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Sample records for partial t-cell receptor

  1. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  2. T cell costimulation by chemokine receptors.

    PubMed

    Molon, Barbara; Gri, Giorgia; Bettella, Monica; Gómez-Moutón, Concepción; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Martínez-A, Carlos; Mañes, Santos; Viola, Antonella

    2005-05-01

    Signals mediated by chemokine receptors may compete with T cell receptor stop signals and determine the duration of T cell-antigen-presenting cell interactions. Here we show that during T cell stimulation by antigen-presenting cells, T cell chemokine receptors coupled to G(q) and/or G(11) protein were recruited to the immunological synapse by a G(i)-independent mechanism. When chemokine receptors were sequestered at the immunological synapse, T cells became insensitive to chemotactic gradients, formed more stable conjugates and finally responded with enhanced proliferation and cytokine production. We suggest that chemokine receptor trapping at the immunological synapse enhances T cell activation by improving T cell-antigen-presenting cell attraction and impeding the 'distraction' of successfully engaged T cells by other chemokine sources.

  3. Changing T cell specificity by retroviral T cell receptor display

    PubMed Central

    Kessels, Helmut W. H. G.; van den Boom, Marly D.; Spits, Hergen; Hooijberg, Erik; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2000-01-01

    The diversity of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is limited, because of the processes of positive and negative T cell selection. To obtain T cells with specificities beyond the immune system's capacity, we have developed a strategy for retroviral TCR display. In this approach, a library of T cell variants is generated in vitro and introduced into a TCR-negative murine T cell line by retroviral transfer. We document the value of TCR display by the creation of a library of an influenza A-specific TCR and the subsequent in vitro selection of TCRs that either recognize the parental influenza epitope or that have acquired a specificity for a different influenza A strain. The resulting in vitro selected TCRs induce efficient T cell activation after ligand recognition and are of equal or higher potency than the in vivo generated parent receptor. TCR display should prove a useful strategy for the generation of high-affinity tumor-specific TCRs for gene transfer purposes. PMID:11121060

  4. Preferential expansion of human virus-specific multifunctional central memory T cells by partial targeting of the IL-2 receptor signaling pathway: the key role of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schmueck, Michael; Fischer, Annika M; Hammoud, Ben; Brestrich, Gordon; Fuehrer, Henrike; Luu, Si-Hong; Mueller, Karin; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2012-05-15

    Effector memory T cells are effective in controlling acute infections, but central memory T cells play a key role in long-lasting protection against viruses and tumors. In vivo/in vitro challenge by Ag commonly supports the generation of effector memory T cells with limited longevity. To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time in the human system and under rechallenge conditions that targeting IL-2R by partial mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition or blocking IL-2Rα enriches human CD4(+)/CD8(+) central memory T cells within the virus-specific T cell product associated with enhanced functionality (i.e., multicytokine secretors, including IL-2; enhanced CD137 and CD107a expression on CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, respectively; and killing infected target cells). Remarkably, the effects on CD8(+) T cells are mainly mediated via the enhancement of CD4(+) T cell function. The data reveal new insights into the role of CD4(+) T cell support for the quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, even under rechallenge conditions. Moreover, our method offers a new approach to improve the long-lasting efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy in patients.

  5. T Cell Receptor-Engineered T Cells to Treat Solid Tumors: T Cell Processing Toward Optimal T Cell Fitness

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; van Brakel, Mandy; Groot-van Ruijven, Corrien M.; van Elzakker, Pascal M.M.L.; van Krimpen, Brigitte; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Therapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T cells specific for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), we observed toxicities that (most likely) indicated in vivo function of CAR T cells as well as low T cell persistence and clinical response rates. The latter observations were confirmed by later clinical trials in other solid tumor types and other gene-modified T cells. To improve the efficacy of T cell therapy, we have redefined in vitro conditions to generate T cells with young phenotype, a key correlate with clinical outcome. For their impact on gene-modified T cell phenotype and function, we have tested various anti-CD3/CD28 mAb-based T cell activation and expansion conditions as well as several cytokines prior to and/or after gene transfer using two different receptors: CAIX CAR and MAGE-C2(ALK)/HLA-A2 TCR. In a total set of 16 healthy donors, we observed that T cell activation with soluble anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs in the presence of both IL15 and IL21 prior to TCR gene transfer resulted in enhanced proportions of gene-modified T cells with a preferred in vitro phenotype and better function. T cells generated according to these processing methods demonstrated enhanced binding of pMHC, and an enhanced proportion of CD8+, CD27+, CD62L+, CD45RA+T cells. These new conditions will be translated into a GMP protocol in preparation of a clinical adoptive therapy trial to treat patients with MAGE-C2-positive tumors. PMID:25423330

  6. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. T-cell receptor variable region gene usage in T-cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Garman, R D; Ko, J L; Vulpe, C D; Raulet, D H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined T-cell receptor alpha- and beta-chain variable (V) region gene usage in T-cell populations predicted to have different major histocompatibility complex-restriction specificities. Using a sensitive ribonuclease protection assay to measure T-cell receptor mRNA levels, we found no striking differences in the usage of three V alpha genes and three V beta genes in T-cell populations from three congeneic H-2-disparate strains of mice and between the mutually exclusive Ly2+ L3T4- and Ly2- L3T4+ T-cell subpopulations. These results suggest that major histocompatibility complex restriction cannot be explained by the differential usage of nonoverlapping V alpha or V beta gene pools. In contrast, striking but unpredictable differences were seen in V gene usage in populations of T cells selected by activation with particular alloantigens. Images PMID:3487085

  8. Preselection Thymocytes Are More Sensitive to T Cell Receptor Stimulation Than Mature T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gayle M.; Schober, Sonya L.; Endrizzi, Bart T.; Dutcher, Angela K.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    1998-01-01

    During T cell development, thymocytes which are tolerant to self-peptides but reactive to foreign peptides are selected. The current model for thymocyte selection proposes that self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes that bind the T cell receptor with low affinity will promote positive selection while those with high affinity will result in negative selection. Upon thymocyte maturation, such low affinity self-peptide–MHC ligands no longer provoke a response, but foreign peptides can incidentally be high affinity ligands and can therefore stimulate T cells. For this model to work, thymocytes must be more sensitive to ligand than mature T cells. Contrary to this expectation, several groups have shown that thymocytes are less responsive than mature T cells to anti-T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)/CD3 mAb stimulation. Additionally, the lower TCR levels on thymocytes, compared with T cells, would potentially correlate with decreased thymocyte sensitivity. Here we compared preselection thymocytes and mature T cells for early activation events in response to peptide–MHC ligands. Remarkably, the preselection thymocytes were more responsive than mature T cells when stimulated with low affinity peptide variants, while both populations responded equally well to the antigenic peptide. This directly demonstrates the increased sensitivity of thymocytes compared with T cells for TCR engagement by peptide–MHC complexes. PMID:9815264

  9. Differential T cell receptor-mediated signaling in naive and memory CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Farber, D L; Acuto, O; Bottomly, K

    1997-08-01

    Naive and memory CD4 T cells differ in cell surface phenotype, function, activation requirements, and modes of regulation. To investigate the molecular bases for the dichotomies between naive and memory CD4 T cells and to understand how the T cell receptor (TCR) directs diverse functional outcomes, we investigated proximal signaling events triggered through the TCR/CD3 complex in naive and memory CD4 T cell subsets isolated on the basis of CD45 isoform expression. Naive CD4 T cells signal through TCR/CD3 similar to unseparated CD4 T cells, producing multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated protein species overall and phosphorylating the T cell-specific ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase which is recruited to the CD3zeta subunit of the TCR. Memory CD4 T cells, however, exhibit a unique pattern of signaling through TCR/CD3. Following stimulation through TCR/CD3, memory CD4 T cells produce fewer species of tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates and fail to phosphorylate ZAP-70, yet unphosphorylated ZAP-70 can associate with the TCR/CD3 complex. Moreover, a 26/28-kDa phosphorylated doublet is associated with CD3zeta in resting and activated memory but not in naive CD4 T cells. Despite these differences in the phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and CD3-associated proteins, the ZAP-70-related kinase, p72syk, exhibits similar phosphorylation in naive and memory T cell subsets, suggesting that this kinase could function in place of ZAP-70 in memory CD4 T cells. These results indicate that proximal signals are differentially coupled to the TCR in naive versus memory CD4 T cells, potentially leading to distinct downstream signaling events and ultimately to the diverse functions elicited by these two CD4 T cell subsets.

  10. Vaccination against Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis with T Cell Receptor Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Mark D.; Winters, Steven T.; Olee, Tsaiwei; Powell, Henry C.; Carlo, Dennis J.; Brostoff, Steven W.

    1989-11-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system mediated by CD4+ T cells reactive with myelin basic protein (MBP). Rats were rendered resistant to the induction of EAE by vaccination with synthetic peptides corresponding to idiotypic determinants of the β chain VDJ region and Jα regions of the T cell receptor (TCR) that are conserved among encephalitogenic T cells. These findings demonstrate the utility of TCR peptide vaccination for modulating the activity of autoreactive T cells and represent a general therapeutic approach for T cell--mediated pathogenesis.

  11. SNX17 Affects T Cell Activation by Regulating T Cell Receptor and Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Douglas G.; Piotrowski, Joshua T.; Dick, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    A key component in T cell activation is the endosomal recycling of receptors to the cell surface, thereby allowing continual integration of signaling and antigen recognition. One protein potentially involved in T cell receptor transport is sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). SNX proteins have been found to bind proteins involved in T cell activation, but specifically the role of SNX17 in receptor recycling and T cell activation is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we find that SNX17 co-localizes with TCR and localizes to the immune synapse in T-APC conjugates. Significantly, knockdown of the SNX17 resulted in fewer T-APC conjugates, lower CD69, TCR, and LFA-1 surface expression, as well as lower overall TCR recycling compared to control T cells. Lastly, we identified the FERM-domain of SNX17 as being responsible in the binding and trafficking of TCR and LFA-1 to the cell surface. These data suggest that SNX17 plays a role in the maintenance of normal surface levels of activating receptors and integrins to permit optimum T cell activation at the immune synapse. PMID:25825439

  12. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy.

  13. A sharp T-cell antigen receptor signaling threshold for T-cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Zikherman, Julie; Mueller, James L.; Ashouri, Judith F.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Cheng, Debra A.; Chen, Yiling; Shokat, Kevan M.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling is essential for activation, proliferation, and effector function of T cells. Modulation of both intensity and duration of TCR signaling can regulate these events. However, it remains unclear how individual T cells integrate such signals over time to make critical cell-fate decisions. We have previously developed an engineered mutant allele of the critical T-cell kinase zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70 kDa (Zap70) that is catalytically inhibited by a small molecule inhibitor, thereby blocking TCR signaling specifically and efficiently. We have also characterized a fluorescent reporter Nur77–eGFP transgenic mouse line in which T cells up-regulate GFP uniquely in response to TCR stimulation. The combination of these technologies unmasked a sharp TCR signaling threshold for commitment to cell division both in vitro and in vivo. Further, we demonstrate that this threshold is independent of both the magnitude of the TCR stimulus and Interleukin 2. Similarly, we identify a temporal threshold of TCR signaling that is required for commitment to proliferation, after which T cells are able to proliferate in a Zap70 kinase-independent manner. Taken together, our studies reveal a sharp threshold for the magnitude and duration of TCR signaling required for commitment of T cells to proliferation. These results have important implications for understanding T-cell responses to infection and optimizing strategies for immunomodulatory drug delivery. PMID:25136127

  14. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management

    PubMed Central

    Brudno, Jennifer N.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27207799

  15. “The role of T cell receptor signaling thresholds in guiding T cell fate decisions”

    PubMed Central

    Zikherman, Julie; Au-Yeung, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Canonical T cell receptor signal transduction has been extensively studied and dissected in cell lines and primary lymphocytes. However, a static depiction of this signaling cascade fails to capture the complex and dynamic process by which individual T cells discriminate TCR:peptide-MHC affinity, then integrate signals over time to drive discrete cellular behaviors such as thymic selection, proliferation, and cytokine production. Recent technological advances have made it possible to study complex lymphocyte behavior on a single cell level and are revealing how T cells interpret information about affinity and abundance of antigen in order to make life-and-death cell fate decisions individually and collectively. PMID:25660212

  16. Chimaeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huan-huan; Wang, Dan-dan; Yan, Da-li; Hu, Yong; Yang, Su-jin; Liu, Si-wen

    2017-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, as one of the cancer immunotherapies, have heralded a new era of treating cancer. The accumulating data, especially about CAR-modified T cells against CD19 support that CAR T-cell therapy is a highly effective immune therapy for B-cell malignancies. Apart from CD19, there have been many trials of CAR T cells directed other tumour specific or associated antigens (TSAs/TAAs) in haematologic malignancies and solid tumours. This review will briefly summarize basic CAR structure, parts of reported TSAs/TAAs, results of the clinical trials of CAR T-cell therapies as well as two life-threatening side effects. Experiments in vivo or in vitro, ongoing clinical trials and the outlook for CAR T-cell therapies also be included. Our future efforts will focus on identification of more viable cancer targets and more strategies to make CAR T-cell therapy safer. PMID:28053197

  17. Measuring T cell receptor and T cell gene expression diversity in antigen-responsive human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Eugster, Anne; Lindner, Annett; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Wilhelm, Carmen; Dietz, Sevina; Catani, Mara; Ziegler, Anette-G; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2013-12-31

    T cells have diversity in TCR, epitope recognition, and cytokine production, and can be used for immune monitoring. Furthermore, clonal expansion of TCR families in disease may provide opportunities for TCR-directed therapies. We developed methodology for sequencing expressed genes of TCR alpha and beta chains from single cells and applied this to vaccine (tetanus-toxoid)-responsive CD4(+) T cells. TCR alpha and beta chains were both successfully sequenced in 1309 (43%) of 3038 CD4(+) T cells yielding 677 different receptors. TRAV and TRBV gene usage differed between tetanus-toxoid-responsive and non-responsive cells (p=0.004 and 0.0002), and there was extensive TCR diversity in tetanus-toxoid-responsive cells within individuals. Identical TCRs could be recovered in different samples from the same subject: TCRs identified after booster vaccination were frequent in pre-booster memory T cells (31% of pre-booster TCR), and also identified in pre-booster vaccination naïve cells (6.5%). No TCR was shared between subjects, but tetanus toxoid-responsive cells sharing one of their TCR chains were observed within and between subjects. Coupling single-cell gene expression profiling to TCR sequencing revealed examples of distinct cytokine profiles in cells bearing identical TCR. Novel molecular methodology demonstrates extensive diversity of Ag-responsive CD4(+) T cells within and between individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Design of T cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, A.S.; Stone, J.D.; Soto, C.M.; Engels, B.; Schreiber, H.; Roy, E.J.; Kranz, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, that introduces antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher affinity TCRs against class I MHC antigens could drive the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here we describe a high-throughput platform of “reverse biochemistry” whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8+ T cells expressing the highest affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the tumor infiltrating lymphocyte population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4+ T cells in the tumor, suggesting they played a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR binding properties that promote peripheral T cell survival and tumor elimination. PMID:23052828

  19. Partial and transient modulation of the CD3–T-cell receptor complex, elicited by low-dose regimens of monoclonal anti-CD3, is sufficient to induce disease remission in non-obese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Devangi S; Christmas, Rudy A; Waldmann, Herman; Rosenzweig, Michael

    2010-01-01

    It has been established that a total of 250 μg of monoclonal anti-mouse CD3 F(ab′)2 fragments, administered daily (50 μg per dose), induces remission of diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of autoimmune diabetes by preventing β cells from undergoing further autoimmune attack. We evaluated lower-dose regimens of monoclonal anti-CD3 F(ab′)2 in diabetic NOD mice for their efficacy and associated pharmacodynamic (PD) effects, including CD3–T-cell receptor (TCR) complex modulation, complete blood counts and proportions of circulating CD4+, CD8+ and CD4+ FoxP3+ T cells. Four doses of 2 μg (total dose 8 μg) induced 53% remission of diabetes, similarly to the 250 μg dose regimen, whereas four doses of 1 μg induced only 16% remission. While the 250 μg dose regimen produced nearly complete and sustained modulation of the CD3 –TCR complex, lower doses, spaced 3 days apart, which induced similar remission rates, elicited patterns of transient and partial modulation. In treated mice, the proportions of circulating CD4+ and CD8+ T cells decreased, whereas the proportions of CD4+ FoxP3+ T cells increased; these effects were transient. Mice with greater residual β-cell function, estimated using blood glucose and C-peptide levels at the initiation of treatment, were more likely to enter remission than mice with more advanced disease. Thus, lower doses of monoclonal anti-CD3 that produced only partial and transient modulation of the CD3–TCR complex induced remission rates comparable to higher doses of monoclonal anti-CD3. Accordingly, in a clinical setting, lower-dose regimens may be efficacious and may also improve the safety profile of therapy with monoclonal anti-CD3, potentially including reductions in cytokine release-related syndromes and maintenance of pathogen-specific immunosurveillance during treatment. PMID:20059577

  20. Elutriated lymphocytes for manufacturing chimeric antigen receptor T cells.

    PubMed

    Stroncek, David F; Lee, Daniel W; Ren, Jiaqiang; Sabatino, Marianna; Highfill, Steven; Khuu, Hanh; Shah, Nirali N; Kaplan, Rosandra N; Fry, Terry J; Mackall, Crystal L

    2017-03-16

    Clinical trials of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cells manufactured from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) concentrates for the treatment of hematologic malignancies have been promising, but CAR T cell yields have been variable. This variability is due in part to the contamination of the PBMC concentrates with monocytes and granulocytes. Counter-flow elutriation allows for the closed system separation of lymphocytes from monocytes and granulocytes. We investigated the use of PBMC concentrates enriched for lymphocytes using elutriation for manufacturing 8 CD19- and 5 GD2-CAR T cell products. When compared to PBMC concentrates, lymphocyte-enriched elutriation fractions contained greater proportions of CD3+ and CD56+ cells and reduced proportions of CD14+ and CD15+ cells. All 13 CAR T cell products manufactured using the elutriated lymphocytes yielded sufficient quantities of transduced CAR T cells to meet clinical dose criteria. The GD2-CAR T cell products contained significantly more T cells and transduced T cells than the CD19-CAR T cell products. A comparison of the yields of CAR T cells produced from elutriated lymphocytes with the yields of CAR T cells previous produced from cells isolated from PBMC concentrates by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection or by anti-CD3/CD28 bead selection plus plastic adherence found that greater quantities of GD2-CAR T cells were produced from elutriated lymphocytes, but not CD19-CAR T cells. Enrichment of PBMC concentrates for lymphocytes using elutriation increased the quantity of GD2-CAR T cells produced. These results provide further evidence that CAR T cell expansion is inhibited by monocytes and granulocytes.

  1. T-Cell Tumor Elimination as a Result of T-Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Longo, Dan L.; Bridges, Sandra H.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been shown that activation of murine T-cell hybridomas with antigen inhibits their growth in vitro. The ``suicide'' of these neoplastic T cells upon stimulation with antigen suggested the possibility that activation via the antigen-specific receptor could also inhibit the growth of neoplastic T cells in vivo. To test this, mice were subcutaneously inoculated with antigen-specific T-cell hybridomas and then treated intraperitoneally with antigen. Administration of the appropriate antigen immediately after inoculation with the T-cell hybridoma abrogated tumor formation; antigen administered after tumors had become established decreased the tumor burden and, in a substantial fraction of animals, led to long-term survival. The efficacy of antigen therapy was due to both a direct inhibitory effect on tumor growth and the induction of host immunity. These studies demonstrate the utility of cellular activation as a means of inhibiting neoplastic T-cell growth in vivo and provide a rationale for studying the use of less selective reagents that can mimic the activating properties of antigen, such as monoclonal antibodies, in the treatment of T-cell neoplasms of unknown antigen specificity.

  2. How Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design Affects Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gacerez, Albert T; Arellano, Benjamine; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been developed to treat tumors and have shown great success against B cell malignancies. Exploiting modular designs and swappable domains, CARs can target an array of cell surface antigens and, upon receptor-ligand interactions, direct signaling cascades, thereby driving T cell effector functions. CARs have been designed using receptors, ligands, or scFv binding domains. Different regions of a CAR have each been found to play a role in determining the overall efficacy of CAR T cells. Therefore, this review provides an overview of CAR construction and common designs. Each CAR region is discussed in the context of its importance to a CAR's function. Additionally, the review explores how various engineering strategies have been applied to CAR T cells in order to regulate CAR T cell function and activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2590-2598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Multimolecular associations of the T-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Beyers, A D; Spruyt, L L; Williams, A F

    1992-09-01

    T cells are activated when the T-cell receptor for antigen (TCR) interacts with an antigenic peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule on the surface of another cell. It is often assumed that T-cell activation is induced by the crosslinking of TCRs. In this article, Albertus Beyers, Louise Spruyt and Alan Williams argue that this mechanism is not generally applicable. They hypothesize that the key event in T-cell activation is the formation of multimolecular complexes consisting of the TCR and several other polypeptides, including CD4 or CD8, CD2, CD5 and the associated tyrosine kinases p59(fyn) and p56(lck).

  4. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  5. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  7. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  8. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells.

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2017-08-31

    New therapies are needed for patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas that are resistant to standard therapies. Indeed, unresponsiveness to standard chemotherapy and relapse after autologous stem-cell transplantation are indicators of an especially poor prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are emerging as a novel treatment modality for these patients. Clinical trial data have demonstrated the potent activity of anti-CD19 CAR T cells against multiple subtypes of B-cell lymphoma, including diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, mantle-cell lymphoma, and marginal-zone lymphoma. Importantly, anti-CD19 CAR T cells have impressive activity against chemotherapy-refractory lymphoma, inducing durable complete remissions lasting >2 years in some patients with refractory DLBCL. CAR-T-cell therapies are, however, associated with potentially fatal toxicities, including cytokine-release syndrome and neurological toxicities. CAR T cells with novel target antigens, including CD20, CD22, and κ-light chain for B-cell lymphomas, and CD30 for Hodgkin and T-cell lymphomas, are currently being investigated in clinical trials. Centrally manufactured CAR T cells are also being tested in industry-sponsored multicentre clinical trials, and will probably soon become a standard therapy. Herein, we review the clinical efficacy and toxicity of CAR-T-cell therapies for lymphoma, and discuss their limitations and future directions with regard to toxicity management, CAR designs and CAR-T-cell phenotypes, conditioning regimens, and combination therapies.

  10. Triggering a Second T Cell Receptor on Diabetogenic T Cells Can Prevent Induction of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Gianluca; Cooke, Anne; Papafio, Ruby Quartey; Haskins, Kathryn; Stockinger, Brigitta

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we test the hypothesis that triggering of a second T cell receptor (TCR) expressed on diabetogenic T cells might initiate the onset of diabetes. A cross between two TCR-transgenic strains, the BDC2.5 strain that carries diabetogenic TCRs and the A18 strain that carries receptors specific for C5, was set up to monitor development of diabetes after activation through the C5 TCR. F1 BDC2.5 × A18 mice developed diabetes spontaneously beyond 3–4 mo of age. Although their T cells express both TCRs constitutively, the A18 receptor is expressed at extremely low levels. In vitro activation of dual TCR T cells followed by adoptive transfer into neonatal or adult F1 mice resulted in diabetes onset and death within 10 d after transfer. In contrast, in vivo immunization of F1 mice with different forms of C5 antigen not only failed to induce diabetes but protected mice from the spontaneous onset of diabetes. We propose that antigenic stimulation of cells with low levels of TCR produces signals inadequate for full activation, resulting instead in anergy. PMID:10449528

  11. Chemokine Receptor Requirements for Epidermal T-Cell Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Tubo, Noah J.; McLachlan, James B.; Campbell, James J.

    2011-01-01

    Inflamed skin contains CD4 T-cell subsets that express chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR6, and/or CCR10. Prior attempts to reveal the distinct role(s) of each receptor in T-cell trafficking to skin have not produced a coherent story. Different conclusions drawn by separate research groups are difficult to reconcile because of the disparate inflammation models used. Here we directly compare CD4 T cells from wild-type, CCR4−/−, CCR6−/−, and CCR10−/− mice in parallel assays of trafficking to skin. Our models require direct competition between wild-type and receptor-deficient populations for access to inflamed cutaneous sites. Major histocompatibility complex-peptide tetramers allowed us to identify antigen-specific endogenous long-term memory CD4 T cells within skin after multiple topical immunizations. We separately analyzed cells from the dermal and epidermal layers, allowing us to assess the involvement of each receptor in trafficking between dermis and epidermis. We found that CCR4 deficiency reduces accumulation of memory CD4 T cells in skin by approximately 20-fold, but neither CCR6 nor CCR10 deficiency yielded any detectable effects. Strikingly, no differences in dermal versus epidermal localization were observed for cells lacking any of these three receptors. Our findings raise the possibility that CCR6 and CCR10 play (as yet) unknown roles in cutaneous T-cell immunology, unrelated to skin-specific trafficking. PMID:21641376

  12. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  13. Concomitant T-cell receptor alpha and delta gene rearrangements in individual T-cell precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, S D; Pelkonen, J; Hurwitz, J L

    1990-01-01

    A debate has recently surfaced concerning the degree of precommitment attained by alpha beta and gamma delta T-cell precursors prior to T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement. It has been suggested that precursors may be precommitted to rearrange either alpha or delta genes, but not both, thus giving rise to alpha beta- and gamma delta-producing T cells, respectively. Alternatively, the precursors may be flexible with regard to potential TCR gene rearrangements. To address this controversy, the gene rearrangements among a group of T-cell hybridomas from fetal, newborn, and early postnatal mouse thymi were examined. Six probes spanning the delta and alpha loci were used in Southern blot analyses to characterize the rearrangements which occurred on homologous chromosomes in each cell. Although homologous chromosomes often rearranged in synchrony within the alpha locus, a number of hybridomas were found which had retained a delta rearrangement on one chromosome and an alpha rearrangement on the second. Results show that a precommitment by T cells to rearrange delta or alpha genes in a mutually exclusive manner is not an absolute feature of mouse thymocyte development. Images PMID:2164690

  14. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-cell Therapies for Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Mikkilineni, Lekha; Kochenderfer, James N

    2017-09-19

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a nearly always incurable malignancy of plasma cells, so new approaches to treatment are needed. T-cell therapies are a promising approach for treating MM, with a mechanism of action different than those of standard MM treatments. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are fusion proteins incorporating antigen-recognition domains and T-cell signaling domains. T-cells genetically engineered to express CARs can specifically recognize antigens. Success of CAR T-cells against leukemia and lymphoma has encouraged development of CAR T-cell therapies for MM. Target antigens for CARs must be expressed on malignant cells, but expression on normal cells must be absent or limited. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed by normal and malignant plasma cells. CAR T-cells targeting B-cell maturation antigen have demonstrated significant anti-myeloma activity in early clinical trials. Toxicities in these trials, including cytokine-release syndrome, have been similarto toxicities observed in CAR T-cell trials for leukemia. Targeting postulated CD19(+) myeloma stem cells with anti-CD19 CAR T-cells is a novel approach to MM therapy. MM antigens including CD138, CD38, signaling lymphocyte-activating molecule 7 (SLAMF7), and kappa light chain are under investigation as CAR targets. MM is genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, so targeting of more than one antigen might often be required for effective treatment of MM with CAR T cells. Integration of CAR T cells with other myeloma therapies is an important area of future research. CAR T cell therapies for MM are at an early stage of development but have great promise to improve MM treatment. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Hematology.

  15. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shank, Brandon R; Do, Bryan; Sevin, Adrienne; Chen, Sheree E; Neelapu, Sattva S; Horowitz, Sandra B

    2017-03-01

    Patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies who progress through first- or second-line chemotherapy have a poor prognosis. Early clinical trials with autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have demonstrated promising results for patients who have relapsed or refractory disease. Lymphodepleting conditioning regimens, including cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, pentostatin, bendamustine, interleukin-2, and total body irradiation, are often administered before the infusion of CAR T cells, allowing for greater T-cell expansion. The major toxicity associated with CAR T-cell infusions is cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a potentially life-threatening systemic inflammatory disorder. The quick onset and progression of CRS require rapid detection and intervention to reduce treatment-related mortality. Management with tocilizumab can help ameliorate the symptoms of severe CRS, allowing steroids, which diminish the expansion and persistence of CAR T cells, to be reserved for tocilizumab-refractory patients. Other toxicities of CAR T-cell therapy include neutropenia and/or febrile neutropenia, infection, tumor lysis syndrome, neurotoxicity and nausea/vomiting. A review of patients' medications is imperative to eliminate medications that may contribute to treatment-related toxicities. Studies are ongoing to help optimize patient selection, preparation, safety, and management of individuals receiving CAR T cells. Long-term follow-up will help establish the place of CAR T cells in therapy.

  16. Development of promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger-expressing innate CD4 T cells requires stronger T-cell receptor signals than conventional CD4 T cells.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Zhu, Lingqiao; Sofi, Hanief; Lapinski, Philip E; Horai, Reiko; Mueller, Kristen; Stritesky, Gretta L; He, Xi; Teh, Hung-Sia; Wiest, David L; Kappes, Dietmar J; King, Philip D; Hogquist, Kristin A; Schwartzberg, Pamela L; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Chang, Cheong-Hee

    2012-10-02

    MHC class II-expressing thymocytes and thymic epithelial cells can mediate CD4 T-cell selection resulting in functionally distinct thymocyte-selected CD4 (T-CD4) and epithelial-selected CD4 (E-CD4) T cells, respectively. However, little is known about how T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling influences the development of these two CD4 T-cell subsets. To study TCR signaling for T-CD4 T-cell development, we used a GFP reporter system of Nur77 in which GFP intensity directly correlates with TCR signaling strength. T-CD4 T cells expressed higher levels of GFP than E-CD4 T cells, suggesting that T-CD4 T cells received stronger TCR signaling than E-CD4 T cells during selection. Elimination of Ras GTPase-activating protein enhanced E-CD4 but decreased T-CD4 T-cell selection efficiency, suggesting a shift to negative selection. Conversely, the absence of IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase that causes poor E-CD4 T-cell selection due to insufficient TCR signaling improved T-CD4 T-cell generation, consistent with rescue from negative selection. Strong TCR signaling during T-CD4 T-cell development correlates with the expression of the transcription factor promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein. However, although modulation of the signaling strength affected the efficiency of T-CD4 T-cell development during positive and negative selection, the signaling strength is not as important for the effector function of T-CD4 T cells. These findings indicate that innate T-CD4 T cells, together with invariant natural killer T cells and γδ T cells, receive strong TCR signals during their development and that signaling requirements for the development and the effector functions are distinct.

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and T cell receptor (TCR) Modified T cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of CAR and TCR engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. Here, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT. PMID:26188068

  18. Effect of partially hydrolyzed soluble glucan produced by glucosyltrasferases of Streptococcus mutans on stimulating human T cell.

    PubMed

    Choi, Inwook; Jung, Changhwa; Han, Yeook; Lee, Eunjoo H

    2006-01-01

    Soluble glucan, which was obtained from action of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) of Streptococcus mutans on sucrose, was partially hydrolyzed by acetic acid and examined for human T lymphoblast (MOLT-4) stimulating activity. Addition of the partially hydrolyzed glucan (15-60 microg/ml) stimulated human T cell (39-65%) in a dose dependant manner according to MTT assay. Production of interleukine-2 (IL-2) and interleukine-2 receptor (IL-2R) from T cell was increased by 44.5 and 25%, respectively, by addition of partially hydrolyzed glucan (15 microg/ml). These results indicate that stimulation of human T cells by hydrolyzed glucan is probably caused by its effects on stimulating gene expression of IL-2 and IL-2R of human T cell.

  19. SHARPIN controls regulatory T cells by negatively modulating the T cell antigen receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yoon; Jin, Hyung-seung; Lopez, Justine; Lee, Jeeho; Liao, Lujian; Elly, Chris; Liu, Yun-Cai

    2016-01-01

    SHARPIN forms a linear-ubiquitin-chain-assembly complex that promotes signaling via the transcription factor NF-κB. SHARPIN deficiency leads to progressive multi-organ inflammation and immune system malfunction, but how SHARPIN regulates T cell responses is unclear. Here we found that SHARPIN deficiency resulted in a substantial reduction in the number of and defective function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Transfer of SHARPIN-sufficient Treg cells into SHARPIN-deficient mice considerably alleviated their systemic inflammation. SHARPIN-deficient T cells displayed enhanced proximal signaling via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) without an effect on the activation of NF-κB. SHARPIN conjugated with Lys63 (K63)-linked ubiquitin chains, which led to inhibition of the association of TCRζ with the signaling kinase Zap70; this affected the generation of Treg cells. Our study therefore identifies a role for SHARPIN in TCR signaling whereby it maintains immunological homeostasis and tolerance by regulating Treg cells. PMID:26829767

  20. T cell receptor repertoires after adoptive transfer of expanded allogeneic regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Theil, A; Wilhelm, C; Kuhn, M; Petzold, A; Tuve, S; Oelschlägel, U; Dahl, A; Bornhäuser, M; Bonifacio, E; Eugster, A

    2017-02-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg ) therapy has been exploited in autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation and in efforts to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, our knowledge on the in-vivo persistence of transfused Treg is limited. Whether Treg transfusion leads to notable changes in the overall Treg repertoire or whether longevity of Treg in the periphery is restricted to certain clones is unknown. Here we use T cell receptor alpha chain sequencing (TCR-α-NGS) to monitor changes in the repertoire of Treg upon polyclonal expansion and after subsequent adoptive transfer. We applied TCR-α-NGS to samples from two patients with chronic GVHD who received comparable doses of stem cell donor derived expanded Treg . We found that in-vitro polyclonal expansion led to notable repertoire changes in vitro and that Treg cell therapy altered the peripheral Treg repertoire considerably towards that of the infused cell product, to different degrees, in each patient. Clonal changes in the peripheral blood were transient and correlated well with the clinical parameters. We suggest that T cell clonotype analyses using TCR sequencing should be considered as a means to monitor longevity and fate of adoptively transferred T cells.

