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Sample records for partial shadowing detection

  1. Robust road detection in shadow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Kaiyue; Xia, Siyu; Zhang, Junkang; Qin, A. Kai

    2016-07-01

    Image-based road detection is a vital task for many real-world applications, such as autonomous driving and obstacle detection. We propose a method for segmenting road regions from a single image based on horizon line estimation and clustering technology. The key idea is to leverage normalized cross correlation to search for the line separating the road image. Additionally, we divide the lower part of the road image into several identical parts horizontally and utilize a density-peak clustering algorithm in terms of gray and HSV value of each pixel. Clustering results are further labeled as road and nonroad based on the assumption that two adjacent horizontal parts share similar clustering size and average gray value. For road images with shadows, we also propose a new shadow-free space derived from HSV space. By calculating maximum entropy and reconstructing images, we show that shadows are eliminated to achieve better road detection. Experimental results on four datasets and shadow images demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of our method.

  2. Shadow detection and removal based on the saliency map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhiwen; Cao, Zhiguo; Deng, Chunhua; Yan, Ruicheng; Qin, Yueming

    2013-10-01

    The detection of shadow is the first step to reduce the imaging effect that is caused by the interactions of the light source with surfaces, and then shadow removal can recover the vein information from the dark region. In this paper, we have presented a new method to detect the shadow in a single nature image with the saliency map and to remove the shadow. Firstly, RGB image is transferred to 2D module in order to improve the blue component. Secondly, saliency map of blue component is extracted via graph-based manifold ranking. Then the edge of the shadow can be detected in order to recover the transitional region between the shadow and non-shadow region. Finally, shadow is compensated by enhancing the image in RGB space. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Exposing Image Forgery by Detecting Consistency of Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yongzhen; Qin, Fan; Min, Weidong; Zhang, Guiling

    2014-01-01

    We propose two tampered image detection methods based on consistency of shadow. The first method is based on texture consistency of shadow for the first kind of splicing image, in which the shadow as well as main body is copied and pasted from another image. The suspicious region including shadow and nonshadow is first selected. Then texture features of the shadow region and the nonshadow region are extracted. Last, correlation function is used to measure the similarity of the two texture features. By comparing the similarity, we can judge whether the image is tampered. Due to the failure in detecting the second kind of splicing image, in which main body, its shadow, and surrounding regions are copied and pasted from another image, another method based on strength of light source of shadows is proposed. The two suspicious shadow regions are first selected. Then an efficient method is used to estimate the strength of light source of shadow. Last, the similarity of strength of light source of two shadows is measured by correlation function. By combining the two methods, we can detect forged image with shadows. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods are effective despite using simplified model compared with the existing methods. PMID:24757419

  4. Exposing image forgery by detecting consistency of shadow.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yongzhen; Qin, Fan; Min, Weidong; Zhang, Guiling

    2014-01-01

    We propose two tampered image detection methods based on consistency of shadow. The first method is based on texture consistency of shadow for the first kind of splicing image, in which the shadow as well as main body is copied and pasted from another image. The suspicious region including shadow and nonshadow is first selected. Then texture features of the shadow region and the nonshadow region are extracted. Last, correlation function is used to measure the similarity of the two texture features. By comparing the similarity, we can judge whether the image is tampered. Due to the failure in detecting the second kind of splicing image, in which main body, its shadow, and surrounding regions are copied and pasted from another image, another method based on strength of light source of shadows is proposed. The two suspicious shadow regions are first selected. Then an efficient method is used to estimate the strength of light source of shadow. Last, the similarity of strength of light source of two shadows is measured by correlation function. By combining the two methods, we can detect forged image with shadows. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods are effective despite using simplified model compared with the existing methods.

  5. A novel method to detect shadows on multispectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daǧlayan Sevim, Hazan; Yardımcı ćetin, Yasemin; Özışık Başkurt, Didem

    2016-10-01

    Shadowing occurs when the direct light coming from a light source is obstructed by high human made structures, mountains or clouds. Since shadow regions are illuminated only by scattered light, true spectral properties of the objects are not observed in such regions. Therefore, many object classification and change detection problems utilize shadow detection as a preprocessing step. Besides, shadows are useful for obtaining 3D information of the objects such as estimating the height of buildings. With pervasiveness of remote sensing images, shadow detection is ever more important. This study aims to develop a shadow detection method on multispectral images based on the transformation of C1C2C3 space and contribution of NIR bands. The proposed method is tested on Worldview-2 images covering Ankara, Turkey at different times. The new index is used on these 8-band multispectral images with two NIR bands. The method is compared with methods in the literature.

  6. Satellite images analysis for shadow detection and building height estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liasis, Gregoris; Stavrou, Stavros

    2016-09-01

    Satellite images can provide valuable information about the presented urban landscape scenes to remote sensing and telecommunication applications. Obtaining information from satellite images is difficult since all the objects and their surroundings are presented with feature complexity. The shadows cast by buildings in urban scenes can be processed and used for estimating building heights. Thus, a robust and accurate building shadow detection process is important. Region-based active contour models can be used for satellite image segmentation. However, spectral heterogeneity that usually exists in satellite images and the feature similarity representing the shadow and several non-shadow regions makes building shadow detection challenging. In this work, a new automated method for delineating building shadows is proposed. Initially, spectral and spatial features of the satellite image are utilized for designing a custom filter to enhance shadows and reduce intensity heterogeneity. An effective iterative procedure using intensity differences is developed for tuning and subsequently selecting the most appropriate filter settings, able to highlight the building shadows. The response of the filter is then used for automatically estimating the radiometric property of the shadows. The customized filter and the radiometric feature are utilized to form an optimized active contour model where the contours are biased to delineate shadow regions. Post-processing morphological operations are also developed and applied for removing misleading artefacts. Finally, building heights are approximated using shadow length and the predefined or estimated solar elevation angle. Qualitative and quantitative measures are used for evaluating the performance of the proposed method for both shadow detection and building height estimation.

  7. Using Shadows to Detect Targets In Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    a filter could be designed that attempts to classify or identify all of the detected objects from a pool of known types. Target identification in SAR...located within that collection of objects with an average detection accuracy rate of 93%. The shadow-based target detection algorithm results in a lower... object casting the shadow or the far edge of the object . The Moving and Stationary Target Acquisition and Recognition (MSTAR) data used in this

  8. Physical models for moving shadow and object detection in video.

    PubMed

    Nadimi, Sohail; Bhanu, Bir

    2004-08-01

    Current moving object detection systems typically detect shadows cast by the moving object as part of the moving object. In this paper, the problem of separating moving cast shadows from the moving objects in an outdoor environment is addressed. Unlike previous work, we present an approach that does not rely on any geometrical assumptions such as camera location and ground surface/object geometry. The approach is based on a new spatio-temporal albedo test and dichromatic reflection model and accounts for both the sun and the sky illuminations. Results are presented for several video sequences representing a variety of ground materials when the shadows are cast on different surface types. These results show that our approach is robust to widely different background and foreground materials, and illuminations.

  9. The research on the shadow detection from high resolution remote sensing imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhong; Zhou, Heng; Deng, Tao; Luo, Song

    2013-10-01

    Shadow is one of the basic characteristics in urban remote sensed imagery. It affects the extraction of object's edge, identification of objects and registration of images, so shadow detection has a great importance in urban remote sensing. In this paper, a kind of method with HSV is proposed to detect shadow from the color high resolution remote sensing imagery mainly through a series of processing steps including twice HSV transformation, self-adaptive segmentation, morphological closing operation and little area removing. At last, the ratio of the shadow is achieved according to the shadow area statistical analysis. The experiments show that the approach can detect the shadow accurately and availably.

  10. Shadow Detection Based on Regions of Light Sources for Object Extraction in Nighttime Video

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gil-beom; Lee, Myeong-jin; Lee, Woo-Kyung; Park, Joo-heon; Kim, Tae-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Intelligent video surveillance systems detect pre-configured surveillance events through background modeling, foreground and object extraction, object tracking, and event detection. Shadow regions inside video frames sometimes appear as foreground objects, interfere with ensuing processes, and finally degrade the event detection performance of the systems. Conventional studies have mostly used intensity, color, texture, and geometric information to perform shadow detection in daytime video, but these methods lack the capability of removing shadows in nighttime video. In this paper, a novel shadow detection algorithm for nighttime video is proposed; this algorithm partitions each foreground object based on the object’s vertical histogram and screens out shadow objects by validating their orientations heading toward regions of light sources. From the experimental results, it can be seen that the proposed algorithm shows more than 93.8% shadow removal and 89.9% object extraction rates for nighttime video sequences, and the algorithm outperforms conventional shadow removal algorithms designed for daytime videos. PMID:28327515

  11. Optical Algorithm for Cloud Shadow Detection Over Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    contextual information to detect cumulus clouds and cloud shadows in Landsat data," Int. J. Remote Sens., vol. 3, no. l.pp. 51-62,1982. [12] T...Betendes, S. K. Sengupta, R. M. Welch, B. A. Wielicki, and M. Navar, " Cumulus cloud base height estimation from high spatial resolution rr-r 740 IEEE...REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 05-02-2013 2. REPORT TYPE Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From ■ To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optical Algorithm for Cloud

  12. The Influence of Cast Shadows on the Detection of Three-Dimensional Curved Contour Structure.

    PubMed

    Khuu, Sieu K; Honson, Vanessa J; Challinor, Kirsten L

    2016-04-01

    Cast shadows have been shown to provide an effective ordinal cue to the depth position of objects. In the present study, two experiments investigated the effectiveness of cast shadows in facilitating the detection of spatial contours embedded in a field of randomly placed elements. In Experiment 1, the separation between the cast shadow and the contour was systematically increased to effectively signal different contour depth positions (relative to background elements), and this was repeated for patterns in which the lighting direction was above and from below. Increasing the shadow separation improved contour detection performance, but the degree to which sensitivity changed was dependent on the lighting direction. Patterns in which the light was from above were better detected than patterns in which the lighting direction was from below. This finding is consistent with the visual system assuming a "light-from-above rule" when processing cast shadows. In Experiment 2, we examined the degree to which changing the shape of the cast shadow (by randomly jittering the position of local cast shadow elements) affected the ability of the visual system to rely on the cast shadow to cue the depth position of the contour. Consistent with a coarse scale analysis, we find that cast shadows remained an effective depth cue even at large degrees of element jitter. Our findings demonstrate that cast shadows provide an effective means of signaling depth, which aids the process of contour integration, and this process is largely tolerant of local variations in lighting direction.

  13. Shadow detection in camera-based vehicle detection: survey and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellos, Pablo; Gomes, Vitor; Scharcanski, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    The number of vehicles in circulation in modern urban centers has greatly increased, which motivates the development of automatic traffic monitoring systems. Consequently, camera-based traffic monitoring systems are becoming more widely used, since they offer important technological advantages in comparison with traditional traffic monitoring systems (e.g., simpler maintenance and more flexibility for the design of practical configurations). The segmentation of the foreground (i.e., vehicles) is a fundamental step in the workflow of a camera-based traffic monitoring system. However, foreground segmentation can be negatively affected by vehicle shadows. This paper discusses the types of shadow detection methods available in the literature, their advantages, disadvantages, and in which situations these methods can improve camera-based vehicle detection for traffic monitoring. In order to compare the performance of these different types of shadow detection methods, experiments are conducted with typical methods of each category using publicly available datasets. This work shows that shadow detection definitely can improve the reliability of traffic monitoring systems, but the choice of the type of shadow method depends on the system specifications (e.g., tolerated error), the availability of computational resources, and prior information about the scene and its illumination in regular operation conditions.

  14. Shadow detection of the high-resolution remote sensing image based on pulse coupled neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Yu; Lu, Shan

    2011-12-01

    Traditional shadow detection methods are usually detected shadow areas by the single threshold in shadow feature map. This leads to the detection results susceptible to affect by noise, and some special target (high-bright objects and green vegetation etc.) susceptible to misdetection. In this paper, a shadow detection method is proposed based on pulse coupled neural network (PCNN). The model can ignore small differences of pixels values in one area, because the network output is not only associated with the pixel brightness but also associated with pixel spatial location. Firstly, a new shadow feature map is build. Then PCNN model is applied to get optimal detection result with max entropy. The experimental results showed that the proposed model performed better than the single threshold models.

  15. Shadow Probability of Detection and False Alarm for Median-Filtered SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter; Miller, John A.; Bishop, Edward E.; Horndt, Volker

    2014-06-01

    Median filtering reduces speckle in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery while preserving edges, at the expense of coarsening the resolution, by replacing the center pixel of a sliding window by the median value. For shadow detection, this approach helps distinguish shadows from clutter more easily, while preserving shadow shape delineations. However, the nonlinear operation alters the shadow and clutter distributions and statistics, which must be taken into consideration when computing probability of detection and false alarm metrics. Depending on system parameters, median filtering can improve probability of detection and false alarm by orders of magnitude. Herein, we examine shadow probability of detection and false alarm in a homogeneous, ideal clutter background after median filter post-processing. Some comments on multi-look processing effects with and without median filtering are also made.

  16. Performance Improvement of Partially Shaded Photovoltaic Arrays under Moving Shadow Conditions through Shade Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayalekshmy, S.; Bindu, G. R.; Rama Iyer, S.

    2016-12-01

    Photovoltaic arrays, which are prone to partial shading (PS) reduce the output power than the real power rating of the array. This paper presents the comparative analyses on the electrical characteristics and power losses of a conventional totally cross tied (TCT) configuration, and rearranged TCT (RTCT) in which the modules are physically rearranged in such a way that there is an improvement of power output of array under moving illumination condition (moving cloud). In RTCT, the physical position of the modules is organized based on the Sudoku puzzle pattern so as to scatter the shading effect over the entire array. The rearrangement of modules is performed without varying the electrical connection of the modules in the array. It is validated that the power generation of array under amoving shadow condition is enhanced and the various PS losses are reduced in rearranged configuration.

  17. Shadow detection improvement using spectral indices and morphological operators in high resolution images from urban areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo, S. C.; Silva, E. A.; Pedrosa, M. M.

    2015-04-01

    While high-resolution remote sensing images have increased application possibilities for urban studies, the large number of shadow areas has created challenges to processing and extracting information from these images. Furthermore, shadows can reduce or omit information from the surface as well as degrading the visual quality of images. The pixels of shadows tend to have lower radiance response within the spectrum and are often confused with low reflectance targets. In this work, a shadow detection method was proposed using a morphological operator for dark pattern identification combined with spectral indices. The aims are to avoid misclassification in shadow identification through properties provided by them on color models and, therefore, to improve shadow detection accuracy. Experimental results were tested applying the panchromatic and multispectral band of WorldView-2 image from Sao Paulo city in Brazil, which is a complex urban environment composed by high objects like tall buildings causing large shadow areas. Black top-hat with area injunction was applied in PAN image and shadow identification performance has improved with index as Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Saturation-Value Difference Index (NSDVI) ratio from HSV color space obtained from pansharpened multispectral WV-2 image. An increase in distinction between shadows and others objects was observed, which was tested for the completeness, correctness and quality measures computed, using a created manual shadow mask as reference. Therefore, this method can contribute to overcoming difficulties faced by other techniques that need shadow detection as a first necessary preprocessing step, like object recognition, image matching, 3D reconstruction, etc.

  18. Automatic aerial image shadow detection through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun; Li, Huilin; Peng, Zhiyong

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents our research on automatic shadow detection from high-resolution aerial image through the hybrid analysis of RGB and HIS color space. To this end, the spectral characteristics of shadow are firstly discussed and three kinds of spectral components including the difference between normalized blue and normalized red component - BR, intensity and saturation components are selected as criterions to obtain initial segmentation of shadow region (called primary segmentation). After that, within the normalized RGB color space and HIS color space, the shadow region is extracted again (called auxiliary segmentation) using the OTSU operation, respectively. Finally, the primary segmentation and auxiliary segmentation are combined through a logical AND-connection operation to obtain reliable shadow region. In this step, small shadow areas are removed from combined shadow region and morphological algorithms are apply to fill small holes as well. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can effectively detect the shadow region from high-resolution aerial image and in high degree of automaton.

  19. Defining solar park location using shadow over time detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, Ivan; Kauranne, Tuomo

    2016-06-01

    There is nowadays a high demand for research on using renewable sources of energy including solar energy. The availability of stable and efficient solar energy is of paramount importance. Therefore, it is vital to install solar panels in locations which are most of the time not in shadow. To illustrate this idea we have developed a shadow identification method for digital elevation models (DEMs) using the computational means of MATLAB whose environment and tools allow fast and easy image processing. As a source of DEMs we use the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) database since it covers most of the terrain of our planet.

  20. Detection of buildings through automatic extraction of shadows in Ikonos imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armesto Gonzalaz, Julia; Gil Docampo, Mariluz L.; Canas Guerrero, Ignacio

    2004-02-01

    The extraction of man-made objects from remotely sensed imagery is a common application in remote sensing. Building detection is useful in territorial planning, mapping and Geographic Information Systems. Nevertheless these features are difficult to recognise in satellite data because of their variations in structure and size and especially because of the spatial resolution of the imagery. IRS panchromatic data, with 5,8 meters pixel size, was the higher spatial resolution sensor in civil applications until the Ikonos imageries distribution. Several approaches have been proposed for building detection in aerial images. Buildings cast a shadow in some direction and that is why many authors have employed shadows to detect constructions. Other authors use shadows to verify them, once they have been detected by some other techniques. This work focus on shadows detection probabilistic methods: it is found that digital supervised classification of the first principal component obtained from the application of a principal component analysis on the four channels of Ikonos allows identifying shadows and distinguishing them from other covers in the image. It is a fast and effective method and it can be implemented through tools available in commercial remote sensing software. This shadow detection system will provide cost-effectiveness in the inventorying of buildings, especially in areas of dispersed settlement, given that it significantly reduces fieldwork, and even can function as a support and test of the methods of automatic extraction of buildings from satellite images developed up to now.

  1. Shadow detection in color aerial images based on HSI space and color attenuation relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenxuan; Li, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Many problems in image processing and computer vision arise from shadows in a single color aerial image. This article presents a new algorithm by which shadows are extracted from a single color aerial image. Apart from using the ratio value of the hue over the intensity in some state-of-the-art algorithms, this article introduces another ratio map, which is obtained by applying the saturation over the intensity. Candidate shadow and nonshadow regions are separated by applying Otus's thresholding method. The color attenuation relationship that describes the relationship between the attenuation of each color channel is derived from the Planck's blackbody irradiance law. For each region, the color attenuation relationship and other determination conditions are performed iteratively to segment it into smaller sub-regions and to identify whether each sub-region is a true shadow region. Compared with previous methods, the proposed algorithm presents better shadow detection accuracy in the images that contain some dark green lawn, river, or low brightness shadow regions. The experimental results demonstrate the advantage of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Shadow detection and removal in RGB VHR images for land use unsupervised classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movia, A.; Beinat, A.; Crosilla, F.

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, high resolution aerial images are widely available thanks to the diffusion of advanced technologies such as UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) and new satellite missions. Although these developments offer new opportunities for accurate land use analysis and change detection, cloud and terrain shadows actually limit benefits and possibilities of modern sensors. Focusing on the problem of shadow detection and removal in VHR color images, the paper proposes new solutions and analyses how they can enhance common unsupervised classification procedures for identifying land use classes related to the CO2 absorption. To this aim, an improved fully automatic procedure has been developed for detecting image shadows using exclusively RGB color information, and avoiding user interaction. Results show a significant accuracy enhancement with respect to similar methods using RGB based indexes. Furthermore, novel solutions derived from Procrustes analysis have been applied to remove shadows and restore brightness in the images. In particular, two methods implementing the so called ;anisotropic Procrustes; and the ;not-centered oblique Procrustes; algorithms have been developed and compared with the linear correlation correction method based on the Cholesky decomposition. To assess how shadow removal can enhance unsupervised classifications, results obtained with classical methods such as k-means, maximum likelihood, and self-organizing maps, have been compared to each other and with a supervised clustering procedure.

  3. Automatic Detection of Clouds and Shadows Using High Resolution Satellite Image Time Series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champion, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Detecting clouds and their shadows is one of the primaries steps to perform when processing satellite images because they may alter the quality of some products such as large-area orthomosaics. The main goal of this paper is to present the automatic method developed at IGN-France for detecting clouds and shadows in a sequence of satellite images. In our work, surface reflectance orthoimages are used. They were processed from initial satellite images using a dedicated software. The cloud detection step consists of a region-growing algorithm. Seeds are firstly extracted. For that purpose and for each input ortho-image to process, we select the other ortho-images of the sequence that intersect it. The pixels of the input ortho-image are secondly labelled seeds if the difference of reflectance (in the blue channel) with overlapping ortho-images is bigger than a given threshold. Clouds are eventually delineated using a region-growing method based on a radiometric and homogeneity criterion. Regarding the shadow detection, our method is based on the idea that a shadow pixel is darker when comparing to the other images of the time series. The detection is basically composed of three steps. Firstly, we compute a synthetic ortho-image covering the whole study area. Its pixels have a value corresponding to the median value of all input reflectance ortho-images intersecting at that pixel location. Secondly, for each input ortho-image, a pixel is labelled shadows if the difference of reflectance (in the NIR channel) with the synthetic ortho-image is below a given threshold. Eventually, an optional region-growing step may be used to refine the results. Note that pixels labelled clouds during the cloud detection are not used for computing the median value in the first step; additionally, the NIR input data channel is used to perform the shadow detection, because it appeared to better discriminate shadow pixels. The method was tested on times series of Landsat 8 and Pl

  4. On the detection of the Moon shadow with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Distefano, C.; ANTARES Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of detecting the Moon shadow with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation was conducted in order to calculate the expected significance for the measurement. Simulation results show that the ANTARES telescope will be able to observe the effect in a couple of years. Results of the simulation study will be presented and discussed.

  5. Visual sensor based abnormal event detection with moving shadow removal in home healthcare applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sook; Chung, Wan-Young

    2012-01-01

    Vision-based abnormal event detection for home healthcare systems can be greatly improved using visual sensor-based techniques able to detect, track and recognize objects in the scene. However, in moving object detection and tracking processes, moving cast shadows can be misclassified as part of objects or moving objects. Shadow removal is an essential step for developing video surveillance systems. The goal of the primary is to design novel computer vision techniques that can extract objects more accurately and discriminate between abnormal and normal activities. To improve the accuracy of object detection and tracking, our proposed shadow removal algorithm is employed. Abnormal event detection based on visual sensor by using shape features variation and 3-D trajectory is presented to overcome the low fall detection rate. The experimental results showed that the success rate of detecting abnormal events was 97% with a false positive rate of 2%. Our proposed algorithm can allow distinguishing diverse fall activities such as forward falls, backward falls, and falling asides from normal activities.

  6. Automated cloud and shadow detection and filling using two-date Landsat imagery in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jin, Suming; Homer, Collin G.; Yang, Limin; Xian, George; Fry, Joyce; Danielson, Patrick; Townsend, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    A simple, efficient, and practical approach for detecting cloud and shadow areas in satellite imagery and restoring them with clean pixel values has been developed. Cloud and shadow areas are detected using spectral information from the blue, shortwave infrared, and thermal infrared bands of Landsat Thematic Mapper or Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus imagery from two dates (a target image and a reference image). These detected cloud and shadow areas are further refined using an integration process and a false shadow removal process according to the geometric relationship between cloud and shadow. Cloud and shadow filling is based on the concept of the Spectral Similarity Group (SSG), which uses the reference image to find similar alternative pixels in the target image to serve as replacement values for restored areas. Pixels are considered to belong to one SSG if the pixel values from Landsat bands 3, 4, and 5 in the reference image are within the same spectral ranges. This new approach was applied to five Landsat path/rows across different landscapes and seasons with various types of cloud patterns. Results show that almost all of the clouds were captured with minimal commission errors, and shadows were detected reasonably well. Among five test scenes, the lowest producer's accuracy of cloud detection was 93.9% and the lowest user's accuracy was 89%. The overall cloud and shadow detection accuracy ranged from 83.6% to 99.3%. The pixel-filling approach resulted in a new cloud-free image that appears seamless and spatially continuous despite differences in phenology between the target and reference images. Our methods offer a straightforward and robust approach for preparing images for the new 2011 National Land Cover Database production.

  7. Vehicle detection based on the use of shadow region and edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Sangheon; Kang, Seongkoo; Kim, Joongkyu

    2013-07-01

    Automotive and advanced driver assistance systems have attracted a great deal of attention lately. In these systems, effective and reliable vehicle detection is important because such systems can reduce the number of accidents and save human' lives. This paper describes an approach to detecting a forward vehicle using a camera mounted on the moving vehicle. In this paper, we describe two methods to detect a vehicle on the road. First, by using the vehicle's shadow, we can obtain the general location of the vehicular candidate. Second, we can identify the strong vertical edges at the left and right position of a vehicle. By combining the shadows and the edge, we can detect the vehicle's location. But other regions may also be detected, such as car windows, reflections, and illumination by the sun. In order to remove these other factors, defined as noises, we need to use a filter. After using the filter, we can calculate the exact location of the vehicle. Additionally, by using connected component labeling, we can obtain coordinates and establish the vehicle's location. Connected component labeling find all connected components in an image and assigns a unique label to all points in the same component. These methods are very useful for vehicle detection and the development of the driving assistance systems, and they can protect drivers' safety from having an accident.

  8. Multiple symbol partially coherent detection of MPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.; Divsalar, D.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that by using the known (or estimated) value of carrier tracking loop signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the decision metric, it is possible to improve the error probability performance of a partially coherent multiple phase-shift-keying (MPSK) system relative to that corresponding to the commonly used ideal coherent decision rule. Using a maximum-likeihood approach, an optimum decision metric is derived and shown to take the form of a weighted sum of the ideal coherent decision metric (i.e., correlation) and the noncoherent decision metric which is optimum for differential detection of MPSK. The performance of a receiver based on this optimum decision rule is derived and shown to provide continued improvement with increasing length of observation interval (data symbol sequence length). Unfortunately, increasing the observation length does not eliminate the error floor associated with the finite loop SNR. Nevertheless, in the limit of infinite observation length, the average error probability performance approaches the algebraic sum of the error floor and the performance of ideal coherent detection, i.e., at any error probability above the error floor, there is no degradation due to the partial coherence. It is shown that this limiting behavior is virtually achievable with practical size observation lengths. Furthermore, the performance is quite insensitive to mismatch between the estimate of loop SNR (e.g., obtained from measurement) fed to the decision metric and its true value. These results may be of use in low-cost Earth-orbiting or deep-space missions employing coded modulations.

  9. Neptune shadows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This image of Neptune shows the discovery of shadows in Neptune's atmosphere, shadows cast onto a deep cloud band by small elevated clouds. They are the first cloud shadows ever seen by Voyager on any planet. Estimates of the height of these discrete clouds above the underlying cloud bank can be obtained by careful analysis of this data. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA'S Office of Space Science and Applications.

  10. Automated detection of cloud and cloud-shadow in single-date Landsat imagery using neural networks and spatial post-processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Michael J.; Hayes, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Use of Landsat data to answer ecological questions is contingent on the effective removal of cloud and cloud shadow from satellite images. We develop a novel algorithm to identify and classify clouds and cloud shadow, \\textsc{sparcs}: Spacial Procedures for Automated Removal of Cloud and Shadow. The method uses neural networks to determine cloud, cloud-shadow, water, snow/ice, and clear-sky membership of each pixel in a Landsat scene, and then applies a set of procedures to enforce spatial rules. In a comparison to FMask, a high-quality cloud and cloud-shadow classification algorithm currently available, \\textsc{sparcs} performs favorably, with similar omission errors for clouds (0.8% and 0.9%, respectively), substantially lower omission error for cloud-shadow (8.3% and 1.1%), and fewer errors of commission (7.8% and 5.0%). Additionally, textsc{sparcs} provides a measure of uncertainty in its classification that can be exploited by other processes that use the cloud and cloud-shadow detection. To illustrate this, we present an application that constructs obstruction-free composites of images acquired on different dates in support of algorithms detecting vegetation change.

  11. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  12. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  13. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application. PMID:27924935

  14. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-07

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  15. Partial turbo detection with reduced complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouardi, Aissa; Djebbari, A.; Bouazza, B. S.

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we propose a novel method for reducing the complexity of the turbo detector MAP (maximum a posteriori). The basic idea consists in turbo detecting a part of intersymbol interference (ISI) after decomposing the channel in two parts. We show that we can reduce the trellis complexity in the turbo process at a certain cost, i.e. performance loss.

  16. Operation Shadow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Marilyn Parrish

    Operation Shadow provides materials for a career education program which gives students ages 11-13 an opportunity to relate school subjects to the world of work. Students spend one month in classroom activities, including study of characteristics of self and others and how these characteristics and interests affect one's choice of a life career.…

  17. Partial least squares and random sample consensus in outlier detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jiangtao; Peng, Silong; Hu, Yong

    2012-03-16

    A novel outlier detection method in partial least squares based on random sample consensus is proposed. The proposed algorithm repeatedly generates partial least squares solutions estimated from random samples and then tests each solution for the support from the complete dataset for consistency. A comparative study of the proposed method and leave-one-out cross validation in outlier detection on simulated data and near-infrared data of pharmaceutical tablets is presented. In addition, a comparison between the proposed method and PLS, RSIMPLS, PRM is provided. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed method is highly efficient.

  18. Moving cast shadow resistant for foreground segmentation based on shadow properties analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Gao, Yun; Yuan, Guowu; Ji, Rongbin

    2015-12-01

    Moving object detection is the fundamental task in machine vision applications. However, moving cast shadows detection is one of the major concerns for accurate video segmentation. Since detected moving object areas are often contain shadow points, errors in measurements, localization, segmentation, classification and tracking may arise from this. A novel shadow elimination algorithm is proposed in this paper. A set of suspected moving object area are detected by the adaptive Gaussian approach. A model is established based on shadow optical properties analysis. And shadow regions are discriminated from the set of moving pixels by using the properties of brightness, chromaticity and texture in sequence.

  19. Method of detecting oxygen partial pressure and oxygen partial pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  20. Shadow corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, N.

    2004-07-01

    An electrochemical mechanism, based on energetically favored complimentary reduction and oxidation reactions, operating in conjunction with radiolysis is proposed for explaining the shadow corrosion phenomenon observed under BWR conditions. The electrochemical reaction on platinum and nickel alloys (Inconel and X-750) is the oxidation of H 2O 2 to produce a localized enhancement in the concentrations of HO 2 and O 2. Energy level of the conduction band of ZrO 2 matches well with that for the reduction of HO 2 and O 2 regenerating H 2O 2. This reduction of the powerful oxidants, stimulates electron emission in ZrO 2 which then is balanced by increased oxidation of zirconium to generate additional electrons and hence also anion vacancies. A coupling between Zircaloy and platinum or nickel alloy is provided by H + transport, the source for initiating shadow corrosion, to Zircaloy-2 (Zircaloy-2 negative relative to platinum or the nickel alloy) in the gap between the materials. An enhanced localized corrosion of Zircaloy-2 occurs, its incidence dependent upon the transport of HO 2, O 2, H + and H 2O 2 in the coolant in the gap.

  1. The power of shadows - Shadow stereopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puerta, Antonio Medina

    1989-01-01

    It is demonstrated that retinal images with no parallax disparity but with different shadows are fused stereoscopically, imparting depth perception to the imaged scene. Shadows are shown to be an important, hitherto undescribed, stereoscopic cue for depth perception.

  2. Deep shadow occulter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, Webster (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for occulting light. The occulter shape suppresses diffraction at any given size or angle and is practical to build because it can be made binary to avoid scatter. Binary structures may be fully opaque or fully transmitting at specific points. The diffraction suppression is spectrally broad so that it may be used with incoherent white light. An occulter may also include substantially opaque inner portion and an at least partially transparent outer portion. Such occulters may be used on the ground to create a deep shadow in a short distance, or may be used in space to suppress starlight and reveal exoplanets.

  3. Method and apparatus for shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system and protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor); Jacobs, Sharon Auerback (Inventor); Dugan, Edward (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A shadow aperture backscatter radiography (SABR) system includes at least one penetrating radiation source for providing a penetrating radiation field, and at least one partially transmissive radiation detector, wherein the partially transmissive radiation detector is interposed between an object region to be interrogated and the radiation source. The partially transmissive radiation detector transmits a portion of the illumination radiation field. A shadow aperture having a plurality of radiation attenuating regions having apertures therebetween is disposed between the radiation source and the detector. The apertures provide illumination regions for the illumination radiation field to reach the object region, wherein backscattered radiation from the object is detected and generates an image by the detector in regions of the detector that are shadowed by the radiation attenuation regions.

  4. Urban road extraction based on shadow removal and road clues detection from high resolution RGB aerial image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herumurti, Darlis; Uchimura, Keiichi; Koutaki, Gou; Uemura, Takumi

    2014-10-01

    In urban areas, the shadow cast by buildings, trees along the road, abundant objects and complex image texture make the extraction of the road on very high Resolution RGB aerial image very difficult and challenging. We propose a method of road extraction from RGB aerial image in the followings steps: Shadow removal, enhanced sobel transform, keypoints extraction based on Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER), feature extraction based on Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) and road construction based on multi-resolution segmentation. The experimental results show that the proposed method achieves a good result.

  5. Beamforming in an acoustic shadow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelock, David; Stinson, Michael; Daigle, Gilles

    1993-01-01

    The sound field deep within an acoustic shadow region is less well understood than that outside the shadow region. Signal levels are substantially lower within the shadow, but beamforming difficulties arise for other reasons such as loss of spatial coherence. Based on analysis of JAPE-91 data, and other data, three types of characteristic signals within acoustic shadow regions are identified. These signal types may correspond to different, intermittent signal propagation conditions. Detection and classification algorithms might take advantage of the signal characteristics. Frequency coherence is also discussed. The extent of coherence across frequencies is shown to be limited, causing difficulties for source classification based on harmonic amplitude relationships. Discussions emphasize short-term characteristics on the order of one second. A video presentation on frequency coherence shows the similarity, in the presence of atmospheric turbulence, between the received signal from a stable set of harmonics generated by a loudspeaker and that received from a helicopter hovering behind a hill.

  6. A Partially Distributed Intrusion Detection System for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eung Jun; Hong, Choong Seon; Lee, Sungwon; Jeon, Seokhee

    2013-01-01

    The increasing use of wireless sensor networks, which normally comprise several very small sensor nodes, makes their security an increasingly important issue. They can be practically and efficiently secured using intrusion detection systems. Conventional security mechanisms are not usually applicable due to the sensor nodes having limitations of computational power, memory capacity, and battery power. Therefore, specific security systems should be designed to function under constraints of energy or memory. A partially distributed intrusion detection system with low memory and power demands is proposed here. It employs a Bloom filter, which allows reduced signature code size. Multiple Bloom filters can be combined to reduce the signature code for each Bloom filter array. The mechanism could then cope with potential denial of service attacks, unlike many previous detection systems with Bloom filters. The mechanism was evaluated and validated through analysis and simulation.

  7. Heterodyne efficiency of a detection system for partially coherent beams.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed; Rolland, Jannick P

    2010-05-01

    We consider the heterodyne efficiency as a measure of quality for a coherent detection system. The heterodyne efficiency reflects the matching between the received beam and the local oscillator beam on the detector surface, and one can use this property for the alignment of the system. In this paper we derive a general expression for the heterodyne efficiency of a detection system for beams at any state of coherence, assuming that the propagation directions for the two signals (the received signal and the locally generated one) are slightly different. We derive an analytical expression for the heterodyne efficiency when mixing coherently two partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams on a photodetector surface. Numerical examples are given for the variation in the heterodyne efficiency with the misalignment angle, the detector radius, and the parameters of the overlapping beams. We show that partially coherent beams, although they suffer more than coherent beams from a decrease in the heterodyne efficiency, are less affected than coherent beams by the misalignment of the detection system.

  8. Accurate colon residue detection algorithm with partial volume segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Liang, Zhengrong; Zhang, PengPeng; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2004-05-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Earlier detection and removal of polyps can dramatically reduce the chance of developing malignant tumor. Due to some limitations of optical colonoscopy used in clinic, many researchers have developed virtual colonoscopy as an alternative technique, in which accurate colon segmentation is crucial. However, partial volume effect and existence of residue make it very challenging. The electronic colon cleaning technique proposed by Chen et al is a very attractive method, which is also kind of hard segmentation method. As mentioned in their paper, some artifacts were produced, which might affect the accurate colon reconstruction. In our paper, instead of labeling each voxel with a unique label or tissue type, the percentage of different tissues within each voxel, which we call a mixture, was considered in establishing a maximum a posterior probability (MAP) image-segmentation framework. A Markov random field (MRF) model was developed to reflect the spatial information for the tissue mixtures. The spatial information based on hard segmentation was used to determine which tissue types are in the specific voxel. Parameters of each tissue class were estimated by the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm during the MAP tissue-mixture segmentation. Real CT experimental results demonstrated that the partial volume effects between four tissue types have been precisely detected. Meanwhile, the residue has been electronically removed and very smooth and clean interface along the colon wall has been obtained.

  9. Forming Spirals From Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    What causes the large-scale spiral structures found in some protoplanetary disks? Most models assume theyre created by newly-forming planets, but a new study suggests that planets might have nothing to do with it.Perturbations from Planets?In some transition disks protoplanetary disks with gaps in their inner regions weve directly imaged large-scale spiral arms. Many theories currently attribute the formation of these structures to young planets: either the direct perturbations of a planet embedded in the disk cause the spirals, or theyre indirectly caused by the orbit of a planetary body outside of the arms.Another example of spiral arms detected in a protoplanetary disk, MWC 758. [NASA/ESA/ESO/M. Benisty et al.]But what if you could get spirals without any planets? A team of scientists led by Matas Montesinos (University of Chile) have recently published a study in which they examine what happens to a shadowed protoplanetary disk.Casting Shadows with WarpsIn the teams setup, they envision a protoplanetary disk that is warped: the inner region is slightly tilted relative to the outer region. As the central star casts light out over its protoplanetary disk, this disk warping would cause some regions of the disk to be shaded in a way that isnt axially symmetric with potentially interesting implications.Montesinos and collaborators ran 2D hydrodynamics simulations to determine what happens to the motion of particles within the disk when they pass in and out of the shadowed regions. Since the shadowed regions are significantly colder than the illuminated disk, the pressure in these regions is much lower. Particles are therefore accelerated and decelerated as they pass through these regions, and the lack of axial symmetry causes spiral density waves to form in the disk as a result.Initial profile for the stellar heating rate per unit area for one of the authors simulations. The regions shadowed as a result of the disk warp subtend 0.5 radians each (shown on the left

  10. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  11. Elastomeric fluorescent POF for partial discharge detection: recent progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebler, Daniel; Hohberg, Michaela; Rohwetter, Philipp; Brusenbach, Roy; Plath, Ronald

    2015-09-01

    We present recent progress in our development of fibre-optic sensors for the detection of partial discharge (PD) in silicone cable accessories, based on detecting related low-level optical emission. We experimentally show that the sensitive optical detection of PD can dramatically enhance the performance of conventional electrical PD measurement in electromagnetically noisy environments, and that it can yield high sensitivity and specificity even when no synchronous electrical PD measurement is conducted. This is demonstrated using a real-scale model of a high voltage cable accessory with a surface-attached conventional thermoplastic fluorescent polymer optical fibre (F-POF) sensor. In order to increase light collection efficiency, as a prerequisite for a commercially competitive implementation using cost-efficient detectors, sensing fibres will have to be integrated into the silicone rubber insulation, close to the potential origin of PD-induced damage. This is the rationale for our efforts to develop elastomeric fluorescent sensing fibres, tailored to the requirements of the application. We discuss specific challenges to be tackled and report on the successful implementation of all-silicone rubber fluorescent POF, to our best knowledge for the first time.

  12. Hygrometer for Detecting Water in Partially Enclosed Volumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Surma, Jan; Parks, Steve

    2005-01-01

    A portable hygrometer has been devised to implement a pre-existing technique for detecting water trapped in partially enclosed volumes that may be difficult to reach and cannot be examined directly. The technique is based on the fact that eventually the air in such a volume becomes saturated or nearly so. The technique is straightforward: One measures the relative humidity and temperature of both the ambient air and a sample of air from the enclosed volume. If the relative humidity of the sample is significantly greater than that of the ambient air and/or if the sample is at or close to the dew point, then it can be concluded that water is trapped in the volume. Of course, the success of this technique depends on the existence of an access hole through which one can withdraw some air from the enclosed volume.

  13. Partially Nondestructive Continuous Detection of Individual Traveling Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Beck, Kristin M.; Duan, Yiheng; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    We report the continuous and partially nondestructive measurement of optical photons. For a weak light pulse traveling through a slow-light optical medium (signal), the associated atomic-excitation component is detected by another light beam (probe) with the aid of an optical cavity. We observe strong correlations of gsp (2 )=4.4 (5 ) between the transmitted signal and probe photons. The observed (intrinsic) conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency ranges between 13% and 1% (65% and 5%) for a signal transmission range of 2% to 35%, at a typical time resolution of 2.5 μ s . The maximal observed (intrinsic) device nondestructive quantum efficiency, defined as the product of the conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency and the signal transmission, is 0.5% (2.4%). The normalized cross-correlation function violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, confirming the nonclassical character of the correlations.

  14. Detection of partial-body exposure to ionizing radiation by the automatic detection of dicentrics.

    PubMed

    Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Gregoire, Eric; Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine; Voisin, Pascale; Martin, Cecile; Voisin, Philippe; Roy, Laurence; Gruel, Gaetan

    2012-10-01

    In accidental exposure to ionizing radiation, it is essential to estimate the dose received by the victims. Currently dicentric scoring is the best biological indicator of exposure. The standard biological dosimetry procedure (500 metaphases scored manually) is suitable for a few dose estimations, but the time needed for analysis can be problematic in the case of a large-scale accident. Recently, a new methodology using automatic detection of dicentrics has greatly decreased the time needed for dose estimation and preserves the accuracy of the estimation. However, the capability to detect nonhomogeneous partial-body exposures is an important advantage of dicentric scoring-based biodosimetry, and this remains to be tested with automatic scoring. Thus we analyzed the results obtained with in vitro blood dilutions and in real cases of accidental exposure (partial- or whole-body exposure) using manual scoring and automatic detection of dicentrics. We confirmed that automatic detection allows threefold quicker dicentric scoring than the manual procedure with similar dose estimations and uncertainty intervals. The results concerning partial-body exposures were particularly promising, and homogeneously exposed samples were correctly distinguished from heterogeneously exposed samples containing 5% to 75% of blood irradiated with 2 Gy. In addition, the results obtained for real accident cases were similar whatever the methodology used. This study demonstrates that automatic detection of dicentrics is a credible alternative for recent and acute cases of whole- and partial-body accidental exposures to ionizing radiation.

  15. Infants' perception of lightness changes related to cast shadows

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    When humans perceive the lightness of an object’s surface in shadows there is an implicit assumption that cast shadows dim the surface. In two experiments, we investigated whether 5- to 8-month-old infants make this assumption about shadows. According to this shadow assumption, the apparent change in lightness produced by shadows on an object’s surface are attributed to blocked light sources. If infants can use the shadow assumption to perceive the object’s lightness in shadows, they will also be able to detect unnatural lightness changes in shadows. We compared the infants’ looking times to the unnatural and the natural lightness changes in the shadow when an object (duck) goes through the cast shadow. In Experiment 1, we examined whether infants could detect the unnatural lightness changes of the object’s surface in shadows. We created computer-graphic movies of unnatural and natural lightness changes to the duck’s surface. Our results showed that 7- to 8-month-olds but not 5- to 6-month-olds significantly preferred the movie with the unnatural changes in lightness, indicating that only the older infants could detect these changes. In Experiment 2, we confirmed that the infants’ preference was based on the detection of unnatural lightness changes according to the shadow assumption. The natural and the unnatural lightness changes of Experiment 1 were presented without cast shadows. Under these conditions, neither younger nor older infants showed a significant preference. Taken together, the experiments showed that 7- to 8-month-old infants could detect the unnaturalness of a surface’s lightness changes produced by shadows. In conclusion, our findings suggest that 7- to 8-month-old infants can perceive an object’s lightness in shadows by using an assumption that cast shadows dim the surface of an object. PMID:28296912

  16. Bringing Light onto Shadows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2007-01-01

    "What starts out long but gets shorter then longer each day?" Shadows! This student's clever riddle was an opportunity to investigate how the Sun's daily position in the sky influences shadow length. Thus began a mini-lesson which was created to help third-grade students understand that a shadow occurs when an opaque object blocks light (Shapiro…

  17. Change blindness for cast shadows in natural scenes: Even informative shadow changes are missed.

    PubMed

    Ehinger, Krista A; Allen, Kala; Wolfe, Jeremy M

    2016-05-01

    Previous work has shown that human observers discount or neglect cast shadows in natural and artificial scenes across a range of visual tasks. This is a reasonable strategy for a visual system designed to recognize objects under a range of lighting conditions, since cast shadows are not intrinsic properties of the scene-they look different (or disappear entirely) under different lighting conditions. However, cast shadows can convey useful information about the three-dimensional shapes of objects and their spatial relations. In this study, we investigated how well people detect changes to cast shadows, presented in natural scenes in a change blindness paradigm, and whether shadow changes that imply the movement or disappearance of an object are more easily noticed than shadow changes that imply a change in lighting. In Experiment 1, a critical object's shadow was removed, rotated to another direction, or shifted down to suggest that the object was floating. All of these shadow changes were noticed less often than changes to physical objects or surfaces in the scene, and there was no difference in the detection rates for the three types of changes. In Experiment 2, the shadows of visible or occluded objects were removed from the scenes. Although removing the cast shadow of an occluded object could be seen as an object deletion, both types of shadow changes were noticed less often than deletions of the visible, physical objects in the scene. These results show that even informative shadow changes are missed, suggesting that cast shadows are discounted fairly early in the processing of natural scenes.

  18. CRISPR Detection From Short Reads Using Partial Overlap Graphs.

    PubMed

    Ben-Bassat, Ilan; Chor, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are structured regions in bacterial and archaeal genomes, which are part of an adaptive immune system against phages. CRISPRs are important for many microbial studies and are playing an essential role in current gene editing techniques. As such, they attract substantial research interest. The exponential growth in the amount of bacterial sequence data in recent years enables the exploration of CRISPR loci in more and more species. Most of the automated tools that detect CRISPR loci rely on fully assembled genomes. However, many assemblers do not handle repetitive regions successfully. The first tool to work directly on raw sequence data is Crass, which requires reads that are long enough to contain two copies of the same repeat. We present a method to identify CRISPR repeats from raw sequence data of short reads. The algorithm is based on an observation differentiating CRISPR repeats from other types of repeats, and it involves a series of partial constructions of the overlap graph. This enables us to avoid many of the difficulties that assemblers face, as we merely aim to identify the repeats that belong to CRISPR loci. A preliminary implementation of the algorithm shows good results and detects CRISPR repeats in cases where other existing tools fail to do so.

  19. Testing the stress shadow hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felzer, Karen R.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2005-05-01

    A fundamental question in earthquake physics is whether aftershocks are predominantly triggered by static stress changes (permanent stress changes associated with fault displacement) or dynamic stresses (temporary stress changes associated with earthquake shaking). Both classes of models provide plausible explanations for earthquake triggering of aftershocks, but only the static stress model predicts stress shadows, or regions in which activity is decreased by a nearby earthquake. To test for whether a main shock has produced a stress shadow, we calculate time ratios, defined as the ratio of the time between the main shock and the first earthquake to follow it and the time between the last earthquake to precede the main shock and the first earthquake to follow it. A single value of the time ratio is calculated for each 10 × 10 km bin within 1.5 fault lengths of the main shock epicenter. Large values of the time ratio indicate a long wait for the first earthquake to follow the main shock and thus a potential stress shadow, whereas small values indicate the presence of aftershocks. Simulations indicate that the time ratio test should have sufficient sensitivity to detect stress shadows if they are produced in accordance with the rate and state friction model. We evaluate the 1989 MW 7.0 Loma Prieta, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, 1994 MW 6.7 Northridge, and 1999 MW 7.1 Hector Mine main shocks. For each main shock, there is a pronounced concentration of small time ratios, indicating the presence of aftershocks, but the number of large time ratios is less than at other times in the catalog. This suggests that stress shadows are not present. By comparing our results to simulations we estimate that we can be at least 98% confident that the Loma Prieta and Landers main shocks did not produce stress shadows and 91% and 84% confident that stress shadows were not generated by the Hector Mine and Northridge main shocks, respectively. We also investigate the long hypothesized existence

  20. Wormhole shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2015-06-01

    We propose a new method of detecting Ellis wormholes by use of the images of wormholes surrounded by optically thin dust. First, we derive steady solutions of dust and a more general medium surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. We find two types of dust solutions: one is a static solution with arbitrary density profile, and the other is a solution of dust which passes into the wormhole and escapes into the other side with constant velocity. Next, solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady solutions. Because the wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. This indicates that the appearance of a bright ring solely confirms neither a black hole nor a wormhole. However, we find that the intensity contrast between the inside and the outside of the ring are quite different. Therefore, we could tell the difference between an Ellis wormhole and a black hole with high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  1. Gas and Shadow Swing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chi-Hung; Lai, Mei-Yi; Liu, Che-Wei; Huang, Shiang-Yin; Lin, Che-Yu; Yeh, Jeng-Sheng

    In our digital art, we design a folding fan as an interactive magic device. You can use it to play with gas around the world of illusions. Although gas could not be seen in our real world, we still want to interact with it in our illusions by the element of bubble shadows. Opening and swinging the folding fan can blow the bubble shadows away; closing and swinging it can break bubbles. If the magic fan touches the shadow of gas, the bubble shadows will explode and release colorful particles to surround you. Those actions are controlled and located by our circuits with Arduino board.

  2. Cosmic ray sun shadow in Soudan 2 underground muon flux.

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Fields, T. H.; Goodman, M. C.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Price, L. E.; Seidlein, R.; Soudan 2 Collaboration; Thron, J. L.

    1999-06-23

    The absorption of cosmic rays by the sun produces a shadow at the earth. The angular offset and broadening of the shadow are determined by the magnitude and structure of the interplanetary magnetic field (IPMF) in the inner solar system. The authors report the first measurement of the solar cosmic ray shadow by detection of deep underground muon flux in observations made during the entire ten-year interval 1989 to 1998. The sun shadow varies significantly during this time, with a 3.3{sigma} shadow observed during the years 1995 to 1998.

  3. Shadows That Enlighten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Dan; Cassel, Darlinda

    2011-01-01

    This inquiry-based investigation focused on shadow measurement and the apparent movement of the Sun throughout the school year. Students would collect data about their shadows weekly. Toward the end of the year, students would then organize and interpret their data. The authors hoped they would discover that the angle of the Sun changes throughout…

  4. Infant Perception of Incongruent Shapes in Cast Shadows

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A cast shadow occurs when an object blocks the light from an illumination and projects a dark region onto a surface. Previous studies have reported that adults are slower to identify an object when the object has an incongruent cast shadow than when it has a congruent cast shadow (Castiello, 2001). Here, we used the familiarization-novelty preference procedure to examine whether 5- to 8-month-old infants could detect the relationship between object shapes and cast shadows. In Experiment 1, we examined the infants' ability to detect incongruency between objects and cast shadows. Results showed that 7- to 8-month olds could detect incongruence between the object shapes and the cast shadows, whereas 5- to 6-month olds did not. Yet, our control experiment showed that infants could not detect this incongruence from stimuli in which a white outline had been added to the original cast shadow to decrease the possibility of it being perceived as a cast shadow (Experiment 2). The results of these experiments demonstrate that 7- to 8-month olds responded to the congruence of cast shadows and to consistent contrast polarity between the cast shadow and its background. PMID:28299167

  5. Highly Sensitive and Quick Detection of Acute Myocardial Infarction Biomarkers Using In2O3 Nanoribbon Biosensors Fabricated Using Shadow Masks.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingzhou; Aroonyadet, Noppadol; Song, Yan; Wang, Xiaoli; Cao, Xuan; Liu, Yihang; Cong, Sen; Wu, Fanqi; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2016-11-22

    We demonstrate a scalable and facile lithography-free method for fabricating highly uniform and sensitive In2O3 nanoribbon biosensor arrays. Fabrication with shadow masks as the patterning method instead of conventional lithography provides low-cost, time-efficient, and high-throughput In2O3 nanoribbon biosensors without photoresist contamination. Combined with electronic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for signal amplification, the In2O3 nanoribbon biosensor arrays are optimized for early, quick, and quantitative detection of cardiac biomarkers in diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are commonly associated with heart attack and heart failure and have been selected as the target biomarkers here. Our approach can detect label-free biomarkers for concentrations down to 1 pg/mL (cTnI), 0.1 ng/mL (CK-MB), and 10 pg/mL (BNP), all of which are much lower than clinically relevant cutoff concentrations. The sample collection to result time is only 45 min, and we have further demonstrated the reusability of the sensors. With the demonstrated sensitivity, quick turnaround time, and reusability, the In2O3 nanoribbon biosensors have shown great potential toward clinical tests for early and quick diagnosis of AMI.

  6. Wormhole shadows in rotating dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohgami, Takayuki; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2016-09-01

    As an extension of our previous work, which investigated the shadows of the Ellis wormhole surrounded by nonrotating dust, in this paper we study wormhole shadows in a rotating dust flow. First, we derive steady-state solutions of slowly rotating dust surrounding the wormhole by solving relativistic Euler equations. Solving null geodesic equations and radiation transfer equations, we investigate the images of the wormhole surrounded by dust for the above steady-state solutions. Because the Ellis wormhole spacetime possesses unstable circular orbits of photons, a bright ring appears in the image, just as in Schwarzschild spacetime. The bright ring looks distorted due to rotation. Aside from the bright ring, there appear weakly luminous complex patterns by the emission from the other side of the throat. These structure could be detected by high-resolution very-long-baseline-interferometry observations in the near future.

  7. Detection of binding areas on removable partial denture frameworks.

    PubMed

    Stendahl, C G; Grob, D J

    1979-01-01

    Owing to a multiplicity of errors introduced during impression procedures and fabrication, disclosure of binding areas on the metal framework is an essential part of any removable partial denture service. Disclosure is best accomplished with an indicator that provides a sensitive, thin, even, and opaque coating. The aims of adjustment or relief are to maintain forces along the long axis of abutment teeth and ensure passivity, and in so doing create a more favorable prognosis. Careful consideration and thought must precede any reduction. Experience should contribute greatly in determining the indicated reduction and the accuracy of performing it.

  8. Features and futures: seizure detection in partial epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Hsin, Yue-Loong; Harnod, Tomor; Liu, Wentai

    2011-10-01

    Many factors underlying basic epileptic conditions determine the characteristics of epileptic seizures and the therapeutic outcome. Diagnosis and treatment rely on the clinical manifestations as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) epileptic activities. This article briefly reviews the fundamentals of the EEG, interictal, and ictal electrical activities of both extracranial and intracranial EEG of partial epilepsies, based on the information obtained from epilepsy patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery. The authors also present the status of their current research, focusing on decomposed seizure sources and the rendered spatial-temporal transitions in focal seizure.

