas. We observed involvement or more prominent activation of the posterior-lateral temporal regions in GTCs prior to propagation to the other cortical regions, vs. FS which had no involvement or less prominent activation of the posterior lateral temporal cortex. Occipital contacts were not involved at the time of clinical secondary generalization. Significance The posterior-lateral temporal cortex may serve as an important “gateway” controlling propagation of medial temporal lobe seizures to other cortical regions. Identifying the mechanisms of secondary generalization of focal seizures may

  5. Monitoring neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Geraldine B; Stevenson, Nathan J; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2013-08-01

    Neonatal seizures are a neurological emergency and prompt treatment is required. Seizure burden in neonates can be very high, status epilepticus a frequent occurrence, and the majority of seizures do not have any clinical correlate. Detection of neonatal seizures is only possible with continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. EEG interpretation requires special expertise that is not available in most neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). As a result, a simplified method of EEG recording incorporating an easy-to-interpret compressed trend of the EEG output (amplitude integrated EEG) from one of the EEG output from one or two channels has emerged as a popular way to monitor neurological function in the NICU. This is not without limitations; short duration and low amplitude seizures can be missed, artefacts are problematic and may mimic seizure-like activity and only a restricted area of the brain is monitored. Continuous multichannel EEG is the gold standard for detecting seizures and monitoring response to therapy but expert interpretation of the EEG output is generally not available. Some centres have set up remote access for neurophysiologists to the cot-side EEG, but reliable interpretation is wholly dependent on the 24 h availability of experts, an expensive solution. A more practical solution for the NICU without such expertise is an automated seizure detection system. This review outlines the current state of the art regarding cot-side monitoring of neonatal seizures in the NICU.

  6. Audiogenic seizures and cochlear damage in rats after perinatal antithyroid treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Van Milllesworth, L.; Norris, C.H.

    1980-06-01

    The feeding of goitrogens during pregnancy and lactation causes the offspring of rats to be partially deaf and persistently sensitive to audiogenic seizures. The most potent goitrogen, propylthiouracil, caused severe dysfunction and disorganization of the organ of Corti. Adult seizure-susceptible rats showed increased sensitivity to audiogenic seizures when they were fed propylthiouracil.

  7. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations.

  8. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  9. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  10. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients; and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient, we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  11. Anticipating epileptic seizures: from mathematics to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2005-02-01

    The study of dynamical changes in the neural activity preceding an epileptic seizure allows the characterization of a preictal state several minutes prior to seizure onset. This opens new perspectives for studying the mechanisms of ictogenesis as well as for possible therapeutic interventions that represent a major breakthrough. In this review we present and discuss the results from our group in this domain using nonlinear analysis of brain signals, as well as its limitation and open questions.

  12. Temporal lobe epilepsy: where do the seizures really begin?

    PubMed

    Bertram, Edward H

    2009-01-01

    Defining precisely the site of seizure onset has important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as for the surgical treatment of the disorder. Removal of the limbic areas of the medial temporal lobe has led to a high rate of seizure control, but the relatively large number of patients for whom seizure control is incomplete, as well as the low rate of surgical cure, suggests that the focus extends beyond the usual limits of surgical resection. Reevaluation of the extent of the pathology, as well as new data from animal models, suggests that the seizure focus extends, at least in some cases, beyond the hippocampus and amygdala, which are usually removed at the time of surgery. In this review, we examine current information about the pathology and physiology of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy syndrome, with special emphasis on the distribution of the changes and patterns of seizure onset. We then propose a hypothesis for the nature of the seizure focus in this disorder and discuss its clinical implications, with the ultimate goal of improving surgical outcomes and developing nonsurgical therapies that may improve seizure control.

  13. Epileptic seizures as condensed sleep: an analysis of network dynamics from electroencephalogram signals.

    PubMed

    Gast, Heidemarie; Müller, Markus; Rummel, Christian; Roth, Corinne; Mathis, Johannes; Schindler, Kaspar; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2014-06-01

    Both deepening sleep and evolving epileptic seizures are associated with increasing slow-wave activity. Larger-scale functional networks derived from electroencephalogram indicate that in both transitions dramatic changes of communication between brain areas occur. During seizures these changes seem to be 'condensed', because they evolve more rapidly than during deepening sleep. Here we set out to assess quantitatively functional network dynamics derived from electroencephalogram signals during seizures and normal sleep. Functional networks were derived from electroencephalogram signals from wakefulness, light and deep sleep of 12 volunteers, and from pre-seizure, seizure and post-seizure time periods of 10 patients suffering from focal onset pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Nodes of the functional network represented electrical signals recorded by single electrodes and were linked if there was non-random cross-correlation between the two corresponding electroencephalogram signals. Network dynamics were then characterized by the evolution of global efficiency, which measures ease of information transmission. Global efficiency was compared with relative delta power. Global efficiency significantly decreased both between light and deep sleep, and between pre-seizure, seizure and post-seizure time periods. The decrease of global efficiency was due to a loss of functional links. While global efficiency decreased significantly, relative delta power increased except between the time periods wakefulness and light sleep, and pre-seizure and seizure. Our results demonstrate that both epileptic seizures and deepening sleep are characterized by dramatic fragmentation of larger-scale functional networks, and further support the similarities between sleep and seizures.

  14. Microscale spatiotemporal dynamics during neocortical propagation of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Fabien B; Eskandar, Emad N; Cosgrove, G Rees; Madsen, Joseph R; Blum, Andrew S; Potter, N Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-11-15

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4×4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) a newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multiunit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~2-3 Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25-60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the MUA

  15. Microscale Spatiotemporal Dynamics during Neocortical Propagation of Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Fabien B.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4 × 4 mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) A newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multi-unit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~ 2–3Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25–60 Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the

  16. Seizures in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Yazici, Mutlu Uysal; Ayar, Ganime; Karalok, Zeynep Selen; Arhan, Ebru Petek

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of the research is to determine the etiology and clinical features of seizures in critically ill children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Methods: A total of 203 children were admitted from June 2013 to November 2013; 45 patients were eligible. Age ranged from 2 months to 19 years. Seizures were organized as epileptic or acute symptomatic. Pediatric risk of mortality score III, Glasgow coma scale, risk factors, coexistent diagnosis, medications administered before admission, type and duration of seizures, drugs used, requirement and duration of mechanical ventilation, length of stay and neuroimaging findings were collected as demographic data prospectively. Results: The male–female ratio was 0.8. Mean age was 5.4. The most common causes of seizures were acute symptomatic. Most frequent coexistent diagnosis was infectious diseases, and 53.3% had recurrent seizures. Medications were administered to 51.1% of the patients before admission. Seizures were focal in 21 (46.7%), generalized in 11 (24.4%) and 13 (28.9%) had status epilepticus. Intravenous midazolam was first-line therapy in 48.9%. Acute symptomatic seizures were usually new-onset, and duration was shorter. Epileptic seizures tended to be recurrent and were likely to progress to status epilepticus. However, type of seizures did not change severity of the disease. Also, laboratory test results, medications administered before admission, requirement and duration of ventilation, mortality and length of stay were not significant between epileptic/acute symptomatic patients. Conclusion: Seizures in critically ill children, which may evolve into status epilepticus, is an important condition that requires attention regardless of cause. Intensified educational programs for PICU physicians and international guidelines are necessary for a more efficient approach to children with seizures. PMID:26892503

  17. Seizures Following Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Monique E.; McMeniman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass are an immediate and alarming indication that a neurologic event has occurred. A case report of a 67-year-old man undergoing aortic valve surgery who unexpectedly experiences seizures following cardiopulmonary bypass is outlined. Possible contributing factors including atheromatous disease in the aorta, low cerebral perfusion pressures, an open-chamber procedure, and the use of tranexamic acid are identified. PMID:27729707

  18. Reflex operculoinsular seizures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Handsun; Tran, Thi Phuoc Yen; Pétrin, Myriam; Boucher, Olivier; Mohamed, Ismail; Bouthillier, Alain; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-03-01

    Activation of specific cortical territories by certain stimuli is known to trigger focal seizures. We report three cases of well documented operculo-insular reflex seizures, triggered by somatosensory stimuli in two and loud noises in the third. Limited operculoinsular resection resulted in an excellent outcome for all. We discuss these observations in regard to the literature on reflex epilepsy and known functions of the insula. [Published with video sequences online].

  19. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    PubMed

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (p<0.05). Fibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described.

  20. Does the Thalamo-Cortical Synchrony Play a Role in Seizure Termination?

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Elisa; Bénar, Christian; Bonini, Francesca; Carron, Romain; Colombet, Bruno; Régis, Jean; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying seizure termination are still unclear despite their therapeutic importance. We studied thalamo-cortical connectivity and synchrony in human mesial temporal lobe seizures in order to analyze their role in seizure termination. Twenty-two seizures from 10 patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing pre-surgical evaluation were analyzed using intracerebral recordings [stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)]. We performed a measure of SEEG signal interdependencies (non-linear correlation), to estimate the functional connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions. Then, we derived synchronization indices, namely global, thalamic, mesio-temporal, and thalamo-mesio temporal index at the onset and the end of seizures. In addition, an estimation of thalamic “outputs and inputs” connectivity was proposed. Thalamus was consistently involved in the last phase of all analyzed seizures and thalamic synchronization index was significantly more elevated at the end of seizure than at the onset. The global synchronization index at the end of seizure negatively correlated with seizure duration (p = 0.045) and in the same way the thalamic synchronization index showed an inverse tendency with seizure duration. Six seizures out of twenty-two displayed a particular thalamo-cortical spike-and-wave pattern at the end. They were associated to higher values of all synchronization indices and outputs from thalamus (p = 0.0079). SWP seizures displayed a higher and sustained increase of cortical and thalamo-cortical synchronization with a stronger participation of thalamic outputs. We suggest that thalamo-cortical oscillations might contribute to seizure termination via modulation of cortical synchronization. In the subgroup of SWP seizures, thalamus may exert a control on temporal lobe structures by inducing a stable hypersynchronization that ultimately leads to seizure termination. PMID:26388834

  1. Consciousness of seizures and consciousness during seizures: are they related?

    PubMed

    Detyniecki, Kamil; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the network mechanisms underlying impairment of consciousness during seizures. However, less is known about patient awareness of their own seizures. Studying patient reports or documentation of their seizures is currently the most commonly utilized mechanism to scientifically measure patient awareness of seizures. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available evidence regarding the accuracy of patient seizure counts and identify the variables that may influence unreliable seizure reporting. Several groups looking at patient documentation of seizures during continuous EEG monitoring show that patients do not report as many as 50% of their seizures. These studies also suggest that seizures accompanied by loss of consciousness, arising from the left hemisphere or the temporal lobe, or occurring during sleep are associated with significantly reduced reporting. Baseline memory performance does not appear to have a major influence on the accuracy of seizure report. Further prospective studies using validated ictal behavioral testing as well as using correlation with newer electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques for seizure localization are needed to more fully understand the mechanisms of underreporting of seizures. Better methods to alert caregivers about unrecognized seizures and to improve seizure documentation are under investigation.

  2. Alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures in cats: bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Velasco, M; Velasco, F; Cepeda, C; Márquez, I; Estrada-Villanueva, F

    1986-06-01

    The effect of bilateral lesions of the mesencephalic reticular formation on the EEG-EMG patterns of types B and C alumina cream-induced focal motor seizures was studied in cats with chronically implanted electrode and cannula lesion systems. EEG patterns included number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B spikes and occurrence and duration of type C tonic-clonic discharges. EMG patterns included changes in muscular multiple-unit activity time locked to the onset of type B spikes and to the onset and end of type C tonic-clonic EEG paroxysmal discharges. The lesions persistently blocked the orienting response to visual, auditory, and tactile stimuli to both sides in all cats and produced other neurologic symptoms partially or totally recovered in some cats. The lesions significantly increased the number, amplitude, and contralateral propagation of type B EEG spikes and the occurrence, but not the duration, of type C EEG tonic-clonic discharges. Ipsi- and contralateral adversion of the tonic phase were completely blocked and the muscular contractions of the clonic phase were reduced and delayed. These facts suggest that in intact epileptic cats, the mesencephalic reticular formation has an ascending suppressive influence on the mechanism related to EEG spike generation and precipitation of seizures but also a descending facilitatory control on the corticospinal epileptic impulses mediated through pyramidal and extrapyramidal pathways.

  3. Clinical features of seizures in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Kyung; Chin, Bum Sik; Shin, Hyoung-Shik

    2015-06-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have a higher burden of seizures, but few studies have examined seizures in HIV-infected individuals in Korea. A retrospective study was conducted to determine the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of seizures in patients with HIV infection. Among a total of 1,141 patients, 34 (3%) had seizures or epilepsy; 4 of these individuals had epilepsy before HIV infection, and the others showed new-onset seizures. Most patients exhibited moderate (200 to 500, n = 13) or low (below 200, n = 16) CD4 counts. The most common seizure etiology was progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (n = 14), followed by other HIV-associated central nervous system (CNS) complications (n = 6). Imaging studies revealed brain lesions in 21 patients. A total of 9 patients experienced only one seizure during the follow-up period, and 25 patients experienced multiple seizures or status epilepticus (n = 2). Multiple seizures were more common in patients with brain etiologies (P = 0.019) or epileptiform discharges on EEG (P = 0.032). Most seizures were controlled without anticonvulsants (n = 12) or with a single anticonvulsant (n = 12). Among patients with HIV infection, seizures are significantly more prevalent than in the general population. Most seizures, with the exception of status epilepticus, have a benign clinical course and few complications.

  4. 10 Methylxanthines, seizures and excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Boison, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    Clinical evidence, in particular the wide use of theophylline as bronchodilator, suggests that methylxanthines can cause seizures in patients without known underlying epilepsy. Theophylline is also known to be an added risk factor for seizure exacerbation in patients with epilepsy. The proconvulsant activity of methylxanthines can best be explained by antagonizing the brain’s own anticonvulsant adenosine. Recent evidence suggests that adenosine dysfunction is a pathological hallmark of epilepsy contributing to seizure generation and seizure spread. Conversely, adenosine augmentation therapies are effective in seizure suppression and prevention, whereas adenosine receptor antagonists such as methylxanthines generally exacerbate seizures. The impact of the methylxanthines caffeine and theophylline on seizures and excitotoxicity depends on timing, dose, and acute versus chronic use. New findings suggest a role of free radicals in theophylline-induced seizures and adenosine-independent mechanisms for seizure generation have been proposed. PMID:20859799

  5. Dysplastic Cerebellar Epilepsy: Complete Seizure Control Following Resection of a Ganglioglioma.

    PubMed

    Martins, William Alves; Paglioli, Eliseu; Hemb, Marta; Palmini, Andre

    2016-08-01

    Subcortical epilepsy has been a controversial issue, partially settled by evidence showing seizure generation in hypothalamic hamartomas and also by reports of seizures caused by cerebellar lesions. We report 4-year-old girl with right hemifacial seizures and autonomic phenomena, in whom MRI showed an irregular mass in the right cerebellar peduncle. Despite several unremarkable video-EEG recordings, seizure origin in the lesion was hypothesized. Complete resection was feasible, histopathology showed a ganglioglioma, and she has been seizure free for 3 years. A fine line separates these developmental tumors from focal cortical dysplasia, and the homogeneous presentation of this entity led us to propose the terminology dysplastic cerebellar epilepsy.

  6. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  7. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP.

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in partial epilepsy: a review.

    PubMed

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Zavanone, Chiara; Dupont, Sophie; Restivo, Domenico A; Pavone, Antonino

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked epileptic seizures. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, but 20-30 % will develop drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. It consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator (Neuro-Cybernetic Prosthesis). In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration approved VNS as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This article reviews the literature from 1988 to nowadays. We discuss thoroughly the anatomy and physiology of vagus nerve and the potential mechanisms of actions and clinical applications involved in VNS therapy, as well as the management, safety, tolerability and effectiveness of VNS therapy. VNS for partial seizures appears to be an effective and well tolerated treatment in adult and pediatric patients. People noted improvements in feelings of well-being, alertness, memory and thinking skills, as well as mood. The adverse effect profile is substantially different from the adverse effect profile associated with antiepileptic drugs, making VNS a potential alternative for patients with difficulty tolerating antiepileptic drug adverse effects. Despite the passing years and the advent of promising neuromodulation technologies, VNS remains an efficacy treatment for people with medically refractory epilepsy. Past and ongoing investigations in other indications have provided signals of the therapeutic potential in a wide variety of conditions.

  9. Anticonvulsant Treatment of Nerve Agent Seizures: Anticholinergics versus Diazepam in Soman-Intoxicated Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    8 June 1999 Abstract A total of eight anticholinergic drugs (aprophen, atropine, azaprophen, benactyzine, biperiden , procyclidine, scopolamine...procyclidine and aprophen terminated seizures most rapidly while scopolamine, trihexyphenidyl, biperiden , and diazepam were significantly slower. When...given 40 min after seizure onset, diazepam was the most potent compound tested, followed by scopolamine, benactyzine and biperiden ; atropine was not

  10. Hypothalamic hamartoma presenting with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal psychosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Hail, Hassan J; Sokrab, Tag-Eldin O; Al-Moslamani, Nasir J; Miyares, Francisco R

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of hypothalamic hamartoma in an adult female who presented with gelastic seizures, generalized convulsions, and ictal aggressive psychotic behavior. Anticonvulsant treatment was ineffective in controlling the epileptic seizures. Surgical excision after accurate imaging diagnosis 3 decades after the onset of symptoms markedly ameliorated her condition. Delayed and erroneous diagnosis had unnecessarily prolonged the suffering of our patient.

  11. Seizures in juvenile Huntington's disease: frequency and characterization in a multicenter cohort.

    PubMed

    Cloud, Leslie J; Rosenblatt, Adam; Margolis, Russel L; Ross, Christopher A; Pillai, Jagan A; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Tully, Hannah M; Bird, Thomas; Panegyres, Peter K; Nichter, Charles A; Higgins, Donald S; Helmers, Sandra L; Factor, Stewart A; Jones, Randi; Testa, Claudia M

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about the epilepsy that often occurs in the juvenile form of Huntington's disease (HD), but is absent from the adult-onset form. The primary aim of this study was to characterize the seizures in juvenile HD (JHD) subjects with regard to frequency, semiology, defining EEG characteristics, and response to antiepileptic agents. A multicenter, retrospective cohort was identified by database query and/or chart review. Data on age of HD onset, primary HD manifestations, number of CAG repeats, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure type(s), antiepileptic drugs used, subjects' response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and EEG results were assembled, where available. Ninety subjects with genetically confirmed JHD were included. Seizures were present in 38% of subjects and were more likely to occur with younger ages of HD onset. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were the most common seizure type, followed by tonic, myoclonic, and staring spells. Multiple seizure types commonly occurred within the same individual. Data on EEG findings and AED usage are presented. Seizure risk in JHD increases with younger age of HD onset. Our ability to draw firm conclusions about defining EEG characteristics and response to AEDs was limited by the retrospective nature of the study. Future prospective studies are required.

  12. Time-frequency analysis of intracranial EEG in patients with myoclonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Zhang, Guojun; Zhang, Xiaohua; Yan, Xiaoming; Li, Liping; Xu, Cuiping; Yu, Tao; Liu, Chunyan; Zhu, Yu; Lin, Yicong; Wang, Yuping

    2016-12-01

    Myoclonic seizures are defined as generalized seizures according to the classification of seizure by the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE). The pathogenesis of myoclonic seizures is not yet clear. There are very few studies on the focal surgical treatment of myoclonic seizures. The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of myoclonic seizure onset in different bands of the intracranial electroencephalogram (EEG) and their dynamic changes in temporal and spatial evolution. We studied four patients with myoclonic seizures who were under the focal resection of the epileptogenic zone. We retrospectively analyzed the semiology, electrocorticogram (ECoG) and imaging data of these patients, and conducted time-frequency analysis of broadband ECoG activity. We found that myoclonic seizures without clinical lateralizing signs could be improved by the resection of the epileptogenic zone. The ECoG power in different frequency bands increased to a peak at 0.5s before the clinical seizure onset and decreased quickly afterwards. The power of alpha activity was highest during the preictal and ictal periods. The central zone had higher power than the epileptogenic zone in all frequency bands during the preictal period, but this difference was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that myoclonic seizures in some patients might have a focal origination, with a fast bilateral propagating network in all frequency bands, especially the alpha band.

  13. Detection of seizure precursors from depth-EEG using a sign periodogram transform.

    PubMed

    Niederhauser, Joël J; Esteller, Rosana; Echauz, Javier; Vachtsevanos, George; Litt, Brian

    2003-04-01

    Brief bursts of focal, low amplitude rhythmic activity have been observed on depth electroencephalogram (EEG) in the minutes before electrographic onset of seizures in human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We have found these periods to contain discrete, individualized synchronized activity in patient-specific frequency bands ranging from 20 to 40 Hz. We present a method for detecting and displaying these events using a periodogram of the sign-limited temporal derivative of the EEG signal, denoted joint sign periodogram event characterization transform (JSPECT). When applied to continuous 2-6 day depth-EEG recordings from ten patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, JSPECT demonstrated that these patient-specific EEG events reliably occurred 5-80 s prior to electrical onset of seizures in five patients with focal, unilateral seizure onsets. JSPECT did not reveal this type of activity prior to seizures in five other patients with bilateral, extratemporal or more diffuse seizure onsets on EEG. Patient-specific, localized rhythmic events may play an important role in seizure generation in temporal lobe epilepsy. The JSPECT method efficiently detects these events, and may be useful as part of an automated system for predicting electrical seizure onset in appropriate patients.

  14. Seizure following the Use of the COX-2 Inhibitor Etoricoxib

    PubMed Central

    Arnao, Valentina; Riolo, Marianna; Fierro, Brigida

    2017-01-01

    We describe a case of epileptic seizures occurring after the use of a COX-2 inhibitor. A 61-year-old man was admitted to our department because of a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. EEG showed generalized slowdown of the activity. Neuroimaging and blood samples studies did not evidence alterations, but a careful pharmacological history revealed that the patient had taken the COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib to treat lumbago few days before the onset of clinical symptoms. No seizures were reported after etoricoxib discontinuation and an EEG resulted to be normal two months after this. Conclusion. Knowing the pharmacological history of a patient is important for understanding the clinical presentation and selecting appropriate treatment. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first reported case of generalized seizures associated with the use of COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:28210513

  15. Ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by sound in rats.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V; Grinenko, Olesya A

    2016-03-15

    It is now recognized that both generalized and focal seizures may originate in subcortical structures. The well-known types of focal subcortically-driven seizures are gelastic seizures in patients with the hypothalamic hamartoma and sound-induced seizures in rodents with audiogenic epilepsy. The seizures are generated by subcortical intrinsically epileptogenic focus, the hamartoma in humans and the inferior colliculus (IC) in rodents. In patients with gelastic epilepsy additional seizure types may develop with time that are supposed to result from secondary epileptogenesis and spreading of epileptic discharges to the cortex. Repeated audiogenic seizures can also lead to development of additional seizure behavior and secondary epileptic activation of the cortex. This process, named audiogenic kindling, may be useful for studying secondary subcortico-cortical epileptogenesis. Using intracollicular and intracortical recordings, we studied an ictal electrographic pattern of focal subcortical seizures induced by repeated sound stimulation in Wistar audiogenic-susceptible rats. The audiogenic seizures, representing brief attacks of paroxysmal unidirectional running, were accompanied by epileptiform abnormalities in the IC, mostly on the side ipsilateral to run direction, and enhanced rhythmic 8-9Hz activity in the cortex. With repetition of the subcortical seizures and kindling development, a secondary cortical discharge began to follow the IC seizure. The secondary discharge initially involved the cortex homolateral to the side of dominant subcortical epileptiform abnormalities and behaviorally expressed as limbic (partial) clonus. Kindling progression was associated with bilateralization of the secondary cortical discharge, an increase in its amplitude and duration, intensification of associated behavioral seizures (from partial clonus to generalized tonic-clonic convulsions). Thus, ictal recordings during brief audiogenic running seizures showed their focal

  16. SEIZURE AND EPILEPSY: STUDIES OF SEIZURE DISORDERS IN DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Louise; Howlett, Iris C.; Rusan, Zeid M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the frequency of seizure disorders in the human population, the genetic and physiological basis for these defects has been difficult to resolve. Although many genetic contributions to seizure susceptibility have been identified, these involve disparate biological processes, many of which are not neural specific. The large number and heterogeneous nature of the genes involved makes it difficult to understand the complex factors underlying the etiology of seizure disorders. Examining the effect known genetic mutations have on seizure susceptibility is one approach that may prove fruitful. This approach may be helpful in both understanding how different physiological processes affect seizure susceptibility and identifying novel therapeutic treatments. We review here factors contributing to seizure susceptibility in Drosophila, a genetically tractable system that provides a model for human seizure disorders. Seizure-like neuronal activities and behaviors in the fruit fly are described, as well as a set of mutations that exhibit features resembling some human epilepsies and render the fly sensitive to seizures. Especially interesting are descriptions of a novel class of mutations that are second-site mutations that act as seizure suppressors. These mutations revert epilepsy phenotypes back to the wild-type range of seizure susceptibility. The genes responsible for seizure suppression are cloned with the goal of identifying targets for lead compounds that may be developed into new antiepileptic drugs. PMID:21906534

  17. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  18. Classification of seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Riviello, James J

    2003-07-01

    The management of seizures and epilepsy begins with forming a differential diagnosis, making the diagnosis, and then classifying seizure type and epileptic syndrome. Classification guides treatment, including ancillary testing, management, prognosis, and if needed, selection of the appropriate antiepileptic drug (AED). Many AEDs are available, and certain seizure types or epilepsy syndromes respond to specific AEDs. The identification of the genetics, molecular basis, and pathophysiologic mechanisms of epilepsy has resulted from classification of specific epileptic syndromes. The classification system used by the International League Against Epilepsy is periodically revised. The proposed revision changes the classification emphasis from the anatomic origin of seizures (focal vs generalized) to seizure semiology (ie, the signs or clinical manifestations). Modified systems have been developed for specific circumstances (eg, neonatal seizures, infantile seizures, status epilepticus, and epilepsy surgery). This article reviews seizure and epilepsy classification, emphasizing new data.

  19. Feasibility study of a caregiver seizure alert system in canine epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coles, Lisa D; Patterson, Edward E; Sheffield, W Douglas; Mavoori, Jaideep; Higgins, Jason; Michael, Bland; Leyde, Kent; Cloyd, James C; Litt, Brian; Vite, Charles; Worrell, Gregory A

    2013-10-01

    A device capable of detecting seizures and alerting caregivers would be a major advance for epilepsy management, and could be used to guide early intervention and prevent seizure-related injuries. The objective of this work was to evaluate a seizure advisory system (SAS) that alerts caregivers of seizures in canines with naturally occurring epilepsy. Four dogs with epilepsy were implanted with a SAS that wirelessly transmits continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG) to an external device embedded with a seizure detection algorithm and the capability to alert caregivers. In this study a veterinarian was alerted by automated text message if prolonged or repetitive seizures occurred, and a rescue therapy protocol was implemented. The performance of the SAS caregiver alert was evaluated over the course of 8 weeks. Following discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs, the dogs experienced spontaneous unprovoked partial seizures that secondarily generalized. Three prolonged or repetitive seizure episodes occurred in 2 of the dogs. On each occasion, the SAS caregiver alert successfully alerted an on call veterinarian who confirmed the seizure activity via remote video-monitoring. A rescue medication was then administered and the seizures were aborted. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a SAS to alert caregivers to the occurrence of prolonged or repetitive seizures and enables rescue medications to be delivered in a timely manner. The SAS may improve the management of human epilepsy by alerting caregivers of seizures, enabling early interventions, and potentially improving outcomes and quality of life of patients and caregivers.

  20. A KCNQ channel opener for experimental neonatal seizures and status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Raol, YogendraSinh H.; Lapides, David A.; Keating, Jeffery; Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Cooper, Edward C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Neonatal seizures occur frequently, are often refractory to anticonvulsants, and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Genetic and electrophysiological evidence indicates that KCNQ voltage-gated potassium channels are critical regulators of neonatal brain excitability. This study tests the hypothesis that selective openers of KCNQ channels may be effective for treatment of neonatal seizures. Methods We induced seizures in postnatal day 10 rats with either kainic acid or flurothyl. We measured seizure activity using quantified behavioral rating and electrocorticography. We compared the efficacy of flupirtine, a selective KCNQ channel opener, with phenobarbital and diazepam, two drugs in current use for neonatal seizures. Results Unlike phenobarbital or diazepam, flupirtine prevented animals from developing status epilepticus (SE) when administered prior to kainate. In the flurothyl model, phenobarbital and diazepam increased latency to seizure onset, but flupirtine completely prevented seizures throughout the experiment. Flupirtine was also effective in arresting electrographic and behavioral seizures when administered after animals had developed continuous kainate-induced SE. Flupirtine caused dose-related sedation and suppressed EEG activity, but did not result in respiratory suppression or result in any mortality. Interpretation Flupirtine appears more effective than either of two commonly used anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbital and diazepam, in preventing and suppressing seizures in both the kainic acid and flurothyl models of symptomatic neonatal seizures. KCNQ channel openers merit further study as potential treatments for seizures in infants and children. PMID:19334075

  1. Seizures after Onyx embolization for the treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformation.

    PubMed

    de Los Reyes, K; Patel, A; Doshi, A; Egorova, N; Panov, F; Bederson, J B; Frontera, J A

    2011-09-01

    Onyx embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM) has become increasingly common. We explored the risk of seizures after Onyx use.A retrospective review was conducted of 20 patients with supratentorial brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) who received Onyx embolization between 2006 and 2009. Baseline demographics, clinical history, seizure history, AVM characteristics and treatment were compared between those who developed post-onyx seizure and those who did not. MRIs were reviewed for edema following Onyx treatment.Of 20 patients who underwent Onyx embolization, the initial AVM presentation was hemorrhage in 40% (N=8). The median number of embolizations was two (range 1-4) and the median final obliteration amount was 90% (range 50-100%). A history of seizure was present in 50% (N=10) of patients pre-embolization and 12 (60%) patients received seizure medications (treatment or prophylaxis) prior to embolization. Seizur post-Onyx embolization occurred in 45% (N=9). The median time to seizur post-Onyx was seven days (range 0.3-210). Four patients (20%) with seizures post-Onyx had no seizure history. Two of these patients (10%) had no other identifiable cause for seizure other than recent Onyx embolization. Seizures in these two patients occurred within 24 hours of Onyx administration. Among patients with post-Onyx seizures, there was a trend toward larger AVM size (P=0.091) and lower percent obliteration (P=0.062). Peri-AVM edema was present in 75% of MRIs performed within one month of Onyx treatment and may represent a possible etiology for seizures.New onset seizures post-Onyx embolization are not uncommon. Further study of seizure prevention is warranted.

  2. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  3. Partially resistant Cucurbita pepo showed late onset of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus infection due to rapid activation of defense mechanisms as compared to susceptible cultivar.

    PubMed

    Nováková, Slavomíra; Flores-Ramírez, Gabriela; Glasa, Miroslav; Danchenko, Maksym; Fiala, Roderik; Skultety, Ludovit

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an emerging viral pathogen in cucurbit-growing areas wordwide. Infection causes significant yield losses in several species of the family Cucurbitaceae. To identify proteins potentially involved with resistance toward infection by the severe ZYMV-H isolate, two Cucurbita pepo cultivars (Zelena susceptible and Jaguar partially resistant) were analyzed using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach. Initial symptoms on leaves (clearing veins) developed 6-7 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the susceptible C. pepo cv. Zelena. In contrast, similar symptoms appeared on the leaves of partially resistant C. pepo cv. Jaguar only after 15 dpi. This finding was confirmed by immune-blot analysis which showed higher levels of viral proteins at 6 dpi in the susceptible cultivar. Leaf proteome analyses revealed 28 and 31 spots differentially abundant between cultivars at 6 and 15 dpi, respectively. The variance early in infection can be attributed to a rapid activation of proteins involved with redox homeostasis in the partially resistant cultivar. Changes in the proteome of the susceptible cultivar are related to the cytoskeleton and photosynthesis.

  4. Partially resistant Cucurbita pepo showed late onset of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus infection due to rapid activation of defense mechanisms as compared to susceptible cultivar

    PubMed Central

    Nováková, Slavomíra; Flores-Ramírez, Gabriela; Glasa, Miroslav; Danchenko, Maksym; Fiala, Roderik; Skultety, Ludovit

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an emerging viral pathogen in cucurbit-growing areas wordwide. Infection causes significant yield losses in several species of the family Cucurbitaceae. To identify proteins potentially involved with resistance toward infection by the severe ZYMV-H isolate, two Cucurbita pepo cultivars (Zelena susceptible and Jaguar partially resistant) were analyzed using a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach. Initial symptoms on leaves (clearing veins) developed 6–7 days post-inoculation (dpi) in the susceptible C. pepo cv. Zelena. In contrast, similar symptoms appeared on the leaves of partially resistant C. pepo cv. Jaguar only after 15 dpi. This finding was confirmed by immune-blot analysis which showed higher levels of viral proteins at 6 dpi in the susceptible cultivar. Leaf proteome analyses revealed 28 and 31 spots differentially abundant between cultivars at 6 and 15 dpi, respectively. The variance early in infection can be attributed to a rapid activation of proteins involved with redox homeostasis in the partially resistant cultivar. Changes in the proteome of the susceptible cultivar are related to the cytoskeleton and photosynthesis. PMID:25972878

  5. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... food to the table. If possible, replace all glass doors either with safety glass or plastic. Most people with seizures can have a very active lifestyle. You should still plan ahead for the ... law from your doctor and the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV).

  6. Antipsychotic drugs and seizures.

    PubMed

    Remick, R A; Fine, S H

    1979-02-01

    The authors examine the clinical problem of which antipsychotic drug to use when antipsychotics are indicated in patients with a seizuire disorder or who are susceptible to seizures. While definitive answers to this problem are still unknown, guidelines are offered for antipsychotic drug use in this situation, based on the author's understanding of psychotropics and epilepsy.

  7. [A successful surgical case of a hypothalamic hamartoma with gelastic seizure: a case report].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoaki; Nishimura, Shinjitsu; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Furuno, Yuichi; Mino, Masaki; Hori, Emiko; Kaimori, Mitsuomi; Shirane, Reizou; Nishijima, Michiharu

    2009-08-01

    Gelastic seizure is a rare form of epilepsy defined as automatic bouts of laughter without mirth commonly associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma. Surgical treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas is associated with a high risk of complications because of the close vicinity of adjacent structures such as the optic tracts and mammillary bodies. This case was an 11-year-old girl who presented with gelastic seizure and complicated partial seizure. She developed gelastic seizure at a frequency of 10 bouts per day. She was found to have an elliptical mass close to the left hypothalamus. The signal intensity on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was consistent with hypothalamic hamartoma. The patient underwent surgical resection by a subtemporal approach. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartoma. Postoperative MRI demonstrated that the hypothalamic hamartoma was successfully resected. Twenty four months after surgery, complicated partial seizure in this patient has improved to Engel's class 1a and gelastic seizure has improved to Engel's class IIIa.