  1. GABAA receptor plasticity in Jurkat T cells.

    PubMed

    Dionisio, Leonardo; Arias, Verónica; Bouzat, Cecilia; Esandi, María del Carmen

    2013-12-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAAR) mediate inhibitory neurotransmission in the human brain. Neurons modify subunit expression, cellular distribution and function of GABAAR in response to different stimuli, a process named plasticity. Human lymphocytes have a functional neuronal-like GABAergic system with GABAAR acting as inhibitors of proliferation. We here explore if receptor plasticity occurs in lymphocytes. To this end, we analyzed human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells exposed to different physiological stimuli shown to mediate plasticity in neurons: GABA, progesterone and insulin. The exposure to 100 μM GABA differently affected the expression of GABAAR subunits measured at both the mRNA and protein level, showing an increase of α1, β3, and γ2 subunits but no changes in δ subunit. Exposure of Jurkat cells to different stimuli produced different changes in subunit expression: 0.1 μM progesterone decreased δ and 0.5 μM insulin increased β3 subunits. To identify the mechanisms underlying plasticity, we evaluated the Akt pathway, which is involved in the phosphorylation of β subunits and receptor translocation to the membrane. A significant increase of phosphorylated Akt and on the expression of β3 subunit in membrane occurred in cells exposed 15 h to GABA. To determine if plastic changes are translated into functional changes, we performed whole cell recordings. After 15 h GABA-exposure, a significantly higher percentage of cells responded to GABA application when compared to 0 and 40 h exposure, thus indicating that the detected plastic changes may have a role in GABA-modulated lymphocyte function. Our results reveal that lymphocyte GABAAR are modified by different stimuli similarly and by similar mechanisms to those in neurons. This property is of significance for the development of future therapies involving pharmacological modulation of the immune response. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimizing T-cell receptor gene therapy for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic engineering have enabled the delivery of clinical trials using patient T cells redirected to recognize tumor-associated antigens. The most dramatic results have been seen with T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19, a differentiation antigen expressed in B cells and B lineage malignancies. We propose that antigen expression in nonmalignant cells may contribute to the efficacy of T-cell therapy by maintaining effector function and promoting memory. Although CAR recognition is limited to cell surface structures, T-cell receptors (TCRs) can recognize intracellular proteins. This not only expands the range of tumor-associated self-antigens that are amenable for T-cell therapy, but also allows TCR targeting of the cancer mutagenome. We will highlight biological bottlenecks that potentially limit mutation-specific T-cell therapy and may require high-avidity TCRs that are capable of activating effector function when the concentrations of mutant peptides are low. Unexpectedly, modified TCRs with artificially high affinities function poorly in response to low concentration of cognate peptide but pose an increased safety risk as they may respond optimally to cross-reactive peptides. Recent gene-editing tools, such as transcription activator–like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, provide a platform to delete endogenous TCR and HLA genes, which removes alloreactivity and decreases immunogenicity of third-party T cells. This represents an important step toward generic off-the-shelf T-cell products that may be used in the future for the treatment of large numbers of patients. PMID:27207802

  3. The T-cell receptor as immunoglobulin: paradigm regained.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Schluter, S F; Edmundson, A B

    1997-12-01

    The quest to determine the molecular nature of T-lymphocyte receptors for antigen was a "holy grail" to immunologists for over 25 years. This paper updates a review written 15 years ago (Marchalonis JJ, Hunt JC. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 171:127-145, 1982), which proposed that "these molecules apparently do not bear determinants specified by the major histocompatibility complex, but express Ig-related variable regions and constant regions unique to T-cell products." We review subsequent contributions from molecular biology, protein chemistry, peptide immunochemistry, and structural biology establishing that T-cell receptors (TCRs) are members of the immunoglobulin family restricted to T cells that share 3-dimensional structural features, sequence homology, antigenic cross-reactivity, and common mechanisms of diversification with conventional immunoglobulins. These molecules and their light- and heavy-chain siblings appeared contemporaneously in vertebrate evolution with the emergence of sharks. We illustrate how extrapolation of concepts from immunoglobulin to T-cell receptors has aided in the understanding of these often enigmatic molecules, and, conversely, how concepts derived for T-cell receptors such as the role of "superantigens" can be directly applied to conventional immunoglobulins. A second precept that follows from the symmetry of the combining sites of Igs and TCRs is that MHC-restricted antibodies should exist. Such molecules have in fact been reported, and the x-ray crystallography for T-cell receptors suggests that the combining sites recognizing simultaneously MHC and peptide epitopes resemble the combining sites of antibodies directed against protein determinants. Additional immunoglobulin molecules of nonmammalian species have been detected and characterized based upon conserved homology to TCR and Igs, and it is anticipated that further study will enable the identification of more antigen-specific members of the family in mammals as well.

  4. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  5. Optimal T-cell receptor affinity for inducing autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Koehli, Sabrina; Naeher, Dieter; Galati-Fournier, Virginie; Zehn, Dietmar; Palmer, Ed

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor affinity for self-antigen has an important role in establishing self-tolerance. Three transgenic mouse strains expressing antigens of variable affinity for the OVA transgenic-I T-cell receptor were generated to address how TCR affinity affects the efficiency of negative selection, the ability to prime an autoimmune response, and the elimination of the relevant target cell. Mice expressing antigens with an affinity just above the negative selection threshold exhibited the highest risk of developing experimental autoimmune diabetes. The data demonstrate that close to the affinity threshold for negative selection, sufficient numbers of self-reactive T cells escape deletion and create an increased risk for the development of autoimmunity. PMID:25411315

  6. Optimized T-cell receptor-mimic chimeric antigen receptor T cells directed toward the intracellular Wilms Tumor 1 antigen

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, S; Purdon, TJ; Daniyan, AF; Koneru, M; Dao, T; Liu, C; Scheinberg, DA; Brentjens, RJ

    2017-01-01

    CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are clinically effective in a limited set of leukemia patients. However, CAR T-cell therapy thus far has been largely restricted to targeting extracellular tumor-associated antigens (TAA). Herein, we report a T-cell receptor-mimic (TCRm) CAR, termed WT1-28z, that is reactive to a peptide portion of the intracellular onco-protein Wilms Tumor 1(WT1), as it is expressed on the surface of the tumor cell in the context of HLA-A*02:01. T cells modified to express WT1-28z specifically targeted and lysed HLA-A*02:01+ WT1+ tumors and enhanced survival of mice engrafted with HLA-A*02:01+, WT1+ leukemia or ovarian tumors. This in vivo functional validation of TCRm CAR T cells provides the proof-of-concept necessary to expand the range of TAA that can be effectively targeted for immunotherapy to include attractive intracellular targets, and may hold great potential to expand on the success of CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27924074

  7. Finding Balance: T cell Regulatory Receptor Expression during Aging.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Mary M; Qi, Qian; Weyand, Cornelia M; Goronzy, Jörg J

    2011-10-01

    Aging is associated with a variety of changes to immune responsiveness. Reduced protection against infection, reduced responses to vaccination and increased risk of autoimmunity are all hallmarks of advanced age. Here we consider how changes in the expression of regulatory receptors on the T cell surface contribute to altered immunity during aging.

  8. NOD1 Cooperates with TLR2 to Enhance T Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation in CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Blandine C.; Debaud, Anne-Laure; Tomkowiak, Martine; Marvel, Jacqueline; Bonnefoy, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR), like Toll-like receptors (TLR) and NOD-like receptors (NLR), are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR). This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions. PMID:22848741

  9. Unravelling the association of partial T-cell immunodeficiency and immune dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Liston, Adrian; Enders, Anselm; Siggs, Owen M

    2008-07-01

    Partial T-cell immunodeficiencies constitute a heterogeneous cluster of disorders characterized by an incomplete reduction in T-cell number or activity. The immune deficiency component of these diseases is less severe than that of the severe T-cell immunodeficiencies and therefore some ability to respond to infectious organisms is retained. Unlike severe T-cell immunodeficiencies, however, partial immunodeficiencies are commonly associated with hyper-immune dysregulation, including autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases and elevated IgE production. This causative association is counter-intuitive--immune deficiencies are caused by loss-of-function changes to the T-cell component, whereas the coincident autoimmune symptoms are the consequence of gain-of-function changes. This Review details the genetic basis of partial T -cell immunodeficiencies and draws on recent advances in mouse models to propose mechanisms by which a reduction in T-cell numbers or function may disturb the population-dependent balance between activation and tolerance.

  10. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A; Geisler, C; Karjalainen, K

    2001-12-28

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affinity determine the level of T cell activation. When fitted to T cell responses against purified ligands immobilized on plastic surfaces, the 2D-affinity model adequately simulated changes in cellular activation as a result of varying ligand affinity and ligand density. These observations further demonstrated the importance of receptor cross-linking density in determining TCR signaling. Moreover, it was found that the functional two-dimensional affinity of TCR ligands was affected by the chemical composition of the ligand-presenting surface. This makes it possible that cell-bound TCR ligands, despite their low affinity in solution, are of optimal two-dimensional affinity thereby allowing effective TCR binding under physiological conditions, i.e. at low ligand densities in cellular interfaces.

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for ALL.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Grupp, Stephan A

    2014-12-05

    Relapsed and refractory leukemias pose substantial challenges in both children and adults, with very little progress being made in more than a decade. Targeted immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells has emerged as a potent therapy with an innovative mechanism. Dramatic clinical responses with complete remission rates as high as 90% have been reported using CAR-modified T cells directed against the B-cell-specific antigen CD19 in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome, posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. Further studies are necessary to identify additional targets, standardize approaches to cytokine release syndrome management, and determine the durability of remissions. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  12. Methods for quantifying T cell receptor binding affinities and thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Gloor, Brian E.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide antigens bound and presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Recognition of a peptide/MHC complex is required for initiation and propagation of a cellular immune response, as well as the development and maintenance of the T cell repertoire. Here we discuss methods to quantify the affinities and thermodynamics of interactions between soluble ectodomains of TCRs and their peptide/MHC ligands, focusing on titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and fluorescence anisotropy. As TCRs typically bind ligand with weak-to-moderate affinities, we focus the discussion on means to enhance the accuracy and precision of low affinity measurements. In addition to further elucidating the biology of the T cell mediated immune response, more reliable low affinity measurements will aid with more probing studies with mutants or altered peptides that can help illuminate the physical underpinnings of how TCRs achieve their remarkable recognition properties. PMID:21609868

  13. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells strike back

    PubMed Central

    Frigault, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are engineered molecules designed to endow a polyclonal T-cell population with the ability to recognize tumor-associated surface antigens. In their simplest form, CARs comprise a targeting moiety in the form of a single-chain variable fragment from an antibody connected to various intracellular signaling domains allowing for T-cell activation. This powerful approach combines the specificity of an antibody with the cytotoxic ability of a T cell. There has been much excitement since early phase trials of CAR-T cells targeting CD19 expressed on B-cell malignancies demonstrated remarkable efficacy in inducing long-term, stable remissions in otherwise relapsed/refractory disease. Despite these successes, we have just begun to understand the intricacies of CAR biology with efforts underway to utilize this platform in the treatment of other, previously refractory malignancies. Challenges currently include identification of viable cancer targets, management strategies for potentially severe and irreversible toxicities and overcoming the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. This review will focus on basic CAR structure and function, previous success and new approaches aimed at the broader application of CAR-T-cell therapy. PMID:27021308

  15. Prospects and limitations of T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Schotte, Remko; Coccoris, Miriam; de Witte, Moniek A; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2011-08-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is an attractive means to provide cancer patients with immune cells of a desired specificity and the efficacy of such adoptive transfers has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. Because the T cell receptor is the single specificity-determining molecule in T cell function, adoptive transfer of TCR genes into patient T cells may be used as an alternative approach for the transfer of tumor-specific T cell immunity. On theoretical grounds, TCR gene therapy has two substantial advantages over conventional cellular transfer. First, it circumvents the demanding process of in vitro generation of large numbers of specific immune cells. Second, it allows the use of a set of particularly effective TCR genes in large patient groups. Conversely, TCR gene therapy may be associated with a number of specific problems that are not confronted during classical cellular therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the potential and possible problems of TCR gene therapy, as based on in vitro experiments, mouse model systems and phase I clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss the prospects of widespread clinical application of this gene therapy approach for the treatment of human cancer.

  16. Gastrointestinal Microbiome Dysbiosis in Infant Mice Alters Peripheral CD8(+) T Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Perez, Gabriela; Lamousé-Smith, Esi S N

    2017-01-01

    We recently reported that maternal antibiotic treatment (MAT) of mice in the last days of pregnancy and during lactation dramatically alters the density and composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota of their infants. MAT infants also exhibited enhanced susceptibility to a systemic viral infection and altered adaptive immune cell activation phenotype and function. CD8(+) effector T cells from MAT infants consistently demonstrate an inability to sustain interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in vivo following vaccinia virus infection and in vitro upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. We hypothesize that T cells developing in infant mice with gastrointestinal microbiota dysbiosis and insufficient toll-like receptor (TLR) exposure alters immune responsiveness associated with intrinsic T cell defects in the TCR signaling pathway and compromised T cell effector function. To evaluate this, splenic T cells from day of life 15 MAT infant mice were stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies prior to examining the expression of ZAP-70, phosphorylated ZAP-70, phospho-Erk-1/2, c-Rel, total protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and IFN-γ production. We determine that MAT infant CD8(+) T cells fail to sustain total protein tyrosine phosphorylation and Erk1/2 activation. Lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro and in vivo, partially restored IFN-γ production in MAT effector CD8(+) T cells and reduced mortality typically observed in MAT mice following systemic viral infection. Our results demonstrate a surprising dependence on the gastrointestinal microbiome and TLR ligand stimulation toward shaping optimal CD8(+) T cell function during infancy.

  17. Gastrointestinal Microbiome Dysbiosis in Infant Mice Alters Peripheral CD8+ T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Gabriela; Lamousé-Smith, Esi S. N.

    2017-01-01

    We recently reported that maternal antibiotic treatment (MAT) of mice in the last days of pregnancy and during lactation dramatically alters the density and composition of the gastrointestinal microbiota of their infants. MAT infants also exhibited enhanced susceptibility to a systemic viral infection and altered adaptive immune cell activation phenotype and function. CD8+ effector T cells from MAT infants consistently demonstrate an inability to sustain interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in vivo following vaccinia virus infection and in vitro upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. We hypothesize that T cells developing in infant mice with gastrointestinal microbiota dysbiosis and insufficient toll-like receptor (TLR) exposure alters immune responsiveness associated with intrinsic T cell defects in the TCR signaling pathway and compromised T cell effector function. To evaluate this, splenic T cells from day of life 15 MAT infant mice were stimulated in vitro with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies prior to examining the expression of ZAP-70, phosphorylated ZAP-70, phospho-Erk-1/2, c-Rel, total protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and IFN-γ production. We determine that MAT infant CD8+ T cells fail to sustain total protein tyrosine phosphorylation and Erk1/2 activation. Lipopolysaccharide treatment in vitro and in vivo, partially restored IFN-γ production in MAT effector CD8+ T cells and reduced mortality typically observed in MAT mice following systemic viral infection. Our results demonstrate a surprising dependence on the gastrointestinal microbiome and TLR ligand stimulation toward shaping optimal CD8+ T cell function during infancy. PMID:28337207

  18. New Insights into How Trafficking Regulates T Cell Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jieqiong; Rossy, Jérémie; Deng, Qiji; Pageon, Sophie V.; Gaus, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exocytosis plays an important role in regulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. The trafficking molecules involved in lytic granule (LG) secretion in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been well-studied due to the immune disorder known as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHLH). However, the knowledge of trafficking machineries regulating the exocytosis of receptors and signaling molecules remains quite limited. In this review, we summarize the reported trafficking molecules involved in the transport of the TCR and downstream signaling molecules to the cell surface. By combining this information with the known knowledge of LG exocytosis and general exocytic trafficking machinery, we attempt to draw a more complete picture of how the TCR signaling network and exocytic trafficking matrix are interconnected to facilitate T cell activation. This also highlights how membrane compartmentalization facilitates the spatiotemporal organization of cellular responses that are essential for immune functions. PMID:27508206

  19. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  20. New Strategies in Engineering T-cell Receptor Gene-Modified T cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Thomas M; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Chapuis, Aude G; Greenberg, Philip D

    2015-12-01

    The immune system, T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, antitumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T-cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune evasion. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. New Strategies in Engineering T-Cell Receptor Gene-Modified T Cells to More Effectively Target Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Chapuis, Aude G.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2016-01-01

    The immune system, and T cells in particular, have the ability to target and destroy malignant cells. However, anti-tumor immune responses induced from the endogenous T cell repertoire are often insufficient for the eradication of established tumors, as illustrated by the failure of cancer vaccination strategies or checkpoint blockade for most tumors. Genetic modification of T cells to express a defined T cell receptor (TCR) can provide the means to rapidly generate large numbers of tumor-reactive T cells capable of targeting tumor cells in vivo. However, cell-intrinsic factors as well as immunosuppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment can limit the function of such gene-modified T cells. New strategies currently being developed are refining and enhancing this approach, resulting in cellular therapies that more effectively target tumors and that are less susceptible to tumor immune-evasion. PMID:26463711

  2. A T-cell-directed chimeric antigen receptor for the selective treatment of T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mamonkin, Maksim; Rouce, Rayne H; Tashiro, Haruko; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2015-08-20

    Options for targeted therapy of T-cell malignancies remain scarce. Recent clinical trials demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can effectively redirect T lymphocytes to eradicate lymphoid malignancies of B-cell origin. However, T-lineage neoplasms remain a more challenging task for CAR T cells due to shared expression of most targetable surface antigens between normal and malignant T cells, potentially leading to fratricide of CAR T cells or profound immunodeficiency. Here, we report that T cells transduced with a CAR targeting CD5, a common surface marker of normal and neoplastic T cells, undergo only limited fratricide and can be expanded long-term ex vivo. These CD5 CAR T cells effectively eliminate malignant T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and T-cell lymphoma lines in vitro and significantly inhibit disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. These data support the therapeutic potential of CD5 CAR in patients with T-cell neoplasms.

  3. Direct Measurement of T Cell Receptor Affinity and Sequence from Naïve Anti-Viral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuqi; Parker, Patricia; Ma, Keyue; He, Chenfeng; Shi, Qian; Cui, Zhonghao; Williams, Chad; Wendel, Ben S.; Meriwether, Amanda; Salazar, Mary A.; Jiang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    T cells recognize and kill a myriad of pathogen-infected or cancer cells using a diverse set of T cell receptors (TCR). The affinity of TCR to cognate antigen is of high interest in adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and antigen-specific T cell repertoire immune profiling because it is widely known to correlate with downstream T cell responses. Here, we introduce the in situ TCR affinity and sequence test (iTAST) for simultaneous measurement of TCR affinity and sequence from single primary CD8+ T cells in human blood. We demonstrate that the repertoire of primary antigen-specific T cells from pathogen inexperienced individuals has a surprisingly broad affinity range of 1000-fold composed of diverse TCR sequences. Within this range, samples from older individuals contained a reduced frequency of high affinity T cells compared to young individuals, demonstrating an age-related effect of T cell attrition that could cause holes in the repertoire. iTAST should enable the rapid selection of high affinity TCRs ex vivo for adoptive immunotherapy and measurement of T cell response for immune monitoring applications. PMID:27252176

  4. Agonist-selected T cell development requires strong T-cell receptor signaling and store-operated calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Oh-hora, Masatsugu; Komatsu, Noriko; Pishyareh, Mojgan; Feske, Stefan; Hori, Shohei; Taniguchi, Masaru; Rao, Anjana; Takayanagi, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Summary T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling driven by interaction of the TCR with specific complexes of self-peptide and the major histocompatibility complex, determines T cell fate in thymic development. However, the signaling pathway through which TCR signal strength regulates distinct T cell lineages remains unknown. Here we have used mice lacking the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ sensors STIM1 and STIM2 to show that STIM-induced store-operated Ca2+ entry is not essential for thymic development of conventional TCRαβ+ T cells, but is specifically required for the development of agonist-selected T cells (regulatory T cells, invariant natural killer T cells and TCRαβ+ CD8αα+ intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes). The severe impairment of agonist-selected T cell development is mainly due to a defect in interleukin-2 (IL-2) or IL-15 signaling. Thus, STIM1 and STIM2-mediated store-operated Ca2+ influx, leading to efficient activation of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T-cells), is critical for the post-selection maturation of agonist-selected T cells. PMID:23499491

  5. Tpl2 and ERK transduce antiproliferative T cell receptor signals and inhibit transformation of chronically stimulated T cells.

    PubMed

    Tsatsanis, Christos; Vaporidi, Katerina; Zacharioudaki, Vassiliki; Androulidaki, Ariadne; Sykulev, Yuri; Margioris, Andrew N; Tsichlis, Philip N

    2008-02-26

    The protein kinase encoded by the Tpl2 protooncogene plays an obligatory role in the transduction of Toll-like receptor and death receptor signals in macrophages, B cells, mouse embryo fibroblasts, and epithelial cells in culture and promotes inflammatory responses in animals. To address its role in T cell activation, we crossed the T cell receptor (TCR) transgene 2C, which recognizes class I MHC presented peptides, into the Tpl2(-/-) genetic background. Surprisingly, the TCR2C(tg/tg)/Tpl2(-/-) mice developed T cell lymphomas with a latency of 4-6 months. The tumor cells were consistently TCR2C(+)CD8(+)CD4(-), suggesting that they were derived either from chronically stimulated mature T cells or from immature single positive (ISP) cells. Further studies showed that the population of CD8(+) ISP cells was not expanded in the thymus of TCR2C(tg/tg)/Tpl2(-/-) mice, making the latter hypothesis unlikely. Mature peripheral T cells of Tpl2(-/-) mice were defective in ERK activation and exhibited enhanced proliferation after TCR stimulation. The same cells were defective in the induction of CTLA4, a negative regulator of the T cell response, which is induced by TCR signals via ERK. These findings suggest that Tpl2 functions normally in a feedback loop that switches off the T cell response to TCR stimulation. As a result, Tpl2, a potent oncogene, functions as a tumor suppressor gene in chronically stimulated T cells.

  6. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect

    Doi, Keiko; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  7. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  8. Future directions in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L

    2017-02-01

    The impact of immunotherapy has grown exponentially in the past 5 years. Principle illustrations are encouraging results with engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). This experimental therapy is developing simultaneously in pediatric and adult clinical trials, making this field particularly relevant and exciting for pediatric oncologists. CAR-modified T cells targeting CD19 have produced dramatic antitumor responses in patients with relapsed/refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinical trials from several institutions, in both children and adults, using distinct CAR T cell products have demonstrated similar high complete remission rates of 61-93%, with durable remissions observed. Although the development of CARs for other malignancies has lagged behind, research into novel approaches to overcome inherent challenges is promising. Clinical trials of CAR-modified T cells have produced unprecedented results and are anticipated to have a broader impact as this approach expands into other indications, including other cancers and frontline therapy. The potential for long-term disease control, if fully realized, will have a transformative impact on the field.

  9. Identification of a New Tuberculosis Antigen Recognized by γδ T Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xueyan; Han, Xiqin; Li, Liang

    2013-01-01

    The immune protection initiated by γδ T cells plays an important role in mycobacterial infection. The γδ T cells activated by Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived nonpeptidic, phosphorylated biometabolites (phosphoantigens) provide only partial immune protection against mycobacterium, while evidence has suggested that protein antigen-activated γδ T cells elicit effective protective immune responses. To date, only a few distinct mycobacterial protein antigens have been identified. In the present study, we screened protein antigens recognized by γδ T cells using cells transfected with the predominant pulmonary tuberculosis γδ T cell receptor (TCR) CDR3 fragment. We identified two peptides, TP1 and TP2, which not only bind to the pulmonary tuberculosis predominant γδ TCR but also effectively activate γδ T cells isolated from pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Moreover, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase 2 (DXS2), the TP1-matched mycobacterial protein, was confirmed as a ligand for the γδ TCR and was found to activate γδ T cells from pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The extracellular region (extracellular peptide [EP]) of Rv2272, a TP2-matched mycobacterial transmembrane protein, was also shown to activate γδ T cells from pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Both DXS2- and EP-expanded γδ T cells from pulmonary tuberculosis patients could secrete gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), which play important roles in mediating cytotoxicity against mycobacterium and stimulating monocyte chemotaxis toward the site of infection. In conclusion, our study identified novel mycobacterial protein antigens recognized by γδ TCR cells that could be candidates for the development of vaccines or adjuvants against mycobacterium infection. PMID:23389928

  10. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells

    PubMed Central

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, Dana; Král, Vlastimil; Fabry, Milan; Vočková, Petra; Latečková, Lucie; Trněný, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tumor immunotherapy based on the use of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells (CAR T cells) is a promising approach for the treatment of refractory hematological malignancies. However, a robust response mediated by CAR T cells is observed only in a minority of patients and the expansion and persistence of CAR T cells in vivo is mostly unpredictable.Lenalidomide (LEN) is an immunomodulatory drug currently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, while it is clinically tested in the therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of activated B cell immunophenotype. LEN was shown to increase antitumor immune responses at least partially by modulating the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligase Cereblon, which leads to increased ubiquitinylation of Ikaros and Aiolos transcription factors, which in turn results in changed expression of various receptors on the surface of tumor cells. In order to enhance the effectiveness of CAR-based immunotherapy, we assessed the anti-lymphoma efficacy of LEN in combination with CAR19 T cells or CAR20 T cells in vitro and in vivo using various murine models of aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL).Immunodeficient NSG mice were transplanted with various human B-NHL cells followed by treatment with CAR19 or CAR20 T cells with or without LEN. Next, CAR19 T cells were subjected to series of tests in vitro to evaluate their response and signaling capacity following recognition of B cell in the presence or absence of LEN.Our data shows that LEN significantly enhances antitumor functions of CAR19 and CAR20 T cells in vivo. Additionally, it enhances production of interferon gamma by CAR19 T cells and augments cell signaling via CAR19 protein in T cells in vitro. Our data further suggests that LEN works through direct effects on T cells but not on B-NHL cells. The biochemical events underlying this costimulatory effect of LEN are currently being investigated. In summary, our data supports the use

  11. Lenalidomide enhances antitumor functions of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Otáhal, Pavel; Průková, Dana; Král, Vlastimil; Fabry, Milan; Vočková, Petra; Latečková, Lucie; Trněný, Marek; Klener, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Tumor immunotherapy based on the use of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells (CAR T cells) is a promising approach for the treatment of refractory hematological malignancies. However, a robust response mediated by CAR T cells is observed only in a minority of patients and the expansion and persistence of CAR T cells in vivo is mostly unpredictable.Lenalidomide (LEN) is an immunomodulatory drug currently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) and mantle cell lymphoma, while it is clinically tested in the therapy of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of activated B cell immunophenotype. LEN was shown to increase antitumor immune responses at least partially by modulating the activity of E3 ubiquitin ligase Cereblon, which leads to increased ubiquitinylation of Ikaros and Aiolos transcription factors, which in turn results in changed expression of various receptors on the surface of tumor cells. In order to enhance the effectiveness of CAR-based immunotherapy, we assessed the anti-lymphoma efficacy of LEN in combination with CAR19 T cells or CAR20 T cells in vitro and in vivo using various murine models of aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL).Immunodeficient NSG mice were transplanted with various human B-NHL cells followed by treatment with CAR19 or CAR20 T cells with or without LEN. Next, CAR19 T cells were subjected to series of tests in vitro to evaluate their response and signaling capacity following recognition of B cell in the presence or absence of LEN.Our data shows that LEN significantly enhances antitumor functions of CAR19 and CAR20 T cells in vivo. Additionally, it enhances production of interferon gamma by CAR19 T cells and augments cell signaling via CAR19 protein in T cells in vitro. Our data further suggests that LEN works through direct effects on T cells but not on B-NHL cells. The biochemical events underlying this costimulatory effect of LEN are currently being investigated. In summary, our data supports the use of LEN for

  12. Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor delta gene in peripheral T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    Kanavaros, P; Farcet, J P; Gaulard, P; Haioun, C; Divine, M; Le Couedic, J P; Lefranc, M P; Reyes, F

    1991-01-01

    Recombinative events of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) delta-chain gene were studied in 37 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma (PTCL) and related to their clinical presentation and the expression of the alpha beta or gamma delta heterodimers as determined by immunostaining of frozen tissue samples. There were 22 cases of alpha beta, 5 cases of gamma delta, and 10 cases of silent TCR expressing neither the alpha beta nor gamma delta TCR. 5 different probes were used to examine the delta locus. The 22 cases of alpha beta PTCL displayed biallelic and monoallelic deletions; a monoallelic V delta 1 J delta 1 rearrangement was observed in 1 case and a monoallelic germ line configuration in 7 cases. The 5 cases of gamma delta PTCL displayed biallelic rearrangements: the productive rearrangements could be ascribed to V delta 1J delta 1 joining in 3 cases and VJ delta 1 joining in 2 cases according to the combined pattern of DNA hybridization with the appropriate probes and of cell reactivity with the TCR delta-1, delta TCS-1, and anti-V delta 2 monoclonal antibodies. In the VJ delta 1 joining, the rearranged V segments were located between V delta 1 and V delta 2. Interestingly, in the third group of 10 cases of silent PTCL, 5 cases were found to have a TCR gene configuration identical to that in the TCR alpha beta PTCL, as demonstrated by biallelic delta gene deletion. These 5 cases were CD3 positive. The 5 remaining cases showed a monoallelic delta gene rearrangement with a monoallelic germ line configuration in 4 and a monoallelic deletion in 1. Four of these cases were CD3 negative, which was consistent with an immature genotype the TCR commitent of which could not be ascertained. Finally, TCR gamma delta PTCL consisted of a distinct clinical morphological and molecular entity whereas TCR alpha beta and silent PTCL had a similar presentation. Images PMID:1991851

  13. Two distinct T-cell receptor alpha-chain transcripts in a rabbit T-cell line: implications for allelic exclusion in T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Marche, P N; Kindt, T J

    1986-01-01

    Information relevant to allelic exclusion in T cells has been obtained by a study of cDNA clones corresponding to alpha-chain genes of the T-cell receptor in the rabbit T-cell line RL-5. One clone contains a variable-joining-constant (VJC) sequence encoding a complete alpha chain of the T-cell receptor. A second has an identical constant region and includes a distinct variable-joining (VJ) sequence. However, a single-base deletion in the variable region places the remainder of the second transcript out-of-phase and appears to be the product of a rearrangement involving a variable region of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain pseudogene. Presence of two variable-joining-constant (VJC) transcripts in the same cell line indicates that alpha-chain gene rearrangement is not affected by transcription of a complete alpha-chain mRNA and suggests that steps after mRNA synthesis are involved in the allelic exclusion process for alpha-chain genes. Comparison of rabbit alpha-chain sequences with those of man and mouse revealed interspecies conservation in constant and variable regions. Genomic Southern blot analyses using a rabbit constant region of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain probe revealed the presence of a single constant region gene. Hybridization with variable region probes defined two distinct multigenic subfamilies. Homology between certain rabbit and murine variable regions of the T-cell receptor alpha-chain sequences suggests that the existence of subfamilies predated divergence of these species. Images PMID:3485798

  14. Unusual features of Self-Peptide/MHC Binding by Autoimmune T Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson,M.; Hahn, M.; Wucherpfennig, K.

    2005-01-01

    Structural studies on T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for foreign antigens demonstrated a remarkably similar topology characterized by a central, diagonal TCR binding mode that maximizes interactions with the MHC bound peptide. However, three recent structures involving autoimmune TCRs demonstrated unusual interactions with self-peptide/MHC complexes. Two TCRs from multiple sclerosis patients bind with unconventional topologies, and both TCRs are shifted toward the peptide N terminus and the MHC class II {beta} chain helix. A TCR from the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model binds in a conventional orientation, but the structure is unusual because the self-peptide only partially fills the binding site. For all three TCRs, interaction with the MHC bound self-peptide is suboptimal, and only two or three TCR loops contact the peptide. Optimal TCR binding modes confer a competitive advantage for antimicrobial T cells during an infection, whereas altered binding properties may permit survival of a subset of autoreactive T cells during thymic selection.

  15. Deep Sequencing of the T-cell Receptor Repertoire Demonstrates Polyclonal T-cell Infiltrates in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Jamie L.; Hamm, David; Gulati, Nicholas; Lowes, Michelle A.; Krueger, James G.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that infiltration of pathogenic T-cells plays an important role in psoriasis pathogenesis. However, the antigen specificity of these activated T-cells is relatively unknown. Previous studies using T-cell receptor polymerase chain reaction technology (TCR-PCR) have suggested there are expanded T-cell receptor (TCR) clones in psoriatic skin, suggesting a response to an unknown psoriatic antigen. Here we describe the results of high-throughput deep sequencing of the entire αβ- and γδ- TCR repertoire in normal healthy skin and psoriatic lesional and non-lesional skin. From this study, we were able to determine that there is a significant increase in the abundance of unique β- and γ- TCR sequences in psoriatic lesional skin compared to non-lesional and normal skin, and that the entire T-cell repertoire in psoriasis is polyclonal, with similar diversity to normal and non-lesional skin. Comparison of the αβ- and γδ- TCR repertoire in paired non-lesional and lesional samples showed many common clones within a patient, and these close were often equally abundant in non-lesional and lesional skin, again suggesting a diverse T-cell repertoire. Although there were similar (and low) amounts of shared β-chain sequences between different patient samples, there was significantly increased sequence sharing of the γ-chain in psoriatic skin from different individuals compared to those without psoriasis. This suggests that although the T-cell response in psoriasis is highly polyclonal, particular γδ- T-cell subsets may be associated with this disease. Overall, our findings present the feasibility of this technology to determine the entire αβ- and γδ- T-cell repertoire in skin, and that psoriasis contains polyclonal and diverse αβ- and γδ- T-cell populations. PMID:26594339

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor controls regulatory CD4+ T cell function.