  9. Auditory Stimulus Detection Partially Depends on Visuospatial Attentional Resources

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Supriya; Sinnett, Scott; König, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Humans’ ability to detect relevant sensory information while being engaged in a demanding task is crucial in daily life. Yet, limited attentional resources restrict information processing. To date, it is still debated whether there are distinct pools of attentional resources for each sensory modality and to what extent the process of multisensory integration is dependent on attentional resources. We addressed these two questions using a dual task paradigm. Specifically, participants performed a multiple object tracking task and a detection task either separately or simultaneously. In the detection task, participants were required to detect visual, auditory, or audiovisual stimuli at varying stimulus intensities that were adjusted using a staircase procedure. We found that tasks significantly interfered. However, the interference was about 50% lower when tasks were performed in separate sensory modalities than in the same sensory modality, suggesting that attentional resources are partly shared. Moreover, we found that perceptual sensitivities were significantly improved for audiovisual stimuli relative to unisensory stimuli regardless of whether attentional resources were diverted to the multiple object tracking task or not. Overall, the present study supports the view that attentional resource allocation in multisensory processing is task-dependent and suggests that multisensory benefits are not dependent on attentional resources. PMID:28203353

  10. Partial discharge detection and analysis in low pressure environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin

    Typical aerospace vehicles (aircraft and spacecraft) experience a wide range of operating pressures during ascending and returning to earth. Compared to the sea-level atmospheric pressure (760 Torr), the pressure at about 60 km altitude is 2 Torr. The performance of the electric power system components of the aerospace vehicles must remain reliable even under such sub-atmospheric operating conditions. It is well known that the dielectric strength of gaseous insulators, while the electrode arrangement remains unchanged, is pressure dependent. Therefore, characterization of the performance and behavior of the electrical insulation in flight vehicles in low-pressure environments is extremely important. Partial discharge testing is one of the practical methods for evaluating the integrity of electrical insulation in aerospace vehicles. This dissertation describes partial discharge (PD) measurements performed mainly with 60 Hz ac energization in air, argon and helium, for pressures between 2 and 760 Torr. Two main electrode arrangements were used. One was a needle-plane electrode arrangement with a Teflon insulating barrier. The other one was a twisted pair of insulated conductors taken from a standard aircraft wiring harness. The measurement results are presented in terms of typical PD current pulse waveforms and waveform analysis for both main electrode arrangements. The evaluation criteria are the waveform polarity, magnitude, shape, rise time, and phase angle (temporal location) relative to the source voltage. Two-variable histograms and statistical averages of the PD parameters are presented. The PD physical mechanisms are analyzed. For PD pattern recognition, both statistical methods (such as discharge parameter dot pattern representation, discharge parameter phase distribution, statistical operator calculations, and PD fingerprint development) and wavelet transform applications are investigated. The main conclusions of the dissertation include: (1) The PD current

  11. Auto-Detection of Partial Discharges in Power Cables by Descrete Wavelet Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Yoh; Hara, Takehisa; Urano, Koji; Chen, Min

    One of the serious problems that may happen in power XLPE cables is destruction of insulator. The best and conventional way to prevent such a crucial accident is generally supposed to ascertain partial corona discharges occurring at small void in organic insulator. However, there are some difficulties to detect those partial discharges because of existence of external noises in detected data, whose patterns are hardly identified at a glance. By the reason of the problem, there have been a number of researches on the way of development to accomplish detecting partial discharges by employing neural network (NN) system, which is widely known as the system for pattern recognition. We have been developing the NN system of the auto-detection for partial discharges, which we actually input numerical data of waveform itself into and obtained appropriate performance from. In this paper, we employed Descrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) to acquire more detailed transformed data in order to put them into the NN system. Employing DWT, we became able to express the waveform data in time-frequency space, and achieved effective detectiton of partial discharges by NN system. We present here the results using DWT analysis for partial discharges and noise signals which we obtained actually. Moreover, we present results out of the NN system which were dealt with those transformed data.

  12. Shadows constructing a relationship between light and color pigments by physical and mathematical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurumezoglu, Kemal; Karabey, Burak; Yigit Koyunkaya, Melike

    2017-03-01

    Full shadows, partial shadows and multilayer shadows are explained based on the phenomenon of the linear dispersion of light. This paper focuses on progressing the understanding of shadows from physical and mathematical perspectives. A significant relationship between light and color pigments is demonstrated with the help of the concept of sets. This integration of physical and mathematical reasoning not only manages an operational approach to the concept of shadows, it also outputs a model that can be used in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curricula by providing a concrete and physical example for abstract concept of the empty set.

  13. Effective Two-Dimensional Partial Response Maximum Likelihood Detection Scheme for Holographic Data Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Gyuyeol; Choi, Sooyong

    2012-08-01

    An effective two-dimensional (2D) partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) detection scheme for holographic data storage (HDS) systems is proposed. The proposed scheme adopts the simplified trellis diagram, uses a priori information, and detects the data in two directions from the previously proposed detection schemes. The simplified trellis diagram which has 4 states and 8 branches yields a dramatic complexity reduction while the simplified 2D PRML detector shows serious performance degradation in the high density HDS channels. To prevent performance degradation, the proposed detector uses a priori information in order to give higher reliability to the branch metric. Furthermore, the proposed scheme detects the data in the vertical and horizontal directions to fully utilize the characteristics of the channel detection with a 2D partial response target. By effective combination of these three techniques, the proposed scheme with a simple structure has more than 2 dB gains compared to the conventional detection schemes.

  14. Observe Your Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovšek, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Observe Your Shadow was the title of an observational experiment that was, among others, conducted in the scope of the past year's (2014-2015) first Slovene science competition for elementary school pupils between the ages of 6 and 13. The main reason for establishing a new science competition was popularization of science and its experimental…

  15. The Shadow Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Pamela U.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter will explore the "shadow curriculum" (a term used by those who question the assumption that direct selling to students who are compelled to attend school is questionable on several levels--ethical, moral, and democratic) and its connection to media literacy. The author first summarizes the kinds of marketing in schools that…

  16. Chasing the Moon's Shadow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Trudy E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggestions and tips for novice and experienced eclipse watchers are provided. Discussed are the mysterious shadow bands that occur just minutes before an eclipse. Directions for building a deluxe pinhole projector for observing the eclipse, a reading list, and a glossary of related terms are included. (KR)

  17. Shadows, An Environmental Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Wildlife Federation, Washington, DC.

    This environmental unit is one of a series designed for integration within an existing curriculum. The units are self-contained and require minimal teacher preparation. The philosophy behind the units is based on an experience-oriented process that encourages self-paced independent work. This unit on shadows is designed for all elementary levels,…

  18. My shadow, myself: cast-body shadows are embodied.

    PubMed

    Kuylen, Christopher; Balas, Benjamin; Thomas, Laura E

    2014-06-01

    Objects that serve as extensions of the body can produce a sensation of embodiment, feeling as if they are a part of us. We investigated the characteristics that drive an object's embodiment, examining whether cast-body shadows, a purely visual stimulus, are embodied. Tools are represented as an extension of the body when they enable observers to interact with distant targets, perceptually distorting space. We examined whether perceptual distortion would also result from exposure to cast-body shadows in two separate distance estimation perceptual matching tasks. If observers represent cast-body shadows as extensions of their bodies, then when these shadows extend toward a target, it should appear closer than when no shadow is present (Experiment 1). This effect should not occur when a non-cast-body shadow is cast toward a target (Experiment 2). We found perceptual distortions in both cast-body shadow and tool-use conditions, but not in our non-cast-body shadow condition. These results suggest that, although cast-body shadows do not enable interaction with objects or provide direct tactile feedback, observers nonetheless represent their shadows as if they were a part of them.

  19. Inflation and shadow matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, L. M.; Guth, A. H.; Spergel, D. N.; Field, G. B.; Press, W. H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible production of shadow matter during the period of cosmic inflation is considered. The superstring theory of Gross et al. (1985), which results in a gauge group E8 x E8, could, at low energies, result in the existence of two sectors: an observed sector associated with all familiar particles and interactions, and a hidden one whose particles couple only through gravitational interactions with ordinary matter. It is demonstrated here that if, in the early universe, an inflationary phase is associated with the breaking of one of the symmetries in the E8 x E8 theory, this strongly constrains the physics of both sectors if shadow matter is to be the missing mass in the universe.

  20. Observe Your Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovšek, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Observe Your Shadow was the title of an observational experiment that was, among others, conducted in the scope of the past year's (2014-2015) first Slovene science competition for elementary school pupils between the ages of 6 and 13. The main reason for establishing a new science competition was popularization of science and its experimental methods, particularly among elementary school students. Elementary school teachers are not generally specialists in science, but rather have (and should have) extremely wide scopes of interests and competencies. By providing them with ideas and instructions for science experiments, we aim to enrich regular school lessons. In the first year alone, the competition took place in over half of Slovene elementary schools, with a total of 9000 participating students. In this paper we shall report about pupils' responses to tasks related to one of the experiments, namely, observation of their shadows on a sunny day.

  1. Titan Casts Revealing Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    A rare celestial event was captured by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory as Titan -- Saturn's largest moon and the only moon in the Solar System with a thick atmosphere -- crossed in front of the X-ray bright Crab Nebula. The X-ray shadow cast by Titan allowed astronomers to make the first X-ray measurement of the extent of its atmosphere. On January 5, 2003, Titan transited the Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion that was observed to occur in the year 1054. Although Saturn and Titan pass within a few degrees of the Crab Nebula every 30 years, they rarely pass directly in front of it. "This may have been the first transit of the Crab Nebula by Titan since the birth of the Crab Nebula," said Koji Mori of Pennsylvania State University in University Park, and lead author on an Astrophysical Journal paper describing these results. "The next similar conjunction will take place in the year 2267, so this was truly a once in a lifetime event." Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Animation of Titan's Shadow on Crab Nebula Chandra's observation revealed that the diameter of the X-ray shadow cast by Titan was larger than the diameter of its solid surface. The difference in diameters gives a measurement of about 550 miles (880 kilometers) for the height of the X-ray absorbing region of Titan's atmosphere. The extent of the upper atmosphere is consistent with, or slightly (10-15%) larger, than that implied by Voyager I observations made at radio, infrared, and ultraviolet wavelengths in 1980. "Saturn was about 5% closer to the Sun in 2003, so increased solar heating of Titan may account for some of this atmospheric expansion," said Hiroshi Tsunemi of Osaka University in Japan, one of the coauthors on the paper. The X-ray brightness and extent of the Crab Nebula made it possible to study the tiny X-ray shadow cast by Titan during its transit. By using Chandra to precisely track Titan's position, astronomers were able to measure a shadow one arcsecond in

  2. Detection of open and partially closed surface defects in plates using ultrasonic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, A. R.; Edwards, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancement of the frequency content of multimodal Lamb waves incident on surface breaking defects has been investigated for use in defect detection and characterization, for different thickness plates with machined defects of varying depth. A fully optical method, using laser ultrasonics, was used to study the enhancement as a function of defect depth when passing either the detection (SLD) or generation (SLS) laser over the defect. Time frequency representations (TFRs) were used to identify the wave modes present at each detection point, and the frequency magnitude of various wave modes was tracked, with an increase in magnitude observed for both scanning laser detection and scanning laser source at the defect. The scanning laser detection enhancement is explained by a superposition of incident waves with those reflected and mode converted from the defect. Scanning laser source enhancement can be explained in terms of several mechanisms; including truncation of the source, the change in geometry at the defect and the change in generation boundary conditions at the defect. The TFR analysis was also applied to samples containing partially closed defects caused by stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Scanning laser detection analysis was shown to be incapable of detecting the defects; however, scanning laser source analysis showed large enhancements over the defect site, illustrating the effectiveness of this method for detection of partially closed cracks.

  3. What Colour Is a Shadow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, S. W.

    2009-01-01

    What colour is a shadow? Black, grey, or some other colour? This article describes how to use a digital camera to test the hypothesis that a shadow under a clear blue sky has a blue tint. A white sheet of A4 paper was photographed in full sunlight and in shadow under a clear blue sky. The images were analysed using a shareware program called…

  4. Shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows.

    PubMed

    Casati, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The stimuli traditionally used for demonstrating shadow-related concavity-convexity inversions reveal a very basic tolerance for impossible shadows-namely, self shadows do not induce a visual request for geometrically mandatory cast shadows.

  5. Absorber height effects on SWA restrictions and 'Shadow' LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    As extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) approaches introduction at the 22-nm half-pitch node, several key aspects of absorber height effects remain unexplored. In particular, sidewall angle (SWA) restrictions based on the height of the mask absorber has not yet been clearly defined. In addition, the effects of absorber height on line-edge roughness (LER) from shadowing has not been examined. We make an initial investigation into how tight SWA constraints are and the extent to which shadow LER alters basic LER. Our approach to SWA aims to find SWA restrictions based on 10% of the total CD error budget (10% of CD). Thus, we allot the SWA budget a {+-}0.2nm tolerance for 22nm half-pitch. New with EUVL is the off-axis illumination system. One potential pitfall that must be carefully monitored is the effect of mask absorber height blocking light from reaching, and therefore, correctly detecting, the base edge position of a feature. While mask features can correctly compensate sizing to target at the wafer, the effects of this shadowing on LER have not yet been investigated. Specifically, shadow LER may exacerbate or mitigate the inherent LER on the mask. Shadowing may also cause a difference in the observed LER on the right and left side of the features. We carefully probe this issue for a range of spatial frequencies. We do rigorous aerial image modeling of mask features with a nominal SWA of 80 degrees and correctly sized to target 22nm features measured at the top, 70nm TaN absorber on a 40 bilayer ML mirror with a 2.5nm Ru cap. Simulations were on a 4X system with an ideal pupil of NA = 0.32, illumination wavelength 13.4nm at 6{sup o} off-axis, and disk source shape with partial coherence factor of {sigma} = 0.50. We first implement a defocus offset to the aerial image so that best focus lies at a nominal zero defocus value. We then calculate the depth of focus (DOF) for which the image-log-slope (ILS) delivers a contrast is greater than 50%, an arbitrary standard

  6. The intensity reduction of ground shadow To deliver better viewing experiences of soccer videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Jaeseung; Lee, Jaeho; Kim, Changick; Bhaskaran, Vasudev

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we present a method for reducing the intensity of shadows cast on the ground in outdoor sports videos to provide TV viewers with a better viewing experience. In the case of soccer videos taken by a long-shot camera technique, it is difficult for viewers to discriminate the tiny objects (i.e., soccer ball and player) from the ground shadows. The algorithm proposed in this paper comprises three modules, such as long-shot detection, shadow region extraction and shadow intensity reduction. We detect the shadow region on the ground by using the relationship between Y and U values in YUV color space and then reduce the shadow components depending on the strength of the shadows. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme offers useful tools to provide a more comfortable viewing environment and is amenable to real-time performance even in a software based implementation.

  7. Memory, double, shadow, and evil.

    PubMed

    McNamara, P

    1994-04-01

    In order to examine shadow dynamics the author explores the phenomenology and mythological associations of the 'double' or Doppelgänger. Current Jungian-inspired theories concerning relations of shadow and double are found to be limited because they do not explain (1) the process of personification of the psychic complex which gives rise to the double, (2) the immediate conditions under which doubling occurs, (3) the conditions which lead to the assignment of evil qualities to the double as shadow. The paper seeks to remedy each of the above limitations by redescribing shadow/double phenomena in terms of autonomous memory phenomena, both personal and trans-personal.

  8. Snake scales, partial exposure, and the Snake Detection Theory: A human event-related potentials study

    PubMed Central

    Van Strien, Jan W.; Isbell, Lynne A.

    2017-01-01

    Studies of event-related potentials in humans have established larger early posterior negativity (EPN) in response to pictures depicting snakes than to pictures depicting other creatures. Ethological research has recently shown that macaques and wild vervet monkeys respond strongly to partially exposed snake models and scale patterns on the snake skin. Here, we examined whether snake skin patterns and partially exposed snakes elicit a larger EPN in humans. In Task 1, we employed pictures with close-ups of snake skins, lizard skins, and bird plumage. In task 2, we employed pictures of partially exposed snakes, lizards, and birds. Participants watched a random rapid serial visual presentation of these pictures. The EPN was scored as the mean activity (225–300 ms after picture onset) at occipital and parieto-occipital electrodes. Consistent with previous studies, and with the Snake Detection Theory, the EPN was significantly larger for snake skin pictures than for lizard skin and bird plumage pictures, and for lizard skin pictures than for bird plumage pictures. Likewise, the EPN was larger for partially exposed snakes than for partially exposed lizards and birds. The results suggest that the EPN snake effect is partly driven by snake skin scale patterns which are otherwise rare in nature. PMID:28387376

  9. Detection, isolation and partial characterization of an immunostimulating glycoprotein from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Butschak, Günter; Karsten, Uwe; Schelhaas, Ute; Ott, Holger; Emmendörffer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Bernd; Helmholz, Heike; Goletz, Steffen

    2006-09-01

    In a search for novel immunostimulating substances we detected that culture supernatants of the gram-positive phytopathogenic bacterium, Rhodococcus fascians, were able to induce cytokine release (TNF(alpha)) from mouse peritoneal macrophages. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the active principle, and were employed for its isolation and partial characterization as a high molecular (MW>100 kDa) glycoprotein. In addition, methods practicable for its biotechnological preparation and several ELISA variants for its determination were developed.

  10. Shadow Realities in Close Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseblatt, Paul C.; Wright, Sara E.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses shadow realities, which include unacceptable and threatening information and interpretations that could undermine negotiated relationship reality. Offers theoretical discussion of shadow realities, reasons people avoid them, gains and risks for exploring them, and the therapeutic applications of therapy within a framework that includes…

  11. What colour is a shadow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, S. W.

    2009-05-01

    What colour is a shadow? Black, grey, or some other colour? This article describes how to use a digital camera to test the hypothesis that a shadow under a clear blue sky has a blue tint. A white sheet of A4 paper was photographed in full sunlight and in shadow under a clear blue sky. The images were analysed using a shareware program called ImageJ. The average red, green and blue pixel values in a region of interest drawn on a photograph of the paper in sunlight and shadow were 0.3, 0.32, 0.38 and 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 respectively, demonstrating that a shadow under a blue sky has a blue tint. The experiment would be a useful exercise for a science class.

  12. Enhanced localized plasmonic detections using partially-embedded gold nanoparticles and ellipsometric measurements

    PubMed Central

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Yaseen, Mohammad Tariq; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2012-01-01

    A cost-effective, stable and ultrasensitive localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) partially embedded in transparent substrate is presented. Partially embedded AuNPs were prepared by thermal annealing of gold thin films deposited on glass at a temperature close to the glass transition temperature of the substrate. Annealed samples were optically characterized by using spectroscopic ellipsometry and compare with theoretical modeling to understand the optical responses from the samples. By combining the partially-embedded AuNPs substrate with a microfluidic flow cell and dove prism in an ellipsometry setup, an ultrasensitive change in the LSPR signal can be detected. The refractive index sensitivity obtained from the phase measurement is up to 1938 degrees/RIU which is several times higher than that of synthesized colloidal gold nanoparticles. The sample is further used to investigate the interactions between primary and secondary antibodies. The bio-molecular detection limit of the LSPR signal is down to 20 pM. Our proposed sensor is label free, non-destructive, with high sensitivity, low cost, and easy to fabricate. These features make it feasible for commercialization in biomedical applications. PMID:22567583

  13. Anisotropic Scattering Shadow Compensation Method for Remote Sensing Image with Consideration of Terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiongjie; Yan, Li

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of sensor networks and earth observation technology, a large quantity of high resolution remote sensing data is available. However, the influence of shadow has become increasingly greater due to the higher resolution shows more complex and detailed land cover, especially under the shadow. Shadow areas usually have lower intensity and fuzzy boundary, which make the images hard to interpret automatically. In this paper, a simple and effective shadow (including soft shadow) detection and compensation method is proposed based on normal data, Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and sun position. First, we use high accuracy DEM and sun position to rebuild the geometric relationship between surface and sun at the time the image shoot and get the hard shadow boundary and sky view factor (SVF) of each pixel. Anisotropic scattering assumption is accepted to determine the soft shadow factor mainly affected by diffuse radiation. Finally, an easy radiation transmission model is used to compensate the shadow area. Compared with the spectral detection method, our detection method has strict theoretical basis, reliable compensation result and minor affected by the image quality. The compensation strategy can effectively improve the radiation intensity of shadow area, reduce the information loss brought by shadow and improve the robustness and efficiency of the classification algorithms.

  14. Shadow extraction for urban area based on hyperspherical color sharpening information distortion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qing; Wang, Qu; Zhang, Hongqun

    2016-10-01

    A shadow extraction method for urban area is presented based on the hyperspherical color transform (HCT) fusion information distortion. We use the near-infrared band of WorldView-2 data to detect the shadow, because the near-infrared band as the long-wave band is more sensitive to shadow comparing to the short-wave band. In the hyperspherical color sharpening (HCS), n input bands are transformed from an n-dimensional Cartesian space to an n-dimensional hyperspherical color space to generate a single intensity component and n-1 angles, and then the intensity component is replaced with the adjusted panchromatic (Pan) image. After HCT, the information amount of the intensity is larger than that of the Pan band. When using the Pan to replace the intensity to get the fused multispectral (MS) image, the information amount is lost. To assess the information distortion of the fusion result, it is found that the shadow is sensitive to the difference index. Hence, the relative difference index is constructed to enhance the shadow information. More specifically, the relative difference index values are made high for shadow area while they are made low for non-shadow area. However, for the original MS image, the digital number values are low for the shadow area while they are high for non-shadow area. Then, by thresholding, the possible shadow area is separated from the non-shadow area. The experimental results show that this shadow extraction method is simple and accurate; not only the shadow of high building but also the little shadows of low trees and between buildings are all detected.

  15. Single- and multiple-pulse noncoherent detection statistics associated with partially developed speckle.

    PubMed

    Osche, G R

    2000-08-20

    Single- and multiple-pulse detection statistics are presented for aperture-averaged direct detection optical receivers operating against partially developed speckle fields. A partially developed speckle field arises when the probability density function of the received intensity does not follow negative exponential statistics. The case of interest here is the target surface that exhibits diffuse as well as specular components in the scattered radiation. An approximate expression is derived for the integrated intensity at the aperture, which leads to single- and multiple-pulse discrete probability density functions for the case of a Poisson signal in Poisson noise with an additive coherent component. In the absence of noise, the single-pulse discrete density function is shown to reduce to a generalized negative binomial distribution. The radar concept of integration loss is discussed in the context of direct detection optical systems where it is shown that, given an appropriate set of system parameters, multiple-pulse processing can be more efficient than single-pulse processing over a finite range of the integration parameter n.

  16. Techniques for plotting shadow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bainbridge, D.A.

    1982-02-01

    Basic approaches for plotting shadow patterns (summer or winter) are discussed, illustrated, and compared. The solar simulator technique uses floodlights or a moveable table to mimic the sun's path over a model of the building being studied. The drawback is that, for large developments, very small models would have to be built. Graphic solutions (2 types) are described in which: (1) sun angles are used to calculate shadow patterns using trigonometry and (2) drawings are made and shadows are calculated. Examples are given for a house on level ground and on sloping ground. Calculations of shade density are also illustrated. 8 references. (MJJ)

  17. How to See Shadows in 3D

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikesit, Gea O. F.

    2014-01-01

    Shadows can be found easily everywhere around us, so that we rarely find it interesting to reflect on how they work. In order to raise curiosity among students on the optics of shadows, we can display the shadows in 3D, particularly using a stereoscopic set-up. In this paper we describe the optics of stereoscopic shadows using simple schematic…

  18. The Moon's Phases and the Self Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Timothy; Guy, Mark

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a new way of teaching the phases of the Moon. Through the introduction of a "self shadow" (an idea of a shadow that is not well-known), they illuminate students' understanding of the phases of the Moon and help them understand the distinction between the shadows that cause eclipses and the shadows that relate…

  19. An Investigation of the Likelihood Ratio Test for Detection of Differential Item Functioning under the Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Seock-Ho; Cohen, Allan S.; DiStefano, Christine A.; Kim, Sooyeon

    Type I error rates of the likelihood ratio test for the detection of differential item functioning (DIF) in the partial credit model were investigated using simulated data. The partial credit model with four ordered performance levels was used to generate data sets of a 30-item test for samples of 300 and 1,000 simulated examinees. Three different…

  20. Study on Miniaturized UHF Antennas for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Electrical Equipment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingcun; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-11-20

    Detecting partial discharge (PD) is an effective way to evaluate the condition of high-voltage electrical equipment insulation. The UHF detection method has attracted attention due to its high sensitivity, strong interference resistance, and ability to locate PDs. In this paper, a miniaturized equiangular spiral antenna (ESA) for UHF detection that uses a printed circuit board is proposed. I-shaped, L-shaped, and C-shaped microstrip baluns were designed to match the impedance between the ESA and coaxial cable and were verified by a vector network analyzer. For comparison, three other types of UHF antenna were also designed: A microstrip patch antenna, a microstrip slot antenna, and a printed dipole antenna. Their antenna factors were calibrated in a uniform electric field of different frequencies modulated in a gigahertz transverse electromagnetic cell. We performed comparison experiments on PD signal detection using an artificial defect model based on the international IEC 60270 standard. We also conducted time-delay test experiments on the ESA sensor to locate a PD source. It was found that the proposed ESA sensor meets PD signal detection requirements. The sensor's compact size makes it suitable for internal installation in high-voltage electrical equipment.

  1. Study on Miniaturized UHF Antennas for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Electrical Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingcun; Zhang, Guogang; Dong, Jinlong; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Detecting partial discharge (PD) is an effective way to evaluate the condition of high-voltage electrical equipment insulation. The UHF detection method has attracted attention due to its high sensitivity, strong interference resistance, and ability to locate PDs. In this paper, a miniaturized equiangular spiral antenna (ESA) for UHF detection that uses a printed circuit board is proposed. I-shaped, L-shaped, and C-shaped microstrip baluns were designed to match the impedance between the ESA and coaxial cable and were verified by a vector network analyzer. For comparison, three other types of UHF antenna were also designed: A microstrip patch antenna, a microstrip slot antenna, and a printed dipole antenna. Their antenna factors were calibrated in a uniform electric field of different frequencies modulated in a gigahertz transverse electromagnetic cell. We performed comparison experiments on PD signal detection using an artificial defect model based on the international IEC 60270 standard. We also conducted time-delay test experiments on the ESA sensor to locate a PD source. It was found that the proposed ESA sensor meets PD signal detection requirements. The sensor’s compact size makes it suitable for internal installation in high-voltage electrical equipment. PMID:26610506

  2. A nonlinear quality-related fault detection approach based on modified kernel partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianfang; Zhao, Ning; Wang, Guang; Yin, Shen

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new nonlinear quality-related fault detection method is proposed based on kernel partial least squares (KPLS) model. To deal with the nonlinear characteristics among process variables, the proposed method maps these original variables into feature space in which the linear relationship between kernel matrix and output matrix is realized by means of KPLS. Then the kernel matrix is decomposed into two orthogonal parts by singular value decomposition (SVD) and the statistics for each part are determined appropriately for the purpose of quality-related fault detection. Compared with relevant existing nonlinear approaches, the proposed method has the advantages of simple diagnosis logic and stable performance. A widely used literature example and an industrial process are used for the performance evaluation for the proposed method.

  3. Multichannel optical-fibre heterodyne interferometer for ultrasound detection of partial discharges in power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, J. E.; Garcia-Souto, J. A.; Rubio-Serrano, J.

    2013-09-01

    A multichannel interferometric system is proposed for the ultrasonic detection of partial discharges using intrinsic optical fibre sensors that may be immersed in oil. It is based on a heterodyne scheme which drives at least four sensor heads in order to localize the source of the acoustic emissions. Proper design of the sensing head improves its sensitivity through magnification and reaches a compact encapsulated probe able to be installed within power transformers. The optoelectronic implementation and the experimental tests are presented to optimize the resolution (4 channels—4 mrad). In addition, the results of ultrasound measurements at 150 kHz with an optical fibre sensor immersed in water in an acoustic test bench are shown, in which a resolution better than 10 Pa was obtained. Finally, the set-up for three-phase power transformers is demonstrated and characterized to detect and locate the source of acoustic emissions.

  4. Detecting Partial Energy Modulation in a Dielectric Laser Accelerator - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lukaczyk, Louis

    2015-08-24

    The Dielectric Laser Acceleration group at SLAC uses micro-fabricated dielectric grating structures and conventional infrared lasers to accelerator electrons. These structures have been estimated to produce an accelerating gradient up to 2 orders of magnitude greater than that produced by conventional RF accelerators. The success of the experiment depends on both the laser damage threshold of the structure and the timing overlap of femtosecond duration laser pulses with the electron bunch. In recent dielectric laser acceleration experiments, the laser pulse was shorter both temporally and spatially than the electron bunch. As a result, the laser is theorized to have interacted with only a small portion of the electron bunch. The detection of this phenomenon, referred to as partial population modulation, required a new approach to the data analysis of the electron energy spectra. A fitting function was designed to separate the accelerated electron population from the unaccelerated electron population. The approach was unsuccessful in detecting acceleration in the partial population modulation data. However, the fitting functions provide an excellent figure of merit for previous data known to contain signatures of acceleration.

  5. A coordinate-independent characterization of a black hole shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    A large international effort is under way to assess the presence of a shadow in the radio emission from the compact source at the centre of our Galaxy, Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). If detected, this shadow would provide the first direct evidence of the existence of black holes and that Sgr A* is a supermassive black hole. In addition, the shape of the shadow could be used to learn about extreme gravity near the event horizon and to determine which theory of gravity better describes the observations. The mathematical description of the shadow has so far used a number of simplifying assumptions that are unlikely to be met by the real observational data. We here provide a general formalism to describe the shadow as an arbitrary polar curve expressed in terms of a Legendre expansion. Our formalism does not presume any knowledge of the properties of the shadow, e.g. the location of its centre, and offers a number of routes to characterize the distortions of the curve with respect to reference circles. These distortions can be implemented in a coordinate-independent manner by different teams analysing the same data. We show that the new formalism provides an accurate and robust description of noisy observational data, with smaller error variances when compared to previous approaches for the measurement of the distortion.

  6. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. C.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C. B.; He, J. R.; Rao, Y. J.; Gong, Y.; Fu, F.; Chen, Y. F.; Li, Y. R.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel ‘FRET on Fiber’ concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based ‘FRET on fiber’ configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated ‘FRET on Fiber’ sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response

  7. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Yao, B C; Wu, Y; Yu, C B; He, J R; Rao, Y J; Gong, Y; Fu, F; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R

    2016-03-24

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel 'FRET on Fiber' concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based 'FRET on fiber' configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated 'FRET on Fiber' sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response.

  8. Impact of ground mover motion and windowing on stationary and moving shadows in synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Bishop, E.; Doerry, A.; Raynal, A. M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the impact of ground mover motion and windowing on stationary and moving shadows in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and video SAR mode imagery. The technique provides a foundation for optimizing algorithms that detect ground movers in SAR imagery. The video SAR mode provides a persistent view of a scene centered at the Motion Compensation Point (MCP). The radar platform follows a circular flight path. Detecting a stationary shadow in a SAR image is important because the shadow indicates a detection of an object with a height component near the shadow. Similarly, the detection of a shadow that moves from frame to frame indicates the detection of a ground mover at the location of the moving shadow. An approach analyzes the impact of windowing in calculating the brightness of a pixel in a stationary, finite-sized shadow region. An extension of the approach describes the pixel brightness for a moving shadow as a function of its velocity. The pixel brightness provides an upper bound on the Probability of Detection (PD) and a lower bound on the Probability of False Alarm (PFA) for a finite-sized, stationary or moving shadow in the presence of homogeneous, ideal clutter. Synthetic data provides shadow characteristics for a radar scenario that lend themselves for detecting a ground mover. The paper presents 2011-2014 flight data collected by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc. (GA-ASI).

  9. The activated partial thromboplastin time of diluted plasma: variability due to the method of fibrin detection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, I B

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the dilution of plasma (1/3 in saline) on the kinetics of fibrin generation in the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay. The diluted APTT is considered to increase the sensitivity of the APTT test however, studies in our laboratory using an electro-optical fibrin detection system failed to show significant differences in APTT values obtained with diluted and undiluted canine plasma. Seventeen plasmas, including plasmas moderately and markedly deficient in intrinsic factor activity were assayed in the undiluted and diluted APTT assay using two methods for fibrin endpoint detection; a visual "tilt-tube" technique and an electro-optical detection system. In the former technique the endpoint was the formation of a visible fibrin web or clot; in the latter procedure the end point was the first detection of a change in optical density of the plasma. Optical density changes during fibrin formation were also recorded ( thrombokinetograms ). The results indicated that the electro-optical fibrin detection system failed to identify a prolongation of the APTT as a result of 1/3 plasma dilution; a prolongation that was consistently observed with the visual fibrin detection technique. Plasma dilution however, did significantly reduce the rate of fibrin production as indicated by the thrombokinetogram profile. It was concluded that the dilution of plasma with saline, as has been used to increase the sensitivity of the APTT assay procedure, has little effect on the time of onset of fibrin formation in a given plasma. The major effect appears to be on the way in which fibrin forms in that the polymerization/crosslinkage events associated with macroscopic fibrin production are delayed. PMID:6722646

  10. Confirmation of a novel siadenovirus species detected in raptors: partial sequence and phylogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Endre R; Benko, Mária

    2009-03-01

    Partial genome characterisation of a novel adenovirus, found recently in organ samples of multiple species of dead birds of prey, was carried out by sequence analysis of PCR-amplified DNA fragments. The virus, named as raptor adenovirus 1 (RAdV-1), has originally been detected by a nested PCR method with consensus primers targeting the adenoviral DNA polymerase gene. Phylogenetic analysis with the deduced amino acid sequence of the small PCR product has implied a new siadenovirus type present in the samples. Since virus isolation attempts remained unsuccessful, further characterisation of this putative novel siadenovirus was carried out with the use of PCR on the infected organ samples. The DNA sequence of the central genome part of RAdV-1, encompassing nine full (pTP, 52K, pIIIa, III, pVII, pX, pVI, hexon, protease) and two partial (DNA polymerase and DBP) genes and exceeding 12 kb pairs in size, was determined. Phylogenetic tree reconstructions, based on several genes, unambiguously confirmed the preliminary classification of RAdV-1 as a new species within the genus Siadenovirus. Further study of RAdV-1 is of interest since it represents a rare adenovirus genus of yet undetermined host origin.

  11. Detection of Upscale-Crop and Partial Manipulation in Surveillance Video Based on Sensor Pattern Noise

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Dai-Kyung; Ryu, Seung-Jin; Lee, Hae-Yeoun; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    In many court cases, surveillance videos are used as significant court evidence. As these surveillance videos can easily be forged, it may cause serious social issues, such as convicting an innocent person. Nevertheless, there is little research being done on forgery of surveillance videos. This paper proposes a forensic technique to detect forgeries of surveillance video based on sensor pattern noise (SPN). We exploit the scaling invariance of the minimum average correlation energy Mellin radial harmonic (MACE-MRH) correlation filter to reliably unveil traces of upscaling in videos. By excluding the high-frequency components of the investigated video and adaptively choosing the size of the local search window, the proposed method effectively localizes partially manipulated regions. Empirical evidence from a large database of test videos, including RGB (Red, Green, Blue)/infrared video, dynamic-/static-scene video and compressed video, indicates the superior performance of the proposed method. PMID:24051524

  12. Detection of upscale-crop and partial manipulation in surveillance video based on sensor pattern noise.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Dai-Kyung; Ryu, Seung-Jin; Lee, Hae-Yeoun; Lee, Heung-Kyu

    2013-09-18

    In many court cases, surveillance videos are used as significant court evidence. As these surveillance videos can easily be forged, it may cause serious social issues, such as convicting an innocent person. Nevertheless, there is little research being done on forgery of surveillance videos. This paper proposes a forensic technique to detect forgeries of surveillance video based on sensor pattern noise (SPN). We exploit the scaling invariance of the minimum average correlation energy Mellin radial harmonic (MACE-MRH) correlation filter to reliably unveil traces of upscaling in videos. By excluding the high-frequency components of the investigated video and adaptively choosing the size of the local search window, the proposed method effectively localizes partially manipulated regions. Empirical evidence from a large database of test videos, including RGB (Red, Green, Blue)/infrared video, dynamic-/static-scene video and compressed video, indicates the superior performance of the proposed method.

  13. Total and partial cloud amount detection during summer 2005 at Westerland (Sylt, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, N. H.; Macke, A.; Sandmann, H.; Stick, C.

    2009-02-01

    The detection of cloudiness is investigated by means of partial and total cloud amount estimations from pyrgeometer radiation measurements and visible all-sky imager observations. The measurements have been performed in Westerland, a seaside resort on the North Sea island of Sylt, Germany, during summer 2005. An improvement to previous studies on this subject resulting in the first time partial cloud amounts (PCAs), defined as cloud amounts without high clouds calculated from longwave downward radiation (LDR) according to the APCADA algorithm (Dürr and Philipona, 2004), are validated against both human observations from the National Meteorological Servive DWD at the nearby airport of Sylt and digital all-sky imaging. The aim is to establish the APCADA scheme at a coastal midlatitude site for longterm observations of cloud cover and to quantify errors resulting from the different methods of detecting cloudiness. Differences between the resulting total cloud amounts (TCAs), defined as cloud amount for all-cloud situations, derived from the camera images and from human observations are within ±1 octa in 72% and within ±2 octa in 85% of the cases. Compared to human observations, PCA measurements, according to APCADA, underestimate the observed cloud cover in 47% of all cases and the differences are within ±1 octa in 60% and ±2 octa in 74% of all cases. Since high cirrus clouds can not be derived from LDR, separate comparisons for all cases without high clouds have been performed showing an agreement within ±1(2) octa in 73(90)% for PCA and also for camera-derived TCA. For this coastal mid-latitude site under investigation, we find similar though slightly smaller agreements to human observations as reported by Dürr and Philipona (2004). Though limited to daytime, the cloud cover retrievals from the sky imager are not really affected by cirrus clouds and provide a more reliable cloud climatology for all-cloud conditions than APCADA.

  14. Improving detection sensitivity for partial discharge monitoring of high voltage equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Lewin, P. L.; Swingler, S. G.

    2008-05-01

    Partial discharge (PD) measurements are an important technique for assessing the health of power apparatus. Previous published research by the authors has shown that an electro-optic system can be used for PD measurement of oil-filled power transformers. A PD signal generated within an oil-filled power transformer may reach a winding and then travel along the winding to the bushing core bar. The bushing, acting like a capacitor, can transfer the high frequency components of the partial discharge signal to its earthed tap point. Therefore, an effective PD current measurement can be implemented at the bushing tap by using a radio frequency current transducer around the bushing-tap earth connection. In addition, the use of an optical transmission technique not only improves the electrical noise immunity and provides the possibility of remote measurement but also realizes electrical isolation and enhances safety for operators. However, the bushing core bar can act as an aerial and in addition noise induced by the electro-optic modulation system may influence overall measurement sensitivity. This paper reports on a machine learning technique, namely the use of a support vector machine (SVM), to improve the detection sensitivity of the system. Comparison between the signal extraction performances of a passive hardware filter and the SVM technique has been assessed. The results obtained from the laboratory-based experiment have been analysed and indicate that the SVM approach provides better performance than the passive hardware filter and it can reliably detect discharge signals with apparent charge greater than 30 pC.

  15. Resolution Of A Shadow Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgerton, Harold E.

    1982-02-01

    The 19th century art of shadow imaging, as started by Wedgwood (1803), and as used by William Henry Fox-Talbot (1851) in England, has been revived by using a small-area electronic flash lamp and fine grain film. One immediate application has been the photographic recording of large samples of living plankton. The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the resolution of the shadow system, and to describe some of the strobe light sources that are presently available. Also, a modified method of shadow photography is described where enhanced color images give interesting and, perhaps, important color effects that may be useful in the study of plankton and other semitrans-parent subjects.

  16. The Shadow War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrini, Michelle; Williams, Charles F.

    2005-01-01

    For much of the nineteenth century, the U.S. did not allocate many resources to intelligence gathering. Many Americans were wary of espionage, partly because of the disreputable association of espionage with the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, the nation's first private detective and police agency. In the realm of twentieth-century…

  17. Total and partial cloud amount detection during summermonths 2005 at Westerland (Sylt, Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, N. H.; Macke, A.; Sandmann, H.; Stick, C.

    2008-07-01

    The detection of cloudiness is investigated by means of partial and total cloud amount estimations from pyrgeometer radiation measurements and all-sky imager observations. The measurements have been performed in Westerland, a seaside resort on the North Sea island of Sylt, Germany, during summer 2005. An improvement to previous studies on this subject results from the fact that for the first time partial cloud amount (PCA), defined as total cloud amounts without high clouds, calculations from longwave downward radiation (LDR) according to the APCADA-Algorithm (Dürr and Philipona, 2004) are validated against both human observations from the German Weather Service DWD at the nearby airport of Sylt and digital all-sky imaging. Differences between the resulting total cloud amounts (TCA's), defined as total cloud amount for all-cloud situations, derived from the camera images and from human observations are within ±1 octa in 72% and within ±2 octa in 85% of the cases. Compared to human observations PCA measurements according to APCADA underestimate the observed cloud cover in 47% of all cases and the differences are within ±1 octa in 60% and ±2 octa in 74% of all cases. Since high cirrus clouds can not be derived from LDR, separate comparisons for all cases without high clouds have been performed showing an agreement within ±1(2) octa in 73(90)% for PCA and also for camera derived TCA. For this coastal mid-latitude site under investigation we find similar though slightly smaller agreements to human observations as reported in Dürr and Philipona (2004). Though limited to day-time the cloud cover retrievals from the sky imager are not much affected by cirrus clouds and provide a more reliable cloud climatology for all-cloud conditions than APCADA.

  18. Editing soft shadows in a digital photograph.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Ankit; Tumblin, Jack; Choudhury, Prasun

    2007-01-01

    This technique for modeling, editing, and rendering shadow edges in a photograph or a synthetic image lets users separate the shadow from the rest of the image and make arbitrary adjustments to its position, sharpness, and intensity.

  19. The shadow world of superstring theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolb, E. W.; Turner, M. S.; Seckel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Some possible astrophysical and cosmological implications of 'shadow matter', a form of matter which only interacts gravitationally with ordinary matter and which may or may not be identical in its properties to ordinary matter, are considered. The possible existence, amount, and location of shadow matter in the solar system are discussed, and the significance of shadow matter for primordial nucleosynthesis, macroscopic asymmetry, baryogenesis, double-bubble inflation, and asymmetric microphysics is addressed. Massive shadow states are discussed.

  20. A spectrum of shadowed mirroring.

    PubMed

    Wanamaker, Melissa C

    2012-04-01

    The central focus of this paper is to explore and extend Kohut's theory of maternal mirroring and to place it within the current context of psychoanalytic thinking. Kohut believed a child must experience "positive" mirroring from his or her mother in infancy and beyond to ensure development of a healthy self. Kohut alludes, however, to a possible situation in which the mother's face, metaphorically a mirror, can appear "faceless" to her child. From this I have inferred the concept of what I shall call "shadowed mirroring." Clinical and literary examples show that distorted, "shadowed" mirroring appears on a spectrum, with passive mirroring at one end and hostile (either verbal or nonverbal) mirroring on the other; some individuals experience both. I then consider how "shadowed mirroring," especially hostile mirroring, can be understood within the twin contexts of the overall mother-child relationship and present-day Intersubjective/Relational thinking that is both bidirectional and co-constructed. Shadowed mirroring can lead to severe personality dysfunction along the borderline-narcissistic range, as well as to difficulties in the areas of identity formation, failure of self-cohesiveness, and the blunting of certain humane qualities like empathy.

  1. [Pellegrini-Stieda disease (shadow)].

    PubMed

    Tkebuchava, G I

    1976-02-01

    The Pellegrini-Stied disease (shadow) (calcification periarthritis of the knee) is characterized by the presence of ossification of the medial condyl of the femur. The author's observations of 51 patients (sportsmen) suffering this lesion are described. The methods of conservative and operative treatment and the results obtained are reported.

  2. Shedding Light on Shadow Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2015-01-01

    This essay review examines four different movies that directly or indirectly refer to the theme of private tutoring or, as it is widely called, shadow education. The movies, directed in locations as diverse as India, Turkey, and Cambodia, are all made from a critical perspective. The directors demonstrate challenges in public education systems and…

  3. The Greatest Shadow on Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen; Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Fahmi, Marco; Winslett, Greg; Dubler, Gabriel; Le Prou, Angela; Loose, David

    2014-01-01

    In a total solar eclipse, the Moon completely covers the Sun, casting a shadow several hundred km wide across the face of the Earth. This paper describes observations of the 14 November 2012 total eclipse of the Sun visible from north Queensland, Australia. The edge of the umbra was captured on video during totality, and this video is provided for…

  4. Video Job Shadows. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucinkas, Gene; Noyce, Gary

    Video Job Shadows encourages students to develop questions about a job and offers them the chance to videotape a business person answering those questions about his or her job. The program can be an effective method of teaching high school students about the world of work and the specific requirements and responsibilities of some jobs in their…

  5. Shadows: Young Taiwanese Children's Views and Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shu-Min

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine young children's views about shadows. Young children hear references to or are involved in many scientific experiences in their everyday lives, and shadows are a part of children's everyday experiences. Young children may have constructed their knowledge about shadows through their daily experiences.…

  6. Gait identification from invisible shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwashita, Yumi; Uchino, Koji; Kurazume, Ryo; Stoica, Adrian

    2012-06-01

    This paper introduces a person identification system that uses as input the shadow images of a walking person, as projected by multiple lights(in this application invisible/infrared lights); the system uses a database of examples of shadows images of a number of people who walk. While it is accepted that personal identification has a higher correct classification rate if views from multiple cameras are used, most systems use only one camera, mainly because (i) Installation in real-world environments is easier, less cameras and no need to synchronize cameras, (ii) Computational cost is reduced. In the proposed system, we obtain the advantages of multiple viewpoints with a single camera and additional light sources. More specific, we install multiple infrared lights to project shadows of a subject on the ground and a camera with an infrared transmitting filter mounted in the ceiling inside of a building. Shadow areas, which are projections of one's body on the ground by multiple lights, can be considered as body areas captured from different viewpoints; thus, the proposed system is able to capture multiple projections of the body from a single camera. We explored in other papers the use of sunproduced shadow for identification of people walking freely in the outdoor. In this paper the application scenario is a system installed at the airport in the areas that precedes the immigration checkpoint. Japan already has health monitoring cameras focused on approaching individuals, to determine their health condition; the here described system would also be installed in such a controlled area with restricted walk corridors of walk and controlled lighting. Gait is a remote biometrics and can provide early warning; on another hand it can be used as corroborating evidence in a multi-modal biometrics system. A database of images including shadows for a set of 28 walking people was collected, and the features extracted from shadow areas by affine moment invariants, after which

  7. Optimum study design for detecting imprinting and maternal effects based on partial likelihood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangyuan; Khalili, Abbas; Lin, Shili

    2016-03-01

    Despite spectacular advances in molecular genomic technologies in the past two decades, resources available for genomic studies are still finite and limited, especially for family-based studies. Hence, it is important to consider an optimum study design to maximally utilize limited resources to increase statistical power in family-based studies. A particular question of interest is whether it is more profitable to genotype siblings of probands or to recruit more independent families. Numerous studies have attempted to address this study design issue for simultaneous detection of imprinting and maternal effects, two important epigenetic factors for studying complex diseases. The question is far from settled, however, mainly due to the fact that results and recommendations in the literature are based on anecdotal evidence from limited simulation studies rather than based on rigorous statistical analysis. In this article, we propose a systematic approach to study various designs based on a partial likelihood formulation. We derive the asymptotic properties and obtain formulas for computing the information contents of study designs being considered. Our results show that, for a common disease, recruiting additional siblings is beneficial because both affected and unaffected individuals will be included. However, if a disease is rare, then any additional siblings recruited are most likely to be unaffected, thus contributing little additional information; in such cases, additional families will be a better choice with a fixed amount of resources. Our work thus offers a practical strategy for investigators to select the optimum study design within a case-control family scheme before data collection.

  8. Partial-differential-equation-constrained amplitude-based shape detection in inverse acoustic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Seong-Won; Kallivokas, Loukas F.

    2008-03-01

    In this article we discuss a formal framework for casting the inverse problem of detecting the location and shape of an insonified scatterer embedded within a two-dimensional homogeneous acoustic host, in terms of a partial-differential-equation-constrained optimization approach. We seek to satisfy the ensuing Karush-Kuhn-Tucker first-order optimality conditions using boundary integral equations. The treatment of evolving boundary shapes, which arise naturally during the search for the true shape, resides on the use of total derivatives, borrowing from recent work by Bonnet and Guzina [1-4] in elastodynamics. We consider incomplete information collected at stations sparsely spaced at the assumed obstacle’s backscattered region. To improve on the ability of the optimizer to arrive at the global optimum we: (a) favor an amplitude-based misfit functional; and (b) iterate over both the frequency- and wave-direction spaces through a sequence of problems. We report numerical results for sound-hard objects with shapes ranging from circles, to penny- and kite-shaped, including obstacles with arbitrarily shaped non-convex boundaries.

  9. Performance analysis of a modified moving shadow elimination method developed for indoor scene activity tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Bhargav Kumar; Fiaz, Muhammad Kamran; Kypraios, Ioannis; Birch, Philip; Young, Rupert; Chatwin, Chris

    2008-10-01

    Moving shadow detection is an important step in automated robust surveillance systems in which a dynamic object is to be segmented and tracked. Rejection of the shadow region significantly reduces the erroneous tracking of non-target objects within the scene. A method to eliminate such shadows in indoor video sequences has been developed by the authors. The objective has been met through the use of a pixel-wise shadow search process that utilizes a computational model in the RGB colour space to demarcate the moving shadow regions from the background scene and the foreground objects. However, it has been observed that the robustness and efficiency of the method can be significantly enhanced through the deployment of a binary-mask based shadow search process. This, in turn, calls for the use of a prior foreground object segmentation technique. The authors have also automated a standard foreground object segmentation technique through the deployment of some popular statistical outlier-detection based strategies. The paper analyses the performance i.e. the effectiveness as a shadow detector, discrimination potential, and the processing time of the modified moving shadow elimination method on the basis of some standard evaluation metrics.

  10. A Global Search for Stress Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallman, E. P.; Parsons, T.

    2004-12-01

    For years scientists have recognized a decrease in seismicity in the regions surrounding the 1857 Fort Tejon and 1906 San Francisco earthquakes in California. This decrease in seismicity has since been correlated with calculated Coulomb stress decrease and termed a stress shadow. Earthquake hazard assessments increasingly incorporate probability perturbations resulting from calculated static stress changes. However, some researchers have questioned the existence of stress shadows when detailed studies of seismicity rates following other earthquakes failed to show correlations between calculated stress decreases and seismicity rate decreases. Regions of decreased seismicity rate are difficult to find compared with rate-increased regions; we thus look for evidence of post-seismic stress rotations, which are easier to detect, require none of the assumptions inherent to static stress calculations, and are a necessary condition for the occurrence of a stress shadow zone. A stress rotation, as determined by comparison of focal mechanisms before and after the mainshock, indicates a changed regional stress state that suppresses events of a certain mechanism and enhances events of a differing mechanism. To independently test the shadow hypothesis, we examined a global catalog of 119 M>7 earthquakes and the events within a 2-degree radius around them that were recorded by the Harvard CMT catalog. We first examined the average mechanism before and after the mainshock, and then compared this with the changes in rate of each of the mechanisms. Of the 119 mainshocks that we identified, 15 showed a rotation of average mechanism following the mainshock that was significant at the 1-sigma level relative to the observed pre-mainshock variability. Of these 15 events, only 2 did not show increases in rate across all mechanisms. That is, only 2 of the 119 show a decrease in at least one mechanism following the mainshock, and also show a significant rotation in mean mechanism. It is

  11. Speckles and Shadow Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian D.

    1995-03-01

    Speckle interferometry has for the past two decades provided a means to measure very accurate relative positions of binary stars, data crucial to the fundamental determination of basic stellar parameters. As a technique for observing small angular separations speckle interferometry is exceeded only by long baseline interferometry (a technique still in infancy) and the observation of lunar occultation phenomena. As the moon passes in front of stars the light coming from those stars is occulted. Occultations of binary stars can determine relative intensities and can measure separations which are comparable to those measured by long-baseline interferometers. The data are difficult to interpret since the measured separation is a projection of the true angular separation and non-standard filters are often used. No complete listing of all occultation measures has been published since the compilation of David Evans (IAU Colloquium No. 62, Current Techniques in Double and Multiple Star Research, Lowell Observatory Bulletin No. 167, 1981, eds. Harrington, R.A. \\& Franz, O.G., Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff). The dissertation presents 772 measures of 357 systems, an increase of 60\\% over the Evans catalog. The methodology of speckle interferometry is presented, followed by 362 re-reduction measures and 253 new measures. The re-reduction measures were cases where prior analysis showed no companion. With improved reduction algorithms, detection frequency significantly increased. One observation in eight previously showing no companion produced a measurable result. Results were obtained with the 1.8-m Perkins telescope of Lowell Observatory, the 2.5-m Hooker telescope of Mt. Wilson Observatory, the 3.8-m Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 4.0-m telescope at Cerro Tololo InterAmerican Observatory. All but 130 of the occultation objects have speckle observations. The likelihood of future detection by speckle is considered. An analysis of 131 negative

  12. Signatures of a shadow biosphere.

    PubMed

    Davies, Paul C W; Benner, Steven A; Cleland, Carol E; Lineweaver, Charles H; McKay, Christopher P; Wolfe-Simon, Felisa

    2009-03-01

    Astrobiologists are aware that extraterrestrial life might differ from known life, and considerable thought has been given to possible signatures associated with weird forms of life on other planets. So far, however, very little attention has been paid to the possibility that our own planet might also host communities of weird life. If life arises readily in Earth-like conditions, as many astrobiologists contend, then it may well have formed many times on Earth itself, which raises the question whether one or more shadow biospheres have existed in the past or still exist today. In this paper, we discuss possible signatures of weird life and outline some simple strategies for seeking evidence of a shadow biosphere.

  13. Spirit Shadow over Laguna Trench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit casts a shadow over the trench that the rover is examining with tools on its robotic arm. Spirit took this image with its front hazard-avoidance camera on Feb. 21, 2004, during the rover's 48th martian day, or sol. It dug the trench with its left front wheel the preceding sol. Plans call for Spirit to finish examining the trench on sol 50.

  14. Locating the shadow regions in LIDAR data: results on the SHARE 2012 dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyaci, Mustafa; Yuksel, Seniha E.

    2015-05-01

    In hyperspectral imaging, shadowy areas present a major problem as targets in shadow show decreased or no spectral signatures. One way to mitigate this problem is by the fusion of hyperspectral data with LiDAR data; since LiDAR data presents excellent information by providing elevation information, which can then be used to identify the regions of shadow. Although there is a lot of work to detect the shadowy areas, many are restricted to distinct platforms like ARGCIS, ENVI etc. The purpose of this study is to (i) detect the shadow areas and to (ii) give a shadowiness scale in LiDAR data with Matlab in an efficient way. For this work, we designed our Line of Sight (LoS) algorithm that is optimized to run in a Matlab interface. The LoS algorithm uses the sun angles (altitude and azimuth) and elevation of the earth; and marks the pixel as "in shadow" if there lies an object of higher elevation between a given pixel and the sun. This is computed for all pixels in the scene and a shadow map is generated. Further, if a pixel is marked as a shadow area, the algorithm assigns a different darkness level which is inversely proportional to the distance between the current pixel and the object that causes the shadow. With this shadow scale, it is both visually and computationally possible to distinguish the soft shadows from the dark shadows; an important information for hyperspectral imagery. The algorithm has been tested on the SHARE 2012 Avon AM dataset. We also show the effect of the shadowiness scale on the spectral signatures.

  15. Towards a Video Passive Content Fingerprinting Method for Partial-Copy Detection Robust against Non-Simulated Attacks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Passive content fingerprinting is widely used for video content identification and monitoring. However, many challenges remain unsolved especially for partial-copies detection. The main challenge is to find the right balance between the computational cost of fingerprint extraction and fingerprint dimension, without compromising detection performance against various attacks (robustness). Fast video detection performance is desirable in several modern applications, for instance, in those where video detection involves the use of large video databases or in applications requiring real-time video detection of partial copies, a process whose difficulty increases when videos suffer severe transformations. In this context, conventional fingerprinting methods are not fully suitable to cope with the attacks and transformations mentioned before, either because the robustness of these methods is not enough or because their execution time is very high, where the time bottleneck is commonly found in the fingerprint extraction and matching operations. Motivated by these issues, in this work we propose a content fingerprinting method based on the extraction of a set of independent binary global and local fingerprints. Although these features are robust against common video transformations, their combination is more discriminant against severe video transformations such as signal processing attacks, geometric transformations and temporal and spatial desynchronization. Additionally, we use an efficient multilevel filtering system accelerating the processes of fingerprint extraction and matching. This multilevel filtering system helps to rapidly identify potential similar video copies upon which the fingerprint process is carried out only, thus saving computational time. We tested with datasets of real copied videos, and the results show how our method outperforms state-of-the-art methods regarding detection scores. Furthermore, the granularity of our method makes it suitable for

  16. Genetic fusion of single-chain variable fragments to partial spider silk improves target detection in micro- and nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Thatikonda, Naresh; Delfani, Payam; Jansson, Ronnie; Petersson, Linn; Lindberg, Diana; Wingren, Christer; Hedhammar, My

    2016-03-01

    Immobilizing biomolecules with retained functionality and stability on solid supports is crucial for generation of sensitive immunoassays. However, upon use of conventional immobilization strategies, a major portion of the biomolecules (e.g. antibodies) frequently tends to lose their bioactivity. In this study, we describe a procedure to immobilize human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) via genetic fusion to partial spider silk, which have a high tendency to adhere to solid supports. Two scFvs, directed towards serum proteins, were genetically fused to partial spider silk proteins and expressed as silk fusion proteins in E. coli. Antigen binding ability of scFvs attached to a partial silk protein denoted RC was investigated using microarray analysis, whereas scFvs fused to the NC silk variant were examined using nanoarrays. Results from micro- and nanoarrays confirmed the functionality of scFvs attached to both RC and NC silk, and also for binding of targets in crude serum. Furthermore, the same amount of added scFv gives higher signal intensity when immobilized via partial spider silk compared to when immobilized alone. Together, the results suggest that usage of scFv-silk fusion proteins in immunoassays could improve target detection, in the long run enabling novel biomarkers to be detected in crude serum proteomes.