  8. Alterations of hippocampal GAbaergic system contribute to development of spontaneous recurrent seizures in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    André, V; Marescaux, C; Nehlig, A; Fritschy, J M

    2001-01-01

    Reorganization of excitatory and inhibitory circuits in the hippocampal formation following seizure-induced neuronal loss has been proposed to underlie the development of chronic seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Here, we investigated whether specific morphological alterations of the GABAergic system can be related to the onset of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) in the rat lithium-pilocarpine model of TLE. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of interneurons and their projections, including parvalbumin (PV), calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), and type 1 GABA transporter (GAT1), was performed in brain sections of rats treated with lithium-pilocarpine and sacrificed after 24 h, during the silent phase (6 and 12 days), or after the onset of SRS (10-18 days after treatment). Semiquantitative analysis revealed a selective loss of interneurons in the stratum oriens of CA1, associated with a reduction of GAT1 staining in the stratum radiatum and stratum oriens. In contrast, interneurons in CA3 were largely preserved, although GAT1 staining was also reduced. These changes occurred within 6 days after treatment and were therefore insufficient to cause SRS. In the dentate gyrus, extensive cell loss occurred in the hilus. The pericellular innervation of granule cells by PV-positive axons was markedly reduced, although the loss of PV-interneurons was only partial. Most strikingly, the density of GABAergic axons, positive for both GAD and GAT1, was dramatically increased in the inner molecular layer. This change emerged during the silent period, but was most marked in animals with SRS. Finally, supernumerary CB-positive neurons were detected in the hilus, selectively in rats with SRS. These findings suggest that alterations of GABAergic circuits occur early after lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and contribute to epileptogenesis. In particular, the reorganization of GABAergic axons in the dentate gyrus might

  9. [Anticonvulsive Therapy after the First Unprovoked Seizure – Pros and Cons].

    PubMed

    Zieglgänsberger, Dominik; Tettenborn, Barbara

    2016-01-06

    A first seizure is a critical life time event with severe consequences. A very thorough work-up is needed to find out the cause of the seizure and to number the risk of recurrence. Reasons for an anticonvulsive therapy are a pathologic EEG, a pathologic neurologic examination, the proof of a structural lesion, focal seizure onset or seizure onset while sleeping or classification as an epilepsy syndrome with high recurrence risk like juvenile myoclonic epilepsy or juvenile absence epilepsy. Psychological and social aspects like the patients or relatives fear of a further seizure, the risk of injury and occupational and recreational aspects must be considered as well. Reasons against an anticonvulsive therapy are mainly related to adverse effects like gain of weight and osteoporosis.

  10. Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in afebrile children with seizures.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indrajit; Hartley-McAndrew, Michelle E; Weinstock, Arie L

    2012-04-01

    Central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is suspected in patients presenting with acute-onset seizures and lethargy. The potential neurologic sequelae from untreated herpes infection can prompt empirical acyclovir therapy, even in afebrile subjects. The objectives of this study were to determine the frequency of central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection in children presenting with afebrile seizures and to assess the need for empirical acyclovir therapy. Clinical and laboratory data of children with acute-onset afebrile seizures and children with central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection were compared. Polymerase chain reaction and viral cultures of the cerebrospinal fluid for herpes simplex virus infection were negative in all subjects with afebrile seizures; 32.7% of these subjects were empirically treated with acyclovir. In conclusion, central nervous system herpes simplex virus infection is uncommon in children presenting with afebrile seizures, and acyclovir therapy is rarely necessary in subjects with normal neurologic examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis.

  11. Updated ILAE evidence review of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Tracy; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Bourgeois, Blaise; Cnaan, Avital; Guerreiro, Carlos; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mattson, Richard; French, Jacqueline A; Perucca, Emilio; Tomson, Torbjorn

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this report was to update the 2006 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) report and identify the level of evidence for long-term efficacy or effectiveness for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as initial monotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed or untreated epilepsy. All applicable articles from July 2005 until March 2012 were identified, evaluated, and combined with the previous analysis (Glauser et al., 2006) to provide a comprehensive update. The prior analysis methodology was utilized with three modifications: (1) the detectable noninferiority boundary approach was dropped and both failed superiority studies and prespecified noninferiority studies were analyzed using a noninferiority approach, (2) the definition of an adequate comparator was clarified and now includes an absolute minimum point estimate for efficacy/effectiveness, and (3) the relationship table between clinical trial ratings, level of evidence, and conclusions no longer includes a recommendation column to reinforce that this review of efficacy/evidence for specific seizure types does not imply treatment recommendations. This evidence review contains one clarification: The commission has determined that class I superiority studies can be designed to detect up to a 20% absolute (rather than relative) difference in the point estimate of efficacy/effectiveness between study treatment and comparator using an intent-to-treat analysis. Since July, 2005, three class I randomized controlled trials (RCT) and 11 class III RCTs have been published. The combined analysis (1940-2012) now includes a total of 64 RCTs (7 with class I evidence, 2 with class II evidence) and 11 meta-analyses. New efficacy/effectiveness findings include the following: levetiracetam and zonisamide have level A evidence in adults with partial onset seizures and both ethosuximide and valproic acid have level A evidence in children with childhood absence epilepsy. There are no major changes in the level of evidence

  12. Retrospective clinical comparison of idiopathic versus symptomatic epilepsy in 240 dogs with seizures.

    PubMed

    Pákozdy, Akos; Leschnik, Michael; Tichy, Alexander G; Thalhammer, Johann G

    2008-12-01

    In the present study, 240 cases of dogs with seizures were analysed retrospectively. The aim was to examine the underlying aetiology and to compare primary or idiopathic epilepsy (IE) with symptomatic epilepsy (SE) concerning signalment, history, ictal pattern, clinical and neurological findings. The diagnosis of symptomatic epilepsy was based on confirmed pathological changes in haematology, serum biochemistry, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis and morphological changes of the brain by CT/MRI or histopathological examination. Seizure aetiologies were classified as idiopathic epilepsy (IE, n = 115) and symptomatic epilepsy (SE, n = 125). Symptomatic epilepsy was mainly caused by intracranial neoplasia (39) and encephalitis (23). The following variables showed significant difference between the IE and SE group: age, body weight, presence of partial seizures, cluster seizures, status epilepticus, ictal vocalisation and neurological deficits. In 48% of the cases, seizures were found to be due to IE, while 16% were due to intracranial neoplasia and 10% to encephalitis. Status epilepticus, cluster seizures, partial seizures, vocalisation during seizure and impaired neurological status were more readily seen with symptomatic epilepsy. If the first seizure occurred between one and five years of age or the seizures occurred during resting condition, the diagnosis was more likely IE than SE.

  13. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset. PMID:25904809

  14. A novel seizure detection algorithm informed by hidden Markov model event states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassano, Steven; Wulsin, Drausin; Ung, Hoameng; Blevins, Tyler; Brown, Mesha-Gay; Fox, Emily; Litt, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Recently the FDA approved the first responsive, closed-loop intracranial device to treat epilepsy. Because these devices must respond within seconds of seizure onset and not miss events, they are tuned to have high sensitivity, leading to frequent false positive stimulations and decreased battery life. In this work, we propose a more robust seizure detection model. Approach. We use a Bayesian nonparametric Markov switching process to parse intracranial EEG (iEEG) data into distinct dynamic event states. Each event state is then modeled as a multidimensional Gaussian distribution to allow for predictive state assignment. By detecting event states highly specific for seizure onset zones, the method can identify precise regions of iEEG data associated with the transition to seizure activity, reducing false positive detections associated with interictal bursts. The seizure detection algorithm was translated to a real-time application and validated in a small pilot study using 391 days of continuous iEEG data from two dogs with naturally occurring, multifocal epilepsy. A feature-based seizure detector modeled after the NeuroPace RNS System was developed as a control. Main results. Our novel seizure detection method demonstrated an improvement in false negative rate (0/55 seizures missed versus 2/55 seizures missed) as well as a significantly reduced false positive rate (0.0012 h versus 0.058 h-1). All seizures were detected an average of 12.1 ± 6.9 s before the onset of unequivocal epileptic activity (unequivocal epileptic onset (UEO)). Significance. This algorithm represents a computationally inexpensive, individualized, real-time detection method suitable for implantable antiepileptic devices that may considerably reduce false positive rate relative to current industry standards.

  15. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2015-04-22

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristics during theta and sharp waves suggested that a parvalbumin-positive basket cell and putative bistratified cells, but not oriens lacunosum moleculare cells, were activated preictally. Preictal changes occurred much earlier than those described by most previous in vitro studies. Preictal activation of interneurons began earliest (>4 min before seizure onset), increased most, was most prevalent in the subiculum, and was minimal in CA3. Preictal inactivation of interneurons was most common in CA1 (27% of interneurons) and included a putative ivy cell and parvalbumin-positive basket cell. Increased or decreased preictal activity correlated with whether interneurons fired faster or slower, respectively, during theta activity. Theta waves were more likely to occur before seizure onset, and increased preictal firing of subicular interneurons correlated with theta activity. Preictal changes by other hippocampal interneurons were largely independent of theta waves. Within seconds of seizure onset, many interneurons displayed a brief pause in firing and a later, longer drop that was associated with reduced action potential amplitude. These findings suggest that many interneurons inactivate during seizures, most increase their activity preictally, but some fail to do so at the critical time before seizure onset.

  16. Gelastic seizures: A case of lateral frontal lobe epilepsy and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Deppe, Michael; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Schiffbauer, Hagen; Schwindt, Wolfram; Möddel, Gabriel; Dogan, Mujgan; Evers, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    We describe a 40-year-old patient with gelastic seizures triggered by hand movement. Despite nonlesional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are concordant with seizure onset in the right frontocentral area. Seizure semiology and EEG recordings imply involvement of mesial frontal structures remote from seizure initiation site. We reviewed all published cases on gelastic seizures of frontal lobe origin to find characteristic features. For further investigation of the phenomenon of movement-induced seizures, fMRI was performed using a finger tapping paradigm. Interictal fMRI revealed widespread activation of right motor cortex during finger tapping on either side outreaching the anatomical representation of the left finger. In line with this finding DTI revealed fiber track impairment in the right frontocentral region, supporting the hypothesis of a focal derangement. This case highlights the importance of complementary functional investigations in MRI-negative epilepsies.

  17. Altered expression of adrenocorticotropic hormone in the epileptic gerbil hippocampus following spontaneous seizure.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yun-Jung; Kim, Heung-No; Jeong, Ji-Heon; Park, Dae-Kyoon; Park, Kyung-Ho; Ko, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Duk-Soo

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the temporal alterations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus after seizure onset. Expression of ACTH was observed within interneurons in the pre-seizure group of seizure sensitive gerbils, whereas its immunoreactivities were rarely detected in seizure resistant gerbil. Three hr after the seizure, ACTH immunoreactivity was significantly increased in interneurons within all hippocampal regions. On the basis of their localization and morphology through immunofluorescence staining, these cells were identified as GABAA α1-containing interneurons. At the 12 hr postictal period, ACTH expression in these regions was down-regulated, in a similar manner to the pre-seizure group of gerbils. These findings support the increase in ACTH synthesis that contributes to a reduction of corticotrophin-releasing factor via the negative feedback system which in turn provides an opportunity to enhance the excitability of GABAergic interneurons. Therefore, ACTH may play an important role in the reduction of excitotoxicity in all hippocampal regions.

  18. Widespread changes in network activity allow non-invasive detection of mesial temporal lobe seizures.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alice D; Zepeda, Rodrigo; Cole, Andrew J; Cash, Sydney S

    2016-10-01

    Decades of experience with intracranial recordings in patients with epilepsy have demonstrated that seizures can occur in deep cortical regions such as the mesial temporal lobes without showing any obvious signs of seizure activity on scalp electroencephalogram. Predicated on the idea that these seizures are purely focal, currently, the only way to detect these 'scalp-negative seizures' is with intracranial recordings. However, intracranial recordings are only rarely performed in patients with epilepsy, and are almost never performed outside of the context of epilepsy. As such, little is known about scalp-negative seizures and their role in the natural history of epilepsy, their effect on cognitive function, and their association with other neurological diseases. Here, we developed a novel approach to non-invasively identify scalp-negative seizures arising from the mesial temporal lobe based on scalp electroencephalogram network connectivity measures. We identified 25 scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures in 10 patients and obtained control records from an additional 13 patients, all of whom underwent recordings with foramen ovale electrodes and scalp electroencephalogram. Scalp data from these records were used to train a scalp-negative seizure detector, which consisted of a pair of logistic regression classifiers that used scalp electroencephalogram coherence properties as input features. On cross-validation performance, this detector correctly identified scalp-negative seizures in 40% of patients, and correctly identified the side of seizure onset for each seizure detected. In comparison, routine clinical interpretation of these scalp electroencephalograms failed to identify any of the scalp-negative seizures. Among the patients in whom the detector raised seizure alarms, 80% had scalp-negative mesial temporal lobe seizures. The detector had a false alarm rate of only 0.31 per day and a positive predictive value of 75%. Of the 13 control patients, false

  19. Cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine (CDP-choline) adversely effects on pilocarpine seizure-induced hippocampal neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Dong Won; Choi, Bo Young; Sohn, Min; Lee, Song Hee; Choi, Hui Chul; Song, Hong Ki; Suh, Sang Won

    2015-01-21

    Citicoline (CDP-choline; cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine) is an important intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids. Citicoline serves as a choline donor in the biosynthetic pathways of acetylcholine and neuronal membrane phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylcholine. The ability of citicoline to reverse neuronal injury has been tested in animal models of cerebral ischemia and clinical trials have been performed in stroke patients. However, no studies have examined the effect of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death. To clarify the potential therapeutic effects of citicoline on seizure-induced neuronal death, we used an animal model of pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine (25mg/kg) in adult male rats. Citicoline (100 or 300 mg/kg) was injected into the intraperitoneal space two hours after seizure onset and a second injection was performed 24h after the seizure. Citicoline was injected once per day for one week after pilocarpine- or kainate-induced seizure. Neuronal injury and microglial activation were evaluated at 1 week post-seizure. Surprisingly, rather than offering protection, citicoline treatment actually enhanced seizure-induced neuronal death and microglial activation in the hippocampus compared to vehicle treated controls. Citicoline administration after seizure-induction increased immunoglobulin leakage via BBB disruption in the hippocampus compared with the vehicle-only group. To clarify if this adverse effect of citicoline is generalizable across alternative seizure models, we induced seizure by kainate injection (10mg/kg, i.p.) and then injected citicoline as in pilocarpine-induced seizure. We found that citicoline did not modulate kainate seizure-induced neuronal death, BBB disruption or microglial activation. These results suggest that citicoline may not have neuroprotective effects after seizure and that clinical application of citicoline after

  20. Seizures in the peripartum period: Epidemiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Aya, A G M; Ondze, B; Ripart, J; Cuvillon, P

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of seizures in the peripartum period is a rare but particularly challenging situation. Seizures in the peripartum period could result from three categories of conditions: first and most frequent is the exacerbation of a known pre-existing seizure disorder, mainly epilepsy. A therapeutic evaluation is needed; second is the new onset of seizures due to a non-pregnancy-related problem. An accurate diagnosis and a specific treatment are required; third is range of pregnancy-related conditions. The present review focuses on this third category, with a special attention to disorders occurring in the peripartum period. It is structured in two sections. The first section is a focus on eclampsia since, based on ICU admission data, it appears to be the leading cause of pregnancy-related seizures. Its epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical diagnosis, neuro-imaging features and recommended management are reviewed. The efficacy and safety of the recommended regimens of MgSO4 therapy are discussed, as well as controversies on the alteration of these regimens and the use of MgSO4 in women with mild preeclampsia. In the second section, the other causes of pregnancy-related new onset seizures are summarized. These include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, amniotic fluid embolism, and air embolism. Noteworthy is the fact that most of these pregnancy-related seizure conditions overlap with each other, mainly in terms of clinical presentations and neuro-imaging. Therefore, the diagnosis and the treatment options should be considered on a multidisciplinary basis.

  1. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  2. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity.

  3. Risk factors for cluster seizures in canine idiopathic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Packer, Rowena M A; Shihab, Nadia K; Torres, Bruno B J; Volk, Holger A

    2016-04-01

    Cluster seizures (CS), two or more seizures within a 24-hour period, are reported in 38-77% of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Negative outcomes associated with CS include a reduced likelihood of achieving seizure freedom, decreased survival time and increased likelihood of euthanasia. Previous studies have found factors including breed, sex and neuter status are associated with CS in dogs with IE; however, only one UK study in a multi-breed study of CS in IE patients exists to the author's knowledge, and thus further data is required to confirm these results. Data from 384 dogs treated at a multi-breed canine specific epilepsy clinic were retrospectively collected from electronic patient records. 384 dogs were included in the study, of which nearly half had a history of CS (49.1%). Dogs with a history of CS had a younger age at onset than those without (p = 0.033). In a multivariate model, three variables predicted risk of CS: a history of status epilepticus (p = 0.047), age at seizure onset (p = 0.066) and breed (German Shepherd Dog) (p < 0.001). Dogs with a history of status epilepticus and dogs with an older age at seizure onset were less likely to be affected by cluster seizures. German Shepherd Dogs (71% experiencing CS) were significantly more likely to suffer from CS compared to Labrador Retrievers (25%) (p < 0.001). There was no association between sex, neuter status, body size and CS. Further studies into the pathophysiology and genetics of CS are required to further understand this phenomenon.

  4. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  5. Targeted silencing of DNA-specific B cells combined with partial plasma cell depletion displays additive effects on delaying disease onset in lupus-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Nikolova-Ganeva, K A; Gesheva, V V; Todorov, T A; Voll, R E; Vassilev, T L

    2013-01-01

    Targeting autoreactive B lymphocytes at any stage of their differentiation could yield viable therapeutic strategies for treating autoimmunity. All currently used drugs, including the most recently introduced biological agents, lack target specificity. Selective silencing of double-stranded DNA-specific B cells in animals with spontaneous lupus has been achieved previously by the administration of a chimeric antibody molecule that cross-links their DNA-reactive B cell immunoglobulin receptors with inhibitory FcγIIb (CD32) receptors. However, long-lived plasmacytes are resistant to this chimeric antibody as well as to all conventional treatments. Bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor) depletes most plasma cells and has been shown recently to suppress disease activity in lupus mice. We hypothesized that the co-administration of non-toxic doses of bortezomib, that partially purge long-lived plasma cells, together with an agent that selectively silences DNA-specific B cells, should have additive effects in an autoantibody-mediated disease. Indeed, our data show that the simultaneous treatment of lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice with suboptimal doses of bortezomib plus the chimeric antibody resulted in the prevention or the delayed appearance of the disease manifestations as well as in a prolonged survival. The effect of the combination therapy was significantly stronger than that of the respective monotherapies and was comparable to that observed after cyclophosphamide administration. PMID:23808414

  6. Targeted silencing of DNA-specific B cells combined with partial plasma cell depletion displays additive effects on delaying disease onset in lupus-prone mice.

    PubMed

    Nikolova-Ganeva, K A; Gesheva, V V; Todorov, T A; Voll, R E; Vassilev, T L

    2013-11-01

    Targeting autoreactive B lymphocytes at any stage of their differentiation could yield viable therapeutic strategies for treating autoimmunity. All currently used drugs, including the most recently introduced biological agents, lack target specificity. Selective silencing of double-stranded DNA-specific B cells in animals with spontaneous lupus has been achieved previously by the administration of a chimeric antibody molecule that cross-links their DNA-reactive B cell immunoglobulin receptors with inhibitory FcγIIb (CD32) receptors. However, long-lived plasmacytes are resistant to this chimeric antibody as well as to all conventional treatments. Bortezomib (a proteasome inhibitor) depletes most plasma cells and has been shown recently to suppress disease activity in lupus mice. We hypothesized that the co-administration of non-toxic doses of bortezomib, that partially purge long-lived plasma cells, together with an agent that selectively silences DNA-specific B cells, should have additive effects in an autoantibody-mediated disease. Indeed, our data show that the simultaneous treatment of lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice with suboptimal doses of bortezomib plus the chimeric antibody resulted in the prevention or the delayed appearance of the disease manifestations as well as in a prolonged survival. The effect of the combination therapy was significantly stronger than that of the respective monotherapies and was comparable to that observed after cyclophosphamide administration.

  7. [Oral loading dose of phenytoin in the treatment of serial seizures, prevention of seizure recurrence and rapid drug substitution].

    PubMed

    Sokić, D; Janković, S M

    1994-01-01

    Over a period of nine months twenty-five epileptic patients were treated with the oral loading dose of phenytoin. The dose ranged from 12 to 23 mg/kg body weight during 1 to 12 hours. In 20 patients with serial seizures or intolerance to other antiepileptic drugs this treatment was effective. Seizures also stopped in 2 of 4 patients with serial partial motor seizures. These 2 patients required both higher loading dose and faster rate of administration than the other patients. A patient with epilepsia partialis continua failed to respond to the treatment. Patients that received phenytoin through the naso-gastric tube, in respect to oral administration, required higher doses to obtain therapeutic plasma levels of phenytoin. One patient had mild nausea, 3 mild dizziness, and 1 tinitus on the first day of the treatment. There was no correlation between a given dose and the achieved phenytoin plasma levels. In our opinion the therapy with oral loading dose of phenytoin is highly effective in the treatment of serial generalized seizures and rapid antiepileptic drug substitution, and partially effective in the prevention of partial motor seizures. It produces only mild and transient side-effects.

  8. Developmental PCB Exposure Increases Susceptibility to Audiogenic Seizures in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Emily; Bandara, Suren B.; Allen, Jont B.; Sadowski, Renee N.; Schantz, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes auditory deficits. Thus, we recently conducted a study to investigate if developmental PCB exposure would exacerbate noise-induced hearing loss in adulthood. Unexpectedly, some PCB-exposed rats exhibited seizure-like behaviors when exposed to loud noise. Therefore, we conducted the current experiment to determine if adult rats perinatally exposed to PCBs are more susceptible to audiogenic seizures when tested in a standard audiogenic seizure paradigm. Adult male and female rats exposed to PCBs during gestation and lactation (0, 1, 3 or 6 mg/kg/day) and previously tested in the noise-induced hearing loss study were presented with a 100dB noise stimulus. If they did not exhibit clonus in response to the 100dB noise, they were exposed to a 105dB stimulus 24-48 hours later. This was followed by an 110dB stimulus 24-48 hours later if they did not exhibit clonus at 105 dB. Female and male rats exposed to either 3 or 6 mg/kg PCBs exhibited a significantly higher incidence of audiogenic seizures, shorter latency to onset of seizures, and greater severity of seizures compared to controls. Thyroxine measured in littermates at weaning was significantly lower in all PCB groups compared to controls, suggesting a potential mechanism for the increased incidence of audiogenic seizures. This is the first study to show that developmental PCB exposure increases the susceptibility to audiogenic seizures in adulthood. PMID:25543072

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation magnet activation for seizures: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R S; Eggleston, K S; Wright, C W

    2015-01-01

    Some patients receiving VNS Therapy report benefit from manually activating the generator with a handheld magnet at the time of a seizure. A review of 20 studies comprising 859 subjects identified patients who reported on-demand magnet mode stimulation to be beneficial. Benefit was reported in a weighted average of 45% of patients (range 0-89%) using the magnet, with seizure cessation claimed in a weighted average of 28% (range 15-67%). In addition to seizure termination, patients sometimes reported decreased intensity or duration of seizures or the post-ictal period. One study reported an isolated instance of worsening with magnet stimulation (Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med, 157, 2003 and 560). All of the reviewed studies assessed adjunctive magnet use. No studies were designed to provide Level I evidence of efficacy of magnet-induced stimulation. Retrospective analysis of one pivotal randomized trial of VNS therapy showed significantly more seizures terminated or improved in the active stimulation group vs the control group. Prospective, controlled studies would be required to isolate the effect and benefit of magnet mode stimulation and to document that the magnet-induced stimulation is the proximate cause of seizure reduction. Manual application of the magnet to initiate stimulation is not always practical because many patients are immobilized or unaware of their seizures, asleep or not in reach of the magnet. Algorithms based on changes in heart rate at or near the onset of the seizure provide a methodology for automated responsive stimulation. Because literature indicates additional benefits from on-demand magnet mode stimulation, a potential role exists for automatic activation of stimulation.

  10. Stereotactic radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Parrent, A G

    1999-11-01

    The author presents the case of a patient with gelastic seizures associated with a hypothalamic hamartoma, in whom partial resection of the hamartoma followed by temporal lobectomy and orbitofrontal corticectomy failed to reduce the seizures. Subsequent stereotactic radiofrequency ablation of the hamartoma resulted in progressive improvement in the seizure disorder during a 28-month follow-up period. There is support in the literature for the concept that gelastic seizures originate directly from the hamartoma; however, direct surgical approaches to these lesions pose significant risks. It is proposed that the technique of radiofrequency ablation provides a minimally invasive, low-risk approach for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  11. Clinical course of untreated tonic-clonic seizures in childhood: prospective, hospital based study.

    PubMed Central

    van Donselaar, C. A.; Brouwer, O. F.; Geerts, A. T.; Arts, W. F.; Stroink, H.; Peters, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess decleration and acceleration in the disease process in the initial phase of epilepsy in children with new onset tonic-clonic seizures. STUDY DESIGN: Hospital based follow up study. SETTING: Two university hospitals, a general hospital, and a children's hospital in the Netherlands. PATIENTS: 204 children aged 1 month to 16 years with idiopathic or remote symptomatic, newly diagnosed, tonic-clonic seizures, of whom 123 were enrolled at time of their first ever seizure; all children were followed until the start of drug treatment (78 children), the occurrence of the fourth untreated seizure (41 children), or the end of the follow up period of two years (85 untreated children). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Analysis of disease pattern from first ever seizure. The pattern was categorised as decelerating if the child became free of seizures despite treatment being withheld. In cases with four seizures, the pattern was categorised as decelerating if successive intervals increased or as accelerating if intervals decreased. Patterns in the remaining children were classified as uncertain. RESULTS: A decelerating pattern was found in 83 of 85 children who became free of seizures without treatment. Three of the 41 children with four or more untreated seizures showed a decelerating pattern and eight an accelerating pattern. In 110 children the disease process could not be classified, mostly because drug treatment was started after the first, second, or third seizure. The proportion of children with a decelerating pattern (42%, 95% confidence interval 35% to 49%) may be a minimum estimate because of the large number of patients with an uncertain disease pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Though untreated epilepsy is commonly considered to be a progressive disorder with decreasing intervals between seizures, a large proportion of children with newly diagnosed, unprovoked tonic-clonic seizures have a decelerating disease process. The fear that tonic-clonic seizures commonly

  12. Rates and Predictors of Seizure Freedom With Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, John D.; Wright, Clinton W.; Hassnain, Kevin H.; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuromodulation-based treatments have become increasingly important in epilepsy treatment. Most patients with epilepsy treated with neuromodulation do not achieve complete seizure freedom, and, therefore, previous studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy have focused instead on reduction of seizure frequency as a measure of treatment response. OBJECTIVE: To elucidate rates and predictors of seizure freedom with VNS. METHODS: We examined 5554 patients from the VNS therapy Patient Outcome Registry, and also performed a systematic review of the literature including 2869 patients across 78 studies. RESULTS: Registry data revealed a progressive increase over time in seizure freedom after VNS therapy. Overall, 49% of patients responded to VNS therapy 0 to 4 months after implantation (≥50% reduction seizure frequency), with 5.1% of patients becoming seizure-free, while 63% of patients were responders at 24 to 48 months, with 8.2% achieving seizure freedom. On multivariate analysis, seizure freedom was predicted by age of epilepsy onset >12 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.58), and predominantly generalized seizure type (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.82), while overall response to VNS was predicted by nonlesional epilepsy (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.81). Systematic literature review results were consistent with the registry analysis: At 0 to 4 months, 40.0% of patients had responded to VNS, with 2.6% becoming seizure-free, while at last follow-up, 60.1% of individuals were responders, with 8.0% achieving seizure freedom. CONCLUSION: Response and seizure freedom rates increase over time with VNS therapy, although complete seizure freedom is achieved in a small percentage of patients. ABBREVIATIONS: AED, antiepileptic drug VNS, vagus nerve stimulation PMID:26645965

  13. Gene Copy-Number Variations (CNVs) and Protein Levels of Complement C4A and C4B as Novel Biomarkers for Partial Disease Remissions in New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kingery, Suzanne E.; Wu, Yee Ling; Zhou, Bi; Hoffman, Robert P.; Yu, C. Yung

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the roles of complement C4A and C4B gene CNVs and their plasma protein concentrations in residual insulin secretion and loss of pancreatic beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes patients. Methods We studied 34 patients of European ancestry with new-onset type 1 diabetes, aged between 3 and 17 years (10.7±3.45), at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Gene copy-number and size variations of complement C4A and C4B were determined by genomic Southern blot analyses. C4A and C4B protein phenotypes were elucidated by immunofixation and radial immunodiffusion. Two-digit HLA-DRB1 genotypes were determined by sequence-specific PCR. At 1 month and 9-month post diagnosis, stimulated C-peptide levels were measured after a standardized mixed-meal tolerance test. Results The diploid gene copy-numbers of C4A varied from 0 to 4, and those of C4B from 0 to 3. Patients with higher copy-number of C4A or higher C4A plasma protein concentrations at diagnosis had higher C-peptide levels at 1 month post diagnosis (p=0.008; p=0.008). When controlled by the Z-score of body-mass index, C4A copy-numbers, C4A protein concentrations, the age of disease-onset, the number of HLA-DR3 but not DR4 alleles were significant parameters in determining C-peptide levels. At 9-month post diagnosis, 42.3% of patients remained in partial remission, and these patients were characterized by lower total C4B copy-numbers or lower C4B protein concentrations (p=0.02, p=0.0004). Conclusions C4A appears to associate with the protection of residual beta-cell function in new-onset type 1 diabetes; C4B is correlated with the end of disease remission at 9-month post diagnosis. PMID:22151770

  14. Changes in Cerebral Oxidative Metabolism during Neonatal Seizures Following Hypoxic–Ischemic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Subhabrata; Bale, Gemma; Mathieson, Sean; Uria-Avellanal, Cristina; Meek, Judith; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are common following hypoxic–ischemic brain injury in newborn infants. Prolonged or recurrent seizures have been shown to exacerbate neuronal damage in the developing brain; however, the precise mechanism is not fully understood. Cytochrome-c-oxidase is responsible for more than 90% of ATP production inside mitochondria. Using a novel broadband near-infrared spectroscopy system, we measured the concentration changes in the oxidation state of cerebral cytochrome-c-oxidase (Δ[oxCCO]) and hemodynamics during recurrent neonatal seizures following hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy in a newborn infant. A rapid increase in Δ[oxCCO] was noted at the onset of seizures along with a rise in the baseline of amplitude-integrated electroencephalogram. Cerebral oxygenation and cerebral blood volume fell just prior to the seizure onset but recovered rapidly during seizures. Δ[oxCCO] during seizures correlated with changes in mean electroencephalogram voltage indicating an increase in neuronal activation and energy demand. The progressive decline in the Δ[oxCCO] baseline during seizures suggests a progressive decrease of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. PMID:27559538

  15. Multistage seizure detection techniques optimized for low-power hardware platforms.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Shriram; Jaitli, Arjun; Irazoqui, Pedro P

    2011-12-01

    Closed-loop neurostimulation devices that stimulate the brain to treat epileptic seizures have shown great promise in treating more than a third of the 2 million people with epilepsy in the United States alone whose seizures are currently nonresponsive to pharmaceutical treatment. Seizure detection algorithms facilitate responsive therapeutic intervention that is believed to increase the efficacy of neurostimulation by improving on its spatial and temporal specificity. Translating these signal processing algorithms into battery-powered, implantable devices poses a number of challenges that severely limit the computational power of the chosen algorithm. We propose a cascaded two-stage seizure detection algorithm that is computationally efficient (resulting in a low-power hardware implementation) without compromising on detection efficacy. Unlike traditional detection algorithms, the proposed technique does not explicitly require a "training" phase from individual to individual and, instead, relies on using features that result in distinct "patterns" at the electrographic seizure onset. We tested the algorithm on spontaneous clinical seizures recorded using depth electrodes from patients with focal intractable epilepsy and annotated by epileptologists at the University of Freiburg Medical Center, via the Freiburg database. The algorithm performs with a specificity and sensitivity of 99.82 and 87.5%, detecting seizures in less than 9.08% of their duration after onset. The proposed technique is also shown to be computationally efficient, facilitating low-power hardware implementation. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  16. Long-Term Clinical and Electroencephalography (EEG) Consequences of Idiopathic Partial Epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Dörtcan, Nimet; Tekin Guveli, Betul; Dervent, Aysin

    2016-05-03

    BACKGROUND Idiopathic partial epilepsies of childhood (IPE) affect a considerable proportion of children. Three main electroclinical syndromes of IPE are the Benign Childhood Epilepsy with Centro-temporal Spikes (BECTS), Panayiotopoulos Syndrome (PS), and Childhood Epilepsy with Occipital Paroxysms (CEOP). In this study we investigated the long-term prognosis of patients with IPE and discussed the semiological and electroencephalography (EEG) data in terms of syndromic characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS This study included a group of consecutive patients with IPE who had been followed since 1990. Demographic and clinical variables were investigated. Patients were divided into 3 groups - A: Cases suitable for a single IPE (BECTS, PS and CEOP); B: cases with intermediate characteristics within IPEs; and C: cases with both IPE and IGE characteristics. Long-term data regarding the individual seizure types and EEG findings were re-evaluated. RESULTS A total of 61 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up duration was 7.8 ± 4.50 years. The mean age at onset of seizures was 7.7 years. There were 40 patients in group A 40, 14 in group B, and 7 in group C. Seizure and EEG characteristics were also explored independently from the syndromic approach. Incidence of autonomic seizures is considerably high at 2-5 years and incidence of oromotor seizures is high at age 9-11 years. The EEG is most abnormal at 6-8 years. The vast majority (86%) of epileptic activity (EA) with parietooccipital is present at 2-5 years, whereas EA with fronto-temporal or multiple sites become more abundant between ages 6 and 11. CONCLUSIONS Results of the present study provide support for the age-related characteristics of the seizures and EEGs in IPE syndromes. Acknowledgement of those phenomena may improve the management of IPEs and give a better estimate of the future consequences.

  17. Assessment of Seizure Severity with Adjunctive Lamotrigine Therapy: Results from a U.S. Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Bryant-Comstock, Lynda; Scott-Lennox, Jane; Lennox, Richard

    2001-04-01

    THE ADJUNCTIVE LAMICTAL (LAMOTRIGINE) IN EPILEPSY: Response to Treatment (ALERT) study was an observational study designed to assess the safety of lamotrigine in patients with refractory partial seizures when used in a general practice setting. We measured the impact of adjunctive lamotrigine therapy for 16 weeks on the severity of seizures using the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS). This questionnaire was scored using a revised scoring procedure that assesses the impact of treatment on the patients "most severe seizure." Data from the LSSS were also compared with physician-rated changes of seizure severity. Patients who completed 16 weeks of lamotrigine treatment showed a significant reduction in LSSS scores when compared with patients who discontinued lamotrigine (change scores: patient's taking lamotrigine at Week 16, 9.2 +/- 23.4; patients who discontinued lamotrigine by Week 16, 0.8 +/- 23.4, P < 0.05). These findings were supported by significant reductions in physician ratings of seizure severity in patients who completed 16 weeks of lamotrigine therapy. Seizure severity is an important outcome in the study of antiepileptic medication. Data from this observational study suggest that lamotrigine is effective in reducing seizure severity when used as an adjunctive therapy in patients with refractory partial seizures.