    PubMed

    Pot, Caroline

    2012-05-31

    The ligand activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been studied for many decades in toxicology as the ligand for the environmental contaminant dioxin. However, AhR has recently emerged as a critical physiological regulator of immune responses affecting both innate and adaptive systems, and several AhR ligands with different pharmacological profiles have recently been studied. The current review discusses new insights into the role of AhR signalling and AhR ligands on the regulation of the immune system, with a focus on regulatory T cells which maintain immune tolerance. Notably, AhR is expressed and modulates the development of two induced regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets, the forkhead box P3-positive (Foxp3+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) and the IL-10-secreting type 1 regulatory T (T(R)1) cells, through different signalling pathways. We will finally discuss how AhR ligands could be exploited to alleviate human autoimmune diseases. Clearly, drugs targeted against AhR should promote the development of new strategies to fight against autoimmune diseases.

  17. Crammed signaling motifs in the T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Borroto, Aldo; Abia, David; Alarcón, Balbino

    2014-09-01

    Although the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is long known to contain multiple signaling subunits (CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ɛ and CD3ζ), their role in signal transduction is still not well understood. The presence of at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in each CD3 subunit has led to the idea that the multiplication of such elements essentially serves to amplify signals. However, the evolutionary conservation of non-ITAM sequences suggests that each CD3 subunit is likely to have specific non-redundant roles at some stage of development or in mature T cell function. The CD3ɛ subunit is paradigmatic because in a relatively short cytoplasmic sequence (∼55 amino acids) it contains several docking sites for proteins involved in intracellular trafficking and signaling, proteins whose relevance in T cell activation is slowly starting to be revealed. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the signaling effectors that bind directly to the TCR and we will propose a hierarchy in their response to TCR triggering.

  18. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ '' T cells. Our previous study identified partial sequences for 13 different WC1 genes by annota...

  19. The human T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes.

    PubMed

    Scaviner, D; Lefranc, M P

    2000-01-01

    'Human T Cell Receptor Alpha Variable (TRAV) Genes', the eighth report of the 'IMGT Locus in Focus' section, comprises four tables: (1) 'Number of human germline TRAV genes at 14q11 and potential repertoire'; (2) 'Human germline TRAV genes at 14q11'; (3) 'Human TRAV allele table', and (4) 'Correspondence between the different human TRAV gene nomenclatures'. These tables are available at the IMGT Marie-Paule page of IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics database (http://imgt.cines.fr:8104) created by Marie-Paule Lefranc, Université Montpellier II, CNRS, France. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. VDJtools: Unifying Post-analysis of T Cell Receptor Repertoires.

    PubMed

    Shugay, Mikhail; Bagaev, Dmitriy V; Turchaninova, Maria A; Bolotin, Dmitriy A; Britanova, Olga V; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Nazarov, Vadim I; Zvyagin, Ivan V; Kirgizova, Vitalina I; Kirgizov, Kirill I; Skorobogatova, Elena V; Chudakov, Dmitriy M

    2015-11-01

    Despite the growing number of immune repertoire sequencing studies, the field still lacks software for analysis and comprehension of this high-dimensional data. Here we report VDJtools, a complementary software suite that solves a wide range of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires post-analysis tasks, provides a detailed tabular output and publication-ready graphics, and is built on top of a flexible API. Using TCR datasets for a large cohort of unrelated healthy donors, twins, and multiple sclerosis patients we demonstrate that VDJtools greatly facilitates the analysis and leads to sound biological conclusions. VDJtools software and documentation are available at https://github.com/mikessh/vdjtools.

  1. VDJtools: Unifying Post-analysis of T Cell Receptor Repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Bolotin, Dmitriy A.; Britanova, Olga V.; Putintseva, Ekaterina V.; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V.; Nazarov, Vadim I.; Zvyagin, Ivan V.; Kirgizova, Vitalina I.; Kirgizov, Kirill I.; Skorobogatova, Elena V.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing number of immune repertoire sequencing studies, the field still lacks software for analysis and comprehension of this high-dimensional data. Here we report VDJtools, a complementary software suite that solves a wide range of T cell receptor (TCR) repertoires post-analysis tasks, provides a detailed tabular output and publication-ready graphics, and is built on top of a flexible API. Using TCR datasets for a large cohort of unrelated healthy donors, twins, and multiple sclerosis patients we demonstrate that VDJtools greatly facilitates the analysis and leads to sound biological conclusions. VDJtools software and documentation are available at https://github.com/mikessh/vdjtools. PMID:26606115

  2. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells for sustained remissions in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M; Bunin, Nancy J; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F; Mahnke, Yolanda D; Melenhorst, Jan J; Rheingold, Susan R; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A

    2014-10-16

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×10(6) to 20.6×10(6) CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by Novartis and others; CART19 Clinical

  3. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  5. Regulatory T cells play a role in T-cell receptor CDR2 peptide regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Andrew, Shayne; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2012-01-01

    Eliciting T-cell receptor (TCR) -specific responsiveness has been known to provide an effective autoregulatory mechanism for limiting inflammation mediated by T effector cells. Our previous use of TCR peptides derived from the CDR3 regions of a pathogenic TCR effectively reversed ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a humanized TCR transgenic model. In this study, we use the TCR BV8S2 CDR2 peptide in the non-transgenic C57BL/6 EAE model to down-regulate the heterogeneous TCR BV8S2+ MOG-35-55-specific pathogenic T-cell population and demonstrate successful treatment of EAE after disease onset. Suppression of disease was associated with reduced MOG-35-55-specific and non-specific T-cell production of interleukin-17a and interferon-γ in the central nervous system, as well as reduced numbers of CD4+ and Foxp3+ T cells in the central nervous system. With the use of Foxp3-GFP and Foxp3 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that the TCR CDR2 peptide treatment effect is dependent on the presence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and that regulatory T cell numbers are significantly expanded in the periphery of treated mice. Hence, TCR CDR2 peptide therapy is effective in regulating heterogeneous, pathogenic T-cell populations through the activity of the Foxp3+ regulatory T cell population. PMID:22044096

  6. T-cell Receptor-optimized Peptide Skewing of the T-cell Repertoire Can Enhance Antigen Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Ekeruche-Makinde, Julia; Clement, Mathew; Cole, David K.; Edwards, Emily S. J.; Ladell, Kristin; Miles, John J.; Matthews, Katherine K.; Fuller, Anna; Lloyd, Katy A.; Madura, Florian; Dolton, Garry M.; Pentier, Johanne; Lissina, Anna; Gostick, Emma; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Price, David A.; Wooldridge, Linda; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2012-01-01

    Altered peptide antigens that enhance T-cell immunogenicity have been used to improve peptide-based vaccination for a range of diseases. Although this strategy can prime T-cell responses of greater magnitude, the efficacy of constituent T-cell clonotypes within the primed population can be poor. To overcome this limitation, we isolated a CD8+ T-cell clone (MEL5) with an enhanced ability to recognize the HLA A*0201-Melan A27–35 (HLA A*0201-AAGIGILTV) antigen expressed on the surface of malignant melanoma cells. We used combinatorial peptide library screening to design an optimal peptide sequence that enhanced functional activation of the MEL5 clone, but not other CD8+ T-cell clones that recognized HLA A*0201-AAGIGILTV poorly. Structural analysis revealed the potential for new contacts between the MEL5 T-cell receptor and the optimized peptide. Furthermore, the optimized peptide was able to prime CD8+ T-cell populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolates from multiple HLA A*0201+ individuals that were capable of efficient HLA A*0201+ melanoma cell destruction. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that it is possible to design altered peptide antigens for the selection of superior T-cell clonotypes with enhanced antigen recognition properties. PMID:22952231

  7. Regulatory T cells play a role in T-cell receptor CDR2 peptide regulation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Andrew, Shayne; Offner, Halina; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2012-02-01

    Eliciting T-cell receptor (TCR) -specific responsiveness has been known to provide an effective autoregulatory mechanism for limiting inflammation mediated by T effector cells. Our previous use of TCR peptides derived from the CDR3 regions of a pathogenic TCR effectively reversed ongoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in a humanized TCR transgenic model. In this study, we use the TCR BV8S2 CDR2 peptide in the non-transgenic C57BL/6 EAE model to down-regulate the heterogeneous TCR BV8S2(+)  MOG-35-55-specific pathogenic T-cell population and demonstrate successful treatment of EAE after disease onset. Suppression of disease was associated with reduced MOG-35-55-specific and non-specific T-cell production of interleukin-17a and interferon-γ in the central nervous system, as well as reduced numbers of CD4(+) and Foxp3(+) T cells in the central nervous system. With the use of Foxp3-GFP and Foxp3 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that the TCR CDR2 peptide treatment effect is dependent on the presence of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells and that regulatory T cell numbers are significantly expanded in the periphery of treated mice. Hence, TCR CDR2 peptide therapy is effective in regulating heterogeneous, pathogenic T-cell populations through the activity of the Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell population.

  8. RNA-transfection of γ/δ T cells with a chimeric antigen receptor or an α/β T-cell receptor: a safer alternative to genetically engineered α/β T cells for the immunotherapy of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Dennis C; Simon, Bianca; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Uslu, Ugur; Schuler, Gerold; Gerer, Kerstin F; Hoyer, Stefanie; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels

    2017-08-17

    Adoptive T-cell therapy relying on conventional T cells transduced with T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has caused substantial tumor regression in several clinical trials. However, genetically engineered T cells have been associated with serious side-effects due to off-target toxicities and massive cytokine release. To obviate these concerns, we established a protocol adaptable to GMP to expand and transiently transfect γ/δ T cells with mRNA. PBMC from healthy donors were stimulated using zoledronic-acid or OKT3 to expand γ/δ T cells and bulk T cells, respectively. Additionally, CD8(+) T cells and γ/δ T cells were MACS-isolated from PBMC and expanded with OKT3. Next, these four populations were electroporated with RNA encoding a gp100/HLA-A2-specific TCR or a CAR specific for MCSP. Thereafter, receptor expression, antigen-specific cytokine secretion, specific cytotoxicity, and killing of the endogenous γ/δ T cell-target Daudi were analyzed. Using zoledronic-acid in average 6 million of γ/δ T cells with a purity of 85% were generated from one million PBMC. MACS-isolation and OKT3-mediated expansion of γ/δ T cells yielded approximately ten times less cells. OKT3-expanded and CD8(+) MACS-isolated conventional T cells behaved correspondingly similar. All employed T cells were efficiently transfected with the TCR or the CAR. Upon respective stimulation, γ/δ T cells produced IFNγ and TNF, but little IL-2 and the zoledronic-acid expanded T cells exceeded MACS-γ/δ T cells in antigen-specific cytokine secretion. While the cytokine production of γ/δ T cells was in general lower than that of conventional T cells, specific cytotoxicity against melanoma cell lines was similar. In contrast to OKT3-expanded and MACS-CD8(+) T cells, mock-electroporated γ/δ T cells also lysed tumor cells reflecting the γ/δ T cell-intrinsic anti-tumor activity. After transfection, γ/δ T cells were still able to kill MHC-deficient Daudi cells. We

  9. Tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily costimulation couples T cell receptor signal strength to thymic regulatory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Schmitz, Heather M.; Xing, Yan; Wang, Yanyan; Owen, David L.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Boomer, Jonathan S.; Green, Jonathan M.; Yagita, Hideo; Chi, Hongbo; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells express tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) members, but their role in thymic Treg development is undefined. We demonstrate that Treg progenitors highly express the TNFRSF members GITR, OX40, and TNFR2. Expression of these receptors correlates directly with T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength, and requires CD28 and the kinase TAK1. Neutralizing TNFSF ligands markedly reduced Treg development. Conversely, TNFRSF agonists enhanced Treg differentiation by augmenting IL-2R/STAT5 responsiveness. GITR-ligand costimulation elicited a dose-dependent enrichment of lower-affinity cells within the Treg repertoire. In vivo, combined inhibition of GITR, OX40 and TNFR2 abrogated Treg development. Thus TNFRSF expression on Treg progenitors translates strong TCR signals into molecular parameters that specifically promote Treg differentiation and shape the Treg repertoire. PMID:24633226

  10. Reconciling views on T cell receptor germline bias for MHC.

    PubMed

    Garcia, K Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Whether MHC restriction by the T cell receptor (TCR) is a product of evolutionary pressures leading to germline-encoded 'rules of engagement' remains avidly debated. Structural results derived from analysis of TCR-peptide-MHC complexes appear to support a model of physical specificity between TCR germline V regions and MHC. Yet, some recent evidence suggests that thymic selection, and co-receptors may have misled us into thinking the TCR is exclusively MHC-specific, when in fact, TCRs can robustly engage non-MHC ligands when given the chance. Here, I propose that seemingly contradictory data and hypotheses for, and against, germline bias are, in fact, compatible and can be reconciled into a unifying model.

  11. Chemokine receptor expression by leukemic T cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: clinical and histopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Elisabetta; Vonderheid, Eric C; Thoburn, Christopher J; Bright, Emilie C; Hess, Allan D

    2007-12-01

    Chemokine receptors expressed by normal and neoplastic lymphocytes provide an important mechanism for cells to traffic into the skin and skin-associated lymph nodes. The goal of this study was to correlate chemokine receptor and CD62L expression by circulating neoplastic T cells with the clinical and pathological findings of the leukemic phase of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, primarily Sézary syndrome (SS). Chemokine receptor mRNA transcripts were found in the majority of leukemic cells for CCR1, CCR4, CCR7, CCR10, CXCR3, and CD62L and in 20-50% of the samples for CXCR5. In patients with SS, relatively high expression levels of CCR7 and CCR10 by circulating neoplastic T cells correlated with epidermotropism, CXCR5 expression correlated with density of the dermal infiltrate, and CD62L correlated with extent of lymphadenopathy. Of note, CXCR5 expression and a dense dermal infiltrate correlated with a poor prognosis. The chemokine receptor profile supports the concept that neoplastic T cells are central memory T cells, and that CCR10 and CD62L play a fundamental role respectively in epidermotropism and lymphadenopathy that is observed in SS.

  12. Simultaneous Vascular Targeting and Tumor Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T-Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    in May 2013, the difference between nude mice (which lack T- cells , but still have a partially functional adaptive and innate immune system) and NSG...Mangada J, Greiner DL, Handgretinger R. Human lymphoid and myeloid cell development in NOD/LtSz-scid IL2R gamma null mice engrafted with mobilized human...Targeting of Cerebral Breast Cancer Metastases Using a T- Cell Receptor Mimic Antibody PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ulrich Bickel

  13. Application of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells in ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minghui; Zhang, Dr Bin; Shi, Huirong

    2017-09-01

    Due to the critical role of T cells in the immune surveillance of ovarian cancer, adoptive T-cell therapies are receiving increased attention as an immunotherapeutic approach for ovarian cancer. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), constructed by incorporating the single-chain Fv fragment to a T-cell signaling domain such as CD3 ζ or Fc receptor γ chain, endow T cell with nonmajor histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity. Dual specificity, trans-signaling CARs and affinity-tuned single-chain Fv fragment have broadened the applicability of CAR-engineered T-cell therapy and may be considered preferential to T cell receptor T-cell therapy in clinical care. As new insights into the CAR-engineered T cells have emerged over the last decade, we review the development of CAR T-cell therapy and discuss the progress and safety concerns regarding its translation from basic research into clinical care of ovarian cancer.

  14. The promise of γδ T cells and the γδ T cell receptor for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Legut, Mateusz; Cole, David K; Sewell, Andrew K

    2015-11-01

    γδ T cells form an important part of adaptive immune responses against infections and malignant transformation. The molecular targets of human γδ T cell receptors (TCRs) remain largely unknown, but recent studies have confirmed the recognition of phosphorylated prenyl metabolites, lipids in complex with CD1 molecules and markers of cellular stress. All of these molecules are upregulated on various cancer types, highlighting the potential importance of the γδ T cell compartment in cancer immunosurveillance and paving the way for the use of γδ TCRs in cancer therapy. Ligand recognition by the γδ TCR often requires accessory/co-stimulatory stress molecules on both T cells and target cells; this cellular stress context therefore provides a failsafe against harmful self-reactivity. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells recognise their targets irrespective of HLA haplotype and therefore offer exciting possibilities for off-the-shelf, pan-population cancer immunotherapies. Here, we present a review of known ligands of human γδ T cells and discuss the promise of harnessing these cells for cancer treatment.

  15. Coupling of T cell receptor specificity to natural killer T cell development by bivalent histone H3 methylation.

    PubMed

    Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Kim, Jong Kyong; Marcello, Jonas; Fang, Terry C; Prinjha, Rab; Bosselut, Remy; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2015-03-09

    The fidelity of T cell immunity depends greatly on coupling T cell receptor signaling with specific T cell effector functions. Here, we describe a chromatin-based mechanism that enables integration of TCR specificity into definite T cell lineage commitment. Using natural killer T cells (iNKT cell) as a model of a T cell subset that differentiates in response to specific TCR signaling, we identified a key role of histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) in coupling iNKT cell TCR specificity with the generation of iNKT cells. We found that the Zbtb16/PLZF gene promoter that drives iNKT cell differentiation possesses a bivalent chromatin state characterized by the simultaneous presence of negative and positive H3K27me3 and H3K4me3 modifications. Depletion of H3K27me3 at the Zbtb16/PLZF promoter leads to uncoupling of iNKT cell development from TCR specificity and is associated with accumulation of iNKT-like CD4(+) cells that express a non-iNKT cell specific T cell repertoire. In turn, stabilization of H3K27me3 leads to a drastic reduction of the iNKT cell population. Our data suggest that H3K27me3 levels at the bivalent Zbtb16/PLZF gene define a threshold enabling precise coupling of TCR specificity to lineage commitment.

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Sustained Remissions in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A.; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M.; Bunin, Nancy J.; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. METHODS We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×106 to 20.6×106 CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. RESULTS A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti–interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. CONCLUSIONS Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by

  17. Immunophenotypic and antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis in T cell neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, D. M.

    1989-01-01

    The author reviews the immunophenotypic profiles displayed by the major clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia, the immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia, and the contributions made by antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis to the understanding of T cell neoplasia. Neoplasms belonging to distinct clinicopathologic categories of T cell neoplasia often exhibit characteristic immunophenotypic profiles. Approximately 80% of lymphoblastic lymphomas and 20% of acute lymphoblastic leukemias express phenotypes consistent with prethymic and intrathymic stages of T cell differentiation, including intranuclear terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of mycosis fungoides type usually express pan-T cell antigens CD2, CD5, and CD3, often lack the pan-T cell antigen CD7, and usually express the mature, peripheral helper subset phenotype, CD4+ CD8-. Cutaneous T cell lymphomas of nonmycosis fungoides type and peripheral T cell lymphomas often lack one or more pan-T cell antigens and, in addition, occasionally express the anomalous CD4+ CD8+ or CD4- CD8- phenotypes. T gamma-lymphoproliferative disease is divisable into two broad categories: those cases that are CD3 antigen positive and exhibit clonal T cell receptor beta chain (TCR-beta) gene rearrangements and those cases that are CD3 antigen negative and exhibit the TCR-beta gene germline configuration. Human T cell lymphotropic virus-I (HTLV-I) associated Japanese, Carribean, and sporadic adult T cell leukemia/lymphomas usually express pan-T cell antigens, the CD4+ CD8- phenotype, and various T cell-associated activation antigens, including the interleukin-2 receptor (CD25). Immunophenotypic criteria useful in the immunodiagnosis of T cell neoplasia include, in increasing order of utility, T cell predominance, T cell subset antigen restriction, anomalous T cell subset antigen expression, and deletion of one or more pan-T cell antigens. Only in

  18. Peripheral T Cell Survival Requires Continual Ligation of the T Cell Receptor to Major Histocompatibility Complex–Encoded Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Kirberg, Jörg; Berns, Anton; Boehmer, Harald von

    1997-01-01

    In the thymus, T cells are selected according to their T cell receptor (TCR) specificity. After positive selection, mature cells are exported from primary lymphoid organs to seed the secondary lymphoid tissue. An important question is whether survival of mature T cells is an intrinsic property or requires continuous survival signals, i.e., engagement of the TCR by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the periphery, perhaps in a similar way as occurring during thymic positive selection. To address this issue we used recombination-activating gene (Rag)-deficient H-2b mice expressing a transgenic TCR restricted by I-Ed class II MHC molecules. After engraftment with Rag−/− H-2d fetal thymi, CD4+8− peripheral T cells emerged. These cells were isolated and transferred into immunodeficient hosts of H-2b or H-2d haplotype, some of the latter being common cytokine receptor γ chain deficient to exclude rejection of H-2b donor cells by host natural killer cells. Our results show that in the absence, but not in the presence, of selecting MHC molecules, peripheral mature T cells are short lived and disappear within 7 wk, indicating that continuous contact of the TCR with selecting MHC molecules is required for survival of T cells. PMID:9334366

  19. Human Th17 cells share major trafficking receptors with both polarized effector T cells and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyung W; Lee, Jeeho; Hillsamer, Peter; Kim, Chang H

    2008-01-01

    It is a question of interest whether Th17 cells express trafficking receptors unique to this Th cell lineage and migrate specifically to certain tissue sites. We found several Th17 cell subsets at different developing stages in a human secondary lymphoid organ (tonsils) and adult, but not in neonatal, blood. These Th17 cell subsets include a novel in vivo-stimulated tonsil IL17+ T cell subset detected without any artificial stimulation in vitro. We investigated in depth the trafficking receptor phenotype of the Th17 cell subsets in tonsils and adult blood. The developing Th17 cells in tonsils highly expressed both Th1- (CCR2, CXCR3, CCR5, and CXCR6) and Th2-associated (CCR4) trafficking receptors. Moreover, Th17 cells share major non-lymphoid tissue trafficking receptors, such as CCR4, CCR5, CCR6, CXCR3, and CXCR6, with FOXP3+ T regulatory cells. In addition, many Th17 cells express homeostatic chemokine receptors (CD62L, CCR6, CCR7, CXCR4, and CXCR5) implicated in T cell migration to and within lymphoid tissues. Expression of CCR6 and CCR4 by some Th17 cells is not a feature unique to Th17 cells but shared with FOXP3+ T cells. Interestingly, the IL17+IFN-gamma+ Th17 cells have the features of both IL17-IFN-gamma+ Th1 and IL17+IFN-gamma- Th17 cells in expression of trafficking receptors. Taken together, our results revealed that Th17 cells are highly heterogeneous, in terms of trafficking receptors, and programmed to share major trafficking receptors with other T cell lineages. These findings have important implications in their distribution in the human body in relation to other regulatory T cell subsets.

  20. T Cell Receptor Signaling in the Control of Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming O.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (TReg cells), a specialized T cell lineage, have a pivotal function in the control of self-tolerance and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have revealed a discrete mode of TCR signaling that regulates Treg cell differentiation, maintenance and function and that impacts on gene expression, metabolism, cell adhesion and migration of these cells. Here, we discuss the emerging understanding of TCR-guided differentiation of Treg cells in the context of their function in health and disease. PMID:27026074

  1. Enhancement of the interleukin 2 receptor expression on T cells by multiple B-lymphotropic lymphokines.

    PubMed

    Noma, T; Mizuta, T; Rosén, A; Hirano, T; Kishimoto, T; Honjo, T

    1987-07-01

    Three new human lymphokines, interleukin-5, BSF-2 and BSF-MP6, were shown to be active in the enhancement of the IL-2 receptor expression on T cells, although they do not stimulate growth of the T cells.

  2. Vaccinia virus inhibits T cell receptor-dependent responses by human gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Haishan; Deetz, Carl O; Zapata, Juan Carlos; Cairo, Cristiana; Hebbeler, Andrew M; Propp, Nadia; Salvato, Maria S; Shao, Yiming; Pauza, C David

    2007-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) is an effective vaccine and vector but has evolved multiple mechanisms for evading host immunity. We characterized the interactions of VV (TianTan and New York City Board of Health strains) with human gammadelta T cells because of the role they play in immune control of this virus. Exposure to VV failed to trigger proliferative responses in gammadelta T cells from unprimed individuals, but it was an unexpected finding that VV blocked responses to model antigens by the Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell subset. Infectious or ultraviolet light-inactivated VV inhibited proliferative Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cell responses to phosphoantigens and tumor cells, prevented cytolysis of Daudi B cells, and reduced cytokine production. Inhibiting Vgamma2Vdelta2 T cells may be a mechanism for evading host immunity and increasing VV virulence. Increased VV replication or expression in the absence of gammadelta T cell responses might contribute to its potency as a vaccine against poxvirus and recombinant antigens.

  3. Expression of inhibitory receptors on intratumoral T cells modulates the activity of a T cell-bispecific antibody targeting folate receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Jens; Thommen, Daniela S; Herzig, Petra; Bacac, Marina; Klein, Christian; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Levitsky, Victor; Savic, Spasenija; Moersig, Wolfgang; Uhlenbrock, Franziska; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; von Bergwelt-Baildon, M; Lardinois, Didier; Müller, Philipp; Karanikas, Vaios; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-02-01

    T-cell bispecific antibodies (TCBs) are a novel therapeutic tool designed to selectively recruit T-cells to tumor cells and simultaneously activate them. However, it is currently unknown whether the dysfunctional state of T-cells, embedded into the tumor microenvironment, imprints on the therapeutic activity of TCBs. We performed a comprehensive analysis of activation and effector functions of tumor-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) in different tumor types, upon stimulation by a TCB targeting folate receptor 1 and CD3 (FolR1-TCB). We observed a considerable heterogeneity in T-cell activation, cytokine production and tumor cell killing upon exposure to FolR1-TCB among different FolR1-expressing tumors. Of note, tumors presenting with a high frequency of PD-1(hi) TILs displayed significantly impaired tumor cell killing and T-cell function. Further characterization of additional T-cell inhibitory receptors revealed that PD-1(hi) TILs defined a T-cell subset with particularly high levels of multiple inhibitory receptors compared with PD-1(int) and PD-1(neg) T-cells. PD-1 blockade could restore cytokine secretion but not cytotoxicity of TILs in a subset of patients with scarce PD-1(hi) expressing cells; in contrast, patients with abundance of PD-1(hi) expressing T-cells did not benefit from PD-1 blockade. Our data highlight that FolR1-TCB is a promising novel immunotherapeutic treatment option which is capable of activating intratumoral T-cells in different carcinomas. However, its therapeutic efficacy may be substantially hampered by a pre-existing dysfunctional state of T-cells, reflected by abundance of intratumoral PD-1(hi) T-cells. These findings present a rationale for combinatorial approaches of TCBs with other therapeutic strategies targeting T-cell dysfunction.

  4. T-cell Receptor Specificity Maintained by Altered Thermodynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Madura, Florian; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Miles, Kim M.; Holland, Christopher J.; Bulek, Anna M.; Fuller, Anna; Schauenburg, Andrea J. A.; Miles, John J.; Liddy, Nathaniel; Sami, Malkit; Li, Yi; Hossain, Moushumi; Baker, Brian M.; Jakobsen, Bent K.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Cole, David K.

    2013-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizes peptides bound to major histocompatibility molecules (MHC) and allows T-cells to interrogate the cellular proteome for internal anomalies from the cell surface. The TCR contacts both MHC and peptide in an interaction characterized by weak affinity (KD = 100 nm to 270 μm). We used phage-display to produce a melanoma-specific TCR (α24β17) with a 30,000-fold enhanced binding affinity (KD = 0.6 nm) to aid our exploration of the molecular mechanisms utilized to maintain peptide specificity. Remarkably, although the enhanced affinity was mediated primarily through new TCR-MHC contacts, α24β17 remained acutely sensitive to modifications at every position along the peptide backbone, mimicking the specificity of the wild type TCR. Thermodynamic analyses revealed an important role for solvation in directing peptide specificity. These findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that can govern the exquisite peptide specificity characteristic of TCR recognition. PMID:23698002

  5. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of T-Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Nagib; Salomon, Arthur R

    2017-01-01

    TCR signaling critically depends on protein phosphorylation across many proteins. Localization of each phosphorylation event relative to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and canonical T-cell signaling proteins will provide clues about the structure of TCR signaling networks. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis by mass spectrometry provides a wide-scale view of cellular phosphorylation networks. However, analysis of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry is still challenging due to the relative low abundance of phosphorylated proteins relative to all proteins and the extraordinary diversity of phosphorylation sites across the proteome. Highly selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides is essential to provide the most comprehensive view of the phosphoproteome. Optimization of phosphopeptide enrichment methods coupled with highly sensitive mass spectrometry workflows significantly improves the sequencing depth of the phosphoproteome to over 10,000 unique phosphorylation sites from complex cell lysates. Here we describe a step-by-step method for phosphoproteomic analysis that has achieved widespread success for identification of serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation. Reproducible quantification of relative phosphopeptide abundance is provided by intensity-based label-free quantitation. An ideal set of mass spectrometry analysis parameters is also provided that optimize the yield of identified sites. We also provide guidelines for the bioinformatic analysis of this type of data to assess the quality of the data and to comply with proteomic data reporting requirements.

  6. CTLA4 blockade broadens the peripheral T cell receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lidia; Tsoi, Jennifer; Wang, Xiaoyan; Emerson, Ryan; Homet, Blanca; Chodon, Thinle; Mok, Stephen; Huang, Rong Rong; Cochran, Alistair J.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Koya, Richard C.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Robins, Harlan; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the immunomodulatory effects of CTLA-4 blockade with tremelimumab in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Experimental Design We used next generation sequencing to study the complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) from the rearranged T cell receptor (TCR) variable beta (V-beta) in PBMC of 21 patients, at baseline and 30–60 days after receiving tremelimumab. Results After receiving tremelimumab there was a median of 30% increase in unique productive sequences of TCR V-beta CDR3 in 19 out of 21 patients, and a median decrease of 30% in only 2 out of 21 patients. These changes were significant for richness (p=0.01) and for Shannon index diversity (p=0.04). In comparison, serially collected PBMC from four healthy donors did not show a significant change in TCR V-beta CDR3 diversity over one year. There was a significant difference in the total unique productive TCR V-beta CDR3 sequences between patients experiencing toxicity with tremelimumab compared to patients without toxicity (p=0.05). No relevant differences were noted between clinical responders and non-responders. Conclusions CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab diversifies the peripheral T cell pool, representing a pharmacodynamic effect of how this class of antibodies modulates the human immune system. PMID:24583799

  7. Inclusion of Strep-Tag II in design of antigen receptors for T cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-01-01

    The tactical introduction of Strep-tag II into synthetic antigen receptors provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, and a functional element for selective antibody coated microbead-driven large-scale expansion. Such receptor designs can be applied to chimeric antigen receptors of different ligand specificities and costimulatory domains, and to T cell receptors to facilitate cGMP manufacturing of adoptive T cell therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. PMID:26900664

  8. Targeting the adenosine 2A receptor enhances chimeric antigen receptor T cell efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Beavis, Paul A.; Henderson, Melissa A.; Giuffrida, Lauren; Mills, Jane K.; Sek, Kevin; Cross, Ryan S.; Davenport, Alexander J.; John, Liza B.; Mardiana, Sherly; Slaney, Clare Y.; Johnstone, Ricky W.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Stagg, John; Loi, Sherene; Kats, Lev; Gyorki, David; Kershaw, Michael H.; Darcy, Phillip K.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been highly successful in treating hematological malignancies, including acute and chronic lymphoblastic leukemia. However, treatment of solid tumors using CAR T cells has been largely unsuccessful to date, partly because of tumor-induced immunosuppressive mechanisms, including adenosine production. Previous studies have shown that adenosine generated by tumor cells potently inhibits endogenous antitumor T cell responses through activation of adenosine 2A receptors (A2ARs). Herein, we have observed that CAR activation resulted in increased A2AR expression and suppression of both murine and human CAR T cells. This was reversible using either A2AR antagonists or genetic targeting of A2AR using shRNA. In 2 syngeneic HER2+ self-antigen tumor models, we found that either genetic or pharmacological targeting of the A2AR profoundly increased CAR T cell efficacy, particularly when combined with PD-1 blockade. Mechanistically, this was associated with increased cytokine production of CD8+ CAR T cells and increased activation of both CD8+ and CD4+ CAR T cells. Given the known clinical relevance of the CD73/adenosine pathway in several solid tumor types, and the initiation of phase I trials for A2AR antagonists in oncology, this approach has high translational potential to enhance CAR T cell efficacy in several cancer types. PMID:28165340

  9. Expression of recombination-activating genes and T cell receptor gene recombination in the human T cell leukemia cell line.

    PubMed

    Zou, Hong-yun; Ma, Li; Meng, Min-jie; Yao, Xin-sheng; Lin, Ying; Wu, Zhen-qiang; He, Xiao-wei; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2007-03-05

    Recent studies have suggested that mature T cells can change their specificity through reexpression of recombination-activating genes (RAG) and RAG-mediated V(D)J recombination. This process is named receptor revision and has been observed in mature peripheral T cells from transgenic mice and human donors. However, whether thebreceptor revision in mature T cells is a random or orientated process remains poorly understood. Here we used the Jurkathuman T cell line, which represents a mature stage of T cell development, as a model to investigate the regulation of Tcell receptor (TCR) gene recombination. TCR Dbeta-Jbeta signal joint T cell receptor excision DNA circles (sjTRECs) were determined by nested and seminested PCR. Double-strand DNA breaks at recombination signal sequences (RSSs) in the TCRVbeta chain locus were detected by ligation-mediated-PCR. Further analysis of the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) size of the TCRVbeta chain was examined by the TCR GeneScan technique. RAG1, RAG2, and three crucial components of the nonhomologous DNA end-joining (NHEJ) pathway were readily detected in Jurkat. Characteristics of junctional diversity of Dbeta2-Jbeta2 signal joints and ds RSS breaks associated with the Dbeta2 5' and Dbeta 2 3' sites were detected in DNA from Jurkat cells. CDR3 size and the gene sequences of the TCRVbeta chain did not change during cell proliferation. RAG1 and RAG2 and ongoing TCR gene recombination are coexpressed in Jurkat cells, but the ongoing recombination process may not play a role in modification of the TCR repertoire.However, the results suggest that Jurkat could be used as a model for studying the regulation of RAGs and V(D)J recombination and as a "special" model of the coexistence of TCR gene rearrangements and "negative" receptor revision.