  17. Chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with subpleural curvilinear shadow.

    PubMed

    Kagohashi, Katsunori; Ohara, Gen; Kurishima, Koichi; Kawaguchi, Mio; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of chronic eosinophilic pneumonia with subpleural curvilinear shadow. CT scan showed a patchy consolidation in the bilateral upper lungs. In addition, subpleural curvilinear shadow was found in the bilateral upper lungs. A bronchoalveolar lavage obtained from the right middle lobe showed 25 % eosinophils. Although very rare, we should therefore keep in mind that patients, who have patchy consolidation with areas of subpleural curvilinear shadow in the bilateral upper lungs, may have chronic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  18. The father's shadow/father's body.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D

    1995-09-01

    The shadow of the father plays an important role in a son's ability to live a creatively meaningful life. The mythological basis for the father's shadow is found in the myth of Cronos and his son Zeus. This myth symbolizes a father's body being intimately connected to his son getting in touch with his creative bright shadow. The conclusions reached regarding the importance of the father's shadow are based on research conducted with an ongoing men's group. An early underground phallus dream of Jung is examined, along with the creative work of a patient, both offering evidence of the importance of the body-bond with the father for a son's creative development.

  19. Construction of Discrete Time Shadow Price

    SciTech Connect

    Rogala, Tomasz Stettner, Lukasz

    2015-12-15

    In the paper expected utility from consumption over finite time horizon for discrete time markets with bid and ask prices and strictly concave utility function is considered. The notion of weak shadow price, i.e. an illiquid price, depending on the portfolio, under which the model without bid and ask price is equivalent to the model with bid and ask price is introduced. Existence and the form of weak shadow price is shown. Using weak shadow price usual (called in the paper strong) shadow price is then constructed.

  20. Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Optical System Using Shadows Triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barba, J. Leiner; Vargas, Q. Lorena; Torres, M. Cesar; Mattos, V. Lorenzo

    2008-04-01

    In this work is developed a three-dimensional reconstruction system using the Shades3D tool of the Matlab® Programming Language and materials of low cost, such as webcam camera, a stick, a weak structured lighting system composed by a desk lamp, and observation plane in which the object is located. The reconstruction is obtained through a triangulation process that is executed after acquiring a sequence of images of the scene with a shadow projected on the object; additionally an image filtering process is done for obtaining only the part of the scene that will be reconstructed. Previously, it is necessary to develop a calibration process for determining the internal camera geometric and optical characteristics (intrinsic parameters), and the 3D position and orientation of the camera frame relative to a certain world coordinate system (extrinsic parameters). The lamp and the stick are used to produce a shadow which scans the object; in this technique, it is not necessary to know the position of the light source, instead the triangulation is obtained using shadow plane produced by intersection between the stick and the illumination pattern. The webcam camera captures all images with the shadow scanning the object, and Shades3D tool processes all information taking into account captured images and calibration parameters. Likewise, this technique is evaluated in the reconstruction of parts of the human body and its application in the detection of external abnormalities and elaboration of prosthesis or implant.

  1. Dark matter trapping by stellar bars: the shadow bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Michael S.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the complex interactions between the stellar disc and the dark-matter halo during bar formation and evolution using N-body simulations with fine temporal resolution and optimally chosen spatial resolution. We find that the forming stellar bar traps dark matter in the vicinity of the stellar bar into bar-supporting orbits. We call this feature the shadow bar. The shadow bar modifies both the location and magnitude of the angular momentum transfer between the disc and dark matter halo and adds 10 per cent to the mass of the stellar bar over 4 Gyr. The shadow bar is potentially observable by its density and velocity signature in spheroid stars and by direct dark matter detection experiments. Numerical tests demonstrate that the shadow bar can diminish the rate of angular momentum transport from the bar to the dark matter halo by more than a factor of 3 over the rate predicted by dynamical friction with an untrapped dark halo, and thus provides a possible physical explanation for the observed prevalence of fast bars in nature.

  2. The greatest shadow on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Stephen; Wimmer, Jason; Towsey, Michael; Fahmi, Marco; Winslett, Greg; Dubler, Gabriel; Le Prou, Angela; Loose, David

    2014-01-01

    In a total solar eclipse, the Moon completely covers the Sun, casting a shadow several hundred km wide across the face of the Earth. This paper describes observations of the 14 November 2012 total eclipse of the Sun visible from north Queensland, Australia. The edge of the umbra was captured on video during totality, and this video is provided for teaching purposes. A series of simple ‘kitchen’ experiments are described which demonstrate the ‘sunset’ effect seen on the horizon during a total solar eclipse and also the curved umbra seen in the sky when the eclipsed Sun is relatively close to the horizon.

  3. Shadows and spirals in the protoplanetary disk HD 100453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benisty, M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; de Boer, J.; Lesur, G.; Dominik, C.; Dullemond, C. P.; Langlois, M.; Min, M.; Wagner, K.; Henning, T.; Juhasz, A.; Pinilla, P.; Facchini, S.; Apai, D.; van Boekel, R.; Garufi, A.; Ginski, C.; Ménard, F.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Zurlo, A.; Boccaletti, A.; Bonnefoy, M.; Beuzit, J. L.; Chauvin, G.; Cudel, M.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Fontanive, C.; Gratton, R.; Kasper, M.; Lagrange, A.-M.; LeCoroller, H.; Mouillet, D.; Mesa, D.; Sissa, E.; Vigan, A.; Antichi, J.; Buey, T.; Fusco, T.; Gisler, D.; Llored, M.; Magnard, Y.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Pragt, J.; Roelfsema, R.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Wildi, F.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Understanding the diversity of planets requires studying the morphology and physical conditions in the protoplanetary disks in which they form. Aims: We aim to study the structure of the 10 Myr old protoplanetary disk HD 100453, to detect features that can trace disk evolution and to understand the mechanisms that drive these features. Methods: We observed HD 100453 in polarized scattered light with VLT/SPHERE at optical (0.6 μm, 0.8 μm) and near-infrared (1.2 μm) wavelengths, reaching an angular resolution of 0.02'', and an inner working angle of 0.09''. Results: We spatially resolve the disk around HD 100453, and detect polarized scattered light up to 0.42'' ( 48 au). We detect a cavity, a rim with azimuthal brightness variations at an inclination of 38° with respect to our line of sight, two shadows and two symmetric spiral arms. The spiral arms originate near the location of the shadows, close to the semi major axis. We detect a faint feature in the SW that can be interpreted as the scattering surface of the bottom side of the disk, if the disk is tidally truncated by the M-dwarf companion currently seen at a projected distance of 119 au. We construct a radiative transfer model that accounts for the main characteristics of the features with an inner and outer disk misaligned by 72°. The azimuthal brightness variations along the rim are well reproduced with the scattering phase function of the model. While spirals can be triggered by the tidal interaction with the companion, the close proximity of the spirals to the shadows suggests that the shadows could also play a role. The change in stellar illumination along the rim induces an azimuthal variation of the scale height that can contribute to the brightness variations. Conclusions: Dark regions in polarized images of transition disks are now detected in a handful of disks and often interpreted as shadows due to a misaligned inner disk. However, the origin of such a misalignment in HD 100453, and

  4. Mapping and characterization of non-polar permanent shadows on the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, J. Andrew; Bussey, D. Benjamin; Greenhagen, Benjamin T.; Paige, David A.; Cahill, Joshua T. S.; Spudis, Paul D.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first globally complete inventory of permanent shadows on the lunar surface that are detectable with the current global instrument datasets, including discovery of regions with persistent shadows over geologic time periods as close to the equator as ±58° of latitude. These results were obtained through application of a ray tracing technique to the latest global topographic datasets from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Our analysis reveals that 13,361 km2 of surface in the northern hemisphere and 17,698 km2 in the southern hemisphere are permanently shadowed. We present maps showing the locations of all the permanent shadows detectable using these datasets then turn our focus toward the permanent shadows farthest from the poles. Each permanent shadow on the equator side of ±65° of latitude is shown in detail. Surface brightness temperature data derived from the Diviner mid-infrared radiometer on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter have been analyzed for four of these locations and found to have mid-day temperatures 75-120 K less than nearby comparison locations that experience direct daytime illumination. In some cases the permanently shadowed locations have nighttime temperatures 10-25 K lower than surroundings. The temperature results support our finding that these non-polar craters are permanently shadowed. The surface brightness temperature results also raise interesting questions about their ability to cold trap volatiles. Discovery of these non-polar permanently shadowed regions increases possible locations of water resources and high priority exploration targets on the Moon.

  5. Quantitative encoding of a partial agonist effect on individual opioid receptors by multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Elaine K.; Trester-Zedlitz, Michelle; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Kotowski, Sarah J.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Burlingame, Alma L.; von Zastrow, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Many drugs act as partial agonists of seven-transmembrane signaling receptors when compared to endogenous ligands. Partial agonism is well described as a 'macroscopic' property manifest at the level of physiological systems or cell populations, but it is not known whether partial agonists encode discrete regulatory information at the 'microscopic' level of individual receptors. We addressed this question by focusing on morphine, a partial agonist drug for µ-type opioid peptide receptors, and combining quantitative mass spectrometry with cell biological analysis to investigate morphine's reduced efficacy for promoting receptor endocytosis when compared to a peptide full agonist. We show that these chemically distinct ligands produce a complex, and qualitatively similar mixture of phosphorylated opioid receptor forms in intact cells. Quantitatively, however, the agonists promote markedly disproportional production of multi-site phosphorylation involving a specific Ser/Thr motif, whose modification at more than one residue is essential for efficient recruitment of the adaptor protein β-arrestin to clathrin-coated pits that mediate subsequent endocytosis of MORs. These results reveal quantitative encoding of agonist-selective endocytosis at the level of individual opioid receptors, based on the conserved biochemical principles of multi-site phosphorylation and threshold detection. PMID:21868358

  6. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Roman, Julio; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Rubio-Serrano, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequency of 150 kHz. In addition, the accessibility to the sensing region is guaranteed by immune fiber-optic cables and the optical phase sensor output. The sensor design is a compact and rugged coil of fiber. In addition to a complete calibration, the in-situ results show that two types of partial discharges are measured through their acoustic emissions with the sensor immersed in oil. PMID:22666058

  7. 47 CFR 80.769 - Shadow loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... shadowing must be taken from § 80.769 Graph 1, as follows: (a) Inspect the map(s) to determine if a hill(s) obstructs an imaginary line of sight (dashed line on illustrative profiles of § 80.769 Graph 1 from the... Graph 1. (d) Read the shadow loss from this Graph 1 and subtract that loss from the computed...

  8. 47 CFR 80.769 - Shadow loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shadowing must be taken from § 80.769 Graph 1, as follows: (a) Inspect the map(s) to determine if a hill(s) obstructs an imaginary line of sight (dashed line on illustrative profiles of § 80.769 Graph 1 from the... Graph 1. (d) Read the shadow loss from this Graph 1 and subtract that loss from the computed...

  9. 47 CFR 80.769 - Shadow loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... shadowing must be taken from § 80.769 Graph 1, as follows: (a) Inspect the map(s) to determine if a hill(s) obstructs an imaginary line of sight (dashed line on illustrative profiles of § 80.769 Graph 1 from the... Graph 1. (d) Read the shadow loss from this Graph 1 and subtract that loss from the computed...

  10. 47 CFR 80.769 - Shadow loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shadowing must be taken from § 80.769 Graph 1, as follows: (a) Inspect the map(s) to determine if a hill(s) obstructs an imaginary line of sight (dashed line on illustrative profiles of § 80.769 Graph 1 from the... Graph 1. (d) Read the shadow loss from this Graph 1 and subtract that loss from the computed...

  11. 47 CFR 80.769 - Shadow loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... shadowing must be taken from § 80.769 Graph 1, as follows: (a) Inspect the map(s) to determine if a hill(s) obstructs an imaginary line of sight (dashed line on illustrative profiles of § 80.769 Graph 1 from the... Graph 1. (d) Read the shadow loss from this Graph 1 and subtract that loss from the computed...

  12. Exploring the World through Job Shadowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2005-01-01

    On Groundhog Day, more than one million young people will have an opportunity to explore their possible future careers, according to the Job Shadow Coalition. However, with its components of career exploration, school-to-career training and cooperative learning experiences, career and technical education programs may include job shadowing for…

  13. Fixing the Shadows While Moving the Gnomon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gangui, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    It is a common practice to fix a vertical gnomon and study the moving shadow cast by it. This shows our local solar time and gives us a hint regarding the season in which we perform the observation. The moving shadow can also tell us our latitude with high precision. In this paper we propose to exchange the roles and while keeping the shadows…

  14. The Dark Side of EDX Tomography: Modeling Detector Shadowing to Aid 3D Elemental Signal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Catriona S M; Rossouw, David; Saghi, Zineb; Burdet, Pierre; Leary, Rowan K; Midgley, Paul A

    2015-06-01

    A simple model is proposed to account for the loss of collected X-ray signal by the shadowing of X-ray detectors in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The model is intended to aid the analysis of three-dimensional elemental data sets acquired using energy-dispersive X-ray tomography methods where shadow-free specimen holders are unsuitable or unavailable. The model also provides a useful measure of the detection system geometry.

  15. Shadow of rotating regular black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Amir, Muhammed; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Ghosh, Sushant G.

    2016-05-01

    We study the shadows cast by the different types of rotating regular black holes viz. Ayón-Beato-García (ABG), Hayward, and Bardeen. These black holes have in addition to the total mass (M ) and rotation parameter (a ), different parameters as electric charge (Q ), deviation parameter (g ), and magnetic charge (g*). Interestingly, the size of the shadow is affected by these parameters in addition to the rotation parameter. We found that the radius of the shadow in each case decreases monotonically, and the distortion parameter increases when the values of these parameters increase. A comparison with the standard Kerr case is also investigated. We have also studied the influence of the plasma environment around regular black holes to discuss its shadow. The presence of the plasma affects the apparent size of the regular black hole's shadow to be increased due to two effects: (i) gravitational redshift of the photons and (ii) radial dependence of plasma density.

  16. PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES FOR CONTAMINATION DETECTION ON POULTRY CARCASSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract The U.S. Department of Agriculture has developed multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems to detect faecal contaminants. Until recently, the hyperspectral imaging system has been used as a research tool to detect a few optimum wavelengths for use in a multispectral imaging system. ...

  17. Partial Least Squares Regression of Hyperspectral Images for Contaminant Detection on Poultry Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture has developed multispectral and hyperspectral imaging systems to detect faecal contaminants. Until recently, the hyperspectral imaging system has been used as a research tool to detect a few optimum wavelengths for use in a multispectral imaging system. However, ...

  18. Alzheimer's disease detection using 11C-PiB with improved partial volume effect correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raniga, Parnesh; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Acosta, Oscar; Ourselin, Sebastien; Rowe, Christopher; Villemagne, Victor L.; Salvado, Olivier

    2009-02-01

    Despite the increasing use of 11C-PiB in research into Alzheimer's disease (AD), there are few standardized analysis procedures that have been reported or published. This is especially true with regards to partial volume effects (PVE) and partial volume correction. Due to the nature of PET physics and acquisition, PET images exhibit relatively low spatial resolution compared to other modalities, resulting in bias of quantitative results. Although previous studies have applied PVE correction techniques on 11C-PiB data, the results have not been quantitatively evaluated and compared against uncorrected data. The aim of this study is threefold. Firstly, a realistic synthetic phantom was created to quantify PVE. Secondly, MRI partial volume estimate segmentations were used to improve voxel-based PVE correction instead of using hard segmentations. Thirdly, quantification of PVE correction was evaluated on 34 subjects (AD=10, Normal Controls (NC)=24), including 12 PiB positive NC. Regional analysis was performed using the Anatomical Automatic Labeling (AAL) template, which was registered to each patient. Regions of interest were restricted to the gray matter (GM) defined by the MR segmentation. Average normalized intensity of the neocortex and selected regions were used to evaluate the discrimination power between AD and NC both with and without PVE correction. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves were computed for the binary discrimination task. The phantom study revealed signal losses due to PVE between 10 to 40 % which were mostly recovered to within 5% after correction. Better classification was achieved after PVE correction, resulting in higher areas under ROC curves.

  19. [Test for detection of activated partial thromboplastin time using ellagic acid].

    PubMed

    Berkovskiĭ, A L; Sergeeva, E V; Kachalova, N D; Prostakova, T M; Kozlov, A A

    1999-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method for estimation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is developed, making use a complex reagent containing the activator (plant phospholipids) and contact factor (ellagic acid). The test requires additionally only 0.025 M CaCl2. The test is more sensitive to the presence of heparin in the blood and to insufficiency of blood clotting factors VIII and IX than the reagents containing insoluble substances (kaolin and animal phosphatides). Addition of soluble ellagic acid into reagent for APTT estimation allows studies on optic coagulometers.

  20. Selecting Observation Platforms for Optimized Anomaly Detectability under Unreliable Partial Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosers for keeping track on the occurrences of special events in the framework of unreliable partially observed discrete-event dynamical systems were developed in previous work. This paper considers observation platforms consisting of sensors that provide partial and unreliable observations and of diagnosers that analyze them. Diagnosers in observation platforms typically perform better as sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper proposes a methodology for finding an observation platform that achieves an optimal balance between cost and performance, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, an observation platform optimization algorithm is utilized that uses two greedy heuristics, one myopic and another based on projected performances. These heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best observation platforms. The developed algorithm is then applied to an observation platform optimization problem for a multi-unit-operation system. Results show that improved observation platforms can be found that may significantly reduce the observation platform cost but still yield acceptable performance for correctly inferring the occurrences of special events.

  1. Lameness detection challenges in automated milking systems addressed with partial least squares discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E; Klaas, I; Amigo, J M; Bro, R; Enevoldsen, C

    2014-12-01

    Lameness causes decreased animal welfare and leads to higher production costs. This study explored data from an automatic milking system (AMS) to model on-farm gait scoring from a commercial farm. A total of 88 cows were gait scored once per week, for 2 5-wk periods. Eighty variables retrieved from AMS were summarized week-wise and used to predict 2 defined classes: nonlame and clinically lame cows. Variables were represented with 2 transformations of the week summarized variables, using 2-wk data blocks before gait scoring, totaling 320 variables (2 × 2 × 80). The reference gait scoring error was estimated in the first week of the study and was, on average, 15%. Two partial least squares discriminant analysis models were fitted to parity 1 and parity 2 groups, respectively, to assign the lameness class according to the predicted probability of being lame (score 3 or 4/4) or not lame (score 1/4). Both models achieved sensitivity and specificity values around 80%, both in calibration and cross-validation. At the optimum values in the receiver operating characteristic curve, the false-positive rate was 28% in the parity 1 model, whereas in the parity 2 model it was about half (16%), which makes it more suitable for practical application; the model error rates were, 23 and 19%, respectively. Based on data registered automatically from one AMS farm, we were able to discriminate nonlame and lame cows, where partial least squares discriminant analysis achieved similar performance to the reference method.

  2. Study on the Application of an Ultra-High-Frequency Fractal Antenna to Partial Discharge Detection in Switchgears

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chenguo; Chen, Pan; Huang, Congjian; Chen, Yu; Qiao, Panpan

    2013-01-01

    The ultra-high-frequency (UHF) method is used to analyze the insulation condition of electric equipment by detecting the UHF electromagnetic (EM) waves excited by partial discharge (PD). As part of the UHF detection system, the UHF sensor determines the detection system performance in signal extraction and recognition. In this paper, a UHF antenna sensor with the fractal structure for PD detection in switchgears was designed by means of modeling, simulation and optimization. This sensor, with a flat-plate structure, had two resonance frequencies of 583 MHz and 732 MHz. In the laboratory, four kinds of insulation defect models were positioned in the testing switchgear for typical PD tests. The results show that the sensor could reproduce the electromagnetic waves well. Furthermore, to optimize the installation position of the inner sensor for achieving best detection performance, the precise simulation model of switchgear was developed to study the propagation characteristics of UHF signals in switchgear by finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. According to the results of simulation and verification test, the sensor should be positioned at the right side of bottom plate in the front cabinet. This research established the foundation for the further study on the application of UHF technique in switchgear PD online detection. PMID:24351641

  3. Shadow Areas Robust Matching Among Image Sequence in Planetary Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoyan, Wei; Xiaogang, Ruan; Naigong, Yu; Xiaoqing, Zhu; Jia, Lin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, an approach for robust matching shadow areas in autonomous visual navigation and planetary landing is proposed. The approach begins with detecting shadow areas, which are extracted by Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER). Then, an affine normalization algorithm is applied to normalize the areas. Thirdly, a descriptor called Multiple Angles-SIFT (MA-SIFT) that coming from SIFT is proposed, the descriptor can extract more features of an area. Finally, for eliminating the influence of outliers, a method of improved RANSAC based on Skinner Operation Condition is proposed to extract inliers. At last, series of experiments are conducted to test the performance of the approach this paper proposed, the results show that the approach can maintain the matching accuracy at a high level even the differences among the images are obvious with no attitude measurements supplied.

  4. Shadow Areas Robust Matching Among Image Sequence in Planetary Landing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruoyan, Wei; Xiaogang, Ruan; Naigong, Yu; Xiaoqing, Zhu; Jia, Lin

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, an approach for robust matching shadow areas in autonomous visual navigation and planetary landing is proposed. The approach begins with detecting shadow areas, which are extracted by Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER). Then, an affine normalization algorithm is applied to normalize the areas. Thirdly, a descriptor called Multiple Angles-SIFT (MA-SIFT) that coming from SIFT is proposed, the descriptor can extract more features of an area. Finally, for eliminating the influence of outliers, a method of improved RANSAC based on Skinner Operation Condition is proposed to extract inliers. At last, series of experiments are conducted to test the performance of the approach this paper proposed, the results show that the approach can maintain the matching accuracy at a high level even the differences among the images are obvious with no attitude measurements supplied.

  5. West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West side, oblique, partially hidden by trees, utility safety fence, and the deep shadow of the 1962 annex. View to northeast. - San Bernardino Valley College, Library, 701 South Mount Vernon Avenue, San Bernardino, San Bernardino County, CA

  6. Detection of Multiple Cracks on a Partially Obstructed Plate Structure Following the Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, T.; Lam, H. F.; Chow, H. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of detecting multiple cracks on thin plates utilizing measured dynamic responses from only a few points on the target plate. Most existing model-based methods in the literature focus on the detection of single-crack or multi-crack with given crack number on beams. Only very limited number of researches have been carried out for the detection of multiple cracks for plate-type structures following the model-based method. There are two phase contained in the proposed crack detection methodology. The number of cracks is first identified by adopting the Bayesian model class selection method in the first stage. After that, the posterior (updated) probability density function (PDF) of the crack parameters, such as crack locations, lengths and depths are identified in the second phase following the Bayesian statistical identification framework. Very encouraging results are obtained for the case studies showing that the proposed methodology can correctly identify the number of cracks, the corresponding crack parameters and their associated uncertainties. Some useful discussions are also made through the case studies.

  7. Stress shadows - a controversial topic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasocki, Stanislaw; Karakostas, Vassilis G.; Papadimitriou, Eletheria E.; Orlecka-Sikora, Beata

    2010-05-01

    The spatial correlation between the positive Coulomb stress changes and the subsequent seismic activity has been firmly confirmed in many recent studies. If, however, the static stress transfer is a consistent expression of interaction between earthquakes one should also observe a decrease of the activity in the zones of negative stress changes. Instead, the existence of stress shadows is poorly evidenced and may be questioned. We tested the influence of the static stress changes associated with the coseismic slip of the 1995 Mw6.5 Kozani-Grevena (Greece) earthquake on locations of its aftershocks. The study was based on a detailed slip model for the main shock and accurate locations and reliable fault plane solutions of an adequate number of the aftershocks. We developed a statistical testing method, which tested whether the proportions of aftershocks located inside areas determined by a selected criterion on the static stress change could be attained if there were no effect of the stress change due to the main shock on aftershock locations. The areas of stress change were determined at the focus of every aftershock. The distribution of test statistic was constructed with the use of a two-dimensional nonparametric, kernel density estimator of the reference epicenter distribution. The tests highly confidently indicated a rise in probability to locate aftershocks inside areas of positive static stress change, which supported the hypothesis on the triggering effect in these areas. Furthermore, it was evidenced that a larger stress increase caused a stronger triggering effect. The analysis, however, did not evidence the existence of stress shadows inside areas of negative stress change. Contrary to expectations, the tests indicated a significant increase of the probability of event location in the areas of a stress decrease of more than or equal to 5.0 and 10.0 bar. It turned out that for areas of larger absolute stress change this probability increased regardless of

  8. Hands-On Science. Bright Ideas for Teaching About Shadows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1997-01-01

    Presents an elementary level hands-on science activity designed to teach students about shadows. The activity helps students draw conclusions about shadows by experimenting with different materials and determining which will make a shadow. A sidebar explains what a shadow is and offers further resources. (SM)

  9. Shadowing: An Innovative Perceptual-Motor Experience for Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Connie M.

    In 1988, 59 Kindergarten students were studied to determine the effect of "shadowing" on perceptual-motor learning. Shadowing is a method whereby the use of one's shadow provides visual feedback. The method developed from observing children's natural curiosity in creating shadows. Illuminated by sunlight outdoors or overhead projectors…

  10. Shadow of noncommutative geometry inspired black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Cheng, Peng; Zhong, Yi; Zhou, Xiang-Nan E-mail: pcheng14@lzu.edu.cn E-mail: zhouxn10@lzu.edu.cn

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the shadow casted by the rotating black hole inspired by noncommutative geometry is investigated. In addition to the dimensionless spin parameter a/M{sub 0} with M{sub 0} black hole mass and inclination angle i, the dimensionless noncommutative parameter √θ/M{sub 0} is also found to affect the shape of the black hole shadow. The result shows that the size of the shadow slightly decreases with the parameter √θ/M{sub 0}, while the distortion increases with it. Compared to the Kerr black hole, the parameter √θ/M{sub 0} increases the deformation of the shadow. This may offer a way to distinguish noncommutative geometry inspired black hole from Kerr one via astronomical instruments in the near future.

  11. Removing shadows from Google Earth satellite images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianhong; Gong, Peng; Liang, Lu

    2007-06-01

    June 2005, Google has released its geographic search tool "Google earth", a new application that combines local search with satellite images and maps from around the globe. It is designed to make every person owned a computer easily "fly" to aerial views of many locations on the planet. However, just as ordinary satellite images, there inevitably exist shadows in it, made some ground objects obscure, even unidentifiable. According to the basic thinking of Radiative Transfer Theory, this paper built a image shadow removal model, which using the Radiative Transfer Theory combined with preknowledge to compensate the lost shadow area information. The results shows: shadows in images were successfully removed and the target objects were returned to their original scenes.

  12. Shadow Imaging of Geosynchronous Satellites: Simulation, Image Reconstruction, and Shadow Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, D.; Hunt, B.; Sheppard, D.

    2016-09-01

    Shadow imaging is a technique to obtain highly resolved silhouettes of resident space objects (RSOs) which would otherwise be unattainable using conventional terrestrial based imaging approaches. This is done by post processing the measured irradiance pattern (shadow) cast onto the Earth as the RSO occults a star. The research presented here focuses on shadow imaging of geosynchronous (GEO) satellites with near stationary orbits approximately 36,000 km from the Earth. Shadows pertaining to a set of diverse observing scenarios are simulated and used as inputs to a Fresnel based phase retrieval algorithm. Spatial resolution limits are evaluated and correlated to signal to noise (SNR) metrics. Resolvable feature sizes of less than 1 m are shown to be readily achievable using foreseeable observing scenarios. The development of a shadow prediction capability is outlined with initial output indicating that there are, on average, over 1000 shadows on the Earth on any given time from a single GEO satellite for stars brighter than mv=10. Shadow ground track uncertainties are correlated to stellar astrometric errors. Global and localized shadow track maps are presented demonstrating a high feasibility for future shadow collections.

  13. Shadow imaging of geosynchronous satellites: simulation, image reconstruction, and shadow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Dennis M.; Hunt, Bobby R.; Sheppard, David G.

    2016-09-01

    Shadow imaging is a technique to obtain highly resolved silhouettes of resident space objects (RSOs) which would otherwise be unattainable using conventional terrestrial based imaging approaches. This is done by post processing the measured irradiance pattern (shadow) cast onto the Earth as the RSO occults a star. The research presented here focuses on shadow imaging of geosynchronous (GEO) satellites with near stationary orbits approximately 36,000 km from the Earth. Shadows pertaining to a set of diverse observing scenarios are simulated and used as inputs to a Fresnel based phase retrieval algorithm. Spatial resolution limits are evaluated and correlated to signal to noise (SNR) metrics. Resolvable feature sizes of less than 1 m are shown to be readily achievable using foreseeable observing scenarios. Initial output from a shadow prediction tool indicates that there are, on average, over 1000 shadows on the Earth on any given time from a single GEO satellite for stars brighter than mv=10. Shadow ground track uncertainties are correlated to stellar astrometric errors. Global and localized shadow track maps are presented demonstrating a high feasibility for future shadow collections.

  14. Shadow based building extraction from single satellite image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gurshamnjot; Jouppi, Mark; Zhang, Zhuoran; Zakhor, Avideh

    2015-03-01

    Automatic building extraction in satellite imagery is an important problem. Existing approaches typically involve stereo processing two or more satellite views of the same region. In this paper, we use shadow analysis coupled with line segment detection and texture segmentation to construct rectangular building approximations from a single satellite image. In addition, we extract building heights to construct a rectilinear height profile for a single region. We characterize the performance of the system in rural and urban regions of Jordan, Philippines, and Australia and demonstrate a detection rate of 76.2 - 86.1% and a false alarm rate of 26.5 - 40.1%.

  15. Implementation of a novel double-side technique for partial discharge detection and location in covered conductor overhead distribution networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weisheng; Li, Hongjie; Liang, Deliang; Sun, Haojie; Yang, Chenbo; Wei, Jinqu; Yuan, Zhijian

    2015-12-01

    Partial discharge (PD) detection has proven to be one of the most acceptable techniques for on-line condition monitoring and predictive maintenance of power apparatus. A powerful tool for detecting PD in covered-conductor (CC) lines is urgently needed to improve the asset management of CC overhead distribution lines. In this paper, an appropriate, portable and simple system designed to detect PD activity in CC lines and ultimately pinpoint the PD source is developed and tested. The system is based on a novel double-side synchronised PD measurement technique driven by pulse injection. Emphasis is placed on the proposed PD-location mechanism and hardware structure, with descriptions of the pulse-injection process, detection device, synchronisation principle and PD-location algorithm. The system is simulated using ATP-EMTP, and the simulated results are found to be consistent with the actual simulation layout. For further validation, the capability of the system is tested in a high-voltage laboratory experiment using a 10-kV CC line with cross-linked polyethylene insulation.

  16. Observation in the MINOS far detector of the shadowing of cosmic rays by the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Ayres, D.S.; Backhouse, C.; Barr, G.; Barrett, W.L.; Bishai, M.; Blake, A.; Bock, B.; Bock, G.J.; Boehnlein, D.J.; /Fermilab /Fermilab

    2010-08-01

    The shadowing of cosmic ray primaries by the the moon and sun was observed by the MINOS far detector at a depth of 2070 mwe using 83.54 million cosmic ray muons accumulated over 1857.91 live-days. The shadow of the moon was detected at the 5.6 {sigma} level and the shadow of the sun at the 3.8 {sigma} level using a log-likelihood search in celestial coordinates. The moon shadow was used to quantify the absolute astrophysical pointing of the detector to be 0.17 {+-} 0.12{sup o}. Hints of Interplanetary Magnetic Field effects were observed in both the sun and moon shadow.

  17. Observation in the MINOS far detector of the shadowing of cosmic rays by the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, D.E.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M.V.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.; Whitehead, L.,.

    2010-10-10

    The shadowing of cosmic ray primaries by the moon and sun was observed by the MINOS far detector at a depth of 2070 mwe using 83.54 million cosmic ray muons accumulated over 1857.91 live-days. The shadow of the moon was detected at the 5.6 {sigma} level and the shadow of the sun at the 3.8 {sigma} level using a log-likelihood search in celestial coordinates. The moon shadow was used to quantify the absolute astrophysical pointing of the detector to be 0.17 {+-} 0.12{sup o}. Hints of interplanetary magnetic field effects were observed in both the sun and moon shadow.

  18. Use of a modified activated partial thromboplastin time to detect lupus anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Cloherty, T; Golden, E A; Lind, S E

    1996-07-15

    Laboratory evidence for the presence of lupus anticoagulants (LAs) is sought when patients experience thrombotic events or when coagulation assays are abnormal. Although a number of tests for LAs have been proposed, none detect all LAs, and laboratories may be confronted with the need to perform more than one test to confirm a suspected LA. Recently, a modification of the aPTT, performed by varying the initial time of incubation of the aPTT reagent with the patient's plasma, was reported to detect LAs. The difference in clotting times when plasma is subjected to a 1- or 10- minute incubation (called here the "Delta one minus ten" or DOT) using a particular micronized silica-based aPTT reagent was shown to provide good discrimination between normal and LA plasmas. Because of the low cost of this test and its relative ease of performance, we attempted to replicate the results of this test using previously characterized LA plasmas. The DOT of 23 normal plasmas was 5.1 +/- 2.1 seconds, with a range of 0.5 - 9.3 seconds. The DOT of 20 of 34 LA samples tested (59%) was > 11 seconds. The DOT was abnormal in 8 of 22 (36%) samples diagnosed with a dilute Russell's viper venom time. It was abnormal in 12 of 12 patients diagnosed by other criteria, prior to the use of the dilute Russell's viper venom time. The DOT performed with a kaolin or ellagic acid-based aPTT reagent failed to discriminate normal from LA plasma. We conclude that the DOT performed with a specific silica-based reagent is an apparently simple and moderately sensitive test for detecting the lupus anticoagulant that deserves further evaluation.

  19. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We also analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.

  20. Leading twist nuclear shadowing phenomena in hard processes with nuclei

    DOE PAGES

    L. Franfurt; Guzey, V.; Strikman, M.

    2012-01-08

    We present and discuss the theory and phenomenology of the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing which is based on the combination of the generalization of Gribov-Glauber theory, QCD factorization theorems, and HERA QCD analysis of diffraction in lepton-proton deep inelastic scattering (DIS). We apply this technique for the analysis of a wide range of hard processes with nuclei-inclusive DIS on deuterons, medium-range and heavy nuclei, coherent and incoherent diffractive DIS with nuclei, and hard diffraction in proton-nucleus scattering - and make predictions for the effect of nuclear shadowing in the corresponding sea quark and gluon parton distributions. We alsomore » analyze the role of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in generalized parton distributions in nuclei and certain characteristics of final states in nuclear DIS. We discuss the limits of applicability of the leading twist approximation for small x scattering off nuclei and the onset of the black disk regime and methods of detecting it. It will be possible to check many of our predictions in the near future in the studies of the ultraperipheral collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Further checks will be possible in pA collisions at the LHC and forward hadron production at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). As a result, detailed tests will be possible at an Electon-Ion Collider (EIC) in USA and at the Large Hadron-Electron Collider (LHeC) at CERN.« less

  1. Real-time simulation of thermal shadows with EMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Andreas; Oberhofer, Stefan; Schätz, Peter; Nischwitz, Alfred; Obermeier, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Modern missile systems use infrared imaging for tracking or target detection algorithms. The development and validation processes of these missile systems need high fidelity simulations capable of stimulating the sensors in real-time with infrared image sequences from a synthetic 3D environment. The Extensible Multispectral Image Generation Toolset (EMIT) is a modular software library developed at MBDA Germany for the generation of physics-based infrared images in real-time. EMIT is able to render radiance images in full 32-bit floating point precision using state of the art computer graphics cards and advanced shader programs. An important functionality of an infrared image generation toolset is the simulation of thermal shadows as these may cause matching errors in tracking algorithms. However, for real-time simulations, such as hardware in the loop simulations (HWIL) of infrared seekers, thermal shadows are often neglected or precomputed as they require a thermal balance calculation in four-dimensions (3D geometry in one-dimensional time up to several hours in the past). In this paper we will show the novel real-time thermal simulation of EMIT. Our thermal simulation is capable of simulating thermal effects in real-time environments, such as thermal shadows resulting from the occlusion of direct and indirect irradiance. We conclude our paper with the practical use of EMIT in a missile HWIL simulation.

  2. Amplification of dust loading in Martian dust devils by self-shadowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuepper, M.; Wurm, G.

    2016-08-01

    Insolation of the Martian soil leads to a sub-surface overpressure due to thermal creep gas flow. This could support particle entrainment into the atmosphere. Short time shadowing e.g. by the traverse of a larger dust devil would enhance this effect. We find in microgravity experiments that mass ejection rates are increased by a factor of 10 for several seconds if a light source of 12.6 kW/m2 is turned off. Scaled to Mars this implies that self-shadowing of a partially opaque dust devil might lead to a strongly amplified flux of lifted material. We therefore suggest that self-shadowing might be a mechanism on Mars to increase the total dust loading of a dust devil and keep it self-sustained.

  3. Defect detection in partially completed SAW and TIG welds using online radioscopy and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonser, Gary R.; Lawson, Shaun W.

    1998-03-01

    An application of machine vision applied to the analysis of radioscopic images of incomplete weld geometries is described. The rationale of the work is to identify weld defects as soon as they are produced, thereby reducing the costs of any subsequent repairs. Existing methods of weld and defect identification are compared, leading to the development of filtering and 'window' based variance operator for segmentation of suspect defect areas inside the weld region is described. The software and radioscopic imaging system have been benchmarked through a series of demonstration trials on both 80 mm thick carbon steel submerged arc welded testpieces, and 25mm thick carbon steel tungsten inert gas welded testpieces. The range of intentionally implanted defects, from root cracks to lack of side wall fusion, were detected with an overall accuracy of 87 percent, and classified in terms of defect size, shape, and position within the weld region.

  4. Detection, localization and quantitation of partial obstruction of common bile duct (CBD) by scintigraphy: Correlation with cholangiogram

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, G.T.; Lieberman, D.; Brar, H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent literature in medical journals does not show any major role for scintigraphy in the evaluation of jaundice. A project was undertaken to test critically the role for scintigraphy in the detection, localization and quantification of partial obstruction of CBD using Tc-99m-IDA and the results are correlated with cholangiogram. After 4 to 5 hours of fast, each of 12 patients with documented CBD obstruction was given 3 to 8 mCi of Tc-99m-IDA and serial hepatobiliary images at 2 minute intervals were taken for 90 minutes using gamma camera and the data were collected on computer for quantitation. At 70 minutes 10 ng/kg of CCK-8 was infused over a 3 minute period (n=8). Liver excretion half time, GB ejection fraction (EF) and ejection rate (ER) were obtained. The results were compared with established values in normal subjects. The location of CBD obstruction was made from analogue images. Partial CBD obstruction was characterized in all but one by prolonged liver excretion half time, reduced GB EF and ER (less than 3.5%/min) and intrahepatic bile pooling with excellent CHD and CBD delineation proximal to obstruction thus aiding in the exact anatomic location which correlated well with cholangiogram. The degree of obstruction (ER) correlated well with dilitation of CBD on cholangiogram. These preliminary results show a promise for scintigraphy in the evaluation of CBD obstruction and offer a great potential for non-invasive quantitation of the degree of CBD obstruction.

  5. Immobilization of ruthenium phthalocyanine on silica-coated multi-wall partially oriented carbon nanotubes: Electrochemical detection of fenitrothion pesticide

    SciTech Connect

    Canevari, Thiago C.; Prado, Thiago M.; Cincotto, Fernando H.; Machado, Sergio A.S.

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Hybrid material, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. • Silica containing multi-walled carbon nanotube partially oriented. • Determination of pesticide fenitrothion in orange juice. - Abstract: This paper reports on the determination of the pesticide fenitrothion using a glassy carbon electrode modified with silica-coated, multi-walled, partially oriented carbon nanotubes, SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs, containing ruthenium phthalocyanine (RuPc) synthesized in situ. The hybrid SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc material was characterized by UV–vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and differential pulse voltammetry. The modified electrode showed well-defined peaks in the presence of fenitrothion in acetate buffer, pH 4.5, with a sensitivity of 0.0822 μA μM{sup −1} mm{sup −2} and a detection limit of 0.45 ppm. Notably, the modified SiO{sub 2}/MWCNTs/RuPc electrodes with did not suffer from significant influences in the presence of other organophosphorus pesticides during the determination of the fenitrothion pesticide. Moreover, this modified electrode showed excellent performance in the determination of fenitrothion in orange juice.

  6. A 65-kV insulated gate bipolar transistor switch applied in damped AC voltages partial discharge detection system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J; Ma, G M; Luo, D P; Li, C R; Li, Q M; Wang, W

    2014-02-01

    Damped AC voltages detection system (DAC) is a productive way to detect the faults in power cables. To solve the problems of large volume, complicated structure and electromagnetic interference in existing switches, this paper developed a compact solid state switch based on electromagnetic trigger, which is suitable for DAC test system. Synchronous electromagnetic trigger of 32 Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) in series was realized by the topological structure of single line based on pulse width modulation control technology. In this way, external extension was easily achieved. Electromagnetic trigger and resistor-capacitor-diode snubber circuit were optimized to reduce the switch turn-on time and circular layout. Epoxy encapsulating was chosen to enhance the level of partial discharge initial voltage (PDIV). The combination of synchronous trigger and power supply is proposed to reduce the switch volume. Moreover, we have overcome the drawback of the electromagnetic interference and improved the detection sensitivity of DAC by using capacitor storage energy to maintain IGBT gate driving voltage. The experimental results demonstrated that the solid-state switch, with compact size, whose turn-on time was less than 400 ns and PDIV was more than 65 kV, was able to meet the actual demands of 35 kV DAC test system.

  7. A 65-kV insulated gate bipolar transistor switch applied in damped AC voltages partial discharge detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Ma, G. M.; Luo, D. P.; Li, C. R.; Li, Q. M.; Wang, W.

    2014-02-01

    Damped AC voltages detection system (DAC) is a productive way to detect the faults in power cables. To solve the problems of large volume, complicated structure and electromagnetic interference in existing switches, this paper developed a compact solid state switch based on electromagnetic trigger, which is suitable for DAC test system. Synchronous electromagnetic trigger of 32 Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) in series was realized by the topological structure of single line based on pulse width modulation control technology. In this way, external extension was easily achieved. Electromagnetic trigger and resistor-capacitor-diode snubber circuit were optimized to reduce the switch turn-on time and circular layout. Epoxy encapsulating was chosen to enhance the level of partial discharge initial voltage (PDIV). The combination of synchronous trigger and power supply is proposed to reduce the switch volume. Moreover, we have overcome the drawback of the electromagnetic interference and improved the detection sensitivity of DAC by using capacitor storage energy to maintain IGBT gate driving voltage. The experimental results demonstrated that the solid-state switch, with compact size, whose turn-on time was less than 400 ns and PDIV was more than 65 kV, was able to meet the actual demands of 35 kV DAC test system.

  8. Detection and partial purification of a potent mitogenic factor for human thyroid follicular cells.

    PubMed

    Bond, J A; Graham, G J; Freshney, M; Dawson, T; Sawhney, N; Williams, E D; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1992-03-01

    Normal adult human thyroid follicular cells have an extremely limited proliferative capacity in vitro. No previously studied mitogen, including thyrotropin (TSH) or epidermal growth factor (EGF), has in our hands resulted in a significant improvement over the 3-4% nuclear [3H]thymidine pulse-labelling index (LI) obtainable with 10% fetal calf serum. Here we report the detection in the conditioned medium from a sub-clone of NIH3T3 fibroblasts of a mitogenic activity capable of increasing this response up to 10-fold, to an LI of over 20%, together with an even greater relative stimulation of mitotic activity. Preliminary characterisation has excluded EGF and TGF alpha, and demonstrated that the activity is bound reversibly by heparin-Sepharose, thus pointing to a member of the heparin-binding fibroblast- or hepatocyte-growth factor families. This material should have wide practical application in facilitating primary culture of follicular cells, and may reveal new mechanisms of stromal-epithelial interaction regulating normal and neoplastic thyroid growth in vivo.

  9. Detection of melamine adulteration in milk by near-infrared spectroscopy and one-class partial least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Tan, Chao; Lin, Zan; Wu, Tong

    2017-02-01

    Melamine is a noxious nitrogen-rich substance and has been illegally adulterated in milk to boost the protein content. The present work investigated the feasibility of using near-infrared (NIR) spectrum and one-class partial least squares (OCPLS) for detecting the adulteration of melamine. A total of 102 liquor milks were prepared for experiment. A special variable importance (VI) index was defined to select 40 most significant variables. Thirty-two pure milk samples constitute the training set for constructing a one-class model and the other samples were used for the test set. The results showed that on the independent test set, it can achieve an acceptable performance, i.e., the total accuracy of 89%, the sensitivity of 90%, and the specificity of 88%. It seems that the combination of NIR spectroscopy and OCPLS classifier can serve as a potential tool for rapid and on-site screening melamine in milk samples.

  10. Partial Least Squares Regression Can Aid in Detecting Differential Abundance of Multiple Features in Sets of Metagenomic Samples.

    PubMed

    Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    It is now feasible to examine the composition and diversity of microbial communities (i.e., "microbiomes") that populate different human organs and orifices using DNA sequencing and related technologies. To explore the potential links between changes in microbial communities and various diseases in the human body, it is essential to test associations involving different species within and across microbiomes, environmental settings and disease states. Although a number of statistical techniques exist for carrying out relevant analyses, it is unclear which of these techniques exhibit the greatest statistical power to detect associations given the complexity of most microbiome datasets. We compared the statistical power of principal component regression, partial least squares regression, regularized regression, distance-based regression, Hill's diversity measures, and a modified test implemented in the popular and widely used microbiome analysis methodology "Metastats" across a wide range of simulated scenarios involving changes in feature abundance between two sets of metagenomic samples. For this purpose, simulation studies were used to change the abundance of microbial species in a real dataset from a published study examining human hands. Each technique was applied to the same data, and its ability to detect the simulated change in abundance was assessed. We hypothesized that a small subset of methods would outperform the rest in terms of the statistical power. Indeed, we found that the Metastats technique modified to accommodate multivariate analysis and partial least squares regression yielded high power under the models and data sets we studied. The statistical power of diversity measure-based tests, distance-based regression and regularized regression was significantly lower. Our results provide insight into powerful analysis strategies that utilize information on species counts from large microbiome data sets exhibiting skewed frequency distributions obtained

  11. Teaching in the Shadow: Operators of Small Shadow Education Institutions in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dierkes, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The shadow education sector plays a centrally important role in the Japanese education system. Advocates of Japanese shadow education institutions, or "juku", claim that the pedagogy employed in these schools leads to superior results compared to teaching methods used in conventional schools. The lack of value-added testing of juku…

  12. Job Shadow Guide for Staff [and] Job Shadow Guide for Students. Connections: Linking Work and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs for the Future, Boston, MA.

    "Job shadows" offer young people a chance to investigate the world of work by spending time with adults in the community and experiencing the culture of the workplace. A job shadow gives a student a meaningful introduction to the world of work and provides a context for understanding the connection between school and careers. This guidebook was…

  13. Optical Detection of Early Damage in Retinal Ganglion Cells in a Mouse Model of Partial Optic Nerve Crush Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Puyang, Zhen; Feng, Liang; Duan, Lian; Liang, Peiji; Backman, Vadim; Liu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elastic light backscattering spectroscopy (ELBS) has exquisite sensitivity to the ultrastructural properties of tissue and thus has been applied to detect various diseases associated with ultrastructural alterations in their early stages. This study aims to test whether ELBS can detect early damage in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Methods We used a mouse model of partial optic nerve crush (pONC) to induce rapid RGC death. We confirmed RGC loss by axon counting and characterized the changes in retinal morphology by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and in retinal function by full-field electroretinogram (ERG), respectively. To quantify the ultrastructural properties, elastic backscattering spectroscopic analysis was implemented in the wavelength-dependent images recorded by reflectance confocal microscopy. Results At 3 days post-pONC injury, no significant change was found in the thickness of the RGC layer or in the mean amplitude of the oscillatory potentials measured by OCT and ERG, respectively; however, we did observe a significantly decreased number of axons compared with the controls. At 3 days post-pONC, we used ELBS to calculate the ultrastructural marker (D), the shape factor quantifying the shape of the local mass density correlation functions. It was significantly reduced in the crushed eyes compared with the controls, indicating the ultrastructural fragmentation in the crushed eyes. Conclusions Elastic light backscattering spectroscopy detected ultrastructural neuronal damage in RGCs following the pONC injury when OCT and ERG tests appeared normal. Our study suggests a potential clinical method for detecting early neuronal damage prior to anatomical alterations in the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layers. PMID:27784071

  14. Quantification of particle sizes with metal replication under standard freeze-etching conditions: a gold ball standard for calibrating shadow widths was used to measure freeze-etched globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruben, G C

    1995-11-01

    The real size of platinum-carbon (Pt-C) replicated particles is not directly equivalent to either its metal-coated diameter or its shadow width. This paper describes two indirect methods, shadow widths and coated particle diameters, for determining a particle's actual size beneath a Pt-C replication film. Both produce equivalent measurements using the same standardized conditions: 2.3 nm Pt-C films deposited at a 45 degree angle on an approximately -100 degrees C surface in a 10(-6) torr vacuum. For the first method, gold balls nucleated in a partial pressure of helium and deposited on flat indirect carbon films (root mean square roughness of 0.8 nm) on 400 mesh grids were used as test particles for calibrating shadow widths as a function of particle size. The gold ball test specimens were replicated, and a distribution of Pt-C shadow widths orthogonal to the Pt-C deposition direction was measured and averaged for gold balls 1.5 +/- 0.25 nm, 2.0 +/- 0.25 nm, etc. The diameter of each gold ball was measured within the Pt-C film along with its shadow width because the Pt-C did not obscure or adhere well to the gold. The shadow width distributions for each gold size do not differ significantly from log normal. Two proteins, the lactose repressor and the mitochondrial ATPase, F1, were also used as replication test objects. Negative staining of both proteins was conducted to measure their average diameters. In the second method, a distribution of Pt-C-coated lac repressor diameters perpendicular to the shadow direction was measured. The Pt-C film thickness measured on the quartz crystal monitor was subtracted from the average metal-coated protein diameter to obtain the lac repressor's diameter. The Pt-C-coated particle diameter distributions also did not differ significantly from log normal. While doing this work it was discovered that outgassing the Pt-C electron gun greatly affected Pt-C film granularity: 19 sec produced a high contrast, granular Pt-C film, whereas

  15. Low Frequency Shadowing of the Parkes Superb Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Kaplan, D. L.; Williams, A.; Wayth, R.

    2017-01-01

    The field of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) is rapidly gaining momentum. Since their discovery in the Parkes high time resolution survey (Thornton et al. 2013), the number of reported FRB detections has more than tripled, and measurements have been made of their scattering, scintillation, polarisation and Faraday rotation properties, all of which helped to establish their astrophysical nature. Obser- vational evidence continues to mount in support of their extragalactic origin, and the world-wide competitive race is ramping up as a suite of new and existing instruments are gearing up to find them in large numbers. The SUPERB survey at Parkes has been conceived to realise the important goal of understanding the origin and progenitors of FRBs. An integral part of this survey is co-ordinated multi-wavelength follow-ups and shadowing. Our MWA-based shadowing efforts last year resulted in the first simultaneous multi-frequency observation of an FRB (albeit a non-detection at the MWA), and hence the first broadband limit on the spectral index, as reported in our Nature publication (Keane at al. 2016). After an year-long hiatus the SUPERB survey is scheduled to resume in December 2016. We propose to resume our MWA-based efforts by undertaking effective low-frequency shadowing that is uniquely possible with the MWA. Simultaneous detection of even a single a self-same FRB would bring in a huge science payoff and will yield the first unambiguous constraints on the spectral and scattering properties of FRBs, besides the prospects of sub-arc minute localisation that will be possible with the long baseline array of Phase 2 MWA. We propose to make use of unallocated blocks of time within the schedule, available outside the approved programs and the planned commissioning activities relating to Phase 2. This proposal will thus make excellent use of idle time for an exciting and very important science goal in the nascent field of FRB science.

  16. Comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector CT using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection as reference standards.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Lee, D H; Ko, Y T

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study is to compare blinded with partially blinded detection of gastric cancer with multidetector (MD) CT by using surgery and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) as reference standards. 44 patients with gastric cancer underwent MDCT with air as an oral contrast agent. Surgery was performed on 37 patients, ESD on six and surgery after ESD on one. To provide comparison cases of blinded evaluation, 38 MDCT examinations were added for cases where no focal gastric lesion was seen on endoscopy. Two radiologists, blinded to the presence, number and location of the tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus multiplanar reformation (MPR) images of 82 MDCT examinations with or without gastric cancer. For partially blinded evaluation, the same radiologists, blinded to the location and number of tumours, evaluated axial and axial plus MPR images of 44 MDCT examinations of gastric cancer. Differences in assessment were resolved by consensus. 45 gastric cancers were found in surgical and ESD specimens. Detection rates of gastric cancer from axial and axial plus MPR images during blinded evaluation and from axial and axial plus MPR images during partially blinded evaluation were 62% (28/45), 64% (29/45), 64% (29/45) and 71% (32/45), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the comparison between blinded and partially blinded detection rates of gastric cancer. The detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during blinded evaluation showed no specific difference compared with the detection rate of gastric cancer with MDCT during partially blinded evaluation.

  17. A new partial volume segmentation approach to extract bladder wall for computer-aided detection in virtual cystoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Wang, Zigang; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xinzhou; Adler, Howard L.; Huang, Wei; Rizvi, Syed A.; Meng, Hong; Harrington, Donald P.; Liang, Zhengrong

    2004-04-01

    We propose a new partial volume (PV) segmentation scheme to extract bladder wall for computer aided detection (CAD) of bladder lesions using multispectral MR images. Compared with CT images, MR images provide not only a better tissue contrast between bladder wall and bladder lumen, but also the multispectral information. As multispectral images are spatially registered over three-dimensional space, information extracted from them is more valuable than that extracted from each image individually. Furthermore, the intrinsic T1 and T2 contrast of the urine against the bladder wall eliminates the invasive air insufflation procedure. Because the earliest stages of bladder lesion growth tend to develop gradually and migrate slowly from the mucosa into the bladder wall, our proposed PV algorithm quantifies images as percentages of tissues inside each voxel. It preserves both morphology and texture information and provides tissue growth tendency in addition to the anatomical structure. Our CAD system utilizes a multi-scan protocol on dual (full and empty of urine) states of the bladder to extract both geometrical and texture information. Moreover, multi-scan of transverse and coronal MR images eliminates motion artifacts. Experimental results indicate that the presented scheme is feasible towards mass screening and lesion detection for virtual cystoscopy (VC).

  18. A new sparse design method on phased array-based acoustic emission sensor for partial discharge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qing; Cheng, Shuyi; Lü, Fangcheng; Li, Yanqing

    2014-03-01

    The acoustic detecting performance of a partial discharge (PD) ultrasonic sensor array can be improved by increasing the number of array elements. However, it will increase the complexity and cost of the PD detection system. Therefore, a sparse sensor with an optimization design can be chosen to ensure good acoustic performance. In this paper, first, a quantitative method is proposed for evaluating the acoustic performance of a square PD ultrasonic array sensor. Second, a method of sparse design is presented to combine the evaluation method with the chaotic monkey algorithm. Third, an optimal sparse structure of a 3 × 3 square PD ultrasonic array sensor is deduced. It is found that, under different sparseness and sparse structure, the main beam width of the directivity function shows a small variation, while the sidelobe amplitude shows a bigger variation. For a specific sparseness, the acoustic performance under the optimal sparse structure is close to that using a full array. Finally, some simulations based on the above method show that, for certain sparseness, the sensor with the optimal sparse structure exhibits superior positioning accuracy compared to that with a stochastic one. The sensor array structure may be chosen according to the actual requirements for an actual engineering application.