  18. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  19. Efficacy of Retigabine on Acute Limbic Seizures in Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, LK; Slomko, AM; Wongvravit, JP; Naseer, Z; Hu, S; Wan, WY; Ali, SS

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The efficacy of retigabine (RGB), a positive allosteric modulator of K+ channels indicated for adjunct treatment of partial seizures, was studied in two adult models of kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus to determine it’s toleratbility. Methods: Retigabine was administered systemiclly at high (5 mg/kg) and low (1–2 mg/kg) doses either 30 min prior to or 2 hr after KA-induced status epilepticus. High (1 µg/µL) and low (0.25 µg/µL) concentrations of RGB were also delivered by intrahippocampal microinjection in the presence of KA. Results: Dose-dependent effects of RGB were observed with both models. Lower doses increased seizure behavior latency and reduced the number of single spikes and synchronized burst events in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Higher doses worsened seizure behavior, produced severe ataxia, and increased spiking activity. Animals treated with RGB that were resistant to seizures did not exhibit significant injury or loss in GluR1 expression; however if stage 5–6 seizures were reached, typical hippocampal injury and depletion of GluR1 subunit protein in vulernable pyramidal fields occurred. Conclusions: RGB was neuroprotective only if seizures were significantly attenuated. GluR1 was simultaneously suppressed in the resistant granule cell layer in presence of RGB which may weaken excitatory transmission. Biphasic effects observed herein suggest that the human dosage must be carefully scrutinized to produce the optimal clinical response. PMID:26819936

  20. Exogenous antenatal glucocorticoid treatment reduces susceptibility for hippocampal kindled and maximal electroconvulsive seizures in infant rats.

    PubMed

    Young, Nicole A; Teskey, G Campbell; Henry, Luke C; Edwards, Heather E

    2006-04-01

    Dexamethasone (DEX) and betamethasone (BETA) are synthetic glucocorticoids used clinically to reduce morbidity and mortality in infants at risk of premature birth. While their main role is to facilitate lung development, their effect on the developing nervous system and seizure susceptibility is unclear. The present study tested the hypothesis that antenatal DEX or BETA treatment would alter seizure thresholds and spread of epileptiform activity in the brains of infant offspring. Pregnant dams received once daily injections with DEX, BETA, or vehicle on gestation days 15 to 18. Physical appearance, litter size, and weight of the pups were assessed postnatally. Seizure thresholds were determined on postnatal day 14 using electroconvulsive shock delivered through ear clips (i.e., generalized seizure) or kindling stimulation of the left hippocampus through indwelling electrodes (i.e., partial seizure). The rate of acquisition of kindled seizures was determined on postnatal days 14 and 15. Pups from dams treated with DEX and BETA were growth restricted. Antenatal BETA treatment increased seizure threshold for both models. Antenatal DEX treatment increased kindling threshold, but not electroconvulsive shock threshold. Kindling rate was unaffected by either antenatal treatment. In summary, repeated glucocorticoid treatments had adverse effects on weight, skin and litter size, raised seizure thresholds, and reduced seizure vulnerability. Although these effects are seemingly desirable with respect to seizure susceptibility, they suggest that the functional organization of the nervous system is altered with antenatal synthetic glucocorticoid treatment.

  1. Natural history of symptomatic partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rowe, P C; Newman, S L; Brusilow, S W

    1986-02-27

    We reviewed the natural history and differential diagnosis of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency (an X-linked inborn error of urea synthesis) in 13 symptomatic female heterozygotes. The patients presented as early as the first week of life or as late as the sixth year. The most common symptoms before diagnosis were nonspecific: episodic extreme irritability (100 percent), episodic vomiting and lethargy (100 percent), protein avoidance (92 percent), ataxia (77 percent), Stage II coma (46 percent), delayed physical growth (38 percent), developmental delay (38 percent), and seizures (23 percent). Including the proband, 42 percent of the female members of the 13 families studied had symptoms. The median interval between the onset of major symptoms (vomiting and lethargy, seizures, and coma) and diagnosis was 16 months (range, 1 to 142). Five patients had IQ scores below 70 at the time of diagnosis. We suggest that careful evaluation of the family history, the dietary history, the episodic nature of the nonspecific symptoms, the response of these symptoms to the withdrawal of protein, and their frequent onset at the time of weaning from breast milk will permit early diagnosis and might thereby reduce the risk of death or neurologic impairment in female patients with partial ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

  2. Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000223.htm Febrile seizures - what to ask your doctor To use the ... enable JavaScript. Your child has had a febrile seizure. A simple febrile seizure stops by itself within ...

  3. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes.

  4. [Gelastic seizures: etiology, semiology, therapeutic perspectives].

    PubMed

    Usacheva, E L; Mukhin, K Iu; Prityko, A G; Aĭvazian, S O; Kharlamov, L A; Shorina, M Iu

    2003-01-01

    Gelastic seizures (laughing seizures) are a rare type of epileptic seizure in which laugh in a main and dominating manifestation of the seizure. As a rule, the seizures are caused by organic cerebral pathology and are often reported as a specific epilepsy marker related to hypothalamic hamartoma. The interictal EEG frequently shows a focal activity. Based on examination of 2 patients with gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma, clinical features, EEG characteristics and therapeutic perspectives for the disorder are discussed.

  5. Preictal Dynamics of EEG Complexity in Intracranially Recorded Epileptic Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208–217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis. The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8–6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures. PMID:25415671

  6. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot.

  7. TRPV1 promotes repetitive febrile seizures by pro-inflammatory cytokines in immature brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Xian; Yu, Fang; Sanchez, Russell M; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-08-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder in children, and children with FS are regarded as a high risk for the eventual development of epilepsy. Brain inflammation may be implicated in the mechanism of FS. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is believed to act as a monitor and regulator of body temperature. The role of inflammation in synaptic plasticity mediation indicates that TRPV1 is relevant to several nervous system diseases, such as epilepsy. Here, we report a critical role for TRPV1 in a febrile seizure mouse model and reveal increased levels of pro-inflammatory factors in the immature brain. Animals were subjected to hyperthermia for 30 min, which generates seizures lasting approximately 20 min, and then were used for experiments. To invoke frequently repetitive febrile seizures, mice are exposed to hyperthermia for three times daily at an interval of 4h between every time induced seizure, and a total of 4 days to induce. Behavioral testing for febrile seizures revealed that a TRPV1 knock-out mouse model demonstrated a prolonged onset latency and a shortened duration and seizure grade of febrile seizure when compared with wild type (WT) mice. The expression levels of both TRPV1 mRNA and protein increased after a hyperthermia-induced febrile seizure in WT mice. Notably, TRPV1 activation resulted in a significant elevation in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and HMGB1) in the hippocampus and cortex. These data indicate that the reduction of TRPV1 expression parallels a decreased susceptibility to febrile seizures. Thus, preventative strategies might be developed for use during febrile seizures.

  8. [Use of benzodiazepines in prolonged seizures and status epilepticus in the community].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carpintero, R; Camino, R; Smeyers, P; Raspall-Chaure, M; Martínez-Bermejo, A; Ruiz-Falcó, M L; Verdú, A; Sanmarti, F X; Blanco, O; Santos Borbujo, J; Picó, G; Cebollero, M A

    2014-12-01

    Prolonged seizures and status epilepticus are common neurological medical emergencies. Early and appropriate treatment is essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. Most seizures occur in the community, so parents and caregivers must be prepared for their management. Benzodiazepines (BZD) are the first-line drugs used, with rectal diazepam (DZPr) being the most commonly used in pre-hospital treatment in Spain. In September 2011, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) authorized the use of oromucosal midazolam (MDZb) for the treatment of prolonged acute convulsive seizures in patients aged 3 months to <18 years. MDZb has a rapid onset, short duration of effect, and avoids first-pass hepatic metabolism. MDZb has shown to be at least as or more effective than DZPr to stop the seizures. Buccal administration is easier and more socially accepted, especially in adolescents and adults. It is a safe drug with similar effects to other BZD; MDZb improves the overall cost-effectiveness of seizures management.

  9. The alpha2 adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine suppresses evoked and spontaneous seizures, whereas the alpha2 adrenoreceptor antagonist idazoxan promotes seizures in amygdala-kindled kittens.

    PubMed

    Shouse, Margaret N; Scordato, John C; Farber, Paul R; de Lanerolle, Nihal

    2007-03-16

    Microinfusion of alpha2 adrenoreceptor agonists and antagonists into amygdala has contrasting effects on evoked and spontaneous seizure susceptibility in amygdala-kindled kittens. Subjects were 14 preadolescent kittens between 3 and 4 months old at the beginning of kindling. The same protocol was followed except that half the kittens received microinfusions (1 mul) of the alpha2 agonist clonidine (CLON; 1.32 nmol), and half received the alpha2 antagonist idazoxan (IDA; 0.33 nmol). Infusions were made over 1 min through needles inserted into cannulae adjacent to stimulating electrodes in the kindled amygdala, and evoked seizures were tested 10-12 min later. The results were: (1) CLON elevated seizure thresholds obtained once at the beginning and end of kindling, but only when compared to sham control values (needle insertion only) in the same animals; IDA significantly reduced thresholds. (2) CLON retarded and IDA accelerated kindling rate, defined as the number of afterdischarges (ADs) required to achieve the first stage 6 seizure or generalized tonic-clonic convulsion (GTC). These effects were most pronounced on the emergence of seizure "generalization" stages (3-6) from "focal" seizure stages (1-2). (3) CLON prevented onset of spontaneous seizures, whereas IDA precipitated onset of spontaneous seizures in 100% of the animals before or during the 5-week post-kindling follow-up during which seizures were evoked once each work day. The study confirms previous findings in kindled rodents to show that CLON and IDA can have opposing effects on kindling development in kittens and is the first report to show contrasting effects on spontaneous epileptogenesis in kindled animals as well.

  10. Feature Parameter Optimization for Seizure Detection/Prediction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    the window length for the feature under consideration. Figure 4 illustrates the variation of the k-factor for the fractal dimension feature, as...r Figure 4: K-Factor from the Fractal Dimension for Different Window Sizes Typically, the window sizes that maximized the k-factor were...Esteller R., Ph.D dissertation “Detection of seizure onset in epileptic patients from intracranial EEG signals ”, Georgia Institute of Technology

  11. Severe Hypoglycemia in a Juvenile Diabetic Rat Model: Presence and Severity of Seizures Are Associated with Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Maheandiran, Margaret; Mylvaganam, Shanthini; Wu, Chiping; El-Hayek, Youssef; Sugumar, Sonia; Hazrati, Lili; del Campo, Martin; Giacca, Adria; Zhang, Liang; Carlen, Peter L.

    2013-01-01

    It is well accepted that insulin-induced hypoglycemia can result in seizures. However, the effects of the seizures, as well as possible treatment strategies, have yet to be elucidated, particularly in juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Here we establish a model of diabetes in young rats, to examine the consequences of severe hypoglycemia in this age group; particularly seizures and mortality. Diabetes was induced in post-weaned 22-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats by streptozotocin (STZ) administered intraperitoneally (IP). Insulin IP (15 U/kg), in rats fasted (14–16 hours), induced hypoglycemia, defined as <3.5 mM blood glucose (BG), in 68% of diabetic (STZ) and 86% of control rats (CON). Seizures occurred in 86% of STZ and all CON rats that reached hypoglycemic levels with mortality only occurring post-seizure. The fasting BG levels were significantly higher in STZ (12.4±1.3 mM) than in CON rodents (6.3±0.3 mM), resulting in earlier onset of hypoglycemia and seizures in the CON group. However, the BG at seizure onset was statistically similar between STZ (1.8±0.2 mM) and CON animals (1.6±0.1 mM) as well as between those that survived (S+S) and those that died (S+M) post-seizure. Despite this, the S+M group underwent a significantly greater number of seizure events than the S+S group. 25% glucose administered at seizure onset and repeated with recurrent seizures was not sufficient to mitigate these continued convulsions. Combining glucose with diazepam and phenytoin significantly decreased post-treatment seizures, but not mortality. Intracranial electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in 10 CON and 9 STZ animals. Predictive EEG changes were not observed in these animals that underwent seizures. Fluorojade staining revealed damaged cells in non-seizing STZ animals and in STZ and CON animals post-seizure. In summary, this model of hypoglycemia and seizures in juvenile diabetic rats provides a paradigm for further study of underlying

  12. Searching for hidden information with Gabor Transform in generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Quian Quiroga, R; Blanco, S; Rosso, O A; Garcia, H; Rabinowicz, A

    1997-10-01

    The analysis of generalized tonic clonic seizures is usually difficult with scalp EEG due to muscle artifact. We applied Gabor Transform to evaluate 20 seizures from 8 consecutive patients admitted for video-EEG monitoring. We studied the relative intensity ratios of alpha, theta and delta bands over time. In 14/20 events we found a significant decremental activity in the delta band at the onset of the seizure indicating that this is dominated by theta and alpha bands. We conclude that GT is a useful auxiliary tool in the analysis of ictal activity that sheds light on the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  13. Hypocalcemic generalised seizures as a manifestation of iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism months to years after thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Mrowka, Matthias; Knake, Susanne; Klinge, Harald; Odin, Per; Rosenow, Felix

    2004-06-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is a relatively common side effect of a thyroidectomy and leads to hypocalcemia. Carpopedal spasm and tetany are typical manifestations and usually occur within weeks after surgery. The first signs can be less typical and include movement disorders such as chorea, as well as symptoms of increased intracranial pressure or epileptic seizures. We describe two cases with generalised tonic-clonic seizures as the first manifestation of postoperative hypoparathyroidism, appearing months and years after thyroidectomy. Iatrogenic hypoparathyroidism needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult-onset, generalised, tonic-clonic seizures even if the thyroidectomy was performed years earlier.

  14. Seizures in the life and works of Edgar Allan Poe.

    PubMed

    Bazil, C W

    1999-06-01

    Edgar Allan Poe, one of the most celebrated of American storytellers, lived through and wrote descriptions of episodic unconsciousness, confusion, and paranoia. These symptoms have been attributed to alcohol or drug abuse but also could represent complex partial seizures, prolonged postictal states, or postictal psychosis. Complex partial seizures were not well described in Poe's time, which could explain a misdiagnosis. Alternatively, he may have suffered from complex partial epilepsy that was complicated or caused by substance abuse. Even today, persons who have epilepsy are mistaken for substance abusers and occasionally are arrested during postictal confusional states. Poe was able to use creative genius and experiences from illness to create memorable tales and poignant poems.

  15. Electroencephalograms in epilepsy: analysis and seizure prediction within the framework of Lyapunov theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, H. R.; Weber, B.; Wieser, H. G.; Meier, P. F.

    1999-06-01

    Epileptic seizures are defined as the clinical manifestation of excessive and hypersynchronous activity of neurons in the cerebral cortex and represent one of the most frequent malfunctions of the human central nervous system. Therefore, the search for precursors and predictors of a seizure is of utmost clinical relevance and may even guide us to a deeper understanding of the seizure generating mechanisms. We extract chaos-indicators such as Lyapunov exponents and Kolmogorov entropies from different types of electroencephalograms (EEGs): this covers mainly intracranial EEGs (semi-invasive and invasive recording techniques), but also scalp-EEGs from the surface of the skin. Among the analytical methods we tested up to now, we find that the spectral density of the local expansion exponents is best suited to predict the onset of a forthcoming seizure. We also evaluate the time-evolution of the dissipation in these signals: it exhibits strongly significant variations that clearly relate to the time relative to a seizure onset. This article is mainly devoted to an assessment of these methods with respect to their sensitivity to EEG changes, e.g., prior to a seizure. Further, we investigate interictal EEGs (i.e., far away from a seizure) in order to characterize their more general properties, such as the convergence of the reconstructed quantities with respect to the number of phase space dimensions. Generally we use multichannel reconstruction, but we also present a comparison with the delay-embedding technique.

  16. De novo KCNT1 mutations in early-onset epileptic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Chihiro; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Takahashi, Nobuya; Osaka, Hitoshi; Shiihara, Takashi; Tohyama, Jun; Nabatame, Shin; Azuma, Junji; Fujii, Yuji; Hara, Munetsugu; Tsurusawa, Reimi; Inoue, Takahito; Ogata, Reina; Watanabe, Yoriko; Togashi, Noriko; Kodera, Hirofumi; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Miyake, Noriko; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-09-01

    KCNT1 mutations have been found in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS; also known as migrating partial seizures in infancy), autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy, and other types of early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs). We performed KCNT1-targeted next-generation sequencing (207 samples) and/or whole-exome sequencing (229 samples) in a total of 362 patients with Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, EIMFS, or unclassified EOEEs. We identified nine heterozygous KCNT1 mutations in 11 patients: nine of 18 EIMFS cases (50%) in whom migrating foci were observed, one of 180 West syndrome cases (0.56%), and one of 66 unclassified EOEE cases (1.52%). KCNT1 mutations occurred de novo in 10 patients, and one was transmitted from the patient's mother who carried a somatic mosaic mutation. The mutations accumulated in transmembrane segment 5 (2/9, 22.2%) and regulators of K(+) conductance domains (7/9, 77.8%). Five of nine mutations were recurrent. Onset ages ranged from the neonatal period (<1 month) in five patients (5/11, 45.5%) to 1-4 months in six patients (6/11, 54.5%). A generalized attenuation of background activity on electroencephalography was seen in six patients (6/11, 54.5%). Our study demonstrates that the phenotypic spectrum of de novo KCNT1 mutations is largely restricted to EIMFS.

  17. Inhibition of neuronal (type 1) nitric oxide synthase prevents hyperaemia and hippocampal lesions resulting from kainate-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Montécot, C; Rondi-Reig, L; Springhetti, V; Seylaz, J; Pinard, E

    1998-06-01

    The possible roles for nitric oxide produced by neurons in epileptic conditions have been investigated from two different aspects: microcirculation and delayed damage. Our aim was to determine whether the selective inhibition of neuronal (type 1) nitric oxide synthase by 7-nitroindazole, during seizures induced by systemic kainate, modifies hippocampal blood flow and oxygen supply and influences the subsequent hippocampal damage. Experiments were performed in conscious Wistar rats whose electroencephalogram was recorded. 7-Nitroindazole (25 mg/kg, i.p.) or its vehicle was injected 30 min before kainate administration (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and then twice at 1-h intervals. Kainate triggered typical limbic seizures evolving into status epilepticus, identified by uninterrupted electroencephalographic spike activity. The seizures were stopped by diazepam (5 mg/kg, i.p.) after 1 h of status epilepticus. Three types of experiments were performed in vehicle- and 7-nitroindazole-treated rats. (1) Hippocampal nitric oxide synthase activity was measured under basal conditions, at 1 h after the onset of the status epilepticus and at 24 h after its termination (n = 4-6 per group). (2) Hippocampal blood flow and tissue partial pressure of oxygen were measured simultaneously by mass spectrometry for the whole duration of the experiment, while systemic variables and body temperature were monitored (n = 6 per group). (3) Hippocampal damage was revealed by Cresyl Violet staining and evaluated with a lesion score seven days after status epilepticus (n = 12 per group). Hippocampal nitric oxide synthase activity was not significantly modified during status epilepticus or the following day in vehicle-treated rats. In contrast, it was inhibited by 57% in 7-nitroindazole-treated rats, both in basal conditions and after 1 h of status epilepticus, but was not different from its basal level 24 h later. 7-Nitroindazole significantly decreased basal hippocampal blood flow and tissue partial

  18. Mirthful gelastic seizures with ictal involvement of temporobasal regions.

    PubMed

    Oehl, Bernhard; Biethahn, Silke; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Ictal laughter is the cardinal clinical sign of gelastic seizures in hypothalamic hamartomas and may also occur in extrahypothalamic epilepsies. Laughing consists of an affective and a motor component. It has been suggested that the affective component may result from an involvement of temporobasal structures, whereas the motor part is related to an involvement of the mesial frontal cortex. So far, evidence is based on a limited number of cases with spontaneously recorded seizures or in whom electrical stimulation of invasive intracranial EEG recordings has been performed. We report a patient who suffered from epigastric psychic auras, complex partial seizures with a gelastic component and secondarily generalized seizures. To evaluate a possible epileptogenic role of the hippocampus and dysplastic region in the right mid-temporal gyrus, intracranial monitoring with subdural electrodes over the temporobasal and temporolateral regions, as well as a deep brain electrode in the hippocampus, were performed. During the intial part of the seizure, consisting of an intense retrosternal ascending feeling with sexual connotation, rhythmic spikes in temporolateral contacts were detected. Concomitant with the development of smiling and laughter, a rhythmic activity over the temporobasal regions evolved. The patient became seizure-free following right temporal lobe resection. This case supports the assumption that ictal involvement of temporobasal structures is crucial for gelastic seizure components in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Progression to temporobasal regions was associated with the feeling of happiness whereas motor components of laughter occurred later. These findings are in accordance with the interpretation of surface recordings by Dericioglu and co-workers in a similar previous case. [Published with video sequences].

  19. Seizures triggered by July 4th fireworks in an 8-year-old girl with perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Brosch, Jared R; Golomb, Meredith R

    2011-05-01

    Warnings regarding fireworks displays as a possible seizure-producing stimulus have been around for several years, but there is a lack of well-documented cases. This case describes photic- and/or pattern-induced seizures that appeared to be triggered by July 4 fireworks. This 8-year-old girl with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and known seizure disorder because of perinatal right middle cerebral artery stroke had a cluster of seizures within minutes of the onset of a professional fireworks display. The seizures stopped when the child's eyes were covered and she was taken away from the scene. The importance of photic- and pattern-induced seizures in children is discussed.

  20. Involvement of Thalamus in Initiation of Epileptic Seizures Induced by Pilocarpine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong-Hua; Li, Jia-Jia; Lu, Qin-Chi; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-01-01

    Studies have suggested that thalamus is involved in temporal lobe epilepsy, but the role of thalamus is still unclear. We obtained local filed potentials (LFPs) and single-unit activities from CA1 of hippocampus and parafascicular nucleus of thalamus during the development of epileptic seizures induced by pilocarpine in mice. Two measures, redundancy and directionality index, were used to analyze the electrophysiological characters of neuronal activities and the information flow between thalamus and hippocampus. We found that LFPs became more regular during the seizure in both hippocampus and thalamus, and in some cases LFPs showed a transient disorder at seizure onset. The variation tendency of the peak values of cross-correlation function between neurons matched the variation tendency of the redundancy of LFPs. The information tended to flow from thalamus to hippocampus during seizure initiation period no matter what the information flow direction was before the seizure. In some cases the information flow was symmetrically bidirectional, but none was found in which the information flowed from hippocampus to thalamus during the seizure initiation period. In addition, inactivation of thalamus by tetrodotoxin (TTX) resulted in a suppression of seizures. These results suggest that thalamus may play an important role in the initiation of epileptic seizures. PMID:24778885

  1. Characteristic phasic evolution of convulsive seizure in PCDH19-related epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Shigematsu, Hideo; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Inoue, Yushi; Higurashi, Norimichi; Hirose, Shinichi

    2016-03-01

    PCDH19-related epilepsy is a genetic disorder that was first described in 1971, then referred to as "epilepsy and mental retardation limited to females". PCDH19 has recently been identified as the responsible gene, but a detailed characterization of the seizure manifestation based on video-EEG recording is still limited. The purpose of this study was to elucidate features of the seizure semiology in children with PCDH19-related epilepsy. To do this, ictal video-EEG recordings of 26 convulsive seizures in three girls with PCDH19-related epilepsy were analysed. All seizures occurred in clusters, mainly during sleep accompanied by fever. The motor manifestations consisted of six sequential phases: "jerk", "reactive", "mild tonic", "fluttering", "mild clonic", and "postictal". Some phases were brief or lacking in some seizures, whereas others were long or pronounced. In the reactive phase, the patients looked fearful or startled with sudden jerks and turned over reactively. The tonic and clonic components were less intense compared with those of typical tonic-clonic seizures in other types of epilepsy. The fluttering phase was characterised initially by asymmetric, less rhythmic, and less synchronous tremulous movement and was then followed by the subtle clonic phase. Subtle oral automatism was observed in the postictal phase. The reactive, mild tonic, fluttering and mild clonic phases were most characteristic of seizures of PCDH19-related epilepsy. Ictal EEG started bilaterally and was symmetric in some patients but asymmetric in others. It showed asymmetric rhythmic discharges in some seizures at later phases. The electroclinical pattern of the phasic evolution of convulsive seizure suggests a focal onset seizure with secondary generalisation. Based on our findings, we propose that the six unique sequential phases in convulsive seizures suggest the diagnosis of PCDH19-related epilepsy when occurring in clusters with or without high fever in girls. [Published with

  2. Hyponatraemia and seizures after ecstasy use.

    PubMed

    Holmes, S B; Banerjee, A K; Alexander, W D

    1999-01-01

    A patient presented to our unit with seizures and profound hyponatraemia after ingestion of a single tablet of ecstasy. The seizures proved resistant to therapy and ventilation on the intensive care unit was required. Resolution of the seizures occurred on correction of the metabolic abnormalities. The pathogenesis of seizures and hyponatraemia after ecstasy use is discussed. Ecstasy use should be considered in any young patient presenting with unexplained seizures and attention should be directed towards electrolyte levels, particularly sodium.

  3. Toward a noninvasive automatic seizure control system in rats with transcranial focal stimulations via tripolar concentric ring electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Liu, Xiang; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Mucio-Ramirez, Samuel; Liu, Yuhong; Sun, Yan L.; Kay, Steven M.; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We are developing a noninvasive, or minimally invasive, transcranial focal electrical stimulation system through our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes to control seizures. In this study we demonstrate feasibility of an automatic seizure control system in rats with pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures through single and multiple stimulations. These stimulations are automatically triggered by a real-time electrographic seizure activity detector based on a disjunctive combination of detections from a cumulative sum algorithm and a generalized likelihood ratio test. An average seizure onset detection accuracy of 76.14% was obtained for the test set (n = 13). Detection of electrographic seizure activity was accomplished in advance of the early behavioral seizure activity in 76.92% of the cases. Automatically triggered stimulation significantly (p = 0.001) reduced the electrographic seizure activity power in the once stimulated group compared to controls in 70% of the cases. To the best of our knowledge this is the first closed-loop automatic seizure control system based on noninvasive electrical brain stimulation using tripolar concentric ring electrode electrographic seizure activity as feedback. PMID:22772373

  4. New-Onset Refractory Status Epilepticus with Claustrum Damage: Definition of the Clinical and Neuroimaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Meletti, Stefano; Giovannini, Giada; d’Orsi, Giuseppe; Toran, Lisa; Monti, Giulia; Guha, Rahul; Kiryttopoulos, Andreas; Pascarella, Maria Grazia; Martino, Tommaso; Alexopoulos, Haris; Spilioti, Martha; Slonkova, Jana

    2017-01-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a rare but challenging condition occurring in a previously healthy patient, often with no identifiable cause. We describe the electro-clinical features and outcomes in a group of patients with NORSE who all demonstrated a typical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sign characterized by bilateral lesions of the claustrum. The group includes 31 patients (12 personal and 19 previously published cases; 17 females; mean age of 25 years). Fever preceded status epilepticus (SE) in 28 patients, by a mean of 6 days. SE was refractory/super-refractory in 74% of the patients, requiring third-line agents and a median of 15 days staying in an intensive care unit. Focal motor and tonic–clonic seizures were observed in 90%, complex partial seizures in 14%, and myoclonic seizures in 14% of the cases. All patients showed T2/FLAIR hyperintense foci in bilateral claustrum, appearing on average 10 days after SE onset. Other limbic (hippocampus, insular) alterations were present in 53% of patients. Within the personal cases, extensive search for known autoantibodies was inconclusive, though 7 of 11 patients had cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytic pleocytosis and 3 cases had oligoclonal bands. Two subjects died during the acute phase, one in the chronic phase (probable sudden unexplained death in epilepsy), and one developed a persistent vegetative state. Among survivors, 80% developed drug-resistant epilepsy. Febrile illness-related SE associated with bilateral claustrum hyperintensity on MRI represents a condition with defined clinical features and a presumed but unidentified autoimmune etiology. A better characterization of de novo SE is mandatory for the search of specific etiologies.

  5. What is the impact of electromagnetic waves on epileptic seizures?

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Nilgun; Sahin, Sevki; Erdinc, Oguz O.

    2013-01-01

    Background The effects of electromagnetic waves (EMWs) on humans and their relationship with various disorders have been investigated. We aimed to investigate the effects of exposure to different frequencies of EMWs in various durations in a mouse epilepsy model induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). Material/Methods A total of 180 4-week-old male mice weighing 25–30 g were used in this study. Each experimental group consisted of 10 mice. They were exposed to 900, 700, 500, 300, and 100 MHz EMWs for 20 hours, 12 hours and 2 hours. Following electromagnetic radiation exposure, 60 mg/kg of PTZ was injected intraperitoneally to all mice. Each control was also injected with PTZ without any exposure to EMW. The latency of initial seizure and most severe seizure onset were compared with controls. Results The shortest initial seizure latency was noted in the 12-hour group, followed by the 700 MHz. The mean initial seizure latencies in the 2-hour EMW exposed group was significantly shorter compared to that in the 12- and 20-hour groups. There was no significant difference between 12- and 20-hour EMW exposed groups. There was a significant difference between control and 2- and 10-hour EMW exposed groups. No statistically significant differences were noted in mean latencies of the most severe seizure latency, following 20-, 12-, and 2- hour EMW exposed groups and control groups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that acute exposure to EMW may facilitate epileptic seizures, which may be independent of EMW exposure time. This information might be important for patients with epilepsy. Further studies are needed. PMID:23676765

  6. Association of seizure, facial dysmorphism, congenital umbilical hernia and undescended testes.

    PubMed

    Thapa, L J; Pokharel, B R; Paudel, R; Rana, P V S

    2012-01-01

    With the advances in neurogenetics association of epilepsy and intellectual disability with chromosomal abnormalities are being increasingly recognized. While onset of seizures with mental retardation at an early age indicate chromosomal abnormality, combination of characteristics facial dysmorphism and congenital abnormalities gives a clue of a particular syndrome. In addition MRI findings may help in confirming the diagnosis. A nine years old boy is presented where early onset seizure, mental retardation, delayed development of speech, presence of facial dysmorphism,, umbilical hernia and undescended testes suggested possibility of chromosomal 6q deletion disorder. Important deletion disorders are discussed and importance of clinical examination is stressed.

  7. Glutamatergic neuron-targeted loss of LGI1 epilepsy gene results in seizures

    PubMed Central

    Boillot, Morgane; Huneau, Clément; Marsan, Elise; Lehongre, Katia; Navarro, Vincent; Ishida, Saeko; Dufresnois, Béatrice; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Garrigue, Jérôme; Miles, Richard; Martin, Benoit; Leguern, Eric; Anderson, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Leucin-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (LGI1) is a secreted protein linked to human seizures of both genetic and autoimmune aetiology. Mutations in the LGI1 gene are responsible for autosomal dominant temporal lobe epilepsy with auditory features, whereas LGI1 autoantibodies are involved in limbic encephalitis, an acquired epileptic disorder associated with cognitive impairment. We and others previously reported that Lgi1-deficient mice have early-onset spontaneous seizures leading to premature death at 2–3 weeks of age. Yet, where and when Lgi1 deficiency causes epilepsy remains unknown. To address these questions, we generated Lgi1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice using a set of universal Cre-driver mouse lines. Selective deletion of Lgi1 was achieved in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons during embryonic (Emx1-Lgi1cKO) or late postnatal (CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO) developmental stages, or in gamma amino butyric acidergic (GABAergic) parvalbumin interneurons (PV-Lgi1cKO). Emx1-Lgi1cKO mice displayed early-onset and lethal seizures, whereas CaMKIIα-Lgi1cKO mice presented late-onset occasional seizures associated with variable reduced lifespan. In contrast, neither spontaneous seizures nor increased seizure susceptibility to convulsant were observed when Lgi1 was deleted in parvalbumin interneurons. Together, these data showed that LGI1 depletion restricted to pyramidal cells is sufficient to generate seizures, whereas seizure thresholds were unchanged after depletion in gamma amino butyric acidergic parvalbumin interneurons. We suggest that LGI1 secreted from excitatory neurons, but not parvalbumin inhibitory neurons, makes a major contribution to the pathogenesis of LGI1-related epilepsies. Our data further indicate that LGI1 is required from embryogenesis to adulthood to achieve proper circuit functioning. PMID:25234641

  8. Optical electrocorticogram (OECoG) using wide-field calcium imaging reveals the divergence of neuronal and glial activity during acute rodent seizures.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Andy G S; Laffont, Philippe; Zhao, Mingrui; Ma, Hongtao; Schwartz, Theodore H

    2015-08-01

    The role of glia in epilepsy has been widely debated. Using in vivo bulk loading of calcium dyes, we imaged neuronal and glial activity in an acute pharmacologic rodent model of neocortical seizures. Optical calcium-based ECoG maps revealed that neuronal waves propagated rapidly and remained mostly confined to the seizure focus. Glial waves were triggered by ictal onset but propagated slowly in a stereotypical fashion far beyond the seizure focus. Although related at their onset, the divergence of these two phenomena during seizure evolution calls into question their interdependence and the criticality of the role of glia in seizure onset and neurovascular coupling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  9. Evaluation of first nonfebrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Wilden, Jessica A; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2012-08-15

    Nonfebrile seizures may indicate underlying disease or epilepsy. The patient history can often distinguish epileptic seizures from nonepileptic disorders by identifying the events directly preceding the convulsion, associated conditions, and details of the seizure, including triggers, length, and type of movements. Laboratory testing, lumbar puncture, and neuroimaging may be indicated depending on the presentation, suspected etiology, and patient's age. Electroencephalography should be performed 24 to 48 hours after a first seizure because of its substantial yield and ability to predict recurrence. Neuroimaging is recommended for adults, infants, and children who have cognitive or motor developmental delay or a focal seizure. Neuroimaging may be scheduled on an outpatient basis for patients with stable vital signs who are awake and have returned to neurologic baseline. Emergent neuroimaging should be performed in patients with persistent decreased mental status or a new focal neurologic abnormality. Although magnetic resonance imaging is generally preferred to head computed tomography because of its greater sensitivity for intracranial pathology, computed tomography should be performed if intracranial bleeding is suspected because of recent head trauma, coagulopathy, or severe headache. Treatment with an antiepileptic drug after a first seizure does not prevent epilepsy in the long term, but it decreases the short-term likelihood of a second seizure. Adults with an unremarkable neurologic examination, no comorbidities, and no known structural brain disease who have returned to neurologic baseline do not need to be started on antiepileptic therapy. Treatment decisions should weigh the benefit of decreased short-term risk of recurrence against the potential adverse effects of antiepileptic drugs.

  10. Neurophysiological aspects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) has been increasingly used and proved useful in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for the management of neonatal seizures. It does not replace, but is supplementary to standard EEG. This article reviews some of findings obtained with standard EEGs, and tries to interpret them with recent findings in the field of basic science. Seizures mainly occur in active-REM sleep in neonates. This is in sharp contrast to those in older children and adults, in whom epileptic seizures occur mainly in NREM sleep. This may be explained by neurotransmitter effects on sleep mechanisms of the neonatal brain that are different from those of older individuals. When all clinical seizures have no electrical correlates, they are non-epileptic, but when the correlation between clinical seizures and frequent electrical discharges are inconsistent, they should rather be considered epileptic, reflecting progression of status epilepticus causing electro-clinical dissociation. Electro-clinical dissociation is not a characteristic of neonatal seizures per se, but a feature of prolonged status epilepticus in adults as well as children. It occurs when prolonged status epilepticus itself causes a progressively severe encephalopathy, or when status occurs in the presence of a severe underlying encephalopathy. In neonates without pre-existing brain damage, frequent seizures per se may cause mild depression characterized by the loss of high voltage slow patterns, an important constituent of slow wave sleep reflecting cortico-cortical connectivity. Mild depression only in the acute stage is not associated with neurological sequelae, but previously damaged brain may be more vulnerable than normal brain.