  10. The α4 Nicotinic Receptor Promotes CD4+ T-Cell Proliferation and a Helper T-Cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Nordman, Jacob C.; Muldoon, Pretal; Clark, Sarah; Damaj, M. Imad

    2014-01-01

    Smoking is a common addiction and a leading cause of disease. Chronic nicotine exposure is known to activate nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in immune cells. We demonstrate a novel role for α4 nAChRs in the effect of nicotine on T-cell proliferation and immunity. Using cell-based sorting and proteomic analysis we define an α4 nAChR expressing helper T-cell population (α4+CD3+CD4+) and show that this group of cells is responsive to sustained nicotine exposure. In the circulation, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus, we find that nicotine promotes an increase in CD3+CD4+ cells via its activation of the α4 nAChR and regulation of G protein subunit o, G protein regulated–inducer of neurite outgrowth, and CDC42 signaling within T cells. In particular, nicotine is found to promote a helper T cell 2 adaptive immunologic response within T cells that is absent in α4−/− mice. We thus present a new mechanism of α4 nAChR signaling and immune regulation in T cells, possibly accounting for the effect of smoking on the immune system. PMID:24107512

  11. Fetal liver T cell receptor gamma/delta+ T cells as cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for maternal alloantigens

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have established fetal liver-derived T cell receptor (TCR) gamma/delta+, CD3+ T cell lines that are cytotoxic for maternal T cells. Fetal liver-derived lymphoid progenitors yielded predominantly TCR-gamma/delta+ cell clusters when cultured on fetal bone marrow- derived stromal cells in the presence of a cytokine cocktail under magnetic force. These tightly adherent clusters were cloned by limiting dilution and the resulting cell lines analyzed for phenotype and function. Six of eight TCR-gamma/delta lines from 8-9.5-wk gestation fetuses were V delta 2+ as compared with zero of eight lines from later stages of gestation (10 and 15 wk), where all the lines were V delta 1+. In cytotoxicity assays, these TCR-gamma/delta+, CD3+, CD4-, and CD8+ or CD8- long-term cultured lymphoid cells (LLC) were killer cells active against the class I antigens on maternal T cells. Of the cell lines, the CD8+ TCR-gamma/delta+ LLC had the highest levels of killer activity. Thus fetal liver TCR-gamma/delta+ T cells may play a crucial role in protection against invading maternal T cells generated in the feto-maternal interaction. PMID:1535364

  12. Linking the T cell receptor to the single cell transcriptome in antigen-specific human T cells.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Rizzetto, Simone; Pirozyan, Mehdi R; Betz-Stablein, Brigid D; Venturi, Vanessa; Kedzierska, Katherine; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneity of T cells is a hallmark of a successful adaptive immune response, harnessing the vast diversity of antigen-specific T cells into a coordinated evolution of effector and memory outcomes. The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is highly diverse to account for the highly heterogeneous antigenic world. During the response to a virus multiple individual clones of antigen specific CD8+ (Ag-specific) T cells can be identified against a single epitope and multiple epitopes are recognised. Advances in single-cell technologies have provided the potential to study Ag-specific T cell heterogeneity at both surface phenotype and transcriptome levels, thereby allowing investigation of the diversity within the same apparent sub-population. We propose a new method (VDJPuzzle) to reconstruct the native TCRαβ from single cell RNA-seq data of Ag-specific T cells and then to link these with the gene expression profile of individual cells. We applied this method using rare Ag-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood of a subject who cleared hepatitis C virus infection. We successfully reconstructed productive TCRαβ in 56 of a total of 63 cells (89%), with double α and double β in 18, and 7% respectively, and double TCRαβ in 2 cells. The method was validated via standard single cell PCR sequencing of the TCR. We demonstrate that single-cell transcriptome analysis can successfully distinguish Ag-specific T cell populations sorted directly from resting memory cells in peripheral blood and sorted after ex vivo stimulation. This approach allows a detailed analysis of the TCR diversity and its relationship with the transcriptional profile of different clones.

  13. Identification of the T-cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) gene(s) in T-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Hinz, T; Kabelitz, D

    2000-12-01

    Due to the lack of a complete range of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) it is often impossible to rapidly identify by flow cytometry the T-cell receptor variable genes in patients suffering from T-cell malignancies. This applies especially to the alpha variable genes (TRAV), since only very few anti-TcR variable alpha mAb are available. We describe a very rapid method for inverse PCR amplification of the TcR alpha chain without prior purification of the double-stranded cDNA, provide the sequences for appropriate oligonucleotides, and describe a buffer system that dramatically enhances the amplification efficiency as compared to standard conditions.

  14. Induction of lysosomal and plasma membrane-bound sialidases in human T-cells via T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ji; Bian, Hong; Wu, Ping; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kung, Ted T; Crawley, Yvette; Egan, Robert W; Billah, M Motasim

    2004-01-01

    Among the three isoenzymes of neuraminidase (Neu) or sialidase, Neu-1 has been suggested to be induced by cell activation and to be involved in IL (interleukin)-4 biosynthesis in murine T-cells. In the present study, we found that antigen-induced airway eosinophilia, a typical response dependent on Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokines, as well as mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, are suppressed in Neu-1-deficient mice, thereby demonstrating the in vivo role of murine Neu-1 in regulation of Th2 cytokines. To elucidate the roles of various sialidases in human T-cell activation, we investigated their tissue distribution, gene induction and function. Neu-1 is the predominant isoenzyme at the mRNA level in most tissues and cells in both mice and humans, including T-cells. T-cells also have significant levels of Neu-3 mRNAs, albeit much lower than those of Neu-1, whereas the levels of Neu-2 mRNAs are minimal. In human T-cells, both Neu-1 and Neu-3 mRNAs are significantly induced by T-cell-receptor stimulation, as is sialidase activity against 4-methylumbelliferyl- N -acetylneuramic acid (a substrate for both Neu-1 and Neu-3) and the ganglioside G(D1a) [NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(NeuAcalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-cer] (a substrate for Neu-3, but not for Neu-1). The expression of the two sialidase genes may be under differential regulation. Western blot analysis and enzymic comparison with recombinant sialidases have revealed that Neu-3 is induced as a major isoform in activated cells. The induction of Neu-1 and Neu-3 in T-cells is unique. In human monocytes and neutrophils stimulated with various agents, the only observation of sialidase induction has been by IL-1 in neutrophils. Functionally, a major difference has been observed in Jurkat T-cell lines over-expressing Neu-1- and Neu-3. Upon T-cell receptor stimulation, IL-2, interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 are induced in the Neu-1 line, whereas in the Neu-3 line the same cytokines are induced

  15. Induction of lysosomal and plasma membrane-bound sialidases in human T-cells via T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Ji; Bian, Hong; Wu, Ping; Kuvelkar, Reshma; Kung, Ted T; Crawley, Yvette; Egan, Robert W; Billah, M Motasim

    2004-06-01

    Among the three isoenzymes of neuraminidase (Neu) or sialidase, Neu-1 has been suggested to be induced by cell activation and to be involved in IL (interleukin)-4 biosynthesis in murine T-cells. In the present study, we found that antigen-induced airway eosinophilia, a typical response dependent on Th2 (T-helper cell type 2) cytokines, as well as mRNA expression of Th2 cytokines, including IL-4, are suppressed in Neu-1-deficient mice, thereby demonstrating the in vivo role of murine Neu-1 in regulation of Th2 cytokines. To elucidate the roles of various sialidases in human T-cell activation, we investigated their tissue distribution, gene induction and function. Neu-1 is the predominant isoenzyme at the mRNA level in most tissues and cells in both mice and humans, including T-cells. T-cells also have significant levels of Neu-3 mRNAs, albeit much lower than those of Neu-1, whereas the levels of Neu-2 mRNAs are minimal. In human T-cells, both Neu-1 and Neu-3 mRNAs are significantly induced by T-cell-receptor stimulation, as is sialidase activity against 4-methylumbelliferyl- N -acetylneuramic acid (a substrate for both Neu-1 and Neu-3) and the ganglioside G(D1a) [NeuAcalpha2-3Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(NeuAcalpha2-3)Galbeta1-4Glcbeta1-cer] (a substrate for Neu-3, but not for Neu-1). The expression of the two sialidase genes may be under differential regulation. Western blot analysis and enzymic comparison with recombinant sialidases have revealed that Neu-3 is induced as a major isoform in activated cells. The induction of Neu-1 and Neu-3 in T-cells is unique. In human monocytes and neutrophils stimulated with various agents, the only observation of sialidase induction has been by IL-1 in neutrophils. Functionally, a major difference has been observed in Jurkat T-cell lines over-expressing Neu-1- and Neu-3. Upon T-cell receptor stimulation, IL-2, interferon-gamma, IL-4 and IL-13 are induced in the Neu-1 line, whereas in the Neu-3 line the same cytokines are induced

  16. Apoptosis in a Fas-resistant, T-cell receptor-sensitive human leukaemic T-cell clone.

    PubMed Central

    Delehanty, L L; Payne, J A; Farrow, S N; Brown, R; Champion, B R

    1997-01-01

    The Fas (CD95) antigen plays a key role in regulating T-cell activation and survival. We have generated a Fas-resistant subclone of the human T-cell leukaemia line, H9, which is still able to undergo apoptosis in response to T-cell receptor ligation. Molecular analyses revealed that resistance to Fas-mediated apoptosis was due to a heterozygous mutation in the death domain of the Fas gene which generates a stop codon, and thus encodes a truncated Fas molecule. Fas ligation was able to induce apoptosis in the presence of cycloheximide, indicating that the mutant Fas molecule retained some signalling capability, which is death-domain independent. These cells will provide a useful tool for dissecting the complexities of Fas signalling pathways. Images Figure 5 PMID:9155645

  17. Differential Inhibitory Receptor Expression on T Cells Delineates Functional Capacities in Chronic Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Teigler, Jeffrey E; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Eller, Michael A; Bolton, Diane L; Marovich, Mary; Gordon, Alexander D; Alrubayyi, Aljawharah; Alter, Galit; Robb, Merlin L; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Michael, Nelson L; Dittmer, Ulf; Streeck, Hendrik

    2017-09-13

    Inhibitory receptors have been extensively described for their importance in regulating immune responses in chronic infections and cancers. Blocking the function of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1, CTLA-4, 2B4, Tim-3, and LAG-3 have shown promise for augmenting CD8 T cell activity and boosting pathogen-specific immunity. However, the prevalence of inhibitory receptors on CD4 T cells and their relative influence on CD4 T cell functionality in chronic HIV infection remains poorly described. We therefore determined and compared inhibitory receptor expression patterns of 2B4, CTLA-4, LAG-3, PD-1, and Tim-3 on virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in relation to their functional T cell profile. In chronic HIV infection, inhibitory receptor distribution differed markedly between cytokine-producing T cell subsets with IFN-γ- and TNF-α-producing cells displaying the highest and lowest prevalence of inhibitory receptors, respectively. Blockade of inhibitory receptors differentially impacted cytokine production by cells in response to SEB stimulation. CTLA-4 blockade increased IFN-γ and CD40L production, while PD-1 blockade strongly augmented IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α production. In a Friend retrovirus infection model, CTLA-4 blockade in particular was able to improve control of viral replication. Together these results show that inhibitory receptor distribution on HIV-specific CD4 T cells varies markedly with respect to the functional subset of CD4 T cell being analyzed. Furthermore, the differential effects of receptor blockade suggest novel methods of immune response modulation, which could be important in the context of HIV vaccination or therapeutic strategies.IMPORTANCE Inhibitory receptors are important to limit damage by the immune system during acute infections. In chronic infections however, their expression limits immune system responsiveness. Studies have shown that blocking inhibitory receptors augments CD8 T cell functionality in HIV infection, but their

  18. Comprehensive Approach for Identifying the T Cell Subset Origin of CD3 and CD28 Antibody-Activated Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells.

    PubMed

    Schmueck-Henneresse, Michael; Omer, Bilal; Shum, Thomas; Tashiro, Haruko; Mamonkin, Maksim; Lapteva, Natalia; Sharma, Sandhya; Rollins, Lisa; Dotti, Gianpietro; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Rooney, Cliona M

    2017-07-01

    The outcome of therapy with chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is strongly influenced by the subset origin of the infused T cells. However, because polyclonally activated T cells acquire a largely CD45RO(+)CCR7(-) effector memory phenotype after expansion, regardless of subset origin, it is impossible to know which subsets contribute to the final T cell product. To determine the contribution of naive T cell, memory stem T cell, central memory T cell, effector memory T cell, and terminally differentiated effector T cell populations to the CD3 and CD28-activated CAR-modified T cells that we use for therapy, we followed the fate and function of individually sorted CAR-modified T cell subsets after activation with CD3 and CD28 Abs (CD3/28), transduction and culture alone, or after reconstitution into the relevant subset-depleted population. We show that all subsets are sensitive to CAR transduction, and each developed a distinct T cell functional profile during culture. Naive-derived T cells showed the greatest rate of proliferation but had more limited effector functions and reduced killing compared with memory-derived populations. When cultured in the presence of memory T cells, naive-derived T cells show increased differentiation, reduced effector cytokine production, and a reduced reproliferative response to CAR stimulation. CD3/28-activated T cells expanded in IL-7 and IL-15 produced greater expansion of memory stem T cells and central memory T cell-derived T cells compared with IL-2. Our strategy provides a powerful tool to elucidate the characteristics of CAR-modified T cells, regardless of the protocol used for expansion, reveals the functional properties of each expanded T cell subset, and paves the way for a more detailed evaluation of the effects of manufacturing changes on the subset contribution to in vitro-expanded T cells. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. T-cell triggering thresholds are modulated by the number of antigen within individual T-cell receptor clusters

    PubMed Central

    Manz, Boryana N.; Jackson, Bryan L.; Petit, Rebecca S.; Dustin, Michael L.; Groves, Jay

    2011-01-01

    T cells react to extremely small numbers of activating agonist peptides. Spatial organization of T-cell receptors (TCR) and their peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands into microclusters is correlated with T-cell activation. Here we have designed an experimental strategy that enables control over the number of agonist peptides per TCR cluster, without altering the total number engaged by the cell. Supported membranes, partitioned with grids of barriers to lateral mobility, provide an effective way of limiting the total number of pMHC ligands that may be assembled within a single TCR cluster. Observations directly reveal that restriction of pMHC content within individual TCR clusters can decrease T-cell sensitivity for triggering initial calcium flux at fixed total pMHC density. Further analysis suggests that triggering thresholds are determined by the number of activating ligands available to individual TCR clusters, not by the total number encountered by the cell. Results from a series of experiments in which the overall agonist density and the maximum number of agonist per TCR cluster are independently varied in primary T cells indicate that the most probable minimal triggering unit for calcium signaling is at least four pMHC in a single cluster for this system. This threshold is unchanged by inclusion of coagonist pMHC, but costimulation of CD28 by CD80 can modulate the threshold lower. PMID:21576490

  20. Sustained interactions between T cell receptors and antigens promote the differentiation of CD4⁺ memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chulwoo; Wilson, Theodore; Fischer, Kael F; Williams, Matthew A

    2013-09-19

    During CD4⁺ T cell activation, T cell receptor (TCR) signals impact T cell fate, including recruitment, expansion, differentiation, trafficking, and survival. To determine the impact of TCR signals on the fate decision of activated CD4⁺ T cells to become end-stage effector or long-lived memory T helper 1 (Th1) cells, we devised a deep-sequencing-based approach that allowed us to track the evolution of TCR repertoires after acute infection. The transition of effector Th1 cells into the memory pool was associated with a significant decrease in repertoire diversity, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II tetramer off rate, but not tetramer avidity, was a key predictive factor in the representation of individual clonal T cell populations at the memory stage. We conclude that stable and sustained interactions with antigens during the development of Th1 responses to acute infection are a determinative factor in promoting the differentiation of Th1 memory cells.

  1. T-cell triggering thresholds are modulated by the number of antigen within individual T-cell receptor clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, Boryana N.; Jackson, Bryan L.; Petit, Rebecca S.; Dustin, Michael L.; Groves, Jay

    2011-05-31

    T cells react to extremely small numbers of activating agonist peptides. Spatial organization of T-cell receptors (TCR) and their peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligands into microclusters is correlated with T-cell activation. In this study, we have designed an experimental strategy that enables control over the number of agonist peptides per TCR cluster, without altering the total number engaged by the cell. Supported membranes, partitioned with grids of barriers to lateral mobility, provide an effective way of limiting the total number of pMHC ligands that may be assembled within a single TCR cluster. Observations directly reveal that restriction of pMHC content within individual TCR clusters can decrease T-cell sensitivity for triggering initial calcium flux at fixed total pMHC density. Further analysis suggests that triggering thresholds are determined by the number of activating ligands available to individual TCR clusters, not by the total number encountered by the cell. Results from a series of experiments in which the overall agonist density and the maximum number of agonist per TCR cluster are independently varied in primary T cells indicate that the most probable minimal triggering unit for calcium signaling is at least four pMHC in a single cluster for this system. In conclusion, this threshold is unchanged by inclusion of coagonist pMHC, but costimulation of CD28 by CD80 can modulate the threshold lower.

  2. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2009-08-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T-cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T-cell receptors on their surface to short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility gene products (displayed on antigen-presenting cells). A diverse and self-tolerant T-cell repertoire is selected in the thymus. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide an analytic expression for the amino acid compositions of selected T-cell receptors (which enable its recognition functions).

  3. Vav1 regulates T cell activation through a feedback mechanism and crosstalk between the T cell receptor and CD28

    PubMed Central

    Helou, Ynes A.; Petrashen, Anna P.; Salomon, Arthur R.

    2015-01-01

    Vavl, a Rac/Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor and a critical component of the T cell receptor (TCR) signaling cascade, is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell activation. Vav1 has established roles in proliferation, cytokine secretion, Ca2+ responses, and actin cytoskeleton regulation, however, its function in the regulation of phosphorylation of TCR components, including the ζ chain, the CD3 δ, ε, γ chains, and the associated kinases Lck, and ZAP-70 is not well established. To obtain a more comprehensive picture of the role of Vav1 in receptor proximal signaling, we performed a wide-scale characterization of Vav1-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation events using quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of Vav1-deficient T cells across a time course of TCR stimulation. Importantly, this study revealed a new function for Vav1 in the negative feedback regulation of the phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs within the ζ chains, CD3 δ, ε, γ chains, as well as activation sites on the critical T cell tyrosine kinases Itk, Lck, and ZAP-70. Our study also uncovered a previously unappreciated role for Vav1 in crosstalk between the CD28 and TCR signaling pathways. PMID:26043137

  4. Identification of three new bovine T-cell receptor delta variable gene subgroups expressed by peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Carolyn T A; Blumerman, Seth L; Baldwin, Cynthia L

    2006-09-01

    To understand the biology of gammadelta T cells in ruminants, it is necessary to have a comprehensive picture of gammadelta T-cell receptor gene diversity and expression. In this study, three new subgroups of bovine T-cell receptor delta (TRD) variable genes were identified by RT-PCR and sequencing and homology with TRDV genes from other mammals determined. Previously unidentified TRDV subgroup genes described in this study include the bovine homologues of ovine TRDV2, TRDV3, and TRDV4 which were named accordingly. TRDV2 subgroup has two genes (TRDV2-1 and TRDV2-2) while we found the previously identified TRDV1 has at least eight genes corresponding to separate genomic sequences. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences for particular gene subgroups between cattle and sheep were more than 87% identical but identities among TRDV subgroups within a species were much less, with bovine TRDV4 having <45% identity to the other three bovine TRDV gene subgroups. Analysis of circulating bovine gammadelta T cells revealed that genes from all four TRDV subgroups were expressed in combination with TRDJ1, TRDJ3, and TRDC, although TRDV4 was the least represented, and all displayed a variety of CDR3 junctional lengths. Finally, some genes within the TRDV1, TRDV2, and TRDV3 subgroups recombined with TRAV incorporating TRAJs, suggesting dual use.

  5. Antigen-specific activation thresholds of CD8+ T cells are independent of IFN-I-mediated partial lymphocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Wijesundara, Danushka K; Kumar, Sheetal; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Müllbacher, Arno; Regner, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Type-I IFN (IFN-I) are highly pleiotropic cytokines known to modulate immune responses and play an early central role in mediating antiviral defenses. We have shown that IFN-I mediate transient up-regulation of a distinct subset of lymphocyte surface activation markers on both B and T cells in vivo independent of cognate antigen: a state referred to as 'partial lymphocyte activation'. Here we investigated in vitro the possibility that partial lymphocyte activation may serve to lower the antigen-specific activation thresholds for T cells. We found that the kinetics of Ca(2+) flux in T cells responding to TCR cross-linking was not enhanced in partially activated T cells. Furthermore, following TCR stimulation with anti-cluster of differentiation (CD) 3 epsilon, a lower proportion of partially activated than naive T cells proliferated. In contrast, the proliferation of partially activated and naive ovalbumin peptide (OVAp, SIINFEKL) specific CD8(+) T cells (OT-I CD8(+) T cells) was similar when stimulated with OVAp. Surprisingly, using an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay for IFN-gamma secretion, we found that a higher number of partially activated OT-I CD8(+) T cells expressed effector functions than did naive OT-I CD8(+) T cells. This is most readily explained by an increased survival of activated antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from a pool of partially activated T cells than naive T cells. Overall, when examining the effects of early (Ca(2+) flux), intermediate (proliferation) or late events (IFN-gamma secretion) of T-cell activation, we found that partial activation promotes the survival but does not alter the antigen-specific activation thresholds of CD8(+) T cells.

  6. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    PubMed

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine, a principal neurotransmitter, deserves upgrading to 'NeuroImmunotransmitter' thanks to its multiple, direct and powerful effects on most/all immune cells. Dopamine by itself is a potent activator of resting effector T cells (Teffs), via two independent ways: direct Teffs activation, and indirect Teffs activation by suppression of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The review covers the following findings: (i) T cells express functional dopamine receptors (DRs) D1R-D5R, but their level and function are dynamic and context-sensitive, (ii) DR membranal protein levels do not necessarily correlate with DR mRNA levels, (iii) different T cell types/subtypes have different DR levels and composition and different responses to dopamine, (iv) autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells and T cell leukaemia/lymphoma also express functional DRs, (v) dopamine (~10(-8) M) activates resting/naive Teffs (CD8(+) >CD4(+) ), (vi) dopamine affects Th1/Th2/Th17 differentiation, (vii) dopamine inhibits already activated Teffs (i.e. T cells that have been already activated by either antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies cytokines or other molecules), (viii) dopamine inhibits activated Tregs in an autocrine/paracrine manner. Thus, dopamine 'suppresses the suppressors' and releases the inhibition they exert on Teffs, (ix) dopamine affects intracellular signalling molecules and cascades in T cells (e.g. ERK, Lck, Fyn, NF-κB, KLF2), (x) T cells produce dopamine (Tregs>Teffs), can release dopamine, mainly after activation (by antigen, mitogen, anti-CD3 antibodies, PKC activators or other), uptake extracellular dopamine, and most probably need dopamine, (xi) dopamine is important for antigen-specific interactions between T cells and dendritic cells, (xii) in few autoimmune diseases (e.g. multiple sclerosis/SLE/rheumatoid arthritis), and neurological/psychiatric diseases (e.g. Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia and Tourette), patient's T cells seem to have abnormal DRs

  7. Engineered secreted T-cell receptor alpha beta heterodimers.

    PubMed Central

    Grégoire, C; Rebaï, N; Schweisguth, F; Necker, A; Mazza, G; Auphan, N; Millward, A; Schmitt-Verhulst, A M; Malissen, B

    1991-01-01

    We have produced a soluble form of a mouse alpha beta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) by shuffling its variable (V) and constant (C) domains to the C region of an immunoglobulin kappa light chain. These chimeric molecules composed of V alpha C alpha C kappa and V beta C beta C kappa chains were efficiently secreted (up to 1 micrograms/ml) by transfected myeloma cells as noncovalent heterodimers of about 95-kDa molecular mass. In the absence of direct binding measurement, we have refined the epitopic analysis of the soluble V alpha C alpha C kappa-V beta C beta C kappa dimers and shown that they react with an anti-clonotypic antibody and two antibodies directed to the C domain of the TCR alpha and beta chains. Conversely, we have raised three distinct monoclonal antibodies against the soluble TCR heterodimers and shown that they recognize surface-expressed TCRs. Two of these antibodies were found to react specifically with the products of the V alpha 2 (V delta 8) and V beta 2 gene segments, respectively. When considered together, these data suggest that these soluble TCR molecules are folded in a conformation indistinguishable from that which they assume at the cell surface. Images PMID:1716770

  8. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Distinctive selection mechanisms govern the T cell receptor repertoire of peripheral CD4-CD8- alpha/beta T cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of CD4+ and CD8+ alpha/beta T cells is heavily influenced by positive and negative selection events that occur during T cell development in the thymus. The coreceptors CD4 and CD8 appear to be essential for this selection to occur. To gain insight into whether T cells that express TCR alpha/beta but lack either coreceptor (CD4- CD8- TCR alpha/beta or alpha/beta double- negative [DN] cells) are also subject to positive and negative selection, and whether selection can occur in the absence of coreceptors, we have performed an extensive immunogenetic analysis of the TCR V beta repertoire of alpha/beta DN cells in lymph nodes of normal mice. Our results show that alpha/beta DN cells appear to be unaffected by clonal deletion of V beta 5 and V beta 11 in I-E- expressing mice, and do not undergo deletion of V beta 6- and V beta 8.1-expressing T cells in Mls-1a-positive mice. They are also unaffected by positive selection of V beta 17a+ T cells in the context of I-Aq. The results suggest that most selection events require the participation of CD4 and CD8, while alpha/beta DN cells are unselected. This argues that most alpha/beta DN cells probably have never expressed CD4 or CD8. However, a unique form of repertoire selection occurs: enrichment of V beta 17a+ alpha/beta DN cells in I-E+ mice. This could be an instance of coreceptor-independent selection. PMID:1512537

  10. T cell receptor signaling pathway is overexpressed in CD4(+) T cells from HAM/TSP individuals.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mariana Tomazini; Malta, Tathiane Maistro; Rodrigues, Evandra Strazza; Takayanagui, Osvaldo Massaiti; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Kashima, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a human retrovirus related to the chronic neuroinflammatory disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). CD4(+) T cells activation appears to play a key role on HTLV-1 infection. Here we investigated the expression of genes associated to T cell activation CD3e molecule, epsilon (CD3ɛ), lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK), vav 1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (VAV1), and zeta-chain (TCR) associated protein kinase 70kDa (ZAP70) on T lymphocytes of HTLV-1-infected individuals and compared to healthy uninfected individuals (CT). We observed that CD3ɛ, LCK, ZAP70, and VAV1 gene expression were increased in CD4(+) T cells from HAM/TSP group compared to HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients (HAC). Moreover, ZAP70 and VAV1 were also upregulated in HAM/TSP compared to CT group. We detected a positive correlation among all these genes. We also observed that CD3ɛ, LCK, and VAV1 genes had a positive correlation with the proviral load (PVL) and Tax expression. These results suggest that PVL and Tax protein could drive CD3ɛ, LCK, and VAV1 gene expression in CD4(+) T cells, and these genes function on a synchronized way on the CD4(+) T cell activation. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying T cell receptor signaling pathway is of considerable interest and might lead to new insights into the mechanism of HAM/TSP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku Okada, Naoki

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  12. CD27 cooperates with the pre-T cell receptor in the regulation of murine T cell development

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD27 is a lymphocyte-specific member of the TNF receptor family and has a TNF-related transmembrane ligand, CD70. The CD27/CD70 receptor-ligand pair cooperates with the TCR in the regulation of the peripheral T cell response. The study presented here reveals that CD27 may play a similar role in thymic pre-T cell development. We have previously cloned the cDNA encoding murine CD27, prepared specific mAbs and observed that murine CD27 is expressed on virtually all thymocytes, with the exception of a subpopulation of CD4-8- precursor T cells. It is shown here that induction of murine CD27 expression occurs at the transition from the CD4-8-25+ to the CD4-8-25- precursor T cell stage and is regulated by the pre-TCR. Therefore, we investigated whether CD27 contributes to pre-TCR-mediated thymocyte development. Pre-TCR function was mimicked by the induction of CD3 signaling in thymocytes of recombination activating gene (RAG)-deficient mice. This in vivo anti- CD3 epsilon mAb treatment induces an about fifty fold numerical expansion of CD4-8-25+ thymocytes and their differentiation to the CD4+8+25- stage. Co-injection of anti-CD27 mAb inhibited the CD3- mediated expansion and differentiation of the CD4-8-25+ precursor population. Also, injection of anti-CD27 mAb in TCR alpha-/- mutant mice led to a reduction in the absolute number of CD4+8+25- thymocytes. We present evidence that in these in vivo systems, anti-CD27 mAb inhibits CD27-ligand interaction. Therefore, we conclude that CD27 may contribute to normal murine T cell development by synergizing with the pre-TCR-mediated signal. PMID:8760821

  13. Bispecific T-cells Expressing Polyclonal Repertoire of Endogenous γδ T-cell Receptors and Introduced CD19-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Hurton, Lenka; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2013-01-01

    Even though other γδ T-cell subsets exhibit antitumor activity, adoptive transfer of γδ Tcells is currently limited to one subset (expressing Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell receptor (TCR)) due to dependence on aminobisphosphonates as the only clinically appealing reagent for propagating γδ T cells. Therefore, we developed an approach to propagate polyclonal γδ T cells and rendered them bispecific through expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were electroporated with Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase to enforce expression of CAR in multiple γδ T-cell subsets. CAR+γδ T cells were expanded on CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC), which resulted in >109 CAR+γδ T cells from <106 total cells. Digital multiplex assay detected TCR mRNA coding for Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ3 with Vγ2, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, and Vγ10 alleles. Polyclonal CAR+γδ T cells were functional when TCRγδ and CAR were stimulated and displayed enhanced killing of CD19+ tumor cell lines compared with CARnegγδ T cells. CD19+ leukemia xenografts in mice were reduced with CAR+γδ T cells compared with control mice. Since CAR, SB, and aAPC have been adapted for human application, clinical trials can now focus on the therapeutic potential of polyclonal γδ T cells. PMID:23295945

  14. Interleukin-1 receptors are differentially expressed in normal and psoriatic T cells.

    PubMed

    Bebes, Attila; Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4(+)CD25(-) effector and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low) regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  15. Whole transcriptome analysis for T cell receptor-affinity and IRF4-regulated clonal expansion of T cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Man, Kevin; Smyth, Gordon K; Nutt, Stephen L; Kallies, Axel

    2014-12-01

    Clonal population expansion of T cells during an immune response is dependent on the affinity of the T cell receptor (TCR) for its antigen [1]. However, there is little understanding of how this process is controlled transcriptionally. We found that the transcription factor IRF4 was induced in a manner dependent on TCR-affinity and was critical for the clonal expansion and maintenance of effector function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. We performed a genome-wide expression profiling experiment using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-seq) to interrogate global expression changes when IRF4 was deleted in CD8(+) T cells activated with either a low or high affinity peptide ligand. This allowed us not only to determine IRF4-dependent transcriptional changes but also to identify transcripts dependent on TCR-affinity [2]. Here we describe in detail the analyses of the RNA-seq data, including quality control, read mapping, quantification, normalization and assessment of differential gene expression. The RNA-seq data can be accessed from Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession number GSE49929).

  16. Interlesional diversity of T cell receptors in melanoma with immune checkpoints enriched in tissue-resident memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Chandra Sekhar; Bar, Noffar; Kadaveru, Krishna; Krauthammer, Michael; Pornputtapong, Natopol; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Kluger, Harriet; Deng, Yanhong; Verma, Rakesh; Das, Rituparna; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Halaban, Ruth; Sznol, Mario; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Dhodapkar, Kavita M.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity of tumor cells and their microenvironment can affect outcome in cancer. Blockade of immune checkpoints (ICPs) expressed only on a subset of immune cells leads to durable responses in advanced melanoma. Tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells have recently emerged as a distinct subset of memory T cells in nonlymphoid tissues. Here, we show that functional properties and expression of ICPs within tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) differ from those of blood T cells. TILs secrete less IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α compared with circulating counterparts, and expression of VEGF correlated with reduced TIL infiltration. Within tumors, ICPs are particularly enriched within T cells with phenotype and genomic features of TRM cells and the CD16+ subset of myeloid cells. Concurrent T cell receptor (TCR) and tumor exome sequencing of individual metastases in the same patient revealed that interlesional diversity of TCRs exceeded differences in mutation/neoantigen load in tumor cells. These findings suggest that the TRM subset of TILs may be the major target of ICP blockade and illustrate interlesional diversity of tissue-resident TCRs within individual metastases, which did not equilibrate between metastases and may differentially affect the outcome of immune therapy at each site. PMID:28018970

  17. T-cell receptor repertoire variation may be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in humans.

    PubMed

    Frankl, Joseph A; Thearle, Marie S; Desmarais, Cindy; Bogardus, Clifton; Krakoff, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    Recent work in Pima Indians, a population with high rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), demonstrated that human leukocyte antigen haplotype DRB1*02 carriers have an increased acute insulin response and decreased risk for the development of T2DM, implicating loss of self-tolerance in the pathogenesis of T2DM. Advances in genomic sequencing have made T-cell receptor repertoire analysis a practical mode of investigation. High-throughput sequencing of T-cell receptor complementarity-determining region 3 was carried out in male Pima Indians with normal glucose regulation (n = 11; age = 31 ± 8 years; %fat = 30.2 ± 8.7%) and the protective DRB1*02 haplotype versus those with T2DM without DRB1*02 (n = 7; age = 34 ± 8 years; %fat = 31.2 ± 4.7%). Findings were partially replicated in another cohort by assessing the predictive ability of T-cell receptor variation on risk of T2DM in Pima Indian men (n = 27; age = 28.9 ± 7.1 years; %fat = 28.8 ± 7.1%) and women (n = 20; age = 29 ± 7.0 years; %fat = 37.1 ± 6.8%) with baseline normal glucose regulation but without the protective haplotype who were invited to follow-up examinations as frequently as every 2 years where diabetes status was assessed by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Of these subjects, 13 developed diabetes. T-cell receptor complementarity-determining region 3 length was shorter in those with T2DM, and a one-nucleotide decrease in complementarity-determining region 3 length was associated with a nearly threefold increase in risk for future diabetes. The frequency of one variable gene, TRBV7-8, was higher in those with T2DM. A 1% increase in TRBV7-8 frequency was associated with a greater than threefold increase in diabetes risk. These results indicate that T-cell autoimmunity may be an important component in progression to T2DM in Pima Indians. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Efficient T-cell priming and activation requires signaling through prostaglandin E2 (EP) receptors.