  19. A Novel High-Performance Beam-Supported Membrane Structure with Enhanced Design Flexibility for Partial Discharge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chenzhao; Si, Wenrong; Li, Haoyong; Li, Delin; Yuan, Peng; Yu, Yiting

    2017-01-01

    A novel beam-supported membrane (BSM) structure for the fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) sensors showing an enhanced performance and an improved resistance to the temperature change was proposed for detecting partial discharges (PDs). The fundamental frequency, sensitivity, linear range, and flatness of the BSM structure were investigated by employing the finite element simulations. Compared with the intact membrane (IM) structure commonly used by EFPI sensors, BSM structure provides extra geometrical parameters to define the fundamental frequency when the diameter of the whole membrane and its thickness is determined, resulting in an enhanced design flexibility of the sensor structure. According to the simulation results, it is noted that BSM structure not only shows a much higher sensitivity (increased by almost four times for some cases), and a wider working range of fundamental frequency to choose, but also an improved linear range, making the system development much easier. In addition, BSM structure presents a better flatness than its IM counterpart, providing an increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A further improvement of performance is thought to be possible with a step-forward structural optimization. The BSM structure shows a great potential to design the EFPI sensors, as well as others for detecting the acoustic signals. PMID:28294962

  20. Electrochemiluminescence detection of NADH and ethanol based on partial sulfonation of sol-gel network with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu; Zhang, Lihua; Shang, Li; Guo, Shaojun; Wen, Dan; Wang, Fuan; Dong, Shaojun

    2009-03-15

    We developed a stable, sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor based on the synthesis of a new sol-gel material with the ion-exchange capacity sol-gel to coimmobilize the Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and enzyme. The partial sulfonated (3-mercaptopropyl)-trimethoxysilane sol-gel (PSSG) film acted as both an ion exchanger for the immobilization of Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and a matrix to immobilize gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). The AuNPs/PSSG/Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) film modified electrode allowed sensitive the ECL detection of NADH as low as 1 nM. Such an ability of AuNPs/PSSG/Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) film to promote the electron transfer between Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) and the electrode suggested a new, promising biocompatible platform for the development of dehydrogenase-based ECL biosensors. With alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) as a model, we then constructed an ethanol biosensor, which had a linear range of 5 microM to 5.2 mM with a detection limit of 12nM.

  1. An Efficient and Robust Moving Shadow Removal Algorithm and Its Applications in ITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Yang, Chien-Ting; Shou, Yu-Wen; Shen, Tzu-Kuei

    2010-12-01

    We propose an efficient algorithm for removing shadows of moving vehicles caused by non-uniform distributions of light reflections in the daytime. This paper presents a brand-new and complete structure in feature combination as well as analysis for orientating and labeling moving shadows so as to extract the defined objects in foregrounds more easily in each snapshot of the original files of videos which are acquired in the real traffic situations. Moreover, we make use of Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) for background removal and detection of moving shadows in our tested images, and define two indices for characterizing non-shadowed regions where one indicates the characteristics of lines and the other index can be characterized by the information in gray scales of images which helps us to build a newly defined set of darkening ratios (modified darkening factors) based on Gaussian models. To prove the effectiveness of our moving shadow algorithm, we carry it out with a practical application of traffic flow detection in ITS (Intelligent Transportation System)—vehicle counting. Our algorithm shows the faster processing speed, 13.84 ms/frame, and can improve the accuracy rate in 4% ~ 10% for our three tested videos in the experimental results of vehicle counting.

  2. Interference effect of body shadow in action control.

    PubMed

    Badets, Arnaud; Toussaint, Lucette; Blandin, Yannick; Bidet-Ildei, Christel

    2013-01-01

    Observing actions performed by other persons can subsequently influence our own motor behaviours. However, it is unknown whether the shadows cast by such actions can also have an impact on the observers' actions. Here we show that the mere observation of a cast shadow can influence imitative behaviours. Specifically, participants were shown a hand picture and its associated cast shadow in a neutral position. In a 'compatible trial' the hand and the shadow that followed were turned in the same open or closed direction, whereas in an 'incompatible trial' the hand and the shadow were turned in different directions. We contrasted two experimental conditions: (i) 'hand-shadow' in which participants observed a hand and its cast shadow (the hand covered the shadow); (ii) 'hand-hand' in which participants observed a hand and another black hand (the shadow covered the hand). The participants' task was to imitate (ie by closing or opening their own hands) the hand or the cast shadow of an action. For both conditions results revealed interference (ie longer response latencies) for incompatible trials. This suggests for the first time that the mere observation of a cast shadow of a hand can influence imitative behaviours. However, time courses of the response latencies revealed that imitative effect in the hand-shadow condition was different than the imitative effect in the hand-hand condition. Therefore, we suggest considering the cast shadow of an action as an important feature during motor control for humans.

  3. FIELD INVESTIGATIONS OF THE DRIFT SHADOW

    SciTech Connect

    G. W. Su, T. J. Kneafsey, T. A. Ghezzehei, B. D. Marshall, and P. J. Cook

    2006-01-15

    The ''Drift Shadow'' is defined as the relatively drier region that forms below subsurface cavities or drifts in unsaturated rock. Its existence has been predicted through analytical and numerical models of unsaturated flow. However, these theoretical predictions have not been demonstrated empirically to date. In this project they plan to test the drift shadow concept through field investigations and compare our observations to simulations. Based on modeling studies they have an identified suitable site to perform the study at an inactive mine in a sandstone formation. Pretest modeling studies and preliminary characterization of the site are being used to develop the field scale tests.

  4. Cloud shadow effects on remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, W. A.

    1985-01-01

    On relatively clear days, the shadow cast by an isolated, optically dense cloud produces an effect which is similar in extent and magnitude to the adjacency effects associated with high-contrast ground albedo boundaries. A Monte Carlo radiative transfer model has been used to examine the intensity and its components, comparing the cloud shadow case with that for a Lambertian albedo boundary. Although the behavior of the total intensity is nearly the same for both cases, the behaviors of the intensity components differ significantly.

  5. Object Based Agricultural Land Cover Classification Map of Shadowed Areas from Aerial Image and LIDAR Data Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberto, R. T.; Serrano, S. C.; Damian, G. B.; Camaso, E. E.; Celestino, A. B.; Hernando, P. J. C.; Isip, M. F.; Orge, K. M.; Quinto, M. J. C.; Tagaca, R. C.

    2016-06-01

    Aerial image and LiDAR data offers a great possibility for agricultural land cover mapping. Unfortunately, these images leads to shadowy pixels. Management of shadowed areas for classification without image enhancement were investigated. Image segmentation approach using three different segmentation scales were used and tested to segment the image for ground features since only the ground features are affected by shadow caused by tall features. The RGB band and intensity were the layers used for the segmentation having an equal weights. A segmentation scale of 25 was found to be the optimal scale that will best fit for the shadowed and non-shadowed area classification. The SVM using Radial Basis Function kernel was then applied to extract classes based on properties extracted from the Lidar data and orthophoto. Training points for different classes including shadowed areas were selected homogeneously from the orthophoto. Separate training points for shadowed areas were made to create additional classes to reduced misclassification. Texture classification and object-oriented classifiers have been examined to reduced heterogeneity problem. The accuracy of the land cover classification using 25 scale segmentation after accounting for the shadow detection and classification was significantly higher compared to higher scale of segmentation.

  6. Automated 3D detection and classification of Giardia lamblia cysts using digital holographic microscopy with partially coherent source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mallahi, A.; Detavernier, A.; Yourassowsky, C.; Dubois, F.

    2012-06-01

    Over the past century, monitoring of Giardia lamblia became a matter of concern for all drinking water suppliers worldwide. Indeed, this parasitic flagellated protozoan is responsible for giardiasis, a widespread diarrhoeal disease (200 million symptomatic individuals) that can lead immunocompromised individuals to death. The major difficulty raised by Giardia lamblia's cyst, its vegetative transmission form, is its ability to survive for long periods in harsh environments, including the chlorine concentrations and treatment duration used traditionally in water disinfection. Currently, there is a need for a reliable, inexpensive, and easy-to-use sensor for the identification and quantification of cysts in the incoming water. For this purpose, we investigated the use of a digital holographic microscope working with partially coherent spatial illumination that reduces the coherent noise. Digital holography allows one to numerically investigate a volume by refocusing the different plane of depth of a hologram. In this paper, we perform an automated 3D analysis that computes the complex amplitude of each hologram, detects all the particles present in the whole volume given by one hologram and refocuses them if there are out of focus using a refocusing criterion based on the integrated complex amplitude modulus and we obtain the (x,y,z) coordinates of each particle. Then the segmentation of the particles is processed and a set of morphological and textures features characteristic to Giardia lamblia cysts is computed in order to classify each particles in the right classes.

  7. Raman spectroscopy for clinical-level detection of heparin in serum by partial least-squares analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Tripathi, Markandey M.; Anis, Hanan

    2013-02-01

    Heparin is the most widely used anti-coagulant for the prevention of blood clots in patients undergoing certain types of surgeries including open heart surgeries and dialysis. The precise monitoring of heparin amount in patients' blood is crucial for reducing the morbidity and mortality in surgical environments. Based upon these considerations, we have used Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with partial least squares (PLS) analysis to measure heparin concentration at clinical level which is less than 10 United States Pharmacopeia (USP) in serum. The PLS calibration model was constructed from the Raman spectra of different concentrations of heparin in serum. It showed a high coefficient of determination (R2>0.91) between the spectral data and heparin level in serum along with a low root mean square error of prediction ˜4 USP/ml. It enabled the detection of extremely low concentrations of heparin in serum (˜8 USP/ml) as desirable in clinical environment. The proposed optical method has the potential of being implemented as the point-of-care testing procedure during surgeries, where the interest is to rapidly monitor low concentrations of heparin in patient's blood.

  8. Shadows on the Internet. Teaching Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Describes a world-wide science project aiming to help students measure the absence of light. The project is accomplished through the Internet. On the first day of Spring, students from all over the world will measure their shadows (absence of light) and use the information to compare and contrast data with that of other students participating in…

  9. Choroidal osteoma: acoustic shadowing and reduplication echoes.

    PubMed

    Abramson, D H; Servodidio, C A; Poole, T A; Budinger, K

    1996-12-01

    A 27-year-old woman had a curious choroidal mass of 12 years duration in her right eye. Interesting ultrasonic findings of a choroidal osteoma, including acoustic shadowing and reduplication echoes on A-scan and B-scan are presented. Ophthalmic nurses can assist in performing ophthalmic examinations and in reinforcing regular follow-up examinations for these patients.

  10. Job Shadowing Introduces the Realities of Manufacturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frawley, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    Engineers and skilled tradesmen stood side by side with executives and politicians as Liverpool High School technology teacher Dan Drogo welcomed parents to a one-of-a-kind graduation ceremony at New Process Gear in Syracuse, New York. The manufacturing shadow program had immersed 25 high school students in an intensive five-week experience inside…

  11. The Rural South: From Shadows to Sunshine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, William F.

    2000-01-01

    The South can move out of the shadows of the harsh economic realities of the last 15 years and into the sunshine of developing new strategies to take advantage of the region's strengths. These strengths include a vast wealth of natural resources; a Sunbelt location; and most important, a huge reservoir of undeveloped human capital. The road to…

  12. Image shadow removal using pulse coupled neural network.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaodong; Yu, Daoheng; Zhang, Liming

    2005-05-01

    This paper introduces an approach for image shadow removal by using pulse coupled neural network (PCNN), based on the phenomena of synchronous pulse bursts in the animal visual cortexes. Two shadow-removing criteria are proposed. These two criteria decide how to choose the optimal parameter (the linking strength beta). The computer simulation results of shadow removal based on PCNN show that if these two criteria are satisfied, shadows are removed completely and the shadow-removed images are almost as the same as the original nonshadowed images. The shadow removal results are independent of changes of intensities of shadows in some range and variations of the places of shadows. When the first criterion is satisfied, even if the second criterion is not satisfied, as to natural grey images that have abundant grey levels, shadows also can be removed and PCNN shadow-removed images retain the shapes of the objects in original images. These two criteria also can be used for color images by dividing a color image into three channels (R, G, B). For shadows varying drastically, such as the noisy points in images, these two criteria are still right, but difficult to satisfy. Therefore, this approach can efficiently remove shadows that do not include the random noise.

  13. Shadows Cast On The Transition Disk Of Hd 135344B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolker, Tomas

    2016-07-01

    I will present new VLT/SPHERE polarimetric imaging observations of the transition disk around HD 135344B (SAO 206462) which have revealed multiple shadow features. These shadows are likely cast by a warped inner disk component and possibly an accretion funnel flow from the inner disk onto the star which might explain the variability of one shadow.

  14. Shadow-driven 4D haptic visualization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Hanson, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Just as we can work with two-dimensional floor plans to communicate 3D architectural design, we can exploit reduced-dimension shadows to manipulate the higher-dimensional objects generating the shadows. In particular, by taking advantage of physically reactive 3D shadow-space controllers, we can transform the task of interacting with 4D objects to a new level of physical reality. We begin with a teaching tool that uses 2D knot diagrams to manipulate the geometry of 3D mathematical knots via their projections; our unique 2D haptic interface allows the user to become familiar with sketching, editing, exploration, and manipulation of 3D knots rendered as projected imageson a 2D shadow space. By combining graphics and collision-sensing haptics, we can enhance the 2D shadow-driven editing protocol to successfully leverage 2D pen-and-paper or blackboard skills. Building on the reduced-dimension 2D editing tool for manipulating 3D shapes, we develop the natural analogy to produce a reduced-dimension 3D tool for manipulating 4D shapes. By physically modeling the correct properties of 4D surfaces, their bending forces, and their collisions in the 3D haptic controller interface, we can support full-featured physical exploration of 4D mathematical objects in a manner that is otherwise far beyond the experience accessible to human beings. As far as we are aware, this paper reports the first interactive system with force-feedback that provides "4D haptic visualization" permitting the user to model and interact with 4D cloth-like objects.

  15. Generating soft shadows with a depth buffer algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brotman, L. S.; Badler, N. I.

    1984-01-01

    Computer-synthesized shadows used to appear with a sharp edge when cast onto a surface. At present the production of more realistic, soft shadows is considered. However, significant costs arise in connection with such a representation. The current investigation is concerned with a pragmatic approach, which combines an existing shadowing method with a popular visible surface rendering technique, called a 'depth buffer', to generate soft shadows resulting from light sources of finite extent. The considered method represents an extension of Crow's (1977) shadow volume algorithm.

  16. Surface water-ice deposits in the northern shadowed regions of Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Schorghofer, N.; Preusker, F.; Mazarico, E.; Schröder, S. E.; Byrne, S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Combe, J.-P.; Schäfer, M.; Thangjam, G. S.; Hoffmann, M.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Landis, M. E.; Dietrich, W.; Ripken, J.; Matz, K.-D.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Ceres, a dwarf planet located in the main asteroid belt, has a low bulk density1, and models predict that a substantial amount of water ice is present in its mantle and outer shell2-4. The Herschel telescope and the Dawn spacecraft5 have observed the release of water vapour from Ceres6,7, and exposed water ice has been detected by Dawn on its surface at mid-latitudes8. Water molecules from endogenic and exogenic sources can also be cold-trapped in permanent shadows at high latitudes9-11, as happens on the Moon12,13 and Mercury14,15. Here we present the first image-based survey of Ceres's northern permanent shadows and report the discovery of bright deposits in cold traps. We identify a minimum of 634 permanently shadowed craters. Bright deposits are detected on the floors of just 10 of these craters in multi-scattered light. We spectroscopically identify one of the bright deposits as water ice. This detection strengthens the evidence that permanently shadowed areas have preserved water ice on airless planetary bodies.

  17. Surface Water-Ice Deposits in the Northern Shadowed Regions of Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platz, T.; Nathues, A.; Schorghofer, N.; Preusker, F.; Mazarico, E.; Schroeder, S. E.; Byrne, S.; Kneissl, T.; Schmedemann, N.; Combe, J.-P.; Schaefer, M.; Thangjam, G. S.; Hoffmann, M.; Gutierrez-Marques, P.; Landis, M. E.; Dietrich, W.; Ripken, J.; Matz, K. D.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Ceres, a dwarf planet located in the main asteroid belt, has a low bulk density, and models predict that a substantial amount of water ice is present in its mantle and outer shell. The Herschel telescope and the Dawn spacecraft have observed the release of water vapor from Ceres, and exposed water ice has been detected by Dawn on its surface at mid-latitudes. Water molecules from endogenic and exogenic sources can also be cold-trapped in permanent shadows at high latitudes, as happens on the Moon and Mercury. Here we present the first image-based survey of Ceres's northern permanent shadows and report the discovery of bright deposits in cold traps. We identify a minimum of 634 permanently shadowed craters. Bright deposits are detected on the floors of just 10 of these craters in multiscattered light. We spectroscopically identify one of the bright deposits as water ice. This detection strengthens the evidence that permanently shadowed areas have preserved water ice on airless planetary bodies.

  18. Directional Bias in the Perception of Cast Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Tomomi; Sunaga, Shoji; Ogawa, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the perception of shading is based upon assumptions about lighting direction, for example, light from above. However, it is not clear whether these assumptions are used in the perception of cast shadows. Moreover, it is unclear whether a perceptual interaction exists between shading and cast shadows because until now they have been studied separately. In this study, we investigated through three experiments whether the light-from-above (or another direction) assumption is used in interpreting ambiguous cast shadows, and whether shading information influences the interpretation of cast shadows. Our results indicate the existence of the light-from-above assumption in interpreting cast shadows. Consistent shading information enhanced the interpretation, and judgments of lighting direction were also based on both cast shadow and shading information. However, the perceptual determination of shape from shading was relatively independent of the cast shadow interpretation or the lighting direction judgments of the scene. PMID:28210485

  19. Shadows of Kerr black holes with and without scalar hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Pedro V. P.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi F.

    2016-06-01

    For an observer, the Black Hole (BH) shadow is the BHs apparent image in the sky due to the gravitational lensing of nearby radiation, emitted by an external source. A recent class of solutions dubbed Kerr BHs with scalar hair possess smaller shadows than the corresponding Kerr BHs and, under some conditions, novel exotic shadow shapes can arise. Thus, these hairy BHs could potentially provide new shadow templates for future experiments such as the Event Horizon Telescope. In order to obtain the shadows, the backward ray-tracing algorithm is briefly introduced, followed by numerical examples of shadows of Kerr BHs with scalar hair contrasting with the Kerr analogues. Additionally, an analytical solution for the Kerr shadow is derived in closed form for a ZAMO observer at an arbitrary position.

  20. Shadow shapes around the black hole in the galactic centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. F.; Nucita, A. A.; De Paolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.

    Recently Holz & Wheeler (2002) considered a very attracting possibility to detect retro-MACHOs, i.e. retro-images of the Sun by a Schwarzschild black hole. In this paper we discuss glories (mirages) formed near rapidly rotating Kerr black hole horizons and propose a procedure to measure masses and rotation parameters analyzing these forms of mirages. In some sense that is a manifestation of gravitational lens effect in the strong gravitational field near black hole horizon and a generalization of the retro-gravitational lens phenomenon. We analyze the case of a Kerr black hole rotating at arbitrary speed for some selected positions of a distant observer with respect to the equatorial plane of a Kerr black hole. We discuss glories (mirages) formed near rapidly rotating Kerr black hole horizons and propose a procedure to measure masses and rotation parameters analyzing these forms of mirages. Some time ago Falcke, Melia & Agol (2000) suggested to search shadows at the Galactic Center. In this paper we present the boundaries for shadows calculated numerically. We also propose to use future radio interferometer RADIOASTRON facilities to measure shapes of mirages (glories) and to evaluate the black hole spin as a function of the position angle of a distant observer.

  1. Shadows (Mirages) Around Black Holes and Retro Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, A. F.; Nucita, A. A.; Depaolis, F.; Ingrosso, G.

    Recently Holz & Wheeler [1] considered a very attracting possibility to detect retro-MACHOs, i.e. retro-images of the Sun by a Schwarzschild black hole. In this paper we discuss glories (mirages) formed near rapidly rotating Kerr black hole horizons and propose a procedure to measure masses and rotation parameters analyzing these forms of mirages (a detailed description of the problem is given in [2]). In some sense that is a manifestation of gravitational lens effect in the strong gravitational field near black hole horizon and a generalization of the retro-gravitational lens phenomenon. We analyze the case of a Kerr black hole rotating at arbitrary speed for some selected positions of a distant observer with respect to the equatorial plane of a Kerr black hole. Some time ago Falcke, Melia & Agol [3] suggested to search shadows at the Galactic Center. In this paper we present the boundaries for shadows calculated numerically. We also propose to use future radio interferometer RADIOASTRON facilities to measure shapes of mirages (glories) and to evaluate the black hole spin as a function of the position angle of a distant observer.

  2. The sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Douglas P; Krüger, Harald

    2008-05-01

    Dust near Jupiter is produced when interplanetary impactors collide energetically with small inner moons, and is organized into a main ring, an inner halo, and two fainter and more distant gossamer rings. Most of these structures are constrained by the orbits of the moons Adrastea, Metis, Amalthea and Thebe, but a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe extension behaves differently and has eluded understanding. Here we report on dust impacts detected during the Galileo spacecraft's traversal of the outer ring region: we find a gap in the rings interior to Thebe's orbit, grains on highly inclined paths, and a strong excess of submicrometre-sized dust just inside Amalthea's orbit. We present detailed modelling that shows that the passage of ring particles through Jupiter's shadow creates the Thebe extension and fully accounts for these Galileo results. Dust grains alternately charge and discharge when traversing shadow boundaries, allowing the planet's powerful magnetic field to excite orbital eccentricities and, when conditions are right, inclinations as well.

  3. The sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Krüger, Harald

    2008-05-01

    Dust near Jupiter is produced when interplanetary impactors collide energetically with small inner moons, and is organized into a main ring, an inner halo, and two fainter and more distant gossamer rings. Most of these structures are constrained by the orbits of the moons Adrastea, Metis, Amalthea and Thebe, but a faint outward protrusion called the Thebe extension behaves differently and has eluded understanding. Here we report on dust impacts detected during the Galileo spacecraft's traversal of the outer ring region: we find a gap in the rings interior to Thebe's orbit, grains on highly inclined paths, and a strong excess of submicrometre-sized dust just inside Amalthea's orbit. We present detailed modelling that shows that the passage of ring particles through Jupiter's shadow creates the Thebe extension and fully accounts for these Galileo results. Dust grains alternately charge and discharge when traversing shadow boundaries, allowing the planet's powerful magnetic field to excite orbital eccentricities and, when conditions are right, inclinations as well.

  4. Shadow of rotating wormhole in plasma environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Juraev, Bakhtinur; Ahmedov, Bobomurat; Stuchlík, Zdeněk

    2016-07-01

    The massless particle motion around rotating wormhole in the presence of plasma environment has been studied. It has been shown that the presence of the plasma decreases the inner radius of the circular orbits of photons around rotating wormhole. The shadow cast by rotating wormhole surrounded by inhomogeneous plasma with the radial power-law density has been explored. It has been shown that the shape and size of the wormhole shadow is distorted and changed depending on i) plasma parameters, ii) wormhole rotation and iii) inclination angle between observer plane and axis of rotation of wormhole. As an example we have considered an inverse radial distribution of the plasma density and different types of the wormhole solution.

  5. Initial condition from the shadowed Glauber model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Sandeep; Singh, Sushant K.; Ghosh, Snigdha; Hasanujjaman, Md; Alam, Jane; Sarkar, Sourav

    2016-07-01

    The two component Monte-Carlo Glauber model predicts a knee-like structure in the centrality dependence of elliptic flow v2 in Uranium + Uranium collisions at √{sNN} = 193 GeV. It also produces a strong anti-correlation between v2 and dNch / dy in the case of top ZDC events. However, none of these features have been observed in data. We address these discrepancies by including the effect of nucleon shadowing to the two component Monte-Carlo Glauber model. Apart from addressing successfully the above issues, we find that the nucleon shadow suppresses the event by event fluctuation of various quantities, e.g. ε2 which is in accordance with expectation from the dynamical models of initial condition based on gluon saturation physics.

  6. Artificial Seismic Shadow Zone by Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    2013-08-01

    We developed a new method of earthquake-proof engineering to create an artificial seismic shadow zone using acoustic metamaterials. By designing huge empty boxes with a few side-holes corresponding to the resonance frequencies of seismic waves and burying them around the buildings that we want to protect, the velocity of the seismic wave becomes imaginary. The meta-barrier composed of many meta-boxes attenuates the seismic waves, which reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially by dissipating the seismic energy. This is a mechanical method of converting the seismic energy into sound and heat. We estimated the sound level generated from a seismic wave. This method of area protection differs from the point protection of conventional seismic design, including the traditional cloaking method. The artificial seismic shadow zone is tested by computer simulation and compared with a normal barrier.

  7. Shadowing Lemma and chaotic orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spoto, Federica; Milani, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    Orbit determination is possible for a chaotic orbit of a dynamical system, given a finite set of observations, provided the initial conditions are at the central time. The Shadowing Lemma (Anosov 1967; Bowen in J Differ Equ 18:333-356, 1975) can be seen as a way to connect the orbit obtained using the observations with a real trajectory. An orbit is a shadowing of the trajectory if it stays close to the real trajectory for some amount of time. In a simple discrete model, the standard map, we tackle the problem of chaotic orbit determination when observations extend beyond the predictability horizon. If the orbit is hyperbolic, a shadowing orbit is computed by the least squares orbit determination. We test both the convergence of the orbit determination iterative procedure and the behaviour of the uncertainties as a function of the maximum number of map iterations observed. When the initial conditions belong to a chaotic orbit, the orbit determination is made impossible by numerical instability beyond a computability horizon, which can be approximately predicted by a simple formula. Moreover, the uncertainty of the results is sharply increased if a dynamical parameter is added to the initial conditions as parameter to be estimated. The Shadowing Lemma does not dictate what the asymptotic behaviour of the uncertainties should be. These phenomena have significant implications, which remain to be studied, in practical problems of orbit determination involving chaos, such as the chaotic rotation state of a celestial body and a chaotic orbit of a planet-crossing asteroid undergoing many close approaches.

  8. Examining Model Fidelity via Shadowing Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, H.; Smith, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Fully fledged climate models provide the best available simulations for reflecting the future, yet we have scant insight into their fidelity, in particular as to the duration into the future at which the real world should be expected to evolve in a manner today's models cannot foresee. We know now that our best available models are not adequate for many sought after purposes. To throw some light on the maximum fidelity expected from a given generation of models, and thereby aid both policy making and model development, we can test the weaknesses of a model as a dynamical system to get an informed idea of its potential applicability at various lead times. Shadowing times reflect the duration on which a GCM reflects the observed dynamics of the Earth; extracting the shortcomings of the model which limit shadowing times allows informed speculation regarding the fidelity of the model in the future. More specifically, by identifying the reasons models cannot shadow we learn the relevant phenomena limiting model fidelity, we can then look at the time scales on which feedbacks on the system (which are not active in the model) are likely to result in model irrelevance. The methodology is developed in the "low dimensional laboratory" of relatively simple dynamical systems, for example Lorenz 95 systems. The results are presented in Lorenz 95 systems as well as GCMs. There are severe limits on the light shadowing experiments can shine on GCM predictions. Never the less, they appear to be one of the brightest lights we can shine to illuminate the likely fidelity of GCM extrapolations into the future.

  9. Symbolic Substitution Using Shadow-Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Wei; Chen, Li-Xue; Li, Chun-Fei; Hu, Qiang-Sheng

    1989-02-01

    A new optical system for symbolic substitution is proposed. The system is composed of the lensless shadow-casting system combined with optical logical array and optical image storage elements. The LED's (light-emitting diode) are used as both a light source and a control element in the operation, so that symbolic substitution is implemented by all-photoelectric manipulation. Experimental principle, procedure and result are given.

  10. Nebkha flow dynamics and shadow dune formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, wind flow is simulated via CFD over five 'nebkha' dune forms that range in shape from a cone, to a hemisphere (approximately) and to a dome in order to examine the structure of the wake zone formed downwind and the effect on the leeward flow separation zone and shadow dune formation. Dune height was fixed at 0.5 m while the nebkha diameter increased in 0.25 m increments from 0.5 m to 1.5 m and aspect ratio (h/D) from 1.0 to 0.3. The mean flow comprises an upwind region of reduced velocity which expands as nebkha width increases, high velocity marginal wings, and paired counter-rotating reversing vortices leeward of the nebkha. The point at which flow separation occurs moves further downwind as the nebkha diameter increases. The core regions of the reversing vortices are situated further downwind behind the smaller nebkha than in the case of the larger nebkha. These factors in combination allow for higher velocity perturbations (TKE) and narrower wake behind the smaller nebkha, and the suppression of downwind wake development in the case of the increasingly larger nebkha. Shadow dune length increases as nebkha width increases for lower incident velocity flow and is barely affected by nebkha width at higher flows. The extent of the leeward separation or wake zone, and hence shadow dune length, more strongly varies as a function of wind velocity.

  11. Bladder carcinoma with shadow cell differentiation: a case report with immunohistochemical analyses.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshitsugu

    2012-01-01

    A peculiar case of bladder carcinoma showing shadow cell differentiation (SCD) in a 72-year-old man is presented. The tumor histologically revealed high grade urothelial carcinoma (UC) and partially contained squamous component with a transition to shadow cell nests, similar to those seen in cutaneous pilomatricoma (PMX). Immunohistochemically, the modes of cell death in the component of SCD were identical to those in PMX. The present case as well as 10 cases of cutaneous PMX showed nuclear expression of beta-catenin, whereas 10 cases of bladder UC with squamous differentiation revealed membranous localization without nuclear expression. These results suggest that nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin may play an important role for SCD in the present case. SCD in extracutaneous tumor is extremely rare and, in the literature, the present case is the second one as for bladder carcinoma.

  12. Coherent detection of frequency-hopped quadrature modulations in the presence of jamming. II - QPR Class I modulation. [Quadrature Partial Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper considers the performance of quadrature partial response (QPR) in the presence of jamming. Although a QPR system employs a single sample detector in its receiver, while quadrature amplitude shift keying (or quadrature phase shift keying) requires a matched-filter type of receiver, it is shown that the coherent detection performances of the two in the presence of the intentional jammer have definite similarities.

  13. Direct 3D printed shadow mask on Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahiminejad, S.; Köhler, E.; Enoksson, P.

    2016-10-01

    A 3D printed shadow mask method is presented. The 3D printer prints ABS plastic directly on the wafer, thus avoiding gaps between the wafer and the shadow mask, and deformation during the process. The wafer together with the 3D printed shadow mask was sputtered with Ti and Au. The shadow mask was released by immersion in acetone. The sputtered patches through the shadow mask were compared to the opening of the 3D printed shadow mask and the design dimensions. The patterned Au patches were larger than the printed apertures, however they were smaller than the design widths. The mask was printed in 4 min, the cost is less than one euro cent, and the process is a low temperature process suitable for temperature sensitive components.

  14. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Identification for MERIS and Sentinel-3/OLCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pringle, Nicholas; Vanhellemont, Quinten; Ruddick, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    Ocean colour remote sensing has become a well-established method for the monitoring of coastal waters. The MERIS chlorophyll product for turbid waters (algal_2) and the total suspended matter product (tsm) have been used in applications such as algal bloom detection, eutrophication monitoring, and coastal sediment transport. These MERIS L2 products are sometimes contaminated by cloud shadow pixels and the same problems are likely to occur in Sentinel-3. In order to avoid erroneous data passing quality control and being used in applications, an automated method for detecting and removing cloud and cloud shadow pixels is needed. With this in mind, we highlight the problems with MERIS in the past and show some results from applying detection methods to Landsat-8 data with the objective of using these methods for Sentinel-2 and -3 in the future.

  15. Perception of Shadows in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Becchio, Cristina; Mari, Morena; Castiello, Umberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Cast shadows in visual scenes can have profound effects on visual perception. Much as they are informative, they also constitute noise as they are salient features of the visual scene potentially interfering with the processing of other features. Here we asked i) whether individuals with autism can exploit the information conveyed by cast shadows; ii) whether they are especially sensitive to noise aspects of shadows. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty high-functioning children with autism and twenty typically developing children were asked to recognize familiar objects while the presence, position, and shape of the cast shadow were systematically manipulated. Analysis of vocal reaction time revealed that whereas typically developing children used information from cast shadows to improve object recognition, in autistic children the presence of cast shadows—either congruent or incongruent—interfered with object recognition. Critically, vocal reaction times were faster when the object was presented without a cast shadow. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that shadow-processing mechanisms are abnormal in autism. As a result, processing shadows becomes costly and cast shadows interfere rather than help object recognition. PMID:20485498

  16. The Orbit of Mimas Through Titan's Shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consolmagno, G. J.; Hubbard, W. B.; Hill, R.; Boyle, R. P.

    1996-09-01

    We recorded a rare mutual event of Mimas and Titan's shadow on the evening of November 9-10 1995 at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT: the Alice P. Lennon telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan facility) on Mt. Graham, Arizona, using a fast occultation CCD imaging system. The shadows of Rhea and Titan were also seen moving across the rings of Saturn itself. Our primary sequence of observations consist of six hundred images of the east ansa of Saturn's ring, each a three second exposure through the R filter, taken from 4:02 to 4:32 UT November 10. Saturn itself was masked from the CCD chip. Each pixel of the chip represented 0.3 arc- seconds. Seeing reached as good as 1.3 arc-seconds, but the focus of the VATT was not corrected during the run as the mirrors cooled, reducing the quality of some of the images. (With Gregorian optics, changes of as little as 5 microns in path length can significantly degrade the focus.) A passing weather front also provided challenges; though the telescope was remarkably stable even aimed into the wind, passing clouds degraded about 5-10% of our images. The predicted time of the event was 4:22:21 to 4:25:22 UT. A clear dip in brightness of Mimas occurs in our data between these times. Further analysis leading to a more precise timing of the shadow- Mimas event can give improved precision to the ephemeris of Mimas' orbit.

  17. Field investigation of the drift shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Grace W.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Cook, Paul J.

    2005-09-08

    A drift shadow is an area immediately beneath an undergroundvoidthat, in theory, will be relatively drier than the surrounding rockmass. Numerical and analytical models of water flow through unsaturatedrock predict the existence of a drift shadow, but field tests confirmingits existence have yet to be performed. Proving the existence of driftshadows and understanding their hydrologic and transport characteristicscould provide a better understanding of how contaminants move in thesubsurface if released from waste emplacement drifts such as the proposednuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. We describe the fieldprogram that will be used to investigate the existence of a drift shadowand the corresponding hydrological process at the Hazel-Atlas silica-sandmine located at the Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve in Antioch,California. The location and configuration of this mine makes it anexcellent site to observe and measure drift shadow characteristics. Themine is located in a porous sandstone unit of the Domengine Formation, anapproximately 230 meter thick series of interbedded Eocene-age shales,coals, and massive-bedded sandstones. The mining method used at the minerequired the development of two parallel drifts, one above the other,driven along the strike of the mined sandstone stratum. Thisconfiguration provides the opportunity to introduce water into the rockmass in the upper drift and to observe and measure its flow around theunderlying drift. The passive and active hydrologic tests to be performedare described. In the passive method, cores will be obtained in a radialpattern around a drift and will be sectioned and analyzed for in-situwater content and chemical constituents. With the active hydrologic test,water will be introduced into the upper drift of the two parallel driftsand the flow of the water will be tracked as it passes near the bottomdrift. Tensiometers, electrical resistance probes, neutron probes, andground penetrating radar may be

  18. [Joseph Rollet & the shadow of Ricord].

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    There are three distinguished names in French venereology during the first half of XIXth century: Ricord, Bassereau and Rollet. Ricord is above all a colourful practitioner of fashionable circles and he takes care of a lot of VIP: political people, actors, writers ... With his influence he takes strong opinions but in fact he has only linked gonorrhoea with veneral ulcers. Joseph Rollet head surgeon in the Antiquaille hospital of Lyon, continuing the studies of Bassereau, proves many basic points about venereal diseases often opposed to the theories of Ricord. So theses two scientists too discret or provincial will remain in the shadow of Ricord.

  19. Langmuir Probe Measurements in Plasma Shadows

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, O.; Koch, B.; Fussmann, G.

    2006-01-15

    When immersing a target into a plasma streaming along magnetic field lines, a distinct shadow region extending over large distances is observed by the naked eye downstream of the target.In this work we present an experimental study of the effect applying Langmuir probes. In contrast to expectations, there are only marginal changes in the profiles of temperature and density behind masks that cut away about 50% of the plasma cross-section. On the other hand, the mean density is drastically reduced by an order of magnitude. First attempts to simulate the observations by solving the classical 2D diffusion equation were not successful.

  20. Partial solubility parameters of lactose, mannitol and saccharose using the modified extended Hansen method and evaporation light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Peña, M A; Daali, Y; Barra, J; Bustamante, P

    2000-02-01

    The modified extended Hansen method was tested for the first time to determine partial solubility parameters of non-polymeric pharmaceutical excipients. The method was formerly tested with drug molecules, and is based upon a regression analysis of the logarithm of the mole fraction solubility of the solute against the partial solubility parameters of a series of solvents of different chemical classes. Two monosaccharides and one disaccharide (lactose monohydrate, saccharose and mannitol) were chosen. The solubility of these compounds was determined in a series of solvents ranging from nonpolar to polar and covering a wide range of the solubility parameter scale. Sugars do not absorb at the UV-vis region, and the saturated solutions were assayed with a recent chromatographic technique coupled to an evaporative light scattering detector. This technique was suitable to determine the concentration dissolved in most solvents. The modified extended Hansen method provided better results than the original approach. The best model was the four parameter equation, which includes the dispersion delta d, dipolar delta p, acidic delta a and basic delta b partial solubility parameters. The partial solubility parameters obtained, expressed as MPa1/2, were delta d = 17.6, delta p = 28.7, delta h = 19, delta a = 14.5, delta b = 12.4, delta T = 32.8 for lactose, delta d = 16.2, delta p = 24.5, delta h = 14.6, delta a = 8.7, delta b = 12.2, delta T = 32.8 for mannitol and delta d = 17.1, delta p = 18.5, delta h = 13, delta a = 11.3, delta b = 7.6, delta T = 28.4 for saccharose. The high total solubility parameters delta T obtained agree with the polar nature of the sugars. The dispersion parameters delta d are quite similar for the three sugars indicating that the polar delta p and hydrogen bonding parameters (delta h, delta a, delta b) are responsible for the variation in the total solubility parameters delta T obtained, as also found for drugs. The results suggest that the method

  1. Framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Alok Kumar Singh; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2015-09-01

    Moving object segmentation using change detection in wavelet domain under continuous variations of lighting condition is a challenging problem in video surveillance systems. There are several methods proposed in the literature for change detection in wavelet domain for moving object segmentation having static backgrounds, but it has not been addressed effectively for dynamic background changes. The methods proposed in the literature suffer from various problems, such as ghostlike appearance, object shadows, and noise. To deal with these issues, a framework for dynamic background modeling and shadow suppression under rapidly changing illumination conditions for moving object segmentation in complex wavelet domain is proposed. The proposed method consists of eight steps applied on given video frames, which include wavelet decomposition of frame using complex wavelet transform; use of change detection on detail coefficients (LH, HL, and HH), use of improved Gaussian mixture-based dynamic background modeling on approximate coefficient (LL subband); cast shadow suppression; use of soft thresholding for noise removal; strong edge detection; inverse wavelet transformation for reconstruction; and finally using closing morphology operator. A comparative analysis of the proposed method is presented both qualitatively and quantitatively with other standard methods available in the literature for six datasets in terms of various performance measures. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  2. aCGH detects partial tetrasomy of 12p in blood from Pallister-Killian syndrome cases without invasive skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Theisen, Aaron; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Farrell, Sandra A; Harris, Catharine J; Wetzel, Heather H; Torchia, Beth A; Bejjani, Bassem A; Ballif, Blake C; Shaffer, Lisa G

    2009-05-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, seizures, streaks of hypo- or hyperpigmentation and dysmorphic features. PKS is associated with tissue-limited mosaic partial tetrasomy of 12p, usually caused by an isochromosome 12p. The mosaicism is usually detected in cultured skin fibroblasts or amniotic cells and rarely in phytohemagluttinin-stimulated lymphocytes, which suggests stimulation of T-lymphocytes may distort the percentage of abnormal cells. We recently reported on the identification by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) of a previously unsuspected case of partial tetrasomy of 12p caused by an isochromosome 12p. Here we report on seven additional individuals with partial tetrasomy of 12p characterized by our laboratory. All individuals were referred for mental retardation/developmental delay and/or dysmorphic features. In each case, aCGH using genomic DNA extracted from whole peripheral blood detected copy-number gain for all clones for the short arm of chromosome 12. In all but one case, FISH on metaphases from cultured lymphocytes did not detect the copy-number gain; in the remaining case, metaphase FISH on cultured lymphocytes showed an isochromosome in 10% of cells. However, interphase FISH using probes to 12p on peripheral blood smears showed additional hybridization signals in 18-70% of cells. Microarray and FISH analysis on cultured skin biopsies from four individuals confirmed the presence of an isochromosome 12p. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of aCGH with genomic DNA from whole peripheral blood to detect chromosome abnormalities that are not present in stimulated blood cultures and would otherwise require invasive skin biopsies for identification.

  3. Studying in the Shadow of 9/11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkel, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The shadow of the Twin Towers will never again stretch across the streets of lower Manhattan, but the shadow of September 11 continues to loom large both in New York and around the globe. In many ways, the events of that day are directly responsible for the latest technical program offering at two high schools in Missouri's St. Louis County. In…

  4. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  5. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect "Violin-Mode" (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a "synthesized split photodiode" detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC "shadow notch" outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing "jitter" at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  6. Asphalted Road Temperature Variations Due to Wind Turbine Cast Shadows

    PubMed Central

    Arnay, Rafael; Acosta, Leopoldo; Sigut, Marta; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is a technique that in certain circumstances allows one to avoid the removal of dynamic shadows in the visible spectrum making use of images in the infrared spectrum. This technique emerged from a real problem concerning the autonomous navigation of a vehicle in a wind farm. In this environment, the dynamic shadows cast by the wind turbines' blades make it necessary to include a shadows removal stage in the preprocessing of the visible spectrum images in order to avoid the shadows being misclassified as obstacles. In the thermal images, dynamic shadows completely disappear, something that does not always occur in the visible spectrum, even when the preprocessing is executed. Thus, a fusion on thermal and visible bands is performed. PMID:22291541

  7. Asphalted road temperature variations due to wind turbine cast shadows.

    PubMed

    Arnay, Rafael; Acosta, Leopoldo; Sigut, Marta; Toledo, Jonay

    2009-01-01

    The contribution of this paper is a technique that in certain circumstances allows one to avoid the removal of dynamic shadows in the visible spectrum making use of images in the infrared spectrum. This technique emerged from a real problem concerning the autonomous navigation of a vehicle in a wind farm. In this environment, the dynamic shadows cast by the wind turbines' blades make it necessary to include a shadows removal stage in the preprocessing of the visible spectrum images in order to avoid the shadows being misclassified as obstacles. In the thermal images, dynamic shadows completely disappear, something that does not always occur in the visible spectrum, even when the preprocessing is executed. Thus, a fusion on thermal and visible bands is performed.

  8. Moving Shadows, Moving Sun. Early Modem Sundials Restaging Miracles.

    PubMed

    Mersmann, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Irrespective of geo- or heliocentric presuppositions, the functioning of sundials is based on the observation of moving shadows or light spots. Even though the cast shadow was often simply used to indicate the time, it could also remind the users of the ephemerality of earthly things or function as an index of planetary movements. This article examines the various ways in which early modem sundials visually interpret the moving shadow or light spot. The instruments address the shadow in inscriptions, integrate it into their design (e.g., in cruciform dials) or even manipulate its course (as in the so-called Horologium Ahaz). Both the crucifix and the Ahaz dials not only refer to astronomical miracles but actually restage them. Even though by means of the horologium it was not possible to explain the Old Testament miracle of the shadow moving backward, adepts were able to recreate it on a terrestrial scale.

  9. A ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensor for interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a system of four novel shadow detectors having, collectively, a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms) / √Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. The detectors were designed to monitor the vibrations of the 600 mm long, 400 μm diameter, silica suspension fibres of the mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors, at the resonances of the so-called Violin Modes (VM). The VM detection system described here had a target sensitivity of 100 pm (rms)/ √Hz at 500 Hz, together with, ultimately, a required detection span of ±0.1 mm about the mean position of each fibre—in order to compensate for potential slow drift over time of fibre position, due to mechanical relaxation. The full sensor system, comprising emitters (sources of illumination) and shadow detectors, therefore met these specifications. Using these sensors, VM resonances having amplitudes of 1.2 nm (rms) were detected in the suspension fibres of an Advanced LIGO dummy test-mass. The VM bandwidth of the sensor, determined by its transimpedance amplifier, was 226 Hz-8.93 kHz at the -3 dB points. This paper focuses mainly on the detector side of the shadow sensors. The emitters are described in an accompanying paper.

  10. Probability of error analysis of digital partial response continuous phase modulation with two-bit differential detection and offset receiver diversity in fast Rayleigh fading channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elnoubi, Said M.

    1990-06-01

    The performance of constant envelope digital partial response continuous phase modulation (PRCPM) with two-bit differential detection and offset receiver diversity is theoretically analyzed in fast Rayleigh fading channels. A simple closed-form expression for the probability of error is derived and evaluated for cases of practical interest to researchers and designers of land mobile radio systems. It is shown that the dynamic bit error rate (BER) performance is considerably improved using the offset diversity scheme. Thus, many PRCPM signals having a compact power spectrum can be used in future digital mobile radio systems.

  11. The Shadow Knows: Using Shadows to Investigate the Structure of the Pretransitional Disk of HD 00453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zachary; Fernandes, Rachel B.; Sitko, Michael L.; Grady, Carol A.; Muto, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Wisniewski, John P.; SEEDS Consortium

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of extreme AO instruments we have begun to obtain more detailed images of circumstellar disks. Recently these images have revealed several disks which contain azimuthally- localized dark features, such as HD 100453, some of which have been interpreted as shadows cast by an inner disk component which is not coplanar with the outer disk. Through careful study of these dark features we are able to probe the structure of the disk and make testable predictions using a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Through the use of this code and comparison to recent SPHERE and GPI images we have determined that the shadows seen in the circumstellar disk of HD 100453 are caused by a misinclined inner disk which is at an inclination approximately 45° from coplanarity. In order to cause this misinclination the disk must have undergone a signicant torqueing event such as giant planet-giant planet scattering.

  12. THE EFFECTS OF SELF-SHADOWING BY A PUFFED-UP INNER RIM IN SCATTERED LIGHT IMAGES OF PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Ruobing

    2015-09-01

    We explore whether protoplanetary disks with self-shadowing from puffed-up inner rims exhibit observable features in scattered light images. We use both self-consistent hydrostatic equilibrium calculations and parameterized models to produce the vertically puffed-up inner rims. We find that, in general, the transition between the shadowed and flared regions occurs in a smooth manner over a broad radius range, and no sudden jump exists at the outer edge of the shadow in either the disk temperature or density structures. As a result, a puffed-up rim cannot create sharp ring/arc/spiral-arm-like features in the outer disk as have been detected in recent direct near-infrared imaging of disks. On the other hand, if the puffed-up rim has a sharp edge in the vertical direction, the shadowing effect can produce a distinct three-stage broken power law in the radial intensity profile of the scattered light, with two steep surface brightness radial profiles in the inner and outer disk joined by a shallow transition region around the shadow edge. These types of scattered light profiles may have already been observed, such as in the recent Subaru direct imaging of the TW Hydrae system.

  13. The Effects of Self-shadowing by a Puffed-up Inner Rim in Scattered Light Images of Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ruobing

    2015-09-01

    We explore whether protoplanetary disks with self-shadowing from puffed-up inner rims exhibit observable features in scattered light images. We use both self-consistent hydrostatic equilibrium calculations and parameterized models to produce the vertically puffed-up inner rims. We find that, in general, the transition between the shadowed and flared regions occurs in a smooth manner over a broad radius range, and no sudden jump exists at the outer edge of the shadow in either the disk temperature or density structures. As a result, a puffed-up rim cannot create sharp ring/arc/spiral-arm-like features in the outer disk as have been detected in recent direct near-infrared imaging of disks. On the other hand, if the puffed-up rim has a sharp edge in the vertical direction, the shadowing effect can produce a distinct three-stage broken power law in the radial intensity profile of the scattered light, with two steep surface brightness radial profiles in the inner and outer disk joined by a shallow transition region around the shadow edge. These types of scattered light profiles may have already been observed, such as in the recent Subaru direct imaging of the TW Hydrae system.

  14. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-01-01

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor. PMID:27472331

  15. Design of a New Built-in UHF Multi-Frequency Antenna Sensor for Partial Discharge Detection in High-Voltage Switchgears.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Cheng, Zheng; Gui, Yingang

    2016-07-26

    In this study a new built-in ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensor was designed and applied in a high-voltage switchgear for partial discharge (PD) detection. The casing of the switchgear was initially used as the ground plane of the antenna sensor, which integrated the sensor into the high-voltage switchgear. The Koch snowflake patch was adopted as the radiation patch of the antenna to overcome the disadvantages of common microstrip antennas, and the feed position and the dielectric layer thickness were simulated in detail. Simulation results show that the antenna sensor possessed four resonant points with good impedance matching from 300 MHz to 1000 MHz, and it also presented good multi-frequency performance in the entire working frequency band. PD detection experiments were conducted in the high-voltage switchgear, and the fabricated antenna sensor was effectively built into the high-voltage switchgear. In order to reflect the advantages of the built-in antenna sensor, another external UHF antenna sensor was used as a comparison to simultaneously detect PD. Experimental results demonstrated that the built-in antenna sensor possessed high detection sensitivity and strong anti-interference capacity, which ensured the practicability of the design. In addition, it had more high-voltage switchgear PD detection advantages than the external sensor.

  16. Detecting equilibrium cytochrome c folding intermediates by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry: Two partially folded forms populate the molten-globule state

    PubMed Central

    Grandori, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-MS) is applied to the characterization of ferric cytochromec (cytc) conformational states under different solvent conditions. The methanol-induced molten-globule state in the pH range 2.6–3.0 is found to be populated by two distinct, partially folded conformers IA and IB. The more compact intermediate IB resembles that induced by glycerol in acid-unfolded cytc. The less compact one, IA, also can be induced by destabilization of the native structure by trifluoroethanol. IA and IB can be detected, in the absence of additives, around the midpoint of the acid-induced unfolding transition, providing direct evidence for involvement of equilibrium folding intermediates in cytc conformational transitions at low pH. This study shows that mass spectrometry can contribute to the characterization of molten-globule states of proteins by detection of distinct, although poorly populated, conformations involved in a dynamic equilibrium. PMID:11847268

  17. Multi-probe-based resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscopy for detection of suspicious breast lesions: improving performance using partial ROC optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, Dror; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xingwei; Wang, Xiao Hui; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    We have developed a multi-probe resonance-frequency electrical impedance spectroscope (REIS) system to detect breast abnormalities. Based on assessing asymmetry in REIS signals acquired between left and right breasts, we developed several machine learning classifiers to classify younger women (i.e., under 50YO) into two groups of having high and low risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we investigated a new method to optimize performance based on the area under a selected partial receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve when optimizing an artificial neural network (ANN), and tested whether it could improve classification performance. From an ongoing prospective study, we selected a dataset of 174 cases for whom we have both REIS signals and diagnostic status verification. The dataset includes 66 "positive" cases recommended for biopsy due to detection of highly suspicious breast lesions and 108 "negative" cases determined by imaging based examinations. A set of REIS-based feature differences, extracted from the two breasts using a mirror-matched approach, was computed and constituted an initial feature pool. Using a leave-one-case-out cross-validation method, we applied a genetic algorithm (GA) to train the ANN with an optimal subset of features. Two optimization criteria were separately used in GA optimization, namely the area under the entire ROC curve (AUC) and the partial area under the ROC curve, up to a predetermined threshold (i.e., 90% specificity). The results showed that although the ANN optimized using the entire AUC yielded higher overall performance (AUC = 0.83 versus 0.76), the ANN optimized using the partial ROC area criterion achieved substantially higher operational performance (i.e., increasing sensitivity level from 28% to 48% at 95% specificity and/ or from 48% to 58% at 90% specificity).

  18. Quality assessment of gasoline using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with unfolded partial least squares: A reliable approach for the detection of gasoline adulteration.

    PubMed

    Parastar, Hadi; Mostafapour, Sara; Azimi, Gholamhasan

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography and flame ionization detection combined with unfolded-partial least squares is proposed as a simple, fast and reliable method to assess the quality of gasoline and to detect its potential adulterants. The data for the calibration set are first baseline corrected using a two-dimensional asymmetric least squares algorithm. The number of significant partial least squares components to build the model is determined using the minimum value of root-mean square error of leave-one out cross validation, which was 4. In this regard, blends of gasoline with kerosene, white spirit and paint thinner as frequently used adulterants are used to make calibration samples. Appropriate statistical parameters of regression coefficient of 0.996-0.998, root-mean square error of prediction of 0.005-0.010 and relative error of prediction of 1.54-3.82% for the calibration set show the reliability of the developed method. In addition, the developed method is externally validated with three samples in validation set (with a relative error of prediction below 10.0%). Finally, to test the applicability of the proposed strategy for the analysis of real samples, five real gasoline samples collected from gas stations are used for this purpose and the gasoline proportions were in range of 70-85%. Also, the relative standard deviations were below 8.5% for different samples in the prediction set.

  19. Measuring the Kerr spin parameter of regular black holes from their shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo E-mail: bambi@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    In a previous paper, one of us has showed that, at least in some cases, the Kerr-nature of astrophysical black hole candidates is extremely difficult to test and current techniques, even in presence of excellent data not available today, cannot distinguish a Kerr black hole from a Bardeen one, despite the substantial difference of the two backgrounds. In this paper, we investigate if the detection of the ''shadow'' of nearby super-massive black hole candidates by near future mm/sub-mm very long baseline interferometry experiments can do the job. More specifically, we consider the measurement of the Kerr spin parameter of the Bardeen and Hayward regular black holes from their shadow, and we then compare the result with the estimate inferred from the Kα iron line and from the frequency of the innermost stable circular orbit. For non-rotating black holes, the shadow approach provides different values, and therefore the Kerr black hole hypothesis can potentially be tested. For near extremal objects, all the approaches give quite similar results, and therefore it is not possible to constrain deviations from the Kerr solution. The present work confirms that it is definitively challenging to test this kind of metrics, even with future facilities. However, the detection of a source that looks like a fast-rotating Kerr black hole can put meaningful constraints on the nature of the compact object.

  20. Observations of shadow bands at the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980.

    PubMed

    Marschall, L A; Mahon, R; Henry, R C

    1984-12-01

    Photoelectric observations of short term light variations (shadow bands) at the 16 Feb. 1980 total solar eclipse have been made using a set of spatially separated PIN diodes. Light variations in a bandpass of 1-500 Hz were detected during the half-minutes preceding and following the total phase. Fourier analysis of the noise spectrum of the variations reveals a sharp drop-off for frequencies above 50 Hz and an overall spectrum quite similar to previously reported power spectra of stellar scintillation. This is consistent with an atmospheric origin for the shadow bands. Cross-correlations between the detector outputs are low, suggesting a short persistence time for the turbulent elements causing the patterns.

  1. Observations of shadow bands at the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Mahon, R.; Henry, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of short term light variations (shadow bands) at the 16 Feb. 1980 total solar eclipse have been made using a set of spatially separated PIN diodes. Light variations in a bandpass of 1-500 Hz were detected during the half-minutes preceding and following the total phase. Fourier analysis of the noise spectrum of the variations reveals a sharp drop-off for frequencies above 50 Hz and an overall spectrum quite similar to previously reported power spectra of stellar scintillation. This is consistent with an atmospheric origin for the shadow bands. Cross-correlations between the detector outputs are low, suggesting a short persistence time for the turbulent elements causing the patterns.

  2. Automatic lumbar vertebrae detection based on feature fusion deep learning for partial occluded C-arm X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo; Tan, Jindong; Yang Li; Wei Liang; Yinlong Zhang; Haibo An; Jindong Tan; Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Tan, Jindong; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    Automatic and accurate lumbar vertebrae detection is an essential step of image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery (IG-MISS). However, traditional methods still require human intervention due to the similarity of vertebrae, abnormal pathological conditions and uncertain imaging angle. In this paper, we present a novel convolutional neural network (CNN) model to automatically detect lumbar vertebrae for C-arm X-ray images. Training data is augmented by DRR and automatic segmentation of ROI is able to reduce the computational complexity. Furthermore, a feature fusion deep learning (FFDL) model is introduced to combine two types of features of lumbar vertebrae X-ray images, which uses sobel kernel and Gabor kernel to obtain the contour and texture of lumbar vertebrae, respectively. Comprehensive qualitative and quantitative experiments demonstrate that our proposed model performs more accurate in abnormal cases with pathologies and surgical implants in multi-angle views.