  11. Seizures and Meperidine: Overstated and Underutilized.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Konrad H; Hemmen, Thomas M; Lyden, Patrick D

    2015-12-01

    Meperidine is used for pain control and treatment of shivering. Concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly seizures, have led to efforts limiting meperidine use. We reviewed the body of evidence linking meperidine to seizures. We searched PubMed for the terms meperidine, normeperidine, pethidine, and norpethidine; each was combined with the terms: seizure, epilepsy, epileptogenic, toxicity, overdose, seizure threshold, and convulsion. Articles were assessed for relevance. Semiologies were reviewed to ascertain seizure likelihood. Our search yielded 351 articles, of which 66 were relevant. Of these, 33 had primary clinical data on meperidine-associated seizures, comprising 50 patients. Twenty events were deemed likely to be seizures, 26 indeterminate, and 4 unlikely. Most studies were case reports. Confounding comorbidities were frequent. The evidence base for meperidine-associated seizures in man is scant. Seizure risk associated with meperidine appears to be overstated. The utility of meperidine should continue to be explored, especially for therapeutic hypothermia.

  12. Stereotactic radiofrequency thermocoagulation for hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic seizures.

    PubMed

    Homma, Junpei; Kameyama, Shigeki; Masuda, Hiroshi; Ueno, Takehiko; Fujimoto, Ayataka; Oishi, Makoto; Fukuda, Masafumi

    2007-08-01

    Management of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy remains controversial. We have used stereotactic thermocoagulation for treatment of hypothalamic hamartoma with intractable gelastic epilepsy since 1997. Herein, we review our experience in five cases to clarify the usefulness of this treatment. A total of five patients with hypothalamic hamartoma were treated by stereotactic thermocoagulation at our hospital during the period October 1997 through February 2004. In all patients, the hamartoma was less than 10mm in diameter and was located on the floor of the third ventricle with sessile attachment to the wall. To identify ictal onset, chronic intracranial electroencephalography was performed in three patients with the use of a depth electrode implanted in the hamartoma. Attempts were made to induce gelastic seizure by electrical stimulation of the hamartoma in three patients. After magnetic resonance imaging-guided targeting, radiofrequency thermocoagulation of the boundary between the hamartoma and normal hypothalamus was performed to achieve disconnection effects. Marked reductions in seizure frequency were obtained in all cases, with three patients becoming seizure-free after the procedure. No intraoperative complications occurred except in one patient who experienced acute and transient panidrosis with hot flushes during coagulation. Our results suggest that stereotactic thermocoagulation of hypothalamic hamartoma is an acceptable treatment option for patients with intractable gelastic seizures.

  13. Lacrimation as an Ictal Autonomic Event in a Patient With Seizures Originating From the Right Hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Erdener, Sefik Evren; Dericioglu, Nese; Ergun, Eser Lay; Saygi, Serap

    2015-07-01

    In dacrystic seizures lacrimation has previously been reported as an ictal autonomic event accompanying emotional and somatic signs. However, it has not been observed as an isolated event in autonomic seizures. We report a patient experiencing complex partial seizures characterized by lacrimation as the initial and most prominent ictal event, with no sign of crying. The patient's ictal electroencephalogram (EEG) suggested a focus in the right hemisphere, along with interictal single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) and positron emission tomographic (PET) studies demonstrating hypoperfusion-hypometabolism in the right temporoparietal lobe. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not show any structural abnormalities. Involvement of the temporal lobe has been suggested for dacrystic seizures, and both dominant and nondominant hemispheric foci were detected in such cases. Therefore, partially in concordance with previous reports, our case may point to neurobiologic interaction, between the temporoparietal region and the hypothalamus, for mediating lacrimation.

  14. Epilepsy and electromagnetic fields: effects of simulated atmospherics and 100-Hz magnetic fields on audiogenic seizure in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juutilainen, J.; Björk, E.; Saali, K.

    1988-03-01

    In order to study the possible association between epileptic seizures and natural electromagnetic fields, 32 female audiogenic seizure (AGS)-susceptible rats were exposed to simulated 10 kHz and 28 kHz atmospherics and to a sinusoidally oscillating magnetic field with a frequency of 100 Hz and field strength of 1 A/m. After the electromagnetic exposure, seizures were induced in the rats with a sound stimulus. The severity of the seizure was determined on an ordinal scale, the audiogenic response score (ARS). The time from the beginning of the sound stimulus to the onset of the seizure (seizure latency) and the duration of the convulsion was measured. No differences from the control experiments were found in the experiments with simulated atmospherics, but the 100 Hz magnetic field increased the seizure latency by about 13% ( P<0.02). The results do not support the hypothesis that natural atmospheric electromagnetic signals could affect the onset of epileptic seizures, but they suggest that AGS-susceptible rats may be a useful model for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic fields.

  15. Noninvasive transcranial focal stimulation via tripolar concentric ring electrodes lessens behavioral seizure activity of recurrent pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Luna-Munguía, Hiram; Rogel-Salazar, Gabriela; Liu, Xiang; Besio, Walter G.

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy affects approximately one percent of the world population. Antiepileptic drugs are ineffective in approximately 30% of patients and have side effects. We have been developing a noninvasive transcranial focal electrical stimulation with our novel tripolar concentric ring electrodes as an alternative/complementary therapy for seizure control. In this study we demonstrate the effect of focal stimulation on behavioral seizure activity induced by two successive pentylenetetrazole administrations in rats. Seizure onset latency, time of the first behavioral change, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score were studied and compared for focal stimulation treated (n = 9) and control groups (n = 10). First, we demonstrate that no significant difference was found in behavioral activity for focal stimulation treated and control groups after the first pentylenetetrazole administration. Next, comparing first and second pentylenetetrazole administrations, we demonstrate there was a significant change in behavioral activity (time of the first behavioral change) in both groups that was not related to focal stimulation. Finally, we demonstrate focal stimulation provoking a significant change in seizure onset latency, duration of seizure, and maximal seizure severity score. We believe that these results, combined with our previous reports, suggest that transcranial focal stimulation may have an anticonvulsant effect. PMID:22692938

  16. Impaired neuronal KCC2 function by biallelic SLC12A5 mutations in migrating focal seizures and severe developmental delay

    PubMed Central

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Watanabe, Miho; Akita, Tenpei; Ohba, Chihiro; Sugai, Kenji; Ong, Winnie Peitee; Shiraishi, Hideaki; Yuasa, Shota; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Beng, Khoo Teik; Saitoh, Shinji; Miyatake, Satoko; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Fukuda, Atsuo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS) is one of the early-onset epileptic syndromes characterized by migrating polymorphous focal seizures. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in ten sporadic and one familial case of EIMFS revealed compound heterozygous SLC12A5 (encoding the neuronal K+-Cl− co-transporter KCC2) mutations in two families: c.279 + 1G > C causing skipping of exon 3 in the transcript (p.E50_Q93del) and c.572 C >T (p.A191V) in individuals 1 and 2, and c.967T > C (p.S323P) and c.1243 A > G (p.M415V) in individual 3. Another patient (individual 4) with migrating multifocal seizures and compound heterozygous mutations [c.953G > C (p.W318S) and c.2242_2244del (p.S748del)] was identified by searching WES data from 526 patients and SLC12A5-targeted resequencing data from 141 patients with infantile epilepsy. Gramicidin-perforated patch-clamp analysis demonstrated strongly suppressed Cl− extrusion function of E50_Q93del and M415V mutants, with mildly impaired function of A191V and S323P mutants. Cell surface expression levels of these KCC2 mutants were similar to wildtype KCC2. Heterologous expression of two KCC2 mutants, mimicking the patient status, produced a significantly greater intracellular Cl− level than with wildtype KCC2, but less than without KCC2. These data clearly demonstrated that partially disrupted neuronal Cl− extrusion, mediated by two types of differentially impaired KCC2 mutant in an individual, causes EIMFS. PMID:27436767

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as a risk factor for stroke-related seizures.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, J; Proot, P; Van Maele, G

    2007-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders and different types of stroke. The present retrospective study investigates whether COPD is also a risk factor for the development of seizures in stroke patients. The study population consisted of 237 patients with stroke-related seizures. The control population was composed of 939 patients, admitted for a stroke between 2002 and 2004 and who did not develop epileptic spells on a follow up of 2 years. The stroke type and aetiology, and the vascular risk factors, including COPD, were compared. The seizure patients were older (P = 0.009) and had more arterial hypertension (P = 0.046) and cardiac-embolic strokes (P = 0.045) than the control group. On logistic regression only partial anterior circulation syndrome/infarct (PACS/I) and COPD (P < 0.001) emerged as independent risk factors for the development of seizures in stroke patients. The occurrence of seizures was not related to the severity of the COPD or to its type of treatment. The present study confirms that seizures occur most frequently in patients with a PACS/I. Although we were unable to demonstrate why COPD is a risk factor for seizures in stroke patients, its frequent associated nocturnal oxygen desaturation seems to be the most plausible explanation. Further prospective are needed to assess the role of COPD as a possible independent risk factor for stroke-related seizures.

  18. Neonatal seizures: controversies and challenges in translating new therapies from the lab to the isolette

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Kevin E.; Raol, Yogendra H.; Brooks-Kayal, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Neonatal seizures have unique properties that have proved challenging for both clinicians and basic science researchers. Clinical therapies aimed at neonatal seizures have proven only partially effective and new therapies are slow to develop. This article will discuss neonatal seizures within the framework of the barriers that exist to the development of new therapies and the challenges inherent in bringing new therapies from the bench to the bedside. With the European Union and United States creating national collaborative project infrastructure, improved collaborative resources should advance clinical research on urgently needed new therapies for this disorder. PMID:22708596

  19. Seizures in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Ch'ang, J; Claassen, J

    2017-01-01

    Critically ill patients with seizures are either admitted to the intensive care unit because of uncontrolled seizures requiring aggressive treatment or are admitted for other reasons and develop seizures secondarily. These patients may have multiorgan failure and severe metabolic and electrolyte disarrangements, and may require complex medication regimens and interventions. Seizures can be seen as a result of an acute systemic illness, a primary neurologic pathology, or a medication side-effect and can present in a wide array of symptoms from convulsive activity, subtle twitching, to lethargy. In this population, untreated isolated seizures can quickly escalate to generalized convulsive status epilepticus or, more frequently, nonconvulsive status epileptics, which is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Status epilepticus (SE) arises from a failure of inhibitory mechanisms and an enhancement of excitatory pathways causing permanent neuronal injury and other systemic sequelae. Carrying a high 30-day mortality rate, SE can be very difficult to treat in this complex setting, and a portion of these patients will become refractory, requiring narcotics and anesthetic medications. The most significant factor in successfully treating status epilepticus is initiating antiepileptic drugs as soon as possible, thus attentiveness and recognition of this disease are critical.

  20. Effect of copper deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore, V. )

    1991-03-11

    The objective of the present study was to study the effects of nutritional copper (Cu) deficiency on cocaine-induced seizures in rats. Following results were obtained when cocaine was given to 10 each of Cu-deficient (CUD) and Cu-sufficient (CUS) rats after 45 days on respective diets. For CUD and CUS groups of rats, respectively, (a) incidence of seizures was 60% and 40%; (b) time of onset for seizures was 8.42 {plus minus} 0.72 and 7.63 {plus minus} 1.00; (c) seizure severity was 2.5 {plus minus} 0.75 and 1.1 {plus minus} 0.45; and (d) 24 h mortality was 40% and none. Thus, except for time of onset, all other parameters for cocaine-induced seizures were significantly higher in CUD rats. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency enhances seizure-inducing effects of cocaine in rats. It is likely that the enhancement observed is due to a decrease in the hepatic metabolism of cocaine in CUD rats. This possibility is currently being investigated.

  1. Phenomenology of hallucinations, illusions, and delusions as part of seizure semiology.

    PubMed

    Kasper, B S; Kasper, E M; Pauli, E; Stefan, H

    2010-05-01

    In partial epilepsy, a localized hypersynchronous neuronal discharge evolving into a partial seizure affecting a particular cortical region or cerebral subsystem can give rise to subjective symptoms, which are perceived by the affected person only, that is, ictal hallucinations, illusions, or delusions. When forming the beginning of a symptom sequence leading to impairment of consciousness and/or a classic generalized seizure, these phenomena are referred to as an epileptic aura, but they also occur in isolation. They often manifest in the fully awake state, as part of simple partial seizures, but they also can be associated to different degrees of disturbed consciousness. Initial ictal symptoms often are closely related to the physiological functions of the cortical circuit involved and, therefore, can provide localizing information. When brain regions related to sensory integration are involved, the seizure discharge can cause specific kinds of hallucinations, for example, visual, auditory, gustatory, olfactory, and cutaneous sensory sensations. In addition to these elementary sensory perceptions, quite complex hallucinations related to a partial seizure can arise, for example, perception of visual scenes or hearing music. By involving psychic and emotional spheres of human perception, many seizures also give rise to hallucinatory emotional states (e.g., fear or happiness) or even more complex hallucinations (e.g., visuospatial phenomena), illusions (e.g., déjà vu, out-of-body experience), or delusional beliefs (e.g., identity change) that often are not easily recognized as epileptic. Here we suggest a classification into elementary sensory, complex sensory, and complex integratory seizure symptoms. Epileptic hallucinations, illusions, and delusions shine interesting light on the physiology and functional anatomy of brain regions involved and their functions in the human being. This article, in which 10 cases are described, introduces the fascinating

  2. Automated seizure detection systems and their effectiveness for each type of seizure.

    PubMed

    Ulate-Campos, A; Coughlin, F; Gaínza-Lein, M; Fernández, I Sánchez; Pearl, P L; Loddenkemper, T

    2016-08-01

    Epilepsy affects almost 1% of the population and most of the approximately 20-30% of patients with refractory epilepsy have one or more seizures per month. Seizure detection devices allow an objective assessment of seizure frequency and a treatment tailored to the individual patient. A rapid recognition and treatment of seizures through closed-loop systems could potentially decrease morbidity and mortality in epilepsy. However, no single detection device can detect all seizure types. Therefore, the choice of a seizure detection device should consider the patient-specific seizure semiologies. This review of the literature evaluates seizure detection devices and their effectiveness for different seizure types. Our aim is to summarize current evidence, offer suggestions on how to select the most suitable seizure detection device for each patient and provide guidance to physicians, families and researchers when choosing or designing seizure detection devices. Further, this review will guide future prospective validation studies.

  3. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: the spectrum of peripheral neuropathy in 30 affected patients.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Barbara E; Logigian, Eric L; Kolodny, Edwin H; Pastores, Gregory M

    2008-08-01

    Late-onset Tay-Sachs (LOTS) disease is a chronic, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial deficiency of beta-hexosaminidase A (HEXA) activity. Deficient levels of HEXA result in the intracellular accumulation of GM2-ganglioside, resulting in toxicity to nerve cells. Clinical manifestations primarily involve the central nervous system (CNS) and lower motor neurons, and include ataxia, weakness, spasticity, dysarthria, dysphagia, dystonia, seizures, psychosis, mania, depression, and cognitive decline. The prevalence of peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement in LOTS has not been well documented, but it has traditionally been thought to be very low. We examined a cohort of 30 patients with LOTS who underwent clinical and electrophysiologic examination, and found evidence of a predominantly axon loss polyneuropathy affecting distal nerve segments in the lower and upper extremities in eight patients (27%).

  4. New onset epilepsy in Prader-Willi syndrome: semiology and literature review.

    PubMed

    Benson, Leslie A; Maski, Kiran P; Kothare, Sanjeev V; Bourgeois, Blaise F

    2010-10-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by absence of expression of the paternal active genes in the 15q11∼q13 chromosome region; it is associated with an increased incidence of epilepsy and narcolepsy. Presented here is the case of a 2.5-year-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome and a history of neonatal superior sagittal sinus thrombosis with new onset of atonic seizures with electrographic onset from the parasagittal region. It is postulated that microscarring from neonatal venous sinus thrombosis, history of febrile seizures, and Prader-Willi syndrome are factors predisposing him to epilepsy. The importance of video electroencephalography with electromyography electrodes is emphasized for Prader-Willi syndrome patients with drop episodes, to differentiate cataplexy from seizures. This being a novel report of a Prader-Willi syndrome patient with atonic seizures, the literature on seizure semiology among patients with Prader-Willi syndrome is reviewed.

  5. Occurrence of spontaneous and audiogenic seizures following global brain ischaemia due to cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Januszewski, Sławomir; Czuczwar, Stanisław J; Pluta, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    Transient cardiac arrest due to cardiac vessel bundle occlusion was used to produce a rat model of spontaneous and audiogenic seizures. Among the rats, spontaneous seizures were present in 64%, and audiogenic seizures could be evoked in 86%, during two weeks of survival after cardiac arrest, by exposure to a loud sound produced by rattling keys, beginning one day after the post-ischaemic injury. Data from literature suggested a key role for GABA-ergic system widespread dysfunction especially in the hippocampus in post-cardiac arrest onset of audiogenic seizures. Reduced GABA inhibition in the hippocampus seems responsible for audiogenic seizures following cardiac arrest. In summary it may be considered that the occurrence of audiogenic seizures following cardiac arrest is determined not only by a neuronal loss, especially in the hippocampus, but also by a condition of synapse modification by a regenerative phenomenon. Data from our study clearly indicate that global brain ischaemia due to cardiac arrest may induce the susceptibility to spontaneous and audiogenic seizures, but this effect is transient.

  6. Seizures and Epileptiform Patterns in SAH and Their Relation to Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Maciel, Carolina B; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    In subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), seizures are frequent and occur at different time points, likely reflecting heterogeneous pathophysiology. Young patients, those with more severe SAH (by clot burden or presence of severe mental status changes at onset or focal neurologic deficits at any time), those with associated increased cortical irritation (by infarction or presence of underlying hematoma), and patients undergoing craniotomy are at higher risk. Advanced neurophysiologic monitoring allows for seizure burden quantification, identification of subclinical seizures, and interictal patterns as well as neurovascular complications that may have an independent impact on the outcome in this population. Practice regarding seizure prophylaxis varies widely; its institution is often guided by the risk-benefit ratio of seizures and medication side effects. Newer anticonvulsants seem to be equally effective and may have a more favorable profile. However, questions regarding the association of seizures and vasospasm, the therapeutic dosing, timing, and duration of antiepileptic treatment and the impact of seizures and antiepileptics on the outcome remain unanswered. In this review, we provide a broad overview of the work in this area and offer a diagnostic and therapeutic approach based on our own expert opinion.

  7. Seizures in early life suppress hippocampal dendrite growth while impairing spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masataka; Gu, Xue; Swann, John W

    2011-11-01

    Impaired learning and memory are common in epilepsy syndromes of childhood. Clinical investigations suggest that the developing brain may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of intractable seizure disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have demonstrated reduced volumes in brain regions involved in learning and memory. The earlier the onset of an epilepsy the larger the effects seem to be on both brain anatomy and cognition. Thus, childhood epilepsy has been proposed to interfere in some unknown way with brain development. Experiments reported here explore these ideas by examining the effects of seizures in infant mice on learning and memory and on the growth of CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. Fifteen brief seizures were induced by flurothyl between postnatal days 7 and 11 in mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in hippocampal pyramidal cells. One to 44days later, dendritic arbors were reconstructed to measure growth. Spatial learning and memory were also assessed in a water maze. Our results show that recurrent seizures produced marked deficits in learning and memory. Seizures also dramatically slowed the growth of basilar dendrites while neurons in littermate control mice continued to add new dendritic branches and lengthen existing branches. When experiments were performed in older mice, seizures had no measureable effects on either dendrite arbor complexity or spatial learning and memory. Our results suggest that the recurring seizures of intractable childhood epilepsy contribute to associated learning and memory deficits by suppressing dendrite growth.

  8. Computing network-based features from intracranial EEG time series data: Application to seizure focus localization.

    PubMed

    Hao, Stephanie; Subramanian, Sandya; Jordan, Austin; Santaniello, Sabato; Yaffe, Robert; Jouny, Christophe C; Bergey, Gregory K; Anderson, William S; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2014-01-01

    The surgical resection of the epileptogenic zone (EZ) is the only effective treatment for many drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) patients, but the pre-surgical identification of the EZ is challenging. This study investigates whether the EZ exhibits a computationally identifiable signature during seizures. In particular, we compute statistics of the brain network from intracranial EEG (iEEG) recordings and track the evolution of network connectivity before, during, and after seizures. We define each node in the network as an electrode and weight each edge connecting a pair of nodes by the gamma band cross power of the corresponding iEEG signals. The eigenvector centrality (EVC) of each node is tracked over two seizures per patient and the electrodes are ranked according to the corresponding EVC value. We hypothesize that electrodes covering the EZ have a signature EVC rank evolution during seizure that differs from electrodes outside the EZ. We tested this hypothesis on multi-channel iEEG recordings from 2 DRE patients who had successful surgery (i.e., seizures were under control with or without medications) and 1 patient who had unsuccessful surgery. In the successful cases, we assumed that the resected region contained the EZ and found that the EVC rank evolution of the electrodes within the resected region had a distinct "arc" signature, i.e., the EZ ranks first rose together shortly after seizure onset and then fell later during seizure.

  9. Correlation between the enhancement of flunitrazepam binding by GABA and seizure susceptibility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, R.J.; Wehner, J.M.

    1987-06-08

    Various populations of mice exhibit differential sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents. The relationship of seizure susceptibility to alterations in the GABA receptor complex was investigated in six different populations of mice consisting of four inbred strains (C57BL, DBA, C3H, and BALB) and two selected lines (long sleep and short sleep). Seizure activity was induced by intraperitoneal administration of the GAD inhibitor, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and latencies to seizure onset and tonus were measured. In naive mice of the same populations, GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding was measured in extensively washed whole brain membranes at several GABA concentrations. Both differential seizure sensitivity to 3-mercaptopropionic acid and differential enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding by GABA were observed in these six populations of mice. Correlational analyses indicated a positive correlation between the degree of GABA enhancement of TH-flunitrazepam binding and resistance to the seizure-inducing properties of 3-mercaptopropionic acid. These data suggest that genetic differences in sensitivity to seizure-inducing agents that disrupt the GABAergic system may be related to differences in coupling between the various receptors associated with the GABA receptor complex.

  10. Optical triggered seizures using a caged 4-Aminopyridine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingrui; McGarry, Laura M.; Ma, Hongtao; Harris, Samuel; Berwick, Jason; Yuste, Rafael; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of epilepsy are critical not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of epilepsy but also for testing the efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs and novel therapeutic interventions. Photorelease of caged molecules is widely used in biological research to control pharmacologic events with high spatio-temporal resolution. We developed a technique for in vivo optical triggering of neocortical seizures using a novel caged compound based on ruthenium photochemistry (RuBi-4AP). Epileptiform events in mouse cortex were induced with blue light in both whole brain and focal illumination. Multi-electrode array recording and optical techniques were used to characterize the propagation of these epileptic events, including interictal spikes, polyspikes, and ictal discharges. These results demonstrate a novel optically-triggered seizure model, with high spatio-temporal control, that could have widespread application in the investigation of ictal onset, propagation and to develop novel light-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:25698919

  11. Inflammatory markers associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hong Seok; Kim, Sung Keun; Lee, Seo-Young

    2016-03-01

    Seizures can produce systemic changes, including elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein levels, which raises concern for potential infection. We describe seizure-induced inflammation-like responses and discuss how these changes may be distinguished from those associated with infection. We prospectively investigated 140 consecutive visits to the emergency room, in which patients presented with seizures. We defined elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels as inflammation-like responses. We investigated the occurrence of inflammation-like responses, characteristics of the seizures, neurological status at the initial visit, outcomes, and clinical findings to determine the presence of infection. We ascertained whether the patients had infection or not based on the overall information post-discharge. An inflammation-like response was observed in 56.3% of all visits and 19.3% were diagnosed with concurrent infection. Among the visits with inflammation-like response, 34.7% were shown to have an infection. Increases in body temperature and C-reactive protein levels were milder (<39°C and <6 mg/dl, respectively) in patients without infection compared to those with infection, whereas there was no difference in leukocytosis, with regard to the presence or absence of infection. Increased body temperature occurred only in cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, whereas leukocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein levels were reported in patients with any type of seizure. Body temperatures returned to normal within eight hours in uncomplicated cases. Seizures frequently induce an increase in body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels, making it challenging to distinguish these changes from those associated with infection. Nonetheless, elevated body temperature in the absence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, above 39̊C, or persisting for more than eight hours after

  12. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI.

  13. Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it cause seizures? Is there any connection between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy? Answers from B Mark Keegan, M. ... seizures are more common in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS) than in those who don't have ...

  14. Monotherapy for partial epilepsy: focus on levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Gambardella, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Colosimo, Eleonora; Ambrosio, Roberta; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV), the S-enantiomer of alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-1-pyrollidine acetamide, is a recently licensed antiepileptic drug (AED) for adjunctive therapy of partial seizures. Its mechanism of action is uncertain but it exhibits a unique profile of anticonvulsant activity in models of chronic epilepsy. Five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials enrolling adult or pediatric patients with refractory partial epilepsy have demonstrated the efficacy of LEV as adjunctive therapy, with a responder rate (≥50% reduction in seizure frequency) of 28%–45%. Long-term efficacy studies suggest retention rates of 60% after one year, with 13% of patients seizure-free for 6 months of the study and 8% seizure-free for 1 year. More recent studies illustrated successful conversion to monotherapy in patients with refractory epilepsy, and its effectiveness as a single agent in partial epilepsy. LEV has also efficacy in generalized epilepsies. Adverse effects of LEV, including somnolence, lethargy, and dizziness, are generally mild and their occurrence rate seems to be not significantly different from that observed in placebo groups. LEV also has no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with other AEDs, or with commonly prescribed medications. The combination of effective antiepileptic properties with a relatively mild adverse effect profile makes LEV an attractive therapy for partial seizures. PMID:18728811

  15. The effect of acute aripiprazole treatment on chemically and electrically induced seizures in mice: The role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Shafaroodi, Hamed; Oveisi, Simin; Hosseini, Mahsa; Niknahad, Hossein; Moezi, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug which acts through dopamine and serotonin receptors. Aripiprazole was noted to have antiseizure effects in a study on mice, while it induced seizures in a few human case reports. Dopaminergic and serotonergic systems relate to nitric oxide, and aripiprazole also has effects on dopamine and serotonin receptors. This study investigated the effects of aripiprazole on seizures and the potential role of nitric oxide in the process. The following three models were examined to explore the role of aripiprazole on seizures in mice: 1 - pentylenetetrazole administered intravenously, 2 - pentylenetetrazole administered intraperitoneally, and 3 - electroshock. Aripiprazole administration delayed clonic seizure in intravenous and intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole models. In the electroshock-induced seizure model, tonic seizure and mortality protection percent were increased after aripiprazole administration. In intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole, aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure latency were significantly decreased when l-NAME - a nonselective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole - a selective neuronal NOS (nNOS) inhibitor, or aminoguanidine - a selective inducible NOS (iNOS) inhibitor was injected before aripiprazole administration. In the intravenous pentylenetetrazole method, administration of l-NAME or aminoguanidine inhibited aripiprazole effects on clonic seizure threshold. Aminoguanidine or l-NAME administration decreased aripiprazole-induced protection against tonic seizures and death in the electroshock model. In both intravenous and intraperitoneal seizure models, aripiprazole and l-arginine coadministration delayed the onset of clonic seizures. Moreover, it increased protection against tonic seizures and death in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and electroshock models. In conclusion, the release of nitric oxide via iNOS or nNOS may be involved in anticonvulsant properties of

  16. Gelastic seizures: not always hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christina S; Parrent, Andrew G; Burneo, Jorge G

    2007-12-01

    Gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. However, focal cortical dysplasias can also cause "laughing seizures", and such cases can be difficult to localize with EEG. This case report presents a 29-year-old woman who was successfully rendered free of gelastic seizures after resection of a frontal cortical dysplasia, localized through MRI and SPECT imaging.[Published with video sequences].

  17. Genetics Home Reference: malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... channels. Potassium channels, which transport positively charged atoms (ions) of potassium into and out of cells, play ... neurons) in the brain, where they transport potassium ions out of cells. This flow of ions is ...

  18. Search and Seizure in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hickok, Angelia B.

    1980-01-01

    Although problems of drug abuse, bomb threats, theft, and concealed weapons sometimes make search and seizure necessary, the student's rights must be protected through proper legal procedures. The article presents guidelines for conducting locker and personal searches and for educating students, teachers, and administrators on student rights. (DS)

  19. Gelastic epilepsy in combination with hypothalamic hamartoma and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bochao; Sun, Chongran; Li, Shiguang; Gong, Qiyong; Lui, Su

    2013-12-01

    Gelastic epilepsy has been reported to originate from various conditions, particularly from hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). In the present study, we report a patient with gelastic seizures (GSs), followed by complex partial and tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a rare combination of HH and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Following resectioning of the HH, the seizures were reduced, but not fully controlled, with medication by the one year follow-up. HH and partial ACC patients may experience seizures; the seizures in the case presented in this study may have originated from HH, partial ACC or both. Considering the fact that seizure frequency reduced following surgery, they may have mainly occurred from HH. Additionally it was considered to be likely that the seizures following surgery were due to secondary epileptogenesis, partial ACC, or both.

  20. Gelastic epilepsy in combination with hypothalamic hamartoma and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, BOCHAO; SUN, CHONGRAN; LI, SHIGUANG; GONG, QIYONG; LUI, SU

    2013-01-01

    Gelastic epilepsy has been reported to originate from various conditions, particularly from hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). In the present study, we report a patient with gelastic seizures (GSs), followed by complex partial and tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a rare combination of HH and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (ACC). Following resectioning of the HH, the seizures were reduced, but not fully controlled, with medication by the one year follow-up. HH and partial ACC patients may experience seizures; the seizures in the case presented in this study may have originated from HH, partial ACC or both. Considering the fact that seizure frequency reduced following surgery, they may have mainly occurred from HH. Additionally it was considered to be likely that the seizures following surgery were due to secondary epileptogenesis, partial ACC, or both. PMID:24255688

  1. Treatment of typical absence seizures and related epileptic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Panayiotopoulos, C P

    2001-01-01

    Typical absences are brief (seconds) generalised seizures of sudden onset and termination. They have 2 essential components: clinically, the impairment of consciousness (absence) and, generalised 3 to 4Hz spike/polyspike and slow wave discharges on electroencephalogram (EEG). They differ fundamentally from other seizures and are pharmacologically unique. Their clinical and EEG manifestations are syndrome-related. Impairment of consciousness may be severe, moderate, mild or inconspicuous. This is often associated with motor manifestations, automatisms and autonomic disturbances. Clonic, tonic and atonic components alone or in combination are motor symptoms; myoclonia, mainly of facial muscles, is the most common. The ictal EEG discharge may be consistently brief (2 to 5 seconds) or long (15 to 30 seconds), continuous or fragmented, with single or multiple spikes associated with the slow wave. The intradischarge frequency may be constant or may vary (2.5 to 5Hz). Typical absences are easily precipitated by hyperventilation in about 90% of untreated patients. They are usually spontaneous, but can be triggered by photic, pattern, video games stimuli, and mental or emotional factors. Typical absences usually start in childhood or adolescence. They occur in around 10 to 15% of adults with epilepsies, often combined with other generalised seizures. They may remit with age or be lifelong. Syndromic diagnosis is important for treatment strategies and prognosis. Absences may be severe and the only seizure type, as in childhood absence epilepsy. They may predominate in other syndromes or be mild and nonpredominant in syndromes such as juvenile myoclonic epilepsy where myoclonic jerks and generalised tonic clonic seizures are the main concern. Typical absence status epilepticus occurs in about 30% of patients and is more common in certain syndromes, e.g. idiopathic generalised epilepsy with perioral myoclonia or phantom absences. Typical absence seizures are often easy to

  2. A novel KCNT1 mutation in a Japanese patient with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shino; Hirano, Yoshiko; Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIFMS) is a rare, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by polymorphous focal seizures. De novo mutations of KCNT1 have been identified in cases of this disorder. We encountered a sporadic patient with EIFMS, who suffered tonic convulsions at the age of 9 days. Using Sanger sequencing, we identified a de novo missense mutation of the same amino acid affected by a previously identified mutation, c.1420C>T (p.Arg474Cys).

  3. Propagation of seizures in a case of lesional mid-cingulate gyrus epilepsy studied by stereo-EEG.

    PubMed

    Alkawadri, Rafeed; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge; Gaspard, Nicolas; Alexopoulos, Andreas V

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the propagation of seizures arising from the cingulate gyrus, as cingulate coverage with interhemispheric subdural electrodes is usually challenging and incomplete due to inherent anatomical and vascular limitations. We present a case of lesional mid-cingulate epilepsy confirmed by stereotactically implanted intracranial depth electrodes and subsequent surgical resection. Hypermotor symptomatology was seen during the first seven seconds of seizure onset while the seizure was still confined to the mid-cingulate gyrus contacts. The patient had brief contralateral clonic movements as seizure propagated to the primary motor cortex. There was a high concordance between the primary propagation contacts, as delineated by intracranial EEG, and the contacts, with higher coherence values in the connectivity matrix. Interestingly, cingulate-extra-cingulate connectivity and spread to the primary motor, premotor, and prefrontal cortex was seen preceding spread to other cingulate contacts, of which one was less than 15 mm from the onset contact. This report is one of a few published, documenting propagation of seizures arising from the mid-cingulate cortex. As illustrated by these data, hypermotor semiology correlated with direct activation of the cingulate cortex. Subsequent seizure propagation activated an extensive extra-cingulate rather than an intra-cingulate epileptogenic network. Interestingly, had the region of onset not sampled, the seizure onset would have appeared as non-localizing widespread rhythms over the fronto-parietal convexities. Further studies to explore the propagation of seizures arising from the cingulate gyrus and the physiological and pathological connectivity patterns within the cingulate gyrus in humans are needed, preferably using stereotactic implantation. Specific targets to be investigated are also discussed.