    PubMed

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Hons, Miroslav; Punzón, Carmen; Stein, Jens V; Sancho, David; Fresno, Manuel; Cuesta, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of T-cell responses during inflammation and auto-immunity is fundamental for designing efficient therapeutic strategies against immune diseases. In this regard, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is mostly considered a myeloid-derived immunosuppressive molecule. We describe for the first time that T cells secrete PGE2 during T-cell receptor stimulation. In addition, we show that autocrine PGE2 signaling through EP receptors is essential for optimal CD4(+) T-cell activation in vitro and in vivo, and for T helper 1 (Th1) and regulatory T cell differentiation. PGE2 was found to provide additive co-stimulatory signaling through AKT activation. Intravital multiphoton microscopy showed that triggering EP receptors in T cells is also essential for the stability of T cell-dendritic cell (DC) interactions and Th-cell accumulation in draining lymph nodes (LNs) during inflammation. We further demonstrated that blocking EP receptors in T cells during the initial phase of collagen-induced arthritis in mice resulted in a reduction of clinical arthritis. This could be attributable to defective T-cell activation, accompanied by a decline in activated and interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) Th1 cells in draining LNs. In conclusion, we prove that T lymphocytes secret picomolar concentrations of PGE2, which in turn provide additive co-stimulatory signaling, enabling T cells to attain a favorable activation threshold. PGE2 signaling in T cells is also required for maintaining long and stable interactions with DCs within LNs. Blockade of EP receptors in vivo impairs T-cell activation and development of T cell-mediated inflammatory responses. This may have implications in various pathophysiological settings.

  19. Cholera Toxin Inhibits the T-Cell Antigen Receptor-Mediated Increases in Inositol Trisphosphate and Cytoplasmic Free Calcium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imboden, John B.; Shoback, Dolores M.; Pattison, Gregory; Stobo, John D.

    1986-08-01

    The addition of monoclonal antibodies to the antigen receptor complex on the malignant human T-cell line Jurkat generates increases in inositol trisphosphate and in the concentration of cytoplasmic free calcium. Exposure of Jurkat cells to cholera toxin for 3 hr inhibited these receptor-mediated events and led to a selective, partial loss of the antigen receptor complex from the cellular surface. None of the effects of cholera toxin on the antigen receptor complex were mimicked by the B subunit of cholera toxin or by increasing intracellular cAMP levels with either forskolin or 8-bromo cAMP. These results suggest that a cholera toxin substrate can regulate signal transduction by the T-cell antigen receptor.

  20. Autoreactive T cells in a partially humanized murine model of T1D.

    PubMed

    Gebe, John A; Falk, Ben; Unrath, Kellee; Nepom, Gerald T

    2007-04-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) and insulin are implicated as target antigens in the pathogenesis of human diabetes through correlative measurements of humoral and cellular reactivity to them in diabetics and at-risk diabetic individuals. Recently, an age-dependent loss of tolerance to one of several naturally processed epitopes of GAD65 (555-567) has been observed to precede diabetes in diabetes-prone mice transgenic for diabetes-correlated human class II genes. Extended studies in these mice (RIP-B7/DR0404) now show that tolerance is maintained to another DR4-restricted naturally processed region within GAD65. While tolerance is lost to GAD65 (555-567) in B7/DR0404 mice prior to diabetes, these mice remain T cell-tolerant to GAD65 (273-286). Prediabetes loss of tolerance to GAD65 (555-567) has now been shown to correlate with an impaired response to exogenous glucose in an intraperitoneal (i.p.) glucose tolerance test. In addition, these mice exhibit a T cell response to insulin A(6-21) at the hyperglycemic state. Investigating a possible cause-and-effect relationship between T cell reactivity to GAD65 and diabetes pathogenesis, GAD65 (555-567) T cell receptor (TcR) transgenic mice have been generated and future work is aimed at understanding the importance of T cell GAD65 reactivity and its role in diabetes progression.

  1. Canine epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: an investigation of T-cell receptor immunophenotype, lesion topography and molecular clonality.

    PubMed

    Moore, Peter F; Affolter, Verena K; Graham, Petra S; Hirt, Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Canine epitheliotropic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a spontaneous neoplasm of the skin and mucous membranes of aged dogs. The WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues in human beings recognizes three forms of cutaneous epitheliotropic CTCL: mycosis fungoides (MF), Sézary syndrome and pagetoid reticulosis. In this series of dogs (n = 56), there were 39 cases of MF, 16 cases of pagetoid reticulosis and a single case of Sézary syndrome. Epitheliotropic T cells in CTCL lesions expressed CD8 in 44 of 55 dogs (80%) assessed; neither CD4 nor CD8 was expressed in the remainder. This contrasts with human MF in which alphabeta T-cell receptors (TCR) and CD4 are dominantly expressed. Molecular clonality assessment of canine epitheliotropic CTCL utilizing PCR primers specific for canine TCR gamma (TCRG) was performed. Of the 45 canine cases assessed, TCRG monoclonality was detected in 36 cases (80%). TCR typing of canine epitheliotropic CTCL revealed that TCRgammadelta was expressed in 60% of cases, including all cases of canine pagetoid reticulosis assessed. Either muco-cutaneous junctions or tissues of the oral cavity were the sites of lesions in 32 dogs (57%) with epitheliotropic CTCL. Analysis of the topography of lesions revealed an association with TCR type. If epitheliotropic CTCL lesions occurred in both locations, T cells were more likely to express TCRgammadelta (gammadelta : alphabeta = 2.0). These data establish that canine skin trafficking T cells have a far wider range than previously thought; this includes tongue, gingival, buccal and palatine mucosae.

  2. Inactivation of T cell receptor peptide-specific CD4 regulatory T cells induces chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Stellrecht, K; Sercarz, E

    1996-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-recognizing regulatory cells, induced after vaccination with self-reactive T cells or TCR peptides, have been shown to prevent autoimmunity. We have asked whether this regulation is involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance to myelin basic protein (MBP) in an autoimmune disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Antigen-induced EAE in (SJL x B10.PL)F1 mice is transient in that most animals recover permanently from the disease. Most of the initial encephalitogenic T cells recognize MBP Ac1-9 and predominantly use the TCR V beta 8.2 gene segment. In mice recovering from MBP-induced EAE, regulatory CD4+ T cells (Treg) specific for a single immunodominant TCR peptide B5 (76-101) from framework region 3 of the V beta 8.2 chain, become primed. We have earlier shown that cloned B5-reactive Treg can specifically downregulate responses to Ac1-9 and also protect mice from EAE. These CD4 Treg clones predominantly use the TCR V beta 14 or V beta 3 gene segments. Here we have directly tested whether deletion/blocking of the Treg from the peripheral repertoire affects the spontaneous recovery from EAE. Treatment of F1 mice with appropriate V beta-specific monoclonal antibodies resulted in an increase in the severity and duration of the disease; even relapses were seen in one-third to one-half of the Treg-deleted mice. Interestingly, chronic disease in treated mice appears to be due to the presence of Ac1-9-specific T cells. Thus, once self-tolerance to MBP is broken by immunization with the antigen in strong adjuvant, TCR peptide-specific CD4 Treg cells participate in reestablishing peripheral tolerance. Thus, a failure to generate Treg may be implicated in chronic autoimmune conditions.

  3. A role for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Beta in T cell development

    PubMed Central

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Murdaca, Joseph; Sibille, Brigitte; Rousseau, Anne-Sophie; Squillace, Raphaëlle; Le Menn, Gwenaëlle; Rekima, Akila; Larbret, Frederic; Pelé, Juline; Verhasselt, Valérie; Grimaldi, Paul A.; Neels, Jaap G.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism plays an important role in T cell biology and changes in metabolism drive T cell differentiation and fate. Most research on the role of metabolism in T lymphocytes focuses on mature T cells while only few studies have investigated the role of metabolism in T cell development. In this study, we report that activation or overexpression of the transcription factor Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β (PPARβ) increases fatty acid oxidation in T cells. Furthermore, using both in vivo and in vitro models, we demonstrate that PPARβ activation/overexpression inhibits thymic T cell development by decreasing proliferation of CD4−CD8− double-negative stage 4 (DN4) thymocytes. These results support a model where PPARβ activation/overexpression favours fatty acid- instead of glucose-oxidation in developing T cells, thereby hampering the proliferative burst normally occurring at the DN4 stage of T cell development. As a consequence, the αβ T cells that are derived from DN4 thymocytes are dramatically decreased in peripheral lymphoid tissues, while the γδ T cell population remains untouched. This is the first report of a direct role for a member of the PPAR family of nuclear receptors in the development of T cells. PMID:27680392

  4. Annotation and classification of the bovine T cell receptor delta genes.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Carolyn T A; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Baldwin, Cynthia L

    2010-02-09

    gammadelta T cells differ from alphabeta T cells with regard to the types of antigen with which their T cell receptors interact; gammadelta T cell antigens are not necessarily peptides nor are they presented on MHC. Cattle are considered a "gammadelta T cell high" species indicating they have an increased proportion of gammadelta T cells in circulation relative to that in "gammadelta T cell low" species such as humans and mice. Prior to the onset of the studies described here, there was limited information regarding the genes that code for the T cell receptor delta chains of this gammadelta T cell high species. By annotating the bovine (Bos taurus) genome Btau_3.1 assembly the presence of 56 distinct T cell receptor delta (TRD) variable (V) genes were found, 52 of which belong to the TRDV1 subgroup and were co-mingled with the T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes. In addition, two genes belonging to the TRDV2 subgroup and single TRDV3 and TRDV4 genes were found. We confirmed the presence of five diversity (D) genes, three junctional (J) genes and a single constant (C) gene and describe the organization of the TRD locus. The TRDV4 gene is found downstream of the C gene and in an inverted orientation of transcription, consistent with its orthologs in humans and mice. cDNA evidence was assessed to validate expression of the variable genes and showed that one to five D genes could be incorporated into a single transcript. Finally, we grouped the bovine and ovine TRDV1 genes into sets based on their relatedness. The bovine genome contains a large and diverse repertoire of TRD genes when compared to the genomes of "gammadelta T cell low" species. This suggests that in cattle gammadelta T cells play a more important role in immune function since they would be predicted to bind a greater variety of antigens.

  5. Low interleukin-2 concentration favors generation of early memory T cells over effector phenotypes during chimeric antigen receptor T-cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Kaartinen, Tanja; Luostarinen, Annu; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Keto, Joni; Arvas, Mikko; Belt, Heini; Koponen, Jonna; Loskog, Angelica; Mustjoki, Satu; Porkka, Kimmo; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Korhonen, Matti

    2017-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy offers new options for cancer treatment. Clinical results suggest that T-cell persistence, depending on T-cell memory, improves efficacy. The use of interleukin (IL)-2 for in vitro T-cell expansion is not straightforward because it drives effector T-cell differentiation but does not promote the formation of T-cell memory. We have developed a cost-effective expansion protocol for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an early memory phenotype. Lymphocytes were transduced with third-generation lentiviral vectors and expanded using CD3/CD28 microbeads. The effects of altering the IL-2 supplementation (0-300 IU/mL) and length of expansion (10-20 days) on the phenotype of the T-cell products were analyzed. High IL-2 levels led to a decrease in overall generation of early memory T cells by both decreasing central memory T cells and augmenting effectors. T memory stem cells (TSCM, CD95(+)CD45RO(-)CD45RA(+)CD27(+)) were present variably during T-cell expansion. However, their presence was not IL-2 dependent but was linked to expansion kinetics. CD19-CAR T cells generated in these conditions displayed in vitro antileukemic activity. In summary, production of CAR T cells without any cytokine supplementation yielded the highest proportion of early memory T cells, provided a 10-fold cell expansion and the cells were functionally potent. The number of early memory T cells in a T-cell preparation can be increased by simply reducing the amount of IL-2 and limiting the length of T-cell expansion, providing cells with potentially higher in vivo performance. These findings are significant for robust and cost-effective T-cell manufacturing. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The ternary complex: T cell receptor, MHC protein, and immunogenic peptide.

    PubMed

    Rothbard, J B

    1990-09-01

    The identification and sequencing of the antigen receptor of T cells coupled with the demonstration that MHC proteins specifically bind immunogenic peptides, and the solution of the crystal structure of HLA A2 and Aw68 collectively have led to a working model of how T cells recognize protein antigens. In contrast with many other known receptor-ligand interactions, this unique recognition mechanism has evolved to allow receptors on two separate cells to contact a common peptide ligand. To accomplish this, MHC proteins and the T cell receptor both differ from previously defined biological receptors in many respects. The MHC class I and II molecules are membrane glycoproteins that have evolved the remarkable capacity to bind and display on the surface of cells an extremely large number of structurally diverse peptides, while the antigen specific receptors of T cells are positively selected to specifically interact with the MHC protein alleles of the individual and only some of the repertoire of self peptides.

  7. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cell Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM)

    PubMed Central

    Klampatsa, Astero; Haas, Andrew R.; Moon, Edmund K.; Albelda, Steven M.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has now become a recognized approach to treating cancers. In addition to checkpoint blockade, adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown impressive clinical outcomes in leukemias and is now being explored in solid tumors. CARs are engineered receptors, stably or transiently transduced into T cells, that aim to enhance T cell effector function by recognizing and binding to a specific tumor-associated antigen. In this review, we provide a summary of CAR T cell preclinical studies and clinical trials for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare, locally invasive pleural cancer with poor prognosis. We list other attractive potential targets for CAR T cell therapy for MPM, and discuss augmentation strategies of CAR T cell therapy with other forms of immunotherapy in this disease. PMID:28862644

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cell Therapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM).

    PubMed

    Klampatsa, Astero; Haas, Andrew R; Moon, Edmund K; Albelda, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has now become a recognized approach to treating cancers. In addition to checkpoint blockade, adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown impressive clinical outcomes in leukemias and is now being explored in solid tumors. CARs are engineered receptors, stably or transiently transduced into T cells, that aim to enhance T cell effector function by recognizing and binding to a specific tumor-associated antigen. In this review, we provide a summary of CAR T cell preclinical studies and clinical trials for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare, locally invasive pleural cancer with poor prognosis. We list other attractive potential targets for CAR T cell therapy for MPM, and discuss augmentation strategies of CAR T cell therapy with other forms of immunotherapy in this disease.

  9. Exploiting natural killer group 2D receptors for CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Demoulin, Benjamin; Cook, W James; Murad, Joana; Graber, David J; Sentman, Marie-Louise; Lonez, Caroline; Gilham, David E; Sentman, Charles L; Agaugue, Sophie

    2017-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are genetically engineered proteins that combine an extracellular antigen-specific recognition domain with one or several intracellular T-cell signaling domains. When expressed in T cells, these CARs specifically trigger T-cell activation upon antigen recognition. While the clinical proof of principle of CAR T-cell therapy has been established in hematological cancers, CAR T cells are only at the early stages of being explored to tackle solid cancers. This special report discusses the concept of exploiting natural killer cell receptors as an approach that could broaden the specificity of CAR T cells and potentially enhance the efficacy of this therapy against solid tumors. New data demonstrating feasibility of this approach in humans and supporting the ongoing clinical trial are also presented.

  10. Secretion of a chimeric T-cell receptor-immunoglobulin protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gascoigne, N R; Goodnow, C C; Dudzik, K I; Oi, V T; Davis, M M

    1987-01-01

    To produce sufficient quantities of soluble T-cell receptor protein for detailed biochemical and biophysical analyses we have explored the use of immunoglobulin--T-cell receptor gene fusions. In this report we describe a chimeric gene construct containing a T-cell receptor alpha-chain variable (V) domain and the constant (C) region coding sequences of an immunoglobulin gamma 2a molecule. Cells transfected with the chimeric gene synthesize a stable protein product that expresses immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor antigenic determinants as well as protein A binding sites. We show that the determinant recognized by the anticlonotypic antibody A2B4.2 resides on the V alpha domain of the T-cell receptor. The chimeric protein associates with a normal lambda light chain to form an apparently normal tetrameric (H2L2, where H = heavy and L = light) immunoglobulin molecule that is secreted. Also of potential significance is the fact that a T-cell receptor V beta gene in the same construct is neither assembled nor secreted with the lambda light chain, and when expressed with a C kappa region it does not assemble with the chimeric V alpha C gamma 2a protein mentioned above. This indicates that not all T-cell receptor V regions are similar enough to immunoglobulin V regions for them to be completely interchangeable. Images PMID:3472243

  11. Mechanisms for segregating T cell receptor and adhesion molecules during immunological synapse formation in Jurkat T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaizuka, Yoshihisa; Douglass, Adam D.; Varma, Rajat; Dustin, Michael L.; Vale, Ronald D.

    2007-01-01

    T cells interacting with antigen-presenting cells (APCs) form an “immunological synapse” (IS), a bull's-eye pattern composed of a central supramolecular activation cluster enriched with T cell receptors (TCRs) surrounded by a ring of adhesion molecules (a peripheral supramolecular activation cluster). The mechanism responsible for segregating TCR and adhesion molecules remains poorly understood. Here, we show that immortalized Jurkat T cells interacting with a planar lipid bilayer (mimicking an APC) will form an IS, thereby providing an accessible model system for studying the cell biological processes underlying IS formation. We found that an actin-dependent process caused TCR and adhesion proteins to cluster at the cell periphery, but these molecules appeared to segregate from one another at the earliest stages of microdomain formation. The TCR and adhesion microdomains attached to actin and were carried centripetally by retrograde flow. However, only the TCR microdomains penetrated into the actin-depleted cell center, whereas the adhesion microdomains appeared to be unstable without an underlying actin cytoskeleton. Our results reveal that TCR and adhesion molecules spatially partition from one another well before the formation of a mature IS and that differential actin interactions help to shape and maintain the final bull's-eye pattern of the IS. PMID:18077330

  12. T cell receptor-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of beta2-chimaerin modulates its Rac-GAP function in T cells.

    PubMed

    Siliceo, María; Mérida, Isabel

    2009-04-24

    The actin cytoskeleton has an important role in the organization and function of the immune synapse during antigen recognition. Dynamic rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in response to T cell receptor (TCR) triggering requires the coordinated activation of Rho family GTPases that cycle between active and inactive conformations. This is controlled by GTPase-activating proteins (GAP), which regulate inactivation of Rho GTPases, and guanine exchange factors, which mediate their activation. Whereas much attention has centered on guanine exchange factors for Rho GTPases in T cell activation, the identity and functional roles of the GAP in this process are largely unknown. We previously reported beta2-chimaerin as a diacylglycerol-regulated Rac-GAP that is expressed in T cells. We now demonstrate Lck-dependent phosphorylation of beta2-chimaerin in response to TCR triggering. We identify Tyr-153 as the Lck-dependent phosphorylation residue and show that its phosphorylation negatively regulates membrane stabilization of beta2-chimaerin, decreasing its GAP activity to Rac. This study establishes the existence of TCR-dependent regulation of beta2-chimaerin and identifies a novel mechanism for its inactivation.

  13. Avidity of human T cell receptor engineered CD4+ T cells drives T-helper differentiation fate

    PubMed Central

    Adair, Patrick; Kim, Yong Chan; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Scott, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the T cell receptor (TCR) in antigen recognition and activation of T lymphocytes is well established. However, how the TCR affects T-helper differentiation/skewing is less well understood, particularly for human CD4+ (CD4) T cell subsets. Here we investigate the role of TCR specific antigen avidity in differentiation and maintenance of human Th1, Th2 and Th17 subsets. Two human TCRs, both specific for the same peptide antigen but with different avidities, were cloned and expressed in human CD4 T cells. These TCR engineered cells were then stimulated with specific antigen in unskewed and T-helper skewed conditions. We show that TCR avidity can control the percentage of IL-4 and IFN-γ co-expression in unskewed TCR engineered cells, that effector function can be maintained in a TCR avidity-dependent manner in skewed TCR engineered cells, and that increased TCR avidity can accelerate Th1 skewing of TCR engineered cells. PMID:26653006

  14. CD8+ T-cell pathogenicity in Rasmussen encephalitis elucidated by large-scale T-cell receptor sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Mohan, Hema; Bien, Christian G.; Breuer, Johanna; Becker, Albert; Görlich, Dennis; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Widman, Guido; Herich, Sebastian; Elpers, Christiane; Melzer, Nico; Dornmair, Klaus; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Schwab, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare paediatric epilepsy with uni-hemispheric inflammation and progressive neurological deficits. To elucidate RE immunopathology, we applied T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing to blood (n=23), cerebrospinal fluid (n=2) and brain biopsies (n=5) of RE patients, and paediatric controls. RE patients present with peripheral CD8+ T-cell expansion and its strength correlates with disease severity. In addition, RE is the only paediatric epilepsy with prominent T-cell expansions in the CNS. Consistently, common clones are shared between RE patients, who also share MHC-I alleles. Public RE clones share Vβ genes and length of the CDR3. Rituximab/natalizumab/basiliximab treatment does not change TCR diversity, stem cell transplantation replaces the TCR repertoire with minimal overlap between donor and recipient, as observed in individual cases. Our study supports the hypothesis of an antigen-specific attack of peripherally expanded CD8+ lymphocytes against CNS structures in RE, which might be ameliorated by restricting access to the CNS. PMID:27040081

  15. CD8(+) T-cell pathogenicity in Rasmussen encephalitis elucidated by large-scale T-cell receptor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Hohendorf, Tilman; Mohan, Hema; Bien, Christian G; Breuer, Johanna; Becker, Albert; Görlich, Dennis; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Widman, Guido; Herich, Sebastian; Elpers, Christiane; Melzer, Nico; Dornmair, Klaus; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Wiendl, Heinz; Schwab, Nicholas

    2016-04-04

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare paediatric epilepsy with uni-hemispheric inflammation and progressive neurological deficits. To elucidate RE immunopathology, we applied T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing to blood (n=23), cerebrospinal fluid (n=2) and brain biopsies (n=5) of RE patients, and paediatric controls. RE patients present with peripheral CD8(+) T-cell expansion and its strength correlates with disease severity. In addition, RE is the only paediatric epilepsy with prominent T-cell expansions in the CNS. Consistently, common clones are shared between RE patients, who also share MHC-I alleles. Public RE clones share Vβ genes and length of the CDR3. Rituximab/natalizumab/basiliximab treatment does not change TCR diversity, stem cell transplantation replaces the TCR repertoire with minimal overlap between donor and recipient, as observed in individual cases. Our study supports the hypothesis of an antigen-specific attack of peripherally expanded CD8(+) lymphocytes against CNS structures in RE, which might be ameliorated by restricting access to the CNS.

  16. T Cell Mineralocorticoid Receptor Controls Blood Pressure by Regulating Interferon Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xue Nan; Li, Chao; Liu, Yuan; Du, Lin-Juan; Zeng, Meng-Ru; Zheng, Xiao Jun; Zhang, Wu Chang; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Mingjiang; Kong, Deping; Zhou, Li; Lu, Limin; Shen, Zhu-Xia; Yi, Yi; Du, Lili; Qin, Mu; Liu, Xu; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Shuyang; Yin, Huiyong; Zhou, Bin; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2017-03-15

    Rationale: Hypertension remains to be a global public health burden and demands novel intervention strategies such as targeting T cells and T cell-derived cytokines. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been clinically used to treat hypertension. However, the function of T cell MR in blood pressure (BP) regulation has not been elucidated. Objective: We aim to determine the role of T cell MR in BP regulation and to explore the mechanism. Methods and Results: Using T cell MR knockout (TMRKO) mouse in combination with angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertensive mouse model, we demonstrated that MR deficiency in T cells strikingly decreased both systolic and diastolic BP, and attenuated renal and vascular damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that TMRKO mitigated AngII-induced accumulation of interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing T cells, particularly CD8(+) population, in both kidneys and aortas. Similarly, eplerenone attenuated AngII-induced elevation of BP and accumulation of IFNγ-producing T cells in wild type mice. In cultured CD8(+) T cells, TMRKO suppressed IFNγ expression whereas T cell MR overexpression and aldosterone both enhanced IFNγ expression. At the molecular level, MR interacted with nuclear factor of activated T-cells 1 (NFAT1) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in T cells. Finally, T cell MR overexpressing mice manifested more elevated BP compared to control mice after AngII infusion and such difference was abolished by IFNγ-neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions: MR may interact with NFAT1 and AP-1 to control IFNγ in T cells, and to regulate target organ damage and ultimately BP. Targeting MR in T cells specifically may be an effective novel approach for hypertension treatment.

  17. Identifying Individual T Cell Receptors of Optimal Avidity for Tumor Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michael; Allard, Mathilde; Gannon, Philippe O.; Schmidt, Julien; Speiser, Daniel E.; Rufer, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize, via their T cell receptors (TCRs), small antigenic peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells and infected or malignant cells. The efficiency of T cell triggering critically depends on TCR binding to cognate pMHC, i.e., the TCR–pMHC structural avidity. The binding and kinetic attributes of this interaction are key parameters for protective T cell-mediated immunity, with stronger TCR–pMHC interactions conferring superior T cell activation and responsiveness than weaker ones. However, high-avidity TCRs are not always available, particularly among self/tumor antigen-specific T cells, most of which are eliminated by central and peripheral deletion mechanisms. Consequently, systematic assessment of T cell avidity can greatly help distinguishing protective from non-protective T cells. Here, we review novel strategies to assess TCR–pMHC interaction kinetics, enabling the identification of the functionally most-relevant T cells. We also discuss the significance of these technologies in determining which cells within a naturally occurring polyclonal tumor-specific T cell response would offer the best clinical benefit for use in adoptive therapies, with or without T cell engineering. PMID:26635796

  18. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Deficiency in T Cells Attenuates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy and Dysfunction Through Modulating T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Sun, Xue-Nan; Zeng, Meng-Ru; Zheng, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Yao; Wan, Qiangyou; Zhang, Wu-Chang; Shi, Chaoji; Du, Lin-Juan; Ai, Tang-Jun; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yan; Du, Li-Li; Yi, Yi; Yu, Ying; Duan, Sheng-Zhong

    2017-07-01

    Although antagonists of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) have been widely used to treat heart failure, the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Recent reports show that T cells play important roles in pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. However, it is unclear whether and how MR functions in T cells under these pathologic conditions. We found that MR antagonist suppressed abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and decreased the accumulation and activation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in mouse heart. T-cell MR knockout mice manifested suppressed cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction compared with littermate control mice after abdominal aortic constriction. T-cell MR knockout mice had less cardiac inflammatory response, which was illustrated by decreased accumulation of myeloid cells and reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines. Less amounts and activation of T cells were observed in the heart of T-cell MR knockout mice after abdominal aortic constriction. In vitro studies showed that both MR antagonism and deficiency repressed activation of T cells, whereas MR overexpression elevated activation of T cells. These results demonstrated that MR blockade in T cells protected against abdominal aortic constriction-induced cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction. Mechanistically, MR directly regulated T-cell activation and modulated cardiac inflammation. Targeting MR in T cells specifically may be a feasible strategy for more effective treatment of pathologic cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Quantification of total T-cell receptor diversity by flow cytometry and spectratyping.

    PubMed

    Ciupe, Stanca M; Devlin, Blythe H; Markert, Mary Louise; Kepler, Thomas B

    2013-08-06

    T-cell receptor diversity correlates with immune competency and is of particular interest in patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Spectratyping generates data about T-cell receptor CDR3 length distribution for each BV gene but is technically complex. Flow cytometry can also be used to generate data about T-cell receptor BV gene usage, but its utility has not been compared to or tested in combination with spectratyping. Using flow cytometry and spectratype data, we have defined a divergence metric that quantifies the deviation from normal of T-cell receptor repertoire. We have shown that the sample size is a sensitive parameter in the predicted flow divergence values, but not in the spectratype divergence values. We have derived two ways to correct for the measurement bias using mathematical and statistical approaches and have predicted a lower bound in the number of lymphocytes needed when using the divergence as a substitute for diversity. Using both flow cytometry and spectratyping of T-cells, we have defined the divergence measure as an indirect measure of T-cell receptor diversity. We have shown the dependence of the divergence measure on the sample size before it can be used to make predictions regarding the diversity of the T-cell receptor repertoire.

  20. NKG2D receptor regulates human effector T-cell cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amorette

    2011-01-01

    Although innate immune signals shape the activation of naive T cells, it is unclear how innate signals influence effector T-cell function. This study determined the effects of stimulating the NKG2D receptor in conjunction with the TCR on human effector CD8+ T cells. Stimulation of CD8+ T cells through CD3 and NKG2D simultaneously or through a chimeric NKG2D receptor, which consists of NKG2D fused to the intracellular region of CD3ζ, activated β-catenin and increased expression of β-catenin–induced genes, whereas T cells stimulated through the TCR or a combination of the TCR and CD28 did not. Activation by TCR and NKG2D prevented expression and production of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10, IL-9, IL-13, and VEGF-α in a β-catenin– and PPARγ- dependent manner. NKG2D stimulation also modulated the cytokine secretion of T cells activated simultaneously through CD3 and CD28. These data indicate that activating CD8+ T cells through the NKG2D receptor along with the TCR modulates signal transduction and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, human effector T cells alter their function depending on which innate receptors are engaged in conjunction with the TCR complex. PMID:21518928

  1. T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

  2. Chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies to retarget T cells in pediatric oncology

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Maya; Curran, Kevin J.; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using antigen-specific T cells has broad therapeutic potential. Chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies can redirect T cells to kill tumors without human leukocyte antigens (HLA) restriction. Key determinants of clinical potential include the choice of target antigen, antibody specificity, antibody affinity, tumor accessibility, T cell persistence, and tumor immune evasion. For pediatric cancers, additional constraints include their propensity for bulky metastatic disease and the concern for late toxicities from treatment. Nonetheless, the recent preclinical and clinical developments of these T cell based therapies are highly encouraging. PMID:25832831

  3. Ibrutinib enhances chimeric antigen receptor T-cell engraftment and efficacy in leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Beckwith, Kyle A.; Patel, Prachi R.; Ruella, Marco; Zheng, Zhaohui; Barrett, David M.; Lacey, Simon F.; Melenhorst, Jan Joseph; McGettigan, Shannon E.; Cook, Danielle R.; Zhang, Changfeng; Xu, Jun; Do, Priscilla; Hulitt, Jessica; Kudchodkar, Sagar B.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Gill, Saar; Porter, David L.; Woyach, Jennifer A.; Long, Meixiao; Johnson, Amy J.; Maddocks, Kami; Muthusamy, Natarajan; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Byrd, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is highly promising but requires robust T-cell expansion and engraftment. A T-cell defect in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) due to disease and/or therapy impairs ex vivo expansion and response to CAR T cells. To evaluate the effect of ibrutinib treatment on the T-cell compartment in CLL as it relates to CAR T-cell generation, we examined the phenotype and function of T cells in a cohort of CLL patients during their course of treatment with ibrutinib. We found that ≥5 cycles of ibrutinib therapy improved the expansion of CD19-directed CAR T cells (CTL019), in association with decreased expression of the immunosuppressive molecule programmed cell death 1 on T cells and of CD200 on B-CLL cells. In support of these findings, we observed that 3 CLL patients who had been treated with ibrutinib for ≥1 year at the time of T-cell collection had improved ex vivo and in vivo CTL019 expansion, which correlated positively together and with clinical response. Lastly, we show that ibrutinib exposure does not impair CAR T-cell function in vitro but does improve CAR T-cell engraftment, tumor clearance, and survival in human xenograft models of resistant acute lymphocytic leukemia and CLL when administered concurrently. Our collective findings indicate that ibrutinib enhances CAR T-cell function and suggest that clinical trials with combination therapy are warranted. Our studies demonstrate that improved T-cell function may also contribute to the efficacy of ibrutinib in CLL. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01747486, #NCT01105247, and #NCT01217749. PMID:26813675

  4. Different Levels of T-Cell Receptor Triggering Induce Distinct Functions in Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus-Specific Human CD4+ T-Cell Clones

    PubMed Central

    Diepolder, Helmut M.; Gruener, Norbert H.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Jung, Maria-Christina; Wierenga, Eddy A.; Pape, Gerd R.