  3. Chest wall segmentation in automated 3D breast ultrasound using rib shadow enhancement and multi-plane cumulative probability enhanced map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Hannah; Hong, Helen

    2015-03-01

    We propose an automatic segmentation method of chest wall in 3D ABUS images using rib shadow enhancement and multi-planar cumulative probability enhanced map. For the identification of individual dark rib shadows, each rib shadow is enhanced using intensity transfer function and 3D sheet-like enhancement filtering. Then, wrongly enhanced intercostal regions and small fatty tissues are removed using coronal and sagittal cumulative probability enhanced maps. The large fatty tissues with globular and sheet-like shapes at the top of rib shadow are removed using shape and orientation analysis based on moment matrix. Detected chest walls are connected with cubic B-spline interpolation. Experimental results show that the Dice similarity coefficient of proposed method as comparison with two manually outlining results provides over 90% in average.

  4. Quantitative detection of Cucumber vein yellowing virus in susceptible and partially resistant plants using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Picó, Belén; Sifres, Alicia; Nuez, Fernando

    2005-09-01

    A method for the detection of Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) that combines reverse transcription with real-time PCR (SYBR((R)) Green chemistry) was developed using specific primers designed from a nucleotide sequence of the RNA polymerase gene (NIb) conserved among all the available CVYV strains. This method provided a linear assay over five to six orders of magnitude and reproducibly detected titres as low as 10(3) molecules of the target CVYV cDNA. Real-time PCR gave reproducible results for the quantification of CVYV in young leaves of susceptible and resistant cucumber landraces after mechanical inoculation. Significant differences in the starting amount of target cDNA were found between the analyzed genotypes, indicating differences in viral accumulation that correlated to their different levels of resistance. Real-time PCR results validated our previous findings using slot-blot hybridization, the dominance of the strong resistance to CVYV displayed by C.sat 10, and provided improved reliability and sensitivity of detection. This method has great potential in resistance breeding for germplasm screening, characterization of resistance mechanisms and genetic studies.

  5. More Efficient Virtual Shadow Maps for Many Lights.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Ola; Billeter, Markus; Sintorn, Erik; Kampe, Viktor; Assarsson, Ulf

    2015-06-01

    Recently, several algorithms have been introduced that enable real-time performance for many lights in applications such as games. In this paper, we explore the use of hardware-supported virtual cube-map shadows to efficiently implement high-quality shadows from hundreds of light sources in real time and within a bounded memory footprint. In addition, we explore the utility of ray tracing for shadows from many lights and present a hybrid algorithm combining ray tracing with cube maps to exploit their respective strengths. Our solution supports real-time performance with hundreds of lights in fully dynamic high-detail scenes.

  6. Teardrop shadow of the pelvis: anatomy and clinical significance

    SciTech Connect

    Bowerman, J.W.; Sena, J.M.; Chang, R.

    1982-06-01

    The teardrop shadow of the pelvis is poorly understood and as a result its clinical significance is not appreciated. The structure responsible for this shadow was pinpointed by removing sections from the hemipelvis of an anatomic specimen with an electric saw. This structure is located in the anteroinferior portion of the acetabular fossa at the acetabular notch and consists of cortical and medullary bone contributed primarily from the ischium with a much smaller contribution from the superior pubic ramus. The normal and abnormal appearances of the teardrop shadow of the acetabulum of three patients were demonstrated on both plain radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans.

  7. Modified gravity black holes and their observable shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, J. W.

    2015-03-01

    The shadows cast by non-rotating and rotating modified gravity black holes are determined by the two parameters mass and angular momentum . The sizes of the shadows cast by the spherically symmetric static modified gravity-Schwarzschild and modified gravity-Kerr rotating black holes increase significantly as the free parameter is increased from zero. The Event Horizon Telescope shadow image measurements can determine whether Einstein's general relativity is correct or whether it should be modified in the presence of strong gravitational fields.

  8. Partially hydrolyzed guar gum characterization and sensitive quantification in food matrices by high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection--validation using accuracy profile.

    PubMed

    Mercier, G; Campargue, C

    2012-11-02

    Interest concerning functional ingredients and especially dietary fibres has been growing in recent years. At the same time, the variety of ingredient accepted as dietary fibres and their mixing at low level in complex matrices have considerably complicated their quantitative analysis by approved AOAC methods. These reasons have led to the specific development of an innovative analytical method performed by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography (HPAEC) with pulsed amperometric detection (PAD) to detect and quantify partially hydrolyzed guar gum (PHGG) in fruit preparation and dairy matrices. The analytical methodology was divided in two steps which could be deployed separately or in conjunction. The first, consists in a complete characterization of PHGG by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) with multi-angle light scattering and refractive index detection and HPAEC-PAD to determine its physico-chemical properties and galactomannans content, and the second step is the development of a new HPAEC-PAD method for PHGG direct quantification in complex matrices (dairy product). Validation in terms of detection and quantification limits, linearity of the analytical range, average accuracy (recovery, trueness) and average uncertainty were statistically carried out with accuracy profile. Overall, this new chromatographic method has considerably improved the possibility to quantify without fractionation treatment, low level of dietary fibres emerging from specific galactomannans, in complex matrices and many foodstuffs.

  9. Highly Selective Mercury Detection at Partially Oxidized Graphene/Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(styrenesulfonate) Nanocomposite Film Modified Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasri, Nael; Sundramoorthy, Ashok; Chang, Woo-Jin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2014-12-01

    Partially oxidized graphene flakes (po-Gr) were obtained from graphite electrode by an electrochemical exfoliation method. As-produced po-Gr flakes were dispersed in water with the assistance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). The po-Gr flakes and the po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS nanocomposite (po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, we demonstrated the potential use of po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS electrode in electrochemical detection of mercury ions (Hg2+) in water samples. The presence of po-Gr sheets in PEDOT:PSS film greatly enhanced the electrochemical response for Hg2+. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed a well-defined Hg2+ redox peaks with a cathodic peak at 0.23 V, and an anodic peak at 0.42 V. Using differential pulse stripping voltammetry, detection of Hg2+ was achieved in the range of 0.2 to 14 µM (R2 = 0.991), with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.19 µM for Hg2+. The electrode performed satisfactorily for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2+ in real samples, and the po-Gr/PEDOT:PSS film remains stable on the electrode surface for repeated use. Therefore, our method is potentially suitable for routine Hg2+ sensing in environmental water samples.

  10. Sequential Two-Dimensional Partial Response Maximum Likelihood Detection Scheme with Constant-Weight Constraint Code for Holographic Data Storage Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Gyuyeol; Choi, Sooyong

    2012-08-01

    A sequential two-dimensional (2D) partial response maximum likelihood (PRML) detection scheme for holographic data storage (HDS) systems is proposed. We use two complexity reduction schemes, a reduced-state trellis and a constant-weight (CW) constraint. In the reduced-state trellis, the limited candidate bits surrounding the target bit are considered for the 2D PRML detector. In the CW constraint, the trellis transitions that violate the CW condition that each code-word block has only one white bit are eliminated. However, the 2D PRML detector using the complexity reduction schemes, which operates on 47 states and 169 branches, has performance degradation. To overcome performance degradation, a sequential detection algorithm uses the estimated a priori probability. By the sequential procedure, we mitigate 2D intersymbol interference with an enhanced reliability of the branch metric. Simulation results show that the proposed 2D PRML detection scheme yields about 3 dB gains over the one-dimensional PRML detection scheme.

  11. Detection of melamine in milk powders using near-infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with regression coefficient of partial least square regression model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jongguk; Kim, Giyoung; Mo, Changyeun; Kim, Moon S; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Fu, Xiaping; Baek, Insuck; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    Illegal use of nitrogen-rich melamine (C3H6N6) to boost perceived protein content of food products such as milk, infant formula, frozen yogurt, pet food, biscuits, and coffee drinks has caused serious food safety problems. Conventional methods to detect melamine in foods, such as Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), are sensitive but they are time-consuming, expensive, and labor-intensive. In this research, near-infrared (NIR) hyperspectral imaging technique combined with regression coefficient of partial least squares regression (PLSR) model was used to detect melamine particles in milk powders easily and quickly. NIR hyperspectral reflectance imaging data in the spectral range of 990-1700nm were acquired from melamine-milk powder mixture samples prepared at various concentrations ranging from 0.02% to 1%. PLSR models were developed to correlate the spectral data (independent variables) with melamine concentration (dependent variables) in melamine-milk powder mixture samples. PLSR models applying various pretreatment methods were used to reconstruct the two-dimensional PLS images. PLS images were converted to the binary images to detect the suspected melamine pixels in milk powder. As the melamine concentration was increased, the numbers of suspected melamine pixels of binary images were also increased. These results suggested that NIR hyperspectral imaging technique and the PLSR model can be regarded as an effective tool to detect melamine particles in milk powders.

  12. INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WEST SPAN LOOKING WEST (SHADOW OF VERTICAL LAPS PLACED ON ZONE III; ASPHALT ZONE IX) - Honey Run Bridge, Spanning Butte Creek, bypassed section of Honey Run Road (originally Carr Hill Road), Paradise, Butte County, CA

  13. Shadow Theater: A Way to Enrich a Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nirgiotis, Nicholas

    1983-01-01

    Describes the "Folk Tales through Shadow Theater" reading-enrichment program unit, in which fifth-grade students search for stories, write scripts, and stage and present plays to an audience of their schoolmates. (RH)

  14. Movement of March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse Shadow (Animation)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The moon will pass in front of the sun, casting its shadow over much of Southeast Asia on March 8, 2016 EST (March 9 local time). People on the nearly 100-mile-wide path of totality will experience...

  15. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A(*).

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-22

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A^{*} (Sgr A^{*}) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A^{*} with an uncertainty of ∼1.5  μas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  16. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E.; Plewa, Philipp M.; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L.; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A* (Sgr A* ) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A* with an uncertainty of ˜1.5 μ as (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  17. Overestimation of Mach number due to probe shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosselin, J. J.; Thakur, S. C.; Sears, S. H.; McKee, J. S.; Scime, E. E.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-07-01

    Comparisons of the plasma ion flow speed measurements from Mach probes and laser induced fluorescence were performed in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment. We show the presence of the probe causes a low density geometric shadow downstream of the probe that affects the current density collected by the probe in collisional plasmas if the ion-neutral mean free path is shorter than the probe shadow length, Lg = w2 Vdrift/D⊥, resulting in erroneous Mach numbers. We then present a simple correction term that provides the corrected Mach number from probe data when the sound speed, ion-neutral mean free path, and perpendicular diffusion coefficient of the plasma are known. The probe shadow effect must be taken into account whenever the ion-neutral mean free path is on the order of the probe shadow length in linear devices and the open-field line region of fusion devices.

  18. A historical note on illusory contours in shadow writing.

    PubMed

    Vezzani, Stefano; Marino, Barbara F M

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that illusory contours have been first displayed and discussed by Schumann (1900, Zeitschrift für Psychologie und Physiologie der Sinnesorgane 23 1-32). Here we show that, before him, Jastrow (1899, Popular Science Monthly 54 299-312) produced illusory contours consisting of a shadow word. A brief history of shadow writing in psychological literature from Jastrow to Brunswik is presented, in which the contributions of Pillsbury, Warren, Koffka, and Benussi are examined.

  19. Light - Shadow Interactions in Italian Medieval Churches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Incerti, Manuela

    In the relationship between architecture and the sky, it is possible to identify three different design issues. The first regards the alignment of buildings with visible points on the horizon that coincide with the rising or setting of a celestial body (sun, planets, stars, or moon) on particular dates during the astronomical year (or liturgical year for sacred buildings). The second is the relationship between planimetric design and the design of the elevations. We are all familiar today with several "light effects", which sometimes have almost hierophanic characteristics that, on certain days of the year, were used to engross, captivate, and amaze the spectator. Contrary to the first two issues, the third comes after the design and building stages and concerns the question of decorative elements. It is reasonable to believe that many years after the works were terminated, certain wall finishings were chosen over others, such as painted frescoes or statues. Whoever did this was fully aware, thanks to direct observation, that such decoration would be struck by a single ray of light on a specific day. This chapter examines light-shadow interactions in some Italian medieval churches.

  20. 'Marsshine' on Shadowed Part of Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Inset

    The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took two images of the larger of Mars' two moons, Phobos, within 10 minutes of each other on March 23, 2008. This is a portion of the second one, enhanced to bring out detail in areas of Phobos that were not illuminated by the sun when the image was taken. Craters are visible due to faint illumination from reflected light off of Mars ('Marsshine'). This is directly analogous to 'Earthshine,' the reflected sunlight from our planet that illuminates the dark side of Earth's moon. The enhancement to show details in the shadows also washes out detail in the sunlit areas in the lower portion of the image.

    The ability to see features on Phobos illuminated by Marsshine demonstrates the high sensitivity of the HiRISE camera. This image is in the HiRISE catalog as PSP_007769_9015.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment is operated by the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the instrument was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo.

  1. Smartphone based Tomographic PIV using colored shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre-Pablo, Andres A.; Alarfaj, Meshal K.; Li, Er Qiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.

    2016-11-01

    We use low-cost smartphones and Tomo-PIV, to reconstruct the 3D-3C velocity field of a vortex ring. The experiment is carried out in an octagonal tank of water with a vortex ring generator consisting of a flexible membrane enclosed by a cylindrical chamber. This chamber is pre-seeded with black polyethylene microparticles. The membrane is driven by an adjustable impulsive air-pressure to produce the vortex ring. Four synchronized smartphone cameras, of 40 Mpx each, are used to capture the location of particles from different viewing angles. We use red, green and blue LED's as backlighting sources, to capture particle locations at different times. The exposure time on the smartphone cameras are set to 2 seconds, while exposing each LED color for about 80 μs with different time steps that can go below 300 μs. The timing of these light pulses is controlled with a digital delay generator. The backlight is blocked by the instantaneous location of the particles in motion, leaving a shadow of the corresponding color for each time step. The image then is preprocessed to separate the 3 different color fields, before using the MART reconstruction and cross-correlation of the time steps to obtain the 3D-3C velocity field. This proof of concept experiment represents a possible low-cost Tomo-PIV setup.

  2. Rapid and direct detection of clostridium chauvoei by PCR of the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region and partial 23S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y; Yamamoto, K; Kojima, A; Tetsuka, Y; Norimatsu, M; Tamura, Y

    2000-12-01

    Clostridium chauvoei causes blackleg, which is difficult to distinguish from the causative clostridia of malignant edema. Therefore, a single-step PCR system was developed for specific detection of C. chauvoei DNA using primers derived from the 16S-23S rDNA spacer region and partial 23S rDNA sequences. The specificity of the single-step PCR system was demonstrated by testing 37 strains of clostridia and 3 strains of other genera. A 509 bp PCR product, which is a C. choauvoei-specific PCR product, could be amplified from all of the C. chauvoei strains tested, but not from the other strains. Moreover, this single-step PCR system specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA in samples of muscle from mice 24 hr after inoculation with 100 spores of C. chauvoei, and in clinical materials from a cow affected with blackleg. These results suggest that our single-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection of C. chauvoei in culture and in clinical materials from animals affected with blackleg.

  3. Defect detection of partially complete SAW and TIG welds using the ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Bonser, Gary R.

    1998-03-01

    An application of machine vision applied to the analysis of ultrasonic images formed using the time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) method on incomplete weld geometries is described. The rationale of the work being to identify weld defects as soon as they are produced, thereby reducing the costs of any subsequent repairs. The analysis uses TOFD scans as input to a filtering and 'window' based variance operator for the segmentation of suspect defect areas inside the weld region. A suite of pc based software and a high temperature TOFD data acquisition system have been benchmarked through a series of demonstration trials on both 80mm thick carbon steel submerged arc welded testpieces, and 25mm thick carbon steel tungsten inert gas welded testpieces. The range of intentionally implanted defects, from root cracks to lack of side wall fusion, were detected with an overall accuracy of 79 percent on a data set of 174 defects on scans performed at 10-90 percent weld completion.

  4. Detection of a true breeding homeotic gene mutant Pps-1 with partially petaloid sepals in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) and its genetic behavior.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Om Prakash; Dubey, Mukesh Kumar; Khanuja, Suman Preet Singh

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous true breeding homeotic gene mutant Pps-1 with distinct partial petaloid sepals was detected in the population of downy mildew (DM)-resistant elite accession I-14 during our studies for the identification of disease resistance sources in opium poppy. The trait was found to be stable and inherited truly in the subsequent generations. Genetic studies were carried out through systematic reciprocal crosses with the parental wild-type genotype I-14, and segregation pattern of phenotypic characteristics in F(1) and F(2) populations clearly indicated single recessive nuclear gene control of the mutant character. The studies have demonstrated that the mutant phenotype is due to mutations at the Pps-1 locus that possibly corresponds to B-class function (according to ABC model) with negative control function. The mutant Pps-1 being single-whorl homeotic mutant might greatly help in providing insight into mechanisms of flower development in opium poppy.

  5. Shadows of Kerr Black Holes with Scalar Hair.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Pedro V P; Herdeiro, Carlos A R; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi F

    2015-11-20

    Using backwards ray tracing, we study the shadows of Kerr black holes with scalar hair (KBHSH). KBHSH interpolate continuously between Kerr BHs and boson stars (BSs), so we start by investigating the lensing of light due to BSs. Moving from the weak to the strong gravity region, BSs-which by themselves have no shadows-are classified, according to the lensing produced, as (i) noncompact, which yield not multiple images, (ii) compact, which produce an increasing number of Einstein rings and multiple images of the whole celestial sphere, and (iii) ultracompact, which possess light rings, yielding an infinite number of images with (we conjecture) a self-similar structure. The shadows of KBHSH, for Kerr-like horizons and noncompact BS-like hair, are analogous to, but distinguishable from, those of comparable Kerr BHs. But for non-Kerr-like horizons and ultracompact BS-like hair, the shadows of KBHSH are drastically different: novel shapes arise, sizes are considerably smaller, and multiple shadows of a single BH become possible. Thus, KBHSH provide quantitatively and qualitatively new templates for ongoing (and future) very large baseline interferometry observations of BH shadows, such as those of the Event Horizon Telescope.

  6. The multisensory body revealed through its cast shadows

    PubMed Central

    Pavani, Francesco; Galfano, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    One key issue when conceiving the body as a multisensory object is how the cognitive system integrates visible instances of the self and other bodies with one’s own somatosensory processing, to achieve self-recognition and body ownership. Recent research has strongly suggested that shadows cast by our own body have a special status for cognitive processing, directing attention to the body in a fast and highly specific manner. The aim of the present article is to review the most recent scientific contributions addressing how body shadows affect both sensory/perceptual and attentional processes. The review examines three main points: (1) body shadows as a special window to investigate the construction of multisensory body perception; (2) experimental paradigms and related findings; (3) open questions and future trajectories. The reviewed literature suggests that shadows cast by one’s own body promote binding between personal and extrapersonal space and elicit automatic orienting of attention toward the body-part casting the shadow. Future research should address whether the effects exerted by body shadows are similar to those observed when observers are exposed to other visual instances of their body. The results will further clarify the processes underlying the merging of vision and somatosensation when creating body representations. PMID:26042079

  7. Objects Versus Shadows as Influences on Perceived Object Motion

    PubMed Central

    Kingdom, Frederick A. A.

    2016-01-01

    The motion trajectory of an object’s cast shadow has been shown to alter the perceived trajectory of a casting object, an effect that holds even if the cast shadow appears unrealistic. This raises the question of whether a cast shadow per se is necessary for this influence, a question that has been studied only with stationary targets. We examined the relative influence of a shadow and a spherical object on the perceived motion trajectory of an identical spherical object, using a paradigm similar to Kersten, Mamassian, and Knill's ball-in-box animation. We recorded both depth and height estimates of the perceived end-point of the target trajectory as a function of various target and context trajectories. Both shadows and objects significantly influenced the perceived trajectory of the target, though the influence of the shadow was overall stronger. We conjecture that the influence of the object reveals the assumption that similar objects moving at the same speed and in similar directions are perceived to move within the same plane, a plane subject to a fronto-parallel bias. PMID:28096972

  8. Characterizing magnetopause shadowing effects in the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, D.; Maget, V. F.; Sicard-Piet, A.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic electrons dynamics is still challenging to predict during the main phase of a storm. In particular, three dimensions radiation belt models, for which temporal resolution is limited, fail in predicting their behavior, especially when dropouts occur. In this paper we present a new model of magnetopause shadowing losses to be incorporated into the ONERA Salammbô code in order to improve the model accuracy. We show in this paper that above a few hundred keVs, magnetopause shadowing is the first contribution to losses in the outer electron belt during dropout events. Global variations of Earth-magnetopause distance and relativistic electron flux have been analyzed to establish the correlation between the magnetopause shadowing and dropouts on the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms. To that purpose, a Superposed Epoch Analysis has been done using NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite 15 measurements. First, a list of 67 Stream Interfaces has been used to validate the method, and then the Superposed Epoch Analysis has been run over more than one solar cycle. Our results show that the model of magnetopause location we have developed fits well with a Superposed Epoch Analysis performed and that we are able to define a criteria based on it that detect intense dropouts. Finally, we have included this model in the Salammbô code, and we present here the improvements obtained as well as the validation made.

  9. Training Classifiers with Shadow Features for Sensor-Based Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Simon; Song, Wei; Cho, Kyungeun; Wong, Raymond; Wong, Kelvin K. L.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel training/testing process for building/using a classification model based on human activity recognition (HAR) is proposed. Traditionally, HAR has been accomplished by a classifier that learns the activities of a person by training with skeletal data obtained from a motion sensor, such as Microsoft Kinect. These skeletal data are the spatial coordinates (x, y, z) of different parts of the human body. The numeric information forms time series, temporal records of movement sequences that can be used for training a classifier. In addition to the spatial features that describe current positions in the skeletal data, new features called ‘shadow features’ are used to improve the supervised learning efficacy of the classifier. Shadow features are inferred from the dynamics of body movements, and thereby modelling the underlying momentum of the performed activities. They provide extra dimensions of information for characterising activities in the classification process, and thereby significantly improve the classification accuracy. Two cases of HAR are tested using a classification model trained with shadow features: one is by using wearable sensor and the other is by a Kinect-based remote sensor. Our experiments can demonstrate the advantages of the new method, which will have an impact on human activity detection research. PMID:28264470

  10. Shadow imaging in bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in porous structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altheimer, Marco; Häfeli, Richard; Wälchli, Carmen; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2015-09-01

    Shadow imaging is used for the investigation of bubbly gas-liquid two-phase flow in a porous structure. The porous structure is made of Somos WaterShed XC 11122, a clear epoxy resin used in rapid prototyping. Optical access is provided by using an aqueous solution of sodium iodide and zinc iodide having the same refractive index as the structure material (). Nitrogen is injected into the continuous phase at volumetric transport fractions in the range of resulting in a hold-up of . The obtained images of overlapping bubble shadows are processed to measure the bubble dimensions. Therefore, a new processing sequence is developed to determine bubble dimensions from overlapping bubble shadows by ellipse fitting. The accuracy of the bubble detection and sizing routine is assessed processing synthetic images. It is shown that the developed technique is suitable for volumetric two-phase flow measurements. Important global quantities such as gas hold-up and total interfacial area can be measured with only one camera. Operation parameters for gas-liquid two-phase flows are determined to improve mass and heat transfer between the phases.

  11. An Approach to Alleviate the False Alarm in Building Change Detection from Urban Vhr Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Hou, J. L.; Deng, M.

    2016-06-01

    Building change detection from very-high-resolution (VHR) urban remote sensing image frequently encounter the challenge of serious false alarm caused by different illumination or viewing angles in bi-temporal images. An approach to alleviate the false alarm in urban building change detection is proposed in this paper. Firstly, as shadows casted by urban buildings are of distinct spectral and shape feature, it adopts a supervised object-based classification technique to extract them in this paper. Secondly, on the opposite direction of sunlight illumination, a straight line is drawn along the principal orientation of building in every extracted shadow region. Starting from the straight line and moving toward the sunlight direction, a rectangular area is constructed to cover partial shadow and rooftop of each building. Thirdly, an algebra and geometry invariant based method is used to abstract the spatial topological relationship of the potential unchanged buildings from all central points of the rectangular area. Finally, based on an oriented texture curvature descriptor, an index is established to determine the actual false alarm in building change detection result. The experiment results validate that the proposed method can be used as an effective framework to alleviate the false alarm in building change detection from urban VHR image.

  12. Building Detection in SAR Imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew; Koch, Mark William; Moya, Mary M; Goold, Jeremy

    2014-08-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. The desire is to present a technique that is effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed technique assumes that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint. Where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. Constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results are provided showing the outcome of the technique.

  13. Building detection in SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. I present two techniques that are effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed techniques assume that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint, where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. For the first technique, constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. The second technique calculates weights for the connections and then performs a series of increasingly relaxed hard and soft thresholds. This results in groups of various levels on their validity. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results demonstrate the outcome of the two techniques. The two techniques are compared and discussed.

  14. Creation of Mice Bearing a Partial Duplication of HPRT Gene Marked with a GFP Gene and Detection of Revertant Cells In Situ as GFP-Positive Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Asao; Suemori, Hirofumi; Hirai, Yuko; Hamasaki, Kanya; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Mitani, Hiroshi; Landes, Reid D.; Nakamura, Nori

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming clear that apparently normal somatic cells accumulate mutations. Such accumulations or propagations of mutant cells are thought to be related to certain diseases such as cancer. To better understand the nature of somatic mutations, we developed a mouse model that enables in vivo detection of rare genetically altered cells via GFP positive cells. The mouse model carries a partial duplication of 3’ portion of X-chromosomal HPRT gene and a GFP gene at the end of the last exon. In addition, although HPRT gene expression was thought ubiquitous, the expression level was found insufficient in vivo to make the revertant cells detectable by GFP positivity. To overcome the problem, we replaced the natural HPRT-gene promoter with a CAG promoter. In such animals, termed HPRT-dup-GFP mouse, losing one duplicated segment by crossover between the two sister chromatids or within a single molecule of DNA reactivates gene function, producing hybrid HPRT-GFP proteins which, in turn, cause the revertant cells to be detected as GFP-positive cells in various tissues. Frequencies of green mutant cells were measured using fixed and frozen sections (liver and pancreas), fixed whole mount (small intestine), or by means of flow cytometry (unfixed splenocytes). The results showed that the frequencies varied extensively among individuals as well as among tissues. X-ray exposure (3 Gy) increased the frequency moderately (~2 times) in the liver and small intestine. Further, in two animals out of 278 examined, some solid tissues showed too many GFP-positive cells to score (termed extreme jackpot mutation). Present results illustrated a complex nature of somatic mutations occurring in vivo. While the HPRT-dup-GFP mouse may have a potential for detecting tissue-specific environmental mutagens, large inter-individual variations of mutant cell frequency cause the results unstable and hence have to be reduced. This future challenge will likely involve lowering the background mutation

  15. Saturn's rings thickness with the shadow hiding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deau, Estelle; Brahic, André; Porco, Carolyn

    Using the Hapke shadow hiding model on various curves phases of ISS/Cassini, we were able to compute the thickness of Saturn's rings through the photometric filling factor. Our results show that diffuse rings (C ring and Cassini Division) are distributed in a monolayer with a thickness from a few centimeters to 5 meters. This seems to suggest that the layer is smaller than the larger particles. For the A and B rings, we find a thickness ranging from 10 to 20 meters, then leading to multiple layers of particles. Our results for the A ring are systematically lower than the values derived by density waves (Tiscareno et al., 2007) and dynamical simulations of Salo and Kaarjalainen (2003). For the first one, this can be explain by the fact the vertical height of the density waves are the upper limit of the real height. Indeed, the wakes (Julian & Toomre, 1966; Salo 1995) conduce the viscosity in the A ring (Daisaka et al., 2001), and produce random speeds greater in the ring plane than in the vertical direction (Daisaka & Ida, 1999), thereby reducing the thickness given by the vertical random speed used to compute the vertical height. However, for the latter one, simulations lead in all the cases (A and B rings such as C ring and Cassini Division) to vertical height of few meters. This constancy can be explained by the fact that simulations take a size distribution too truncated, and a coefficient of restitution rather simple (indeed, rings reflect different surface conditions related to the optical depth, thus the Bridges' law could not promote only one type of collisions). Finally, our results prefer monolayer (layer smaller than the larger particles which allow multilayer of smaller particules) for the faint rings (C ring and Cassini Division) and multilayer for the A and B rings.

  16. [Molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish (Aurelia sp.) based on partial sequencing of mitochondrial 16S rDNA and COI].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Yan; Zhen, Yu; Wang, Guo-shan; Mi, Tie-Zhu; Yu, Zhi-gang

    2013-03-01

    Taking the moon jellyfish Aurelia sp. commonly found in our coastal sea areas as test object, its genome DNA was extracted, the partial sequences of mt-16S rDNA (650 bp) and mt-COI (709 bp) were PCR-amplified, and, after purification, cloning, and sequencing, the sequences obtained were BLASTn-analyzed. The sequences of greater difference with those of the other jellyfish were chosen, and eight specific primers for the mt-16S rDNA and mt-COI of Aurelia sp. were designed, respectively. The specificity test indicated that the primer AS3 for the mt-16S rDNA and the primer AC3 for the mt-COI were excellent in rapidly detecting the target jellyfish from Rhopilema esculentum, Nemopilema nomurai, Cyanea nozakii, Acromitus sp., and Aurelia sp., and thus, the techniques for the molecular identification and detection of moon jellyfish were preliminarily established, which could get rid of the limitations in classical morphological identification of Aurelia sp. , being able to find the Aurelia sp. in the samples more quickly and accurately.

  17. Shadowing the Circular Restricted Three-Body Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yong-Kang; Hayes, W. B.

    2009-05-01

    The circular restricted three-body problem (CRTBP) is a celebrated problem in which Poincare first derived the existence of chaos. In chaotic systems, nearby trajectories diverge exponentially away from each other. This implies that numerical errors become exponentially magnified, degrading the reliability of numerical solutions. Confidence in the reliability of numerical solutions can be increased using shadowing. A shadow is an exact trajectory that stays close to a numerical one for a long time, validating the dynamics observed in the numerical solution. To find shadows, we use a refinement algorithm similar a Newton's method (Hayes and Jackson 2007). Murison (1989) used an extremely accurate, high cost integrator to observe fractal structure in a capture-time diagram in the CRTBP. We can reproduce this structure using much cheaper integrations, and demonstrate that most of the cheap trajectories are shadowed. We also observe a negative correlation between capture time and shadow length. We surmise that this is because the dynamical time for orbits around the smaller massive particle in the CRTBP is much shorter than dynamical time around the larger (eg., the Moon's orbital period around the Earth is much shorter than the Earth's orbital period around the Sun), and it has been observed(Hayes 2003) that shadow lengths tend to scale linearly with dynamical times. However, in this study we also found many orbits with very long capture time (Moon-like orbits) which were shadowable for long periods, indicating that such stable orbits were reliably integrated. Thus, we are able to verify the reliability of most short capture time orbits, but are unable to verify the reliability of a significant proportion of long-capture-time orbits.

  18. Doctoring Undercover: updating the educational tradition of shadowing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Claire D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Premedical students are educated in basic biological and health sciences. As a complement to traditional premedical coursework, medical school applicants are encouraged to shadow practitioners, with the hope that observation will introduce students to the culture and practice of healthcare. Yet the shadowing experience varies widely across practitioners and institutions; resources that guide students’ critical reflection and structure the experience are scarce. Development: A pilot experiential learning course, Doctoring Undercover: Shadowing and the Culture of Medicine, was developed to fill this gap. The course consisted of three parts: an introduction to medical culture through the disciplines of medical sociology, history, anthropology, and bioethics; a site placement in which students applied these fields’ analytical techniques to the study of medical culture and practice; and the development of an online activity guide that other premedical students may adapt to their shadowing circumstances. Implementation: Students reported that they were exposed to new disciplinary perspectives and interprofessional environments that they would not traditionally encounter. Students’ contributions to the shadowing guide encouraged active learning and reflection on the dynamics of effective patient-provider relationships and shadowing experiences. Future Directions: Locally, the class may be scaled for a larger group of premedical students and incorporated into a formal pathway program for premedical students; the content will also be integrated into the clinical medicine course for first-year medical students. Online, the guide will be promoted for use by other institutions and by individuals planning extracurricular shadowing experiences; feedback will be solicited. Tools for evaluating the short- and long-term impact of the course and guide will be developed and validated. Observational and experimental studies of the course’s impact should be

  19. Image processing system and method for recognizing and removing shadows from the image of a monitored scene

    DOEpatents

    Osbourn, Gordon C.

    1996-01-01

    The shadow contrast sensitivity of the human vision system is simulated by configuring information obtained from an image sensor so that the information may be evaluated with multiple pixel widths in order to produce a machine vision system able to distinguish between shadow edges and abrupt object edges. A second difference of the image intensity for each line of the image is developed and this second difference is used to screen out high frequency noise contributions from the final edge detection signals. These edge detection signals are constructed from first differences of the image intensity where the screening conditions are satisfied. The positional coincidence of oppositely signed maxima in the first difference signal taken from the right and the second difference signal taken from the left is used to detect the presence of an object edge. Alternatively, the effective number of responding operators (ENRO) may be utilized to determine the presence of object edges.

  20. Electromagnetic penetration through narrow slots in conducting surfaces and coupling to structures on the shadow side

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, E.K.; Butler, C.M. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1990-07-01

    Electromagnetic field penetration through a curved narrow slot in a planar conducting surface and coupling to a curved, loaded thin wire on the shadow side are determined in the time domain (TD) and the frequency domain (FD) by integral equation methods. Coupled integral equations are derived and solved numerically for the equivalent magnetic current in the slot and the electric current on the wire, from which the field that penetrates the slotted surface is determined. One employs a piecewise linear approximation of the unknown currents and performs equation enforcement by pulse testing. The resulting TD equations are solved by a scheme incorporating a finite-difference approximation for a second partial time derivative which allows one to solve for the unknown currents at a discrete time instant t + 1 in terms of the known excitation and currents calculated at a discrete time instant t and earlier. The FD equations are solved by the method of moments. A hybrid time-domain integral equation -- finite-difference time-domain solution technique is described whereby one solves for the field which penetrates a slotted cavity-backed surface. One models the fields in the exterior region and in the slot with integral operators and models the fields inside the cavity with a discretized form of Maxwell's equations. Narrow slots following various contours were chemically etched in thin bass sheets and an apparatus was fabricated to measure shadow-side fields, electric current on a thin wire on the shadow side, and, separately, fields inside a rectangular cavity which backed the slotted brass sheet. The experimentation was conducted at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on a frequency-domain test range employing a monocone source over a large ground plane. One observes very good agreement among the experimental and theoretical results.

  1. Chasing Shadows: Rotation of the Azimuthal Asymmetry in the TW Hya Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debes, John H.; Poteet, Charles A.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Gaspar, Andras; Hines, Dean; Kastner, Joel H.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rapson, Valerie; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2017-02-01

    We have obtained new images of the protoplanetary disk orbiting TW Hya in visible, total intensity light with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), using the newly commissioned BAR5 occulter. These HST/STIS observations achieved an inner working angle of ∼0.″2, or 11.7 au, probing the system at angular radii coincident with recent images of the disk obtained by ALMA and in polarized intensity near-infrared light. By comparing our new STIS images to those taken with STIS in 2000 and with NICMOS in 1998, 2004, and 2005, we demonstrate that TW Hya’s azimuthal surface brightness asymmetry moves coherently in position angle. Between 50 au and 141 au we measure a constant angular velocity in the azimuthal brightness asymmetry of 22.°7 yr‑1 in a counterclockwise direction, equivalent to a period of 15.9 yr assuming circular motion. Both the (short) inferred period and lack of radial dependence of the moving shadow pattern are inconsistent with Keplerian rotation at these disk radii. We hypothesize that the asymmetry arises from the fact that the disk interior to 1 au is inclined and precessing owing to a planetary companion, thus partially shadowing the outer disk. Further monitoring of this and other shadows on protoplanetary disks potentially opens a new avenue for indirectly observing the sites of planet formation. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the data archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute. STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Increased Detection of Lymphatic Vessel Invasion by D2-40 (Podoplanin) in Early Breast Cancer: Possible Influence on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Debald, Manuel; Poelcher, Martin; Flucke, Uta; Walgenbach-Bruenagel, Gisela

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Several international trials are currently investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. According to existing guidelines, patients with lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) do not qualify for APBI. D2-40 (podoplanin) significantly increases the frequency of LVI detection compared with conventional hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining in early-stage breast cancer. Our purpose was to retrospectively assess the hypothetical change in management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy with the application of D2-40. Patients and Methods: Immunostaining with D2-40 was performed on 254 invasive breast tumors of 247 patients. The following criteria were used to determine the eligibility for APBI: invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of {<=}3 cm, negative axillary node status (N0), and unifocal disease. Of the 247 patients, 74 with available information concerning LVI, as detected by D2-40 immunostaining and routine HE staining, formed our study population. Results: Using D2-40, our results demonstrated a significantly greater detection rate (p = .031) of LVI compared with routine HE staining. LVI was correctly identified by D2-40 (D2-40-positive LVI) in 10 (13.5%) of 74 tumors. On routine HE staining, 4 tumors (5.4%) were classified as HE-positive LVI. Doublestaining of these specimens with D2-40 unmasked false-positive LVI status in 2 (50%) of the 4 tumors. According to the current recommendations for APBI, immunostaining with D2-40 would have changed the clinical management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy in 8 (10.8%) of 74 patients and from whole breast radiotherapy to APBI in 2 patients (2.7%). Conclusion: These data support the implementation of D2-40 immunostaining in the routine workup to determine a patient's eligibility for APBI.

  3. The interrupted power law and the size of shadow banking.

    PubMed

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is "interrupted" by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an "interrupted" Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate-which we propose as a shadow banking index-compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity.

  4. Illumination invariance and shadow compensation via spectro-polarimetry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Izzati; Yuen, Peter; Hong, Kan; Chen, Tong; Soori, Umair; Jackman, James; Richardson, Mark

    2012-10-01

    A major problem for obtaining target reflectance via hyperspectral imaging systems is the presence of illumination and shadow effects. These factors are common artefacts, especially when dealing with a hyperspectral imaging system that has sensors in the visible to near infrared region. This region is known to have highly scattered and diffuse radiance that can modify the energy recorded by the imaging system. A shadow effect will lower the target reflectance values due to the small radiant energy impinging on the target surface. Combined with illumination artefacts, such as diffuse scattering from the surrounding targets, background or environment, the shape of the shadowed target reflectance will be altered. We propose a new method to compensate for illumination and shadow effects on hyperspectral imageries by using a polarization technique. This technique, called spectro-polarimetry, estimates the direct and diffuse irradiance based on two images taken with and without a polarizer. The method is then evaluated using a spectral similarity measure, angle and distance metric. The results of indoor and outdoor tests have shown that using the spectro-polarimetry technique can improve the spectral constancy between shadow and full illumination spectra.

  5. The Interrupted Power Law and the Size of Shadow Banking

    PubMed Central

    Fiaschi, Davide; Kondor, Imre; Marsili, Matteo; Volpati, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Using public data (Forbes Global 2000) we show that the asset sizes for the largest global firms follow a Pareto distribution in an intermediate range, that is “interrupted” by a sharp cut-off in its upper tail, where it is totally dominated by financial firms. This flattening of the distribution contrasts with a large body of empirical literature which finds a Pareto distribution for firm sizes both across countries and over time. Pareto distributions are generally traced back to a mechanism of proportional random growth, based on a regime of constant returns to scale. This makes our findings of an “interrupted” Pareto distribution all the more puzzling, because we provide evidence that financial firms in our sample should operate in such a regime. We claim that the missing mass from the upper tail of the asset size distribution is a consequence of shadow banking activity and that it provides an (upper) estimate of the size of the shadow banking system. This estimate–which we propose as a shadow banking index–compares well with estimates of the Financial Stability Board until 2009, but it shows a sharper rise in shadow banking activity after 2010. Finally, we propose a proportional random growth model that reproduces the observed distribution, thereby providing a quantitative estimate of the intensity of shadow banking activity. PMID:24728096

  6. eShadow: A tool for comparing closely related sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Ovcharenko, Ivan; Boffelli, Dario; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2004-01-15

    Primate sequence comparisons are difficult to interpret due to the high degree of sequence similarity shared between such closely related species. Recently, a novel method, phylogenetic shadowing, has been pioneered for predicting functional elements in the human genome through the analysis of multiple primate sequence alignments. We have expanded this theoretical approach to create a computational tool, eShadow, for the identification of elements under selective pressure in multiple sequence alignments of closely related genomes, such as in comparisons of human to primate or mouse to rat DNA. This tool integrates two different statistical methods and allows for the dynamic visualization of the resulting conservation profile. eShadow also includes a versatile optimization module capable of training the underlying Hidden Markov Model to differentially predict functional sequences. This module grants the tool high flexibility in the analysis of multiple sequence alignments and in comparing sequences with different divergence rates. Here, we describe the eShadow comparative tool and its potential uses for analyzing both multiple nucleotide and protein alignments to predict putative functional elements. The eShadow tool is publicly available at http://eshadow.dcode.org/

  7. Observing shadow motions: resonant activity within the observer's motor system?

    PubMed

    Alaerts, Kaat; Van Aggelpoel, Tinne; Swinnen, Stephan P; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2009-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that the human motor cortex is activated by the mere observation of actions performed by others. In the present study, we explored whether the perception of 'impoverished motion stimuli', such as shadow animations, is sufficient to activate motor areas. To do so, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied over the hand area of the primary motor cortex (M1) while subjects observed shadow animations depicting finger motions. Data showed that resonant motor responses in M1 were only found when a biological effector was recognized from the observed shadow animation. Interestingly, M1 responses were similar for observing shadow or real motions. Therefore, the loss of 'pictorial' movement features in a shadow animation appeared to have no effect on motor resonance in M1. In summary, these findings suggest that the 'recognition' of biological motion from sparse visual input is both necessary and sufficient to recruit motor areas. This supports the hypothesis that the motor system is involved in recognizing the actions performed by others.

  8. Moon and Sun shadowing effect in the MACRO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosio, M.; Antolini, R.; Baldini, A.; Barbarino, G. C.; Barish, B. C.; Battistoni, G.; Becherini, Y.; Bellotti, R.; Bemporad, C.; Bernardini, P.; Bilokon, H.; Bower, C.; Brigida, M.; Bussino, S.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Campana, D.; Carboni, M.; Caruso, R.; Cecchini, S.; Cei, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarusi, T.; Choudhary, B. C.; Coutu, S.; Cozzi, M.; De Cataldo, G.; Dekhissi, H.; De Marzo, C.; De Mitri, I.; Derkaoui, J.; De Vincenzi, M.; Di Credico, A.; Erriquez, O.; Favuzzi, C.; Forti, C.; Fusco, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giannini, G.; Giglietto, N.; Giorgini, M.; Grassi, M.; Grillo, A.; Gustavino, C.; Habig, A.; Hanson, K.; Heinz, R.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katsavounidis, I.; Kearns, E.; Kim, H.; Kumar, A.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lane, C.; Levin, D. S.; Lipari, P.; Longley, N. P.; Longo, M. J.; Loparco, F.; Maaroufi, F.; Mancarella, G.; Mandrioli, G.; Manzoor, S.; Margiotta, A.; Marini, A.; Martello, D.; Marzari-Chiesa, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michael, D. G.; Monacelli, P.; Montaruli, T.; Monteno, M.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nicolò, D.; Nolty, R.; Orth, C.; Osteria, G.; Palamara, O.; Patrizii, L.; Pazzi, R.; Peck, C. W.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Popa, V.; Rainò, A.; Reynoldson, J.; Ronga, F.; Satriano, C.; Scapparone, E.; Scholberg, K.; Sioli, M.; Sirri, G.; Sitta, M.; Spinelli, P.; Spinetti, M.; Spurio, M.; Steinberg, R.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Surdo, A.; Tarlè, G.; Togo, V.; Vakili, M.; Walter, C. W.; Webb, R.

    2003-11-01

    Using data collected by the MACRO experiment from 1989 to the end of its operations in 2000, we have studied in the underground muon flux the shadowing effects due to both the Moon and the Sun. We have observed the shadow cast by the Moon at its apparent position with a significance of 6.5 σ. The Moon shadowing effect has been used to verify the pointing capability of the detector and to determine the instrument resolution for the search of muon excesses from any direction of the celestial sphere. The dependence of the effect on the geomagnetic field is clearly shown by splitting the data sample in day and night observations. The Sun shadow, observed with a significance of 4.6 σ is displaced by about 0.6° from its apparent position. In this case however the explanation resides in the configuration of the Solar and Interplanetary Magnetic Fields, which affect the propagation of cosmic ray particles between the Sun, and the Earth. The displacement of the Sun shadow with respect to the real Sun position has been used to establish an upper limit on the antimatter flux in cosmic rays of about 48% at 68% c.l. and primary energies of about 20 TeV.

  9. Shadows of Kerr Black Holes with Scalar Hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunha, Pedro V. P.; Herdeiro, Carlos A. R.; Radu, Eugen; Rúnarsson, Helgi F.

    2015-11-01

    Using backwards ray tracing, we study the shadows of Kerr black holes with scalar hair (KBHSH). KBHSH interpolate continuously between Kerr BHs and boson stars (BSs), so we start by investigating the lensing of light due to BSs. Moving from the weak to the strong gravity region, BSs—which by themselves have no shadows—are classified, according to the lensing produced, as (i) noncompact, which yield not multiple images, (ii) compact, which produce an increasing number of Einstein rings and multiple images of the whole celestial sphere, and (iii) ultracompact, which possess light rings, yielding an infinite number of images with (we conjecture) a self-similar structure. The shadows of KBHSH, for Kerr-like horizons and noncompact BS-like hair, are analogous to, but distinguishable from, those of comparable Kerr BHs. But for non-Kerr-like horizons and ultracompact BS-like hair, the shadows of KBHSH are drastically different: novel shapes arise, sizes are considerably smaller, and multiple shadows of a single BH become possible. Thus, KBHSH provide quantitatively and qualitatively new templates for ongoing (and future) very large baseline interferometry observations of BH shadows, such as those of the Event Horizon Telescope.

  10. Using shadow page cache to improve isolated drivers performance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dong, Xiaoshe; Wang, Endong; Chen, Baoke; Zhu, Zhengdong; Liu, Chengzhe

    2015-01-01

    With the advantage of the reusability property of the virtualization technology, users can reuse various types and versions of existing operating systems and drivers in a virtual machine, so as to customize their application environment. In order to prevent users' virtualization environments being impacted by driver faults in virtual machine, Chariot examines the correctness of driver's write operations by the method of combining a driver's write operation capture and a driver's private access control table. However, this method needs to keep the write permission of shadow page table as read-only, so as to capture isolated driver's write operations through page faults, which adversely affect the performance of the driver. Based on delaying setting frequently used shadow pages' write permissions to read-only, this paper proposes an algorithm using shadow page cache to improve the performance of isolated drivers and carefully study the relationship between the performance of drivers and the size of shadow page cache. Experimental results show that, through the shadow page cache, the performance of isolated drivers can be greatly improved without impacting Chariot's reliability too much.

  11. Simultaneous cast shadows, illumination and geometry inference using hypergraphs.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Alexandros; Wang, Chaohui; Samaras, Dimitris; Paragios, Nikos

    2013-02-01

    The cast shadows in an image provide important information about illumination and geometry. In this paper, we utilize this information in a novel framework in order to jointly recover the illumination environment, a set of geometry parameters, and an estimate of the cast shadows in the scene given a single image and coarse initial 3D geometry. We model the interaction of illumination and geometry in the scene and associate it with image evidence for cast shadows using a higher order Markov Random Field (MRF) illumination model, while we also introduce a method to obtain approximate image evidence for cast shadows. Capturing the interaction between light sources and geometry in the proposed graphical model necessitates higher order cliques and continuous-valued variables, which make inference challenging. Taking advantage of domain knowledge, we provide a two-stage minimization technique for the MRF energy of our model. We evaluate our method in different datasets, both synthetic and real. Our model is robust to rough knowledge of geometry and inaccurate initial shadow estimates, allowing a generic coarse 3D model to represent a whole class of objects for the task of illumination estimation, or the estimation of geometry parameters to refine our initial knowledge of scene geometry, simultaneously with illumination estimation.

  12. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70[sub [minus]0.06][sup [plus]0.07] degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a [approximately]25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4[degree].

  13. Angular resolution studies of the CYGNUS array using the shadows of the sun and moon

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, A.L.; The CYGNUS Collaboration

    1993-05-01

    Using the cosmic ray shadows of the sun and moon, we have estimated the angular resolution of the CYGNUS extensive air shower array. With the event sample now available we estimate the angular resolution of the array to be 0.70{sub {minus}0.06}{sup {plus}0.07} degrees. The resolution depends on the total number of detected shower particles. A new parameterization of the measured shower-front timing structure and the use of counters with small pulse areas lead to a {approximately}25% improvement in the resolution. The systematic pointing error of the array is less than 0.4{degree}.

  14. A source of illumination for low-noise ‘Violin-Mode’ shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Strain, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    A low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow sensors having a displacement sensitivity of (69  ±  13) picometres (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm. These sensors were designed to detect ‘Violin-Mode’ resonances in the suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) gravitational wave detectors. The source of illumination (emitter) described here used a single column of 8 × miniature near infrared LEDs (λ = 890 nm). These emitters cast the shadows of 400 μm diameter fused silica suspension fibres onto their complementary shadow-displacement detectors, located at a distance of 74 fibre diameters (29.6 mm) behind the axes of the fibres themselves. Violin-Mode vibrations of each fibre were sensed as differential ac photocurrents in the corresponding ‘split-photodiode’ detector. This paper describes the design, construction, noise analysis, and measures that were taken in the conception of the emitters, in order to produce high-contrast shadows at such distant detectors. In this way it proved possible to obtain, simultaneously, a very high transfer sensitivity to Violin-Mode vibration of the fibres, and a very low level of detection noise—close to the fundamental shot noise limit—whilst remaining within the constraints of this simple design of emitter. The shadow detector is described in an accompanying paper.

  15. Shading and shadowing on Canaletto's Piazza San Marco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijntjes, Maarten W. A.; de Ridder, Huib

    2014-02-01

    Whereas the 17th century painter Canaletto was a master in linear perspective of the architectural elements, he seems to have had considerable difficulty with linear perspective of shadows. A common trick to avoid shadow perspective problems is to set the (solar) illumination direction parallel to the projection screen. We investigated in one painting where Canaletto clearly used this trick, whether he followed this light direction choice consistently through in how he shades the persons. We approached this question with a perceptual experiment where we measured perceived light directions in isolated details of the paintings. Specifically, we controlled whether observers could only see the (cast) shadow, only shading or both. We found different trends in all three conditions. The results indicate that Canaletto probably used different shading than the parallel light direction would predict. We interpret the results as a form or artistic freedom that Canaletto used to shade the persons individually.

  16. Binary black hole shadows, chaotic scattering and the Cantor set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Jake O.; Dolan, Sam R.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the qualitative features of binary black hole shadows using the model of two extremally charged black holes in static equilibrium (a Majumdar-Papapetrou solution). Our perspective is that binary spacetimes are natural exemplars of chaotic scattering, because they admit more than one fundamental null orbit, and thus an uncountably infinite set of perpetual null orbits which generate scattering singularities in initial data. Inspired by the three-disc model, we develop an appropriate symbolic dynamics to describe planar null geodesics on the double black hole spacetime. We show that a one-dimensional (1D) black hole shadow may be constructed through an iterative procedure akin to the construction of the Cantor set; thus the 1D shadow is self-similar. Next, we study non-planar rays, to understand how angular momentum affects the existence and properties of the fundamental null orbits. Taking slices through 2D shadows, we observe three types of 1D shadow: regular, Cantor-like, and highly chaotic. The switch from Cantor-like to regular occurs where outer fundamental orbits are forbidden by angular momentum. The highly chaotic part is associated with an unexpected feature: stable and bounded null orbits, which exist around two black holes of equal mass M separated by {a}1\\lt a\\lt \\sqrt{2}{a}1, where {a}1=4M/\\sqrt{27}. To show how this possibility arises, we define a certain potential function and classify its stationary points. We conjecture that the highly chaotic parts of the 2D shadow possess the Wada property. Finally, we consider the possibility of following null geodesics through event horizons, and chaos in the maximally extended spacetime.

  17. Microphotometry of underwater shadowing by a moss from a Niagara Escarpment waterfall.

    PubMed

    Swatland, Howard J

    2011-02-01

    Microscope and fiber-optic spectrophotometry of transmittance and backscattering both showed moss leaves to be capable of casting strong shadows, with a single leaf blocking approximately 90% of incident light from a point source. In leaves with only one layer of cells, the transmittance through the cytoplasm of single cells was similar to that for whole leaves. Analysis of cell wall birefringence by polarized-light interferometry indicated that cell walls might normally scatter rather than transmit light. Spectra transmitted through, or backscattered from, the upper green layers of moss were dominated by selective absorbance from chlorophyll, but there was also evidence of wavelength-dependent scattering, as detected in the lower layers of brown, dead moss. Specular reflectance from moss leaves was detected by polarimetry and may have contributed to the relatively high macroscopic transmittance of stationary moss in water. Shadowing by moss leaves was confirmed by dynamic measurements of mosses in turbulent water without bubbles. Flicker patterns from leaves were superimposed on the underwater flicker pattern created at the air-water interface, thus flecks of light were reduced in intensity, increased in frequency, and decreased in duration. This was detected with both point source and diffuse illumination of samples.

  18. Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy to detect anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibody in blood sera of domestic cats: quantitative analysis based on partial least-squares multivariate statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Janaína; Pacheco, Marcos T. T.; Villaverde, Antonio Balbin; Machado, Rosangela Z.; Zângaro, Renato A.; Silveira, Landulfo

    2010-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an important zoonosis in public health because domestic cats are the main agents responsible for the transmission of this disease in Brazil. We investigate a method for diagnosing toxoplasmosis based on Raman spectroscopy. Dispersive near-infrared Raman spectra are used to quantify anti-Toxoplasma gondii (IgG) antibodies in blood sera from domestic cats. An 830-nm laser is used for sample excitation, and a dispersive spectrometer is used to detect the Raman scattering. A serological test is performed in all serum samples by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for validation. Raman spectra are taken from 59 blood serum samples and a quantification model is implemented based on partial least squares (PLS) to quantify the sample's serology by Raman spectra compared to the results provided by the ELISA test. Based on the serological values provided by the Raman/PLS model, diagnostic parameters such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive prediction values, and negative prediction values are calculated to discriminate negative from positive samples, obtaining 100, 80, 90, 83.3, and 100%, respectively. Raman spectroscopy, associated with the PLS, is promising as a serological assay for toxoplasmosis, enabling fast and sensitive diagnosis.

  19. Detection of inborn errors of metabolism utilizing GC-MS urinary metabolomics coupled with a modified orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qin; Lin, Shan-Shan; Yang, Jiang-Tao; Tang, Li-Juan; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2017-04-01

    GC-MS urinary metabolomic analysis coupled with chemometrics is used to detect inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), which are genetic disorders causing severe mental and physical debility and even sudden infant death. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) is an efficient multivariate statistical method that conducts data analysis of metabolite profiling. However, performance degradation is often observed for OPLS-DA due to increasing size and complexity of metabolomic datasets. In this study, hybrid particle swarm optimization (HPSO) is employed to modify OPLS-DA by simultaneously selecting the optimal variable subset, associated weights and the appropriate number of orthogonal components, constructing a new algorithm called HPSO-OPLSDA. Investigating two IEMs, methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) and isovaleric acidemia (IVA), results suggest that HPSO-OPLSDA can significantly outperform OPLS-DA in terms of the discrimination between disease samples and healthy controls. Moreover, main discriminative metabolites are identified by HPSO-OPLSDA to aid the clinical diagnosis of IEMs, including methylmalonic-2, methylcitric-4(1) and 3-OH-propionic-2 for MMA and isovalerylglycine-1 for IVA.

  20. Plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of row crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.

    1975-01-01

    Data from the first Earth Resource Technology Satellite (LANDSAT-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) were used to develop three plant canopy models (Kubelka-Munk (K-M), regression, and combined K-M and regression models) for extracting plant, soil, and shadow reflectance components of cropped fields. The combined model gave the best correlation between MSS data and ground truth, by accounting for essentially all of the reflectance of plants, soil, and shadow between crop rows. The principles presented can be used to better forecast crop yield and to estimate acreage.