  4. EFFECT OF AGE ON KAINATE-INDUCED SEIZURE SEVERITY AND CELL DEATH

    PubMed Central

    McCord, Meghan C.; Lorenzana, Ariana; Bloom, Christopher S.; Chancer, Zackary O.; Schauwecker, P. Elyse

    2008-01-01

    While the onset and extent of epilepsy increases in the aged population, the reasons for this increased incidence remain unexplored. The present study used two inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ) to address the genetic control of age-dependent neurodegeneration by building upon previous experiments that have identified phenotypic differences in susceptibility to hippocampal seizure-induced cell death. We determined if seizure induction and seizure-induced cell death are affected differentially in young adult, mature, and aged male C57BL/6J and FVB/NJ mice administered the excitotoxin, kainic acid. Dose response testing was performed in three-four groups of male mice from each strain. Following kainate injections, mice were scored for seizure activity and brains from mice in each age group were processed for light microscopic histopathologic evaluation seven days following kainate administration to evaluate the severity of seizure-induced brain damage. Irrespective of the dose of kainate administered or the age group examined, resistant strains of mice (C57BL/6J) continued to be resistant to seizure-induced cell death. In contrast, aged animals of the FVB/NJ strain were more vulnerable to the induction of behavioral seizures and associated neuropathology after systemic injection of kainic acid than young or middle-aged mice. Results from these studies suggest that the age-related increased susceptibility to the neurotoxic effects of seizure induction and seizure-induced injury is regulated in a strain-dependent manner, similar to previous observations in young adult mice. PMID:18479826

  5. Role of subdural electrocorticography in prediction of long-term seizure outcome in epilepsy surgery

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Csaba; Shah, Aashit; Sood, Sandeep; Chugani, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    Since prediction of long-term seizure outcome using preoperative diagnostic modalities remains suboptimal in epilepsy surgery, we evaluated whether interictal spike frequency measures obtained from extraoperative subdural electrocorticography (ECoG) recording could predict long-term seizure outcome. This study included 61 young patients (age 0.4–23.0 years), who underwent extraoperative ECoG recording prior to cortical resection for alleviation of uncontrolled focal seizures. Patient age, frequency of preoperative seizures, neuroimaging findings, ictal and interictal ECoG measures were preoperatively obtained. The seizure outcome was prospectively measured [follow-up period: 2.5–6.4 years (mean 4.6 years)]. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses determined how well preoperative demographic and diagnostic measures predicted long-term seizure outcome. Following the initial cortical resection, Engel Class I, II, III and IV outcomes were noted in 35, 6, 12 and 7 patients, respectively. One child died due to disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with pseudomonas sepsis 2 days after surgery. Univariate regression analyses revealed that incomplete removal of seizure onset zone, higher interictal spike-frequency in the preserved cortex and incomplete removal of cortical abnormalities on neuroimaging were associated with a greater risk of failing to obtain Class I outcome. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that incomplete removal of seizure onset zone was the only independent predictor of failure to obtain Class I outcome. The goodness of regression model fit and the predictive ability of regression model were greatest in the full regression model incorporating both ictal and interictal measures [R2 0.44; Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve: 0.81], slightly smaller in the reduced model incorporating ictal but not interictal measures (R2 0.40; Area under the ROC curve: 0.79) and slightly smaller

  6. Partial neuroprotection by nNOS inhibition during profound asphyxia in preterm fetal sheep

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Paul P.; Davidson, Joanne O.; van den Heuij, Lotte G.; Tan, Sidhartha; Silverman, Richard B.; Ji, Haitao; Blood, Arlin B.; Fraser, Mhoyra; Bennet, Laura; Jan Gunn, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    Preterm brain injury is partly associated with hypoxia-ischemia starting before birth. Excessive nitric oxide production during HI may cause nitrosative stress, leading to cell membrane and mitochondrial damage. We therefore tested the hypothesis that therapy with a new, selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitor, JI-10 (0.022 mg/kg bolus, n=8), given 30 min before 25 min of complete umbilical cord occlusion was protective in preterm fetal sheep at 101-104 d gestation (term is 147 d), compared to saline (n=8). JI-10 had no effect on fetal blood pressure, heart rate, carotid and femoral blood flow, total EEG power, nuchal activity, temperature or intracerebral oxygenation on near-infrared spectroscopy during or after occlusion. JI-10 was associated with later onset of post-asphyxial seizures compared with saline (p<0.05), and attenuation of the subsequent progressive loss of cytochrome oxidase (p<0.05). After 7 days recovery, JI-10 was associated with improved neuronal survival in the caudate nucleus (p<0.05), but not the putamen or hippocampus, and more CNPase positive oligodendrocytes in the periventricular white matter (p<0.05). In conclusion, prophylactic nNOS inhibition before profound asphyxia was associated with delayed onset of seizures, slower decline of cytochrome oxidase and partial white and grey matter protection, consistent with protection of mitochondrial function. PMID:24120436

  7. Gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Machado, René Andrade; Astencio, Adriana Goicoechea

    2012-01-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma. We describe a patient with gelastic seizures involving the left parietal lobe. Our patient, an 8-year-old girl, underwent interictal video/EEG monitoring and MRI. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic spikes and waves in the left parietal lobe. MRI revealed the characteristic features of focal cortical dysplasia. Our findings suggest that the left parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  8. ACTH and prednisone in childhood seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Snead, O C; Benton, J W; Myers, G J

    1983-08-01

    We treated 116 children with ACTH or prednisone. Fifty-two had infantile spasms with hypsarhythmia, and 64 had other types of intractable seizures. ACTH completely controlled seizures in all patients with infantile spasms and hypsarhythmia and 74% of those with other types of seizures. Prednisone controlled 51% of patients with infantile spasms and none with other seizures. Serious side effects were minimal for both drugs, and recurrent seizures occurred in 40 to 50% of patients within 4 to 14 months after completion of therapy.

  9. [Multicystic encephalopathy with frontal lobe-originated gelastic seizure, ipsilateral oculogyric crisis, and horizontal epileptic nystagmus: an autopsy case].

    PubMed

    Ohara, K; Morita, Y; Takauchi, S; Takeda, T; Hayashi, S

    1996-08-01

    Attacks of gelastic (laughing) seizure are usually reported as complex partial seizures of temporal lobe epilepsy and seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but are rarely reported as complex partial seizures of frontal lobe origin. We recently encountered a 29-year-old woman who had gelastic seizure attacks from age 17. She had shown severe mental retardation with cerebral palsy at 7 months, and entered precocious puberty at age 7. Attacks of gelastic seizure with ipsilateral adversive seizures, ipsilateral oculogyric crisis, and horizontal epileptic nystagmus were observed until her death at age 29. Each gelastic seizure lasted 1 to 10 minutes. Her laughing was very strong and loud. Interictal spikes were observed over the right fronto-parietal lobe, but no ictal spike was detected. The neuropathological examinations of her brain revealed no hypothalamic lesions such as hamartomas, gliosis, and distinct neuronal loss. Her brain was severely affected with multicystic encephalopathy, and the bilateral temporal lobe tissues were almost replaced by the cystic changes. The right frontal lobe and occipital lobe were not cystic. From the clinicopathological examinations, the focus of her gelastic seizure was considered to be of the right frontal origin. The hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus are major components of the limbic system, which is involved in affective emotions. Although the right hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus were completely lost, and those of the left hemisphere were almost completely lost, by the multicystic replacements in this case, the gelastic seizure attacks were evoked from right frontal origin. The frontal lobe may play an important role in motor expressions of laughing. The motor expressions of the loud and strong laughing may be one of the characteristic features of frontal lobe-originated gelastic seizure of this case.

  10. Serum and CSF levels of cytokines in acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Ichiyama, Takashi; Suenaga, Naoko; Kajimoto, Madoka; Tohyama, Jun; Isumi, Hiroshi; Kubota, Masaya; Mori, Masato; Furukawa, Susumu

    2008-01-01

    It is well known that an acute encephalopathy occasionally follows prolonged febrile seizures. We measured the concentrations of interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1) in serum and CSF during the acute stage in 13 children with acute encephalopathy following prolonged febrile seizures (AEPFS) and 23 with prolonged febrile seizures without encephalopathy (PFS) to investigate the pathogenesis of AEPFS. Serum IL-6, IL-10, sTNFR1, and CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher in AEPFS and PFS compared with control subjects. CSF IL-6 levels in AEPFS were significantly higher than those in PFS, but not serum IL-6, IL-10, or sTNFR1. The CSF IL-6 levels were significantly higher than the serum levels in AEPFS, but not PFS. The serum levels of sTNFR1 and IL-10 were significantly higher than those in the CSF in AEPFS and PFS. The serum IL-10 and sTNFR1 levels in patients who did not experience a second seizure were significantly higher than those in patients who experienced a second seizure, which was characterized by clusters of complex partial seizures several days after the initial prolonged febrile seizure. Our results suggest that serum IL-6, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and CSF IL-6 are part of the regulatory system of cytokines in AEPFS.

  11. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  12. Inferring Seizure Frequency From Brief EEG Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Westover, M. Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T.; Shafi, Mouhsin; Hoch, Daniel B.; Cole, Andrew J.; Chiappa, Keith; Cash, Sydney S.

    2012-01-01

    Routine EEGs remain a cornerstone test in caring for people with epilepsy. Although rare, a self-limited seizure (clinical or electrographic only) may be observed during such brief EEGs. The implications of observing a seizure in this situation, especially with respect to inferring the underlying seizure frequency, are unclear. The issue is complicated by the inaccuracy of patient-reported estimations of seizure frequency. The treating clinician is often left to wonder whether the single seizure indicates very frequent seizures, or if it is of lesser significance. We applied standard concepts of probabilistic inference to a simple model of seizure incidence to provide some guidance for clinicians facing this situation. Our analysis establishes upper and lower bounds on the seizure rate implied by observing a single seizure during routine EEG. Not surprisingly, with additional information regarding the expected seizure rate, these bounds can be further constrained. This framework should aid the clinician in applying a more principled approach toward decision making in the setting of a single seizure on a routine EEG. PMID:23545768

  13. Inferring seizure frequency from brief EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Westover, M Brandon; Bianchi, Matt T; Shafi, Mouhsin; Hoch, Daniel B; Cole, Andrew J; Chiappa, Keith; Cash, Sydney S

    2013-04-01

    Routine EEGs remain a cornerstone test in caring for people with epilepsy. Although rare, a self-limited seizure (clinical or electrographic only) may be observed during such brief EEGs. The implications of observing a seizure in this situation, especially with respect to inferring the underlying seizure frequency, are unclear. The issue is complicated by the inaccuracy of patient-reported estimations of seizure frequency. The treating clinician is often left to wonder whether the single seizure indicates very frequent seizures, or if it is of lesser significance. We applied standard concepts of probabilistic inference to a simple model of seizure incidence to provide some guidance for clinicians facing this situation. Our analysis establishes upper and lower bounds on the seizure rate implied by observing a single seizure during routine EEG. Not surprisingly, with additional information regarding the expected seizure rate, these bounds can be further constrained. This framework should aid the clinician in applying a more principled approach toward decision making in the setting of a single seizure on a routine EEG.

  14. Gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee-Young; Hong, Seung Bong; Joo, Eun Yeon; Tae, Woo Suk; Han, Sun Jung; Cho, Jae Wook; Seo, Dae Won; Kim, Sun Hyung; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sun I

    2006-09-01

    Gelastic seizures have been described in various epilepsies arising from the temporal or frontal lobes, although the most commonly encountered form is related to the presence of an hypothalamic hamartoma. We report a patient with gelastic seizures involving the right parietal lobe. Our patient, a 32-year-old man, underwent video-EEG monitoring, interictal and ictal brain SPECTs during gelastic seizures. Subtraction ictal SPECT co-registered to MRI (SISCOM), was performed to localize any ictal hyperperfusion during these gelastic seizures. The seizures consisted of brief staring followed by smiling and laughing. Electroencephalography during the gelastic seizures showed rhythmic sharp waves in the right parietal lobe. SISCOM showed ictal hyperperfusion in the right parietal lobe and medial portions of right cerebellum. Our findings suggest that the right parietal lobe may actively participate in the particular epileptogenic network generating gelastic seizures.

  15. Quickest detection of drug-resistant seizures: An optimal control approach

    PubMed Central

    Santaniello, Sabato; Burns, Samuel P.; Golby, Alexandra J.; Singer, Jedediah M.; Anderson, William S.; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy affects 50 million people worldwide, and seizures in 30% of the cases remain drug resistant. This has increased interest in responsive neurostimulation, which is most effective when administered during seizure onset. We propose a novel framework for seizure onset detection that involves (i) constructing statistics from multichannel intracranial EEG (iEEG) to distinguish nonictal versus ictal states; (ii) modeling the dynamics of these statistics in each state and the state transitions; you can remove this word if there is no room. (iii) developing an optimal control-based “quickest detection” (QD) strategy to estimate the transition times from nonictal to ictal states from sequential iEEG measurements. The QD strategy minimizes a cost function of detection delay and false positive probability. The solution is a threshold that non-monotonically decreases over time and avoids responding to rare events that normally trigger false positives. We applied QD to four drug resistant epileptic patients (168 hour continuous recordings, 26–44 electrodes, 33 seizures) and achieved 100% sensitivity with low false positive rates (0.16 false positive/hour). This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction. PMID:22078519

  16. The diagnostic accuracy of routine electroencephalography after a first unprovoked seizure.

    PubMed

    Bouma, H K; Labos, C; Gore, G C; Wolfson, C; Keezer, M R

    2016-03-01

    The clinical utility of routine electroencephalography (EEG) after a first unprovoked seizure remains uncertain. Its diagnostic accuracy in identifying adults and children with new onset epilepsy was examined. A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies examining individuals who underwent routine EEG after a first unprovoked seizure and were followed for seizure recurrence for at least 1 year was performed. A 'positive' test was defined by the presence of epileptiform discharges (ED). Pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates were calculated using a bivariate random effects regression model. In all, 3096 records were reviewed, from which 15 studies were extracted with a total of 1799 participants. Amongst adult studies, the sensitivity and specificity (95% confidence interval) of routine EEG were 17.3% (7.9, 33.8) and 94.7% (73.7, 99.1), respectively. Amongst child studies, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 57.8% (49.7, 65.6) and 69.6% (57.5, 79.5), respectively. Based upon our positive likelihood ratios, and assuming a pre-test probability of 50%, an adult with ED on routine EEG after a first unprovoked seizure has a 77% probability of having a second seizure, whilst a child with similar findings has a 66% probability. Further studies are required to examine the impact of patient characteristics and EEG features on the diagnostic accuracy of routine EEG for new onset epilepsy.

  17. Early presentation of de novo high grade glioma with epileptic seizures: electroclinical and neuroimaging findings.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Rosario; Figus, Andrea; Corraine, Simona

    2010-10-01

    We report the clinical, EEG and neuroradiologic findings from three adult patients who developed new-onset seizure disorders as early clinical manifestations of de novo high grade glioma. The malignancies could not be recognised at the time of the first epileptic seizure because of minimal non-specific brain abnormalities, which showed no signs of necrosis or significant contrast enhancement on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Focal EEG abnormalities were recorded in all cases and appeared consistent with the neuroradiologic findings. The patients regained normal neurological status after the first seizure but rapidly developed space-occupying necrotic lesions. Two patients underwent surgery and received histological diagnoses of the tumours. Another patient was finally diagnosed with a malignant glioma based on the neuroradiologic picture and rapid progression of the cerebral lesion. It should be noted that in adult patients, new-onset epileptic seizures might reveal the presence of malignant gliomas at a very early stage in the tumour formation process. This report indicates that typical anatomoradiologic features of de novo high grade glioma, such as necrosis and rim-contrast enhancement, could be absent at the time of the first epileptic seizure but become clear within a short period after clinical presentation.

  18. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Kate K; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility.

  19. Features of stimulus-specific seizures in dogs with reflex epilepsy: 43 cases (2000-2014).

    PubMed

    Shell, Linda; Scariano, Rachel; Rishniw, Mark

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the occurrence and management of reflex epilepsy (ie, seizure activity triggered by exposure to specific locations or situations) in dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 43 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Discussions by veterinarians participating in the Veterinary Information Network online community for the years 2000 through 2014 were reviewed to identify dogs with a diagnosis of reflex epilepsy and seizure activity in response to stimuli. History, signalment (including age at onset), the specific stimulus or stimuli that provoked seizures, treatments, and any concurrent neurologic diagnoses were recorded. RESULTS A variety of breeds were affected. Median age at onset was 5 years (range, 3 months to 11 years). Reflex seizures were reported as being repeatedly triggered by visits to a veterinary clinic (35/43 dogs), grooming facility (24/43 dogs), or boarding facility (13/43 dogs) and, less commonly, by other situations (eg, pet store or car ride). Over half of the dogs (24/43) had multiple triggers. Eight (19%) dogs had seizures at other times that were not induced by location or a specific situation. A variety of sedatives and maintenance antiepileptic drugs administered to affected dogs failed to prevent the stimulus-specific seizure activity. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of the present study suggested that seizures provoked by specific situations or locations occur in dogs with reflex epilepsy and that common triggers were visits to veterinary and grooming facilities. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the characteristics of reflex epilepsy in dogs and to determine the most effective means to manage these patients.

  20. MicroRNA-132 silencing decreases the spontaneous recurrent seizures

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunyi; Guo, Jing; Wang, Qian; Chen, Yangmei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the role of microRNA-132 in the epileptogenesis. Methods: Antagomir-132 (Ant-132) was used to silence the expression of miR-132 and non-targeting scrambled sequence (Scr) as a control. Rats were randomly divided into ant-132 group and Scr group in which rats were pretreated with An-132 and Scr, respectively, and then induced temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) by Li-Pilo. Behavioral observation was done, and results showed the changes in spontaneous recurrent seizures in the chronic phase between two groups. Bax and Bcl-2 were detected aiming to evaluate the neuronal apoptosis. NPY staining was done to investigate the mossy fiber sprouting (MFS). Golgi staining was used to assess the changes in the dendritic morphology. Results: Our study showed that ant-132 induced miR-132 silencing in rats could increase the on-set epilepsy threshold and suppress the numbers of spontaneous recurrent seizures. The number of apoptotic neurons and MFS reduced after miR-132 silencing. In addition, the dendrites of neurons were highly suppressed in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Conclusions: miR-132 silencing suppresses the spontaneous seizures. The better outcome may result from the neuroprotective effect and the inhibition of MFs-CA3 pathway following miR-132 silencing. Thus, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of anti-epileptic drugs. PMID:25126160

  1. Resetting of brain dynamics: epileptic versus psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balu; Faith, Aaron; Vlachos, Ioannis; Roth, Austin; Williams, Korwyn; Noe, Katie; Drazkowski, Joe; Tapsell, Lisa; Sirven, Joseph; Iasemidis, Leon

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of differential diagnosis of patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) through an advanced analysis of the dynamics of the patients' scalp EEGs. The underlying principle was the presence of resetting of brain's preictal spatiotemporal entrainment following onset of ES and the absence of resetting following PNES. Long-term (days) scalp EEGs recorded from five patients with ES and six patients with PNES were analyzed. It was found that: (1) Preictal entrainment of brain sites was reset at ES (P<0.05) in four of the five patients with ES, and not reset (P=0.28) in the fifth patient. (2) Resetting did not occur (p>0.1) in any of the six patients with PNES. These preliminary results in patients with ES are in agreement with our previous findings from intracranial EEG recordings on resetting of brain dynamics by ES and are expected to constitute the basis for the development of a reliable and supporting tool in the differential diagnosis between ES and PNES. Finally, we believe that these results shed light on the electrophysiology of PNES by showing that occurrence of PNES does not assist patients in overcoming a pathological entrainment of brain dynamics. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  2. Tardive seizure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Adedapo; Adetunji, Babatunde; Odulate, Adeola

    2006-12-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy remains the best option for treatment-resistant depressive episodes. A rare, but potentially dangerous, complication is tardive seizures, which occur after the patient has already stopped convulsing from the electroconvulsive therapy and has recovered full consciousness. We have decided to report this case, which many psychiatrists and psychiatry residents may not be familiar with, to heighten the awareness of the condition because it has ramifications in terms of safe management of the patients concerned.

  3. Neural networks with periodogram and autoregressive spectral analysis methods in detection of epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Kiymik, M Kemal; Subasi, Abdulhamit; Ozcalik, H Riza

    2004-12-01

    Approximately 1% of the people in the world suffer from epilepsy. Careful analyses of the electroencephalograph (EEG) records can provide valuable insight and improved understanding of the mechanisms causing epileptic disorders. Predicting the onset of epileptic seizure is an important and difficult biomedical problem, which has attracted substantial attention of the intelligent computing community over the past two decades. The purpose of this work was to investigate the performance of the periodogram and autoregressive (AR) power spectrum methods to extract classifiable features from human electroencephalogram (EEG) by using artificial neural networks (ANN). The feedforward ANN system was trained and tested with the backpropagation algorithm using a large data set of exemplars. We present a method for the automatic comparison of epileptic seizures in EEG, allowing the grouping of seizures having similar overall patterns. Each channel of the EEG is first broken down into segments having relatively stationary characteristics. Features are then calculated for each segment, and all segments of all channels of the seizures of a patient are grouped into clusters of similar morphology. This clustering allows labeling of every EEG segment. Examples from 5 patients with scalp electrodes illustrate the ability of the method to group seizures of similar morphology. It was observed that ANN classification of EEG signals with AR preprocessing gives better results, and these results can also be used for the deduction of epileptic seizure.

  4. Anticonvulsive effect of vitamin C on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in immature rats.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Misael; Razo-Juárez, León I; Sauer-Ramírez, José L; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Salgado-Ceballos, Hermelinda; Orozco-Suarez, Sandra

    2010-12-01

    Vitamin C helps to prevent brain oxidative stress and participate in the synthesis of progesterone. It also possesses a progesterone-like effect and acts synergistically with progesterone on the brain. Progesterone and its metabolites, but also vitamin C have been associated with anticonvulsant effects. We evaluated the progesterone concentration 30min and 24h after the last administration of vitamin C (500mg/kg, i.p. for five days). We also evaluated how vitamin C altered pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures by measuring the onset latency of seizures, percentage of incidence and mortality as well as amino acid levels after seizures. Vitamin C treatment alone increased basal progesterone concentrations to 531% after 30min compared to 253% after 24h. Furthermore, vitamin C significantly increased the latency to the first myoclonic, clonic and tonic seizure induced by PTZ (80mg/kg, i.p.) and decreased the percentage of incidence of clonic and tonic seizures as well as the mortality rate. Changes in tissue concentration of amino acids were primarily observed at 24h after vitamin C treatment. Our results suggest that vitamin C together with progesterone and/or its metabolites are involved in the protection against PTZ-induced seizures in immature rats.

  5. Measure profile surrogates: A method to validate the performance of epileptic seizure prediction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreuz, Thomas; Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Mormann, Florian; Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Elger, Christian E.; Lehnertz, Klaus; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    In a growing number of publications it is claimed that epileptic seizures can be predicted by analyzing the electroencephalogram (EEG) with different characterizing measures. However, many of these studies suffer from a severe lack of statistical validation. Only rarely are results passed to a statistical test and verified against some null hypothesis H0 in order to quantify their significance. In this paper we propose a method to statistically validate the performance of measures used to predict epileptic seizures. From measure profiles rendered by applying a moving-window technique to the electroencephalogram we first generate an ensemble of surrogates by a constrained randomization using simulated annealing. Subsequently the seizure prediction algorithm is applied to the original measure profile and to the surrogates. If detectable changes before seizure onset exist, highest performance values should be obtained for the original measure profiles and the null hypothesis. “The measure is not suited for seizure prediction” can be rejected. We demonstrate our method by applying two measures of synchronization to a quasicontinuous EEG recording and by evaluating their predictive performance using a straightforward seizure prediction statistics. We would like to stress that the proposed method is rather universal and can be applied to many other prediction and detection problems.

  6. Review of therapeutic options for adjuvant treatment of focal seizures in epilepsy: focus on lacosamide.

    PubMed

    Becerra, Juan Luis; Ojeda, Joaquín; Corredera, Enrique; Ruiz Giménez, Jesús

    2011-12-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common serious neurological conditions worldwide, with an age-adjusted incidence of approximately 50 per 100,000 persons per year in developed countries. Antiepileptic therapy can result in long-term remission in 60-70% of patients, but many patients will require combination treatment to achieve optimal seizure control, as monotherapy is ineffective at controlling seizures in 30-53% of patients. Despite the increase in available treatment options, patient outcomes have not improved significantly and there is still a need for more effective therapies. Drugs used in the treatment of focal-onset seizures are a diverse range of compounds, and in most cases their mechanism of action is unknown or poorly defined. This review discusses the efficacy and safety of the newer adjuvant antiepileptic therapies that may improve outcomes in patients unresponsive to monotherapy, including clobazam, vigabatrin, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, tiagabine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, zonisamide and eslicarbazepine, with focus on lacosamide. Lacosamide has been shown to exert its anticonvulsant effects predominantly by enhancement of the slow inactivation of voltage-gated sodium channels. Lacosamide is indicated for use as adjuvant treatment of focal-onset seizures in patients with epilepsy, and there is some evidence that it may also be of use in patients with status epilepticus and cancer patients with epilepsy. The efficacy of lacosamide has been assessed in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials, all of which have shown lacosamide to be effective at reducing seizure frequency and increasing 50% responder rates in patients with focal-onset seizures. Long-term lacosamide treatment is generally well tolerated and is not associated with significant drug interactions; the availability of an intravenous form of the drug also makes it particularly useful for a broad range of patients.

  7. Role of CA3 theta-modulated interneurons during the transition to spontaneous seizures.

    PubMed

    Karunakaran, Suganya; Grasse, Dane W; Moxon, Karen A

    2016-09-01

    Multiple studies have observed heterogeneous neuronal firing patterns as a local network transitions to spontaneous seizures. We demonstrated that separately examining interneurons and pyramidal cells during this transition in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy elucidates some of this heterogeneity. Recently, it was demonstrated that classifying cells into specific theta-related subtypes further clarified the heterogeneity. Moreover, changes in neuronal synchrony with the local field potential were identified and determined to be specific to interneurons during the transition to seizures. To extend our understanding of the chronic changes in epileptic networks, we examined field potentials and single neuron activity in the CA3 hippocampus of pilocarpine-treated rats during interictal periods and compared these to neuronal activity in healthy controls and during preictal periods. Neurons were classified into theta-subtypes based on changes in firing patterns during theta periods. As previously reported, we find a high probability of theta oscillations before seizure onset and a selective increase in theta-on interneuron firing rate immediately preceding seizure onset. However, we also find overall slower theta rhythm and a general decrease in subtype-specific firing during interictal periods compared to that in control animals. The decrease in subtype specific interneuron activity is accompanied by increases in synchrony. Exceptionally, theta-on interneurons, that selectively increase their firing rate at seizure onset, maintain similar firing rates and synchrony as controls during interictal period. These data suggest that increased synchrony during interictal periods may compensate for low firing rates creating instability during theta that is prone to seizure initiation via a transition to hyper-synchronous activation of theta-on interneurons.

  8. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording.

  9. Impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve in seizure patients with brain arteriovenous malformations.

    PubMed

    Fierstra, Jorn; Conklin, John; Krings, Timo; Slessarev, Marat; Han, Jay S; Fisher, Joseph A; Terbrugge, Karel; Wallace, M Christopher; Tymianski, Michael; Mikulis, David J

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are a common presentation in patients with newly diagnosed brain arteriovenous malformations, but the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the seizures remain poorly understood. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity mapping and conventional angiography to determine whether seizure-prone patients with brain arteriovenous malformations exhibit impaired cerebrovascular reserve or morphological angiographic features predictive of seizures. Twenty consecutive patients with untreated brain arteriovenous malformations were recruited (10 with and 10 without epileptic seizures) along with 12 age-matched healthy controls. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI was performed while applying iso-oxic step changes in end-tidal partial pressure of CO(2) to obtain quantitative cerebrovascular reactivity measurements. The brain arteriovenous malformation morphology was evaluated by angiography, to determine to what extent limitations of arterial blood supply or the presence of restricted venous outflow and tissue congestion correlated with seizure susceptibility. Only patients with seizures exhibited impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reactivity by magnetic resonance imaging (0.11 ± 0.10 versus 0.25 ± 0.07, respectively; P < 0.001) and venous drainage patterns suggestive of tissue congestion on angiography. However, cerebrovascular reactivity changes were not of a magnitude suggestive of arterial steal, and were probably compatible with venous congestion in aetiology. Our findings demonstrate a strong association between impaired peri-nidal cerebrovascular reserve and epileptic seizure presentation in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation. The impaired cerebrovascular reserve may be associated with venous congestion. Quantitative measurements of cerebrovascular reactivity using blood oxygen level-dependent MRI appear to correlate with seizure susceptibility in patients with brain arteriovenous malformation.

  10. Seizure related accidents and injuries in childhood.

    PubMed

    Buffo, Thais Helena; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Tai, Peter; Montenegro, Maria Augusta

    2008-09-01

    Several studies show that the risk of accidents involving patients with epilepsy is much higher compared to the general population. The objective of this study was to identify the frequency and type of seizure related injuries in children diagnosed with epilepsy. In addition we also assessed possible risk factors associated with this seizure related accidents in childhood. This study was conducted at the pediatric epilepsy clinic of Unicamp, from January 2005 to August 2006. We evaluated 100 consecutive children with epilepsy. Parents were interviewed by one of the authors using a structured questionnaire that included questions about seizure related accidents and related injuries. Forty-four patients reported seizure related accidents. Eighteen patients needed medical assistance at an emergency room due the severity of their seizure related accident. Forty patients reported having a seizure related accident prevented by a bystander. Another 14 patients reported avoiding a seizure related accident by luck alone. Contusions and lacerations were the most common type of lesion associated with seizures. Patients with symptomatic/probable symptomatic epilepsy and those using higher numbers of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) were at greater risk for seizure related accidents (p<0.05). We conclude that patients with symptomatic/probable symptomatic epilepsy and on multiple AEDs are at increased risk of seizure related accidents. Parents and caretakers should be even more cautious about risk of injury in such patients.

  11. Hypothalamic hamartoma, precocious puberty and gelastic seizures: a special model of "epileptic" developmental disorder.

    PubMed

    Deonna, T; Ziegler, A L

    2000-03-01

    Based on a review of the literature and a detailed longitudinal single case study of a child with early onset gelastic seizures and hypothalamic hamartoma, the authors review the arguments suggesting that the acquired cognitive and behavioral symptoms seen in the majority of cases of this special epileptic syndrome result from a direct effect of the seizures. The early neurobehavioral profile of the case presented in this paper and that of a previous study is particular and combines features of a pervasive developmental and an attention deficit disorder which are probably closely related to the particular location of the epilepsy and its spread from the hypothalamus.

  12. Brain on FIRES: Super Refractory Seizure in a 7 yr Old Boy

    PubMed Central

    Tavasoli, Alireza; GHARIB, Behdad; ALIZADEH, Houman; FARSHADMOGHADDAM, Hossein; MEMARIAN, Sara; ASHRAFI, Mahmoodreza; SHARIFZADE, Meisam

    2016-01-01

    We present a 7 yr old boy afflicted with super-refractory seizure that responded poorly to antiepileptic drugs and sustained a long course of hospitalization and complications of high doses of medications as well as longstanding stay in hospital. The differential diagnoses were, fever-induced refractory epileptic encephalopathy (FIRES), and infectious and autoimmune encephalitis. However, work-ups had not revealed any evidence of any specific diagnosis, so we assumed that he was afflicted by viral infectious encephalitis as he had, fever, vomiting, and prodromal symptoms of infectious (most probably viral) disease prior to onset of the seizure attacks. PMID:27843471

  13. Sequential intrarectal diazepam and intravenous levetiracetam in treating acute repetitive and prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Modur, Pradeep N; Milteer, Warren E; Zhang, Song

    2010-06-01

    In this retrospective study of institutionalized patients with mental retardation, we present the efficacy and safety of sequential treatment with intrarectal diazepam (IRD) gel (Diastat) and intravenous levetiracetam (IVL) in comparison with either treatment alone for acute repetitive or prolonged seizures (ARPS). We defined ARPS as >or=3 seizures of any type within 1 h or a single seizure of any type lasting >or=3 min. Eighty-eight ARPS episodes were treated in 25 patients (14 female, age 21-72 years), with mainly symptomatic generalized epilepsy. There were no adverse events directly attributable to the administration of IRD or IVL. Seizure recurrence within 4 h of treatment, the primary outcome measure, was significantly lower after combined sequential IRD + IVL treatment (3 of 36) compared to IRD alone (6 of 24, p = 0.048) or IVL alone (10 of 28, p = 0.039). There was no statistically significant difference between the individual IRD and IVL treatments (p = 0.604). The estimated odds ratio (OR) indicated that the risk of seizure recurrence was higher after IRD or IVL monotherapy compared to combined IRD + IVL treatment. Subsequent emergency room (ER) transfers following seizure recurrence were least likely after IVL treatment (10%) compared to combined IRD + IVL (67%) or IRD (83%) treatment. These findings suggest that although IRD or IVL monotherapy is efficacious, the combination is superior in controlling ARPS in this special group of institutionalized patients. In addition, we speculate that a more reliable onset of action after IVL treatment results in rapid seizure control and fewer ER transfers, despite seizure recurrence.

  14. Toward a probabilistic definition of seizures.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan; Lyubushin, Alexey; Sornette, Didier

    2011-12-01

    This writing (1) draws attention to the intricacies inherent to the pursuit of a universal seizure definition even when powerful, well-understood signal analysis methods are used to this end; (2) identifies this aim as a multi-objective optimization problem and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of adopting or rejecting a unitary seizure definition; and (3) introduces a probabilistic measure of seizure activity to manage this thorny issue. The challenges posed by the attempt to define seizures unitarily may be partly related to their fractal properties and understood through a simplistic analogy to the so-called "Richardson effect." A revision of the time-honored conceptualization of seizures may be warranted to further advance epileptology. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction.

  15. Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside

    PubMed Central

    Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Tanno, Luciana Kase; Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Motta, Antôno Abílio; Kalil, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption. Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds) or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert. PMID:19707540

  16. TONIC INFLUENCE OF NEOCORTEX ON HIPPOCAMPAL SEIZURES.

    PubMed

    Saralidze, E; Khuchua, L; Kobaidze, I

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between different brain structures could be crucial to predicting seizure occurrence, threshold and spread. Moreover, the sleep-wake cycle and electrical activity of brain structures in different phases of sleep could significantly affect the pattern and extent of seizure spread, and therefore the characteristics of epileptic activity. In this animal model using 15 Wistar rats, we show that the duration of hippocampal seizures, induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus, is significantly increased during slow sleep. Moreover, decreasing the electrical activity of the neocortex by cooling of the cortical surface or induction of cortical spreading depression also caused an increase in hippocampal seizure duration. Conversely, warming the cortical surface triggered a remission in spreading depression, in turn restoring the duration of epileptic episodes. Our data suggest that the neocortex probably exerts a tonic inhibitory influence on hippocampal seizures. Thus, cortico-hippocampal interaction could be an important component in the manifestation and generalization of limbic seizures.

  17. A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures.

    PubMed

    Di Vito, Lidia; Naldi, Ilaria; Mostacci, Barbara; Licchetta, Laura; Bisulli, Francesca; Tinuper, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a dog reacting to its owner's seizure.

  18. Focal Seizures Induced by Intracranial Electroencephalogram Grids

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mesha-Gay; Litt, Brian; Davis, Kathryn; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a unique, but important seizure variant directly related to placement of subdural grids. Two distinct epileptogenic zones were identified, one which correlated with the patient’s baseline seizures and a separate zone associated with atypical semiology and localization. Inspection of this zone at surgery revealed cortical deformation from the grid itself. The patient underwent successful surgical resection of the primary epileptogenic zone, but not that of the atypical zone. She remains seizure free at two years following surgery. Recognition of grid-induced seizures is important as they may confound the interpretation of intracranial electroencephalograms (iEEG) and mislead resective surgery. PMID:27896038

  19. Cellular and network mechanisms of electrographic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor; Fröhlich, Flavio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2008-01-01

    Epileptic seizures constitute a complex multiscale phenomenon that is characterized by synchronized hyperexcitation of neurons in neuronal networks. Recent progress in understanding pathological seizure dynamics provides crucial insights into underlying mechanisms and possible new avenues for the development of novel treatment modalities. Here we review some recent work that combines in vivo experiments and computational modeling to unravel the pathophysiology of seizures of cortical origin. We particularly focus on how activity-dependent changes in extracellular potassium concentration affects the intrinsic dynamics of neurons involved in cortical seizures characterized by spike/wave complexes and fast runs. PMID:19190736

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  1. Nonepileptic seizures treatment workshop summary☆

    PubMed Central

    LaFrance, W. Curt; Alper, Kenneth; Babcock, Debra; Barry, John J.; Benbadis, Selim; Caplan, Rochelle; Gates, John; Jacobs, Margaret; Kanner, Andres; Martin, Roy; Rundhaugen, Lynn; Stewart, Randy; Vert, Christina

    2009-01-01

    In May 2005, an international, interdisciplinary group of researchers gathered in Bethesda, MD, USA, for a workshop to discuss the development of treatments for patients with nonepileptic seizures (NES). Specific subgroup topics that were covered included: pediatric NES; presenting the diagnosis of NES, outcome measures for NES trials; classification of NES subtypes; and pharmacological treatment approaches and psychotherapies. The intent was to develop specific research strategies that can be expanded to involve a large segment of the epilepsy and psychiatric treatment communities. Various projects have resulted from the workshop, including the initial development of a prospective randomized clinical trial for NES. PMID:16540377

  2. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  3. Psychomotor seizures, Penfield, Gibbs, Bailey and the development of anterior temporal lobectomy: A historical vignette

    PubMed Central

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Stone, James L.; Vannemreddy, Siddharth; Slavin, Konstantin V.