    2001-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a major role in the host defense against viruses and intracellular microbes. During the natural course of such an infection, specific CD4+ T cells are exposed to a wide range of antigen concentrations depending on the body compartment and the stage of disease. While epitope variants trigger only subsets of T-cell effector functions, the response of virus-specific CD4+ T cells to various concentrations of the wild-type antigen has not been systematically studied. We stimulated hepatitis B virus core- and hepatitis C virus NS3-specific CD4+ T-cell clones which had been isolated from patients with acute hepatitis during viral clearance with a wide range of specific antigen concentrations and determined the phenotypic changes and the induction of T-cell effector functions in relation to T-cell receptor internalization. A low antigen concentration induced the expression of T-cell activation markers and adhesion molecules in CD4+ T-cell clones in the absence of cytokine secretion and proliferation. The expression of CD25, HLA-DR, CD69, and intercellular cell adhesion molecule 1 increased as soon as T-cell receptor internalization became detectable. A 30- to 100-fold-higher antigen concentration, corresponding to the internalization of 20 to 30% of T-cell receptor molecules, however, was required for the induction of proliferation as well as for gamma interferon and interleukin-4 secretion. These data indicate that virus-specific CD4+ T cells can respond to specific antigen in a graded manner depending on the antigen concentration, which may have implications for a coordinate regulation of specific CD4+ T-cell responses. PMID:11483723

  5. Mannan-binding lectin, a serum collectin, suppresses T-cell proliferation via direct interaction with cell surface calreticulin and inhibition of proximal T-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Wu, Jie; Xiong, Simin; Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Xiao; Chen, Shangliang; Wu, Qifeng; Wang, Hailan; Liu, Ying; Chen, Zhengliang; Zuo, Daming

    2017-06-01

    Mannan binding lectin (MBL), initially reported to activate the complement pathway, is also known to be involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We report a thus far unknown function of MBL as a suppressor of T-cell activation. MBL markedly inhibited T-cell proliferation induced by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies. Moreover, the presence of MBL during T-cell priming interfered with proximal T-cell receptor signaling by decreasing phosphorylation of Lck, ZAP-70, and LAT. MBL bound to T cells through interaction between the collagen-like region of MBL and calreticulin (CRT) expressed on the T-cell surface. The neutralizing antibody against CRT abrogated MBL-mediated suppression of T-cell proliferation, suggesting that MBL down-modulates T-cell proliferation via cell surface CRT. We further demonstrated that the feature of MBL-mediated T-cell suppression is shared by other serum collectins (e.g., C1q and collectin 11). The concentrations of MBL correlated negatively with in vivo T-cell activation status in patients with early-stage silicosis. Furthermore, MBL efficiently inhibited activation and proliferation of autoreactive T cells derived from patients with silicosis, indicating that MBL serves as a negative feedback control of the T-cell responses.-Zhao, N., Wu, J., Xiong, S., Zhang, L., Lu, X., Chen, S., Wu, Q., Wang, H., Liu, Y., Chen, Z., Zuo, D. Mannan-binding lectin, a serum collectin, suppresses T-cell proliferation via direct interaction with cell surface calreticulin and inhibition of proximal T-cell receptor signaling. © FASEB.

  6. Flow cytometric detection of neoplastic T cells in patients with mycosis fungoides based on levels of T-cell receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kuchnio, M; Sausville, E A; Jaffe, E S; Greiner, T; Foss, F M; McClanahan, J; Fukushima, P; Stetler-Stevenson, M A

    1994-12-01

    The authors report the flow cytometric detection of neoplastic T cells in the peripheral blood of four out of five (80%) patients with peripheral blood involvement with mycosis fungoides (Sezary syndrome) based on the levels of T-cell receptor expression as measured by CD3 and TCR-alpha beta staining. Antigen receptor expression was abnormal in terms of increased density of surface CD3 or TCR-alpha beta per cell. Other immunophenotypic abnormalities were present in three of these patients. However, in one patient abnormal T-cell receptor expression was the only immunophenotypic evidence of neoplasia, although morphologically abnormal lymphocytes were present and a T-cell clone was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In another patient, the authors were able to detect development of a new, more aggressive neoplastic T-cell population based on levels of T-cell receptor expression. Levels of T-cell receptor expression may be of diagnostic utility in the evaluation of peripheral blood for the presence of neoplastic T-cell populations.

  7. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Praveen; Petrocca, Fabio

    2017-07-18

    Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands.

  8. Regional Delivery of Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Praveen; Petrocca, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T-cells are T-cells with recombinant receptors targeted to tumor antigens. CAR-T cell therapy has emerged as a mode of immunotherapy and is now being extensively explored in hematologic cancer. In contrast, CAR-T cell use in solid tumors has been hampered by multiple obstacles. Several approaches have been taken to circumvent these obstacles, including the regional delivery of CAR-T cells. Regional CAR-T cell delivery can theoretically compensate for poor T-cell trafficking and tumor antigen specificity while avoiding systemic toxicity associated with intravenous delivery. We reviewed completed clinical trials for the treatment of glioblastoma and metastatic colorectal cancer and examined the data in these studies for safety, efficacy, and potential advantages that regional delivery may confer over systemic delivery. Our appraisal of the available literature revealed that regional delivery of CAR-T cells in both glioblastoma and hepatic colorectal metastases was generally well tolerated and efficacious in select instances. We propose that the regional delivery of CAR-T cells is an area of potential growth in the solid tumor immunotherapy, and look towards future clinical trials in head and neck cancer, mesothelioma, and peritoneal carcinomatosis as the use of this technique expands. PMID:28718815

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Engineered T Cells for Immunotherapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Feldmann, Anja; Bippes, Claudia; Stamova, Slava; Wehner, Rebekka; Temme, Achim; Schmitz, Marc

    2010-01-01

    CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes are powerful components of adaptive immunity, which essentially contribute to the elimination of tumors. Due to their cytotoxic capacity, T cells emerged as attractive candidates for specific immunotherapy of cancer. A promising approach is the genetic modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). First generation CARs consist of a binding moiety specifically recognizing a tumor cell surface antigen and a lymphocyte activating signaling chain. The CAR-mediated recognition induces cytokine production and tumor-directed cytotoxicity of T cells. Second and third generation CARs include signal sequences from various costimulatory molecules resulting in enhanced T-cell persistence and sustained antitumor reaction. Clinical trials revealed that the adoptive transfer of T cells engineered with first generation CARs represents a feasible concept for the induction of clinical responses in some tumor patients. However, further improvement is required, which may be achieved by second or third generation CAR-engrafted T cells. PMID:20467460

  10. Improving Therapy of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Schwab, Robert D.; Maus, Marcela V.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has heralded a new era of synthetic biology. The infusion of genetically-engineered, autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed against CD19 expressed by normal and malignant B cells represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. The results of recent clinical trials of CAR T cells in relapsed and refractory CLL have demonstrated long-term disease-free remissions, underscoring the power of harnessing and re-directing the immune system against cancer. This review will briefly summarize T cell therapies in development for CLL disease. We discuss the role of T cell function and phenotype, T cell culture optimization, CAR design, and approaches to potentiate the survival and anti-tumor effects of infused lymphocytes. Future efforts will focus on improving the efficacy of CAR T cells for the treatment of CLL and incorporating adoptive cell immunotherapy into standard medical management of CLL. PMID:27040708

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell neuropsychiatric toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prudent, Vasthie; Breitbart, William S

    2017-01-04

    Chimeric antigen receptor T cells are used in the treatment of B-cell leukemias. Common chimeric antigen receptor T-cell toxicities can range from mild flu-like symptoms, such as fever and myalgia, to a more striking neuropsychiatric toxicity that can present as discrete neurological symptoms and delirium. We report here two cases of chimeric antigen receptor T-cell neuropsychiatric toxicity, one who presented as a mild delirium and aphasia that resolved without intervention, and one who presented with delirium, seizures, and respiratory insufficiency requiring intensive treatment. The current literature on the treatment and proposed mechanisms of this clinically challenging chimeric antigen receptor T-cell complication is also presented.

  12. Regulator T cells: specific for antigen and/or antigen receptors?

    PubMed

    Rubin, B; de Durana, Y Diaz; Li, N; Sercarz, E E

    2003-05-01

    Adaptive immune responses are regulated by many different molecular and cellular effectors. Regulator T cells are coming to their rights again, and these T cells seem to have ordinary alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs) and to develop in the thymus. Autoimmune responses are tightly regulated by such regulatory T cells, a phenomenon which is beneficial to the host in autoimmune situations. However, the regulation of autoimmune responses to tumour cells is harmful to the host, as this regulation delays the defence against the outgrowth of neoplastic cells. In the present review, we discuss whether regulatory T cells are specific for antigen and/or for antigen receptors. Our interest in these phenomena comes from the findings that T cells produce many more TCR-alpha and TCR-beta chains than are necessary for surface membrane expression of TCR-alphabeta heterodimers with CD3 complexes. Excess TCR chains are degraded by the proteasomes, and TCR peptides thus become available to the assembly pathway of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules. Consequently, do T cells express two different identification markers on the cell membrane, the TCR-alphabeta clonotype for recognition by B-cell receptors and clonotypic TCR-alphabeta peptides for recognition by T cells?

  13. Lck regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of the T cell receptor subunits and ZAP-70 in murine thymocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The Src-family and Syk/ZAP-70 family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTK) are required for T cell receptor (TCR) functions. We provide evidence that the Src-family PTK Lck is responsible for regulating the constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of the TCR zeta subunit in murine thymocytes. Moreover, ligation of the TCR expressed on thymocytes from Lck-deficient mice largely failed to induce the phosphorylation of TCR- zeta, CD3 epsilon, or ZAP-70. In contrast, we find that the TCR-zeta subunit is weakly constitutively tyrosine phosphorylated in peripheral T cells isolated from Lck-null mice. These data suggest that Lck has a functional role in regulation of TCR signal transduction in thymocytes. In peripheral T cells, other Src-family PTKs such as Fyn may partially compensate for the absence of Lck. PMID:8642247

  14. Disruption of PTH Receptor 1 in T Cells Protects against PTH-Induced Bone Loss

    PubMed Central

    Tawfeek, Hesham; Bedi, Brahmchetna; Li, Jau-Yi; Adams, Jonathan; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Pacifici, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Background Hyperparathyroidism in humans and continuous parathyroid hormone (cPTH) treatment in mice cause bone loss by regulating the production of RANKL and OPG by stromal cells (SCs) and osteoblasts (OBs). Recently, it has been reported that T cells are required for cPTH to induce bone loss as the binding of the T cell costimulatory molecule CD40L to SC receptor CD40 augments SC sensitivity to cPTH. However it is unknown whether direct PTH stimulation of T cells is required for cPTH to induce bone loss, and whether T cells contribute to the bone catabolic activity of PTH with mechanisms other than induction of CD40 signaling in SCs. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that silencing of PTH receptor 1 (PPR) in T cells blocks the bone loss and the osteoclastic expansion induced by cPTH, thus demonstrating that PPR signaling in T cells is central for PTH-induced reduction of bone mass. Mechanistic studies revealed that PTH activation of the T cell PPR stimulates T cell production of the osteoclastogenic cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF). Attesting to the relevance of this effect, disruption of T cell TNF production prevents PTH-induced bone loss. We also show that a novel mechanism by which TNF mediates PTH induced osteoclast formation is upregulation of CD40 expression in SCs, which increases their RANKL/OPG production ratio. Conclusions/Significance These findings demonstrate that PPR signaling in T cells plays an essential role in PTH induced bone loss by promoting T cell production of TNF. A previously unknown effect of TNF is to increase SC expression of CD40, which in turn increases SC osteoclastogenic activity by upregulating their RANKL/OPG production ratio. PPR-dependent stimulation of TNF production by T cells and the resulting TNF regulation of CD40 signaling in SCs are potential new therapeutic targets for the bone loss of hyperparathyroidism. PMID:20808842

  15. Altered expression of chemokine receptor CXCR5 on T cells of myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ryuji; Onodera, Hiroshi; Tago, Hideaki; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shimizu, Masayuki; Matsumura, Yuji; Kondo, Takashi; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2005-12-30

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by the T cell-dependent production of anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) antibodies. The chemokine receptor CXCR5 regulates lymphocyte migration and is expressed on a subset of CD4+ T cells named follicular helper T cells (T(FH)), the key modulators of antibody production by B cells. We studied the frequency of CXCR5-positive lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of MG patients before and after therapy (thymectomy plus glucocorticoid). Before therapy, the MG patients showed a significantly higher frequency of CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood compared with the control group, while no significant difference in the percentages of CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells was observed between the patients of the hyperplasia group and those of the thymoma group. The CXCR5+ CD4+ T cell frequency correlated with the disease severity. The CXCR5+ CD4+ T cell frequency of MG patients positive for other autoantibodies together with anti-AChR antibodies was significantly higher than in those having only anti-AChR antibodies. After therapy, the CXCR5+ CD4+ T cell percentage decreased gradually to the control level with a significant inverse correlation between the CXCR5+ CD4+ T cell frequency and duration after the initiation of MG therapy. The CXCR5+ CD4+ T cell populations in the hyperplastic thymuses and thymomas were not significantly different from those in the control thymuses. These results suggest that CXCR5+ CD4+ T cells play an important role in the disease activity of MG and that some MG patients have a systemic abnormality in T cell-dependent antibody production.

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptor- and TCR-Modified T Cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street.

    PubMed

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-08-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of chimeric Ag receptor (CAR)- and TCR-engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and it holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology, and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. In this overview, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT.

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells against CD19 for Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Garfall, Alfred L.; Maus, Marcela V.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Zheng, Zhaohui; Vogl, Dan T.; Cohen, Adam D.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Dengel, Karen; Kerr, Naseem D.S.; Bagg, Adam; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY A patient with refractory multiple myeloma received an infusion of CTL019 cells, a cellular therapy consisting of autologous T cells transduced with an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor, after myeloablative chemotherapy (melphalan, 140 mg per square meter of body-surface area) and autologous stem-cell transplantation. Four years earlier, autologous transplantation with a higher melphalan dose (200 mg per square meter) had induced only a partial, transient response. Autologous transplantation followed by treatment with CTL019 cells led to a complete response with no evidence of progression and no measurable serum or urine monoclonal protein at the most recent evaluation, 12 months after treatment. This response was achieved despite the absence of CD19 expression in 99.95% of the patient’s neoplastic plasma cells. (Funded by Novartis and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02135406.) PMID:26352815

  18. Interleukin-1 Receptors Are Differentially Expressed in Normal and Psoriatic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kovács-Sólyom, Ferenc; Prihoda, Judit; Kui, Róbert; Kemény, Lajos; Gyulai, Rolland

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to examine the possible role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) in the functional insufficiency of regulatory T cells in psoriasis, by comparing the expression of IL-1 receptors on healthy control and psoriatic T cells. Patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis and healthy volunteers, matched in age and sex, were selected for all experiments. CD4+CD25− effector and CD4+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells were separated and used for the experiments. Expression of the mRNA of IL-1 receptors (IL-1R1, IL-1R2, and sIL-1R2) was determined by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell surface IL-1 receptor expression was assessed by flow cytometry. Relative expression of the signal transmitting IL-1 receptor type 1 (IL-1R1) mRNA is higher in resting psoriatic effector and regulatory T cells, and activation induces higher IL-1R1 protein expression in psoriatic T cells than in healthy cells. Psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells express increased mRNA levels of the decoy IL-1 receptors (IL-1R2 and sIL-1R2) upon activation compared to healthy counterparts. Psoriatic T cells release slightly more sIL-1R2 into their surrounding than healthy T cells. In conclusion, changes in the expression of IL-1 receptors in psoriatic regulatory and effector T cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:24665164

  19. Introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors into human hematopoietic progenitors results in exclusion of endogenous T-cell receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-05-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1-specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection.

  20. Introduction of Exogenous T-cell Receptors Into Human Hematopoietic Progenitors Results in Exclusion of Endogenous T-cell Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vatakis, Dimitrios N; Arumugam, Balamurugan; Kim, Sohn G; Bristol, Gregory; Yang, Otto; Zack, Jerome A

    2013-01-01

    Current tumor immunotherapy approaches include the genetic modification of peripheral T cells to express tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs). The approach, tested in melanoma, has led to some limited success of tumor regression in patients. Yet, the introduction of exogenous TCRs into mature T cells entails an underlying risk; the generation of autoreactive clones due to potential TCR mispairing, and the lack of effective negative selection, as these peripheral cells do not undergo thymic selection following introduction of the exogenous TCR. We have successfully generated MART-1–specific CD8 T cells from genetically modified human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) in a humanized mouse model. The advantages of this approach include a long-term source of antigen specific T cells and proper T-cell selection due to thymopoiesis following expression of the TCR. In this report, we examine the molecular processes occurring on endogenous TCR expression and demonstrate that this approach results in exclusive cell surface expression of the newly introduced TCR, and the exclusion of endogenous TCR cell surface expression. This suggests that this stem cell based approach can provide a potentially safer approach for anticancer immunotherapy due to the involvement of thymic selection. PMID:23481324

  1. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  2. Comparison of Lentiviral and Sleeping Beauty Mediated αβ T Cell Receptor Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm’s tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  3. Selective manipulation of the human T-cell receptor repertoire expressed by thymocytes in organ culture.

    PubMed Central

    Merkenschlager, M; Fisher, A G

    1992-01-01

    A recently described organ culture system for human thymocytes is shown to support the generation of a diverse T-cell receptor repertoire in vitro: thymocytes of the alpha beta lineage, including representatives of the V beta families 5.2/5.3, 6.7, and 8, accounted for the majority of T-cell receptor-positive cells throughout a 3-week culture period. Thymocytes bearing gamma delta receptors were also identified, particularly among the CD4 CD8 double-negative subset. The T-cell receptor repertoire expressed in organ culture responded to experimental manipulation with staphylococcal enterotoxins. Staphylococcal enterotoxin D (a powerful activator of human peripheral T cells expressing V beta 5.2/5.3 receptors) caused a marked reduction of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression, as determined with the V beta-specific antibody 42/1C1. Evidence is presented that this loss of V beta 5.2/5.3 expression resulted from the selective deletion of activated thymocytes by apoptosis, in concert with T-cell receptor modulation. These effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin D were specific (since staphylococcal enterotoxin E did not influence V beta 5.2/5.3 expression) and V beta-selective (since expression of V beta 6.7 remained unaffected by staphylococcal enterotoxin D). On the basis of these observations, we suggest that thymic organ culture provides a powerful approach to study the generation of the human T-cell repertoire. Images PMID:1584760

  4. Interleukin-21 Receptor Gene Induction in Human T Cells Is Mediated by T-Cell Receptor-Induced Sp1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zheng; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo; Xue, Hai-Hui; Liu, Hong; Zhao, Keji; Leonard, Warren J.

    2005-01-01

    Interleukin-21 (IL-21) plays important roles in regulating the immune response. IL-21 receptor (IL-21R) mRNA is expressed at a low level in human resting T cells but is rapidly induced by mitogenic stimulation. We now investigate the basis for IL21R gene regulation in T cells. We found that the −80 to −20 region critically regulates IL-21R promoter activity and corresponds to a major DNase I-hypersensitive site. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays, DNA affinity chromatography followed by mass spectrometry, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that Sp1 binds to this region in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, mutation of the Sp1 motif markedly reduced IL-21R promoter activity, and Sp1 small interfering RNAs effectively diminished IL-21R expression in activated T cells. Interestingly, upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation, T cells increased IL-21R expression and Sp1 protein levels while decreasing Sp1 phosphorylation. Moreover, phosphatase inhibitors that increased phosphorylation of Sp1 diminished IL-21R transcription. These data indicate that TCR-induced IL-21R expression is driven by TCR-mediated augmentation of Sp1 protein levels and may partly depend on the dephosphorylation of Sp1. PMID:16260592

  5. The T cell antigen receptor: the Swiss army knife of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Attaf, M; Legut, M; Cole, D K; Sewell, A K

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian T cell receptor (TCR) orchestrates immunity by responding to many billions of different ligands that it has never encountered before and cannot adapt to at the protein sequence level. This remarkable receptor exists in two main heterodimeric isoforms: αβ TCR and γδ TCR. The αβ TCR is expressed on the majority of peripheral T cells. Most αβ T cells recognize peptides, derived from degraded proteins, presented at the cell surface in molecular cradles called major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Recent reports have described other αβ T cell subsets. These ‘unconventional’ T cells bear TCRs that are capable of recognizing lipid ligands presented in the context of the MHC-like CD1 protein family or bacterial metabolites bound to the MHC-related protein 1 (MR1). γδ T cells constitute a minority of the T cell pool in human blood, but can represent up to half of total T cells in tissues such as the gut and skin. The identity of the preferred ligands for γδ T cells remains obscure, but it is now known that this receptor can also functionally engage CD1-lipid, or immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily proteins called butyrophilins in the presence of pyrophosphate intermediates of bacterial lipid biosynthesis. Interactions between TCRs and these ligands allow the host to discriminate between self and non-self and co-ordinate an attack on the latter. Here, we describe how cells of the T lymphocyte lineage and their antigen receptors are generated and discuss the various modes of antigen recognition by these extraordinarily versatile receptors. PMID:25753381

  6. Accumulation of cytolytic CD8{sup +} T cells in B16-melanoma and proliferation of mature T cells in TIS21-knockout mice after T cell receptor stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Min Sook; Woo, Min-Yeong; Kwon, Daeho; Hong, Allen E.; Song, Kye Yong; Park, Sun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    In vivo and in vitro effects of TIS21 gene on the mature T cell activation and antitumor activities were explored by employing MO5 melanoma orthograft and splenocytes isolated from the TIS21-knockout (KO) mice. Proliferation and survival of mature T cells were significantly increased in the KO than the wild type (WT) cells, indicating that TIS21 inhibits the rate of mature T cell proliferation and its survival. In MO5 melanoma orthograft model, the KO mice recruited much more CD8{sup +} T cells into the tumors at around day 14 after tumor cell injection along with reduced tumor volumes compared with the WT. The increased frequency of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in splenocytes of the KO mice compared with the WT may account for antitumor-immunity of TIS21 gene in the melanoma orthograft. In contrast, reduced frequencies of CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in the splenocytes of KO mice may affect the loss of CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in the orthograft at around day 19. These results indicate that TIS21 exhibits antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in mature T cells, and differentially affects the frequencies of granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells and CD107a{sup +} CD8{sup +} T-cells, thus transiently regulating in vivo anti-tumor immunity. - Highlights: • Constitutive expression of TIS21 in splenocytes and upregulation by TCR stimulation. • Proliferation of mature T-cells in spleen of TIS21KO mice after TCR stimulation. • Inhibition of cell death in mature T-cells of TIS21KO mice compared with the wild type. • Inhibition of melanoma growth in TIS21KO mice and CD8{sup +} T cell infiltration in tumor. • Reduction of CD 107{sup +}CD8{sup +} T cells, but increased granzyme B{sup +} CD8{sup +} T cells in TIS21KO mice.

  7. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M.; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR–pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR–pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models. PMID:24817867

  8. Receptor Pre-Clustering and T cell Responses: Insights into Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mario; van Santen, Hisse M; Férez, María; Alarcón, Balbino; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    T cell activation, initiated by T cell receptor (TCR) mediated recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I or II molecules (pMHC), shows exquisite specificity and sensitivity, even though the TCR-pMHC binding interaction is of low affinity. Recent experimental work suggests that TCR pre-clustering may be a mechanism via which T cells can achieve such high sensitivity. The unresolved stoichiometry of the TCR makes TCR-pMHC binding and TCR triggering, an open question. We formulate a mathematical model to characterize the pre-clustering of T cell receptors (TCRs) on the surface of T cells, motivated by the experimentally observed distribution of TCR clusters on the surface of naive and memory T cells. We extend a recently introduced stochastic criterion to compute the timescales of T cell responses, assuming that ligand-induced cross-linked TCR is the minimum signaling unit. We derive an approximate formula for the mean time to signal initiation. Our results show that pre-clustering reduces the mean activation time. However, additional mechanisms favoring the existence of clusters are required to explain the difference between naive and memory T cell responses. We discuss the biological implications of our results, and both the compatibility and complementarity of our approach with other existing mathematical models.

  9. Role of monocyte fucose-receptors in T-cell fibronectin activity.

    PubMed Central

    Donson, J; Mandy, K; Feng, Z H; Mandy, S; Brown, E J; Godfrey, H P

    1991-01-01

    T-cell fibronectin (FN) is a lymphokine produced by antigen- and mitogen-activated T cells that agglutinates human monocytes at femtomolar concentrations. This extreme degree of activity derives from co-operative interactions between multiple FN domains and multiple monocyte integrin protein receptors. T-cell FN, like other FN, is a glycoprotein. The role interactions between T-cell FN carbohydrate and lectin-like monocyte surface receptors play in mediating T-cell FN activity was studied by determining the ability of monosaccharides to inhibit T-cell FN activity. L-Fucose and L-rhamnose significantly inhibited T-cell FN-mediated monocyte agglutination at concentrations as low as 0.01 mM; D-glucose, D- or L-galactose, D- or L-mannose and D-fucose were not inhibitory at 10-100 mM. This inhibition appeared to be due to interference with the binding of T-cell FN fucose residues to monocyte fucose receptors since: (i) treatment of T-cell FN with alpha-L-fucosidase abolished its agglutinating activity for human monocytes, while treatment with beta-D-galactosidase or with alpha-L-fucosidase in the presence of L-fucose had no effect; (ii) treatment of monocytes with alpha-L-fucosidase did not affect their response to T-cell FN; and (iii) L-fucose or L-rhamnose did not alter the expression of monocyte integrin FN receptors under conditions where T-cell FN-mediated monocyte agglutination was completely inhibited. In vivo, 1 mumol intracutaneous L-fucose inhibited expression of delayed hypersensitivity by 30% (P much less than 0.001); similar doses of L-rhamnose inhibited responses by 10% (P less than 0.02). These data implicate a fucose receptor in monocyte response to T-cell FN, and suggest that T-cell FN is only one of the mediators involved in initiating delayed hypersensitivity reactions in vivo. PMID:1769694

  10. IL-7 receptor blockade following T cell depletion promotes long-term allograft survival

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Hoa-Le; Boeffard, Françoise; Longis, Julie; Danger, Richard; Martinet, Bernard; Haspot, Fabienne; Vanhove, Bernard; Brouard, Sophie; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    T cell depletion is commonly used in organ transplantation for immunosuppression; however, a restoration of T cell homeostasis following depletion leads to increased memory T cells, which may promote transplant rejection. The cytokine IL-7 is important for controlling lymphopoiesis under both normal and lymphopenic conditions. Here, we investigated whether blocking IL-7 signaling with a mAb that targets IL-7 receptor α (IL-7Rα) alone or following T cell depletion confers an advantage for allograft survival in murine transplant models. We found that IL-7R blockade alone induced indefinite pancreatic islet allograft survival if anti–IL-7R treatment was started 3 weeks before graft. IL-7R blockade following anti-CD4– and anti-CD8–mediated T cell depletion markedly prolonged skin allograft survival. Furthermore, IL-7 inhibition in combination with T cell depletion synergized with either CTLA-4Ig administration or suboptimal doses of tacrolimus to induce long-term skin graft acceptance in this stringent transplant model. Together, these therapies inhibited T cell reconstitution, decreased memory T cell numbers, increased the relative frequency of Tregs, and abrogated both cellular and humoral alloimmune responses. Our data suggest that IL-7R blockade following T cell depletion has potential as a robust, immunosuppressive therapy in transplantation. PMID:24569454

  11. Role of Prolactin in the Recovered T-Cell Development of Early Partially Decapitated Chicken Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, J.; Varas, A.; Vicente, A.

    1998-01-01

    Although different experimental approaches have suggested certain regulation of the mammalian immune system by the neuroendocrine system, the precise factors involved in the process are largely unknown. In previous reports, we demonstrated important changes in the thymic development of chickens deprived of the major neuroendocrine centers by the removal of embryonic prosencephalon at 33-38 hr of incubation (DCx embryos) (Herradón et al., 1991; Moreno et al., 1995). In these embryos, there was a stopping of T-cell maturation that resulted in an accumulation of the most immature T-cell subsets (CD4-CD8- cells and CD4-CD81o cells) and, accordingly, in decreased numbers of DP (CD4+CD8+) thymocytes and mature CD3+TcRαβ + cells, but not CD3+TcRγδ lymphocytes. In the present work, we restore the thymic histology as well as the percentage of distinct T-cell subsets of DCx embryos by supplying recombinant chicken prolactin, grafting of embryonic pituitary gland, or making cephalic chick-quail chimeras. The recovery was not, however, whole and the percentage of CD3+TcRαβ thymocytes did not reach the normal values observed in 17-day-old control Sham-DCx embryos. The results are discussed on the basis of a key role for prolactin in chicken T-cell maturation. This hormone could regulate the transition of DN (CD4-CD8-) thymocytes to the DP (CD4+CD8+) cell compartment through its capacity for inducing IL-2 receptor expression on the former. PMID:9851358

  12. Loss of the LAT adaptor converts antigen-responsive T cells into pathogenic effectors that function independently of the T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Mingueneau, Michael; Roncagalli, Romain; Grégoire, Claude; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; Miazek, Arkadiusz; Archambaud, Cristel; Wang, Ying; Perrin, Pierre; Bertosio, Elodie; Sansoni, Amandine; Richelme, Sylvie; Locksley, Richard M; Aguado, Enrique; Malissen, Marie; Malissen, Bernard

    2009-08-21

    Despite compromised T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling, mice in which tyrosine 136 of the adaptor linker for activation of T cells (LAT) was constitutively mutated (Lat(Y136F) mice) accumulate CD4(+) T cells that trigger autoimmunity and inflammation. Here we show that equipping postthymic CD4(+) T cells with LATY136F molecules or rendering them deficient in LAT molecules triggers a lymphoproliferative disorder dependent on prior TCR engagement. Therefore, such disorders required neither faulty thymic T cell maturation nor LATY136F molecules. Unexpectedly, in CD4(+) T cells recently deprived of LAT, the proximal triggering module of the TCR induced a spectrum of protein tyrosine phosphorylation that largely overlapped the one observed in the presence of LAT. The fact that such LAT-independent signals result in lymphoproliferative disorders with excessive cytokine production demonstrates that LAT constitutes a key negative regulator of the triggering module and of the LAT-independent branches of the TCR signaling cassette.

  13. Molecular basis of cross-reactivity among allergen-specific human T cells: T-cell receptor V alpha gene usage and epitope structure.

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, S S; Mohapatra, S; Yang, M; Ansari, A A; Parronchi, P; Maggi, E; Romagnani, S

    1994-01-01

    Cross-reactivities between the major grass pollen allergens, at the level of T-cell recognition was examined employing several Lolium perenne I (Lol p I)-specific human T-cell clones. Nine of these Lol p I-specific T-cell clones exhibited cross-recognition of the recombinant Poa pratensis IX (Poa p IX) allergen, rKBG7.2, indicating that these two major antigens of a grass pollen share T-cell epitopes. Furthermore, proliferative responses of two other T-cell clones demonstrated that individual allergens of diverse grass pollens also possess common T-cell epitopes. Examination of the T-cell receptor (TcR) V alpha genes of these T-cell clones indicated that these cloned cells utilized distinct J alpha genes and that nine out of 10 clones possessed V alpha 13 gene. Furthermore, sequence comparisons of several allergenic molecules indicated that this cross-reactivity may be due to the presence of epitope(s) with structure(s) similar to the major T-cell epitope of Poa p IX allergens. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that the major grass pollen allergens share cross-reacting T-cell epitope(s), and that this cross-reactivity is due to the structural homologies among allergens and restricted usage of TcR V alpha genes. PMID:7510663

  14. Zbtb16 (PLZF) is stably suppressed and not inducible in non-innate T cells via T cell receptor-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sai; Laouar, Amale; Denzin, Lisa K; Sant'Angelo, Derek B

    2015-07-16

    The transcription factor PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger; zbtb16) is essential for nearly all of the unique characteristics of NKT cells including their rapid and potent response to antigen. In the immune system, zbtb16 expression is only found in innate cells. Conventional T cells that ectopically express PLZF spontaneously acquire an activated, effector phenotype. Activation induced expression of lineage defining transcription factors such as T-bet, FoxP3, RORγt, GATA3 and others is essential for naïve T cell differentiation into effector T cells. In this study, we used sensitive genetic-based approaches to assess the induction of PLZF expression in non-innate T cells by T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation. Surprisingly, we found that PLZF was stably repressed in non-innate T cells and that TCR-mediated signaling was not sufficient to induce PLZF in conventional T cells. The inactivated state of PLZF was stably maintained in mature T cells, even under inflammatory conditions imposed by bacterial infection. Collectively, our data show that, in contrast to multiple recent reports, PLZF expression is highly specific to innate T cells and cannot be induced in conventional T cells via TCR-mediated activation or inflammatory challenge.