  1. Quasi-static displacement calibration system for a “Violin-Mode” shadow-sensor intended for Gravitational Wave detector suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-10-15

    This paper describes the design of, and results from, a calibration system for optical linear displacement (shadow) sensors. The shadow sensors were designed to detect “Violin-Mode” (VM) resonances in the 0.4 mm diameter silica fibre suspensions of the test masses/mirrors of Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave interferometers. Each sensor illuminated the fibre under test, so as to cast its narrow shadow onto a “synthesized split photodiode” detector, the shadow falling over adjacent edges of the paired photodiodes. The apparatus described here translated a vertically orientated silica test fibre horizontally through a collimated Near InfraRed illuminating beam, whilst simultaneously capturing the separate DC “shadow notch” outputs from each of the paired split photodiode detectors. As the ratio of AC to DC photocurrent sensitivities to displacement was known, a calibration of the DC response to quasi-static shadow displacement allowed the required AC sensitivity to vibrational displacement to be found. Special techniques are described for generating the required constant scan rate for the test fibre using a DC motor-driven stage, for removing “jitter” at such low translation rates from a linear magnetic encoder, and so for capturing the two shadow-notch signals at each micrometre of the test fibre's travel. Calibration, across the four detectors of this work, gave a vibrational responsivity in voltage terms of (9.45 ± 1.20) MV (rms)/m, yielding a VM displacement sensitivity of (69 ± 13) pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over the required measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  2. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  3. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  4. Crater shadowing effects at low sun angles, part Q

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    A comparison of Apollo 15 lunar surface photographs taken at low sun-elevation angles with photographs of an experimentally cratered surface at low lighting angles is discussed. The comparison revealed marked similarities, the most significant being that the smallest craters in both sets of photographs are filled with shadows that form beadlike chains and clusters. It was also found that the fraction of area covered by shadows within the smaller craters is so large that 30 to 40 percent of the total field of view is covered by shadow. It is concluded that: the fraction of area covered by resolvable craters, which should be somewhat less than the fraction of area covered by shadow for photographs with very low sun elevation angles, may be calculated using the steady state crater frequency distribution for craters from 20 to 100 m in diameter and then adding the area covered by larger craters for which the crater frequency distribution has the form of the crater-production frequency distribution.

  5. Spiral Arms Triggered By Shadows In Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Matias

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the recent identification of deep shadows cast by an inner warp in HD142527 we suggest a novel mechanism able to trigger spiral arms only from illumination effects due the warp. Using 2D hydro simulations we found that pressure gradients due to temperature differences between obscured and illuminated regions induce observable (scattered light) spiral structures in the density field.

  6. Conspicuous Invisibility: Shadowing as a Data Collection Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinlan, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Shadowing entails a researcher closely following a subject over a period of time to investigate what people actually do in the course of their everyday lives, not what their roles dictate of them. Behaviors, opinions, actions, and explanations for those actions are reflected in the resulting thick, descriptive data. There is little written that…

  7. How To Have a Successful Groundhog Job Shadow Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    America's Promise: The Alliance for Youth, Alexandria, VA.

    This guide, created for Groundhog Job Shadow Day (GJSD), held on February 2, 1999, provides structured activities for both the classroom and the job site to help students understand the importance and the relevance of their education and see firsthand the range of knowledge, skills, and teamwork that the workplace demands. In addition, the…

  8. How To Have a Successful Groundhog Job Shadow Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    America's Promise: The Alliance for Youth, Alexandria, VA.

    This guide, which is an updated version of the guide created for the Groundhog Job Shadow Day (GJSD) that was held on February 2, 1999, provides structured activities that classroom teachers and job sites can use to help students understand the importance and relevance of their education and see firsthand the range of knowledge, skills, and…

  9. Shadow Education: Theory, Analysis and Future Directions--A Rejoinder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Claudia; Condron, Dennis J.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    The authors welcome and appreciate the comments of Eric Grodsky and Sigal Alon on their article "Shadow Education, American Style: Test Preparation, the SAT and College Enrollment." In their comments, Grodsky takes issue with several important theoretical and methodological aspects of their article and Alon highlights key processes…

  10. Dismantling the Imperialist Discourse Shadowing Mexican Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lisa L.

    2006-01-01

    This article unravels the political, public, and private discourse shadowing Mexican immigrants in the Southwestern U.S. The author illustrates how the dominant discourse with regard to immigration in the U.S. has led to the dehumanization of migrant people significantly impacting what occurs in their daily lives and directly influencing the…

  11. "Shadow" Deviations in Colleges and Universities: Facets of the Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fedorenko, L.P.

    2006-01-01

    E.O. Leont'eva's article "Education from the Seamy Underside: Experience from a Pilot Survey of "Shadow" Relations in Colleges and Universities," published in the December 2004 issue of the journal "Sotsiologicheskie issledovanii," described informal practices for getting grades. The empirical base was the findings of…

  12. Shadow Formation at Preschool from a Socio-materiality Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impedovo, Maria Antonietta; Delserieys-Pedregosa, Alice; Jégou, Corinne; Ravanis, Konstantinos

    2016-05-01

    The paper is set in socio-material farming to offer a way of conceptualising actions and interactions of children in preschool involved in the understanding of scientific concepts. A model of early science education about the physical phenomena of shadow formation is implemented in group work in a French context. The research involved 44 children (13 females and 31 males) of 5-6 years old. The research design was organised in three video recording steps: pre-test, teaching session and post-test. We focus on the analysis of nine teaching sessions to investigate children's `understanding' of shadow formation. A descriptive and qualitative approach was used. In particular, we have identified three main categories (the interaction of the children with the tools, the embodiment and verbal dimension)—with respective indicators—to perform the analysis. From the results, all the categories explored seem to influence each other: all material, human and social dimensions contribute to the children's understanding of shadow formation. Also we have identified some elements that can serve as a potential source of improvement of the teaching session on shadow formation. Finally, the research provides insights on how to improve science activities in preschool with the aim of supporting early understanding of physical phenomena.

  13. Spiral Waves Triggered by Shadows in Transition Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesinos, Matías; Perez, Sebastian; Casassus, Simon; Marino, Sebastian; Cuadra, Jorge; Christiaens, Valentin

    2016-05-01

    Circumstellar asymmetries such as central warps have recently been shown to cast shadows on outer disks. We investigate the hydrodynamical consequences of such variable illumination on the outer regions of a transition disk, and the development of spiral arms. Using 2D simulations, we follow the evolution of a gaseous disk passively heated by the central star, under the periodic forcing of shadows with an opening angle of ˜28°. With a lower pressure under the shadows, each crossing results in a variable azimuthal acceleration, which in time develops into spiral density waves. Their pitch angles evolve from Π ˜ 15°-22° at the onset, to ˜11°-14°, over ˜65 au to 150 au. Self-gravity enhances the density contrast of the spiral waves, as also reported previously for spirals launched by planets. Our control simulations with unshadowed irradiation do not develop structures, except for a different form of spiral waves seen at later times only in the gravitationally unstable control case. Scattered light predictions in the H-band show that such illumination spirals should be observable. We suggest that spiral arms in the case-study transition disk HD 142527 could be explained as a result of shadowing from the tilted inner disk.

  14. Shadowing: Who Benefits and How? Uncovering a Booming EFL Teaching Technique for Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamada, Yo

    2016-01-01

    This study examines common claims associated with shadowing. Studies in Japan conclude that shadowing is effective for improving learners' listening skills. Two common claims are that shadowing is effective for lower-proficiency learners and that it enhances learners' phoneme perception, thus improving listening comprehension skills. The former…

  15. Evolution of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity: therapy-associated decline, positive association with detectable viremia, and partial restoration of B-cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Carolina B; Merino-Mansilla, Alberto; Llano, Anuska; Pérez, Ignacio; Crespo, Isabel; Llinas, Laia; Garcia, Felipe; Gatell, Jose M; Yuste, Eloisa; Sanchez-Merino, Victor

    2013-11-01

    Little is known about the stability of HIV-1 cross-neutralizing responses. Taking into account the fact that neutralization breadth has been positively associated with plasma viral load, there is no explanation for the presence of broadly neutralizing responses in a group of patients on treatment with undetectable viremia. In addition, the B-cell profile responsible for broadly cross-neutralizing responses is unknown. Here we studied the evolution of neutralizing responses and the B-cell subpopulation distribution in a group of patients with broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity. We studied neutralization breadth evolution in a group of six previously identified broadly cross-neutralizing patients and six control patients during a 6-year period with a previously described minipanel of recombinant viruses from five different subtypes. B-cell subpopulation distribution during the study was also determined by multiparametric flow cytometry. Broadly cross-neutralizing activity was transient in four broad cross-neutralizers and stable, up to 4.6 years, in the other two. In four out of five broad cross-neutralizers who initiated treatment, a neutralization breadth loss occurred after viremia had been suppressed for as much as 20 months. B-cell subpopulation analyses revealed a significant increase in the frequency of naive B cells in broadly cross-reactive samples, compared with samples with less neutralization breadth (increased from 44% to 62%). We also observed a significant decrease in tissue-like and activated memory B cells (decreased from 19% to 12% and from 17% to 9%, respectively). Our data suggest that HIV-1 broadly cross-neutralizing activity is variable over time and associated with detectable viremia and partial B-cell restoration.

  16. Partial least squares analysis of rocket propulsion fuel data using diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Fitz, Brian D; Billingsley, Matthew C; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition and several physical properties of RP-1 fuels were studied using comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with flame ionization detection (FID). A "reversed column" GC×GC configuration was implemented with a RTX-wax column on the first dimension ((1)D), and a RTX-1 as the second dimension ((2)D). Modulation was achieved using a high temperature diaphragm valve mounted directly in the oven. Using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV), the summed GC×GC-FID signal of three compound-class selective 2D regions (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics) was regressed against previously measured ASTM derived values for these compound classes, yielding root mean square errors of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.855, 0.734, and 0.530mass%, respectively. For comparison, using partial least squares (PLS) analysis with LOOCV, the GC×GC-FID signal of the entire 2D separations was regressed against the same ASTM values, yielding a linear trend for the three compound classes (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics), yielding RMSECV values of 1.52, 2.76, and 0.945 mass%, respectively. Additionally, a more detailed PLS analysis was undertaken of the compounds classes (n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, mono-, di-, and tri-cycloalkanes, and aromatics), and of physical properties previously determined by ASTM methods (such as net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, density, kinematic viscosity, sustained boiling temperature and vapor rise temperature). Results from these PLS studies using the relatively simple to use and inexpensive GC×GC-FID instrumental platform are compared to previously reported results using the GC×GC-TOFMS instrumental platform.

  17. The Shadow Knows: Using Shadows to Investigate the Structure of the Pretransitional Disk of HD 100453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Zachary C.; Fernandes, Rachel B.; Sitko, Michael; Wagner, Kevin; Muto, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Jun; Follette, Katherine; Grady, Carol A.; Fukagawa, Misato; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Kluska, Jacques; Kraus, Stefan; Mayama, Satoshi; McElwain, Michael W.; Oh, Daehyon; Tamura, Motohide; Uyama, Taichi; Wisniewski, John P.; Yang, Yi

    2017-03-01

    We present Gemini Planet Imager polarized intensity imagery of HD 100453 in Y, J, and K1 bands that reveals an inner gap (9–18 au), an outer disk (18–39 au) with two prominent spiral arms, and two azimuthally localized dark features that are also present in Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) total intensity images. Spectral energy distribution fitting further suggests that the radial gap extends to 1 au. The narrow, wedge-like shape of the dark features appears similar to predictions of shadows cast by an inner disk that is misaligned with respect to the outer disk. Using the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code HOCHUNCK3D, we construct a model of the disk that allows us to determine its physical properties in more detail. From the angular separation of the features, we measure the difference in inclination between the disks (45°) and their major axes, PA = 140° east of north for the outer disk, and 100° for the inner disk. We find an outer-disk inclination of 25° ± 10° from face-on, in broad agreement with the Wagner et al. measurement of 34°. SPHERE data in J and H bands indicate a reddish disk, which indicates that HD 100453 is evolving into a young debris disk.

  18. Depth perception from moving cast shadow in macaque monkey.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Saneyuki; Usui, Nobuo; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Taira, Masato; Katsuyama, Narumi

    2015-07-15

    In the present study, we investigate whether the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow. To accomplish this, we conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, an adult Japanese monkey was trained in a motion discrimination task in depth by binocular disparity. A square was presented on the display so that it appeared with a binocular disparity of 0.12 degrees (initial position), and moved toward (approaching) or away from (receding) the monkey for 1s. The monkey was trained to discriminate the approaching and receding motion of the square by GO/delayed GO-type responses. The monkey showed a significantly high accuracy rate in the task, and the performance was maintained when the position, color, and shape of the moving object were changed. In the next experiment, the change in the disparity was gradually decreased in the motion discrimination task. The results showed that the performance of the monkey declined as the distance of the approaching and receding motion of the square decreased from the initial position. However, when a moving cast shadow was added to the stimulus, the monkey responded to the motion in depth induced by the cast shadow in the same way as by binocular disparity; the reward was delivered randomly or given in all trials to prevent the learning of the 2D motion of the shadow in the frontal plane. These results suggest that the macaque monkey can perceive motion in depth using a moving cast shadow as well as using binocular disparity.

  19. In the Shadow/from the Shadow: The Principal as a Reflective Practitioner in Trinidad and Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Laurette; Esnard, Talia; Brown, Launcelot

    2015-01-01

    This case highlights a school principal's leading practice as she worked to transform the social and educational status of students, teachers, and community in a small urban primary school. We employ shadowing, a technique popularized in work-based education and photography, as reflective and research tools. Teaching notes provide insight into the…

  20. FACET: a radiation view factor computer code for axisymmetric, 2D planar, and 3D geometries with shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, A.B.

    1983-08-01

    The computer code FACET calculates the radiation geometric view factor (alternatively called shape factor, angle factor, or configuration factor) between surfaces for axisymmetric, two-dimensional planar and three-dimensional geometries with interposed third surface obstructions. FACET was developed to calculate view factors for input to finite-element heat-transfer analysis codes. The first section of this report is a brief review of previous radiation-view-factor computer codes. The second section presents the defining integral equation for the geometric view factor between two surfaces and the assumptions made in its derivation. Also in this section are the numerical algorithms used to integrate this equation for the various geometries. The third section presents the algorithms used to detect self-shadowing and third-surface shadowing between the two surfaces for which a view factor is being calculated. The fourth section provides a user's input guide followed by several example problems.

  1. Usability of multiangular imaging spectroscopy data for analysis of vegetation canopy shadow fraction in boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markiet, Vincent; Perheentupa, Viljami; Mõttus, Matti; Hernández-Clemente, Rocío

    2016-04-01

    Imaging spectroscopy is a remote sensing technology which records continuous spectral data at a very high (better than 10 nm) resolution. Such spectral images can be used to monitor, for example, the photosynthetic activity of vegetation. Photosynthetic activity is dependent on varying light conditions and varies within the canopy. To measure this variation we need very high spatial resolution data with resolution better than the dominating canopy element size (e.g., tree crown in a forest canopy). This is useful, e.g., for detecting photosynthetic downregulation and thus plant stress. Canopy illumination conditions are often quantified using the shadow fraction: the fraction of visible foliage which is not sunlit. Shadow fraction is known to depend on view angle (e.g., hot spot images have very low shadow fraction). Hence, multiple observation angles potentially increase the range of shadow fraction in the imagery in high spatial resolution imaging spectroscopy data. To investigate the potential of multi-angle imaging spectroscopy in investigating canopy processes which vary with shadow fraction, we obtained a unique multiangular airborne imaging spectroscopy data for the Hyytiälä forest research station located in Finland (61° 50'N, 24° 17'E) in July 2015. The main tree species are Norway spruce (Picea abies L. karst), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh., Betula pendula Roth). We used an airborne hyperspectral sensor AISA Eagle II (Specim - Spectral Imaging Ltd., Finland) mounted on a tilting platform. The tilting platform allowed us to measure at nadir and approximately 35 degrees off-nadir. The hyperspectral sensor has a 37.5 degrees field of view (FOV), 0.6m pixel size, 128 spectral bands with an average spectral bandwidth of 4.6nm and is sensitive in the 400-1000 nm spectral region. The airborne data was radiometrically, atmospherically and geometrically processed using the Parge and Atcor software (Re Se applications Schl

  2. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the significance of planetary shadowing in shaping Jupiter's gossamer ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Gruen, Eberhard

    particle ring material interior to Thebe's orbit. The existence of this partially evacuated gap in ring is also indirectly confirmed by Galileo in-situ energetic particle measurements (Norbert Krupp, priv. comm.). Recent modelling (Hamilton & Kr¨ger, u Nature, submitted) shows that time variable electromagnetic effects can account for all of these surprising results. In particular, when the ring particles travel through Jupiter's shadow, dust grain electric charges vary systematically, driving grains out into the Thebe Extension and matching the Galileo in-situ dust measurements.

  3. Riddles in the Dark: Imaging Inside Mercury's Permanently Shadowed Craters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, C. M.; Chabot, N. L.; Denevi, B. W.; Nair, H.; Deutsch, A. N.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Blewett, D. T.; Head, J. W.; Harmon, J. K.; Neumann, G. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Numerous lines of evidence independently point to the presence of water ice in Mercury's polar regions: Earth-based radar shows radar-bright regions; Mariner 10 and MESSENGER Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) images reveal that these regions are permanently (south polar region) or persistently (north polar region) shadowed; neutron spectrometry indicates hydrogen-rich material; thermal models support the presence of water ice; and Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) reflectance measurements at 1064 nm show high and low reflectance deposits consistent in location to where models predict surface and buried water ice, respectively. Throughout 2013, MESSENGER executed a campaign dedicated to imaging the permanently shadowed crater floors of Mercury's north polar region using sunlight scattered from nearby terrain. The campaign makes use of the broadband clear filter (central wavelength 700 nm, bandwidth 600 nm) of the MDIS wide-angle camera (WAC) to target and image radar-bright areas within all host craters > 10 km in diameter under multiple lighting conditions. To date, MESSENGER has imaged the interiors of nearly 20 craters that host radar-bright deposits, including the largest such deposits near the north pole that are likely to host surface water ice. The images reveal a variety of surface morphologies, ranging from the smooth crater floor of the fresh Kandinsky crater, to the moderately cratered floor of Tolkien crater, and to the battered floor of Prokofiev crater, in which the permanently shadowed region does not differ morphologically from the rest of the crater floor. Thus, no distinct morphology is identified in association with polar deposits, and craters hosting such material span the typical range of degradation states relative to their illuminated counterparts. MDIS images also reveal albedo differences in craters with floors not fully in permanent shadow. Prokofiev provides a special environment for viewing a radar- and MLA-bright region suspected to host

  4. The establishment of shadow model based on Flash and realization of control technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jianping; Zhao, Shan; Yu, Xuejun

    2011-10-01

    Shadow play is a kind of folk art forms. It is produced and performed by digital pattern, and used informational element for spread. There is to play a great role in development of Chinese shadow play. First of all, how to establish the shadow model is very important; Secondly, it needs to realize the controllability of shadow. It needs people perform a lot of actions on computers. So it requires multi-mouse to operate. How to use multi-mouse and make all parts of shadow to work harmonious is an important problem to deal. In this article, I will introduce the how to establish shadow model based on Flash CS4, how to implement multi-mouse and interactivity of VC and Flash, in order to achieve all parts of shadow people can coordinated work under multi-mouse.

  5. Searching for a shadow biosphere on Earth as a test of the 'cosmic imperative'.

    PubMed

    Davies, P C W

    2011-02-13

    Estimates for the number of communicating civilizations in the galaxy, based on the so-called Drake equation, are meaningless without a plausible estimate for the probability that life will emerge on an Earth-like planet. In the absence of a theory of the origin of life, that number can be anywhere from 0 to 1. Distinguished scientists have been known to argue that life on Earth is a freak accident, unique in the observable universe and, conversely, that life is almost bound to arise in the course of time, given Earth-like conditions. De Duve, adopting the latter position, coined the phrase that 'life is a cosmic imperative'. De Duve's position would be immediately verified if we were to discover a second sample of life that we could be sure arose from scratch independently of known life. Given the current absence of evidence for life beyond Earth, the best way to test the hypothesis of the cosmic imperative is to see whether terrestrial life began more than once. If it did, it is possible that descendants of a second genesis might be extant, forming a sort of 'shadow biosphere' existing alongside, or perhaps interpenetrating, the known biosphere. I outline a strategy to detect the existence of such a shadow biosphere.

  6. DIFFERENTIATION OF AURANTII FRUCTUS IMMATURUS AND FRUCTUS PONICIRI TRIFOLIATAE IMMATURUS BY FLOW-INJECTION WITH ULTRAVIOLET SPECTROSCOPIC DETECTION AND PROTON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE USING PARTIAL LEAST-SQUARES DISCRIMINANT ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mengliang; Zhao, Yang; Harrington, Peter de B; Chen, Pei

    2016-03-01

    Two simple fingerprinting methods, flow-injection coupled to ultraviolet spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance, were used for discriminating between Aurantii fructus immaturus and Fructus poniciri trifoliatae immaturus. Both methods were combined with partial least-squares discriminant analysis. In the flow-injection method, four data representations were evaluated: total ultraviolet absorbance chromatograms, averaged ultraviolet spectra, absorbance at 193, 205, 225, and 283 nm, and absorbance at 225 and 283 nm. Prediction rates of 100% were achieved for all data representations by partial least-squares discriminant analysis using leave-one-sample-out cross-validation. The prediction rate for the proton nuclear magnetic resonance data by partial least-squares discriminant analysis with leave-one-sample-out cross-validation was also 100%. A new validation set of data was collected by flow-injection with ultraviolet spectroscopic detection two weeks later and predicted by partial least-squares discriminant analysis models constructed by the initial data representations with no parameter changes. The classification rates were 95% with the total ultraviolet absorbance chromatograms datasets and 100% with the other three datasets. Flow-injection with ultraviolet detection and proton nuclear magnetic resonance are simple, high throughput, and low-cost methods for discrimination studies.

  7. THERMAL SHADOWS AND COMPOSITIONAL STRUCTURE IN COMET NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu

    2011-12-10

    We use a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model to examine the effects of a non-uniform surface albedo on the subsurface thermal structure of comets. Surface albedo markings cast 'thermal shadows' with strong lateral thermal gradients. Corresponding compositional gradients can be strong, especially if the crystallization of amorphous water ice is triggered in the hottest regions. We show that the spatial extent of the structure depends mainly on the obliquity, thermal conductivity, and heliocentric distance. In some circumstances, subsurface structure caused by the thermal shadows of surface features can be maintained for more than 10 Myr, the median transport time from the Kuiper Belt to the inner solar system. Non-uniform compositional structure can be an evolutionary product and does not necessarily imply that comets consist of building blocks accumulated in different regions of the protoplanetary disk.

  8. Shadow photogrammetric apparatus for the quantitative evaluation of corneal buttons.

    PubMed

    Denham, D; Mandelbaum, S; Parel, J M; Holland, S; Pflugfelder, S; Parel, J M

    1989-11-01

    We have developed a technique for the accurate, quantitative, geometric evaluation of trephined and punched corneal buttons. A magnified shadow of the frontal and edge views of a corneal button mounted on the rotary stage of a modified optical comparator is projected onto the screen of the comparator and photographed. This process takes approximately three minutes. The diameters and edge profile at any meridian photographed can subsequently be analyzed from the film. The precision in measuring the diameters of well cut corneal buttons is +/- 23 microns, and in measuring the angle of the edge profile is +/- 1 degree. Statistical analysis of inter observer variability indicated excellent reproducibility of measurements. Shadow photogrammetry offers a standardized, accurate, and reproducible method for analysis of corneal trephination.

  9. Simulation of Hard Shadows on Large Spherical Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslandere, Turgay; Flatken, Markus; Gerndt, Andreas

    2016-12-01

    Real-time rendering of high precision shadows using digital terrain models as input data is a challenging task. Especially when interactivity is targeted and level of detail data structures are utilized to tackle huge amount of data. In this paper, we present a real-time rendering approach for the computation of hard shadows using large scale digital terrain data obtained by satellite imagery. Our approach is based on an extended horizon mapping algorithm that avoids costly pre-computations and ensures high accuracy. This algorithm is further developed to handle large data. The proposed algorithms take the surface curvature of the large spherical bodies into account during the computation. The performance issues are discussed and the results are presented. The generated images can be exploited in 3D research and aerospace related areas.

  10. Extended Empirical Roadside Shadowing model from ACTS mobile measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Vogel, Wolfhard

    1995-01-01

    Employing multiple data bases derived from land-mobile satellite measurements using the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) at 20 GHz, MARECS B-2 at 1.5 GHz, and helicopter measurements at 870 MHz and 1.5 GHz, the Empirical Road Side Shadowing Model (ERS) has been extended. The new model (Extended Empirical Roadside Shadowing Model, EERS) may now be employed at frequencies from UHF to 20 GHz, at elevation angles from 7 to 60 deg and at percentages from 1 to 80 percent (0 dB fade). The EERS distributions are validated against measured ones and fade deviations associated with the model are assessed. A model is also presented for estimating the effects of foliage (or non-foliage) on 20 GHz distributions, given distributions from deciduous trees devoid of leaves (or in full foliage).

  11. The Permanently Shadowed Regions of Dwarf Planet Ceres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; Mazarico, Erwan; Platz, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Schroeder, Stefan E.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Ceres has only a small spin axis tilt (4 deg), and craters near its rotational poles can experience permanent shadow and trap volatiles, as is the case on Mercury and on Earth's Moon. Topography derived from stereo imaging by the Dawn spacecraft is used to calculate direct solar irradiance that defines the extent of the permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In the northern polar region, PSRs cover approximately 1800 sq km or 0.13% of the hemisphere, and most of the PSRs are cold enough to trap water ice over geological time periods. Based on modeling of the water exosphere, water molecules seasonally reside around the winter pole and ultimately an estimated 0.14% of molecules get trapped. Even for the lowest estimates of the amount of available water, this predicts accumulation rates in excess of loss rates, and hence, there should be fresh ice deposits in the cold traps.

  12. Shadow Systems and Attractors in Reaction-Diffusion Equations,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    the shadow system of (1.1), (1.2), we mean the system au/at = DIAu + f(u,¢) (1.3) dt/dt = In1-1 fn g(u(,x), )dx in (I with the boundary condition (1.4...r,O . The functions ut,%t arc supposed t(-) belong to the spaces C(q-rOJX, . C(-r,0],YAa) . The shadow s5 stem is 8u 8t = DIAu + f(ut.z t ) in 0 dz...au/an = 0 , aw/an = 0 in &a We are going to consider this equation as a perturbation of the system au/at = DIAu + f(u,z) (2.4) dz/dt = In ŕ f g(u,z)dx

  13. X-Ray Shadowing Experiments Toward Infrared Dark Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. E.; Snowden, S.; Bania, T. M.

    2009-01-01

    We searched for X-ray shadowing toward two infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) using the MOS detectors on XMM-Newton to learn about the Galactic distribution of X-ray emitting plasma. IRDCs make ideal X-ray shadowing targets of 3/4 keY photons due to their high column densities, relatively large angular sizes, and known kinematic distances. Here we focus on two clouds near 30 deg Galactic longitude at distances of 2 and 5 kpc from the Sun. We derive the foreground and background column densities of molecular and atomic gas in the direction of the clouds. We find that the 3/4 ke V emission must be distributed throughout the Galactic disk. It is therefore linked to the structure of the cooler material of the ISM, and to the birth of stars.

  14. Agitating mass transfer with a warped disc's shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cambier, H.

    2015-10-01

    For compact objects fed by Roche lobe overflow, accretion-generated X-rays irradiating the donor star can alter gas flow towards the Lagrange point thus varying mass transfer. The latest work specific to this topic consists of simple yet insightful two-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations stressing the role of global flow. To explore how a time-varying disc shadow affects mass transfer, I generalize the geometry, employ a robust hydrodynamics solver, and use phase space analysis near the nozzle to include coriolis lift there. Without even exposing the nozzle, a warped disc's shadow can drive mass transfer cycles by shifting the equatorial edges of the irradiation patches in turns: drawing in denser ambient gas before sweeping it into the nozzle. Other important effects remain missing in two-dimensional models, which I discuss along with prospects for more detailed yet efficient models.

  15. The permanently shadowed regions of dwarf planet Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schorghofer, Norbert; Mazarico, Erwan; Platz, Thomas; Preusker, Frank; Schröder, Stefan E.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2016-07-01

    Ceres has only a small spin axis tilt (4°), and craters near its rotational poles can experience permanent shadow and trap volatiles, as is the case on Mercury and on Earth's Moon. Topography derived from stereo imaging by the Dawn spacecraft is used to calculate direct solar irradiance that defines the extent of the permanently shadowed regions (PSRs). In the northern polar region, PSRs cover ˜1800 km2 or 0.13% of the hemisphere, and most of the PSRs are cold enough to trap water ice over geological time periods. Based on modeling of the water exosphere, water molecules seasonally reside around the winter pole and ultimately an estimated 0.14% of molecules get trapped. Even for the lowest estimates of the amount of available water, this predicts accumulation rates in excess of loss rates, and hence, there should be fresh ice deposits in the cold traps.

  16. Blending History with Physics: Acoustic Shadows in the Civil War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Charles D.

    1998-04-01

    To spark student interest in and broaden student perspectives of certain physics principles, it is useful to show how these principles have dramatically affected the course of history. In this case, the study of refraction is enhanced by looking at the results of an original study of the causes of acoustic shadows in the U.S. Civil War and their effect on command decisions in important battles.

  17. Examining the Fidelity of Climate model via Shadowing Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, H.; Smith, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fully fledged climate models provide the best available simulations for reflecting the future, yet we have scant insight into their fidelity, in particular as to the duration into the future at which the real world should be expected to evolve in a manner today's models cannot foresee. We know now that our best available models are not adequate for many sought after purposes. To throw some light on the maximum fidelity expected from a given generation of models, and thereby aid both policy making and model development, we can test the weaknesses of a model as a dynamical system to get an informed idea of its potential applicability at various lead times. Shadowing times reflect the duration on which a GCM reflects the observations; extracting the shortcomings of the model which limit shadowing times allows informed speculation regarding the fidelity of the model in the future. More specifically, the relevant phenomena limiting model fidelity can be learned by identifying the reasons models cannot shadow; the time scales on which feedbacks on the system (which are not active in the model) are likely to result in model irrelevance can be discerned. The methodology is developed in the "low dimensional laboratory" of relatively simple dynamical systems, for example Lorenz 95 systems. The results are presented in Lorenz 95 systems, high dimensional fluid dynamical simulations of rotating annulus and GCMs. There are severe limits on the light shadowing experiments can shine on GCM predictions. Never the less, they appear to be one of the brightest lights we can shine to illuminate the likely fidelity of GCM extrapolations into the future.

  18. A 1K shadow RAM for circumvention applications

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.R. )

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports that circumvention applications require a memory that retains data through radiation (total dose and transient) and loss of power. Various memory technologies have been reviewed and none, as yet, can meet, these requirements. However, if complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) and silicon nitride oxide silicon (SNOS) memories are combined in a shadow RAM (random access memory) configuration, the requirements can be fulfilled.

  19. Shadows cast on the transition disk of HD 135344B. Multiwavelength VLT/SPHERE polarimetric differential imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolker, T.; Dominik, C.; Avenhaus, H.; Min, M.; de Boer, J.; Ginski, C.; Schmid, H. M.; Juhasz, A.; Bazzon, A.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Garufi, A.; Augereau, J.-C.; Benisty, M.; Boccaletti, A.; Henning, Th.; Langlois, M.; Maire, A.-L.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M. R.; Pinte, C.; Quanz, S. P.; Thalmann, C.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Carbillet, M.; Costille, A.; Dohlen, K.; Feldt, M.; Gisler, D.; Mouillet, D.; Pavlov, A.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Pragt, J.; Rochat, S.; Roelfsema, R.; Salasnich, B.; Soenke, C.; Wildi, F.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The protoplanetary disk around the F-type star HD 135344B (SAO 206462) is in a transition stage and shows many intriguing structures both in scattered light and thermal (sub-)millimeter emission which are possibly related to planet formation processes. Aims: We aim to study the morphology and surface brightness of the disk in scattered light to gain insight into the innermost disk regions, the formation of protoplanets, planet-disk interactions traced in the surface and midplane layers, and the dust grain properties of the disk surface. Methods: We have carried out high-contrast polarimetric differential imaging (PDI) observations with VLT/SPHERE and obtained polarized scattered light images with ZIMPOL in the R and I-bands and with IRDIS in the Y and J-bands. The scattered light images and surface brightness profiles are used to study in detail structures in the disk surface and brightness variations. We have constructed a 3D radiative transfer model to support the interpretation of several detected shadow features. Results: The scattered light images reveal with unprecedented angular resolution and sensitivity the spiral arms as well as the 25 au cavity of the disk. Multiple shadow features are discovered on the outer disk with one shadow only being present during the second observation epoch. A positive surface brightness gradient is observed in the stellar irradiation corrected (r2-scaled) images in southwest direction possibly due to an azimuthally asymmetric perturbation of the temperature and/or surface density by the passing spiral arms. The disk integrated polarized flux, normalized to the stellar flux, shows a positive trend towards longer wavelengths which we attribute to large (2πa ≳ λ) aggregate dust grains in the disk surface. Part of the non-azimuthal polarization signal in the Uφ image of the J-band observation can be attributed to multiple scattering in the disk. Conclusions: The detected shadow features and their possible variability

  20. Shadow overlap ion-beam lithography for nanoarchitectures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeonho; Hong, Soongweon; Lee, Luke P

    2009-11-01

    Precisely constructed nanoscale devices and nanoarchitectures with high spatial resolution are critically needed for applications in high-speed electronics, high-density memory, efficient solar cells, optoelectronics, plasmonics, optical antennas, chemical sensors, biological sensors, and nanospectroscopic imaging. Current methods of classical optical lithography are limited by the diffraction effect of light for nanolithography, and the state of art of e-beam or focused ion beam lithography limit the throughput and further reduction less than few nanometers for large-area batch fabrication. However, these limits can be surpassed surprisingly by utilizing the overlap of two shadow images. Here we present shadow overlap of ion-beam lithography (SOIL), which can combine the advantages of parallel processing, tunable capability of geometries, cost-effective method, and high spatial resolution nanofabrication technique. The SOIL method relies on the overlap of shadows created by the directional metal deposition and etching angles on prepatterned structures. Consequently, highly tunable patterns can be obtained. As examples, unprecedented nanoarchitectures for optical antennas are demonstrated by SOIL. We expect that SOIL can have a significant impact not only on nanoscale devices, but also large-scale (i.e., micro and macro) three-dimensional innovative lithography.

  1. Study of acoustic shadow moire for imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaqoub, Mahmoud

    This research is to utilize ultrasound waves and moire phenomena to establish a new imaging technology for industrial and medical applications. The theory and mathematical description is presented in this work. Numerical simulation is performed to prove the concept; COMSOL simulation, which uses finite difference technique, is used. The results are compared with experimental results done by a researcher from NIU at Santec Systems Inc., Wheeling, IL. The diffraction of the ultrasound waves is dependent on the wavelength. Because the sound wave length is large, a diffraction grating of wider pitch is used. Therefore, using ultrasound in shadow moire imaging will be limited by the size of pitch of the diffraction grating. Talbot image of the grating was studied using numerical simulation. The simulation results were found to be in agreement with experimental results. This is an evidence that ultrasound shadow moire has the same characteristics as light shadow moire. This work simulates the imaging of an inclined specimen with two different angles, 20 and 25 degrees. The distance between the first 2-moire fringes is found to be close to 5.5 mm. This means that the second fringe is a locus of constant out-of-plane elevation of 4.2mm with respect to the first fringe. This simulation provides an error compared with the experimental and theoretical results of 17.7%. This difference can be attributed to the fact that the experiments conditions are not ideal, and the use of paraxial and Fresnel approximation used in the analytical equations.

  2. Study of the shadow effect caused by a railway tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Qiyun; Thompson, David

    2016-09-01

    When a train runs in a tunnel the largest vibration on the ground surface may not occur directly above the tunnel but at some lateral distance away from the tunnel alignment. This has been called the ‘shadow effect’. The characteristics of this shadow effect can help in understanding the distribution of vibration on the ground surface. For the current study it is first shown, using an analytical ground model, that a shadow region may occur for a force at some depth in the ground even in the absence of a tunnel; the extent of this effect depends on the Poisson's ratio of the soil. To introduce the tunnel a 2.5D finite element/boundary element model has been used to represent the coupled tunnel-ground situation. When the tunnel is present the vibration caused by excitation at the tunnel base shares many of the features found in the absence of the tunnel. However, the existence of the tunnel structure also influences these features, especially at high frequencies. It is found that, rather than the tunnel structure shielding the vibration from reaching the ground surface, its dominant effect is to transmit vibration from the tunnel base to the crown at high frequencies. The dependence of these effects on various parameters is studied, in particular the tunnel diameter, wall thickness and depth.

  3. LDRD final report on enhanced edge detection techniques for manufacturing quality control and materials characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-01-01

    Detecting object boundaries in the presence of cast shadows is a difficult task for machine vision systems. A new edge detector is presented which responds to shadow penumbras and abrupt object edges with distinguishable signals. The detector requires the use of spatially extended light sources and sufficient video resolution to resolve the shadow penumbras of interest. Detection of high frequency noise is suppressed without requiring image-dependent adjustment of signal thresholds. The ability of the edge operator to distinguish shadow penumbras from abrupt object boundaries while suppressing responses to high frequency noise and texture is illustrated with idealized shadow and object edge intensity profiles. Selective detection of object boundaries in a video scene with a cast shadow has also been demonstrated with this operator.

  4. Learning in the Shadows and in the Light of Day: A Commentary on "Shadow Education, American Style: Test Preparation, the SAT and College Enrollment"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodsky, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Buchmann, Condron and Roscigno argue in their article, "Shadow Education, American Style: Test Preparation, the SAT and College Enrollment," that the activities in which students engage to prepare for college entrance exams are forms of shadow education, a means by which more advantaged parents seek to pass their privileged status along…

  5. Acoustic shadows help gleaning bats find prey, but may be defeated by prey acoustic camouflage on rough surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Elizabeth L; Holderied, Marc W

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual abilities of animals, like echolocating bats, are difficult to study because they challenge our understanding of non-visual senses. We used novel acoustic tomography to convert echoes into visual representations and compare these cues to traditional echo measurements. We provide a new hypothesis for the echo-acoustic basis of prey detection on surfaces. We propose that bats perceive a change in depth profile and an ‘acoustic shadow’ cast by prey. The shadow is more salient than prey echoes and particularly strong on smooth surfaces. This may explain why bats look for prey on flat surfaces like leaves using scanning behaviour. We propose that rather than forming search images for prey, whose characteristics are unpredictable, predators may look for disruptions to the resting surface (acoustic shadows). The fact that the acoustic shadow is much fainter on rougher resting surfaces provides the first empirical evidence for ‘acoustic camouflage’ as an anti-predator defence mechanism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07404.001 PMID:26327624

  6. Perception of object motion in three-dimensional space induced by cast shadows.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Nose, Izuru; Taira, Masato

    2011-01-01

    Cast shadows can be salient depth cues in three-dimensional (3D) vision. Using a motion illusion in which a ball is perceived to roll in depth on the bottom or to flow in the front plane depending on the slope of the trajectory of its cast shadow, we investigated cortical mechanisms underlying 3D vision based on cast shadows using fMRI techniques. When modified versions of the original illusion, in which the slope of the shadow trajectory (shadow slope) was changed in 5 steps from the same one as the ball trajectory to the horizontal, were presented to participants, their perceived ball trajectory shifted gradually from rolling on the bottom to floating in the front plane as the change of the shadow slope. This observation suggests that the perception of the ball trajectory in this illusion is strongly affected by the motion of the cast shadow. In the fMRI study, cortical activity during observation of the movies of the illusion was investigated. We found that the bilateral posterior-occipital sulcus (POS) and right ventral precuneus showed activation related to the perception of the ball trajectory induced by the cast shadows in the illusion. Of these areas, it was suggested that the right POS may be involved in the inferring of the ball trajectory by the given spatial relation between the ball and the shadow. Our present results suggest that the posterior portion of the medial parietal cortex may be involved in 3D vision by cast shadows.

  7. A GENERAL RELATIVISTIC NULL HYPOTHESIS TEST WITH EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF THE BLACK HOLE SHADOW IN Sgr A*

    SciTech Connect

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    The half opening angle of a Kerr black hole shadow is always equal to (5 ± 0.2)GM/Dc{sup 2}, where M is the mass of the black hole and D is its distance from the Earth. Therefore, measuring the size of a shadow and verifying whether it is within this 4% range constitutes a null hypothesis test of general relativity. We show that the black hole in the center of the Milky Way, Sgr A*, is the optimal target for performing this test with upcoming observations using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We use the results of optical/IR monitoring of stellar orbits to show that the mass-to-distance ratio for Sgr A* is already known to an accuracy of ∼4%. We investigate our prior knowledge of the properties of the scattering screen between Sgr A* and the Earth, the effects of which will need to be corrected for in order for the black hole shadow to appear sharp against the background emission. Finally, we explore an edge detection scheme for interferometric data and a pattern matching algorithm based on the Hough/Radon transform and demonstrate that the shadow of the black hole at 1.3 mm can be localized, in principle, to within ∼9%. All these results suggest that our prior knowledge of the properties of the black hole, of scattering broadening, and of the accretion flow can only limit this general relativistic null hypothesis test with EHT observations of Sgr A* to ≲10%.

  8. Imaging the supermassive black hole shadow and jet base of M87 with the event horizon telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ru-Sen; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor; Broderick, Avery E.; Baron, Fabien; Monnier, John D.

    2014-06-20

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a project to assemble a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network of millimeter wavelength dishes that can resolve strong field general relativistic signatures near a supermassive black hole. As planned, the EHT will include enough dishes to enable imaging of the predicted black hole 'shadow', a feature caused by severe light bending at the black hole boundary. The center of M87, a giant elliptical galaxy, presents one of the most interesting EHT targets as it exhibits a relativistic jet, offering the additional possibility of studying jet genesis on Schwarzschild radius scales. Fully relativistic models of the M87 jet that fit all existing observational constraints now allow horizon-scale images to be generated. We perform realistic VLBI simulations of M87 model images to examine the detectability of the black shadow with the EHT, focusing on a sequence of model images with a changing jet mass load radius. When the jet is launched close to the black hole, the shadow is clearly visible both at 230 and 345 GHz. The EHT array with a resolution of 20-30 μas resolution (∼2-4 Schwarzschild radii) is able to image this feature independent of any theoretical models and we show that imaging methods used to process data from optical interferometers are applicable and effective for EHT data sets. We demonstrate that the EHT is also capable of tracing real-time structural changes on a few Schwarzschild radii scales, such as those implicated by very high-energy flaring activity of M87. While inclusion of ALMA in the EHT is critical for shadow imaging, the array is generally robust against loss of a station.

  9. A General Relativistic Null Hypothesis Test with Event Horizon Telescope Observations of the Black Hole Shadow in Sgr A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psaltis, Dimitrios; Özel, Feryal; Chan, Chi-Kwan; Marrone, Daniel P.

    2015-12-01

    The half opening angle of a Kerr black hole shadow is always equal to (5 ± 0.2)GM/Dc2, where M is the mass of the black hole and D is its distance from the Earth. Therefore, measuring the size of a shadow and verifying whether it is within this 4% range constitutes a null hypothesis test of general relativity. We show that the black hole in the center of the Milky Way, Sgr A*, is the optimal target for performing this test with upcoming observations using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). We use the results of optical/IR monitoring of stellar orbits to show that the mass-to-distance ratio for Sgr A* is already known to an accuracy of ∼4%. We investigate our prior knowledge of the properties of the scattering screen between Sgr A* and the Earth, the effects of which will need to be corrected for in order for the black hole shadow to appear sharp against the background emission. Finally, we explore an edge detection scheme for interferometric data and a pattern matching algorithm based on the Hough/Radon transform and demonstrate that the shadow of the black hole at 1.3 mm can be localized, in principle, to within ∼9%. All these results suggest that our prior knowledge of the properties of the black hole, of scattering broadening, and of the accretion flow can only limit this general relativistic null hypothesis test with EHT observations of Sgr A* to ≲10%.

  10. Imaging the Supermassive Black Hole Shadow and Jet Base of M87 with the Event Horizon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ru-Sen; Broderick, Avery E.; Baron, Fabien; Monnier, John D.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Pankratius, Victor

    2014-06-01

    The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a project to assemble a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) network of millimeter wavelength dishes that can resolve strong field general relativistic signatures near a supermassive black hole. As planned, the EHT will include enough dishes to enable imaging of the predicted black hole "shadow," a feature caused by severe light bending at the black hole boundary. The center of M87, a giant elliptical galaxy, presents one of the most interesting EHT targets as it exhibits a relativistic jet, offering the additional possibility of studying jet genesis on Schwarzschild radius scales. Fully relativistic models of the M87 jet that fit all existing observational constraints now allow horizon-scale images to be generated. We perform realistic VLBI simulations of M87 model images to examine the detectability of the black shadow with the EHT, focusing on a sequence of model images with a changing jet mass load radius. When the jet is launched close to the black hole, the shadow is clearly visible both at 230 and 345 GHz. The EHT array with a resolution of 20-30 μas resolution (~2-4 Schwarzschild radii) is able to image this feature independent of any theoretical models and we show that imaging methods used to process data from optical interferometers are applicable and effective for EHT data sets. We demonstrate that the EHT is also capable of tracing real-time structural changes on a few Schwarzschild radii scales, such as those implicated by very high-energy flaring activity of M87. While inclusion of ALMA in the EHT is critical for shadow imaging, the array is generally robust against loss of a station.

  11. Message communications of particular message types between compute nodes using DMA shadow buffers

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-11-16

    Message communications of particular message types between compute nodes using DMA shadow buffers includes: receiving a buffer identifier specifying an application buffer having a message of a particular type for transmission to a target compute node through a network; selecting one of a plurality of shadow buffers for a DMA engine on the compute node for storing the message, each shadow buffer corresponding to a slot of an injection FIFO buffer maintained by the DMA engine; storing the message in the selected shadow buffer; creating a data descriptor for the message stored in the selected shadow buffer; injecting the data descriptor into the slot of the injection FIFO buffer corresponding to the selected shadow buffer; selecting the data descriptor from the injection FIFO buffer; and transmitting the message specified by the selected data descriptor through the data communications network to the target compute node.

  12. Comparison of ISS Power System Telemetry with Analytically Derived Data for Shadowed Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, H. James

    2002-01-01

    Accurate International Space Station (ISS) power prediction requires the quantification of solar array shadowing. Prior papers have discussed the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) ISS power system tool SPACE (System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation) and its integrated shadowing algorithms. On-orbit telemetry has become available that permits the correlation of theoretical shadowing predictions with actual data. This paper documents the comparison of a shadowing metric (total solar array current) as derived from SPACE predictions and on-orbit flight telemetry data for representative significant shadowing cases. Images from flight video recordings and the SPACE computer program graphical output are used to illustrate the comparison. The accuracy of the SPACE shadowing capability is demonstrated for the cases examined.

  13. Light shadowing effect of large breast lesions imaged by optical tomography in reflection geometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Zhu, Quing

    2010-01-01

    When a large, highly absorbing breast lesion is imaged by optical tomography in reflection geometry, most of the photons are absorbed by the top portion of the lesion. As a result, the lower portion of the lesion is not quantified correctly. This posterior light shadowing effect is similar to the sound shadowing effect frequently seen in pulse-echo ultrasound images. The presence of significant posterior shadowing of a lesion in ultrasound images suggests malignance. The light shadowing effect due to optical contrast is characterized using a simple measure and validated by the Monte Carlo photon-tracking method and phantom experiments. Clinical examples of large malignant and benign lesions are presented to demonstrate the shadowing effect and the utility of the measure. Understanding and quantifying the shadowing effect due to optical contrast is important for characterizing larger malignant cancers from benign lesions.

  14. Lroc Observations of Permanently Shadowed Regions: Seeing into the Dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeber, S. D.; Robinson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) near the lunar poles that receive secondary illumination from nearby Sun facing slopes were imaged by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Narrow Angle Cameras (NAC). Typically secondary lighting is optimal in polar areas around respective solstices and when the LRO orbit is nearly coincident with the sub-solar point (low spacecraft beta angles). NAC PSR images provide the means to search for evidence of surface frosts and unusual morphologies from ice rich regolith, and aid in planning potential landing sites for future in-situ exploration. Secondary illumination imaging in PSRs requires NAC integration times typically more than ten times greater than nominal imaging. The increased exposure time results in downtrack smear that decreases the spatial resolution of the NAC PSR images. Most long exposure NAC images of PSRs were acquired with exposure times of 24.2-ms (1-m by 40-m pixels, sampled to 20-m) and 12-ms (1-m by 20-m, sampled to 10-m). The initial campaign to acquire long exposure NAC images of PSRs in the north pole region ran from February 2013 to April 2013. Relative to the south polar region, PSRs near the north pole are generally smaller (D<24-km) and located in simple craters. Long exposure NAC images of PSRs in simple craters are often well illuminated by secondary light reflected from Sun-facing crater slopes during the northern summer solstice, allowing many PSRs to be imaged with the shorter exposure time of 12-ms (resampled to 10-m). With the exception of some craters in Peary crater, most northern PSRs with diameters >6-km were successfully imaged (ex. Whipple, Hermite A, and Rozhestvenskiy U). The third PSR south polar campaign began in April 2013 and will continue until October 2013. The third campaign will expand previous NAC coverage of PSRs and follow up on discoveries with new images of higher signal to noise ratio (SNR), higher resolution, and varying secondary illumination conditions

  15. Plume behavior and thin film deposition by laser ablation using a hellicoidal shadow mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Aurelian; Grigoriu, Constantin; Jang, W.; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2000-02-01

    The laser ablation is one of the best ways to obtain smooth thin film deposited on various substrates. However, to obtain a 'droplets-free' surface some special experimental setups are necessary.ONe of them is the 'eclipse' method, using a plane shadow mask. Based on studies on the plume behavior in a 'standard' deposition and in a plane shadow mask eclipse deposition, we prose a new shadow mask having a an helicoidal shape, which permit to obtain a abetter film quality - maximum droplets size about 10 times smaller than for the plane shadow mask. The plume behavior and thin film quality are presented and discussed.

  16. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Robust Lane Sensing and Departure Warning under Shadows and Occlusions

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Espinoza, Rodolfo; Torres-Torriti, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    A prerequisite for any system that enhances drivers' awareness of road conditions and threatening situations is the correct sensing of the road geometry and the vehicle's relative pose with respect to the lane despite shadows and occlusions. In this paper we propose an approach for lane segmentation and tracking that is robust to varying shadows and occlusions. The approach involves color-based clustering, the use of MSAC for outlier removal and curvature estimation, and also the tracking of lane boundaries. Lane boundaries are modeled as planar curves residing in 3D-space using an inverse perspective mapping, instead of the traditional tracking of lanes in the image space, i.e., the segmented lane boundary points are 3D points in a coordinate frame fixed to the vehicle that have a depth component and belong to a plane tangent to the vehicle's wheels, rather than 2D points in the image space without depth information. The measurement noise and disturbances due to vehicle vibrations are reduced using an extended Kalman filter that involves a 6-DOF motion model for the vehicle, as well as measurements about the road's banking and slope angles. Additional contributions of the paper include: (i) the comparison of textural features obtained from a bank of Gabor filters and from a GMRF model; and (ii) the experimental validation of the quadratic and cubic approximations to the clothoid model for the lane boundaries. The results show that the proposed approach performs better than the traditional gradient-based approach under different levels of difficulty caused by shadows and occlusions. PMID:23478598

  18. Human detection and tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengxian; Wei, Yaxun

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a method to segment moving human bodies. A self-adaptive background model is used to update the background image(so-called reference image). By calculating the Euclidean distance of corresponding points in the current and background image, we can check out the foreground objects. And the shadow can be detected and removed according to the characteristics of the shadow regions shown in HSV space. Finally, target tracking is implemented by calculating the relativity of color histogram between the moving areas in two succeeding images.

  19. Extreme Access & Lunar Ice Mining in Permanently Shadowed Craters Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Results from the recent LCROSS mission in 2010, indicate that H2O ice and other useful volatiles such as CO, He, and N are present in the permanently shadowed craters at the poles of the moon. However, the extreme topography and steep slopes of the crater walls make access a significant challenge. In addition temperatures have been measured at 40K (-233 C) so quick access and exit is desirable before the mining robot cold soaks. The Global Exploration Roadmap lists extreme access as a necessary technology for Lunar Exploration.

  20. How outliers become superstars: what shadow coaches do.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kevin W

    2012-01-01

    Physicians who score low on patient satisfaction surveys usually don't know what they're doing (or not doing) to cause below-average ratings. Too often, the temporary improvement gained from books and seminars dissipates as providers return to overloaded schedules and variability in patient expectations. Shadow coaching has proved effective for motivated physicians seeking more patient visits, better risk management, and high marks on the payer metrics that will soon affect qualification for Accountable Care, Medical Home, and favorable reimbursement.

  1. Nuclear Shadowing and Select d+Au Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeluyi, Adeola; Fai, George

    2007-04-01

    Much of the complexity of the description of d+Au collisions in the framework of perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics (pQCD) derives from effects of the nuclear environment. Here we investigate the effects of the most recent available nuclear shadowing parametrization, the Hirai-Kumano-Nagai (HKN) nuclear parton distribution functions (nPDFs) and the updated Albino-Kniehl-Kramer (AKK) fragmentation functions on three select d+Au collision observables. We compare our results to available experimental data from the STAR and BRAHMS collaborations.

  2. Under the shadow of Tuskegee: African Americans and health care.

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, V N

    1997-01-01

    The Tuskegee Syphilis Study continues to cast its long shadow on the contemporary relationship between African Americans and the biomedical community. Numerous reports have argued that the Tuskegee Syphilis Study is the most important reason why many African Americans distrust the institutions of medicine and public health. Such an interpretation neglects a critical historical point: the mistrust predated public revelations about the Tuskegee study. This paper places the syphilis study within a broader historical and social context to demonstrate that several factors have influenced--and continue to influence--African American's attitudes toward the biomedical community. PMID:9366634

  3. Testing the concept of drift shadow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paces, J.B.; Neymark, L.A.; Ghezzehei, T.; Dobson, P.F.

    2006-01-01

    If proven, the concept of drift shadow, a zone of reduced water content and slower ground-water travel time beneath openings in fractured rock of the unsaturated zone, may increase performance of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, To test this concept under natural-flow conditions present in the proposed repository horizon, isotopes within the uranium-series decay chain (uranium-238, uranium-234, and thorium-230, or 238U-234U-230Th) have been analyzed in samples of rock from beneath four naturally occurring lithophysal cavities. All rock samples show 234U depletion relative to parent 238U indicating varying degrees of water-rock interaction over the past million years. Variations in 234U/238U activity ratios indicate that depletion of 234U relative to 238U can be either smaller or greater in rock beneath cavity floors relative to rock near cavity margins. These results are consistent with the concept of drift shadow and with numerical simulations of meter-scale spherical cavities in fractured tuff. Differences in distribution patterns of 234U/ 238U activity ratios in rock beneath the cavity floors are interpreted to reflect differences in the amount of past seepage into lithophysal cavities, as indicated by the abundance of secondary mineral deposits present on the cavity floors.

  4. How Cold are the Floors of Lunar Polar Shadowed Craters?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendell, Wendell W.

    2010-01-01

    Almost five decades ago Watson, et al, [1] speculated that molecules of volatile species might accumulate within the cryogenic environments of permanently shadowed polar craters. The subject was largely a scientific curiosity until recently. In the mid-1980's, people began to seriously discuss the feasibility of long-term or permanent human settlement of the Moon. Given that the Moon was known be missing the compounds need to support life and that importing volatiles from Earth is prohibitively expensive, lunar colonists were pictured as processing the putative polar volatiles. A bistatic radar experiment performed with the Clementine spacecraft was interpreted to suggest the presence of large quantities of ice at some polar locations. [2] The neutron spectrometer aboard the Lunar Prospector spacecraft reported high concentrations of hydrogen in the polar regolith, [3] and some interpretations of the data set pointed to very high concentrations in permanently shadowed craters. The reformulation of civilian space policy in 2004, known as the Vision for Space Exploration, emphasized lunar exploration with eye toward development of economic returns from cislunar space and long-tern human presence on the Moon. The theme of finding lunar resources was an impetus for the inclusion of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Preliminary results from Diviner report an unexpectedly low temperature down to 35K in the depths of some craters. [4

  5. Testing the Concept of Drift Shadow at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J.B. Paces; L.A. Neymark; T. Ghezzehei; P.F. Dobson

    2006-03-10

    If proven, the concept of drift shadow, a zone of reduced water content and slower ground-water travel time beneath openings in fractured rock of the unsaturated zone, may increase performance of a proposed geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. To test this concept under natural-flow conditions present in the proposed repository horizon, isotopes within the uranium-series decay chain (uranium-238, uranium-234, and thorium-230, or {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th) have been analyzed in samples of rock from beneath four naturally occurring lithophysal cavities. All samples show {sup 234}U depletion relative to parent {sup 238}U, indicating varying degrees of water-rock interaction over the past million years. Variations in {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios indicate that depletion of {sup 234}U relative to {sup 238}U can be either smaller or greater in rock beneath cavity floors relative to rock near cavity margins. These results are consistent with the concept of drift shadow and with numerical simulations of meter-scale spherical cavities in fractured tuff. Differences in distribution patterns of {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratios in rock beneath the cavity floors are interpreted to reflect differences in the amount of past seepage into lithophysal cavities, as indicated by the abundance of secondary mineral deposits present on the cavity floors.