    2010-01-01

    Psychomotor seizures, referred to as limbic or partial complex seizures, have had an interesting evolution in diagnosis and treatment. Hughlings Jackson was the first to clearly relate the clinical syndrome and likely etiology to lesions in the uncinate region of the medial temporal lobe. With the application of electroencephalography (EEG) to the study of human epilepsy as early as 1934 by Gibbs, Lennox, and Davis in Boston, electrical recordings have significantly advanced the study of epilepsy. In 1937, Gibbs and Lennox proposed the term "psychomotor epilepsy" to describe a characteristic EEG pattern of seizures accompanied by mental, emotional, motor, and autonomic phenomena. Concurrently, typical psychomotor auras and dreamy states were produced by electrical stimulation of medial temporal structures during epilepsy surgery by Penfield in Montreal. In 1937, Jasper joined Penfield, EEG was introduced and negative surgical explorations became less frequent. Nevertheless, Penfield preferred to operate only on space occupying lesions. A milestone in psychomotor seizure diagnosis was in the year 1946 when Gibbs, at the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute, Chicago, reported that the patient falling asleep during EEG was a major activator of the psychomotor discharges and electrographic ictal episodes becoming more prominently recorded. Working with Percival Bailey, Gibbs was proactive in applying EEG to define surgical excision of the focus in patients with intractable psychomotor seizures. By early 1950s, the Montreal group began to clearly delineate causative medial temporal lesions such as hippocampal sclerosis and tumors in the production of psychomotor seizures. PMID:20814492

  4. Evaluation of levetiracetam effects on pilocarpine-induced seizures: cholinergic muscarinic system involvement.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A A; Nogueira, C R A; Nascimento, V S; Aguiar, L M V; Freitas, R M; Sousa, F C F; Viana, G S B; Fonteles, M M F

    2005-09-16

    Levetiracetam (LEV) is a new antiepileptic drug effective as adjunctive therapy for partial seizures. It displays a unique pharmacological profile against experimental models of seizures, including pilocarpine-induced seizures in rodents. Aiming to clarify if anticonvulsant activity of LEV occurs due to cholinergic alterations, adult male mice received LEV injections before cholinergic agonists' administration. Pretreatment with LEV (30-200 mg/kg, i.p.) increased the latencies of seizures, but decreased status epilepticus and death on the seizure model induced by pilocarpine, 400 mg/kg, s.c. (P400). LEV (LEV200, 200 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment also reduced the intensity of tremors induced by oxotremorine (0.5 mg/kg, i.p). [3H]-N-methylscopolamine-binding assays in mice hippocampus showed that LEV200 pretreatment reverts the downregulation on muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR), induced by P400 administration, bringing back these density values to control ones (0.9% NaCl, i.p.). However, subtype-specific-binding assays revealed that P400- and LEV-alone treatments result in M1 and M2 subtypes decrease, respectively. The agonist-like behavior of LEV on the inhibitory M2 mAChR subtype, observed in this work, could contribute to explain the reduction on oxotremorine-induced tremors and the delay on pilocarpine-induced seizures, by an increase in the attenuation of neuronal activity mediated by the M1 receptors.

  5. Seizure reporting technologies for epilepsy treatment: A review of clinical information needs and supporting technologies.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Jonathan; Khuwatsamrit, Thanin; Askew, Brittain; Ehrenberg, Joshua Andrew; Helmers, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    This review surveys current seizure detection and classification technologies as they relate to aiding clinical decision-making during epilepsy treatment. Interviews and data collected from neurologists and a literature review highlighted a strong need for better distinguishing between patients exhibiting generalized and partial seizure types as well as achieving more accurate seizure counts. This information is critical for enabling neurologists to select the correct class of antiepileptic drugs (AED) for their patients and evaluating AED efficiency during long-term treatment. In our questionnaire, 100% of neurologists reported they would like to have video from patients prior to selecting an AED during an initial consultation. Presently, only 30% have access to video. In our technology review we identified that only a subset of available technologies surpassed patient self-reporting performance due to high false positive rates. Inertial seizure detection devices coupled with video capture for recording seizures at night could stand to address collecting seizure counts that are more accurate than current patient self-reporting during day and night time use.

  6. Wavelet-based texture analysis of EEG signal for prediction of epileptic seizure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Arthur A.; Homan, Richard; Pemmaraju, Suryalakshmi; Mitra, Sunanda

    1995-09-01

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) signal texture content analysis has been proposed for early warning of an epileptic seizure. This approach was evaluated by investigating the interrelationship between texture features and basic signal informational characteristics, such as Kolmogorov complexity and fractal dimension. The comparison of several traditional techniques, including higher-order FIR digital filtering, chaos, autoregressive and FFT time- frequency analysis was also carried out on the same epileptic EEG recording. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether wavelet transform can be used to further enhance the developed methods for prediction of epileptic seizures. The combined consideration of texture and entropy characteristics extracted from subsignals decomposed by wavelet transform are explored for that purpose. Yet, the novel neuro-fuzzy clustering algorithm is performed on wavelet coefficients to segment given EEG recording into different stages prior to an actual seizure onset.

  7. The anticholinergic and antiglutamatergic drug caramiphen reduces seizure duration in soman-exposed rats: Synergism with the benzodiazepine diazepam

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, M.K.; Wright, L.K.M.; Stone, M.F.; Schwartz, J.E.; Kelley, N.R.; Moffett, M.C.; Lee, R.B.; Lumley, L.A.

    2012-03-15

    Therapy of seizure activity following exposure to the nerve agent soman (GD) includes treatment with the anticonvulsant diazepam (DZP), an allosteric modulator of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABA{sub A}) receptors. However, seizure activity itself causes the endocytosis of GABA{sub A} receptors and diminishes the inhibitory effects of GABA, thereby reducing the efficacy of DZP. Treatment with an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist prevents this reduction in GABAergic inhibition. We examined the efficacy of the NMDA receptor antagonist caramiphen edisylate (CED; 20 mg/kg, im) and DZP (10 mg/kg, sc), administered both separately and in combination, at 10, 20 or 30 min following seizure onset for attenuation of the deleterious effects associated with GD exposure (1.2 LD{sub 50}; 132 μg/kg, sc) in rats. Outcomes evaluated were seizure duration, neuropathology, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, body weight, and temperature. We also examined the use of the reversible AChE inhibitor physostigmine (PHY; 0.2 mg/kg, im) as a therapy for GD exposure. We found that the combination of CED and DZP yielded a synergistic effect, shortening seizure durations and reducing neuropathology compared to DZP alone, when treatment was delayed 20–30 min after seizure onset. PHY reduced the number of animals that developed seizures, protected a fraction of AChE from GD inhibition, and attenuated post-exposure body weight and temperature loss independent of CED and/or DZP treatment. We conclude that: 1) CED and DZP treatment offers considerable protection against the effects of GD and 2) PHY is a potential therapeutic option following GD exposure, albeit with a limited window of opportunity. -- Highlights: ► Soman (GD) produced seizure activity resulting in neuropathology in rats. ► Tx: caramiphen (CED) and/or diazepam (DZP) @ 10, 20 or 30 min after seizure onset. ► CED/DZP showed superior anticonvulsant and neuroprotective capacity. ► Physostigmine (PHY) was

  8. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Street drugs, such as angel dust (PCP), cocaine, amphetamines Stroke Toxemia of pregnancy Toxin buildup in the ... Tests that may be ordered include: Blood tests CT scan of the head or MRI of the ...

  9. Orexin Receptor Antagonism Improves Sleep and Reduces Seizures in Kcna1-null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Roundtree, Harrison M.; Simeone, Timothy A.; Johnson, Chaz; Matthews, Stephanie A.; Samson, Kaeli K.; Simeone, Kristina A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: Comorbid sleep disorders occur in approximately one-third of people with epilepsy. Seizures and sleep disorders have an interdependent relationship where the occurrence of one can exacerbate the other. Orexin, a wake-promoting neuropeptide, is associated with sleep disorder symptoms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that orexin dysregulation plays a role in the comorbid sleep disorder symptoms in the Kcna1-null mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Methods: Rest-activity was assessed using infrared beam actigraphy. Sleep architecture and seizures were assessed using continuous video-electroencephalography-electromyography recordings in Kcna1-null mice treated with vehicle or the dual orexin receptor antagonist, almorexant (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). Orexin levels in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical region (LH/P) and hypothalamic pathology were assessed with immunohistochemistry and oxygen polarography. Results: Kcna1-null mice have increased latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep onset, sleep fragmentation, and number of wake epochs. The numbers of REM and non-REM (NREM) sleep epochs are significantly reduced in Kcna1-null mice. Severe seizures propagate to the wake-promoting LH/P where injury is apparent (indicated by astrogliosis, blood-brain barrier permeability, and impaired mitochondrial function). The number of orexin-positive neurons is increased in the LH/P compared to wild-type LH/P. Treatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist significantly increases the number and duration of NREM sleep epochs and reduces the latency to REM sleep onset. Further, almorexant treatment reduces the incidence of severe seizures and overall seizure burden. Interestingly, we report a significant positive correlation between latency to REM onset and seizure burden in Kcna1-null mice. Conclusion: Dual orexin receptor antagonists may be an effective sleeping aid in epilepsy, and warrants further study on their somnogenic and ant-seizure effects in

  10. NEUROCYSTICERCOSIS IN CHILDREN PRESENTING WITH AFEBRILE SEIZURE: CLINICAL PROFILE, IMAGING AND SERODIAGNOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Priyadarshi Soumyaranjan; Seepana, Jyotsna; Padela, Sudarsini; Sahu, Abani Kanta; Subbarayudu, Swarna; Barua, Ankur

    2014-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is one of the major causes of childhood seizures in developing countries including India and Latin America. In this study neurological pediatric cases presenting with afebrile seizures were screened for anti-Cysticercus antibodies (IgG) in their sera in order to estimate the possible burden of cysticercal etiology. The study included a total of 61 pediatric afebrile seizure subjects (aged one to 15 years old); there was a male predominance. All the sera were tested using a pre-evaluated commercially procured IgG-ELISA kit (UB-Magiwell Cysticercosis Kit ™). Anti-Cysticercus antibody in serum was positive in 23 of 61 (37.7%) cases. The majority of cases with a positive ELISA test presented with generalized seizure (52.17%), followed by complex partial seizure (26.08%), and simple partial seizure (21.73%). Headaches were the major complaint (73.91%). Other presentations were vomiting (47.82%), pallor (34.78%), altered sensorium (26.08%), and muscle weakness (13.04%). There was one hemiparesis case diagnosed to be NCC. In this study one child without any significant findings on imaging was also found to be positive by serology. There was a statistically significant association found between the cases with multiple lesions on the brain and the ELISA-positivity (p = 0.017). Overall positivity of the ELISA showed a potential cysticercal etiology. Hence, neurocysticercosis should be suspected in every child presenting with afebrile seizure especially with a radio-imaging supportive diagnosis in tropical developing countries or areas endemic for taeniasis/cysticercosis. PMID:24879004

  11. Treatment of drug-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yi; Albertson, Timothy E; Olson, Kent R

    2016-03-01

    Seizures are a common complication of drug intoxication, and up to 9% of status epilepticus cases are caused by a drug or poison. While the specific drugs associated with drug-induced seizures may vary by geography and change over time, common reported causes include antidepressants, stimulants and antihistamines. Seizures occur generally as a result of inadequate inhibitory influences (e.g., gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA) or excessive excitatory stimulation (e.g. glutamate) although many other neurotransmitters play a role. Most drug-induced seizures are self-limited. However, status epilepticus occurs in up to 10% of cases. Prolonged or recurrent seizures can lead to serious complications and require vigorous supportive care and anticonvulsant drugs. Benzodiazepines are generally accepted as the first line anticonvulsant therapy for drug-induced seizures. If benzodiazepines fail to halt seizures promptly, second line drugs include barbiturates and propofol. If isoniazid poisoning is a possibility, pyridoxine is given. Continuous infusion of one or more anticonvulsants may be required in refractory status epilepticus. There is no role for phenytoin in the treatment of drug-induced seizures. The potential role of ketamine and levetiracetam is promising but not established.

  12. Search and Seizure in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

  13. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Epilepsy (PACE) practice guideline for the long-term management of the http://www.paceusa.org child with ... on Quality Improvement and tensen J. The long-term risk of epilepsy after febrile seizures in Management SboFSAAoP. Febrile seizures: clinical susceptible subgroups. Am J ...

  14. Oxygen and seizure dynamics: II. Computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yina; Ullah, Ghanim; Ingram, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings show intense neuronal firing during epileptic seizures leading to enhanced energy consumption. However, the relationship between oxygen metabolism and seizure patterns has not been well studied. Recent studies have developed fast and quantitative techniques to measure oxygen microdomain concentration during seizure events. In this article, we develop a biophysical model that accounts for these experimental observations. The model is an extension of the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism and includes the neuronal microenvironment dynamics of sodium, potassium, and oxygen concentrations. Our model accounts for metabolic energy consumption during and following seizure events. We can further account for the experimental observation that hypoxia can induce seizures, with seizures occurring only within a narrow range of tissue oxygen pressure. We also reproduce the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory neurons seen in experiments, accounting for the different oxygen levels observed during seizures in excitatory vs. inhibitory cell layers. Our findings offer a more comprehensive understanding of the complex interrelationship among seizures, ion dynamics, and energy metabolism. PMID:24671540

  15. Adult-onset NREM parasomnia with hypnopompic hallucinatory pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mantoan, Laura; Eriksson, Sofia H; Nisbet, Angus P; Walker, Matthew C

    2013-02-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old woman presenting with nocturnal episodes of pain and screaming during sleep starting at age 30. There was no childhood or family history of parasomnia. The events had gradually become more frequent over the years, occurring in the first half of the night within 2 h of sleep onset. There were no triggers, and she had partial amnesia for the events. A diagnosis of adult-onset sleep terrors was made on clinical grounds and supported polysomnographically. Seizures and periodic limb movements were excluded as triggering factors. There was some mild sleep disordered breathing (predominantly non-desaturating hypopnea with a propensity for REM sleep of debatable significance). Imaging of the brain and spine and neurophysiological investigations ruled out lesions, entrapments, or neuropathies as possible causes of pain. Treatment (clonazepam, paroxetine, or gabapentin) was poorly tolerated and made no difference to the nocturnal episodes, while trazodone worsened them. This is the first report of hypnopompic psychic pain in association with a NREM parasomnia. We hypothesize that the pain may represent a sensory hallucination analogous to the more commonly recognized visual NREM parasomnia-associated hypnopompic visual hallucinations and that, as such, it may arise during arousal of the sensory neocortex as confabulatory response.

  16. Preictal dynamics of EEG complexity in intracranially recorded epileptic seizure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bob, Petr; Roman, Robert; Svetlak, Miroslav; Kukleta, Miloslav; Chladek, Jan; Brazdil, Milan

    2014-11-01

    Recent findings suggest that neural complexity reflecting a number of independent processes in the brain may characterize typical changes during epileptic seizures and may enable to describe preictal dynamics. With respect to previously reported findings suggesting specific changes in neural complexity during preictal period, we have used measure of pointwise correlation dimension (PD2) as a sensitive indicator of nonstationary changes in complexity of the electroencephalogram (EEG) signal. Although this measure of complexity in epileptic patients was previously reported by Feucht et al (Applications of correlation dimension and pointwise dimension for non-linear topographical analysis of focal onset seizures. Med Biol Comput. 1999;37:208-217), it was not used to study changes in preictal dynamics. With this aim to study preictal changes of EEG complexity, we have examined signals from 11 multicontact depth (intracerebral) EEG electrodes located in 108 cortical and subcortical brain sites, and from 3 scalp EEG electrodes in a patient with intractable epilepsy, who underwent preoperative evaluation before epilepsy surgery. From those 108 EEG contacts, records related to 44 electrode contacts implanted into lesional structures and white matter were not included into the experimental analysis.The results show that in comparison to interictal period (at about 8-6 minutes before seizure onset), there was a statistically significant decrease in PD2 complexity in the preictal period at about 2 minutes before seizure onset in all 64 intracranial channels localized in various brain sites that were included into the analysis and in 3 scalp EEG channels as well. Presented results suggest that using PD2 in EEG analysis may have significant implications for research of preictal dynamics and prediction of epileptic seizures.

  17. Gelastic seizures misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Laura L; Ng, Yu-Tze; Kerrigan, John F

    2007-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can have variable manifestations including regurgitation, irritability, arching, choking, and apnea. The disorder is also frequently mistaken for seizures (Sandifer syndrome). We report 6 patients in whom the opposite phenomenon occurred: their seizures were mistaken for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Six of 77 patients (6.8%) with gelastic seizures and epilepsy symptomatic of hypothalamic hamartomas were noted to be misdiagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease in infancy. As is typical in these patients, gelastic seizures were not diagnosed until months, or often years, later. Delayed diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartomas can lead to a potentially deleterious syndrome involving refractory epilepsy, developmental problems, and precocious puberty. Gelastic seizures should be considered among the conditions that can mimic reflux symptoms.

  18. Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.

    PubMed

    Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

    2011-09-01

    An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue.

  19. Description of Ictal HFO Mapping in Patients with Both Temporal and Extratemporal Seizure Focus

    PubMed Central

    Rusyniak, Walter G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Review presurgical use of ictal HFO mapping to detect ictal activation areas with dual seizure focus in both the temporal and extratemporal cortex. Methods. Review of consecutive patients admitted to the University of South Alabama Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (SouthCEP) between January 2014 and October 2015, with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy and intracranial electrode recording. Ictal HFO localization was displayed in 3D reconstructed brain images using the patient's own coregistered magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) with the implanted electrodes. Results. Four of fifteen patients showed evidence of extratemporal involvement at the onset of the clinical seizures. Ictal HFO mapping involving both frontal and temporal lobe changed the surgical resection areas in three patients where the initial surgical plan included only the temporal lobe. Resection of the ictal HFO at the onset of the seizure and the initial propagation region was associated with seizure freedom in all patients; follow-up period ranged from 12 to 25 months. Significance. Extratemporal ictal involvement may not have clinical manifestations and may account for surgical failure in temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal HFO mapping is useful to define the ictal cortical network and may help detect an extratemporal focus. PMID:28018675

  20. AMPA Receptor Antagonist NBQX Decreased Seizures by Normalization of Perineuronal Nets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen; Li, Yan-Shuang; Gao, Jing; Lin, Xiao-Ying; Li, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a serious brain disorder with diverse seizure types and epileptic syndromes. AMPA receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzoquinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) attenuates spontaneous recurrent seizures in rats. However, the anti-epileptic effect of NBQX in chronic epilepsy model is poorly understood. Perineuronal nets (PNNs), specialized extracellular matrix structures, surround parvalbumin-positive inhibitory interneurons, and play a critical role in neuronal cell development and synaptic plasticity. Here, we focused on the potential involvement of PNNs in the treatment of epilepsy by NBQX. Rats were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ, 50 mg/kg) for 28 consecutive days to establish chronic epilepsy models. Subsequently, NBQX (20 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected for 3 days for the observation of behavioral measurements of epilepsy. The Wisteria floribundi agglutinin (WFA)-labeled PNNs were measured by immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the PNNs. The levels of three components of PNNs such as tenascin-R, aggrecan and neurocan were assayed by Western blot assay. The results showed that there are reduction of PNNs and decrease of tenascin-R, aggrecan and neurocan in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in the rats injected with PTZ. However, NBQX treatment normalized PNNs, tenascin-R, aggrecan and neurocan levels. NBQX was sufficient to decrease seizures through increasing the latency to seizures, decrease the duration of seizure onset, and reduce the scores for the severity of seizures. Furthermore, the degradation of mPFC PNNs by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) exacerbated seizures in PTZ-treated rats. Finally, the anti-epileptic effect of NBQX was reversed by pretreatment with ChABC into mPFC. These findings revealed that PNNs degradation in mPFC is involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and enhancement of PNNs may be effective for the treatment of epilepsy. PMID:27880801

  1. Erdosteine ameliorates PTZ-induced oxidative stress in mice seizure model.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Atilla; Aladag, M Arif; Kocer, Abdulkadir; Boluk, Ayhan; Gurel, Ahmet; Armutcu, Ferah

    2005-05-30

    The role of oxygen-derived free radicals has been suggested in genesis of epilepsy and in the post seizure neuronal death. The aim of this study was to investigate whether erdosteine has a preventive effect against epilepsy and postepileptic oxidative stress. The mice (n=27) were divided into three groups: (i) PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (n=9); (ii) PTZ-induced-epilepsy+erdosteine group (n=9); (iii) control group (n=9). The animals were observed for a period of 30 min for latency to first seizure onset, total seizure duration, the number of seizure episodes. Then they were sacrificed and the brains were quickly removed, and frozen for biochemical analysis. Malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) activities were carried out in the brain tissue. The latent period between PTZ induction and seizure are longer in the PTZ+erdosteine group than in PTZ-induced-epilepsy group (P<0.05). Biochemical analyses of brain tissue, revealed a significant increase in the MDA, XO and NO levels in the PTZ group according to erdosteine group. SOD level did not change in this group. While MDA and XO levels are significantly lower, SOD level is significantly higher in the PTZ+erdosteine group compared to PTZ and control groups (P<0.01). The present study demonstrated that erdosteine treatment both may increase latent interval between seizures and may decrease oxidative stress, thus may ameliorate neuronal death in brain during seizures. It may be used as an adjunct therapy in epilepsy.

  2. Epileptic Seizure Prediction by a System of Particle Filter Associated with a Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Pang, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhuo

    2009-12-01

    None of the current epileptic seizure prediction methods can widely be accepted, due to their poor consistency in performance. In this work, we have developed a novel approach to analyze intracranial EEG data. The energy of the frequency band of 4-12 Hz is obtained by wavelet transform. A dynamic model is introduced to describe the process and a hidden variable is included. The hidden variable can be considered as indicator of seizure activities. The method of particle filter associated with a neural network is used to calculate the hidden variable. Six patients' intracranial EEG data are used to test our algorithm including 39 hours of ictal EEG with 22 seizures and 70 hours of normal EEG recordings. The minimum least square error algorithm is applied to determine optimal parameters in the model adaptively. The results show that our algorithm can successfully predict 15 out of 16 seizures and the average prediction time is 38.5 minutes before seizure onset. The sensitivity is about 93.75% and the specificity (false prediction rate) is approximately 0.09 FP/h. A random predictor is used to calculate the sensitivity under significance level of 5%. Compared to the random predictor, our method achieved much better performance.

  3. An incident case-referent study of epileptic seizures in adults.

    PubMed

    Forsgren, L; Nyström, L

    1990-01-01

    An epidemiological community-based study of incident cases with non-provoked epileptic seizures, using case-referent methodology, was carried out to explore possible risk factors for epileptic seizures. 83 cases, between 17 and 74 years of age, of whom 67.4% had seizures of localized onset, were compared with 2 age- and sex-matched referents. Higher birth weight, movement disabilities, mental retardation, head trauma, brain tumor, depression, a period of unemployment during the previous 6 months and a history of epilepsy in relatives were more common in cases than in referent subjects. No difference was found in the socioeconomic factors investigated, except that the cases belonged to smaller households. Prematurity, home or hospital birth, parents' age at birth of cases or referents, febrile convulsions in relatives, various infections including meningitis and encephalitis, cerebrovascular disease, and alcohol, tobacco, sleep and nutritional habits were not found to be associated with development of seizures. The recent life events investigated, at home or at work, occurred as often in cases as in referents, except that significantly fewer cases had received any increase in salary during the last 6 months. The relationship between depression and development of seizures should be explored further. Moreover, the possibility of false negative results should be considered because of the sample size.

  4. Taenia solium Cysticercosis Hotspots Surrounding Tapeworm Carriers: Clustering on Human Seroprevalence but Not on Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Lescano, Andres G.; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Villaran, Manuel V.; Montano, Silvia M.; Gonzalez, Armando E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Neurocysticercosis accounts for 30%–50% of all late-onset epilepsy in endemic countries. We assessed the clustering patterns of Taenia solium human cysticercosis seropositivity and seizures around tapeworm carriers in seven rural communities in Peru. Methodology The presence of T. solium–specific antibodies was defined as one or more positive bands in the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB). Neurocysticercosis-related seizures cases were diagnosed clinically and had positive neuroimaging or EITB. Principal Findings Eleven tapeworm carriers were identified by stool microscopy. The seroprevalence of human cysticercosis was 24% (196/803). Seroprevalence was 21% >50 m from a carrier and increased to 32% at 1–50 m (p = 0.047), and from that distance seroprevalence had another significant increase to 64% at the homes of carriers (p = 0.004). Seizure prevalence was 3.0% (25/837) but there were no differences between any pair of distance ranges (p = 0.629, Wald test 2 degrees of freedom). Conclusion/Significance We observed a significant human cysticercosis seroprevalence gradient surrounding current tapeworm carriers, although cysticercosis-related seizures did not cluster around carriers. Due to differences in the timing of the two outcomes, seroprevalence may reflect recent T. solium exposure more accurately than seizure frequency. PMID:19172178

  5. Neuroimaging predictors of AED resistance in new-onset epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Cendes, Fernando

    2011-07-01

    The best prognostic factors in early-onset epilepsies are the response to the first antiepileptic drug (AED) trial, age at seizure onset, number of seizures prior to treatment, and the presence of a lesion or abnormal neurologic examination. However, early and adequate response to AED is most likely an epiphenomenon reflecting the nature of underlying epileptogenicity, which may be defined as a complex interaction of underlying pathology, genetics, and environment. Patients with the same type of epileptogenic lesion, for example, hippocampal sclerosis, may have a varying response to AED. Modern neuroimaging, in particular quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques may be helpful to better understand this complex interaction of factors leading to refractoriness. Patients who respond well to AEDs have no or minor MRI abnormalities, and among those with underlying lesions there is an inverse correlation between outcome and the extent of MRI-defined neuronal damage outside the main lesion, which may be undetectable by visual analyses of routine MRI. The extent of neuronal damage appears to be related to the severity of initial precipitating injuries, probably interacts with genetic factors, and may progress over time when seizures are uncontrolled. The presence and extent of abnormalities detected by quantitative MRI may also be helpful to guide AED withdrawal in those patients who are seizure free for >2 years. Combined MRI measures may have potential clinical value for predicting AED response in near future.

  6. The effects of coenzyme Q10 on seizures in mice: the involvement of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sattarinezhad, Elahe; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Sheikhnouri, Kiandokht; Mousavi, Zahra; Moezi, Leila

    2014-08-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a potent antioxidant in both mitochondria and lipid membranes. It has also been recognized to have an effect on gene expression. This study was designed to investigate whether acute or subchronic treatment with coenzyme Q10 altered the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole or electroshock in mice. We also evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide in the effects of coenzyme Q10 in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models. Acute oral treatment with different doses of coenzyme Q10 did not affect the seizure in intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole, intravenous pentylenetetrazole, and electroshock models in mice. Subchronic oral administration of coenzyme Q10 (100 mg/kg or more) increased time latencies to the onset of myoclonic jerks and clonic seizures induced by intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole and at the doses of 25 mg/kg or more increased the seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. Subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 (50 mg/kg or more) also decreased the incidence of tonic seizures in the electroshock-induced seizure model. Moreover, acute treatment with the precursor of nitric oxide synthesis, L-arginine (60 mg/kg), led to a significant potentiation of the antiseizure effects of subchronic administration of coenzyme Q10 (400 mg/kg in intraperitoneal and 6.25 mg/kg in intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests). Acute treatment with l-NAME (5 mg/kg), a nonspecific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, significantly attenuated the antiseizure effects of subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both seizure models induced by pentylenetetrazole. On the other hand, acute administration of aminoguanidine (100 mg/kg), a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, did not affect the seizures in mice treated with subchronic doses of coenzyme Q10 in both intraperitoneal and intravenous pentylenetetrazole tests. In conclusion, only subchronic and not acute administration of coenzyme Q10 attenuated seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole

  7. Alcohol significantly lowers the seizure threshold in mice when co-administered with bupropion hydrochloride

    PubMed Central

    Silverstone, Peter H; Williams, Robert; McMahon, Louis; Fleming, Rosanna; Fogarty, Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    Background Bupropion HCl is a widely used antidepressant that is known to cause seizures in a dose-dependent manner. Many patients taking antidepressants will consume alcohol, even when advised not to. Previous studies have not shown any interactions between bupropion HCl and alcohol. However, there have been no previous studies examining possible changes in seizure threshold induced by a combination of alcohol and bupropion HCl. Methods Experimentally naïve female Swiss albino mice (10 per group) received either single doses of bupropion HCl (ranging from 100 mg/kg to 120 mg/kg) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl) by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in a dose volume of 10 ml/kg, and single-dose ethanol alone (2.5 g/kg), or vehicle, 5 min prior to bupropion dosing. The presence or absence of seizures, the number of seizures, the onset, duration and the intensity of seizures were all recorded for 5 h following the administration of ethanol. Results The results show that administration of IP bupropion HCl alone induced seizures in mice in a dose-dependent manner, with the 120 mg/kg dose having the largest effect. The percentage of convulsing mice were 0%, 20%, 30% and 60% in the 0 (vehicle), 100, 110, and 120 mg/kg dose groups, respectively. Pretreatment with ethanol produced a larger bupropion HCl-induced convulsive effect at all the doses (70% each at 100, 110 and 120 mg/kg) and a 10% effect in the ethanol + vehicle only group. The convulsive dose of bupropion HCl required to induce seizures in 50% of mice (CD50), was 116.72 mg/kg for bupropion HCl alone (CI: 107.95, 126.20) and 89.40 mg/kg for ethanol/bupropion HCl (CI: 64.92, 123.10). Conclusion These results show that in mice alcohol lowers the seizure threshold for bupropion-induced seizures. Clinical implications are firstly that there may be an increased risk of seizures in patients consuming alcohol, and secondly that formulations that can release bupropion more readily in alcohol may present additional risks to patients

  8. Hydroxychloroquine-induced seizure in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Malcangi, G; Fraticelli, P; Palmieri, C; Cappelli, M; Danieli, M G

    2000-12-01

    We report on a case of a 17-year-old female with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), with a clinical history of complex partial seizure, who developed a tonicoclonic crisis after receiving hydroxychloroquine for 2 weeks at a dosage of 200 mg/day (5 mg/kg). The absence of previous similar episodes and of recurrences after withdrawal of the drug in subsequent months, the short latency after administration and the favourable short-term evolution raised suspicions for a potential role of the drug in the development of the isolated convulsive crisis. It is possible for hydroxychloroquine to be responsible for tonicoclonic seizures in predisposed subjects.

  9. Cross-sectional study of the prehospital management of adult patients with a suspected seizure (EPIC1)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Louise H; Shewan, Jane; Baldwin, Trevor; Grünewald, Richard A; Reuber, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Suspected seizures are a common reason for emergency calls to ambulance services. Prehospital management of these patients is an important element of good quality care. The aim of this study, conducted in a regional ambulance service in the UK, was to quantify the number of emergency telephone calls for suspected seizures in adults, the associated costs, and to describe the patients’ characteristics, their prehospital management and their immediate outcomes. Design Quantitative cross-sectional study using routinely collected data and a detailed review of the clinical records of a consecutive series of adult patients (≥16 years). Setting A regional ambulance service within the National Health Service in England. Participants Cross-sectional data from all 605 481 adult emergency incidents managed by the ambulance service from 1 April 2012 to 31 March 2013. We selected a consecutive series of 178 individual incidents from May 2012 for more detailed analysis (132 after exclusions and removal of non-seizure cases). Results Suspected seizures made up 3.3% of all emergency incidents. True medical emergencies were uncommon but 3.3% had partially occluded airways, 6.8% had ongoing seizure activity and 59.1% had clinical problems in addition to the seizure (29.1% involving injury). Emergency vehicles were dispatched for 97.2% of suspected seizures, the seizure had terminated on arrival in 93.2% of incidents, 75% of these patients were transported to hospital. The estimated emergency management cost per annum of suspected seizures in the English ambulance services is £45.2 million (€64.0 million, $68.6 million). Conclusions Many patients with suspected seizures could potentially be treated more effectively and at lower cost by modifying ambulance call handling protocols. The development of innovative care pathways could give call handlers and paramedics alternatives to hospital transportation. Increased adoption of care plans could reduce 999 calls and

  10. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    PubMed

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  11. Late onset arginase deficiency presenting with encephalopathy and midbrain hyperintensity

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Raja, Rajat; Balagopal, Anuroop

    2016-01-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are very rare metabolic disorders that present with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia. Of the UCDs, Arginase deficiency (ARD) is the rarest and presents in childhood with a progressive spastic diplegia or seizures. Acute presentation in adulthood is extremely unusual.[1] We present the first case of adult onset ARD presenting with encephalopathy and diffusion weighted MRI findings that resembled a moustache in the midbrain. PMID:27570396

  12. Treatment of acute and remote symptomatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Barbara S

    2009-07-01

    In principle, the use of anticonvulsant drugs does not differ between acute and remote symptomatic seizures, but control of acute symptomatic seizures requires simultaneous treatment of the underlying etiology. Prevention of remote seizures when the risk is known to be high has been the subject of intense efforts at antiepileptogenesis, but the optimal duration of treatment after an injury is not yet known. Appropriate evaluation of a seizure depends on individual circumstances, but findings on examination, laboratory tests (serum electrolytes, magnesium, glucose, assessment of hepatic and renal function), and brain imaging (CT scan or MRI) are necessary to determine the most likely cause. Lumbar puncture is always required when there is suspicion of meningitis or encephalitis. Preferred medications for treatment of acute symptomatic seizures or status epilepticus are those available for intravenous use, such as benzodiazepines, fosphenytoin or phenytoin, valproate, levetiracetam, and phenobarbital. Diazepam is also available as a gel for rectal administration. Seizures that occur in patients with epilepsy because of missed antiepileptic drugs or inadequate serum levels should be treated with additional doses of their regular medications; loading doses can be administered with minimal toxicity in tolerant patients. Surgery is rarely necessary in the acute setting except for intracerebral lesions with rapidly rising intracranial pressure and impending herniation. After seizures are controlled, the provoking condition must also be determined and treated.