  15. Zbtb16 (PLZF) is stably suppressed and not inducible in non-innate T cells via T cell receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sai; Laouar, Amale; Denzin, Lisa K.; Sant’Angelo, Derek B.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PLZF (promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger; zbtb16) is essential for nearly all of the unique characteristics of NKT cells including their rapid and potent response to antigen. In the immune system, zbtb16 expression is only found in innate cells. Conventional T cells that ectopically express PLZF spontaneously acquire an activated, effector phenotype. Activation induced expression of lineage defining transcription factors such as T-bet, FoxP3, RORγt, GATA3 and others is essential for naïve T cell differentiation into effector T cells. In this study, we used sensitive genetic-based approaches to assess the induction of PLZF expression in non-innate T cells by T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated activation. Surprisingly, we found that PLZF was stably repressed in non-innate T cells and that TCR-mediated signaling was not sufficient to induce PLZF in conventional T cells. The inactivated state of PLZF was stably maintained in mature T cells, even under inflammatory conditions imposed by bacterial infection. Collectively, our data show that, in contrast to multiple recent reports, PLZF expression is highly specific to innate T cells and cannot be induced in conventional T cells via TCR-mediated activation or inflammatory challenge. PMID:26178856

  16. High-throughput sequencing of the T-cell receptor repertoire: pitfalls and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Heather, James M; Ismail, Mazlina; Oakes, Theres; Chain, Benny

    2017-01-10

    T-cell specificity is determined by the T-cell receptor, a heterodimeric protein coded for by an extremely diverse set of genes produced by imprecise somatic gene recombination. Massively parallel high-throughput sequencing allows millions of different T-cell receptor genes to be characterized from a single sample of blood or tissue. However, the extraordinary heterogeneity of the immune repertoire poses significant challenges for subsequent analysis of the data. We outline the major steps in processing of repertoire data, considering low-level processing of raw sequence files and high-level algorithms, which seek to extract biological or pathological information. The latest generation of bioinformatics tools allows millions of DNA sequences to be accurately and rapidly assigned to their respective variable V and J gene segments, and to reconstruct an almost error-free representation of the non-templated additions and deletions that occur. High-level processing can measure the diversity of the repertoire in different samples, quantify V and J usage and identify private and public T-cell receptors. Finally, we discuss the major challenge of linking T-cell receptor sequence to function, and specifically to antigen recognition. Sophisticated machine learning algorithms are being developed that can combine the paradoxical degeneracy and cross-reactivity of individual T-cell receptors with the specificity of the overall T-cell immune response. Computational analysis will provide the key to unlock the potential of the T-cell receptor repertoire to give insight into the fundamental biology of the adaptive immune system and to provide powerful biomarkers of disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. T Cell Receptor CDR3 Sequence but Not Recognition Characteristics Distinguish Autoreactive Effector and Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Nguyen, Phuong; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Cheng; Steeves, Meredith; Obenauer, John C.; Ma, Jing; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The source, specificity, and plasticity of the forkhead box transcription factor 3 (Foxp3)+ regulatory T (Treg) and conventional T (Tconv) cell populations active at sites of autoimmune pathology are not well characterized. To evaluate this, we combined global repertoire analyses and functional assessments of isolated T cell receptors (TCR) from TCRα retrogenic mice with autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Treg and Tconv cell TCR repertoires were distinct, and autoantigen-specific Treg and Tconv cells were enriched in diseased tissue. Autoantigen sensitivity and fine specificity of these cells intersected, implying that differences in responsiveness were not responsible for lineage specification. Notably, autoreactive Treg and Tconv cells could be fully distinguished by an acidic versus aliphatic variation at a single TCR CDR3 residue. Our results imply that ontogenically distinct Treg and Tconv cell repertoires with convergent specificities for autoantigen respond during autoimmunity and argue against more than limited plasticity between Treg and Tconv cells during autoimmune inflammation. PMID:20005134

  18. Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum of NY-ESO-1 specific T cells is modulated by the affinity of T cell receptor and by the use of the CD8 co-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume; Shepherd, Dawn; Bossi, Giovanna; Wooldridge, Linda; Hutchinson, Sarah L.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Griffiths, Gillian M.; van der Merwe, P. Anton; Jones, E. Yvonne; Galione, Antony; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Although several cancer immunotherapy strategies are currently based on the use of analog peptides and on the modulation of the TCR affinity of adoptively transferred T cells, it remains unclear whether tumor specific T cell activation by strong and weak TCR stimuli evoke different Ca2+ signatures from the Ca2+ intracellular stores and whether the amplitude of Ca2+ release from the ER can be further modulated by co-receptor binding to peptide/MHC complexes (pMHC). We here combined functional, structural and kinetic measurements to correlate the intensity of Ca2+ signals triggered by the stimulation of the 1G4 T cell clone specific to the tumor epitope NY-ESO-1157–165. Two analogs of the NY-ESO-1157–165 peptide, having similar affinity to HLA-A2 molecules, but a six-fold difference in binding affinity for the 1G4 TCR, resulted in different Ca2+ signals and T cell activation. 1G4 stimulation by the stronger stimulus emptied the ER of stored Ca2+, even in the absence of CD8 binding, resulting in sustained Ca2+ influx. In contrast, the weaker stimulus induced only partial emptying of stored Ca2+, resulting in significantly diminished and oscillatory Ca2+ signals, which was enhanced by CD8 binding. Our data define the range of TCR/pMHC affinities required to induce depletion of Ca2+ from intracellular stores and provide insights into the ability of T cells to tailor the use of the CD8 co-receptor to enhance Ca2+ release from the ER. This in turn modulates Ca2+ influx from the extracellular environment, ultimately controlling T cell activation. PMID:20053942

  19. Annotation and classification of the bovine T cell receptor delta genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background γδ T cells differ from αβ T cells with regard to the types of antigen with which their T cell receptors interact; γδ T cell antigens are not necessarily peptides nor are they presented on MHC. Cattle are considered a "γδ T cell high" species indicating they have an increased proportion of γδ T cells in circulation relative to that in "γδ T cell low" species such as humans and mice. Prior to the onset of the studies described here, there was limited information regarding the genes that code for the T cell receptor delta chains of this γδ T cell high species. Results By annotating the bovine (Bos taurus) genome Btau_3.1 assembly the presence of 56 distinct T cell receptor delta (TRD) variable (V) genes were found, 52 of which belong to the TRDV1 subgroup and were co-mingled with the T cell receptor alpha variable (TRAV) genes. In addition, two genes belonging to the TRDV2 subgroup and single TRDV3 and TRDV4 genes were found. We confirmed the presence of five diversity (D) genes, three junctional (J) genes and a single constant (C) gene and describe the organization of the TRD locus. The TRDV4 gene is found downstream of the C gene and in an inverted orientation of transcription, consistent with its orthologs in humans and mice. cDNA evidence was assessed to validate expression of the variable genes and showed that one to five D genes could be incorporated into a single transcript. Finally, we grouped the bovine and ovine TRDV1 genes into sets based on their relatedness. Conclusions The bovine genome contains a large and diverse repertoire of TRD genes when compared to the genomes of "γδ T cell low" species. This suggests that in cattle γδ T cells play a more important role in immune function since they would be predicted to bind a greater variety of antigens. PMID:20144200

  20. Low-dose radiation accelerates aging of the T-cell receptor repertoire in CBA/Ca mice.

    PubMed

    Candéias, Serge M; Mika, Justyna; Finnon, Paul; Verbiest, Tom; Finnon, Rosemary; Brown, Natalie; Bouffler, Simon; Polanska, Joanna; Badie, Christophe

    2017-06-30

    While the biological effects of high-dose-ionizing radiation on human health are well characterized, the consequences of low-dose radiation exposure remain poorly defined, even though they are of major importance for radiological protection. Lymphocytes are very radiosensitive, and radiation-induced health effects may result from immune cell loss and/or immune system impairment. To decipher the mechanisms of effects of low doses, we analyzed the modulation of the T-cell receptor gene repertoire in mice exposed to a single low (0.1 Gy) or high (1 Gy) dose of radiation. High-throughput T-cell receptor gene profiling was used to visualize T-lymphocyte dynamics over time in control and irradiated mice. Radiation exposure induces "aging-like" effects on the T-cell receptor gene repertoire, detectable as early as 1 month post-exposure and for at least 6 months. Surprisingly, these effects are more pronounced in animals exposed to 0.1 Gy than to 1 Gy, where partial correction occurs over time. Importantly, we found that low-dose radiation effects are partially due to the hematopoietic stem cell impairment. Collectively, our findings show that acute low-dose radiation exposure specifically results in long-term alterations of the T-lymphocyte repertoire.

  1. On the organization of human T-cell receptor loci: log-periodic distribution of T-cell receptor gene segments

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Toor, Abdullah A.; Rahmani, Mohamed; Manjili, Masoud H.

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell repertoire is complex and is generated by the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) segments on the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. The T-cell repertoire demonstrates self-similarity in terms clonal frequencies when defined by V, D and J gene segment usage; therefore to determine whether the structural ordering of these gene segments on the TCR loci contributes to the observed clonal frequencies, the TCR loci were examined for self-similarity and periodicity in terms of gene segment organization. Logarithmic transformation of numeric sequence order demonstrated that the V and J gene segments for both T-cell receptor α (TRA) and β (TRB) loci are arranged in a self-similar manner when the spacing between the adjacent segments was considered as a function of the size of the neighbouring gene segment, with an average fractal dimension of approximately 1.5. Accounting for the gene segments occurring on helical DNA molecules with a logarithmic distribution, sine and cosine functions of the log-transformed angular coordinates of the start and stop nucleotides of successive TCR gene segments showed an ordered progression from the 5′ to the 3′ end of the locus, supporting a log-periodic organization. T-cell clonal frequency estimates, based on V and J segment usage, from normal stem cell donors were plotted against the V and J segment on TRB locus and demonstrated a periodic distribution. We hypothesize that this quasi-periodic variation in gene-segment representation in the T-cell clonal repertoire may be influenced by the location of the gene segments on the periodic-logarithmically scaled TCR loci. Interactions between the two strands of DNA in the double helix may influence the probability of gene segment usage by means of either constructive or destructive interference resulting from the superposition of the two helices. PMID:26763333

  2. On the organization of human T-cell receptor loci: log-periodic distribution of T-cell receptor gene segments.

    PubMed

    Toor, Amir A; Toor, Abdullah A; Rahmani, Mohamed; Manjili, Masoud H

    2016-01-01

    The human T-cell repertoire is complex and is generated by the rearrangement of variable (V), diversity (D) and joining (J) segments on the T-cell receptor (TCR) loci. The T-cell repertoire demonstrates self-similarity in terms clonal frequencies when defined by V, D and J gene segment usage; therefore to determine whether the structural ordering of these gene segments on the TCR loci contributes to the observed clonal frequencies, the TCR loci were examined for self-similarity and periodicity in terms of gene segment organization. Logarithmic transformation of numeric sequence order demonstrated that the V and J gene segments for both T-cell receptor α (TRA) and β (TRB) loci are arranged in a self-similar manner when the spacing between the adjacent segments was considered as a function of the size of the neighbouring gene segment, with an average fractal dimension of approximately 1.5. Accounting for the gene segments occurring on helical DNA molecules with a logarithmic distribution, sine and cosine functions of the log-transformed angular coordinates of the start and stop nucleotides of successive TCR gene segments showed an ordered progression from the 5' to the 3' end of the locus, supporting a log-periodic organization. T-cell clonal frequency estimates, based on V and J segment usage, from normal stem cell donors were plotted against the V and J segment on TRB locus and demonstrated a periodic distribution. We hypothesize that this quasi-periodic variation in gene-segment representation in the T-cell clonal repertoire may be influenced by the location of the gene segments on the periodic-logarithmically scaled TCR loci. Interactions between the two strands of DNA in the double helix may influence the probability of gene segment usage by means of either constructive or destructive interference resulting from the superposition of the two helices. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Challenges to chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Magee, Michael S; Snook, Adam E

    2014-11-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with B cell malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T cell therapy targeting other cancers has, in part, been limited by both the induction of antigen-specific toxicities targeting normal tissues expressing the target-antigen, and the extreme potency of CAR-T cell treatments resulting in life-threatening cytokine-release syndromes. Herein, we discuss toxicities associated with CAR-T cell therapy in the clinic. Further, we discuss potential clinical interventions to ameliorate these toxicities and the application of preclinical animal models to predict the clinical utility of CAR-T cell therapy.

  4. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2010-03-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses that clear pathogens from infected hosts. T cells recognize short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen- presenting cells). Recognition occurs when T cell receptor (TCR) proteins expressed on T cells bind sufficiently strongly to antigen- derived pMHC complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. A diverse repertoire of self-tolerant TCR sequences is shaped during development of T cells in the thymus by processes called positive and negative selection. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide analytic expression for the amino acid composition of selected TCR sequences (which enable its recognition functions).

  5. T cell receptor recognition of CD1b presenting a mycobacterial glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Stephanie; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Shahine, Adam; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Bhati, Mugdha; Tan, Li Lynn; Halim, Hanim; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Gapin, Laurent; Le Nours, Jérôme; Moody, D. Branch; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    CD1 proteins present microbial lipids to T cells. Germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive (GEM) T cells with conserved αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1b presenting mycobacterial mycolates. As the molecular basis underpinning TCR recognition of CD1b remains unknown, here we determine the structure of a GEM TCR bound to CD1b presenting glucose-6-O-monomycolate (GMM). The GEM TCR docks centrally above CD1b, whereby the conserved TCR α-chain extensively contacts CD1b and GMM. Through mutagenesis and study of T cells from tuberculosis patients, we identify a consensus CD1b footprint of TCRs present among GEM T cells. Using both the TCR α- and β-chains as tweezers to surround and grip the glucose moiety of GMM, GEM TCRs create a highly specific mechanism for recognizing this mycobacterial glycolipid. PMID:27807341

  6. KLF2 deficiency in T cells results in unrestrained cytokine production and bystander chemokine receptor upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Weinreich, Michael A.; Takada, Kensuke; Skon, Cara; Reiner, Steven L.; Jameson, Stephen C.; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcription factor KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by promoting expression of the lipid binding receptor, S1P1, and the selectin, CD62L. Recently, it was proposed that KLF2 also represses the expression of chemokine receptors. We confirm the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR3 on KLF2 deficient T cells. However, we show that this is a cell nonautonomous effect, as revealed by CXCR3 upregulation on WT bystander cells in mixed bone marrow chimeras with KLF2 deficient cells. Furthermore, we show that KLF2 deficient T cells overproduce IL-4, leading to the upregulation of CXCR3 through an IL-4 receptor and eomesodermin dependent pathway. Consistent with the increased IL-4 production, we find high levels of serum IgE in mice with T cell specific KLF2 deficiency. Our findings support a model where KLF2 regulates T cell trafficking by direct regulation of S1P1 and CD62L, and restrains spontaneous cytokine production in naive T cells. PMID:19592277

  7. Safety of targeting ROR1 in primates with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Carolina; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Berger, Michael; Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Paszkiewicz, Paulina J.; Kosasih, Paula L.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic engineering of T cells for adoptive transfer by introducing a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a new approach to cancer immunotherapy. A challenge for the field is to define cell surface molecules that are both preferentially expressed on tumor cells and can be safely targeted with T cells. The orphan tyrosine kinase receptor ROR1 is a candidate target for T-cell therapy with CAR-modified T cells (CAR-T cells) since it is expressed on the surface of many lymphatic and epithelial malignancies and has a putative role in tumor cell survival. The cell surface isoform of ROR1 is expressed in embryogenesis but absent in adult tissues except for B-cell precursors, and low levels of transcripts in adipocytes, pancreas, and lung. ROR1 is highly conserved between humans and macaques and has a similar pattern of tissue expression. To determine if low-level ROR1-expression on normal cells would result in toxicity or adversely affect CAR-T cell survival and/or function, we adoptively transferred autologous ROR1 CAR-T cells into nonhuman primates. ROR1 CAR-T cells did not cause overt toxicity to normal organs and accumulated in bone marrow and lymph node sites where ROR1-positive B cells were present. The findings support the clinical evaluation of ROR1 CAR-T cells for ROR1+ malignancies and demonstrate the utility of nonhuman primates for evaluating the safety of immunotherapy with engineered T cells specific for tumor-associated molecules that are homologous between humans and nonhuman primates. PMID:25355068

  8. Enhancing Antitumor Efficacy of Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Through Constitutive CD40L Expression

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Kevin J; Seinstra, Beatrijs A; Nikhamin, Yan; Yeh, Raymond; Usachenko, Yelena; van Leeuwen, Dayenne G; Purdon, Terence; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with genetically modified T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a promising therapy for patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, CAR-modified T cells (CAR T cells) have mostly failed in patients with solid tumors or low-grade B-cell malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia with bulky lymph node involvement. Herein, we enhance the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells through the constitutive expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154). T cells genetically modified to constitutively express CD40L (CD40L-modified T cells) demonstrated increased proliferation and secretion of proinflammatory TH1 cytokines. Further, CD40L-modified T cells augmented the immunogenicity of CD40+ tumor cells by the upregulated surface expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86), adhesion molecules (CD54, CD58, and CD70), human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecules (Class I and HLA-DR), and the Fas-death receptor (CD95). Additionally, CD40L-modified T cells induced maturation and secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 by monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Finally, tumor-targeted CD19-specific CAR/CD40L T cells exhibited increased cytotoxicity against CD40+ tumors and extended the survival of tumor-bearing mice in a xenotransplant model of CD19+ systemic lymphoma. This preclinical data supports the clinical application of CAR T cells additionally modified to constitutively express CD40L with anticipated enhanced antitumor efficacy. PMID:25582824

  9. Toll like Receptor 2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells promotes TH9 differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Karim, Ahmad Faisal; Reba, Scott M; Li, Qing; Boom, W Henry; Rojas, Roxana E

    2017-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that mycobacterial ligands engage Toll like receptor 2 (TLR2) on CD4(+) T cells and up-regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) triggered Th1 responses in vitro and in vivo. To better understand the role of T-cell expressed TLR2 on CD4(+) T-cell differentiation and function, we conducted a gene expression analysis of murine naïve CD4(+) T-cells stimulated in the presence or absence of TLR2 co-stimulation. Unexpectedly, naïve CD4(+) T-cells co-stimulated via TLR2 showed a significant up-regulation of Il9 mRNA compared to cells co-stimulated via CD28. Under TH9 differentiation, we observed up-regulation of TH9 differentiation, evidenced by increases in both percent of IL-9 secreting cells and IL-9 in culture supernatants in the presence of TLR2 agonist both in polyclonal and Ag85B cognate peptide specific stimulations. Under non-polarizing conditions, TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T-cells had minimal effect on IL-9 secretion and TH9 differentiation, likely due to a prominent effect of TLR2 signaling on IFN-γ secretion and TH1 differentiation. We also report that, TLR2 signaling in CD4(+) T cells increased expression of transcription factors BATF and PU.1, known to positively regulate TH9 differentiation. These results reveal a novel role of T-cell expressed TLR2 in enhancing the differentiation and function of TH9 T cells. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  11. T cells expressing an anti–B-cell maturation antigen chimeric antigen receptor cause remissions of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed Abbas; Shi, Victoria; Maric, Irina; Wang, Michael; Stroncek, David F.; Rose, Jeremy J.; Brudno, Jennifer N.; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Feldman, Steven A.; Hansen, Brenna G.; Fellowes, Vicki S.; Hakim, Frances T.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Therapies with novel mechanisms of action are needed for multiple myeloma (MM). B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is expressed in most cases of MM. We conducted the first-in-humans clinical trial of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting BCMA. T cells expressing the CAR used in this work (CAR-BCMA) specifically recognized BCMA-expressing cells. Twelve patients received CAR-BCMA T cells in this dose-escalation trial. Among the 6 patients treated on the lowest 2 dose levels, limited antimyeloma activity and mild toxicity occurred. On the third dose level, 1 patient obtained a very good partial remission. Two patients were treated on the fourth dose level of 9 × 106 CAR+ T cells/kg body weight. Before treatment, the first patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM, making up 90% of bone marrow cells. After treatment, bone marrow plasma cells became undetectable by flow cytometry, and the patient’s MM entered a stringent complete remission that lasted for 17 weeks before relapse. The second patient on the fourth dose level had chemotherapy-resistant MM making up 80% of bone marrow cells before treatment. Twenty-eight weeks after this patient received CAR-BCMA T cells, bone marrow plasma cells were undetectable by flow cytometry, and the serum monoclonal protein had decreased by >95%. This patient is in an ongoing very good partial remission. Both patients treated on the fourth dose level had toxicity consistent with cytokine-release syndrome including fever, hypotension, and dyspnea. Both patients had prolonged cytopenias. Our findings demonstrate antimyeloma activity of CAR-BCMA T cells. This trial was registered to www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT02215967. PMID:27412889

  12. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T; Puchner, Elias M; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A

    2015-10-16

    There is growing interest in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, these engineered T cells can exhibit excessive activity that is difficult to control and can cause severe toxicity. We designed "ON-switch" CARs that enable small-molecule control over T cell therapeutic functions while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen-binding and intracellular signaling components assemble only in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate cell-autonomous recognition and user control. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  13. Constitutively active Lck kinase in T cells drives antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Nika, Konstantina; Soldani, Cristiana; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Paster, Wolfgang; Gray, Adrian; Etzensperger, Ruth; Fugger, Lars; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Dushek, Omer; Höfer, Thomas; Viola, Antonella; Acuto, Oreste

    2010-06-25

    T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and coreceptor ligation is thought to initiate signal transduction by inducing activation of the kinase Lck. Here we showed that catalytically active Lck was present in unstimulated naive T cells and thymocytes and was readily detectable in these cells in lymphoid organs. In naive T cells up to approximately 40% of total Lck was constitutively activated, part of which was also phosphorylated on the C-terminal inhibitory site. Formation of activated Lck was independent of TCR and coreceptors but required Lck catalytic activity and its maintenance relied on monitoring by the HSP90-CDC37 chaperone complex to avoid degradation. The amount of activated Lck did not change after TCR and coreceptor engagement; however it determined the extent of TCR-zeta phosphorylation. Our findings suggest a dynamic regulation of Lck activity that can be promptly utilized to initiate T cell activation and have implications for signaling by other immune receptors.

  14. Remote control of therapeutic T cells through a small molecule-gated chimeric receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Yung; Roybal, Kole T.; Puchner, Elias M.; Onuffer, James; Lim, Wendell A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing promise in using engineered cells as therapeutic agents. For example, synthetic Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells to recognize and eliminate tumor cells expressing specific antigens. Despite promising clinical results, excessive activity and poor control over such engineered T cells can cause severe toxicities. We present the design of “ON-switch” CARs that enable small molecule-control over T cell therapeutic functions, while still retaining antigen specificity. In these split receptors, antigen binding and intracellular signaling components only assemble in the presence of a heterodimerizing small molecule. This titratable pharmacologic regulation could allow physicians to precisely control the timing, location, and dosage of T cell activity, thereby mitigating toxicity. This work illustrates the potential of combining cellular engineering with orthogonal chemical tools to yield safer therapeutic cells that tightly integrate both cell autonomous recognition and user control. PMID:26405231

  15. Reengineering chimeric antigen receptor T cells for targeted therapy of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Bhoj, Vijay G; Nace, Arben; Choi, Eun Jung; Mao, Xuming; Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Seykora, John T; Cotsarelis, George; Milone, Michael C; Payne, Aimee S

    2016-07-08

    Ideally, therapy for autoimmune diseases should eliminate pathogenic autoimmune cells while sparing protective immunity, but feasible strategies for such an approach have been elusive. Here, we show that in the antibody-mediated autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), autoantigen-based chimeric immunoreceptors can direct T cells to kill autoreactive B lymphocytes through the specificity of the B cell receptor (BCR). We engineered human T cells to express a chimeric autoantibody receptor (CAAR), consisting of the PV autoantigen, desmoglein (Dsg) 3, fused to CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains. Dsg3 CAAR-T cells exhibit specific cytotoxicity against cells expressing anti-Dsg3 BCRs in vitro and expand, persist, and specifically eliminate Dsg3-specific B cells in vivo. CAAR-T cells may provide an effective and universal strategy for specific targeting of autoreactive B cells in antibody-mediated autoimmune disease.

  16. An essential role for IL-2 receptor in regulatory T cell function

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Andrew G; Fan, Xiying; Klein, Ulf; Zheng, Ye; Gasteiger, Georg; Feng, Yongqiang; Fontenot, Jason D.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, expressing abundant amounts of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R), are reliant on IL-2 produced by activated T cells. This feature implied a key role for a simple network based on IL-2 consumption by Treg cells in their suppressor function. However, congenital deficiency in IL-2R results in reduced expression of the Treg cell lineage specification factor Foxp3, confounding experimental efforts to understand the role of IL-2R expression and signaling in Treg suppressor function. Using genetic gain and loss of function approaches, we demonstrate that IL-2 capture is dispensable for control of CD4+ T cells, but is important for limiting CD8+ T cell activation, and that IL-2R dependent STAT5 transcription factor activation plays an essential role in Treg cell suppressor function separable from T cell receptor signaling. PMID:27595233

  17. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors.

  18. TRAF3 is required for T cell-mediated immunity and T cell receptor/CD28 signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Kraus, Zachary J.; Stunz, Laura L.; Liu, Yan; Bishop, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that TRAF3, a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein, promotes mature B cell apoptosis. However, the specific function of TRAF3 in T cells has remained unclear. Here we report the generation and characterization of T cell-specific TRAF3−/− mice, in which the TRAF3 gene was deleted from thymocytes and T cells. Ablation of TRAF3 in the T cell-lineage did not affect the numbers or proportions of CD4+,CD8+ or double positive or negative thymocytes, or CD4 or CD8 T cell populations in secondary lymphoid organs except that the T cell specific TRAF3−/− mice had a two-fold increase in FoxP3+ T cells.. In striking contrast to mice lacking TRAF3 in B cells, the T cell TRAF3 deficient mice exhibited defective IgG1 responses to a T dependent antigen, and impaired T cell-mediated immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Surprisingly, we found that TRAF3 was recruited to the TCR/CD28 signaling complex upon co-stimulation, and that TCR/CD28-mediated proximal and distal signaling events were compromised by TRAF3 deficiency. These findings provide new insights into the roles played by TRAF3 in T cell activation and T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:21084666

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in AML: How close are we?

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially respond to chemotherapy but post-remission therapy is required to consolidate this response and achieve long-term disease-free survival. The most effective form of post-remission therapy relies on T cell immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, patients with active disease cannot usually expect to be cured with HCT. This inherent dichotomy implies that traditional T cell-based immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic HCT stops being efficacious somewhere between the measurable residual disease (MRD) and the morphologically obvious range. This is in part because the full power of T cells must be restrained in order to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and partly because only a sub-population of donor T cells are expected to be able to recognize AML cells via their T cell receptor. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, most advanced in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, may circumvent some of these limitations. However, major challenges remain to be overcome before CAR T cell therapy can be safely applied to AML.

  20. Preclinical targeting of aggressive T-cell malignancies using anti-CD5 chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Lin, K-W; Jares, A; Firor, A E; Shuai, X; Salman, H; Golightly, M; Lan, F; Senzel, L; Leung, E L; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2017-02-10

    The outlook for T-cell malignancies remain poor due to the lack of effective therapeutic options. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) immunotherapy has recently shown promise in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies, however, designing CARs for T-cell based disease remain a challenge due to the shared surface antigen pool between normal and malignant T-cells. Normal T-cells express CD5 but NK (natural killer) cells do not, positioning NK cells as attractive cytotoxicity cells for CD5CAR design. Additionally, CD5 is highly expressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). Here, we report a robust anti-CD5 CAR (CD5CAR) transduced into a human NK cell line NK-92 that can undergo stable expansion ex vivo. We found that CD5CAR NK-92 cells possessed consistent, specific, and potent anti-tumor activity against a variety of T-cell leukemia and lymphoma cell lines as well as primary tumor cells. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate significant inhibition and control of disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. The data suggest that CAR redirected targeting for T-cell malignancies using NK cells may be a viable method for new and complementary therapeutic approaches that could improve the current outcome for patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.8.

  1. Elimination of Progressive Mammary Cancer by Repeated Administrations of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Modified T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-01-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease. PMID:24572294

  2. Elimination of progressive mammary cancer by repeated administrations of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Globerson-Levin, Anat; Waks, Tova; Eshhar, Zelig

    2014-05-01

    Continuous oncogenic processes that generate cancer require an on-going treatment approach to eliminate the transformed cells, and prevent their further development. Here, we studied the ability of T cells expressing a chimeric antibody-based receptor (CAR) to offer a therapeutic benefit for breast cancer induced by erbB-2. We tested CAR-modified T cells (T-bodies) specific to erbB-2 for their antitumor potential in a mouse model overexpressing a human erbB-2 transgene that develops mammary tumors. Comparing the antitumor reactivity of CAR-modified T cells under various therapeutic settings, either prophylactic, prior to tumor development, or therapeutically. We found that repeated administration of CAR-modified T cells is required to eliminate spontaneously developing mammary cancer. Systemic, as well as intratumoral administered CAR-modified T cells accumulated at tumor sites and eventually eliminated the malignant cells. Interestingly, within a few weeks after a single CAR T cells' administration, and rejection of primary lesion, tumors usually relapsed both in treated mammary gland and at remote sites; however, repeated injections of CAR-modified T cells were able to control the secondary tumors. Since spontaneous tumors can arise repeatedly, especially in the case of syndromes characterized by specific susceptibility to cancer, multiple administrations of CAR-modified T cells can serve to control relapsing disease.

  3. Transgenic mice demonstrate that epithelial homing of gamma/delta T cells is determined by cell lineages independent of T cell receptor specificity

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    gamma/delta T cells with different TCR repertoires are compartmentalized in different epithelia. This raises the possibility that the TCR-gamma/delta directs homing of T cells to these epithelia. Alternatively, the signals that induce TCR-gamma/delta expression in developing T cells may also induce homing properties in such cells, presumably in the form of cell surface receptors. We have examined this issue by studying the homing of gamma/delta T cells in transgenic mice constructed with specific pairs of rearranged gamma and delta genes. In such mice, most gamma/delta T cells express the transgene-encoded TCR. We find that homing to both skin and gut epithelia is a property of T cells and is not determined by the type of gamma and delta genes used to encode their TCR. We also studied the effect of TCR replacement on the expression of Thy-1 and CD8 proteins on the gamma/delta T cells associated with gut epithelia. Our results show that the expression of the appropriate type of TCR-gamma/delta is not required for the Thy-1 expression by these T cells, suggesting that Thy-1 is not an activation marker. In contrast, CD8 expression by gut gamma/delta T cells seems to depend on the expression of the appropriate type of TCR. PMID:2109035

  4. T cells engineered with a T cell receptor against the prostate antigen TARP specifically kill HLA-A2+ prostate and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Nilsson, Berith; Carlsson, Björn; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2012-09-25

    To produce genetically engineered T cells directed against prostate and breast cancer cells, we have cloned the T-cell receptor recognizing the HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor γ-chain alternate reading-frame protein (TARP)(4-13) epitope. TARP is a protein exclusively expressed in normal prostate epithelium and in adenocarcinomas of the prostate and breast. Peripheral blood T cells transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding the TARP-TCR proliferated well when exposed to peptide-specific stimuli. These cells exerted peptide-specific IFN-γ production and cytotoxic activity. Importantly, HLA-A2(+) prostate and breast cancer cells expressing TARP were also killed, demonstrating that the TARP(4-13) epitope is a physiologically relevant target for T-cell therapy of prostate and breast cancer. In conclusion, we present the cloning of a T cell receptor (TCR) directed against a physiologically relevant HLA-A2 epitope of TARP. To our knowledge this report on engineering of T cells with a TCR directed against an antigen specifically expressed by prostate cells is unique.

  5. tcR: an R package for T cell receptor repertoire advanced data analysis.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Vadim I; Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Komech, Ekaterina A; Zvyagin, Ivan V; Bolotin, Dmitry A; Shugay, Mikhail; Chudakov, Dmitry M; Lebedev, Yury B; Mamedov, Ilgar Z

    2015-05-28

    The Immunoglobulins (IG) and the T cell receptors (TR) play the key role in antigen recognition during the adaptive immune response. Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technologies has provided an opportunity for the deep T cell receptor repertoire profiling. However, a specialised software is required for the rational analysis of massive data generated by next-generation sequencing. Here we introduce tcR, a new R package, representing a platform for the advanced analysis of T cell receptor repertoires, which includes diversity measures, shared T cell receptor sequences identification, gene usage statistics computation and other widely used methods. The tool has proven its utility in recent research studies. tcR is an R package for the advanced analysis of T cell receptor repertoires after primary TR sequences extraction from raw sequencing reads. The stable version can be directly installed from The Comprehensive R Archive Network ( http://cran.r-project.org/mirrors.html ). The source code and development version are available at tcR GitHub ( http://imminfo.github.io/tcr/ ) along with the full documentation and typical usage examples.

  6. Partial Regulatory T Cell Depletion Prior to Schistosomiasis Vaccination Does Not Enhance the Protection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Xu, Zhipeng; Hoellwarth, Jason; Chen, Xiaojun; He, Lei; Zhang, Rongbo; Liu, Feng; Wang, Jun; Su, Chuan

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not only influence self-antigen specific immune responses, but also dampen the protective effect induced by a number of vaccines. The impact of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on vaccines against schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease that is a major public health concern, however, has not been examined. In this study, a DNA vaccine encoding a 26 kDa glutathione S-transferase of Schistosoma japonicum (pVAX1-Sj26GST) was constructed and its potential effects were evaluated by depleting CD25+ cells prior to pVAX1-Sj26GST immunization. This work shows that removal of CD25+ cells prior to immunization with the pVAX1-Sj26GST schistosomiasis DNA vaccine significantly increases the proliferation of splenocytes and IgG levels. However, CD25+ cell-depleted mice immunized with pVAX1-Sj26GST show no improved protection against S. japonicum. Furthermore, depletion of CD25+ cells causes an increase in both pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IFN-γ, GM-CSF and IL-4) and an anti-inflammatory cytokine (e.g. IL-10), with CD4+CD25- T cells being one of the major sources of both IFN-γ and IL-10. These findings indicate that partial CD25+ cell depletion fails to enhance the effectiveness of the schistosome vaccine, possibly due to IL-10 production by CD4+CD25- T cells, or other cell types, after CD25+ cell depletion during vaccination. PMID:22802961

  7. Signalling pathways induced by protease-activated receptors and integrins in T cells.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shavit, Rachel; Maoz, Miriam; Yongjun, Yin; Groysman, Maya; Dekel, Idit; Katzav, Shulamit

    2002-01-01

    Recent characterization of the thrombin receptor indicates that it plays a role in T-cell signalling pathways. However, little is known regarding the signalling events following stimulation of additional members of the protease-activated receptor (PAR) family, i.e. PAR2 and PAR3. Most of the postligand cascades are largely unknown. Here, we illustrate that in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells, activation of PAR1, PAR2 and PAR3 induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav1. This response was impaired in Jurkat T cells deficient in p56lck (JCaM1.6). Activation of PARs also led to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP-70 and SLP-76, two key proteins in T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling. We also demonstrated that p56lck is meaningful for integrin signalling. Thus, JCaM1.6 cells exhibited a marked reduction in their adherence to fibronectin-coated plates, as compared to the level of adherence of Jurkat T cells. While the phosphorylation of Vav1 in T cells is augmented following adhesion, no additional increase was noted following treatment of the adhered cells with PARs. Altogether, we have identified key components in the postligand-signalling cascade of PARs and integrins. Furthermore, we have identified Lck as a critical and possibly upstream component of PAR-induced Vav1 phosphorylation, as well as integrin activation, in Jurkat T cells.

  8. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengnan; Li, Anping; Liu, Qian; Li, Tengfei; Yuan, Xun; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Kongming

    2017-03-29

    The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and mesothelin (MSLN), as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  9. Feline T-Cell Receptor gamma V- and J-Region Sequences Retrieved from the Trace Archive and from Transcriptome Analysis of Cats.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alexander Thomas Andreas; Hecht, Werner; Reinacher, Manfred

    2010-01-01

    The variable domains of antigen receptors are very diverse and assembled in a modular system from a number of V-, D-, and J-region genes. Here we describe additional variants of V- and J-region genes of the feline T-cell receptor gamma (TRG) as well as the corresponding RSSs retrieved from Trace Archive of feline genomic sequences. Additionally, an unusually recombined TRGV-domain containing a partial inverted repeat of the included J-region and a short interspersed element of the CAN-SINE family located within the feline T-cell receptor gamma locus are also described.