  6. Implicit encoding of extrinsic object properties in stored representations mediating recognition: evidence from shadow-specific repetition priming.

    PubMed

    Leek, E Charles; Davitt, Lina I; Cristino, Filipe

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated whether, and under what conditions, stored shape representations mediating recognition encode extrinsic object properties that vary according to viewing conditions. This was examined in relation to cast shadow. Observers (N = 90) first memorised a subset of 3D multi-part novel objects from a limited range of viewpoints rendered with either no shadow, object internal shadow, or both object internal and external (ground) plane shadow. During a subsequent test phase previously memorised targets were discriminated from visually similar distractors across learned and novel views following brief presentation of a same-shape masked prime. The primes contained either matching or mismatching shadow rendering from the training condition. The results showed a recognition advantage for objects memorised with object internal shadow. In addition, objects encoded with internal shadow were primed more strongly by matching internal shadow primes, than by same shape primes with either no shadow or both object internal and external (ground) shadow. This pattern of priming effects generalises to previously unseen views of targets rendered with object internal shadow. The results suggest that the object recognition system contains a level of stored representation at which shape and the extrinsic object property of cast shadow are bound. We propose that this occurs when cast shadow cannot be discounted during perception on the basis of external cues to the scene lighting model.

  7. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise "Violin-Mode" shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ˜100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral "Violin-Mode" resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8 × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a "reverse Galilean" telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre's shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre's shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in anti-phase in the

  8. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise “Violin-Mode” shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-01-15

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral “Violin-Mode” resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors—one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension—comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors—these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a “reverse Galilean” telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre’s shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre’s shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector—even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in

  9. A step-wise steerable source of illumination for low-noise "Violin-Mode" shadow sensors, intended for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-01-01

    A steerable low-noise source of illumination is described for shadow-sensors having a displacement sensitivity of ∼100 pm (rms)/√Hz, at 500 Hz, over a measuring span of at least ±0.5 mm. These sensors were designed to detect lateral "Violin-Mode" resonances in the highly tensioned fused-silica suspension fibres of the test-masses/mirrors for the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory gravitational wave detectors. The shadow sensors-one intended for each of the four fibres in a suspension-comprised a source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation (emitter) and a differential shadow-displacement sensor (detector), these bracketing the fibre under test. The suspension fibres themselves were approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm in diameter, and when illuminated from the side, they cast narrow, vertical, shadows onto their respective detectors-these being located at an effective distance of 50 fibre diameters behind the axes of the fibres themselves. The emitter described here was designed to compensate for a significant degree of mechanical drift or creep over time in the mean position of its suspension fibre. This was achieved by employing five adjacent columns of 8  × miniature NIR LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes, λ = 890 nm), with one column being activated at a time. When used in conjunction with a "reverse Galilean" telescope, the LED sources allowed the collimated beam from the emitter to be steered azimuthally in fine angular increments (0.65°), causing the fibre's shadow to move laterally, in a step-wise manner, across the plane of its facing detector. Each step in shadow position was approximately 0.23 mm in size, and this allowed the fibre's shadow to be re-centred, so as to bridge once again both elements of its photodiode detector-even if the fibre was off-centred by as much as ±0.5 mm. Re-centring allowed Violin-Mode vibrations of the fibre to be sensed once again as differential AC photocurrents, these flowing in anti-phase in the two

  10. Observing the shadow of Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao E-mail: liuyx@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the shadows cast by Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton-Axion black hole and naked singularity are studied. The shadow of a rotating black hole is found to be a dark zone covered by a deformed circle. For a fixed value of the spin a, the size of the shadow decreases with the dilaton parameter b. The distortion of the shadow monotonically increases with b and takes its maximal when the black hole approaches to the extremal case. Due to the optical properties, the area of the black hole shadow is supposed to equal to the high-energy absorption cross section. Based on this assumption, the energy emission rate is investigated. For a naked singularity, the shadow has a dark arc and a dark spot or straight, and the corresponding observables are obtained. These results show that there is a significant effect of the spin a and dilaton parameter b on these shadows. Moreover, we examine the observables of the shadow cast by the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, which is very useful for us to probe the nature of the black hole through the astronomical observations in the near future.

  11. The Link between Speech Perception and Production Is Phonological and Abstract: Evidence from the Shadowing Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitterer, Holger; Ernestus, Mirjam

    2008-01-01

    This study reports a shadowing experiment, in which one has to repeat a speech stimulus as fast as possible. We tested claims about a direct link between perception and production based on speech gestures, and obtained two types of counterevidence. First, shadowing is not slowed down by a gestural mismatch between stimulus and response. Second,…

  12. Implementation and Evaluation of a Shadow Program for PharmD Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucci, Kathryn K.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A program in which first-year pharmacy students "shadowed" fourth-year students in clerkships for a day found the shadowing experienced did not significantly improve students' ability to master course objectives, but the introduction of younger students to practice areas of pharmacy was seen as very beneficial. (Author/MSE)

  13. Working in and between Two Cultures: Moon Shadow's Dilemma in Laurence Yep's "Dragonwings."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baghban, Marcia

    Laurence Yep's "Dragonwings" won the Newbery Award in 1976. It is the story of a young boy named Moon Shadow and his physical and emotional journeys between Chinese and American cultures. Through Moon Shadow's experiences upon entering the United States as an immigrant, the reader empathizes with him on 3 levels: the perception of…

  14. Presence of Gumprecht shadows (smudge cells) in bovine leukemia virus-positive cattle.

    PubMed

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Larsen, Alejandra; González, Ester Teresa; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a chronic disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Smudge cells, also known as Gumprecht shadows, are not simple artifacts of slide preparation, but ragged lymphoid cells found mainly in peripheral blood smears from human patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, we report the presence of Gumprecht shadows in peripheral blood from BLV-positive cattle.

  15. The Shadow: Mining Its Dark Treasury for Teaching and Adult Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpiak, Irene E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores the psychological shadow--the disowned self--as one of the hidden, unconscious elements in adult and continuing education, often underlying those inexplicable emotional reactions that transpire in instructor/learner interactions. Drawing on the literature related to the psychological shadow, teaching/learning, and adult…

  16. Shadow Education, American Style: Test Preparation, the SAT and College Enrollment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchmann, Claudia; Condron, Dennis J.; Roscigno, Vincent J.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-national research finds that "shadow education"--educational activities outside of formal schooling--tends to confer advantages on already privileged students. Shadow education in the United States, such as test prep for college entrance exams, has received considerably less attention. Drawing on the National Education Longitudinal…

  17. A Historical Approach to the Teaching of the Linear Propagation of Light, Shadows and Pinhole Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihas, Pavlos; Andreadis, Panagiotis

    2005-01-01

    In this paper are presented the views of Al Haytham and his predecessors on the shadows, the rectilinear propagation of rays and the images produced by pinholes. Al Haytham had given erroneous views on the distribution of light in the shadows. Educational applications of these are presented. These applications concern: (a) Simple experiments (b)…

  18. A Study on Building an Efficient Job Shadowing Management Methodology for the Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakoda, Koichi; Takahashi, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes heuristic knowledge through the job-shadowing project at the International University of Kagoshima, Japan. Job shadowing is one of the conventional in-house trainings given to the executive trainee cadets in North America and proved the effect of training in Leonard's paper for the conventional target such as the executive…

  19. Measurement Issues in Research on Shadow Education: Challenges and Pitfalls Encountered in TIMSS and PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Mark; Kobakhidze, Magda Nutsa

    2014-01-01

    Expanding numbers of researchers are focusing on the scale and impact of private supplementary tutoring. Such tutoring is widely called shadow education, since much of its curriculum mimics that of regular schooling. Although shadow education has expanded significantly worldwide and is now recognized to have far-reaching significance, research…

  20. Discursive Shadowing in Linguistic Ethnography. Situated Practices and Circulating Discourses in Multilingual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewilde, Joke; Creese, Angela

    2016-01-01

    We consider discursive shadowing as methodology in linguistic ethnography and how it refines our analyses of participants' situated practices. In addition to the constant and extended company the researcher and key participant keep with one another in the field, shadowing in a linguistic ethnographic approach includes the ubiquitous…

  1. Regulatory elements of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS identified by phylogenetic footprinting and shadowing.

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, R. L., Hamaguchi, L., Busch, M. A., and Weigel, D.

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 In Arabidopsis thaliana, cis-regulatory sequences of the floral homeotic gene AGAMOUS (AG) are located in the second intron. This 3 kb intron contains binding sites for two direct activators of AG, LEAFY (LFY) and WUSCHEL (WUS), along with other putative regulatory elements. We have used phylogenetic footprinting and the related technique of phylogenetic shadowing to identify putative cis-regulatory elements in this intron. Among 29 Brassicaceae, several other motifs, but not the LFY and WUS binding sites previously identified, are largely invariant. Using reporter gene analyses, we tested six of these motifs and found that they are all functionally important for activity of AG regulatory sequences in A. thaliana. Although there is little obvious sequence similarity outside the Brassicaceae, the intron from cucumber AG has at least partial activity in A. thaliana. Our studies underscore the value of the comparative approach as a tool that complements gene-by-gene promoter dissection, but also highlight that sequence-based studies alone are insufficient for a complete identification of cis-regulatory sites.

  2. Shadowing effects in Newton’s law from compact extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidis, K.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-10-01

    One problem that appears in theories with compact extra dimensions is the shadowing phenomenon, which makes it difficult to identify the topology and the geometry of the extra-dimensional manifold, if it exists. In this paper, we address this problem from the perspective of Newton’s law modifications caused by compact extra dimensions. After providing the modifications cause by some of the most phenomenologically interesting compact manifolds, we qualitatively study and compare the modifications that these manifolds cause to Newton’s law. As we demonstrate, the shadowing phenomenon persists in this approach too, and it seems that the shadowing phenomenon is grouped in “shadowing zones”. At these points, it is impossible to distinguish which compact space causes the modification of Newton’s law. However, away from the shadowing zones, the effects of the different compact manifolds are distinguishable. It is possible that these effects can be observed in the next generation of Newton’s law experiments.

  3. Krüppel expression levels are maintained through compensatory evolution of shadow enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D.J.; Vincent, Ben J.; White, Jonathan A.; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers, pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We find that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is activated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation. PMID:26344774

  4. Krüppel Expression Levels Are Maintained through Compensatory Evolution of Shadow Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Wunderlich, Zeba; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Vincent, Ben J; White, Jonathan A; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-09-22

    Many developmental genes are controlled by shadow enhancers—pairs of enhancers that drive overlapping expression patterns. We hypothesized that compensatory evolution can maintain the total expression of a gene, while individual shadow enhancers diverge between species. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed expression driven by orthologous pairs of shadow enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster, Drosophila yakuba, and Drosophila pseudoobscura that control expression of Krüppel, a transcription factor that patterns the anterior-posterior axis of blastoderm embryos. We found that the expression driven by the pair of enhancers is conserved between these three species, but expression levels driven by the individual enhancers are not. Using sequence analysis and experimental perturbation, we show that each shadow enhancer is regulated by different transcription factors. These results support the hypothesis that compensatory evolution can occur between shadow enhancers, which has implications for mechanistic and evolutionary studies of gene regulation.

  5. Uniformity Masks Design Method Based on the Shadow Matrix for Coating Materials with Different Condensation Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    An intuitionistic method is proposed to design shadow masks to achieve thickness profile control for evaporation coating processes. The proposed method is based on the concept of the shadow matrix, which is a matrix that contains coefficients that build quantitive relations between shape parameters of masks and shadow quantities of substrate directly. By using the shadow matrix, shape parameters of shadow masks could be derived simply by solving a matrix equation. Verification experiments were performed on a special case where coating materials have different condensation characteristics. By using the designed mask pair with complementary shapes, thickness uniformities of better than 98% are demonstrated for MgF2 (m = 1) and LaF3 (m = 0.5) simultaneously on a 280 mm diameter spherical substrate with the radius curvature of 200 mm. PMID:24227996

  6. Probe of the Solar Magnetic Field Using the ``Cosmic-Ray Shadow'' of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenomori, M.; Bi, X. J.; Chen, D.; Chen, T. L.; Chen, W. Y.; Cui, S. W.; Danzengluobu; Ding, L. K.; Feng, C. F.; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z. Y.; Gou, Q. B.; Guo, Y. Q.; Hakamada, K.; He, H. H.; He, Z. T.; Hibino, K.; Hotta, N.; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H. B.; Huang, J.; Jia, H. Y.; Jiang, L.; Kajino, F.; Kasahara, K.; Katayose, Y.; Kato, C.; Kawata, K.; Labaciren; Le, G. M.; Li, A. F.; Li, H. J.; Li, W. J.; Liu, C.; Liu, J. S.; Liu, M. Y.; Lu, H.; Meng, X. R.; Mizutani, K.; Munakata, K.; Nanjo, H.; Nishizawa, M.; Ohnishi, M.; Ohta, I.; Onuma, H.; Ozawa, S.; Qian, X. L.; Qu, X. B.; Saito, T.; Saito, T. Y.; Sakata, M.; Sako, T. K.; Shao, J.; Shibata, M.; Shiomi, A.; Shirai, T.; Sugimoto, H.; Takita, M.; Tan, Y. H.; Tateyama, N.; Torii, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Udo, S.; Wang, H.; Wu, H. R.; Xue, L.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yasue, S.; Yuan, A. F.; Yuda, T.; Zhai, L. M.; Zhang, H. M.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X. X.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a clear solar-cycle variation of the Sun’s shadow in the 10 TeV cosmic-ray flux observed by the Tibet air shower array during a full solar cycle from 1996 to 2009. In order to clarify the physical implications of the observed solar cycle variation, we develop numerical simulations of the Sun’s shadow, using the potential field source surface model and the current sheet source surface (CSSS) model for the coronal magnetic field. We find that the intensity deficit in the simulated Sun’s shadow is very sensitive to the coronal magnetic field structure, and the observed variation of the Sun’s shadow is better reproduced by the CSSS model. This is the first successful attempt to evaluate the coronal magnetic field models by using the Sun’s shadow observed in the TeV cosmic-ray flux.

  7. Reducing radiation dose to the female breast during CT coronary angiography: A simulation study comparing breast shielding, angular tube current modulation, reduced kV, and partial angle protocols using an unknown-location signal-detectability metric

    SciTech Connect

    Rupcich, Franco; Gilat Schmidt, Taly; Badal, Andreu; Popescu, Lucretiu M.; Kyprianou, Iacovos

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The authors compared the performance of five protocols intended to reduce dose to the breast during computed tomography (CT) coronary angiography scans using a model observer unknown-location signal-detectability metric.Methods: The authors simulated CT images of an anthropomorphic female thorax phantom for a 120 kV reference protocol and five “dose reduction” protocols intended to reduce dose to the breast: 120 kV partial angle (posteriorly centered), 120 kV tube-current modulated (TCM), 120 kV with shielded breasts, 80 kV, and 80 kV partial angle (posteriorly centered). Two image quality tasks were investigated: the detection and localization of 4-mm, 3.25 mg/ml and 1-mm, 6.0 mg/ml iodine contrast signals randomly located in the heart region. For each protocol, the authors plotted the signal detectability, as quantified by the area under the exponentially transformed free response characteristic curve estimator (A-caret{sub FE}), as well as noise and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) versus breast and lung dose. In addition, the authors quantified each protocol's dose performance as the percent difference in dose relative to the reference protocol achieved while maintaining equivalent A-caret{sub FE}.Results: For the 4-mm signal-size task, the 80 kV full scan and 80 kV partial angle protocols decreased dose to the breast (80.5% and 85.3%, respectively) and lung (80.5% and 76.7%, respectively) with A-caret{sub FE} = 0.96, but also resulted in an approximate three-fold increase in image noise. The 120 kV partial protocol reduced dose to the breast (17.6%) at the expense of increased lung dose (25.3%). The TCM algorithm decreased dose to the breast (6.0%) and lung (10.4%). Breast shielding increased breast dose (67.8%) and lung dose (103.4%). The 80 kV and 80 kV partial protocols demonstrated greater dose reductions for the 4-mm task than for the 1-mm task, and the shielded protocol showed a larger increase in dose for the 4-mm task than for the 1-mm task

  8. Detection of melamine in milk powders using Near-Infrared Hyperspectral imaging combined with regression coefficient of partial least square regression model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Illegal use of nitrogen-rich melamine (C3H6N6) to boost perceived protein content of food products such as milk, infant formula, frozen yogurt, pet food, biscuits, and coffee drinks has caused serious food safety problems. Conventional methods to detect melamine in foods, such as Enzyme-linked immun...

  9. Effects of Steering and Shadowing in Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amar, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    While shadowing has been known to play a role in some thin-film deposition processes, until recently it has been assumed that in epitaxial growth the effects of steering and shadowing are negligible. Here we present analytical and molecular dynamics results describing the effects of steering due to the short-range and long-range van der Waals (vdW) attraction in metal (100), (111) and (110) epitaxial growth. Our results lead to a general picture of the process of deposition near step-edges^1,2 which is quite different from the standard downward funneling picture. In particular, we find that short-range attraction plays an important role not only before but also after collision with the step. As a result, it can significantly enhance the uphill current, selected mound angle, and surface roughness in epitaxial growth. In the case of deposition on metal (111) and (110) surfaces we also find a significant asymmetry between the interaction at A and B steps which may be explained by differences in the step geometry. General expressions for the surface current and selected mound angle valid for arbitrary crystal geometry are also presented. We have also calculated the vdW constant describing the long-range interaction between a Cu atom and a Cu(100) surface.^3 Our result is large enough to explain recent observations^4 of a significant increase in mound angle in Cu/Cu(100) growth for large angles of incidence (θ> 50^o) and also indicates that for smaller angles of incidence the dominant effects are due to the short-range rather than to the long-range interaction. Finally, we discuss the effects of shadowing in oblique incidence epitaxial growth and its implications for the control of nanoscale patterning.1. J. Yu and J.G. Amar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 286103 (2002).2. J. Yu and J.G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 69, 045426 (2004).3. J.G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 67, 165425 (2003).4. S. van Dijken et al, Phys. Rev. B 61, 14047 (2000).

  10. Modeling of global variations and ring shadowing in Saturn's ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L. E.; Mendillo, M.; Müller-Wodarg, I. C. F.; Murr, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional model of Saturn's ionosphere has been developed as an intermediate step towards a fully coupled Saturn Thermosphere-Ionosphere Model (STIM). A global circulation model (GCM) of the thermosphere provides the latitude and local time dependent neutral atmosphere, from which a globally varying ionosphere is calculated. Four ion species are used (H +, H +2, H +3, and He +) with current cross-sections and reaction rates, and the SOLAR2000 model for the Sun's irradiance. Occultation data from the Voyager photopolarimeter system (PPS) are adapted to model the radial profile of the ultraviolet (UV) optical depth of the rings. Diurnal electron density peak values and heights are generated for all latitudes and two seasons under solar minimum and solar maximum conditions, both with and without shadowing from the rings. Saturn's lower ionosphere is shown to be in photochemical equilibrium, whereas diffusive processes are important in the topside. In agreement with previous 1-D models, the ionosphere is dominated by H + and H +3, with a peak electron density of ˜10 electrons cm -3. At low- and mid-latitudes, H + is the dominant ion, and the electron density exhibits a diurnal maximum during the mid-afternoon. At higher latitudes and shadowed latitudes (smaller ionizing fluxes), the diurnal maximum retreats towards noon, and the ratio of [H +]/[H +3] decreases, with H +3 becoming the dominant ion at altitudes near the peak (˜1200-1600 km) for noon-time hours. Shadowing from the rings leads to attenuation of solar flux, the magnitude and latitudinal structure of which is seasonal. During solstice, the season for the Cassini spacecraft's encounter with Saturn, attenuation has a maximum of two orders of magnitude, causing a reduction in modeled peak electron densities and total electron column contents by as much as a factor of three. Calculations are performed that explore the parameter space for charge-exchange reactions of H + with

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of a novel 22- to 25-kilodalton glycoprotein of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in biopsy material and partial characterization by using species-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A; Allen, M; Hay, R

    1994-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA] and Western blot [immunoblot]) were produced by using a modification of standard hybridization protocols, with cyclophosphamide included as an immunomodulator to abolish responses to highly cross-reactive immunodominant epitopes. MAbs PS14 and PS15 are two different clones which exhibit similar characteristics by ELISA and Western blot. They are directed against a 22- to 25-kDa antigen which is present in P. brasiliensis and which could not be identified in other dimorphic fungi by ELISA or Western blot. Partial purification of the antigen was accomplished by isoelectric focusing, and deglycosylation studies suggested that the 22- to 25-kDa antigen is a glycoprotein with a pI of between 4.5 and 5 and that O-linked sugars may be part of the recognized epitope. The MAbs stained the cytoplasm of P. brasiliensis yeast and hyphal cells in cryostat sections of fresh cultures of the fungus. In addition, the MAbs stained the wall of paracoccidioidomycotic granulomas, as well as the cytoplasm of the fungus, as determined by the use of immunofluorescence, immunoperoxidase, and immuno-alkaline phosphatase staining techniques in paraffin-embedded sections of human biopsy material, and they failed to stain granulomas resulting from other clinical conditions. These findings suggest that these MAbs have potential use in the immunohistochemical identification of P. brasiliensis. Images PMID:8077405

  12. Analysis of the Sensitivity of K-Type Molecular Sieve-Deposited MWNTs for the Detection of SF6 Decomposition Gases under Partial Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xin; Luo, Chenchen; Dong, Xingchen; Zhou, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely utilized in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS). However, part of SF6 decomposes into different components under partial discharge (PD) conditions. Previous research has shown that the gas responses of intrinsic and 4 Å-type molecular sieve-deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to SOF2 and SO2F2, two important decomposition components of SF6, are not obvious. In this study, a K-type molecular sieve-deposited MWNTs sensor was developed. Its gas response characteristics and the influence of the mixture ratios of gases on the gas-sensing properties were studied. The results showed that, for sensors with gas mixture ratios of 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1, the resistance change rate increased by nearly 13.0% after SOF2 adsorption, almost 10 times that of MWNTs sensors, while the sensors’ resistance change rate with a mixture ratio of 10:1 reached 17.3% after SO2F2 adsorption, nearly nine times that of intrinsic MWNT sensors. Besides, a good linear relationship was observed between concentration of decomposition components and the resistance change rate of sensors. PMID:26569245

  13. Analysis of the Sensitivity of K-Type Molecular Sieve-Deposited MWNTs for the Detection of SF₆ Decomposition Gases under Partial Discharge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xin; Luo, Chenchen; Dong, Xingchen; Zhou, Lei

    2015-11-11

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely utilized in gas-insulated switchgear (GIS). However, part of SF6 decomposes into different components under partial discharge (PD) conditions. Previous research has shown that the gas responses of intrinsic and 4 Å-type molecular sieve-deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) to SOF2 and SO2F2, two important decomposition components of SF6, are not obvious. In this study, a K-type molecular sieve-deposited MWNTs sensor was developed. Its gas response characteristics and the influence of the mixture ratios of gases on the gas-sensing properties were studied. The results showed that, for sensors with gas mixture ratios of 5:1, 10:1, and 20:1, the resistance change rate increased by nearly 13.0% after SOF2 adsorption, almost 10 times that of MWNTs sensors, while the sensors' resistance change rate with a mixture ratio of 10:1 reached 17.3% after SO2F2 adsorption, nearly nine times that of intrinsic MWNT sensors. Besides, a good linear relationship was observed between concentration of decomposition components and the resistance change rate of sensors.

  14. Perception of the Motion Trajectory of Objects from Moving Cast Shadows in Infant Japanese Macaques ("Macaca fuscata")

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imura, Tomoko; Adachi, Ikuma; Hattori, Yuko; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    The shadows cast by moving objects enable human adults and infants to infer the motion trajectories of objects. Nonhuman animals must also be able to discriminate between objects and their shadows and infer the spatial layout of objects from cast shadows. However, the evolutionary and comparative developmental origins of sensitivity to cast…

  15. Detection and partial discrimination of atypical and classical bovine spongiform encephalopathies in cattle and primates using real-time quaking-induced conversion assay

    PubMed Central

    Levavasseur, Etienne; Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Comoy, Emmanuel; Culeux, Audrey; Grznarova, Katarina; Privat, Nicolas; Simoneau, Steve; Flan, Benoit; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Seilhean, Danielle; Baron, Thierry; Haïk, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The transmission of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE) through contaminated meat product consumption is responsible for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans. More recent and atypical forms of BSE (L-BSE and H-BSE) have been identified in cattle since the C-BSE epidemic. Their low incidence and advanced age of onset are compatible with a sporadic origin, as are most cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Transmissions studies in primates and transgenic mice expressing a human prion protein (PrP) indicated that atypical forms of BSE may be associated with a higher zoonotic potential than classical BSE, and require particular attention for public health. Recently, methods designed to amplify misfolded forms of PrP have emerged as promising tools to detect prion strains and to study their diversity. Here, we validated real-time quaking-induced conversion assay for the discrimination of atypical and classical BSE strains using a large series of bovine samples encompassing all the atypical BSE cases detected by the French Centre of Reference during 10 years of exhaustive active surveillance. We obtained a 100% sensitivity and specificity for atypical BSE detection. In addition, the assay was able to discriminate atypical and classical BSE in non-human primates, and also sporadic CJD and vCJD in humans. The RT-QuIC assay appears as a practical means for a reliable detection of atypical BSE strains in a homologous or heterologous PrP context. PMID:28231300

  16. Least Squares Shadowing sensitivity analysis of chaotic limit cycle oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiqi; Hu, Rui; Blonigan, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The adjoint method, among other sensitivity analysis methods, can fail in chaotic dynamical systems. The result from these methods can be too large, often by orders of magnitude, when the result is the derivative of a long time averaged quantity. This failure is known to be caused by ill-conditioned initial value problems. This paper overcomes this failure by replacing the initial value problem with the well-conditioned "least squares shadowing (LSS) problem". The LSS problem is then linearized in our sensitivity analysis algorithm, which computes a derivative that converges to the derivative of the infinitely long time average. We demonstrate our algorithm in several dynamical systems exhibiting both periodic and chaotic oscillations.

  17. Practical applications of thin films nanostructured by shadowing growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi

    2012-10-01

    Even prior to the recent advent of advanced top-down processes, shadowing growth by oblique angle deposition (OAD) has long been providing self-assembled nanostructures over much larger areas for much lower costs. In the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the development of well-controlled three-dimensional nanomorphologies such as zigzags and helixes. Much effort has been put into theoretical and numerical understanding of the growth mechanism to improve morphology. Many researchers in academia have been investigating useful properties of nanocolumnar thin films in their laboratories. However, most companies seem hesitant to introduce OAD techniques into the factory owing to the prejudice that the OAD thin films are neither durable nor reproducible. In this review article, we discuss the progress in OAD technology for practical applications.

  18. Practical applications of thin films nanostructured by shadowing growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Motofumi

    2013-01-01

    Even prior to the recent advent of advanced top-down processes, shadowing growth by oblique angle deposition (OAD) has long been providing self-assembled nanostructures over much larger areas for much lower costs. In the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the development of well-controlled three-dimensional nanomorphologies such as zigzags and helixes. Much effort has been put into theoretical and numerical understanding of the growth mechanism to improve morphology. Many researchers in academia have been investigating useful properties of nanocolumnar thin films in their laboratories. However, most companies seem hesitant to introduce OAD techniques into the factory, owing to the prejudice that the OAD thin films are neither durable nor reproducible. The progress in OAD technology for practical applications is reviewed and discussed.

  19. Shadow enhancers enable Hunchback bifunctionality in the Drosophila embryo.

    PubMed

    Staller, Max V; Vincent, Ben J; Bragdon, Meghan D J; Lydiard-Martin, Tara; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H

    2015-01-20

    Hunchback (Hb) is a bifunctional transcription factor that activates and represses distinct enhancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Hb can activate and repress the same enhancer. Computational models predicted that Hb bifunctionally regulates the even-skipped (eve) stripe 3+7 enhancer (eve3+7) in Drosophila blastoderm embryos. We measured and modeled eve expression at cellular resolution under multiple genetic perturbations and found that the eve3+7 enhancer could not explain endogenous eve stripe 7 behavior. Instead, we found that eve stripe 7 is controlled by two enhancers: the canonical eve3+7 and a sequence encompassing the minimal eve stripe 2 enhancer (eve2+7). Hb bifunctionally regulates eve stripe 7, but it executes these two activities on different pieces of regulatory DNA--it activates the eve2+7 enhancer and represses the eve3+7 enhancer. These two "shadow enhancers" use different regulatory logic to create the same pattern.

  20. Least Squares Shadowing sensitivity analysis of chaotic limit cycle oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiqi Hu, Rui Blonigan, Patrick

    2014-06-15

    The adjoint method, among other sensitivity analysis methods, can fail in chaotic dynamical systems. The result from these methods can be too large, often by orders of magnitude, when the result is the derivative of a long time averaged quantity. This failure is known to be caused by ill-conditioned initial value problems. This paper overcomes this failure by replacing the initial value problem with the well-conditioned “least squares shadowing (LSS) problem”. The LSS problem is then linearized in our sensitivity analysis algorithm, which computes a derivative that converges to the derivative of the infinitely long time average. We demonstrate our algorithm in several dynamical systems exhibiting both periodic and chaotic oscillations.

  1. Load-cell based characterization system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre's holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated.

  2. Load-cell based characterization system for a "Violin-Mode" shadow-sensor in advanced LIGO suspensions.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, N A; Tokmakov, K V

    2016-07-01

    The background to this work was a prototype shadow sensor, which was designed for retro-fitting to an advanced LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) test-mass/mirror suspension, in which 40 kg test-mass/mirrors are each suspended by four approximately 600 mm long by 0.4 mm diameter fused-silica suspension fibres. The shadow sensor comprised a LED source of Near InfraRed (NIR) radiation and a rectangular silicon photodiode detector, which, together, were to bracket the fibre under test. The aim was to detect transverse Violin-Mode resonances in the suspension fibres. Part of the testing procedure involved tensioning a silica fibre sample and translating it transversely through the illuminating NIR beam, so as to measure the DC responsivity of the detection system to fibre displacement. However, an equally important part of the procedure, reported here, was to keep the fibre under test stationary within the beam, whilst trying to detect low-level AC Violin-Mode resonances excited on the fibre, in order to confirm the primary function of the sensor. Therefore, a tensioning system, incorporating a load-cell readout, was built into the test fibre's holder. The fibre then was excited by a signal generator, audio power amplifier, and distant loudspeaker, and clear resonances were detected. A theory for the expected fundamental resonant frequency as a function of fibre tension was developed and is reported here, and this theory was found to match closely with the detected resonant frequencies as they varied with tension. Consequently, the resonances seen were identified as being proper Violin-Mode fundamental resonances of the fibre, and the operation of the Violin-Mode detection system was validated.

  3. Galileo in-situ dust measurements and the sculpting of Jupiter's gossamer rings by its shadow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Harald; Hamilton, Douglas P.; Moissl, Richard; Grün, Eberhard

    2008-09-01

    Galileo was the first articfiial satellite to orbit Jupiter. During its late orbital mission the spacecraft made two passages through the giant planet's gossamer ring system. The highly sensitive impact-ionization dust detector on board successfully recorded dust impacts during both ring passages and provided the first in-situ measurements from a dusty planetary ring. During the first passage { on 5 November 2002 while Galileo was approaching Jupiter - dust measurements were collected until a spacecraft anomaly at 2:33RJ (Jupiter radii) just 16 min after a close flyby of Amalthea put the spacecraft into a safing mode. The second ring passage on 21 September 2003 provided ring dust measurements down to about 2:5RJ and the Galileo spacecraft was destroyed shortly thereafter in a planned impact with Jupiter. In all, a few thousand dust impacts were counted with the instrument accumulators during both ring passages, but only a total of 110 complete data sets of dust impacts were transmitted to Earth (Krüger et al, Icarus, submitted). Detected particle sizes range from about 0.2 to 5 μm, extending the known size distribution by an order of magnitude towards smaller particles than previously derived from optical imaging (Showalter et al., Icarus 2008). The grain size distribution increases towards smaller particles and shows an excess of these tiny motes in the Amalthea gossamer ring compared to the Thebe ring. The size distribution for the Amalthea ring derived from our in-situ measurements for the small grains agrees very well with the one obtained from images for large grains. Our analysis shows that particles contributing most to the optical cross-section are approximately 5 μm in radius, in agreement with imaging results. The measurements indicate a large drop in particle ux immediately interior to Thebe's orbit and some detected particles seem to be on highly-tilted orbits with inclinations up to 20°. Finally, the faint Thebe ring extension was detected out to

  4. Hadron Diffractive Production at Ultrahigh Energies and Shadow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.

    Shadow effects at collisions of hadrons with light nuclei at high energies were subject of scientific interest of V.N. Gribov, first, we mean his study of the hadron-deuteron scattering, see Sov. Phys. JETP 29, 483 (1969) [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 56, 892 (1969)] and discovery of the reinforcement of shadowing due to inelastic diffractive rescatterings. It turns out that the similar effect exists on hadron level though at ultrahigh energies... Diffractive production is considered in the ultrahigh energy region where pomeron exchange amplitudes are transformed into black disk ones due to rescattering corrections. The corresponding corrections in hadron reactions h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 with small momenta transferred (q^2_{1 to 1} m^2/ ln^2 s, q^2_{3 to 3} m^2/ ln^2 s) are calculated in terms of the K-matrix technique modified for ultrahigh energies. Small values of the momenta transferred are crucial for introducing equations for amplitudes. The three-body equation for hadron diffractive production reaction h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 is written and solved precisely in the eikonal approach. In the black disk regime final state scattering processes do not change the shapes of amplitudes principally but dump amplitudes by a factor 1/4 initial state rescatterings result in additional factor 1/2. In the resonant disk regime initial and final state scatterings damp strongly the production amplitude that corresponds to σ_{inel}/σ_{tot} to 0 at √{s}to ∞ in this mode.

  5. Hadron diffractive production at ultrahigh energies and shadow effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Matveev, M. A.; Nikonov, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Shadow effects at collisions of hadrons with light nuclei at high energies were subject of scientific interest of V.N. Gribov, first, we mean his study of the hadron-deuteron scattering, see Sov. Phys. JETP 29, 483 (1969) [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 56, 892 (1969)] and discovery of the reinforcement of shadowing due to inelastic diffractive rescatterings. It turns out that the similar effect exists on hadron level though at ultrahigh energies. Diffractive production is considered in the ultrahigh energy region where pomeron exchange amplitudes are transformed into black disk ones due to rescattering corrections. The corresponding corrections in hadron reactions h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 with small momenta transferred (q1→12 ˜ m2/ln2s, q3→32 ˜ m2/ln2s) are calculated in terms of the K-matrix technique modified for ultrahigh energies. Small values of the momenta transferred are crucial for introducing equations for amplitudes. The three-body equation for hadron diffractive production reaction h1 + h3 → h1 + h2 + h3 is written and solved precisely in the eikonal approach. In the black disk regime final state scattering processes do not change the shapes of amplitudes principally but dump amplitudes by a factor ˜ 1 4; initial state rescatterings result in additional factor ˜ 1 2. In the resonant disk regime initial and final state scatterings damp strongly the production amplitude that corresponds to σinel/σtot → 0 at s →∞ in this mode.

  6. The 0.5-2.22 micrometer Scattered Light Spectrum of the Disk around TW Hya: Detection of a Partially Filled Disk Gap at 80 AU*

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2 micrometer scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances greater than 40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at approximately 80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady a-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are selfconsistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 solar mass.

  7. THE 0.5-2.22 {mu}m SCATTERED LIGHT SPECTRUM OF THE DISK AROUND TW Hya: DETECTION OF A PARTIALLY FILLED DISK GAP AT 80 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Debes, John H.; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Roberge, Aki; Schneider, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    We present a 0.5-2.2 {mu}m scattered light spectrum of the circumstellar disk around TW Hya from a combination of spatially resolved Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectroscopy and NICMOS coronagraphic images of the disk. We investigate the morphology of the disk at distances >40 AU over this wide range of wavelengths, and identify the presence of a depression in surface brightness at {approx}80 AU that could be caused by a gap in the disk. Additionally, we quantify the surface brightness, azimuthal symmetry, and spectral character of the disk as a function of radius. Our analysis shows that the scattering efficiency of the dust is largely neutral to blue over the observed wavelengths. We model the disk as a steady {alpha}-disk with an ad hoc gap structure. The thermal properties of the disk are self-consistently calculated using a three-dimensional radiative transfer code that uses ray tracing to model the heating of the disk interior and scattered light images. We find a good fit to the data over a wide range of distances from the star if we use a model disk with a partially filled gap of 30% depth at 80 AU and with a self-similar truncation knee at 100 AU. The origin of the gap is unclear, but it could arise from a transition in the nature of the disk's dust composition or the presence of a planetary companion. Based on scalings to previous hydrodynamic simulations of gap-opening criteria for embedded proto-planets, we estimate that a planetary companion forming the gap could have a mass between 6 and 28 M{sub Circled-Plus }.

  8. Shadow masked organometallic vapor phase epitaxy for advanced micro-optical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2000-12-01

    This thesis presents novel techniques and applications of nonplanar chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for optoelectronic materials and devices. Specifically, nonplanar organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) employing a shadow mask has been developed for the fabrication of integrated optoelectronic structures. Shadow masked OMVPE (SM-OMVPE) is currently the only technique known to produce thick, nonplanar layers of single crystal material without macroscopic faceting. By the use of SM-OMVPE, various microlenses, micromirrors and novel devices have been designed fabricated and tested. Shadow masked microlenses with record short focal lengths have been produced. High quality microlens arrays with accurate control of lens diameter, sagitta, focal length, astigmatism and position have been designed, fabricated and tested. The author has shown that precise three-dimensional control during crystal growth can be employed to construct useful optoelectronic structures in a reproducible manner. This work also presents novel techniques for the fabrication of shadow masks. A high aluminum- concentration spacer layer and chemical recipes for the removal of epitaxial shadow masks are reported. In addition, the first reusable shadow mask constructed by reactive ion etching has been utilized for the growth of shadow masked structures. Direct fusion wafer bonding of silicon shadow masks was first developed by the author and has proven to be a robust, clean and reliable technique for mask placement. The application of shadow masked growth to vertical cavity semiconductor lasers (VCSELs) was initiated in this work. Microlenses were designed for top-emitting VCSELs to provide focusing of the output beam and these designs are currently being fabricated at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, by introducing curvature to the distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors, a high power single mode VCSEL has been designed. The author has grown the first concentrically

  9. Perception of motion trajectory of object from the moving cast shadow in infants.

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Masami K; Kanazawa, So; Shirai, Nobu; Otsuka, Yumiko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Yagi, Akihiro

    2006-03-01

    A moving cast shadow of the object affects the perception of the object's trajectory in adults [Kersten, D., Mamassian, P., & Knill, D. C. (1997). Moving cast shadow induce apparent motion in depth. Perception, 26, 171-192]. In the present study, we investigated by using a habituation-dishabituation procedure whether infants at 4- to 7-months old discriminate the motion trajectory of a ball from the moving shadow it casts. In Experiment 1, 4- to 5-month-old and 6- to 7-month-old were tested for ability to discriminate between a "depth" display containing a ball and a cast shadow with a diagonal trajectory and an "up" display containing a ball with a diagonal trajectory and a cast shadow with a horizontal trajectory. Six- and 7-month-old, but not 4- and 5-month-old, infants looked significantly longer at the "up" display than at the "depth" display. In Experiment 2, we tested whether 4- to 5-month-old and 6- to 7-month-old infants would perceive "up" motion as categorically different from "depth" depending on the object's 3-D trajectory. We used displays containing a ball and a cast shadow with the same trajectories as those in Experiment 1 except that the cast shadows appeared above the ball. These displays did not produce 3-D impressions in adults. Neither age group of infants exhibited significant differences between "up" and "depth" displays. When the results from the two experiments are considered, 6- and 7-month-old infants discriminated the motion trajectory of the ball from the moving cast shadows. This developmental emergence of depth perception from a moving cast shadow at 6 months of age is consistent with that of other pictorial depth cues.

  10. Specific and sensitive detection of Nosema bombi (Microsporidia: Nosematidae) in bumble bees (Bombus spp.; Hymenoptera: Apidae) by PCR of partial rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Klee, Julia; Tek Tay, Wee; Paxton, Robert J

    2006-02-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based method was developed for the specific and sensitive diagnosis of the microsporidian parasite Nosema bombi in bumble bees (Bombus spp.). Four primer pairs, amplifying ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene fragments, were tested on N. bombi and the related microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, both of which infect honey bees. Only primer pair Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 could distinguish N. bombi (323bp amplicon) from these other bee parasites. Primer pairs Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 and ITS-f2/r2 were then tested for their sensitivity with N. bombi spore concentrations from 10(7) down to 10 spores diluted in 100 microl of either (i) water or (ii) host bumble bee homogenate to simulate natural N. bombi infection (equivalent to the DNA from 10(6) spores down to 1 spore per PCR). Though the N. bombi-specific primer pair Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 was relatively insensitive, as few as 10 spores per extract (equivalent to 1 spore per PCR) were detectable using the N. bombi-non-specific primer pair ITS-f2/r2, which amplifies a short fragment of approximately 120 bp. Testing 99 bumble bees for N. bombi infection by light microscopy versus PCR diagnosis with the highly sensitive primer pair ITS-f2/r2 showed the latter to be more accurate. PCR diagnosis of N. bombi using a combination of two primer pairs (Nbombi-SSU-Jf1/Jr1 and ITS-f2/r2) provides increased specificity, sensitivity, and detection of all developmental stages compared with light microscopy.

  11. An analytical and experimental evaluation of shadow shields and their support members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Boyle, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on a model shadow shield thermal protection system to examine the effect of certain configuration variables. The experimental results were used to verify the ability of an analytical program to predict the shadow shield performance including the shield-support interaction. In general, the analysis (assuming diffuse surfaces) agreed well with the experimental support temperature profiles. The agreement for the shield profiles was not as good. The results demonstrated: (1) shadow shields can be effective in reducing the heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks, and (2) the conductive heat transfer through supports can be reduced by selective surface coatings.

  12. Characterizations of MV-algebras based on the theory of falling shadows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongwei; Xin, Xiaolong; He, Pengfei

    2014-01-01

    Based on the falling shadow theory, the concept of falling fuzzy (implicative) ideals as a generalization of that of a T ∧-fuzzy (implicative) ideal is proposed in MV-algebras. The relationships between falling fuzzy (implicative) ideals and T-fuzzy (implicative) ideals are discussed, and conditions for a falling fuzzy (implicative) ideal to be a T ∧-fuzzy (implicative) ideal are provided. Some characterizations of falling fuzzy (implicative) ideals are presented by studying proprieties of them. The product ⊛ and the up product ⊚ operations on falling shadows and the upset of a falling shadow are established, by which T-fuzzy ideals are investigated based on probability spaces.

  13. [Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex disease that presented multiple nodular shadows rapidly].

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kiyohiro

    2009-09-01

    The patient was 81-year-old woman diagnosed with lung cancer who underwent upper right lobectomy in January 2002. Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax showed a mass shadow presenting rapid-growing in the left S3 in August, 2008. The size of the mass shadow in the left S3 increased on day 16 after hospitalization, and a nodular shadow appeared in the left S(1+2). The bronchial washing specimen showed acid-fast bacilli identified as Mycobacterium intracellulare by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) -DNA hybridization (DDH). The patient showed radiological improvement following combination chemotherapy with rifampicin, ethambutol and clarithromycin.

  14. A generalised formulation of beam-shadow measurement in spiral-sector superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Jedidiah; Dey, Malay Kanti; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-06-01

    A generalised analysis of coherent radial oscillation through shadow measurements on the beam in a spiral-sector, superconducting cyclotron is discussed here. Experimental measurements of shadow cast by one beam-probe on another have been used to study beam behaviour at different radial positions of the K500 superconducting cyclotron at this institute. The correlation of radial oscillation and shadow measurements as well as the motion of orbit centre are also described. The modulation of turn separation by coherent radial oscillation is used to estimate the oscillation amplitude and dee voltage.

  15. Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production at RHIC: comparing shadowing models

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Lansberg, J.P.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2009-06-19

    We present a wide study on the comparison of different shadowing models and their influence on J/{psi} production. We have taken into account the possibility of different partonic processes for the c{bar c}-pair production. We notice that the effect of shadowing corrections on J/{psi} production clearly depends on the partonic process considered. Our results are compared to the available data on dAu collisions at RHIC energies. We try different break up cross section for each of the studied shadowing models.

  16. Method for the calculation of spacecraft umbra and penumbra shadow terminator points

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortizlongo, Carlos R.; Rickman, Steven L.

    1995-01-01

    A method for calculating orbital shadow terminator points is presented. The current method employs the use of an iterative process which is used for an accurate determination of shadow points. This calculation methodology is required since orbital perturbation effects can introduce large errors when a spacecraft orbits a planet in a high altitude and/or highly elliptical orbit. To compensate for the required iteration methodology, all reference frame change definitions and calculations are performed with quaternions. Quaternion algebra significantly reduces the computational time required for the accurate determination of shadow terminator points.

  17. Waiting for Shadows from the Distant Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    How can we hope to measure the hundreds of thousands of objects in our distant solar system? A team of astronomers is harnessing citizen science to begin to tackle this problem!A light curve from an occultation collected by a RECON site in Quincy, California. As the objects shadow passes, the background stars light dims. [RECON/Charley Arrowsmith (Feather River College)]Occultation InformationEstimates currently place the number of Kuiper belt objects larger than 100 km across at over 100,000. Knowing the sizes and characteristics of these objects is important for understanding the composition of the outer solar system and constraining models of the solar systems formation and evolution.Unfortunately, measuring small, dim bodies at large distances is incredibly difficult! One of the best ways to obtain the sizes of these objects is to watch as they occult a distant star. Timing the object as it passes across the face of the star can give us a good measure of its size and shape, when observed from multiple stations in the path of the shadow.An Extended NetworkOccultations by nearby objects (like main-belt asteroids) can be predicted fairly accurately, but those by trans-Neptunian objects are much more poorly constrained. Only ~900 trans-Neptunian objects have approximately known paths, and occultation-shadow predictions for these objects are often only accurate to ~1000km on the Earths surface. So how can we ensure that theres a telescope in the right location, ready to observe when an occultation occurs?Map of the 56 RECON sites distributed over 2000 km in the western United States. [Buie et al. 2016]The simplest answer is to set up a huge network of observing stations, and wait for the shadows to come to the network. With this approach, even if the predicted path isnt precisely known, some of the stations will still observe the occultation.Due to the number of stations needed, this project lends itself perfectly to citizen science. In a recently published paper by

  18. Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    On March 2, 2003, near-surface winds carried a large amount of Saharan dust aloft and transported the material westward over the Atlantic Ocean. These observations from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aboard NASA's Terra satellite depict an area near the Cape Verde Islands (situated about 700 kilometers off of Africa's western coast) and provide images of the dust plume along with measurements of its height and motion. Tracking the three-dimensional extent and motion of air masses containing dust or other types of aerosols provides data that can be used to verify and improve computer simulations of particulate transport over large distances, with application to enhancing our understanding of the effects of such particles on meteorology, ocean biological productivity, and human health.

    MISR images the Earth by measuring the spatial patterns of reflected sunlight. In the upper panel of the still image pair, the observations are displayed as a natural-color snapshot from MISR's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera. High-altitude cirrus clouds cast shadows on the underlying ocean and dust layer, which are visible in shades of blue and tan, respectively. In the lower panel, heights derived from automated stereoscopic processing of MISR's multi-angle imagery show the cirrus clouds (yellow areas) to be situated about 12 kilometers above sea level. The distinctive spatial patterns of these clouds provide the necessary contrast to enable automated feature matching between images acquired at different view angles. For most of the dust layer, which is spatially much more homogeneous, the stereoscopic approach was unable to retrieve elevation data. However, the edges of shadows cast by the cirrus clouds onto the dust (indicated by blue and cyan pixels) provide sufficient spatial contrast for a retrieval of the dust layer's height, and indicate that the top of layer is only about 2.5 kilometers above sea level.

    Motion of the dust and clouds is directly

  19. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  20. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  1. Second by second prediction of solar power generation based on cloud shadow behavior estimation near a power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryohei; Harigai, Toru; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2017-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) power generation has a particular problem for grid cooperation in that output can fluctuate due to the shadows created by clouds. If we can grasp the behavior of cloud shadows beforehand, then it may be possible to forecast output fluctuations. In this study, we want to prove if it is possible to calculate power output variation from the accumulated cloud shadow data. Cloud shadow behavior was measured from the ground by photodiodes (PDs) and the cloud shadow vector was calculated from the position and time difference. The time from the calculated cloud shadow vector to the arrival of the cloud shadow and the power generation output was calculated and compared with the actual solar power generation output. Thus, we confirmed that we can predict power generation output from a high correlation of two outputs. We found that prediction is possible, with high precision, at a short distance.

  2. Detection, partial purification and characterization of bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 isolated from freshwater fish: Bacteriocin from Lb. brevis FPTLB3.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiba Prosad; Dora, Krushna Chandra; Chowdhury, Supratim

    2013-02-01

    Lactobacillus brevis FPTLB3 was isolated from freshwater fish, capable of producing bacteriocin that had broad spectrum of inhibition (3200 AU/ml) against Escherichia coli MTCC 1563, Enterococcus faecalis MTCC 2729, Lactobacillus casei MTCC 1423, Lactobacillus sakei ATCC 15521 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The antimicrobial activity of crude supernatant fluid was stable after heating at 121 °C for 60 min and declined thereafter. Stability of antimicrobial activity was observed at pH range of 2.0 to 8.0. Its active principle was proteinaceous in nature since the bacteriocin was inactivated by proteolytic enzymes, but not by other non-proteolytic enzymes. Mitomycin C and UV light did not affect the activity of the bacteriocin, while chloroform extraction completely destroyed their activity. Exposure to surfactant resulted in an increase in titre, except Nonidet P-40, which led to total loss of activity. No bacteriocin adsorption was detected at pH 1 to 2, whereas 100% bacteriocin adsorption was found at pH 6.5. Based on Tricine SDS-PAGE the estimated molecular mass of bacteriocin was 54 kDa. No plasmid was found to present in the isolate.

  3. Immunoaffinity isolation and partial characterization of the Coccidioides immitis antigen detected by the tube precipitin and immunodiffusion-tube precipitin tests.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmer, B L; Pappagianis, D

    1989-01-01

    The antigen participating in the tube precipitin (TP) serologic test for coccidioidomycosis was isolated from mycelial-phase antigen (coccidioidin) by immunoaffinity and characterized by various analytical procedures. This was accomplished by first preparing the antigen-antibody precipitate by using antigen and human serum positive for TP (immunoglobulin M) antibody and then liberating the antigen by digestion with pronase. This protease destroyed the antibody and left the antigen intact as indicated by immunodiffusion-TP. The coccidioidal antigen was isolated from the proteolytic digest by using size exclusion chromatography. DEAE chromatography of this antigen yielded two fractions with immunodiffusion-TP reactivity which had average molecular sizes of 225 and 140 kilodaltons, respectively. The presence of carbohydrate and amino acids indicated that the antigen(s) is a glycopeptide. Compositional analysis showed that one fraction contained 3-O-methylmannose, mannose, and glucose in a ratio of 8:1.2:1, whereas the second fraction contained 3-O-methylmannose, mannose, glucose, and galactose in a ratio of 1:1:1:1. The amino acids glycine, alanine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid plus asparagine, and glutamic acid plus glutamine constituted 60 to 70% of the amino acids in both glycopeptides. Neither antigen could be detected entering the gel in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Lectin affinity provided evidence of a high-mannose asparagine-linked glycopeptide in the first peak and an asparagine-linked glycopeptide with a biantennary complex-type structure in the second peak. Images PMID:2504775

  4. Albedo of Permanently Shadowed Regions of the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riner, M. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Bussey, B.; Cahill, J. T.; McGovern, A.

    2012-12-01

    Due to the slight tilt in the Moon's spin axis, some topographic depressions near the lunar poles experience permanent shadow and may serve as cold traps, harboring water ice and/or other volatile compounds [1]. Permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) provide an opportunity toward understanding the amount, nature and transport of volatiles on the Moon and may also be a potential resource for human exploration. While many different data sets have suggested the presence of water ice in PSRs near the lunar poles many questions remain. For example, ice does not appear to be uniformly distributed across identified PSRs. More work is needed to understand the distribution of ice in PSRs and how delivery and retention mechanisms influence the distribution. The active illumination of the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA) provides a unique contribution toward exploration PSR exploration. While LOLA is principally a laser altimeter used for quantitative topography and related cartographic and geodetic applications [2], LOLA also measures the intensity and width of the return laser pulse (1064 nm) from the surface. Here we use a global mosaic (4 pixels per degree) of LOLA albedo data corrected for instrumental drift, irregular variations, and calibrated to normal albedo using local equatorial measurements of normal albedo obtained by the Kaguya Multiband Imager [3]. Recent work using LOLA albedo shows the floor of Shackleton crater, near the lunar south pole, is brighter than the surrounding terrain (and the interior of nearby craters) at 1064 nm [4]. This albedo difference may be due to decreased space weathering due to shadowing from the Sun or to a 1 μm thick layer with 20% water ice a the surface of the crater floor [4]. Here we use LOLA dayside reflectance measurements to examine the albedo of PSRs catalogued by [5] derived from illumination modeling of a hybrid 100 m/pixel LOLA-LROC digital terrain model (DTM) up to 83° north and south latitudes. The upper latitude

  5. Near-infrared brightness of the Galilean satellites eclipsed in Jovian shadow: A new technique to investigate Jovian upper atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Tsumura, K.; Arimatsu, K.; Matsuura, S.; Shirahata, M.; Wada, T.; Egami, E.; Hayano, Y.; Minowa, Y.; Honda, C.; Kimura, J.; Kuramoto, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Surace, J.

    2014-07-10

    Based on observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope, we have discovered that Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto are bright around 1.5 μm even when not directly lit by sunlight. The observations were conducted with non-sidereal tracking on Jupiter outside of the field of view to reduce the stray light subtraction uncertainty due to the close proximity of Jupiter. Their eclipsed luminosity was 10{sup –6}-10{sup –7} of their uneclipsed brightness, which is low enough that this phenomenon has been undiscovered until now. In addition, Europa in eclipse was <1/10 of the others at 1.5 μm, a potential clue to the origin of the source of luminosity. Likewise, Ganymede observations were attempted at 3.6 μm by the Spitzer Space Telescope, but it was not detected, suggesting a significant wavelength dependence. It is still unknown why they are luminous even when in the Jovian shadow, but forward-scattered sunlight by hazes in the Jovian upper atmosphere is proposed as the most plausible candidate. If this is the case, observations of these Galilean satellites while eclipsed by the Jovian shadow provide us with a new technique to investigate the Jovian atmospheric composition. Investigating the transmission spectrum of Jupiter by this method is important for investigating the atmosphere of extrasolar giant planets by transit spectroscopy.

  6. Use of shadow for enhancing mapping of perennial desert plants from high-spatial resolution multispectral and panchromatic satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharrah, Saad A.; Bouabid, Rachid; Bruce, David A.; Somenahalli, Sekhar; Corcoran, Paul A.

    2016-07-01

    Satellite remote-sensing techniques face challenges in extracting vegetation-cover information in desert environments. The limitations in detection are attributed to three major factors: (1) soil background effect, (2) distribution and structure of perennial desert vegetation, and (3) tradeoff between spatial and spectral resolutions of the satellite sensor. In this study, a modified vegetation shadow model (VSM-2) is proposed, which utilizes vegetation shadow as a contextual classifier to counter the limiting factors. Pleiades high spatial resolution, multispectral (2 m), and panchromatic (0.5 m) images were utilized to map small and scattered perennial arid shrubs and trees. We investigated the VSM-2 method in addition to conventional techniques, such as vegetation indices and prebuilt object-based image analysis. The success of each approach was evaluated using a root sum square error metric, which incorporated field data as control and three error metrics related to commission, omission, and percent cover. Results of the VSM-2 revealed significant improvements in perennial vegetation cover and distribution accuracy compared with the other techniques and its predecessor VSM-1. Findings demonstrated that the VSM-2 approach, using high-spatial resolution imagery, can be employed to provide a more accurate representation of perennial arid vegetation and, consequently, should be considered in assessments of desertification.