  13. Detecting Neonatal Seizures With Computer Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Temko, Andriy; Lightbody, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    It is now generally accepted that EEG is the only reliable way to accurately detect newborn seizures and, as such, prolonged EEG monitoring is increasingly being adopted in neonatal intensive care units. Long EEG recordings may last from several hours to a few days. With neurophysiologists not always available to review the EEG during unsociable hours, there is a pressing need to develop a reliable and robust automatic seizure detection method-a computer algorithm that can take the EEG signal, process it, and output information that supports clinical decision making. In this study, we review existing algorithms based on how the relevant seizure information is exploited. We start with commonly used methods to extract signatures from seizure signals that range from those that mimic the clinical neurophysiologist to those that exploit mathematical models of neonatal EEG generation. Commonly used classification methods are reviewed that are based on a set of rules and thresholds that are either heuristically tuned or automatically derived from the data. These are followed by techniques to use information about spatiotemporal seizure context. The usual errors in system design and validation are discussed. Current clinical decision support tools that have met regulatory requirements and are available to detect neonatal seizures are reviewed with progress and the outstanding challenges are outlined. This review discusses the current state of the art regarding automatic detection of neonatal seizures.

  14. Metabolic brain PET pattern underlying hyperkinetic seizures.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Eric; McGonigal, Aileen; Vaugier, Lisa; Mundler, Olivier; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to contribute to the identification of selective brain regions involved in hyperkinetic behaviors. We studied the whole-brain voxel-based interictal metabolic 18FDG-PET pattern of 23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures, in comparison with both 15 healthy subjects similar for age and gender, and 23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures. Patients were in particular similar for the localization of the epileptogenic zone, this having been defined using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) when clinically indicated (15/23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures and 13/23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures). Using conjunction voxel-based analysis, patients with hyperkinetic seizures exhibited significant hypometabolism within bilateral midbrain and the right caudate head, in comparison both to healthy subjects (p<0.05, FDR-corrected for the voxel) and to patients without hyperkinetic seizures (p<0.0167, uncorrected for the voxel). Findings were secondarily confirmed separately in each subgroup of patients with frontal, temporal or posterior epilepsy. These findings argue for a specific subcortical metabolic impairment in patients with hyperkinetic seizures, within brain structures supposed to be involved in the generation of primitive motor programs.

  15. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  16. ATPergic signalling during seizures and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Engel, Tobias; Alves, Mariana; Sheedy, Caroline; Henshall, David C

    2016-05-01

    Much progress has been made over the last few decades in the identification of new anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). However, 30% of epilepsy patients suffer poor seizure control. This underscores the need to identify alternative druggable neurotransmitter systems and drugs with novel mechanisms of action. An emerging concept is that seizure generation involves a complex interplay between neurons and glial cells at the tripartite synapse and neuroinflammation has been proposed as one of the main drivers of epileptogenesis. The ATP-gated purinergic receptor family is expressed throughout the brain and is functional on neurons and glial cells. ATP is released in high amounts into the extracellular space after increased neuronal activity and during chronic inflammation and cell death to act as a neuro- and gliotransmitter. Emerging work shows pharmacological targeting of ATP-gated purinergic P2 receptors can potently modulate seizure generation, inflammatory processes and seizure-induced brain damage. To date, work showing the functional contribution of P2 receptors has been mainly performed in animal models of acute seizures, in particular, by targeting the ionotropic P2X7 receptor subtype. Other ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y receptor family members have also been implicated in pathological processes following seizures such as the P2X4 receptor and the P2Y12 receptor. However, during epilepsy, the characterization of P2 receptors was mostly restricted to the study of expressional changes of the different receptor subtypes. This review summarizes the work to date on ATP-mediated signalling during seizures and the functional impact of targeting the ATP-gated purinergic receptors on seizures and seizure-induced pathology. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'.

  17. Febrile seizure recurrence reduced by intermittent oral levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lin-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping; Zhong, Jian-Min; Gao, Lei; Zhao, Jian-Bo; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Hong; Zhao, Meng; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Liu, Yu-Jie; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Wei-Na; Yang, Xiao-Fan; Kwan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common form of childhood seizure disorders. FS is perhaps one of the most frequent causes of admittance to pediatric emergency wards worldwide. We aimed to identify a new, safe, and effective therapy for preventing FS recurrence. Methods A total of 115 children with a history of two or more episodes of FS were randomly assigned to levetiracetam (LEV) and control (LEV/control ratio = 2:1) groups. At the onset of fever, LEV group was orally administered with a dose of 15–30 mg/kg per day twice daily for 1 week. Thereafter, the dosage was gradually reduced until totally discontinued in the second week. The primary efficacy variable was seizure frequency associated with febrile events and FS recurrence rate (RR) during 48-week follow-up. The second outcome was the cost effectiveness of the two groups. Results The intention-to-treat analysis showed that 78 children in LEV group experienced 148 febrile episodes. Among these 78 children, 11 experienced 15 FS recurrences. In control group, 37 children experienced 64 febrile episodes; among these 37 children, 19 experienced 32 FS recurrences. A significant difference was observed between two groups in FS RR and FS recurrence/fever episode. The cost of LEV group for the prevention of FS recurrence is lower than control group. During 48-week follow-up period, one patient in LEV group exhibited severe drowsiness. No other side effects were observed in the same patient and in other children. Interpretation Intermittent oral LEV can effectively prevent FS recurrence and reduce wastage of medical resources. PMID:25356397

  18. Continuous multi-modality brain imaging reveals modified neurovascular seizure response after intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ringuette, Dene; Jeffrey, Melanie A.; Dufour, Suzie; Carlen, Peter L.; Levi, Ofer

    2017-01-01

    We developed a multi-modal brain imaging system to investigate the relationship between blood flow, blood oxygenation/volume, intracellular calcium and electrographic activity during acute seizure-like events (SLEs), both before and after pharmacological intervention. Rising blood volume was highly specific to SLE-onset whereas blood flow was more correlated with all eletrographic activity. Intracellular calcium spiked between SLEs and at SLE-onset with oscillation during SLEs. Modified neurovascular and ionic SLE responses were observed after intervention and the interval between SLEs became shorter and more inconsistent. Comparison of artery and vein pulsatile flow suggest proximal interference and greater vascular leakage prior to intervention. PMID:28270990

  19. Presurgical evaluation for partial epilepsy: Relative contributions of chronic depth-electrode recordings versus FDG-PET and scalp-sphenoidal ictal EEG

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Henry, T.R.; Risinger, M.W.; Mazziotta, J.C.; Sutherling, W.W.; Levesque, M.F.; Phelps, M.E.

    1990-11-01

    One hundred fifty-three patients with medically refractory partial epilepsy underwent chronic stereotactic depth-electrode EEG (SEEG) evaluations after being studied by positron emission tomography (PET) with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and scalp-sphenoidal EEG telemetry. We carried out retrospective standardized reviews of local cerebral metabolism and scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets to determine when SEEG recordings revealed additional useful information. FDG-PET localization was misleading in only 3 patients with temporal lobe SEEG ictal onsets for whom extratemporal or contralateral hypometabolism could be attributed to obvious nonepileptic structural defects. Two patients with predominantly temporal hypometabolism may have had frontal epileptogenic regions, but ultimate localization remains uncertain. Scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets were misleading in 5 patients. For 37 patients with congruent focal scalp-sphenoidal ictal onsets and temporal hypometabolic zones, SEEG recordings never demonstrated extratemporal or contralateral epileptogenic regions; however, 3 of these patients had nondiagnostic SEEG evaluations. The results of subsequent subdural grid recordings indicated that at least 1 of these patients may have been denied beneficial surgery as a result of an equivocal SEEG evaluation. Weighing risks and benefits, it is concluded that anterior temporal lobectomy is justified without chronic intracranial recording when specific criteria for focal scalp-sphenoidal ictal EEG onsets are met, localized hypometabolism predominantly involves the same temporal lobe, and no other conflicting information has been obtained from additional tests of focal functional deficit, structural imaging, or seizure semiology.

  20. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  1. Adaptation and evaluation of the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale and Liverpool Quality of Life battery for American epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Rapp, S; Shumaker, S; Smith, T; Gibson, P; Berzon, R; Hoffman, R

    1998-05-01

    The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and the Liverpool Quality of Life (LQOL) battery were developed in Great Britain to assess the severity of seizure symptoms and the impact of epilepsy on patients' quality of life. The scales have been validated on British patients, but have not been validated for use with American patients. The objectives of this study were to adapt the scales to the American population and to evaluate their reliability and validity. After modifications recommended by focus groups with patients and epilepsy specialists, the scales were administered to a sample of 90 epilepsy patients who had experienced seizures within the previous 4 weeks. Comparisons of patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n = 58) and partial seizures (n = 32) revealed significant differences on 12 of the 20 items on the LSSS as well as the total score. None of the six LQOL subscales (negative drug effects, positive drug effects, affect balance, sense of mastery, life fulfillment and impact of epilepsy) distinguished patients with different seizure types but five of the six subscales were significantly correlated with seizure severity. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate for both the LSSS and LQOL. Finally, five of the six LQOL scales were significantly correlated with independent measures of mental health, physical health and role functioning.

  2. Adaptation and evaluation of the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale and Liverpool Quality of Life battery for American epilepsy patients.

    PubMed

    Rapp, S; Shumaker, S; Smith, T; Gibson, P; Berzon, R; Hoffman, R

    1998-08-01

    The Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS) and the Liverpool Quality of Life (LQOL) battery were developed in Great Britain to assess the severity of seizure symptoms and the impact of epilepsy on patients' quality of life. The scales have been validated on British patients, but have not been validated for use with American patients. The objectives of this study were to adapt the scales to the American population and to evaluate their reliability and validity. After modifications recommended by focus groups with patients and epilepsy specialists, the scales were administered to a sample of 90 epilepsy patients who had experienced seizures within the previous 4 weeks. Comparisons of patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (n = 58) and partial seizures (n = 32) revealed significant differences on 9 of the 20 items on the LSSS as well as the total score. None of the six LQOL subscales (negative drug effects, positive drug effects, affect balance, sense of mastery, life fulfilment and impact of epilepsy) distinguished patients with different seizure types but five of the six subscales were significantly correlated with seizure severity. The internal consistency and test-retest reliability were adequate for both the LSSS and LQOL. Finally, five of the six LQOL scales were significantly correlated with independent measures of mental health, physical health and role functioning.

  3. Eight Flurothyl-Induced Generalized Seizures Lead to the Rapid Evolution of Spontaneous Seizures in Mice: A Model of Epileptogenesis with Seizure Remission

    PubMed Central

    Kadiyala, Sridhar B.; Yannix, Joshua Q.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Papandrea, Dominick; Beyer, Barbara S.; Herron, Bruce J.

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of recurrent, unprovoked seizures is the hallmark of human epilepsy. Currently, only two-thirds of this patient population has adequate seizure control. New epilepsy models provide the potential for not only understanding the development of spontaneous seizures, but also for testing new strategies to treat this disorder. Here, we characterize a primary generalized seizure model of epilepsy following repeated exposure to the GABAA receptor antagonist, flurothyl, in which mice develop spontaneous seizures that remit within 1 month. In this model, we expose C57BL/6J mice to flurothyl until they experience a generalized seizure. Each of these generalized seizures typically lasts <30 s. We induce one seizure per day for 8 d followed by 24 h video-electroencephalographic recordings. Within 1 d following the last of eight flurothyl-induced seizures, ∼50% of mice have spontaneous seizures. Ninety-five percent of mice tested have seizures within the first week of the recording period. Of the spontaneous seizures recorded, the majority are generalized clonic seizures, with the remaining 7–12% comprising generalized clonic seizures that transition into brainstem seizures. Over the course of an 8 week recording period, spontaneous seizure episodes remit after ∼4 weeks. Overall, the repeated flurothyl paradigm is a model of epileptogenesis with spontaneous seizures that remit. This model provides an additional tool in our armamentarium for understanding the mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis and may provide insights into why spontaneous seizures remit without anticonvulsant treatment. Elucidating these processes could lead to the development of new epilepsy therapeutics. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by the occurrence of recurrent, unprovoked seizures in which the individual seizure–ictal events are self-limiting. Remission of recurrent, unprovoked seizures can be achieved in two-thirds of cases by treatment with

  4. ULTRASTRUCTURAL ANALYSES OF STONE HEART SYNDROME AT ONSET AND SIX DAYS LATER FOLLOWING TOTAL SUPPORT OF THE CIRCULATION WITH A PARTIAL ARTIFICIAL HEART OR LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (ALVAD)

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, J. T.; Bossart, M. I.; Holub, D. A.; Milam, J. D.; Norman, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ischemic myocardial contracture developed in a 21-year-old man following aortic and mitral valve replacement. The patient's circulation was supported totally for 6 days with an abdominal left ventricular assist device (ALVAD). Cardiac allografting was then undertaken. Samples of myocardium taken at the original operation and 6 days later at transplantation were analyzed ultrastructurally. At the onset of ischemic cortracture, left ventricular abnormalities included hypercontraction of myofibrils, loss of normal A-band and Z-band patterns, mitochondrial swelling with fusion of cristae, interfibrillar edema and glycogen depletion. Capillaries demonstrated swelling of endothelial cells and basement membrane disruption. Six days later, ultrastructural morphology showed further degeneration. The myofibrils remained hypercontracted, but were more fragmented. Degenerative changes in mitochondria were more advanced and calcium deposition in cristae was present. No glycogen was seen. The right ventricular myocardium exhibited significantly fewer ultrastructural abnormalities. The principal right ventricular changes were endothelial swelling and basement membrane disruption. Glycogen granules were present. Ischemic contracture affects the left ventricle more than the right, and the morphology becomes more abnormal with time. To our knowledge, this is the first instance wherein morphologic progressions of the ultrastructural alterations of ischemic contracture have been documented. Images PMID:15216023

  5. Wavelet transforms for electroencephalographic spike and seizure detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; Milton, John G.

    1993-11-01

    The application of wavelet transforms (WT) to experimental data from the nervous system has been hindered by the lack of a straightforward method to handle noise. A noise reduction technique, developed recently for use in wavelet cluster analysis in cosmology and astronomy, is here adapted for electroencephalographic (EEG) time-series data. Noise is filtered using control surrogate data sets generated from randomized aspects of the original time-series. In this study, WT were applied to EEG data from human patients undergoing brain mapping with implanted subdural electrodes for the localization of epileptic seizure foci. EEG data in 1D were analyzed from individual electrodes, and 2D data from electrode grids. These techniques are a powerful means to identify epileptic spikes in such data, and offer a method to identity the onset and spatial extent of epileptic seizure foci. The method is readily applied to the detection of structure in stationary and non-stationary time-series from a variety of physical systems.

  6. Enhanced steroid dosing reduces seizures during antiparasitic treatment for cysticercosis and early after

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Hector H.; Gonzales, Isidro; Lescano, Andres G.; Bustos, Javier A.; Pretell, E. Javier; Saavedra, Herbert; Nash, Theodore E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Neurocysticercosis is a major cause of seizures and epilepsy in endemic countries. Antiparasitic treatment of brain cysts leads to seizures due to the host’s inflammatory reaction, requiring concomitant steroids. We hypothesized that increased steroid dosing will reduce treatment-associated seizures. Methods Open-label randomized trial comparing 6 mg/d dexamethasone for 10 days (conventional) with 8 mg/d for 28 days followed by a 2 week taper (enhanced) in neurocysticercosis patients receiving albendazole. Follow up included active seizure surveillance and brain imaging. Study outcomes were seizure days and patients with seizures, both measured in days 11-42. Additional analyses compared days 1-10, 11-21, 22-32, 33-42, 43-60, and 61-180. Results Thirty-two individuals were randomized into each arm, two did not complete follow up. From days 11 to 42, 59 partial and 6 generalized seizure days occurred in 20 individuals, non-significantly fewer in the enhanced arm (12 versus 49, p=0.114). The numbers of patients with seizures in this period showed similar non-significant differences. In the enhanced steroid arm there were significantly fewer days and individuals with seizures during antiparasitic treatment (days 1-10: 4 versus 17, p=0.004, and 1 versus 10, p=0.003, number needed to treat 4.6, relative risk 0.1013, 95%CI: 0.01 – 0.74) and early after dexamethasone cessation (days 11-21: 6 versus 27, p=0.014, and 4 versus 12, p=0.021, NNT 4.0, RR 0.33, 95%CI: 0.12 – 0.92) but not after day 21. There were no significant differences in antiparasitic efficacy or relevant adverse events. Significance Increased dexamethasone dosing results in fewer seizures for the first 21 days during and early after antiparasitic treatment for viable parenchymal neurocysticercosis but not during the first 11-42 days, which was the primary predetermined time of analysis. PMID:25092547

  7. Profound suppression of kindled seizures by cysteamine: possible role of somatostatin to kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, T; Sikand, G S; Kato, N; Wada, J A; Friesen, H G

    1983-12-12

    Recently we reported significant increase in immunoreactive somatostatin content in various brain regions of amygdaloid-kindled rats. We report here that acute intraperitoneal administration of cysteamine, an agent reported to deplete brain and gastrointestinal immunoreactive somatostatin content in kindled rats, led to profound suppression of kindled seizures. Purified anti-somatostatin antibody injected intracerebroventricularly also blocked the kindled seizures. The results show that endogenous immunoreactive somatostatin has a role in the development of seizures in amygdaloid kindled rats.

  8. Effect of Ethanolic Extract of Indigofera tinctoria on Chemically-Induced Seizures and Brain GABA Levels in Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Garbhapu, Asuntha; Yalavarthi, Prasannaraju; Koganti, Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Objective(s) Indigofera tinctoria Linn. of Fabaceae family is claimed to be useful to control epileptic seizures in the Indian system of folkore medicine. This study was designed to evaluate tinctoria and to verify the claim. Materials and Methods Seizures were induced in male albino rats with pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). The test group animals were administered ethanolic extract of Indigofera tinctoria (EEIT) orally. The time of onset and duration of clonic convulsions were recorded. Maximal electroshock seizures (MES) were induced in animals. The duration of hind limb tonic extension (HLTE) was recorded. GABA levels and GABA transaminase activity in brain were estimated. Results In PTZ model, EEIT significantly (P< 0.01, P< 0.001) delayed the onset of convulsions and reduced the duration of seizures in a dose dependent manner. A significant (P< 0.05) reduction in the duration of HLTE at higher doses of EEIT was observed in MES model. Increase in brain GABA levels was observed on treatment with EEIT at 500 and 1000 mg/kg doses, suggested that the plant may be acting by facilitating GABAergic transmission. A significant reduction (P< 0.05) in the activity of brain GABA transaminase was observed at higher doses. No neurotoxic signs were observed with rotarod test, pentobarbital induced sleeping time, locomotor activity and haloperidol-induced catalepsy. Conclusion The ethanolic extract of tinctoria was found to be useful to control and treat the variety of seizures. PMID:23493444

  9. [Research advances in circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen-Qi; Li, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The time phase of epileptic seizures has attracted more and more attention. Epileptic seizures have their own circadian rhythm. The same type of epilepsy has different seizure frequencies in different time periods and states (such as sleeping/awakening state and natural day/night cycle). The circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures has complex molecular and endocrine mechanisms, and currently there are several hypotheses. Clarification of the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures and prevention and administration according to such circadian rhythm can effectively control seizures and reduce the adverse effects of drugs. The research on the circadian rhythm of epileptic seizures provides a new idea for the treatment of epilepsy.

  10. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project.

    PubMed

    Brook, Heather A; Hiltz, Cynthia M; Kopplin, Vicki L; Lindeke, Linda L

    2015-08-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26) were trained as seizure management educators and instructed staff in 21 schools on seizure awareness and response. School nurses utilized new seizure management resources, a procedural guideline, and care plan updates. The majority of school nurses rated the resources and training interventions as "very helpful." School nurse confidence in managing students with seizures increased, seizure action plan use increased, and 88% of children's records with new seizure diagnoses had completed documentation. School nurses played vital roles in increasing seizure awareness as educators and care managers. EFMN is using this project as an exemplar for expanding its Seizure Smart Schools program.

  11. A pathogenetic hypothesis of Unverricht-Lundborg disease onset and progression.

    PubMed

    Franceschetti, Silvana; Sancini, Giulio; Buzzi, Andrea; Zucchini, Silvia; Paradiso, Beatrice; Magnaghi, Giuseppina; Frassoni, Carolina; Chikhladze, Maia; Avanzini, Giuliano; Simonato, Michele

    2007-03-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1), the most common progressive myoclonic epilepsy, is associated with a defect of cystatin B (CSTB), a protease inhibitor. We used CSTB knockout mice to test the hypothesis that EPM1 onset is related to a latent hyperexcitability and that progression depends on higher susceptibility to seizure-induced cell damage. Hippocampal slices prepared from CSTB-deficient mice were hyperexcitable, as they responded to afferent stimuli in CA1 with multiple population spikes and kainate perfusion provoked the appearance of epileptic-like activity earlier than in WT mice. This hyperexcitability may depend on loss of inhibition, because the density of GABA-immunoreactive cells was reduced in the hippocampus of CSTB knockouts. In vivo, CSTB-deficient mice treated with kainate displayed increased susceptibility to seizures, with shorter latency to seizure onset and increased seizure severity compared with WT littermates. Furthermore, a greater degree of neuronal damage was observed in CSTB-deficient than in WT mice after seizures of identical grade, indicating increased susceptibility to seizure-induced cell death.

  12. Cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome in childhood: clinical features and risk of seizure recurrence.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, J G; duPlessis, A J; Barnes, P D; Riviello, J J

    1998-07-01

    Cyclosporin A is associated with an acute encephalopathy including seizures and alterations in mental status, herein referred to as cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome. The clinical history, electroencephalogram (EEG), and neuroimaging findings in 19 children with cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome over a 10-year period were reviewed in order to delineate clinical characteristics, imaging features, and to determine the risk of seizure recurrence in this population. All 19 had motor seizures associated with other features of cortical and subcortical dysfunction. The acute mean cyclosporin A level was 342 microg/L, but was within the "therapeutic" range in five cases. Brain imaging by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute or subacute phase revealed lesions characteristic of cyclosporin A toxicity in 14 cases. Acute EEG abnormalities were present in all and included epileptiform discharges or focal slowing. Patients were followed for a median of 49 months (1-9 years). Follow-up imaging (n = 10) showed lesion resolution or improvement in the majority while EEG (n = 10) had normalized in only three. Seizures recurred in six patients and only in those with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities. No patient had a second episode of cyclosporin A associated neurotoxicity or seizure. It appears that a significant risk of seizure recurrence exists following cyclosporin A acute encephalopathy and seizure syndrome and primarily in those children with persistent EEG or imaging abnormalities.

  13. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  14. Commercialization of Seizure Prediction Technology Promises and Pitfalls of Biosignal Analysis: Seizure Prediction and Management (A case study);

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    biosignals utilizing computationally intensive algorithms are useful and provide no limitation for clinical Commercialization of Seizure Prediction...Technology Promises and Pitfalls of Biosignal Analysis: Seizure Prediction and Management (A case study); Mark T. Rise, Ph.D. Technical Fellow...Title and Subtitle Commercialization of Seizure Prediction Technology Promises and Pitfalls of Biosignal Analysis: Seizure Prediction and

  15. CADASIL Initially Presented with a Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kang, Bong Su; Choi, Jay Chol

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a hereditary disease of the cerebral small blood vessels characterized by recurrent ischemic strokes, migraine, and progressive cognitive impairment. In patients with CADASIL, in whom subcortical white matter structures are typically involved, epileptic seizures have been rarely reported as an initial clinical symptom. We describe a patient genetically confirmed as having CADASIL who initially presented with a seizure. PMID:28101484

  16. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    PubMed Central

    ESMAILI GOURABI, Hamed; BIDABADI, Elham; CHERAGHALIPOUR, Fatemeh; AARABI, Yasaman; SALAMAT, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Because of geographical and periodical variation, we prompted to determine the demographic features and causative factors for febrile seizure in Rasht. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all 6–month- to 6-year-old children with the diagnosis of febrile seizure admitted to 17 Shahrivar hospital in Rasht, from August, 2009 to August, 2010 were studied. Age, sex, family history of the disease, seizure types, body temperature upon admission and infectious causes of the fever were recorded. All statistical analysis was performed with SPSS software, version 16. Results Of the 214 children (mean age, 25.24±15.40 months), 124 were boys and 109 had a positive family history. Complex seizures were seen in 39 cases. In patients with a complex febrile seizure, 59% had the repetitive type, 20.5% had the focal type and 20.5% had more than 15 minutes duration of seizures. Most of the repetitive seizures (78.3%) occurred in patients under 2 years old; the difference between under and over 2-year-old patients was statistically significant. Study results did not show significant differences between the two genders for simple or complex seizures. The mean body temperature upon admission was 38.2±1.32◦C (38.31±0.82 degrees in boys and 38.04±1.78 in girls). Upper respiratory infections were seen in most patients (74.29%). All cases of lower respiratory infections were boys. There was a statistically significant difference between boys and girls in causes of fever. Conclusion Most of the children had a positive family history and the most common causative factor was upper respiratory infection. PMID:24665278

  17. Feline hippocampal and piriform lobe necrosis as a consequence of severe cluster seizures in two cats in Finland.

    PubMed

    Fors, Sara; Van Meervenne, Sofie; Jeserevics, Janis; Rakauskas, Mindaugas; Cizinauskas, Sigitas

    2015-07-28

    Feline hippocampal and piriform lobe necrosis (FHN) has been reported from several countries worldwide and is considered an important aetiology for feline epileptic seizures. The aetiology of FHN remains unclear, however it is suspected that FHN might occur secondary to intense epileptic activity as described in humans and dogs although this has not yet been documented in cats. The purpose of our report is to describe the first cases of FHN in Finland diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology. The two cases we describe had a well documented history of pre-existing seizures with normal brain MRI at the onset of cluster seizures but MRI done when the cats exhibited clinical deterioration secondary to severe seizure activity, revealed lesions in the hippocampus and piriform lobes typical of FHN. Our report confirms that feline hippocampus and piriform lobe necrosis does occur in the Finnish cat population and should therefore be considered as a differential diagnosis in cats with seizures. In addition, the presentation, clinical findings, results of MRI and/or histopathology shows that cats may develop FHN secondary to severe seizure activity.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character.

  19. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage.

  20. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  1. From here to epilepsy: the risk of seizure in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicastro, Nicolas; Assal, Frédéric; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-03-01

    To describe the association between Alzheimer's disease and seizures by reviewing epidemiological data from available literature and to assess the putative pathophysiological links between neurodegeneration and altered cortical excitability. We also discuss specific antiepileptic treatment strategies in patients with Alzheimer's disease, as well as transient epileptic amnesia as a possible crossroads between degeneration and epilepsy. Regarding epidemiology, we searched publications in Pubmed, Medline, Scopus and Web of Science (until September 2015) using the keywords "incidence", "prevalence" and "frequency", as well as "Alzheimer's disease" and "seizures". In addition, therapeutic aspects for seizures in Alzheimer's disease were searched using the key words "antiepileptic drugs", "seizure treatment" and "Alzheimer". The prevalence and incidence rates of seizures were found to be increased 2 to 6-fold in patients with Alzheimer's disease compared to age-adjusted control patients. Treatment strategies have mainly been extrapolated from elderly patients without dementia, except for one single randomised trial, in which levetiracetam, lamotrigine and phenobarbital efficacy and tolerance were investigated in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mouse models appear to show a major role of amyloid precursor protein and its cleavage products in the generation of cortical hyperexcitability. A link between Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy has long been described and recent cohort studies have more clearly delineated risk factors associated with the genesis of seizures, such as early onset and possibly severity of dementia. As genetic forms of Alzheimer's disease and experimental mouse models suggest, beta-amyloid may play a prominent role in the propagation of synchronised abnormal discharges, perhaps more via an excitatory mode than a direct neurodegenerative effect.

  2. Can hyper-synchrony in meditation lead to seizures? Similarities in meditative and epileptic brain states.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Shane

    2014-10-01

    Meditation is used worldwide by millions of people for relaxation and stress relief. Given sufficient practice, meditators may also experience a variety of altered states of consciousness. These states can lead to a variety of unusual experiences, including physical, emotional and psychic disturbances. This paper highlights the correspondences between brain states associated with these experiences and the symptoms and neurophysiology of epileptic simple partial seizures. Seizures, like meditation practice, can result in both positive and negative experiences. The neurophysiology and chemistry underlying simple partial seizures are characterised by a high degree of excitability and high levels of neuronal synchrony in gamma-band brain activity. Following a survey of the literature that shows that meditation practice is also linked to high power gamma activity, an account of how meditation could cause such activity is provided. This paper discusses the diagnostic challenges for the claim that meditation practices lead to brain states similar to those found in epileptic seizures, and seeks to develop our understanding of the range of pathological and non-pathological states that result from a hyper-excited and hyper-synchronous brain.

  3. A novel KCNT1 mutation in a Japanese patient with epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Shino; Hirano, Yoshiko; Ito, Susumu; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru; Shimojima, Keiko; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIFMS) is a rare, early-onset epileptic encephalopathy characterized by polymorphous focal seizures. De novo mutations of KCNT1 have been identified in cases of this disorder. We encountered a sporadic patient with EIFMS, who suffered tonic convulsions at the age of 9 days. Using Sanger sequencing, we identified a de novo missense mutation of the same amino acid affected by a previously identified mutation, c.1420C>T (p.Arg474Cys). PMID:27081515

  4. Early-onset epileptic encephalopathy caused by a reduced sensitivity of Kv7.2 potassium channels to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Ambrosino, Paolo; Mosca, Ilaria; De Maria, Michela; Moretto, Edoardo; Miceli, Francesco; Alaimo, Alessandro; Iraci, Nunzio; Manocchio, Laura; Medoro, Alessandro; Passafaro, Maria; Taglialatela, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Kv7.2 and Kv7.3 subunits underlie the M-current, a neuronal K+ current characterized by an absolute functional requirement for phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Kv7.2 gene mutations cause early-onset neonatal seizures with heterogeneous clinical outcomes, ranging from self-limiting benign familial neonatal seizures to severe early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (Kv7.2-EE). In this study, the biochemical and functional consequences prompted by a recurrent variant (R325G) found independently in four individuals with severe forms of neonatal-onset EE have been investigated. Upon heterologous expression, homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channels were non-functional, despite biotin-capture in Western blots revealed normal plasma membrane subunit expression. Mutant subunits exerted dominant-negative effects when incorporated into heteromeric channels with Kv7.2 and/or Kv7.3 subunits. Increasing cellular PIP2 levels by co-expression of type 1γ PI(4)P5-kinase (PIP5K) partially recovered homomeric Kv7.2 R325G channel function. Currents carried by heteromeric channels incorporating Kv7.2 R325G subunits were more readily inhibited than wild-type channels upon activation of a voltage-sensitive phosphatase (VSP), and recovered more slowly upon VSP switch-off. These results reveal for the first time that a mutation-induced decrease in current sensitivity to PIP2 is the primary molecular defect responsible for Kv7.2-EE in individuals carrying the R325G variant, further expanding the range of pathogenetic mechanisms exploitable for personalized treatment of Kv7.2-related epilepsies. PMID:27905566

  5. Seizure disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, John G.; Urowitz, Murray B.; Su, Li; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Wallace, Daniel J; Clarke, Ann E.; Ginzler, E.M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Isenberg, David A.; Rahman, Anisur; Petri, M.; Fortin, Paul R.; Gladman, D. D.; Bruce, Ian N.; Steinsson, Kristjan; Dooley, M.A.; Khamashta, Munther A.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Fessler, Barri J.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Manzi, Susan; Zoma, Asad A.; Sturfelt, Gunnar K.; Nived, Ola; Aranow, Cynthia; Mackay, Meggan; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; van Vollenhoven, R.F.; Kalunian, Kenneth C.; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Lim, Sam; Kamen, Diane L.; Peschken, Christine A.; Inanc, Murat; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Farewell, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in SLE Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrollment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-β2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrollment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow up of 3.5±2.9 years. 75/1631 (4.6%) had ≥1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR(CI):1.97 (1.07–3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21–3.19); p<0.01). Higher damage scores (without NP variables) were associated with an increased risk of subsequent seizures (SDI=1:3.93 (1.46–10.55)); SDI=2 or 3:1.57 (0.32–7.65); SDI≥4:7.86 (0.89–69.06); p=0.03). There was an association with disease activity but not with autoantibodies. Seizures attributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78(76%)) in the absence of anti-seizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the MCS or PCS scores. Anti-malarial drugs in absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07(0.01–0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Anti-malarial drugs were associated with a protective effect. PMID:22492779

  6. Analyzing reliability of seizure diagnosis based on semiology.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Wu, Han; Xu, Jiahui; Yan, Jianwei; Ding, Yao; Wang, Z Irene; Guo, Yi; Wang, Zhongjin; Shen, Chunhong; Chen, Zhong; Ding, Meiping; Wang, Shuang

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the accuracy of seizure diagnosis by semiological analysis and to assess the factors that affect diagnostic reliability. A total of 150 video clips of seizures from 50 patients (each with three seizures of the same type) were observed by eight epileptologists, 12 neurologists, and 20 physicians (internists). The videos included 37 series of epileptic seizures, eight series of physiologic nonepileptic events (PNEEs), and five series of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs). After observing each video, the doctors chose the diagnosis of epileptic seizures or nonepileptic events for the patient; if the latter was chosen, they further chose the diagnosis of PNESs or PNEEs. The overall diagnostic accuracy rate for epileptic seizures and nonepileptic events increased from 0.614 to 0.660 after observations of all three seizures (p < 0.001). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of epileptic seizures were 0.770 and 0.808, respectively, for the epileptologists. These values were significantly higher than those for the neurologists (0.660 and 0.699) and physicians (0.588 and 0.658). A wide range of diagnostic accuracy was found across the various seizures types. An accuracy rate of 0.895 for generalized tonic-clonic seizures was the highest, followed by 0.800 for dialeptic seizures and then 0.760 for automotor seizures. The accuracy rates for myoclonic seizures (0.530), hypermotor seizures (0.481), gelastic/dacrystic seizures (0.438), and PNESs (0.430) were poor. The reliability of semiological diagnosis of seizures is greatly affected by the seizure type as well as the doctor's experience. Although the overall reliability is limited, it can be improved by observing more seizures.

  7. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  8. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  9. Treatment Trials for Neonatal Seizures: The Effect of Design on Sample Size.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Nathan J; Boylan, Geraldine B; Hellström-Westas, Lena; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are common in the neonatal intensive care unit. Clinicians treat these seizures with several anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) to reduce seizures in a neonate. Current AEDs exhibit sub-optimal efficacy and several randomized control trials (RCT) of novel AEDs are planned. The aim of this study was to measure the influence of trial design on the required sample size of a RCT. We used seizure time courses from 41 term neonates with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy to build seizure treatment trial simulations. We used five outcome measures, three AED protocols, eight treatment delays from seizure onset (Td) and four levels of trial AED efficacy to simulate different RCTs. We performed power calculations for each RCT design and analysed the resultant sample size. We also assessed the rate of false positives, or placebo effect, in typical uncontrolled studies. We found that the false positive rate ranged from 5 to 85% of patients depending on RCT design. For controlled trials, the choice of outcome measure had the largest effect on sample size with median differences of 30.7 fold (IQR: 13.7-40.0) across a range of AED protocols, Td and trial AED efficacy (p<0.001). RCTs that compared the trial AED with positive controls required sample sizes with a median fold increase of 3.2 (IQR: 1.9-11.9; p<0.001). Delays in AED administration from seizure onset also increased the required sample size 2.1 fold (IQR: 1.7-2.9; p<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that RCTs in neonates treated with hypothermia required a median fold increase in sample size of 2.6 (IQR: 2.4-3.0) compared to trials in normothermic neonates (p<0.001). These results show that RCT design has a profound influence on the required sample size. Trials that use a control group, appropriate outcome measure, and control for differences in Td between groups in analysis will be valid and minimise sample size.

  10. [Clinical features and gene mutations in epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures].

    PubMed

    Shang, K W; Zhang, Y H; Yang, X L; Liu, A J; Yang, Z X; Liu, X Y; Jiang, Y W; Wu, X R

    2016-10-02

    Objective: To summarize the clinical features and gene mutations of epilepsy of infancy with migrating focal seizures (EIMFS). Method: Clinical features and electroencephalograms(EEG)of 9 patients with EIMFS of Peking University First Hospital from May 2015 to January 2016 were analyzed. Candidate gene mutations were screened by next generation sequencing. Result: Among the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 were females. Two patients had family history. Seizure onset age was 2 days to 3 months after birth (median age 35 days). Migrating focal seizure was presented. Seizures manifested as eyes and(or)head deviation, involuntary blinking, swallowing, trembling or stiffness of limbs, hand clenching, flushing and cyanosis of lips, etc. Four patients had a history of status epilepticus. All 9 patients had psychomotor delay. EEG of all patients presented relatively slow background; during interictal phase, there were multi-focal epileptic discharges, which dominated one hemisphere or brain region; seizures were recorded in all 9 cases, which manifested eyes or(and)head deviation, stiffening or trembling of limbs, lip smacking, etc. Corresponding EEG showed low-medium-amplitude fast waves that originated from some brain regions and migrated to other regions. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was abnormal in 4 cases, which predominantly showed white matter dysplasia and enlargement of subarachnoid spaces. Two cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of SCN1A gene, while 3 cases carried heterozygous missense mutations of KCNT1 gene, all of which were de novo. One case carried compound heterozygous mutation of TBC1D24 gene(p.Gln207*, p. Ala289Va). Gene mutation was not found in 3 cases. All patients used multiple antiepileptic drugs (AED) and their seizures were not controlled. Follow-up ranged from 2 months to 5 years and 8 months, during which 4 were found dead. Two were lost to follow-up. Conclusion: EIMFS is clinically characterized by early onset, which is

  11. Treatment Trials for Neonatal Seizures: The Effect of Design on Sample Size

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Nathan J.; Boylan, Geraldine B.; Hellström-Westas, Lena; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are common in the neonatal intensive care unit. Clinicians treat these seizures with several anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) to reduce seizures in a neonate. Current AEDs exhibit sub-optimal efficacy and several randomized control trials (RCT) of novel AEDs are planned. The aim of this study was to measure the influence of trial design on the required sample size of a RCT. We used seizure time courses from 41 term neonates with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy to build seizure treatment trial simulations. We used five outcome measures, three AED protocols, eight treatment delays from seizure onset (Td) and four levels of trial AED efficacy to simulate different RCTs. We performed power calculations for each RCT design and analysed the resultant sample size. We also assessed the rate of false positives, or placebo effect, in typical uncontrolled studies. We found that the false positive rate ranged from 5 to 85% of patients depending on RCT design. For controlled trials, the choice of outcome measure had the largest effect on sample size with median differences of 30.7 fold (IQR: 13.7–40.0) across a range of AED protocols, Td and trial AED efficacy (p<0.001). RCTs that compared the trial AED with positive controls required sample sizes with a median fold increase of 3.2 (IQR: 1.9–11.9; p<0.001). Delays in AED administration from seizure onset also increased the required sample size 2.1 fold (IQR: 1.7–2.9; p<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that RCTs in neonates treated with hypothermia required a median fold increase in sample size of 2.6 (IQR: 2.4–3.0) compared to trials in normothermic neonates (p<0.001). These results show that RCT design has a profound influence on the required sample size. Trials that use a control group, appropriate outcome measure, and control for differences in Td between groups in analysis will be valid and minimise sample size. PMID:27824913

  12. Does the seizure frequency increase in Ramadan?

    PubMed

    Gomceli, Yasemin B; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Cavdar, Leyla; Inan, Levent E

    2008-12-01

    During Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic lunar calendar, adult Muslims are required to refrain from taking any food, beverages, or oral drugs, as well as from sexual intercourse between dawn and sunset. In this study, we aimed at discovering alterations in drug regimens and the seizure frequency of epileptic patients during Ramadan (15 October 2004-13 November 2004). In the 3 months following Ramadan in the year 2004, 114 patients with epilepsy who were fasting during Ramadan were examined at our Epilepsy Department. Of the 114 patients who were included in the study, 38 patients had seizures and one of these patients developed status epilepticus during Ramadan. When the seizure frequency of these patients during Ramadan was compared to that in the last 1 year and last 3 months period just prior to Ramadan, a statistically significant increase was observed (p<0.001). Moreover, there was an important increase in the risk of having seizures in the patients who changed their drug regimens compared with those who did not (p<0.05). In the patients who received monotherapy or polytherapy, no difference in the frequency of seizures during Ramadan was seen (p>0.05). During Ramadan, an increase in the seizure frequency of patients with epilepsy was observed. The most important reason for this situation was the alteration in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs, and consequently, in their efficacy. We believe that in the patients who received monotherapy and who did not change their drug regimes, the increase in seizure frequency may have been related to the changes in their daily rhythms, emotional stress, tiredness and their day-long fasting.

  13. L-Theanine intake increases threshold for limbic seizures but decreases threshold for generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Schallier, Anneleen; Vermoesen, Katia; Loyens, Ellen; Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Michotte, Yvette; Smolders, Ilse; Massie, Ann

    2013-03-01

    L-Theanine, an ethylamide derivate of glutamate found in abundance in green tea, has been shown to exert beneficial actions in animal models for several neurological disorders. We here investigated for the first time the effect of L-theanine intake on seizure susceptibility using acute pilocarpine and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) mouse models for studying, respectively, limbic seizures or primarily generalized seizures. Moreover, we studied the effect of l-theanine intake on extracellular hippocampal and cortical glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels, using in vivo microdialysis. Feeding mice with a 4% L-theanine solution significantly decreased their susceptibility to pilocarpine-induced seizures whereas susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures was increased. The latter effect was linked to decreased extracellular GABA concentrations in frontal cortex.

  14. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures mimicking gelastic seizures: A description of two cases.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Addolorata; Quarato, Pier Paolo; D'Aniello, Alfredo; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are sudden, involuntary seizure-like attacks that, unlike epileptic seizures, are not related to electrographic ictal discharges and are psychological in nature. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures presenting symptoms mimic a wide array of nervous system dysfunctions, as they involve changes in behavior, motor activity, sensation, cognitive, and autonomic functions. Spontaneous paroxysms of laughing resembling gelastic seizure have only exceptionally been reported as main symptom of PNES. Here, we describe the cases of two patients with a prolonged history of laughter attacks mistaken for epilepsy and unresponsive to AED treatment. Brain MRI and interictal EEG were unremarkable. Video-EEG monitoring allowed us to document the spontaneous and suggestion-induced habitual episodes that were then diagnosed as PNES.

  15. Frontal lobe epilepsy with atypical seizure semiology resembling shuddering attacks or wet dog shake seizures.

    PubMed

    Jahodova, Alena; Krsek, Pavel; Komarek, Vladimir; Kudr, Martin; Kyncl, Martin; Zamecnik, Josef; Tichy, Michal

    2012-03-01

    We report a girl with a drug-resistant frontal lobe epilepsy caused by focal cortical dysplasia, who exhibited uncommon seizures. The seizures consisted of shoulder or whole body shuddering after a short psychic aura and face grimacing. Consciousness was fully preserved. The seizures resembled "wet dog shake" seizures described in rat models of epilepsy or shuddering attacks in infants. EEG findings were inconclusive, however, MRI showed a clear dysplastic lesion in the right frontal mesial and polar structures. The patient underwent an extended lesionectomy guided by neuronavigation and intraoperative electrocorticography. Focal cortical dysplasia type Ib was histologically confirmed and the patient has been seizure-free for the three years following resection. [Published with video sequences].

  16. Are seizures in the setting of sleep deprivation provoked?

    PubMed

    Lawn, Nicholas; Lieblich, Sam; Lee, Judy; Dunne, John

    2014-04-01

    It is generally accepted that sleep deprivation contributes to seizures. However, it is unclear whether a seizure occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should be considered as provoked or not and whether this is influenced by seizure type and etiology. This information may have an important impact on epilepsy diagnosis and management. We prospectively analyzed the influence of sleep deprivation on the risk of seizure recurrence in patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures and compared the findings with patients with first-ever provoked seizures. Of 1026 patients with first-ever unprovoked seizures, 204 (20%) were associated with sleep deprivation. While the overall likelihood of seizure recurrence was slightly lower in sleep-deprived patients with first-ever seizures (log-rank p=0.03), sleep deprivation was not an independent predictor of seizure recurrence on multivariate analysis. Seizure recurrence following a first-ever unprovoked seizure associated with sleep deprivation was far more likely than for 174 patients with a provoked first-ever seizure (log-rank p<0.0001). Our findings support the International League Against Epilepsy recommendation that seizures occurring in the setting of sleep deprivation should not be regarded as provoked.

  17. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  18. Seizures Associated With Hypocalcemia in a Yorkshire Terrier With Protein-Losing Enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Jim; Quimby, Jessica; Bayliss, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    A 7 yr old, male, castrated, Yorkshire terrier was presented on emergency for an acute onset of seizure activity. The owner also reported that the dog had previously exhibited other symptoms, including intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and anorexia for several yr. The initial workup revealed a marked decrease in ionized calcium and total protein. Further diagnostics revealed decreases in magnesium, 25 hydroxyvitamin D, albumin, and globulins, and an increased parathyroid hormone level. Intestinal biopsies revealed inflammatory bowel disease and lymphangiectasia. The dog received intravenous calcium gluconate for treatment of hypocalcemia followed by oral calcium and vitamin D supplementation. Seizure activity ceased once calcium levels approached the normal range. Medical and dietary therapy for lymphangiectasia and inflammatory bowel disease consisted of prednisone, rutin, and a low-fat diet. Decreased serum total ionized calcium levels have been reported previously in dogs with protein-losing enteropathies. Typically, the hypocalcemia is not associated with clinical signs. Severe clinical signs of hypocalcemia are rarely reported in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy, but seizures, facial twitching, and tremors can occur. When presented with a dog with a history of seizure activity, panhypoproteinemia, and hypocalcemia, protein-losing enteropathy should be included on the list of differential diagnoses.

  19. Effects of endogenous histamine on seizure development of pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-San; Chen, Zhong; Huang, Yu-Wen; Hu, Wei-Wei; Wei, Er-Qing; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate whether or not endogenous histamine can protect seizure development of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling in rats. An intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection with clobenpropit (5 and 10 microg), a representative H(3)-antagonist, significantly prolonged the onset of kindling and inhibited the seizure stages in a dose-dependent manner. Its action was significantly reversed by both immepip (2 microg, i.c.v.), an H(3)-agonist, and alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (alpha-FMH, 10 microg, i.c.v.), a selective histidine decarboxylase inhibitor. alpha-FMH (20 microg, i.c.v.) and pyrilamine (1 and 5 mg/kg i.p.), a classical H(1)-antagonist, markedly augmented the severity of seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling. Therefore, these results indicate that brain endogenous histamine plays a certain protective role on seizure development of PTZ-induced kindling in rats, and that its protective roles are mediated by H(1)-receptors.

  20. Frontal lobe nonconvulsive status epilepticus: a case of epileptic stuttering, aphemia, and aphasia--not a sign of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Peter W; Stagg, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    Stuttering is a repetitive, iterative disfluency of speech, and is usually seen as a developmental problem in childhood. Acquired causes in adults include strokes and medications. When stuttering occurs with seizure-like events, it is usually attributed to psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe an elderly man who experienced personality change and bouts of stuttering, followed by anarthria with preserved writing and then aphasia affecting written and uttered language, and ending with confusion. EEG recordings showed nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) with focality in the left frontal region followed by bifrontal NCSE. This case enlarges our understanding of the behavioral correlates of focal frontal seizures to include simple partial seizures with speech and then language output disturbances (aphemia, then aphasia), progressing to complex partial phenomenology in the setting of frontal NCSE.

  1. Constipation enhances the propensity to seizure in pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure models of mice.

    PubMed

    Moezi, Leila; Pirsalami, Fatema; Inaloo, Soroor

    2015-03-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous recurrent seizures and represents one of the most frequent neurological diseases, affecting about 60 million people worldwide. The cellular and neurocircuit bases of epilepsy are poorly understood. Constipation is a common gastrointestinal disorder characterized by symptoms such as straining, hard stool, and infrequent defecation. Population-based studies have shown that the prevalence of constipation is up to 30% of the population in developed countries. The causal link between seizure and constipation is a common belief among patients and physicians, but there are no scientific data to support this association. The current investigation evaluated the effects of constipation induced by loperamide (a peripheral μ-opioid receptor agonist without effect on central nervous system receptors) and clidinium (a quaternary amine antimuscarinic agent with reduced central nervous system effects) on two different seizure models of mice: (1) myoclonic, clonic, and generalized tonic seizures and death induced by intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole and (2) clonic seizure threshold induced by intravenous infusion of pentylenetetrazole. We demonstrated that the measured intestinal transit (%intestinal transit) decreased after loperamide or clidinium treatment for 3days. Constipation in mice which was induced by loperamide or clonidine caused a decrease in threshold to clonic seizure in the intravenous pentylenetetrazole seizure model. Moreover loperamide- or clidinium-induced constipation decreased latencies to, clonic, and tonic seizures and death in the intraperitoneal pentylenetetrazole model of mice. Serum ammonia levels were slightly elevated in both loperamide- and clidinium-treated mice. In conclusion, loperamide- or clidinium-induced constipated mice are more prone to seizure which might confirm the belief of patients and physicians about constipation as a trigger of seizure.

  2. The effects of glycemic control on seizures and seizure-induced excitotoxic cell death

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder after stroke, affecting more than 50 million persons worldwide. Metabolic disturbances are often associated with epileptic seizures, but the pathogenesis of this relationship is poorly understood. It is known that seizures result in altered glucose metabolism, the reduction of intracellular energy metabolites such as ATP, ADP and phosphocreatine and the accumulation of metabolic intermediates, such as lactate and adenosine. In particular, it has been suggested that the duration and extent of glucose dysregulation may be a predictor of the pathological outcome of status. However, little is known about neither the effects of glycemic control on brain metabolism nor the effects of managing systemic glucose concentrations in epilepsy. Results In this study, we examined glycemic modulation of kainate-induced seizure sensitivity and its neuropathological consequences. To investigate the relationship between glycemic modulation, seizure susceptibility and its neuropathological consequences, C57BL/6 mice (excitotoxin cell death resistant) were subjected to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia, followed by systemic administration of kainic acid to induce seizures. Glycemic modulation resulted in minimal consequences with regard to seizure severity but increased hippocampal pathology, irrespective of whether mice were hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic prior to kainate administration. Moreover, we found that exogenous administration of glucose following kainic acid seizures significantly reduced the extent of hippocampal pathology in FVB/N mice (excitotoxin cell death susceptible) following systemic administration of kainic acid. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that modulation of the glycemic index can modify the outcome of brain injury in the kainate model of seizure induction. Moreover, modulation of the glycemic index through glucose rescue greatly diminishes the extent of seizure-induced cell death following kainate

  3. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials for sites of early versus late seizure spread in stereoelectroencephalography.

    PubMed

    Lega, Bradley; Dionisio, Sasha; Flanigan, Patrick; Bingaman, William; Najm, Imad; Nair, Dileep; Gonzalez-Martinez, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Cortico-cortical evoked potentials offer the possibility of understanding connectivity within seizure networks to improve diagnosis and more accurately identify candidates for seizure surgery. We sought to determine if cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation oscillatory changes differ for sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. 37 patients undergoing stereoelectroencephalography were tested using a cortico-cortical evoked potential paradigm. All electrodes were classified according to the speed of ictal spread. EARLY spread sites were matched to a LATE spread site equidistant from the onset zone. Root-mean-square was used to quantify evoked responses and post-stimulation gamma band power and coherence were extracted and compared. Sites of EARLY spread exhibited significantly greater evoked responses after stimulation across all patients (t(36)=2.973, p=0.004). Stimulation elicited enhanced gamma band activity at EARLY spread sites (t(36)=2.61, p=0.03, FDR corrected); this gamma band oscillation was highly coherent with the onset zone. Cortico-cortical evoked potentials and post-stimulation changes in gamma band activity differ between sites of EARLY versus LATE ictal spread. The oscillatory changes can help visualize connectivity within the seizure network.

  4. Early-onset Lafora body disease

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Julie; Girard, Jean-Marie; Lohi, Hannes; Chan, Elayne M.; Wang, Peixiang; Tiberia, Erica; Omer, Salah; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Bennett, Christopher; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Tyagi, Atul; Liu, Yan; Pencea, Nela; Zhao, XiaoChu; Scherer, Stephen W.; Ackerley, Cameron A.

    2012-01-01

    The most common progressive myoclonus epilepsies are the late infantile and late infantile-variant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (onset before the age of 6 years), Unverricht–Lundborg disease (onset after the age of 6 years) and Lafora disease. Lafora disease is a distinct disorder with uniform course: onset in teenage years, followed by progressively worsening myoclonus, seizures, visual hallucinations and cognitive decline, leading to a vegetative state in status myoclonicus and death within 10 years. Biopsy reveals Lafora bodies, which are pathognomonic and not seen with any other progressive myoclonus epilepsies. Lafora bodies are aggregates of polyglucosans, poorly constructed glycogen molecules with inordinately long strands that render them insoluble. Lafora disease is caused by mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding the laforin phosphatase and the malin ubiquitin ligase, respectively, two cytoplasmically active enzymes that regulate glycogen construction, ensuring symmetric expansion into a spherical shape, essential to its solubility. In this work, we report a new progressive myoclonus epilepsy associated with Lafora bodies, early-onset Lafora body disease, map its locus to chromosome 4q21.21, identify its gene and mutation and characterize the relationship of its gene product with laforin and malin. Early-onset Lafora body disease presents early, at 5 years, with dysarthria, myoclonus and ataxia. The combination of early-onset and early dysarthria strongly suggests late infantile-variant neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, not Lafora disease. Pathology reveals no ceroid lipofuscinosis, but Lafora bodies. The subsequent course is a typical progressive myoclonus epilepsy, though much more protracted than any infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, or Lafora disease, patients living into the fourth decade. The mutation, c.781T>C (Phe261Leu), is in a gene of unknown function, PRDM8. We show that the PRDM8 protein interacts with laforin and malin and

  5. Somatostatin receptor subtypes 2 and 4 affect seizure susceptibility and hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Moneta, D; Richichi, C; Aliprandi, M; Dournaud, P; Dutar, P; Billard, J M; Carlo, A S; Viollet, C; Hannon, J P; Fehlmann, D; Nunn, C; Hoyer, D; Epelbaum, J; Vezzani, A

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated the role of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst2 and sst4 in limbic seizures and glutamate-mediated neurotransmission in mouse hippocampus. As compared to wild-type littermates, homozygous mice lacking sst2 receptors showed a 52% reduction in EEG ictal activity induced by intrahippocampal injection of 30 ng kainic acid (P < 0.05). The number of behavioural tonic-clonic seizures was reduced by 50% (P < 0.01) and the time to onset of seizures was doubled on average (P < 0.05). Seizure-associated neurodegeneration was found in the injected hippocampus (CA1, CA3 and hilar interneurons) and sporadically in the ipsilateral latero-dorsal thalamus. This occurred to a similar extent in wild-type and sst2 knock-out mice. Intrahippocampal injection of three selective sst2 receptor agonists in wild-type mice (Octreotide, BIM 23120 and L-779976, 1.5-6.0 nmol) did not affect kainate seizures while the same compounds significantly reduced seizures in rats. L-803087 (5 nmol), a selective sst4 receptor agonist, doubled seizure activity in wild-type mice on average. Interestingly, this effect was blocked by 3 nmol octreotide. It was determined, in both radioligand binding and cAMP accumulation, that octreotide had no direct agonist or antagonist action at mouse sst4 receptors expressed in CCl39 cells, up to micromolar concentrations. In hippocampal slices from wild-type mice, octreotide (2 micro m) did not modify AMPA-mediated synaptic responses while facilitation occurred with L-803087 (2 micro m). Similarly to what was observed in seizures, the effect of L-803087 was reduced by octreotide. In hippocampal slices from sst2 knock-out mice, both octreotide and L-803087 were ineffective on synaptic responses. Our findings show that, unlike in rats, sst2 receptors in mice do not mediate anticonvulsant effects. Moreover, stimulation of sst4 receptors in the hippocampus of wild-type mice induced excitatory effects which appeared to depend on the presence of sst2

  6. Liposteroid therapy for refractory seizures in children.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Yamazaki, S; Abe, T; Oda, Y

    2000-10-01

    Liposteroid is dexamethasone palmitate incorporated into liposomes and was developed as an anti-inflammatory drug for targeting therapy mainly for rheumatoid arthritis. Recently, it was reported that liposteroid might be effective for the treatment of West syndrome, with fewer side effects than those of corticotropin therapy. We describe three patients, a 2-month-old boy with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, a 4-month-old girl with symptomatic West syndrome, and a 2-year-old girl with symptomatic localization-related epilepsy, whose refractory seizures were treated with liposteroid according to the original method reported by Yamamoto and colleagues in 1998. Uncontrollable seizures ceased completely in two patients and the seizure frequency decreased markedly in the other patient. Electroencephalograms revealed marked improvement in all patients. They showed no relapse of the seizures, and all showed no adverse effects except for mild brain shrinkage in one patient. Our experience with these three patients suggests that liposteroid therapy might be a new option for the treatment of refractory seizures in children, as well as for West syndrome.

  7. Plic-1, a new target in repressing epileptic seizure by regulation of GABAAR function in patients and a rat model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yujiao; Li, Zengyou; Gu, Juan; Zhang, Yanke; Wang, Wei; Shen, Hui; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunction of γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors (GABAARs) is a prominent factor affecting intractable epilepsy. Plic-1, an ubiquitin-like protein enriched in the inhibitory synapses connecting GABAARs and the ubiquitin protease system (UPS), plays a key role in the modification of GABAAR functions. However, the relationship between Plic-1 and epileptogenesis is not known. In the present study, we aimed to investigate Plic-1 levels in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as the role of Plic-1 in regulating onset and progression of epilepsy in animal models. We found that Plic-1 expression was significantly decreased in patients with epilepsy as well as pilocarpine- and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced rat epileptic models. Intrahippocampal injection of the PePα peptide, which disrupts Plic-1 binding to GABAARs, significantly shortened the latency of seizure onset, and increased the seizure severity and duration in these two epileptic models. Overexpressed Plic-1 through lentivirus transfection into a PTZ model resulted in a reduction in both seizure severity and generalized tonic-clonic seizure duration. Whole-cell clamp recordings revealed that the PePα peptide decreased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) whereas overexpressed Plic-1 increased mIPSCs in the pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. These effects can be blocked by picrotoxin, a GABAAR inhibitor. Our results indicate that Plic-1 plays an important role in managing epileptic seizures by enhancing seizure inhibition through regulation of GABAARs at synaptic sites.

  8. Acute amnesia and seizures in a young female.

    PubMed

    García García, María Eugenia; Castrillo, Sergio Muñiz; Morales, Irene Garcia; Di Capua Sacoto, Daniela; Dolado, Alberto Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a condition characterised by an acute or sub-acute onset of memory disorder, associated with seizures and psychiatric manifestations. Investigations such as brain MRI usually reveal a high intensity signal in the medial temporal lobe and cerebrospinal fluid analysis shows mild pleocytosis and oligoclonal bands. It may occur in association with cancer, infection, or as an isolated clinical condition, often accompanying autoimmune disorders. Immune-mediated limbic encephalitis is now subclassified according to the presence and type of autoantibodies, which has significant consequences regarding the effectiveness of treatment and prognosis. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that catalyses glutamic acid into gamma aminobutyric acid. Anti-GAD antibodies are associated with different neurological and non-neurological disorders, but only a few cases of limbic encephalitis associated with anti-GAD antibodies have been reported in the literature, most of them non-paraneoplastic. Here, we report the case of a young female patient with a medical history of psoriasis who developed an acute onset and chronic evolution of anterograde amnesia, associated with drug-resistant epilepsy. Brain MRI showed hyperintensity in the medial temporal lobes and the biochemical studies revealed intrathecal synthesis of anti-GAD antibodies. Screening tests for tumours were negative. Despite antiepileptic drugs, intravenous immunoglobulins and immunosuppressive treatment, the patient did not show clinical improvement and one year later, she continues to present refractory temporal epilepsy and cognitive deficits.

  9. Seizures induced by frustration and despair due to unresolved moral and political issues: a rare case of reflex epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, O; River, Y; Abramsky, O

    1999-01-01

    We present a case of reflex-induced simple partial seizures, triggered by feelings of frustration, anger and despair. Such emotions were provoked by pondering over complex national and international, political and moral issues. The present case may suggest that activation of right temporal networks may mediate negative and adverse emotions induced by preoccupation with agitating, controversial issues.

  10. Low doses of urethane effectively inhibit spinal seizures evoked by sudden cooling of toad isolated spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-crespo, J.C.; Dalo, N.L. )

    1992-01-01

    The effect of low doses of urethane on three phases of spinal seizures evoked by sudden cooling (SSSC) of toad isolated spinal cord was studied. In control toads, SSSC began with a latency of 91[plus minus]3 sec exhibiting brief tremors, followed by clonic muscle contractions and finally reaching a tonic contraction. The latency of onset of seizures was significantly enhanced. The tonic phase was markedly abolished in toads pretreated intralymphaticaly with 0.15 g/kg of urethane. Tremors were the only phase observed in 55% of toads that received doses of 0.2 g/kg, and a total blockage of seizures was seen after doses of 0.25 g/kg of urethane in 50% of the preparations. A possible depressant effect of urethane on transmission mediated by excitatory amino acids is suggested.

  11. Management of dental patients with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Robert B; Sullivan, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    Dental practitioners from time to time must treat patients with epilepsy or similar seizure disorders. This article describes the various classification for epilepsy, explains how such disorders are evaluated and diagnosed, discusses management methods, and addresses related issues for special populations, such as pregnant women and elderly. In addition, the article offers information about what special steps dentists should take in treating such epileptic patients and others vulnerable to seizures and in preparing offices and staff for the possibility that a patient will have a seizure in the office. In general, a patient with severe, poorly controlled epilepsy should be treated in a hospital. Otherwise, a well-controlled patient should easily be treated in the office.

  12. Effects of an Acute Seizure on Associative Learning and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Andrew J.; Lugo, Joaquin N.

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed an adult 129SvEvTac mouse to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1 hour, but not 6 hours, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared to controls 24 hours later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1 hour after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open field test 2 hours but not 24 hours later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge. PMID:26655449

  13. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  14. Comparable seizure characteristics in magnetic seizure therapy and electroconvulsive therapy for major depression.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Sarah; Bewernick, Bettina H; Hurlemann, René; Soehle, Martin; Schlaepfer, Thomas E

    2013-11-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is highly effective for treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, its use for less severe forms of depression is somewhat limited by a lack of control over current spreading to medial temporal lobe memory structures, resulting in various cognitive side effects. In contrast, magnetic seizure therapy (MST), which uses high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for local seizure induction, has been associated with reduced cognitive side effects. To assess whether different characteristics of seizures induced by both methods are responsible for the differences in neuropsychological side-effect profile, we studied seven TRD-patients undergoing both MST and ECT in an open-label, within subject, controlled crossover pilot study. Comparison parameters included seizure-related ictal characteristics, including motor activity, electromyogram (EMG), electroencephalogram (EEG), and postictal recovery and reorientation times.Our results showed no differences in motor activity or EMG and EEG characteristics, thus implicating similar electrophysiological processes in seizure induction with MST and ECT. In line with previous studies, we observed shorter postictal recovery and reorientation times following MST.The ictal characteristics of induced seizures were found similar with ECT and MST suggesting that the more focal seizure induction associated with MST may account for the more beneficial neuropsychological side effect profile of MST.

  15. Comparison of three nonlinear seizure prediction methods by means of the seizure prediction characteristic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiwald, Thomas; Winterhalder, Matthias; Aschenbrenner-Scheibe, Richard; Voss, Henning U.; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Timmer, Jens

    2004-07-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by the spontaneous and unforeseeable occurrence of seizures, during which the perception or behavior of patients is disturbed. The predictability of these seizures would render novel therapeutic approaches possible. Several prediction methods have claimed to be able to predict seizures based on EEG recordings minutes in advance. However, the term seizure prediction is not unequivocally defined, different criteria to assess prediction methods exist, and only little attention has been paid to issues of sensitivity and false prediction rate. We introduce an assessment criterion called the seizure prediction characteristic that incorporates the assessment of sensitivity and false prediction rate. Within this framework, three nonlinear seizure prediction methods were evaluated on a large EEG data pool of 21 patients. Altogether, 582 h intracranial EEG data and 88 seizures were examined. With a rate of 1-3.6 false predictions per day, the “dynamical similarity index” achieves a sensitivity between 21 and 42%, which was the best result of the three methods. Sensitivity was between 18 and 31% for the extended, prospective version of the “accumulated energy” and between 13 and 30% for the “effective correlation dimension”. These results still are not sufficient for clinical applications.

  16. Carbamazepine clearance and seizure stability during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Emily L; Stowe, Zachary N; Ritchie, James C; Newport, D Jeffrey; Newman, Melanee L; Knight, Bettina; Pennell, Page B

    2014-04-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the alterations in total and free carbamazepine (CBZ) and in total and free carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-EPO) clearances during pregnancy, to calculate the change in free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-EPO during pregnancy, and to determine whether seizure worsening is associated with a low ratio to nonpregnant baseline concentration of total or free CBZ or CBZ-EPO. Women on CBZ were enrolled before conception or during pregnancy in this prospective, observational study. Concomitant medications and seizure frequency were recorded. Serum total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO were collected at each visit. Changes in the clearance of all four compounds and free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-EPO were compared with nonpregnant baseline. During pregnancy, the ratios to baseline concentrations of total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO were compared for months with and without increased seizure frequency. Total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO clearances were calculated in 15 pregnancies in 12 women. Clearances did not change for any of these compounds during pregnancy. The free fraction of CBZ increased from 0.23 at baseline to a maximum of 0.32 in the third trimester (p=0.008). In the six women on CBZ monotherapy with adequate seizure diaries and blood sampling, seizure worsening did not correspond to a ratio to baseline concentration of less than 0.65 for total or free CBZ or CBZ-EPO. In conclusion, total and free CBZ and CBZ-EPO clearances did not change substantially during pregnancy, and seizure frequency worsening was not associated with decreased concentrations of total or free CBZ; therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring may not be necessary for all women on CBZ during pregnancy. Further studies with larger sample sizes are needed before definitive recommendations can be made. Carbamazepine monotherapy may be a relatively safe and cost effective treatment option for women with focal epilepsy syndromes during pregnancy.

  17. The effects of early-life seizures on hippocampal dendrite development and later-life learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Casanova, J R; Nishimura, Masataka; Swann, John W

    2014-04-01

    Severe childhood epilepsy is commonly associated with intellectual developmental disabilities. The reasons for these cognitive deficits are likely multifactorial and will vary between epilepsy syndromes and even among children with the same syndrome. However, one factor these children have in common is the recurring seizures they experience - sometimes on a daily basis. Supporting the idea that the seizures themselves can contribute to intellectual disabilities are laboratory results demonstrating spatial learning and memory deficits in normal mice and rats that have experienced recurrent seizures in infancy. Studies reviewed here have shown that seizures in vivo and electrographic seizure activity in vitro both suppress the growth of hippocampal pyramidal cell dendrites. A simplification of dendritic arborization and a resulting decrease in the number and/or properties of the excitatory synapses on them could help explain the observed cognitive disabilities. There are a wide variety of candidate mechanisms that could be involved in seizure-induced growth suppression. The challenge is designing experiments that will help focus research on a limited number of potential molecular events. Thus far, results suggest that growth suppression is NMDA receptor-dependent and associated with a decrease in activation of the transcription factor CREB. The latter result is intriguing since CREB is known to play an important role in dendrite growth. Seizure-induced dendrite growth suppression may not occur as a single process in which pyramidal cells dendrites simply stop growing or grow slower compared to normal neurons. Instead, recent results suggest that after only a few hours of synchronized epileptiform activity in vitro dendrites appear to partially retract. This acute response is also NMDA receptor dependent and appears to be mediated by the Ca(+2)/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. An understanding of the staging of seizure-induced growth suppression and the

  18. Animal Models of Seizures and Epilepsy: Past, Present, and Future Role for the Discovery of Antiseizure Drugs.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-03-13

    The identification of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of epilepsy requires the use of seizure models. Except for some early treatments, including bromides and phenobarbital, the antiseizure activity of all clinically used drugs was, for the most part, defined by acute seizure models in rodents using the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole seizure tests and the electrically kindled rat. Unfortunately, the clinical evidence to date would suggest that none of these models, albeit useful, are likely to identify those therapeutics that will effectively manage patients with drug resistant seizures. Over the last 30 years, a number of animal models have been developed that display varying degrees of pharmacoresistance, such as the phenytoin- or lamotrigine-resistant kindled rat, the 6-Hz mouse model of partial seizures, the intrahippocampal kainate model in mice, or rats in which spontaneous recurrent seizures develops after inducing status epilepticus by chemical or electrical stimulation. As such, these models can be used to study mechanisms of drug resistance and may provide a unique opportunity for identifying a truly novel antiseizure drug (ASD), but thus far clinical evidence for this hope is lacking. Although animal models of drug resistant seizures are now included in ASD discovery approaches such as the ETSP (epilepsy therapy screening program), it is important to note that no single model has been validated for use to identify potential compounds for as yet drug resistant seizures, but rather a battery of such models should be employed, thus enhancing the sensitivity to discover novel, highly effective ASDs. The present review describes the previous and current approaches used in the search for new ASDs and offers some insight into future directions incorporating new and emerging animal models of therapy resistance.

  19. Comparison of Relation between Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children with and without Simple Febrile Seizure Admitted in Arak Central Iran

    PubMed Central

    SALEHI, Bahman; YOUSEFICHAIJAN, Parsa; SAFI ARIAN, Smira; EBRAHIMI, Somaieh; NAZIRI, Mahdyieh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Febrile seizure is one of the most prevalent childhood convulsions with the most common age of onset at 14-18 mo old. Fever decreases the brain threshold for seizure. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is also a neurologic-behavioral problem defined by attention deficit and hyperactivity according to DSM-IV criteria in which the child must have these signs in two different environments. There is controversy on the possible relation between febrile seizure and ADHD; while some studies approve a strong relation, some exclude any relation and some attribute ADHD to the side effects of other reasons. Materials & Methods This descriptive-analytic study enrolled all children of 3-12 yr old with febrile seizure (according to Nelson Pediatrics Textbook diagnosed by the pediatrician in charge) referring to Amir Kabir Hospital, Arak, central Iran in 2010-2011. Overall, 103 of them with no corporeal or psychological disorder (like depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and other CNS maternal disease) were compared to 103 children of the same age and gender admitted due to disease other than febrile seizure utilizing DSM IV criteria for ADHD. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results The hyperactivity disorder in the control and case group was 34.3% and 16.7%, respectively, denoted a significant relation between simple febrile seizure and hyperactivity. Conclusion Hyperactivity has a significant relation with febrile seizure in male gender, making further investigation in these children prudent for early diagnosis and management. PMID:27843467

  20. Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activity Regulates Brain Expression of P-Glycoprotein in the Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nian; Di, Qing; Liu, Hao; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Ying; Yan, Yu-kui; Zhang, Yan-fang; Zhang, Ying-dong

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of NF-κB activity on the