  7. Partial Spreading of a Laser Beam into a Light Sheet by Shock Waves and Its Use as a Shock Detection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, J.

    1994-01-01

    It is observed that when a laser beam is allowed to fall on a shock surface at a grazing incidence, a small part of the beam spreads out in a thin, diverging sheet of light normal to the surface, and both upstream and downstream of the shock. The phenomenon is visualized by observing a cross section of the light sheet on a screen placed normal to the laser path after it touches a shock. The light sheet disappears when the beam is moved to any other locations where there is no shock or the beam pierces the shock surface, i.e., at a non-grazing incidence. The spread angle of the light sheet is considerably higher than the angle by which the beam may bend as it passes through the shock, which produces a small difference of refractive index. Various details indicate that the spread light is a result of diffraction of a small part of the laser beam by the shock whose thickness is nearly the same as that of the laser wavelength. Shocks formed in underexpanded free jets of fully expanded Mach numbers 1.4 to 1.8 are used for this experiment. The above optical phenomenon is used as the basis of a novel shock detection technique which depends on sensing the spread light using a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The locations of the shock surfaces in the underexpanded supersonic jet, obtained using this technique, match with those inferred from the Schlieren photographs and velocity measurements. Moreover, if the shock oscillates, a periodic PMT signal is obtained which provides information about the frequency and amplitude of shock motion.

  8. Leading twist nuclear shadowing, nuclear generalized parton distributions and nuclear DVCS at small x

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, Vadim; Goeke, Klaus; Siddikov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    We generalize the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing and calculate quark and gluon generalized parton distributions (GPDs) of spinless nuclei. We predict very large nuclear shadowing for nuclear GPDs. In the limit of the purely transverse momentum transfer, our nuclear GPDs become impact parameter dependent nuclear parton distributions (PDFs). Nuclear shadowing induces non-trivial correlations between the impact parameter $b$ and the light-cone fraction $x$. We make predictions for the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) amplitude and the DVCS cross section on $^{208}$Pb at high energies. We calculate the cross section of the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process and address the issue of the extraction of the DVCS signal from the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ cross section. We find that the $e A \\to e \\gamma A$ differential cross section is dominated by DVCS at the momentum transfer $t$ near the minima of the nuclear form factor. We also find that nuclear shadowing leads

  9. Color fluctuation approximation for multiple interactions in leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing

    SciTech Connect

    Vadim Guzey, Mark Strikman

    2010-04-01

    The leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing predicts nuclear parton distributions in the small $x$ shadowing region by connecting them to the leading twist hard diffraction in electron-nucleon scattering. The uncertainties of the predictions are related to the shadowing effects resulting from the interaction of the hard probe with $N \\ge 3$ nucleons. We argue that the pattern of hard diffraction observed at HERA allows one to reduce these uncertainties, and we develop a new approach to the treatment of these multiple collisions. It is based on the concept of the color fluctuations and accounts for the presence of both point-like and hadron-like configurations in the virtual photon. Using the developed framework, we update our predictions for the effect of the leading twist nuclear shadowing in nuclear parton distributions of heavy nuclei at small $x$.

  10. Moving shadows contribute to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes).

    PubMed

    Imura, Tomoko; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies have reported that backgrounds depicting linear perspective and texture gradients influence relative size discrimination in nonhuman animals (known as the "corridor illusion"), but research has not yet identified the other kinds of depth cues contributing to the corridor illusion. This study examined the effects of linear perspective and shadows on the responses of a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) to the corridor illusion. The performance of the chimpanzee was worse when a smaller object was presented at the farther position on a background reflecting a linear perspective, implying that the corridor illusion was replicated in the chimpanzee (Imura, Tomonaga, & Yagi, 2008). The extent of the illusion changed as a function of the position of the shadows cast by the objects only when the shadows were moving in synchrony with the objects. These findings suggest that moving shadows and linear perspective contributed to the corridor illusion in a chimpanzee.

  11. Curvature of blended rolled edge reflectors at the shadow boundary contour

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellingson, S. W.

    1988-01-01

    A technique is advanced for computing the radius of curvature of blended rolled edge reflector surfaces at the shadow boundary, in the plane perpendicular to the shadow boundary contour. This curvature must be known in order to compute the spurious endpoint contributions in the physical optics (PO) solution for the scattering from reflectors with rolled edges. The technique is applicable to reflectors with radially-defined rim-shapes and rolled edge terminations. The radius of curvature for several basic reflector systems is computed, and it is shown that this curvature can vary greatly along the shadow boundary contour. Finally, the total PO field in the target zone of a sample compact range system is computed and corrected using the shadow boundary radius of curvature, obtained using the technique. It is shown that the fields obtained are a better approximation to the true scattered fields.

  12. An analytical and experimental evaluation of shadow shields and their support members.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Boyle, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Review of the major results of an analytical and experimental program aimed at determining the potential effectiveness of shadow shields in minimizing radiant heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks on long-duration interplanetary missions, taking into account the thermal interaction between shields and their support structures. Analytical procedures are developed and applied that include the strut-shield interaction in predicting shadow shield performance. The results of experimental studies of the effects of configuration variables on the performance of a scale model of a shadow shield system are presented. The experimental results are used to verify the validity of analytical predictions. The results obtained show that: (1) shadow shields can be effective in reducing the heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks, and (2) the conductive heat transfer through supports can be reduced by selective surface coatings.

  13. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Masking of High and Medium Resolution Optical Sensors- An Algorithm Inter-Comparison Example for Landsat 8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Carole; Stelzer, Kerstin; Brockmann, Carsten; Bertels, Luc; Pringle, Nicholas; Paperin, Michael; Danne, Olaf; Knaeps, Els; Ruddick, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Image processing for satellite water quality products requires reliable cloud and cloud shadow detection and cloud classification before atmospheric correction. Within the FP7/HIGHROC ("HIGH spatial and temporal Resolution Ocean Colour") Project, it was necessary to improve cloud detection and the cloud classification algorithms for the spatial high resolution sensors, aiming at Sentinel 2 and using Landsat 8 as a precursor. We present a comparison of three different algorithms, AFAR developed by RBINS; ACCAm created by VITO, and IDEPIX developed by Brockmann Consult. We show image comparisons and the results of the comparison using a pixel identification database (PixBox); FMASK results are also presented as reference.

  14. Evidence for a magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis of Taiwan from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2016-01-01

    There are more than 7 million people living near the Tatun volcano group in northern Taiwan. For the safety of the Taipei metropolis, in particular, it has been debated for decades whether or not these volcanoes are active. Here I show evidence of a deep magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays. The reservoir is probably composed of either a thin magma layer overlay or many molten sills within thick partially molten rocks. Assuming that 40% of the reservoir is partially molten, its total volume could be approximately 350 km3. The exact location and geometry of the magma reservoir will be obtained after dense seismic arrays are deployed in 2017–2020. PMID:28008931

  15. Evidence for a magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis of Taiwan from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2016-12-23

    There are more than 7 million people living near the Tatun volcano group in northern Taiwan. For the safety of the Taipei metropolis, in particular, it has been debated for decades whether or not these volcanoes are active. Here I show evidence of a deep magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays. The reservoir is probably composed of either a thin magma layer overlay or many molten sills within thick partially molten rocks. Assuming that 40% of the reservoir is partially molten, its total volume could be approximately 350 km(3). The exact location and geometry of the magma reservoir will be obtained after dense seismic arrays are deployed in 2017-2020.

  16. Evidence for a magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis of Taiwan from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    2016-12-01

    There are more than 7 million people living near the Tatun volcano group in northern Taiwan. For the safety of the Taipei metropolis, in particular, it has been debated for decades whether or not these volcanoes are active. Here I show evidence of a deep magma reservoir beneath the Taipei metropolis from both S-wave shadows and P-wave delays. The reservoir is probably composed of either a thin magma layer overlay or many molten sills within thick partially molten rocks. Assuming that 40% of the reservoir is partially molten, its total volume could be approximately 350 km3. The exact location and geometry of the magma reservoir will be obtained after dense seismic arrays are deployed in 2017–2020.

  17. Behavioral responses to a repetitive shadow stimulus express a persistent state of defensive arousal in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos R.; Fernandez, Conchi M.; Ramasamy, Lakshmi; Tabachnik, Tanya; Du, Rebecca R.; Felsen, Panna E.; Maire, Michael M.; Perona, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Summary The neural circuit mechanisms underlying emotion states remain poorly understood. Drosophila offers powerful genetic approaches for dissecting neural circuit function, but whether flies exhibit emotion-like behaviors has not been clear. We recently proposed that model organisms may express internal states displaying “emotion primitives,” which are general characteristics common to different emotions, rather than specific anthropomorphic emotions such as “fear” or “anxiety”. These emotion primitives include scalability, persistence, valence and generalization to multiple contexts. Here we have applied this approach to determine whether flies' defensive responses to shadows are purely reflexive, or may express underlying emotion states. We describe a new behavioral assay in which flies confined in an enclosed arena are repeatedly exposed to an overhead translational shadow. Repetitive shadows promoted graded (scalable) and persistent increases in locomotor velocity and hopping, and occasional freezing. The shadow also dispersed feeding flies from a food resource, suggesting both negative valence and context generalization. Strikingly, there was a significant delay before the flies returned to the food following shadow-induced dispersal, suggestive of a slowly decaying internal defensive state. The length of this delay was increased when more shadows were delivered for initial dispersal. These responses can be mathematically modeled by assuming an internal state that behaves as a leaky integrator of shadow exposure. Our results suggest that flies' responses to repetitive shadow stimuli express an internal state exhibiting canonical emotion primitives, possibly analogous to “fear” in mammals. The mechanistic basis of this state can now be investigated in a genetically tractable insect species. PMID:25981791

  18. Simplified Least Squares Shadowing sensitivity analysis for chaotic ODEs and PDEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chater, Mario; Ni, Angxiu; Wang, Qiqi

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a variant of the Least Squares Shadowing (LSS) method, which has successfully computed the derivative for several chaotic ODEs and PDEs. The development in this paper aims to simplify Least Squares Shadowing method by improving how time dilation is treated. Instead of adding an explicit time dilation term as in the original method, the new variant uses windowing, which can be more efficient and simpler to implement, especially for PDEs.

  19. Cutaneous metastasis of ovarian carcinoma with shadow cells mimicking a primary pilomatrical neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Lalich, Daniel; Tawfik, Ossama; Chapman, Julia; Fraga, Garth

    2010-07-01

    Shadow cells are characteristic of pilomatricoma, although they have been described in other cutaneous and visceral neoplasms, particularly endometrioid adenocarcinomas of the female genital tract. We describe a metastasis of an ovarian endometrioid adenocarcinoma with shadow cells to the skin that was initially misinterpreted as a pilomatricoma. We compare the histology of the ovarian neoplasm to 21 pilomatricomas. This is the first reported case of a cutaneous metastasis of a visceral neoplasm mimicking a primary pilomatrical neoplasm.

  20. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow

    PubMed Central

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity. PMID:27597999

  1. Activation of the Human MT Complex by Motion in Depth Induced by a Moving Cast Shadow.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Narumi; Usui, Nobuo; Taira, Masato

    2016-01-01

    A moving cast shadow is a powerful monocular depth cue for motion perception in depth. For example, when a cast shadow moves away from or toward an object in a two-dimensional plane, the object appears to move toward or away from the observer in depth, respectively, whereas the size and position of the object are constant. Although the cortical mechanisms underlying motion perception in depth by cast shadow are unknown, the human MT complex (hMT+) is likely involved in the process, as it is sensitive to motion in depth represented by binocular depth cues. In the present study, we examined this possibility by using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. First, we identified the cortical regions sensitive to the motion of a square in depth represented via binocular disparity. Consistent with previous studies, we observed significant activation in the bilateral hMT+, and defined functional regions of interest (ROIs) there. We then investigated the activity of the ROIs during observation of the following stimuli: 1) a central square that appeared to move back and forth via a moving cast shadow (mCS); 2) a segmented and scrambled cast shadow presented beside the square (sCS); and 3) no cast shadow (nCS). Participants perceived motion of the square in depth in the mCS condition only. The activity of the hMT+ was significantly higher in the mCS compared with the sCS and nCS conditions. Moreover, the hMT+ was activated equally in both hemispheres in the mCS condition, despite presentation of the cast shadow in the bottom-right quadrant of the stimulus. Perception of the square moving in depth across visual hemifields may be reflected in the bilateral activation of the hMT+. We concluded that the hMT+ is involved in motion perception in depth induced by moving cast shadow and by binocular disparity.

  2. Slant path L- and S-Band tree shadowing measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1994-01-01

    This contribution presents selected results from simultaneous L- and S-Band slant-path fade measurements through a pecan, a cottonwood, and a pine tree employing a tower-mounted transmitter and dual-frequency receiver. A single, circularly-polarized antenna was used at each end of the link. The objective was to provide information for personal communications satellite design on the correlation of tree shadowing between frequencies near 1620 and 2500 MHz. Fades were measured along 10 m lateral distance with 5 cm spacing. Instantaneous fade differences between L- and S-Band exhibited normal distribution with means usually near 0 dB and standard deviations from 5.2 to 7.5 dB. The cottonwood tree was an exception, with 5.4 dB higher average fading at S- than at L-Band. The spatial autocorrelation reduced to near zero with lags of about 10 lambda. The fade slope in dB/MHz is normally distributed with zero mean and standard deviation increasing with fade level.

  3. Current treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-10-01

    For patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the consensus is to treat those who develop thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation therapy and to prevent obstetric manifestations by use of aspirin and heparin. These recommendations are based on data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies. Despite this body of knowledge, areas of uncertainty regarding the management of APS exist where evidence is scarce or nonexistent. In other words, for a subset of patients the course of management is unclear. Some examples are patients with 'seronegative' APS, those who do not fulfil the formal (clinical or serological) classification criteria for definite APS, and those with recurrent thrombotic events despite optimal anticoagulation. Other challenges include the treatment of clinical manifestations not included in the classification criteria, such as haematologic manifestations (thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anaemia), neurologic manifestations (chorea, myelitis and multiple sclerosis-like lesions), and nephropathy and heart valve disease associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), as well as the possible withdrawal of anticoagulation treatment in selected cases of thrombotic APS in which assays for aPL become persistently negative. This Review focuses on the current recommendations for thrombotic and obstetric manifestations of APS, as well as the management of difficult cases. Some aspects of treatment, such as secondary prophylaxis of venous thrombosis, are based on strong evidence--the 'lights' of APS treatment. Conversely, other areas, such as the treatment of non-criteria manifestations of APS, are based only on expert consensus or common sense and remain the 'shadows' of APS therapy.

  4. Kriging in the Shadows: Geostatistical Interpolation for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossi, Richard E.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Beck, Louisa R.

    1994-01-01

    It is often useful to estimate obscured or missing remotely sensed data. Traditional interpolation methods, such as nearest-neighbor or bilinear resampling, do not take full advantage of the spatial information in the image. An alternative method, a geostatistical technique known as indicator kriging, is described and demonstrated using a Landsat Thematic Mapper image in southern Chiapas, Mexico. The image was first classified into pasture and nonpasture land cover. For each pixel that was obscured by cloud or cloud shadow, the probability that it was pasture was assigned by the algorithm. An exponential omnidirectional variogram model was used to characterize the spatial continuity of the image for use in the kriging algorithm. Assuming a cutoff probability level of 50%, the error was shown to be 17% with no obvious spatial bias but with some tendency to categorize nonpasture as pasture (overestimation). While this is a promising result, the method's practical application in other missing data problems for remotely sensed images will depend on the amount and spatial pattern of the unobscured pixels and missing pixels and the success of the spatial continuity model used.

  5. Slant path L- and S-Band tree shadowing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Wolfhard J.; Torrence, Geoffrey W.

    1994-08-01

    This contribution presents selected results from simultaneous L- and S-Band slant-path fade measurements through a pecan, a cottonwood, and a pine tree employing a tower-mounted transmitter and dual-frequency receiver. A single, circularly-polarized antenna was used at each end of the link. The objective was to provide information for personal communications satellite design on the correlation of tree shadowing between frequencies near 1620 and 2500 MHz. Fades were measured along 10 m lateral distance with 5 cm spacing. Instantaneous fade differences between L- and S-Band exhibited normal distribution with means usually near 0 dB and standard deviations from 5.2 to 7.5 dB. The cottonwood tree was an exception, with 5.4 dB higher average fading at S- than at L-Band. The spatial autocorrelation reduced to near zero with lags of about 10 lambda. The fade slope in dB/MHz is normally distributed with zero mean and standard deviation increasing with fade level.

  6. Method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yoshimasa; Kajitani, Kazuo; Ohde, Hisashi

    2015-03-01

    A new microscopy method for observing phase objects without halos and directional shadows is proposed. The key optical element is an annular aperture at the front focal plane of a condenser with a larger diameter than those used in standard phase contrast microscopy. The light flux passing through the annular aperture is changed by the specimen's surface profile and then passes through an objective and contributes to image formation. This paper presents essential conditions for realizing the method. In this paper, images of colonies formed by induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells using this method are compared with the conventional phase contrast method and the bright-field method when the NA of the illumination is small to identify differences among these techniques. The outlines of the iPS cells are clearly visible with this method, whereas they are not clearly visible due to halos when using the phase contrast method or due to weak contrast when using the bright-field method. Other images using this method are also presented to demonstrate a capacity of this method: a mouse ovum and superimposition of several different images of mouse iPS cells.

  7. Gradient shadow pattern reveals refractive index of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wonkyoung; Kim, Dong Sung

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple method that uses a gradient shadow pattern (GSP) to measure the refractive index nL of liquids. A light source generates a “dark-bright-dark” GSP when it is projected through through the back of a transparent, rectangular block with a cylindrical chamber that is filled with a liquid sample. We found that there is a linear relationship between nL and the proportion of the bright region in a GSP, which provides the basic principle of the proposed method. A wide range 1.33 ≤ nL ≤ 1.46 of liquids was measured in the single measurement setup with error <0.01. The proposed method is simple but robust to illuminating conditions, and does not require for any expensive or precise optical components, so we expect that it will be useful in many portable measurement systems that use nL to estimate attributes of liquid samples.

  8. Shadow enhancers enable Hunchback bifunctionality in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Staller, Max V.; Vincent, Ben J.; Bragdon, Meghan D. J.; Lydiard-Martin, Tara; Wunderlich, Zeba; Estrada, Javier; DePace, Angela H.

    2015-01-01

    Hunchback (Hb) is a bifunctional transcription factor that activates and represses distinct enhancers. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that Hb can activate and repress the same enhancer. Computational models predicted that Hb bifunctionally regulates the even-skipped (eve) stripe 3+7 enhancer (eve3+7) in Drosophila blastoderm embryos. We measured and modeled eve expression at cellular resolution under multiple genetic perturbations and found that the eve3+7 enhancer could not explain endogenous eve stripe 7 behavior. Instead, we found that eve stripe 7 is controlled by two enhancers: the canonical eve3+7 and a sequence encompassing the minimal eve stripe 2 enhancer (eve2+7). Hb bifunctionally regulates eve stripe 7, but it executes these two activities on different pieces of regulatory DNA—it activates the eve2+7 enhancer and represses the eve3+7 enhancer. These two “shadow enhancers” use different regulatory logic to create the same pattern. PMID:25564665

  9. AVIRIS calibration using the cloud-shadow method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Reinersman, P.; Chen, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    More than 90 percent of the signal at an ocean-viewing, satellite sensor is due to the atmosphere, so a 5 percent sensor-calibration error viewing a target that contributes but 10 percent of the signal received at the sensor may result in a target-reflectance error of more than 50 percent. Since prelaunch calibration accuracies of 5 percent are typical of space-sensor requirements, recalibration of the sensor using ground-base methods is required for low-signal target. Known target reflectance or water-leaving radiance spectra and atmospheric correction parameters are required. In this article we describe an atmospheric-correction method that uses cloud shadowed pixels in combination with pixels in a neighborhood region of similar optical properties to remove atmospheric effects from ocean scenes. These neighboring pixels can then be used as known reflectance targets for validation of the sensor calibration and atmospheric correction. The method uses the difference between water-leaving radiance values for these two regions. This allows nearly identical optical contributions to the two signals (e.g., path radiance and Fresnel-reflected skylight) to be removed, leaving mostly solar photons backscattered from beneath the sea to dominate the residual signal. Normalization by incident solar irradiance reaching the sea surface provides the remote-sensing reflectance of the ocean at the location of the neighbor region.

  10. Glacial isostatic stress shadowing by the Antarctic ice sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivins, E. R.; James, T. S.; Klemann, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous examples of fault slip that offset late Quaternary glacial deposits and bedrock polish support the idea that the glacial loading cycle causes earthquakes in the upper crust. A semianalytical scheme is presented for quantifying glacial and postglacial lithospheric fault reactivation using contemporary rock fracture prediction methods. It extends previous studies by considering differential Mogi-von Mises stresses, in addition to those resulting from a Coulomb analysis. The approach utilizes gravitational viscoelastodynamic theory and explores the relationships between ice mass history and regional seismicity and faulting in a segment of East Antarctica containing the great Antarctic Plate (Balleny Island) earthquake of 25 March 1998 (Mw 8.1). Predictions of the failure stress fields within the seismogenic crust are generated for differing assumptions about background stress orientation, mantle viscosity, lithospheric thickness, and possible late Holocene deglaciation for the D91 Antarctic ice sheet history. Similar stress fracture fields are predicted by Mogi-von Mises and Coulomb theory, thus validating previous rebound Coulomb analysis. A thick lithosphere, of the order of 150-240 km, augments stress shadowing by a late melting (middle-late Holocene) coastal East Antarctic ice complex and could cause present-day earthquakes many hundreds of kilometers seaward of the former Last Glacial Maximum grounding line.

  11. The Shadowing Effect in Regolith-Type Media: Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankevich, D. G.; Shkuratov, Yu. G.

    We present in this paper the results of computer simulation of the shadowing effect in a medium composed of nontransparent particles under the assumption of Lambertian light scattering from the particle sur- faces. Within the geometric-optics approximation, the performed simulation allows one to obtain, with an accu- racy better than 1%, the photometric characteristics of such multilayer media. For optically dense statistically homogeneous media, the packing density is the only parameter influencing backscattering: the lower the pack- ing density of the medium, the more pronounced the opposition amplification of brightness is. This is also true for media composed of particles different in size. Phase dependences for mono- and polydispersed media with equal packing densities were found to be identical. Phase curves for a monolayer of hemispherical particles ran- domly arranged on a smooth Lambertian substrate are always convex upward. In the phase-angle range from 0° to 40°, the phase dependence of brightness for the monolayer of spherical particles may be almost linear. In a two-layer model, an optically thin layer of small particles lying on a layer of large particles can considerably enhance the opposition effect. However, the enhancement depends strongly on the way the layers adjoin each other. A medium consisting of sparsely arranged large particles on a smooth substrate made up of small particles also exhibits a steeper phase curve near opposition.

  12. "Shadow stories" in oral interviews: Narrative care through careful listening.

    PubMed

    de Medeiros, Kate; Rubinstein, Robert L

    2015-08-01

    In most narrative approaches to understanding old age, the primary object of interest is the told story. However, what is often overlooked in narrative research are the untold stories--the silences, gaps, and omissions that form a type of shadow story or a story that lies just below the surface of what is said or written. This paper presents an illustrative case example of Constance to demonstrate how careful listening can help uncover hidden stories in an interview. In this case, Constance mentions two people (her brother and husband) as being important in her life yet omits them from the majority of her interview. The interviewer is able to uncover a hidden story with regard to her brother, learning important details about their relationship that would have otherwise gone unspoken. Overall, findings point to the importance of untold stories both in terms of content and as a way to empower the speaker to address topics that he or she may have otherwise thought were not of interest to the interviewer.

  13. Generating CAHV and CAHVOR Images with Shadows in ROAMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madison, Richard; Jain, Abhinandan; Pomerantz, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Part of the Rover Analysis, Modeling and Simulation (ROAMS) software that synthesizes images of terrain has been augmented to make the images more realistic. [ROAMS was described in "Simulating Operation of a Planetary Rover" (NPO-30722), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 52. ROAMS simulates the operation of a robotic vehicle (rover) exploring terrain on a remote planet.] The images are needed for modeling responses of rover cameras that provide sensory inputs for machine-vision-based algorithms for controlling the motion of the rover. The augmented image-synthesizing part of the ROAMS software supports terrain geometry and texture specifiable by the user, CAHV and CAHVOR camera models, and more-realistic shadowing (see figure). (The letters in "CAHV" represent vectors in a standard photogrammetric model of a pinhole camera. Letters O and R in "CAHVOR" represent vectors used to model distortions.) A contemplated future version of ROAMS would support the CAHVORE model, which represents more-general cameras, including those having fish-eye or other wide-field-of-view lenses. (Letter E in "CAHVORE" represents a vector used to model apparent motion of a camera entrance pupil.)

  14. The Effects of Accretion Flow Dynamics on the Black Hole Shadow of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Hung-Yi; Akiyama, Kazunori; Asada, Keiichi

    2016-11-01

    A radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF), which is commonly characterized by its sub-Keplerian nature, is a favored accretion model for the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sagittarius A*. To investigate the observable features of an RIAF, we compare the modeled shadow images, visibilities, and spectra of three flow models with dynamics characterized by (i) a Keplerian shell that is rigidly rotating outside the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) and infalling with a constant angular momentum inside ISCO, (ii) a sub-Keplerian motion, and (iii) a free-falling motion with zero angular momentum at infinity. At near-millimeter wavelengths, the emission is dominated by the flow within several Schwarzschild radii. The energy shift due to these flow dynamics becomes important and distinguishable, suggesting that the flow dynamics are an important model parameter for interpreting the millimeter/sub-millimeter very long baseline interferometric observations with the forthcoming, fully assembled Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). As an example, we demonstrate that structural variations of Sagittarius A* on event horizon-scales detected in previous EHT observations can be explained by the non-stationary dynamics of an RIAF.

  15. ASCA Observation of an "X-Ray Shadow" in the Galactic Plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sangwook; Ebisawa, Ken

    2001-01-01

    The diffuse X-ray background (DXB) emission near the Galactic plane (l,b approximately 25.6 degrees, 0.78 degrees) has been observed with ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics). The observed region is toward a Galactic molecular cloud which was recently reported to cast a deep X-ray shadow in the 0.5 - 2.0 keV band DXB. The selection of this particular region is intended to provide a constraint on the spatial distribution of the DXB emission along the line of sight: i.e., the molecular cloud is optically thick at <2 keV and so the bulk of the observed soft X-rays must originate in the foreground of the cloud, which is at approximately 3 kpc from the Sun. In the 0.8 - 9.0 keV band, the observed spectrum is primarily from multiple components of thermal plasmas. We here report a detection of soft X-ray (0.5 - 2 keV) emission from an approximately 10(exp 7) K thermal plasma. Comparisons with the ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite) data suggest that this soft X-ray emission is absorbed by N(sub H) = 1 - 3 x 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), which implies a path-length through the soft X-ray emitting regions of approximately less than 1 kpc from the Sun.

  16. Position determination and measurement error analysis for the spherical proof mass with optical shadow sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhendong; Wang, Zhaokui; Zhang, Yulin

    2016-09-01

    To meet the very demanding requirements for space gravity detection, the gravitational reference sensor (GRS) as the key payload needs to offer the relative position of the proof mass with extraordinarily high precision and low disturbance. The position determination and error analysis for the GRS with a spherical proof mass is addressed. Firstly the concept of measuring the freely falling proof mass with optical shadow sensors is presented. Then, based on the optical signal model, the general formula for position determination is derived. Two types of measurement system are proposed, for which the analytical solution to the three-dimensional position can be attained. Thirdly, with the assumption of Gaussian beams, the error propagation models for the variation of spot size and optical power, the effect of beam divergence, the chattering of beam center, and the deviation of beam direction are given respectively. Finally, the numerical simulations taken into account of the model uncertainty of beam divergence, spherical edge and beam diffraction are carried out to validate the performance of the error propagation models. The results show that these models can be used to estimate the effect of error source with an acceptable accuracy which is better than 20%. Moreover, the simulation for the three-dimensional position determination with one of the proposed measurement system shows that the position error is just comparable to the error of the output of each sensor.

  17. A LIKELY MICRO-QUASAR IN THE SHADOW OF M82 X-1

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Xiao-jie; Liu, Jifeng; Liu, Jiren E-mail: jfliu@nao.cas.cn

    2015-02-01

    The ultra-luminous X-ray source M82 X-1 is one of the most promising intermediate mass black hole candidates in the local universe based on its high X-ray luminosities (10{sup 40}–10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1}) and quasi-periodic oscillations, and is possibly associated with a radio flare source. In this work, applying the sub-pixel technique to the 120 ks Chandra observation (ID: 10543) of M82 X-1, we split M82 X-1 into two sources separated by 1.″1. The secondary source is not detected in other M82 observations. The radio flare source is not found to associate with M82 X-1, but is instead associated with the nearby transient source S1 with an outburst luminosity of ∼10{sup 39} erg s{sup −1}. With X-ray outburst and radio flare activities analogous to the recently discovered micro-quasar in M31, S1 is likely to be a micro-quasar hidden in the shadow of M82 X-1.

  18. [Construction of vegetation shadow index (SVI) and application effects in four remote sensing images].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhang-Hua; Liu, Jian; Yu, Kun-Yong; Liu, Tao; Gong, Cong-Hong; Tang, Meng-Ya; Xie, Wan-Jun; Li, Zeng-Lu

    2013-12-01

    Taking the images of Landsat TM, ALOS AVNIR-2, CBERS-02B CCD and HJ-1 CCD as the experimental data, for increasing the differences among shaded area, bright area and water further, the present paper construed a novel vegetation index-Shaded Vegetation Index(SVI), which can not only keep the absolute differences among bright area, shaded area and water area in the near-infrared band, but also can enlarge NDVI, eliminate the possible mixes, and change the histogram "skewed" phenomenon of NDVI, so the vegetation index value is closer to normal distribution, and more in line with the filed condition; this new index was applied to the surface features of large difference of the near-infrared radiation characteristics. Verified by accuracy assessment for the bright area, shaded area and water area recognition effects with SVI, it was showed that the overall classification accuracies of these images were up to 98. 89%, 100%, 97.78% and 97.78% respectively, with the overall Kappa statistics of 0.9833, 1, 0.9667, and 0.966 7, indicating that SVI has excellent detection effects for bright area, shaded area and water area; the statistical comparison of sub-images between SVI and NDVI also illustrated the reliability and effectiveness of SVI, which can be applied in the shadow removal for remote sensing images.

  19. Double shadow of a regular phantom black hole as photons couple to the Weyl tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Chen, Songbai; Jing, Jiliang

    2016-11-01

    We have studied the shadow of a regular phantom black hole as photons couple to the Weyl tensor. We find that due to the coupling photons with different polarization directions propagate along different paths in the spacetime so that there exists a double shadow for a black hole, which is quite different from that in the non-coupling case where only a single shadow emerges. The overlap region of the double shadow, the umbra, of the black hole increases with the phantom charge and decreases with the coupling strength. The dependence of the penumbra on the phantom charge and the coupling strength is converse to that of the umbra. Combining with the supermassive central object in our Galaxy, we estimated the shadow of the black hole as the photons couple to the Weyl tensor. Our results show that the coupling brings about richer behaviors of the propagation of coupled photon and the shadow of the black hole in the regular phantom black hole spacetime.

  20. Influence of a plasma on the shadow of a spherically symmetric black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlick, Volker; Tsupko, Oleg Yu.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, Gennady S.

    2015-11-01

    We analytically calculate the influence of a plasma on the shadow of a black hole (or of another compact object). We restrict to spherically symmetric and static situations, where the shadow is circular. The plasma is assumed to be nonmagnetized and pressureless. We derive the general formulas for a spherically symmetric plasma density on an unspecified spherically symmetric and static spacetime. Our main result is an analytical formula for the angular size of the shadow. As a plasma is a dispersive medium, the radius of the shadow depends on the photon frequency. The effect of the plasma is significant only in the radio regime. The formalism applies not only to black holes but also, e.g., to wormholes. As examples for the underlying spacetime model, we consider the Schwarzschild spacetime and the Ellis wormhole. In particular, we treat the case that the plasma is in radial free fall from infinity onto a Schwarzschild black hole. We find that for an observer far away from a Schwarzschild black hole, the plasma has a decreasing effect on the size of the shadow. The perspectives of actually observing the influence of a plasma on the shadows of supermassive black holes are discussed.

  1. Shadow of a dressed black hole and determination of spin and viewing angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lingyun; Li, Zilong

    2016-12-01

    Shadows of black holes surrounded by an optically thin emitting medium have been extensively discussed in the literature. The Hioki-Maeda algorithm is a simple recipe to characterize the shape of these shadows and determine the parameters of the system. Here, we extend their idea to the case of a dressed black hole, namely a black hole surrounded by a geometrically thin and optically thick accretion disk. While the boundary of the shadow of black holes surrounded by an optically thin emitting medium corresponds to the apparent photon capture sphere, that of dressed black holes corresponds to the apparent image of the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO). Even in this case, we can characterize the shape of the shadow and infer the black hole spin and viewing angle. The shape and the size of the shadow of a dressed black hole are strongly affected by the black hole spin and inclination angle. Despite that, it seems that we cannot extract any additional information from it. Here, we study the possibility of testing the Kerr metric. Even with the full knowledge of the boundary of the shadow, those of Kerr and non-Kerr black holes are very similar and it is eventually very difficult to distinguish the two cases.

  2. Effects of shadowing and steering in oblique incidence epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Yunsic

    2009-03-01

    Recently the fabrication of novel nanostructures by oblique deposition has drawn much attention due to their potential application in electronic and mechanical devices as well as the interesting morphologies observed in various experiments, such as nanorods, nanocolumns, and nanohelicoids. Unlike self-organization by misfit strain in heteroepitaxial growth, oblique deposition provides a relatively direct way of controlling surface structures of growing films. Recent experiments indicate that oblique incidence deposition can significantly alter materials properties such as surface roughness, magnetic anisotropy, optical transmittance, and porosity. After a review of these experimental results, we first show that a series of morphological transitions observed in oblique incidence Cu/Cu(100) growth near room temperature can be explained primarily by geometrical shadowing effects [1]. We then discuss the modifying effects of steering due to short-range and long-range attraction [2] as well as of substrate rotation on the surface morphology. Finally, we present the results of recent multiscale simulations of Cu/Cu(100) growth at lower temperature (T = 160 - 200 K) [3] as well as parallel accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations at very low temperature [4]. Based on these simulations we have been able to explain a number of recent intriguing but previously unexplained experimental results including the strong dependence of the surface morphology and roughening behavior on temperature as well as the development of compressive strain in metal thin film growth. [4pt] [1] Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 046103 (2007).[0pt] [2] Y. Shim, V. Borovikov and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 77, 235423 (2008).[0pt] [3] V. Borovikov, Y. Shim and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. B 76, 241401(R) (2007).[0pt] [4] Y. Shim, V. Borovikov, B. P. Uberuaga, A. F. Voter, and J. G. Amar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 116101 (2008).

  3. Investigating shadows: a pedagogical intervention project with primary school children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noversa, Silvana; Abreu, Cátia; Varela, Paulo; Costa, Manuel F. M.

    2014-07-01

    This communication results from a pedagogical intervention project, carried out at a primary school in the district of Braga - Portugal. The intervention took place in a class of the 3rd year, composed of 16 students, and it incorporated the practice of inquiry-based science teaching addressing the theme "Light Experiments", which is part of the "Environmental Studies" curricular area. Various class activities were planned and implemented concerning some of the factors that influence the shadow of an object, in order to find answers to the following three questions: a) will 3rd year students, aged 7/8 years, be able to construct and execute an investigation strategy that involves manipulating and controlling variables? b) what are the main difficulties experienced by students in the designing and execution of such a strategy? c) how will students, in interaction with the teacher and with their peers, gradually design and execute their investigation strategy in order to respond to the problem formulated? The project adopted an action research methodology. A careful record was kept of the events most relevant to the questions under study in each class. This data was used to prepare the class diaries - descriptive and reflective narratives prepared based on recorded audio and field notes made during participant observation in the context of the classroom. A content analysis of the diaries has identified a few elements that provide answers to the research questions raised. In order to plan and implement a research project with children in the 7/8 years old range require a high level of scaffolding to allow students to gradually build a coherent strategy to tackle the research problem. Teacher's role is crucial. The teacher, by questioning and inducing reasoning and discussion, promotes encourages and regulates the cognitive activity of students. Some level of autonomy should be given to the students in large group collaborative work.

  4. Anticipated Electrical Environment Within Permanently Shadowed Lunar Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Killen, R. M.; Delory, G. T.; Collier, M. R.; Vondrak, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Shadowed locations ncar the lunar poles arc almost certainly electrically complex regions. At these locations near the terminator, the local solar wind flows nearly tangential to the surface and interacts with large-scale topographic features such as mountains and deep large craters, In this work, we study the solar wind orographic effects from topographic obstructions along a rough lunar surface, On the leeward side of large obstructions, plasma voids are formed in the solar wind because of the absorption of plasma on the upstream surface of these obstacles, Solar wind plasma expands into such voids) producing an ambipolar potential that diverts ion flow into the void region. A surface potential is established on these leeward surfaces in order to balance the currents from the expansion-limited electron and ion populations, Wc find that there arc regions ncar the leeward wall of the craters and leeward mountain faces where solar wind ions cannot access the surface, leaving an electron-rich plasma previously identified as an "electron cloud." In this case, some new current is required to complete the closure for current balance at the surface, and we propose herein that lofted negatively charged dust is one possible (nonunique) compensating current source. Given models for both ambipolar and surface plasma processes, we consider the electrical environment around the large topographic features of the south pole (including Shoemaker crater and the highly varied terrain near Nobile crater), as derived from Goldstone radar data, We also apply our model to moving and stationary objects of differing compositions located on the surface and consider the impact of the deflected ion flow on possible hydrogen resources within the craters

  5. Applicability of VI in arid vegetation delineation using shadow-affected SPOT imagery.

    PubMed

    Gunasekara, N K; Al-Wardy, M M; Al-Rawas, G A; Charabi, Y

    2015-07-01

    GDVI(3), GDVI(2), NDVI, MSAVI and SAVI were evaluated for their dynamic ranges, the class accuracy of the Vegetation Index (VI) classifications, the effects of shadow delineation on the other land use classes and their applicability in vegetation delineation in Al-Qara Mountains, Oman. Supervised classifications of a SPOT scene by Support Vector Machines (SVM) algorithm were employed. GDVI(3) showed the widest dynamic range in all land use types, while GDVI(2) also exhibited evidently wider dynamic ranges for arid to semi-arid Al-Qara than NDVI, MSAVI and SAVI. GDVI(3) reported the highest accuracies in delineating natural vegetation (dense - 74.80%, medium-dense- 43.19%), except for low-dense vegetation (40.51%). It also performs the best in delineating bare soil and dry grass with over 80% and 60% accuracies. The attenuated reflectance created by the shadows results in VI signals in the range of dry grass to bare soil, enabling us to neglect the shadow effect on natural vegetation delineation due to below 9.50% omissions from the shadows class. GDVI(3) also limits shadow delineation better than the other indices, which will enable us to analyze spectral information recovery by the VI with the help of ground truth information under the shadows. For applications such as land degradation assessments, GDVI(3) has better prospects over the other indices explored. Saturation at high-vigor vegetation is an issue in GDVI(3), GDVI(2) and NDVI. Our study also points to a dependency of a VI's capability to weaken shadows on the number of training data pixels to be utilized in a supervised classification.

  6. Lost in Jupiter's Shadow: Can Resonant Charge Variations Explain Dust Grain Sizes in the Main Ring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jontof-Hutter, Daniel; Hamilton, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    Interplanetary impacts onto the tiny moons Metis and Adrastea replenish Jupiter's main ring with dusty ejecta of all sizes. The equilibrium size distribution present in the rings at a given time is a function of production and loss mechanisms, both of which may be vary with particle size. Loss mechanisms include collisions and dynamical processes. Here we explore some of the latter. Grains tend to pick up negative electric charges due to motion through Jupiter's plasma environment, and positive charges from the photoelectric effect of sunlight. The periodic interruption of sunlight in Jupiter's shadow causes the equilibrium electric charge, and hence the Lorentz force, to resonate with the Kepler orbital frequency. The eccentricity increases for grains moving radially inwards during the shadow transit, and decreases when grains move outward in the shadow, hence the azimuthal location of pericenter is important. For smaller grains, the eccentricity increases monotonically until they collide with Jupiter. For much larger grains, precession due to both the Lorentz force and planetary oblateness causes the eccentricity to oscillate periodically. We explore the shadow instability in the main ring for a variety of uniform plasma density models, comparing numerical data with a semi-analytic approximation. We find that the effect of the shadow dwindles in importance for plasma that is either too sparse or too dense. In sparse plasma, the charging timescale slows, limiting the change in electric potential from sunlight to shadow. In dense plasma, charging currents from the plasma overwhelm the photoelectric effect in sunlight, also resulting in a small change in electric potential. Between these two regimes, the shadow resonance efficiently removes grains up to a particular size threshold in the main ring. This size-dependent loss mechanism may contribute to the observed flattening in the size distribution index for smaller grains.

  7. Amplitude, isobar and grey-scale imaging of ultrasonic shadows behind rigid, elastic and gaseous spheres.

    PubMed

    Filipczyński, L; Kujawska, T; Tymkiewicz, R; Wójcik, J

    1996-01-01

    The theory of wave reflection from spherical obstacles was applied for determination of the cause of the shadow created by plane wave pulses incident on rigid, steel, gaseous spheres and on spheres made of kidney stones. The spheres were immersed in water which was assumed to be a tissue-like medium. Acoustic pressure distributions behind the spheres with the radii of 1 mm, 2.5 mm and 3.5 mm were determined at the frequency of 5 MHz. The use of the exact wave theory enabled us to take into account the diffraction effects. The computed pressure distributions were verified experimentally at the frequency of 5 MHz for a steel sphere with a 2.5-mm radius. The experimental and theoretical pulses were composed of about three ultrasonic frequency periods. Acoustic pressure distributions in the shadow zone of all spheres were shown in the amplitude axonometric projection, in the grey scale and also as acoustic isobar patterns. Our analysis confirmed existing simpler descriptions of the shadow from the point of view of reflection and refraction effects; however, our approach is more general, also including diffraction effects and assuming the pulse mode. The analysis has shown that gaseous spherical inclusions caused shadows with very high dynamics of acoustic pressures that were about 15 dB higher in relation to all the other spheres. The shadow length, determined as the length at which one observes a 6-dB drop of the acoustic pressure, followed the relation r-6dB = 3.7a2/lambda with the accuracy of about 20% independent of the sphere type. lambda denotes the wavelength and a the sphere radius. Thus, a theoretical possibility of differentiating between gaseous and other inclusions and of estimation of the inclusion size in the millimeter range from the shadow was shown. The influence of the frequency-dependent attenuation on the shadow will be considered in the next study.

  8. Robust event detection scheme for complex scenes in video surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Erkang; Xu, Yi; Yang, Xiaokang; Zhang, Wenjun

    2011-07-01

    Event detection for video surveillance is a difficult task due to many challenges: cluttered background, illumination variations, scale variations, occlusions among people, etc. We propose an effective and efficient event detection scheme in such complex situations. Moving shadows due to illumination are tackled with a segmentation method with shadow detection, and scale variations are taken care of using the CamShift guided particle filter tracking algorithm. For event modeling, hidden Markov models are employed. The proposed scheme also reduces the overall computational cost by combing two human detection algorithms and using tracking information to aid human detection. Experimental results on TRECVid event detection evaluation demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed scheme. It is robust, especially to moving shadows and scale variations. Employing the scheme, we achieved the best run results for two events in the TRECVid benchmarking evaluation.

  9. Advanced dexterous manipulation for IED defeat : report on the feasibility of using the ShadowHand for remote operations.

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Improvised Explosive Device (IED) defeat (IEDD) operations can involve intricate operations that exceed the current capabilities of the grippers on board current bombsquad robots. The Shadow Dexterous Hand from the Shadow Robot Company or 'ShadowHand' for short (www.shadowrobot.com) is the first commercially available robot hand that realistically replicates the motion, degrees-of-freedom and dimensions of a human hand (Figure 1). In this study we evaluate the potential for the ShadowHand to perform potential IED defeat tasks on a mobile platform.

  10. Analysis of shadowing effects on MIR photovoltaic and solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fincannon, James

    1995-05-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently working with RSC-Energia, the Russian Space Agency, and Allied Signal in developing a flight demonstration solar dynamic power system. This type of power system is dependent upon solar flux that is reflected and concentrated into a thermal storage system to provide the thermal energy input to a closed-cycle Brayton heat engine. The solar dynamic unit will be flown on the Russian Mir space station in anticipation of use on the International Space Station Alpha. By the time the power system is launched, the Mir will be a spatially complex configuration which will have, in addition to the three-gimbaled solar dynamic unit, eleven solar array wings that are either fixed or track the Sun along one axis and a variety or repositionable habitation and experiment modules. The proximity of arrays to modules creates a situation which makes it highly probable that there will be varying solar flux due to shadowing on the solar dynamic unit and some of the arrays throughout the orbit. Shadowing causes fluctuations in the power output from the arrays and the solar dynamic power system, thus reducing the energy capabilities of the spacecraft. An assessment of the capabilities of the power system under these conditions is an important part in influencing the design and operations of the spacecraft and predicting its energy performance. This paper describes the results obtained from using the Orbiting Spacecraft Shadowing Analysis Station program that was integrated into the Station Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE) electrical power system computer program. OSSA allows one to consider the numerous complex factors for analyzing the shadowing effects on the electrical power system including the variety of spacecraft hardware geometric configurations, yearly and daily orbital variations in the vehicle attitude and orbital maneuvers (for communications coverage, payload pointing requirements and rendezvous/docking with other

  11. Analysis of shadowing effects on MIR photovoltaic and solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fincannon, James

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is currently working with RSC-Energia, the Russian Space Agency, and Allied Signal in developing a flight demonstration solar dynamic power system. This type of power system is dependent upon solar flux that is reflected and concentrated into a thermal storage system to provide the thermal energy input to a closed-cycle Brayton heat engine. The solar dynamic unit will be flown on the Russian Mir space station in anticipation of use on the International Space Station Alpha. By the time the power system is launched, the Mir will be a spatially complex configuration which will have, in addition to the three-gimbaled solar dynamic unit, eleven solar array wings that are either fixed or track the Sun along one axis and a variety or repositionable habitation and experiment modules. The proximity of arrays to modules creates a situation which makes it highly probable that there will be varying solar flux due to shadowing on the solar dynamic unit and some of the arrays throughout the orbit. Shadowing causes fluctuations in the power output from the arrays and the solar dynamic power system, thus reducing the energy capabilities of the spacecraft. An assessment of the capabilities of the power system under these conditions is an important part in influencing the design and operations of the spacecraft and predicting its energy performance. This paper describes the results obtained from using the Orbiting Spacecraft Shadowing Analysis Station program that was integrated into the Station Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE) electrical power system computer program. OSSA allows one to consider the numerous complex factors for analyzing the shadowing effects on the electrical power system including the variety of spacecraft hardware geometric configurations, yearly and daily orbital variations in the vehicle attitude and orbital maneuvers (for communications coverage, payload pointing requirements and rendezvous/docking with other

  12. The impact of shadow evacuation on evacuation time estimates for nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Weinisch, Kevin; Brueckner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A shadow evacuation is the voluntary evacuation of people from areas outside a declared evacuation area. Shadow evacuees can congest roadways and inhibit the egress of those evacuating from an area at risk. Federal regulations stipulate that nuclear power plant (NPP) licensees in the United States must conduct an Evacuation Time Estimate (ETE) study after each decennial census. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published federal guidance for conducting ETE studies in November 2011. This guidance document recommends the consideration of a Shadow Region which extends 5 miles radially beyond the existing 10-mile Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) for NPPs. The federal guidance also suggests the consideration of the evacuation of 20 percent of the permanent resident population in the Shadow Region in addition to 100 percent of the declared evacuation region within the EPZ when conducting ETE studies. The 20 percent recommendation was questioned in a March 2013 report prepared by the US Government Accountability Office. This article discusses the effects on ETE of increasing the shadow evacuation from 20 to 60 percent for 48 NPPs in the United States. Only five (10 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase (30 minutes or greater) in 90th percentile ETE (time to evacuate 90 percent of the population in the EPZ), while seven (15 percent) of the 48 sites show a significant increase in 100th percentile ETE (time to evacuate all population in the EPZ). Study areas that are prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation are classified as one of four types; case studies are presented for one plant of each type to explain why the shadow evacuation significantly affects ETE. A matrix of the four case types can be used by emergency management personnel to predict during planning stages whether the evacuated area is prone to a significant increase in ETE due to shadow evacuation. Potential mitigation tactics that reduce demand (public information

  13. Automated vessel shadow segmentation of fovea-centered spectral-domain images from multiple OCT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2014-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high reso- lution, three-dimensional (3D) cross sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and glaucoma.1 Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment requires a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using different scanning devices, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, the use of OCT imaging devices from different vendors, combined with patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation, potentially leading to incorrect patient diagnosis or treatment analysis. Image registration can be used to precisely compare disease states by registering differing 3D scans to one another. In order to align 3D scans from different time- points and vendors using registration, landmarks are required, the most obvious being the retinal vasculature. Presented here is a fully automated cross-vendor method to acquire retina vessel locations for OCT registration from fovea centred 3D SD-OCT scans based on vessel shadows. Noise filtered OCT scans are flattened based on vendor retinal layer segmentation, to extract the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) layer of the retina. Voxel based layer profile analysis and k-means clustering is used to extract candidate vessel shadow regions from the RPE layer. In conjunction, the extracted RPE layers are combined to generate a projection image featuring all candidate vessel shadows. Image processing methods for vessel segmentation of the OCT constructed projection image are then applied to optimize the accuracy of OCT vessel shadow segmentation through the removal of false positive shadow regions such as those caused by exudates and cysts. Validation of segmented vessel shadows uses

  14. Constraining the spin and the deformation parameters from the black hole shadow

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Naoki; Li, Zilong; Bambi, Cosimo E-mail: zilongli@fudan.edu.cn

    2014-06-01

    Within 5–10 years, very-long baseline interferometry (VLBI) facilities will be able to directly image the accretion flow around SgrA*, the super-massive black hole candidate at the center of the Galaxy, and observe the black hole ''shadow''. In 4-dimensional general relativity, the no-hair theorem asserts that uncharged black holes are described by the Kerr solution and are completely specified by their mass M and by their spin parameter a. In this paper, we explore the possibility of distinguishing Kerr and Bardeen black holes from their shadow. In Hioki and Maeda (2009), under the assumption that the background geometry is described by the Kerr solution, the authors proposed an algorithm to estimate the value of a/M by measuring the distortion parameter δ, an observable quantity that characterizes the shape of the shadow. Here, we try to extend their approach. Since the Hioki-Maeda distortion parameter is degenerate with respect to the spin and possible deviations from the Kerr solution, one has to measure another quantity to test the Kerr black hole hypothesis. We study a few possibilities. We find that it is extremely difficult to distinguish Kerr and Bardeen black holes from the sole observation of the shadow, and out of reach for the near future. The combination of the measurement of the shadow with possible accurate radio observations of a pulsar in a compact orbit around SgrA* could be a more promising strategy to verify the Kerr black hole paradigm.

  15. Horizon structure and shadow of rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atamurotov, Farruh

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the horizon structure of the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld solution which goes over to the Einstein-Maxwell's Kerr-Newman solution as the Born-Infeld parameter goes to innity ( ! 1). We nd that for a given , mass M and charge Q, there exist critical spinning parameter aE and rEH, which corresponds to an extremal Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole with degenerate horizons, and aE decreases and rEH increases with increase in the Born-Infeld parameter . While a < aE describe a non-extremal Einstein-Born- Infeld black hole with outer and inner horizons. Similarly, the effect of on innite redshift surface and in turn on ergoregion is also included. It is well known that a black hole can cast a shadow as an optical appearance due to its strong gravitational eld. We also investigate the shadow cast by the rotating Einstein- Born-Infeld black hole and demonstrate that the null geodesic equations can be integrated that allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole which is found to be a dark zone covered by a circle. Interestingly, the shadows of Einstein-Born-Infeld black hole is slightly smaller than for the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole which are concentric circles, for different values of the Born-Infeld parameter , whose radius decreases with increase in the value of parameter . The shadows for the rotating Einstein-Born-Infeld solution are also included.

  16. Reflectance calibration and shadow effect of VNIS spectra acquired by the Yutu rover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Sen; Lin, Yang-Ting; Liu, Bin; Yang, Wei; He, Zhi-Ping; Xing, Wei-Fan

    2015-09-01

    Yutu is the first lunar rover after the Apollo program and Luna missions. One of the payloads on the Yutu rover, the Visible and Near-infrared Imaging Spectrometer (VNIS), has acquired four VIS/NIR images and SWIR spectra near its landing site in Mare Imbrium. The radiance images were reduced through repairing bad lines and bad points, and applying flat field correction, and then were converted into reflectance values based on the solar irradiance and angles of incidence. A significant shadow effect was observed in the VIS/NIR image. The shadowed regions show lower reflectance with a darkening trend compared with illuminated regions. The reflectance increased by up to 24% for entire images and 17% for the VIS/NIR-SWIR overlapping regions after shadow correction. The correction for the shadow effect will remarkably decrease the estimate of FeO content, by up to 4.9 wt.% in this study. The derived FeO contents of CD-005∼008 after shadow correction are around 18.0 wt.%.

  17. Viewing the Shadow of the Black Hole at the Galactic Center.

    PubMed

    Falcke; Melia; Agol

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, evidence for the existence of an ultracompact concentration of dark mass associated with the radio source Sagittarius A* in the Galactic center has become very strong. However, unambiguous proof that this object is indeed a black hole is still lacking. A defining characteristic of a black hole is the event horizon. To a distant observer, the event horizon casts a relatively large "shadow" with an apparent diameter of approximately 10 gravitational radii that is due to the bending of light by the black hole, and this shadow is nearly independent of the black hole spin or orientation. The predicted size ( approximately 30 µas) of this shadow for Sgr A* approaches the resolution of current radio interferometers. If the black hole is maximally spinning and viewed edge-on, then the shadow will be offset by approximately 8 µas from the center of mass and will be slightly flattened on one side. Taking into account the scatter broadening of the image in the interstellar medium and the finite achievable telescope resolution, we show that the shadow of Sgr A* may be observable with very long baseline interferometry at submillimeter wavelengths, assuming that the accretion flow is optically thin in this region of the spectrum. Hence, there exists a realistic expectation of imaging the event horizon of a black hole within the next few years.

  18. Activated partial thromboplastin time and minor coagulopathies.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, W E; Assmus, S L; Montgomery, R R; Dubansky, A S

    1979-01-01

    Five commercially available activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test systems were compared with the kaolin partial thromboplastin time (KPTT) method to determine sensitivity in detecting minor coagulation defects. All reagent systems detected severe factor VIII-, IX-, and XI-deficient hemophilia. Homozygous states of factor XII deficiency, Fletcher factor deficiency, and high-molecular-weight kininogen deficiency (Fitzgerald trait) also showed abnormally long APTTs by all systems. Of 19 samples from patients with deficiencies of factors XII, VIII, IX, XI, and II ranging from 2.5 to 52%, eight had deficiencies that were not detected by reagent A (ellagic acid); two, by reagent B (ellagic acid); two, by reagent C (kaolin); one, by reagent D (silica); one, by the KPTT method. All deficiencies were detected by reagent E (celite). Heparin effect on plasma was less well detected by reagent A (ellagic acid) than with the other test systems. APTT test systems can vary greatly in their abilities to detect minor coagulation abnormalities.

  19. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  20. Elegant Shadow Making Tiny Force Visible for Water-Walking Arthropods and Updated Archimedes' Principle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yelong; Lu, Hongyu; Yin, Wei; Tao, Dashuai; Shi, Lichun; Tian, Yu

    2016-10-07

    Forces acted on legs of water-walking arthropods with weights in dynes are of great interest for entomologist, physicists, and engineers. While their floating mechanism has been recognized, the in vivo leg forces stationary have not yet been simultaneously achieved. In this study, their elegant bright-edged leg shadows are used to make the tiny forces visible and measurable based on the updated Archimedes' principle. The force was approximately proportional to the shadow area with a resolution from nanonewton to piconewton/pixel. The sum of leg forces agreed well with the body weight measured with an accurate electronic balance, which verified updated Archimedes' principle at the arthropod level. The slight changes of vertical body weight focus position and the body pitch angle have also been revealed for the first time. The visualization of tiny force by shadow is cost-effective and very sensitive and could be used in many other applications.