  10. Cytokine Release Syndrome After Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Julie C; Weiss, Scott L; Maude, Shannon L; Barrett, David M; Lacey, Simon F; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Shaw, Pamela; Berg, Robert A; June, Carl H; Porter, David L; Frey, Noelle V; Grupp, Stephan A; Teachey, David T

    2017-02-01

    Initial success with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia is leading to expanded use through multicenter trials. Cytokine release syndrome, the most severe toxicity, presents a novel critical illness syndrome with limited data regarding diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy. We sought to characterize the timing, severity, and intensive care management of cytokine release syndrome after chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy. Retrospective cohort study. Academic children's hospital. Thirty-nine subjects with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy on a phase I/IIa clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01626495). All subjects received chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapy. Thirteen subjects with cardiovascular dysfunction were treated with the interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. Eighteen subjects (46%) developed grade 3-4 cytokine release syndrome, with prolonged fever (median, 6.5 d), hyperferritinemia (median peak ferritin, 60,214 ng/mL), and organ dysfunction. Fourteen (36%) developed cardiovascular dysfunction treated with vasoactive infusions a median of 5 days after T cell therapy. Six (15%) developed acute respiratory failure treated with invasive mechanical ventilation a median of 6 days after T cell therapy; five met criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome. Encephalopathy, hepatic, and renal dysfunction manifested later than cardiovascular and respiratory dysfunction. Subjects had a median of 15 organ dysfunction days (interquartile range, 8-20). Treatment with tocilizumab in 13 subjects resulted in rapid defervescence (median, 4 hr) and clinical improvement. Grade 3-4 cytokine release syndrome occurred in 46% of patients following T cell therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Clinicians should be aware of expanding use of this breakthrough therapy and

  11. Ligand-Driven T Cell Receptor Selection in Celiac Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nishant K; Baker, Brian M

    2016-10-04

    Recognition of antigens by T cell receptors (TCRs) underlies cellular immunity. By comparing how different TCRs recognize the key antigens associated with celiac disease, Petersen et al. (2016), in this issue of Structure, show how celiac antigen properties select immunologically distinct yet structurally and physically compatible TCRs, ultimately driving autoimmunity.

  12. Maternal CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Tolerance Towards a Fetal Minor Histocompatibility Antigen in T Cell Receptor Transgenic Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Perchellet, Antoine L.; Jasti, Susmita; Petroff, Margaret G.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tolerance of the maternal immune system in pregnancy is important for successful pregnancy because the semiallogeneic fetus may be subject to antifetal responses. We examined maternal tolerance to the fetus using a murine system in which a model paternally inherited antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), is expressed exclusively in the fetus and placenta. By employing T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic mice specific for major histocompatibility complex class I- or class II-restricted epitopes of OVA (OT-I and OT-II) as mothers, we investigated the fate of fetus-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively, during gestation. Both OVA-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells displayed an activated phenotype in the peripheral lymphoid tissues of OVA-bred OT-I and OT-II mice, consistent with their encounter of fetal antigen. Whereas a small percentage of OVA-specific CD4+ T cells were deleted in the periphery and thymus of OVA-bred OT-II mice, with evidence of TCR downregulation in the remaining T cells, deletion and TCR downregulation were not observed in OVA-bred OT-I mice. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells upregulated inducible costimulator expression in response to the fetal antigen, but only CD4+ T cells consistently upregulated the inhibitory receptors programmed cell death 1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4. More regulatory T cells (Tregs) were present in pregnant OVA-bred than in WT-bred OT-II mice, revealing that Tregs expanded specifically in response to the fetal antigen. These data indicate that several mechanisms tolerize fetal antigen-specific maternal CD4+ T cells, whereas tolerance of fetal antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is less effective. The importance of these mechanisms is underscored by the finding that fetal loss occurs in OVA-bred OT-I but not OT-II mice. PMID:24025737

  13. Current status and regulatory perspective of chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cell therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Kim, Dongyoon; Suh, Soo-Kyung; Park, Zewon; Choi, Min Joung; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T) have emerged as a new modality for cancer immunotherapy due to their potent efficacy against terminal cancers. CAR-Ts are reported to exert higher efficacy than monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates, and act via mechanisms distinct from T cell receptor-engineered T cells. These cells are constructed by transducing genes encoding fusion proteins of cancer antigen-recognizing single-chain Fv linked to intracellular signaling domains of T cell receptors. CAR-Ts are classified as first-, second- and third-generation, depending on the intracellular signaling domain number of T cell receptors. This review covers the current status of CAR-T research, including basic proof-of-concept investigations at the cell and animal levels. Currently ongoing clinical trials of CAR-T worldwide are additionally discussed. Owing to the lack of existing approved products, several unresolved concerns remain with regard to safety, efficacy and manufacturing of CAR-T, as well as quality control issues. In particular, the cytokine release syndrome is the major side-effect impeding the successful development of CAR-T in clinical trials. Here, we have addressed the challenges and regulatory perspectives of CAR-T therapy.

  14. T cell receptor assessment in autoimmune disease requires access to the most adjacent immunologically active organ.

    PubMed

    Oftedal, Bergithe E; Ardesjö Lundgren, Brita; Hamm, David; Gan, Poh-Yi; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Hahn, Christopher N; Schreiber, Andreas W; Scott, Hamish S

    2017-07-01

    Next generation sequencing of T and B cell receptors is emerging as a valuable and effective method to diagnose and monitor hematopoietic malignancies. So far, this approach has not been fully explored in regard to autoimmune diseases. T cells develop in the thymus where they undergo positive and negative selection, and the autoimmune regulator (Aire) is central in the establishment of immunological tolerance. Loss of Aire leads to severe multiorgan autoimmune disease with infiltration of autoreactive T cells in affected organs. Here, we have utilized next generation sequencing technology to investigate the T cell receptor repertoire in autoimmunity induced by immunization of mice with a self-antigen, myeloperoxidase. By investigating the T cell receptor repertoire in peripheral blood, spleen and lumbar lymph nodes from naïve and immunized Aire -/- mice and wild type littermates, changes in the usage of V and J genes were evident. Our results identify TCR clonotypes which could be potential targets for immune therapy. Also, Aire -/- autoimmunity is driven by a variety of autoantigens where the autoimmune response is highly polyclonal, and access to the most adjacent immunologically active tissue is required to identify T cell receptor sequences that are potentially unique to the antigen in Aire-/- immunized mice. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Cycling Memory CD4+ T Cells in HIV Disease Have a Diverse T Cell Receptor Repertoire and a Phenotype Consistent with Bystander Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Mudd, Joseph C.; Espinosa, Enrique; Davenport, Miles P.; Babineau, Denise C.; Sieg, Scott F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms of increased memory CD4+ T cell cycling in HIV disease are incompletely understood but have been linked to antigen stimulation, homeostatic signals, or exposure to microbial products and the inflammatory cytokines that they induce. We examined the phenotype and Vβ family distribution in cycling memory CD4+ T cells among 52 healthy and 59 HIV-positive (HIV+) donors. Cycling memory CD4+ T cells were proportionally more frequent in subjects with HIV infection than in controls, more often expressed CD38 and PD-1, and less frequently expressed OX40 and intracellular CD40L. OX40 expression on memory CD4+ T cells was induced in vitro by anti-CD3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-7, or IL-15 but not by Toll-like receptor ligands. In HIV+ donors, memory CD4+ T cell cycling was directly related to plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, to plasma HIV RNA levels, and to memory CD8+ T cell cycling and was inversely related to peripheral blood CD4+ T cell counts but not to the levels of IL-2, IL-7, or IL-15, while in HIV-negative donors, memory CD4+ T cell cycling was related to IL-7 levels and negatively related to the plasma levels of LPS. In both controls and HIV+ donors, cycling memory CD4+ T cells had a broad distribution of Vβ families comparable to that of noncycling cells. Increased memory CD4+ T cell cycling in HIV disease is reflective of generalized immune activation and not driven primarily by cognate peptide stimulation or exposure to common gamma-chain cytokines. This cycling may be a consequence of exposure to microbial products, to plasma viremia, or, otherwise, to proinflammatory cytokines. IMPORTANCE This work provides evidence that the increased memory CD4+ T cell cycling in HIV infection is not a result of cognate peptide recognition but, rather, is more likely related to the inflammatory environment of HIV infection. PMID:24522925

  16. A Novel Mechanism of Soluble HLA-G Mediated Immune Modulation: Downregulation of T Cell Chemokine Receptor Expression and Impairment of Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Fabio; Ferretti, Elisa; Bocca, Paola; Prigione, Ignazia; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Pistoia, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years, many immunoregulatory functions have been ascribed to soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G). Since chemotaxis is crucial for an efficient immune response, we have investigated for the first time the effects of sHLA-G on chemokine receptor expression and function in different human T cell populations. Methodology/Principal Findings T cell populations isolated from peripheral blood were stimulated in the presence or absence of sHLA-G. Chemokine receptors expression was evaluated by flow cytometry. sHLA-G downregulated expression of i) CCR2, CXCR3 and CXCR5 in CD4+ T cells, ii) CXCR3 in CD8+ T cells, iii) CXCR3 in Th1 clones iv) CXCR3 in TCR Vδ2γ9 T cells, and upregulated CXCR4 expression in TCR Vδ2γ9 T cells. sHLA-G inhibited in vitro chemotaxis of i) CD4+ T cells towards CCL2, CCL8, CXCL10 and CXCL11, ii) CD8+ T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11, iii) Th1 clones towards CXCL10, and iv) TCR Vδ2γ9 T cells towards CXCL10 and CXCL11. Downregulation of CXCR3 expression on CD4+ T cells by sHLA-G was partially reverted by adding a blocking antibody against ILT2/CD85j, a receptor for sHLA-G, suggesting that sHLA-G downregulated chemokine receptor expression mainly through the interaction with ILT2/CD85j. Follicular helper T cells (TFH) were isolated from human tonsils and stimulated as described above. sHLA-G impaired CXCR5 expression in TFH and chemotaxis of the latter cells towards CXCL13. Moreover, sHLA-G expression was detected in tonsils by immunohistochemistry, suggesting a role of sHLA-G in local control of TFH cell chemotaxis. Intracellular pathways were investigated by Western Blot analysis on total extracts from CD4+ T cells. Phosphorylation of Stat5, p70 s6k, β-arrestin and SHP2 was modulated by sHLA-G treatment. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrated that sHLA-G impairs expression and functionality of different chemokine receptors in T cells. These findings delineate a novel mechanism whereby sHLA-G modulates T cell recruitment in

  17. Lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 predicts fratricide amongst T cell receptor transgenic CD8+ T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Andreas; Thiede, Melanie; Blaeschke, Franziska; Richter, Günther H.S.; Gerke, Julia S.; Baldauf, Michaela C.; Grünewald, Thomas G.P.; Busch, Dirk H.; Burdach, Stefan; Thiel, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Aim Autologous as well as allogeneic CD8+ T cells transduced with tumor antigen specific T cell receptors (TCR) may cause significant tumor lysis upon adoptive transfer. Besides unpredictable life-threatening off-target effects, these TCRs may unexpectedly commit fratricide. We hypothesized lysosome-associated membrane glycoprotein 1 (LAMP1, CD107a) to be a marker for fratricide in TCR transgenic CD8+ T cells. Methods We identified HLA-A*02:01/peptide-restricted T cells directed against ADRB3295. After TCR identification, we generated HLA-A*02:01/peptide restricted TCR transgenic T cells by retroviral transduction and tested T cell expansion rates as well as A*02:01/peptide recognition and ES killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. Expansion arrest was analyzed via Annexin and CD107a staining. Results were compared to CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Results Beta-3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) as well as chondromodulin-1 (CHM1) are over-expressed in Ewing Sarcoma (ES) but not on T cells. TCR transgenic T cells demonstrated HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295 mediated ES recognition and killing in ELISpot and xCELLigence assays. 24h after TCR transduction, CD107a expression correlated with low expansion rates due to apoptosis of ADRB3 specific T cells in contrast to CHM1 specific transgenic T cells. Amino-acid exchange scans clearly indicated the cross-reactive potential of HLA-A*02:01/ADRB3295- and HLA-A*02:01/CHM1319-TCR transgenic T cells. Comparison of peptide motive binding affinities revealed extended fratricide among ADRB3295 specific TCR transgenic T cells in contrast to CHM1319. Conclusion Amino-acid exchange scans alone predict TCR cross-reactivity with little specificity and thus require additional assessment of potentially cross-reactive HLA-A*02:01 binding candidates. CD107a positivity is a marker for fratricide of CD8+ TCR transgenic T cells. PMID:27447745

  18. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis supports Th17 differentiation and limits de novo regulatory T cell induction by directly interfering with T cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Pasztoi, Maria; Bonifacius, Agnes; Pezoldt, Joern; Kulkarni, Devesha; Niemz, Jana; Yang, Juhao; Teich, René; Hajek, Janina; Pisano, Fabio; Rohde, Manfred; Dersch, Petra; Huehn, Jochen

    2017-04-04

    Adaptive immunity critically contributes to control acute infection with enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; however, the role of CD4(+) T cell subsets in establishing infection and allowing pathogen persistence remains elusive. Here, we assessed the modulatory capacity of Y. pseudotuberculosis on CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Using in vivo assays, we report that infection with Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in enhanced priming of IL-17-producing T cells (Th17 cells), whereas induction of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) was severely disrupted in gut-draining mesenteric lymph nodes (mLNs), in line with altered frequencies of tolerogenic and proinflammatory dendritic cell (DC) subsets within mLNs. Additionally, by using a DC-free in vitro system, we could demonstrate that Y. pseudotuberculosis can directly modulate T cell receptor (TCR) downstream signaling within naïve CD4(+) T cells and Tregs via injection of effector molecules through the type III secretion system, thereby affecting their functional properties. Importantly, modulation of naïve CD4(+) T cells by Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in an enhanced Th17 differentiation and decreased induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs in vitro. These findings shed light to the adjustment of the Th17-Treg axis in response to acute Y. pseudotuberculosis infection and highlight the direct modulation of CD4(+) T cell subsets by altering their TCR downstream signaling.

  19. Drug Hypersensitivity: How Drugs Stimulate T Cells via Pharmacological Interaction with Immune Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J; Adam, Jacqueline; Watkins, Stephen; Wuillemin, Natascha; Yun, James; Yerly, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Small chemicals like drugs tend to bind to proteins via noncovalent bonds, e.g. hydrogen bonds, salt bridges or electrostatic interactions. Some chemicals interact with other molecules than the actual target ligand, representing so-called 'off-target' activities of drugs. Such interactions are a main cause of adverse side effects to drugs and are normally classified as predictable type A reactions. Detailed analysis of drug-induced immune reactions revealed that off-target activities also affect immune receptors, such as highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigens (HLA) or T cell receptors (TCR). Such drug interactions with immune receptors may lead to T cell stimulation, resulting in clinical symptoms of delayed-type hypersensitivity. They are assigned the 'pharmacological interaction with immune receptors' (p-i) concept. Analysis of p-i has revealed that drugs bind preferentially or exclusively to distinct HLA molecules (p-i HLA) or to distinct TCR (p-i TCR). P-i reactions differ from 'conventional' off-target drug reactions as the outcome is not due to the effect on the drug-modified cells themselves, but is the consequence of reactive T cells. Hence, the complex and diverse clinical manifestations of delayed-type hypersensitivity are caused by the functional heterogeneity of T cells. In the abacavir model of p-i HLA, the drug binding to HLA may result in alteration of the presenting peptides. More importantly, the drug binding to HLA generates a drug-modified HLA, which stimulates T cells directly, like an allo-HLA. In the sulfamethoxazole model of p-i TCR, responsive T cells likely require costimulation for full T cell activation. These findings may explain the similarity of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to graft-versus-host disease, and how systemic viral infections increase the risk of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

  20. Review: Current clinical applications of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-11-01

    The past several years have been marked by extraordinary advances in clinical applications of immunotherapy. In particular, adoptive cellular therapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells targeted to CD19 has demonstrated substantial clinical efficacy in children and adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) and durable clinical benefit in a smaller subset of patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Early-phase clinical trials are currently assessing CAR T-cell safety and efficacy in additional malignancies. Here, we discuss clinical results from the largest series to date investigating CD19-targeted CAR T cells in B-ALL, CLL, and B-NHL, including discussion of differences in CAR T-cell design and production and treatment approach, as well as clinical efficacy, nature of severe cytokine release syndrome and neurologic toxicities, and CAR T-cell expansion and persistence. We additionally review the current and forthcoming use of CAR T cells in multiple myeloma and several solid tumors and highlight challenges and opportunities afforded by the current state of CAR T-cell therapies, including strategies to overcome inhibitory aspects of the tumor microenvironment and enhance antitumor efficacy.

  1. Critical role for BIM in T cell receptor restimulation-induced death.

    PubMed

    Snow, Andrew L; Oliveira, João B; Zheng, Lixin; Dale, Janet K; Fleisher, Thomas A; Lenardo, Michael J

    2008-08-20

    Upon repeated or chronic antigen stimulation, activated T cells undergo a T cell receptor (TCR)-triggered propriocidal cell death important for governing the intensity of immune responses. This is thought to be chiefly mediated by an extrinsic signal through the Fas-FasL pathway. However, we observed that TCR restimulation still potently induced apoptosis when this interaction was blocked, or genetically impaired in T cells derived from autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) patients, prompting us to examine Fas-independent, intrinsic signals. Upon TCR restimulation, we specifically noted a marked increase in the expression of BIM, a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family protein known to mediate lymphocyte apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. In fact, T cells from an ALPS type IV patient in which BIM expression is suppressed were more resistant to restimulation-induced death. Strikingly, knockdown of BIM expression rescued normal T cells from TCR-induced death to as great an extent as Fas disruption. Our data implicates BIM as a critical mediator of apoptosis induced by restimulation as well as growth cytokine withdrawal. These findings suggest an important role for BIM in eliminating activated T cells even when IL-2 is abundant, working in conjunction with Fas to eliminate chronically stimulated T cells and maintain immune homeostasis. This article was reviewed by Dr. Wendy Davidson (nominated by Dr. David Scott), Dr. Mark Williams (nominated by Dr. Neil Greenspan), and Dr. Laurence C. Eisenlohr.

  2. Perturbed T cell IL7 receptor-signaling in chronic Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Albareda, M. Cecilia; Perez-Mazliah, Damián; Natale, M. Ailén; Castro-Eiro, Melisa; Alvarez, María G.; Viotti, Rodolfo; Bertocchi, Graciela; Lococo, Bruno; Tarleton, Rick L; Laucella, Susana A.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immune responses in subjects with chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection display features common to other persistent infections with signs of T cell exhaustion. Alterations in cytokine receptor signal transduction have emerged as one of the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of T cell exhaustion. Herein, we performed an analysis of the expression of IL-7R components (CD127 and CD132) on CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and evaluated IL-7-dependent signaling events in patients at different clinical stages of chronic chagasic heart disease. Subjects with no signs of cardiac disease showed a decrease in CD127+CD132+ cells and a reciprocal gain of CD127-CD132+ in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells compared to either patients exhibiting heart enlargement or uninfected controls. T. cruzi infection, in vitro, was able to stimulate the downregulation of CD127 and the upregulation of CD132 on T cells. IL-7-induced phosphorylation of STAT5 as well as Bcl-2 and CD25 expression were lower in T. cruzi-infected subjects compared with uninfected controls. The serum levels of IL-7 was also increased in chronic chagasic patients. The present study highlights perturbed IL-7/IL-7R T cell signaling through STAT5 as a potential mechanism of T cell exhaustion in chronic T. cruzi infection. PMID:25769928

  3. Performance-enhancing drugs: design and production of redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells.

    PubMed

    Levine, B L

    2015-03-01

    Performance enhancement of the immune system can now be generated through ex vivo gene modification of T cells in order to redirect native specificity to target tumor antigens. This approach combines the specificity of antibody therapy, the expanded response of cellular therapy and the memory activity of vaccine therapy. Recent clinical trials of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed toward CD19 as a stand-alone therapy have shown sustained complete responses in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As these drug products are individually derived from a patient's own cells, a different manufacturing approach is required for this kind of personalized therapy compared with conventional drugs. Key steps in the CAR T-cell manufacturing process include the selection and activation of isolated T cells, transduction of T cells to express CARs, ex vivo expansion of modified T cells and cryopreservation in infusible media. In this review, the steps involved in isolating, genetically modifying and scaling-out the CAR T cells for use in a clinical setting are described in the context of in-process and release testing and regulatory standards.

  4. The P2Y6 Receptor Inhibits Effector T Cell Activation in Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Giorgio; Ohta, Shin; Boyce, Joshua R.; Xing, Wei; Balestrieri, Barbara; Boyce, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    We show that the P2Y6 receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor with high affinity for the nucleotide uridine diphosphate, is an important endogenous inhibitor of T cell function in allergic pulmonary inflammation. Mice conditionally deficient in P2Y6 receptors [p2ry6 (flox/flox);cre/+ mice] exhibited severe airway and tissue pathology relative to P2Y6-sufficient [p2ry6 (flox/flox)] littermates (+/+ mice) when treated intranasally with an extract (Df) of the dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. P2Y6 receptors were inducibly expressed by lung, lymph node and splenic CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of Df-treated +/+ mice. Df-restimulated P2Y6-deficient lymph node cells produced higher levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and polyclonally-stimulated P2Y6-deficient CD4+ T cells proliferated faster than comparably stimulated P2Y6-sufficient cells. The absence of P2Y6 receptors on CD4+ cells, but not antigen presenting cells, was sufficient to amplify cytokine generation. Thus, P2Y6 receptors protect the lung against exuberant allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation by inhibiting the activation of effector T cells. PMID:21724990

  5. Characterization of a single-chain T-cell receptor expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoo, W F; Lacy, M J; Denzin, L K; Voss, E W; Hardman, K D; Kranz, D M

    1992-05-15

    Despite progress in defining the nature of major histocompatibility complex products that are recognized by the T-cell antigen receptor, the binding properties and structure of the receptor have not been solved. The primary problem has been the difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of active receptor. In this report we show that a single-chain T-cell receptor gene can be expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein consists of the variable (V) regions of the alpha and beta chains (V alpha and V beta) encoded by the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clone 2C (a H-2b anti-H-2d alloreactive cell line) linked by a 25-amino acid flexible peptide. Solubilized extracts that contain the 27-kDa V alpha 3V beta 8 protein are positive in solid-phase immunoassays with the anti-V beta 8 antibody KJ16 and the anti-clonotypic antibody 1B2. Approximately 1% of the protein can be specifically purified on a 1B2-conjugated column. These results indicate that a fraction of the protein is able to fold into a native conformation and that single-chain proteins should be useful not only as immunogens for eliciting anti-T-cell receptor antibodies but in the study of T-cell receptor structure and function.

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Therapy for the Community Oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Bruce L.

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer immunotherapy has rapidly progressed in the past decade as several therapeutic modalities have entered into the clinic. One such immunotherapy that has shown promise in the treatment of cancer is the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T lymphocytes. CARs are engineered receptors constructed from antigen recognition regions of antibodies fused to T-cell signaling and costimulatory domains that can be used to reprogram a patient’s T cells to specifically target tumor cells. CAR T-cell therapy has demonstrated sustained complete responses for some patients with advanced leukemia, and a number of CAR therapies are being evaluated in clinical studies. CAR T-cell therapy-associated toxicities, including cytokine release syndrome, macrophage activation syndrome, and tumor lysis syndrome, have been observed and effectively managed in the clinic. In patients with significant clinical responses, sustained B-cell aplasia has also been observed and is a marker of CAR T-cell persistence that might provide long-term disease control. Education on CAR T-cell therapy efficacy and safety management is critical for clinicians and patients who are considering this novel type of treatment. In the present report, the current landscape of CAR T-cell therapy, the effective management of patients undergoing treatment, and which patients are the most suitable candidates for current trials are discussed. Implications for Practice: The present report describes the current status of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T lymphocytes as an immunotherapy for patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell malignancies. CAR T cells targeting CD19, a protein expressed on many B-cell malignancies, typically induce high complete response rates in patients with B-cell leukemia or lymphoma who have very limited therapeutic options. Recent clinical trial results of CD19 CAR T-cell therapies and the management of CAR T-cell-associated adverse events are discussed. The present

  7. FCγ Chimeric Receptor-Engineered T Cells: Methodology, Advantages, Limitations, and Clinical Relevance.

    PubMed

    Caratelli, Sara; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Arriga, Roberto; Coppola, Andrea; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Venditti, Adriano; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Buccisano, Francesco; Maurillo, Luca; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    For many years, disappointing results have been generated by many investigations, which have utilized a variety of immunologic strategies to enhance the ability of a patient's immune system to recognize and eliminate malignant cells. However, in recent years, immunotherapy has been used successfully for the treatment of hematologic and solid malignancies. The impressive clinical responses observed in many types of cancer have convinced even the most skeptical clinical oncologists that a patient's immune system can recognize and reject his tumor if appropriate strategies are implemented. The success immunotherapy is due to the development of at least three therapeutic strategies. They include tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), T cell checkpoint blockade, and TAA-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) T cell-based immunotherapy. However, the full realization of the therapeutic potential of these approaches requires the development of strategies to counteract and overcome some limitations. They include off-target toxicity and mechanisms of cancer immune evasion, which obstacle the successful clinical application of mAbs and CAR T cell-based immunotherapies. Thus, we and others have developed the Fc gamma chimeric receptors (Fcγ-CRs)-based strategy. Like CARs, Fcγ-CRs are composed of an intracellular tail resulting from the fusion of a co-stimulatory molecule with the T cell receptor ζ chain. In contrast, the extracellular CAR single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which recognizes the targeted TAA, has been replaced with the extracellular portion of the FcγRIIIA (CD16). Fcγ-CR T cells have a few intriguing features. First, given in combination with mAbs, Fcγ-CR T cells mediate anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo by an antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity mechanism. Second, CD16-CR T cells can target multiple cancer types provided that TAA-specific mAbs with the appropriate specificity are available. Third, the off

  8. Crossreactive T Cells Spotlight the Germline Rules for [alpha beta] T Cell-Receptor Interactions with MHC Molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Shaodong; Huseby, Eric S.; Rubtsova, Kira; Scott-Browne, James; Crawford, Frances; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Marrack, Philippa; Kappler, John W.

    2008-10-31

    To test whether highly crossreactive {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) produced during limited negative selection best illustrate evolutionarily conserved interactions between TCR and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, we solved the structures of three TCRs bound to the same MHC II peptide (IA{sup b}-3K). The TCRs had similar affinities for IA{sup b}-3K but varied from noncrossreactive to extremely crossreactive with other peptides and MHCs. Crossreactivity correlated with a shrinking, increasingly hydrophobic TCR-ligand interface, involving fewer TCR amino acids. A few CDR1 and CDR2 amino acids dominated the most crossreactive TCR interface with MHC, including V{beta}8 48Y and 54E and V{alpha}4 29Y, arranged to impose the familiar diagonal orientation of TCR on MHC. These interactions contribute to MHC binding by other TCRs using related V regions, but not usually so dominantly. These data show that crossreactive TCRs can spotlight the evolutionarily conserved features of TCR-MHC interactions and that these interactions impose the diagonal docking of TCRs on MHC.

  9. A T-Cell Receptor Breaks the Rules | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Most mature T cells function immunologically when a T-cell receptor (TCR) located on the cell surface encounters and engages its ligand, a major histocompatability complex (MHC), which displays a specific part of a target protein called an antigen. This antigen-presenting complex is assembled from one of the dozen or so MHC molecules that every person inherits from their parents; and the antigen fragment, called a peptide epitope, is excised from one of thousands of possible proteins—originally part of an invading pathogen or a cancer cell—that T cells are capable of identifying and attacking. The framework of an MHC molecule holding a centrally displayed or “presented” peptide is what engages the TCR and triggers T-cell action. This role of MHC molecules presenting antigens to the TCR is a central tenet of immunology, with the fit between a TCR and the MHC framework actually “hardwired” into their three-dimensional structures.

  10. Lethal graft-versus-host disease in mouse models of T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bendle, Gavin M; Linnemann, Carsten; Hooijkaas, Anna I; Bies, Laura; de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Kaiser, Andrew D M; Pouw, Nadine; Debets, Reno; Kieback, Elisa; Uckert, Wolfgang; Song, Ji-Ying; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-05-01

    The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to induce immune reactivity toward defined antigens to which endogenous T cells are insufficiently reactive. This approach, which is called TCR gene therapy, is being developed to target tumors and pathogens, and its clinical testing has commenced in patients with cancer. In this study we show that lethal cytokine-driven autoimmune pathology can occur in mouse models of TCR gene therapy under conditions that closely mimic the clinical setting. We show that the pairing of introduced and endogenous TCR chains in TCR gene-modified T cells leads to the formation of self-reactive TCRs that are responsible for the observed autoimmunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adjustments in the design of gene therapy vectors and target T cell populations can be used to reduce the risk of TCR gene therapy-induced autoimmune pathology.

  11. Adoptive T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    The functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by effector T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs). Transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors enables polyclonal T cells to redirect toward cancer cells and virally infected cells expressing those defined antigens. Using this technology, a large population of redirected T cells displaying uniform therapeutic properties has been produced, powerfully advancing their clinical application as "cellular drugs" for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using these genetically engineered T cells has an impressive and proven track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells redirected towards B-cell lineage antigen CD19 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and the impressive outcomes in the use of TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a representative cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. In this review, we briefly overview the current status of this treatment option in the context of hematological malignancy, and discuss a number of challenges that still pose an obstacle to the full effectiveness of this strategy.

  12. Breakpoint sites disclose the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of T-cell receptor (TCR) and non-TCR associated aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Larmonie, Nicole S D; Dik, Willem A; Meijerink, Jules P P; Homminga, Irene; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant recombination between T-cell receptor genes and oncogenes gives rise to chromosomal translocations that are genetic hallmarks in several subsets of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias. The V(D)J recombination machinery has been shown to play a role in the formation of these T-cell receptor translocations. Other, non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations, such as SIL-TAL1 deletions, have likewise been recognized as V(D)J recombination associated aberrations. Despite the postulated role of V(D)J recombination, the extent of the V(D)J recombination machinery involvement in the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is still poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive in silico and ex vivo evaluation of 117 breakpoint sites from 22 different T-cell receptor translocation partners as well as 118 breakpoint sites from non-T-cell receptor chromosomal aberrations. Based on this extensive set of breakpoint data, we provide a comprehensive overview of T-cell receptor and oncogene involvement in T-ALL. Moreover, we assessed the role of the V(D)J recombination machinery in the formation of chromosomal aberrations, and propose an up-dated mechanistic classification on how the V(D)J recombination machinery contributes to the formation of T-cell receptor and non-T-cell receptor aberrations in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  13. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W.; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Kam, Lance C.; Stokes, David L.; Dustin, Michael L.

    2014-03-01

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  14. Polarized release of T-cell-receptor-enriched microvesicles at the immunological synapse.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Kaushik; Llodrá, Jaime; Roth, Eric W; Tsai, Jones; Gordo, Susana; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Kam, Lance C; Stokes, David L; Dustin, Michael L

    2014-03-06

    The recognition events that mediate adaptive cellular immunity and regulate antibody responses depend on intercellular contacts between T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs). T-cell signalling is initiated at these contacts when surface-expressed T-cell receptors (TCRs) recognize peptide fragments (antigens) of pathogens bound to major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC) on APCs. This, along with engagement of adhesion receptors, leads to the formation of a specialized junction between T cells and APCs, known as the immunological synapse, which mediates efficient delivery of effector molecules and intercellular signals across the synaptic cleft. T-cell recognition of pMHC and the adhesion ligand intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) on supported planar bilayers recapitulates the domain organization of the immunological synapse, which is characterized by central accumulation of TCRs, adjacent to a secretory domain, both surrounded by an adhesive ring. Although accumulation of TCRs at the immunological synapse centre correlates with T-cell function, this domain is itself largely devoid of TCR signalling activity, and is characterized by an unexplained immobilization of TCR-pMHC complexes relative to the highly dynamic immunological synapse periphery. Here we show that centrally accumulated TCRs are located on the surface of extracellular microvesicles that bud at the immunological synapse centre. Tumour susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) sorts TCRs for inclusion in microvesicles, whereas vacuolar protein sorting 4 (VPS4) mediates scission of microvesicles from the T-cell plasma membrane. The human immunodeficiency virus polyprotein Gag co-opts this process for budding of virus-like particles. B cells bearing cognate pMHC receive TCRs from T cells and initiate intracellular signals in response to isolated synaptic microvesicles. We conclude that the immunological synapse orchestrates TCR sorting and release in extracellular microvesicles. These

  15. Predominance of T cell receptor V delta 3 in small bowel biopsies from coeliac disease patients.

    PubMed Central

    Falk, M C; NG, G; Zhang, G Y; Fanning, G C; Kamath, K R; Knight, J F

    1994-01-01

    Increased numbers of T cells bearing the gamma delta antigen receptor (gamma delta T cells) have been reported in small bowel biopsies of patients with latent, active or treated coeliac disease. We have studied jejunal biopsies from seven children with coeliac disease and 10 children with normal gut histology to characterize gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR) variable region gene subfamily expression in resident gamma delta T cells and compared the results with the findings in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained on the same day as the gut biopsy. Molecular analysis of RNA extracted from PBMC and biopsies was performed by reverse transcription and amplification with the polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for six TCR V delta families and four TCR V gamma families. We report, first, that a significantly increased number of gamma delta T cells expressing the TCR V delta 3 subfamily (P = 0.008) was observed in jejunal biopsies from children with coeliac disease, and second, that gamma delta T cell V region subfamily populations in gut differed from those seen in PBMC for both control and coeliac patients. Significantly reduced numbers of TCR V delta 2, V delta 3, V delta 5 (P < 0.01) and V gamma 2, V gamma 4 (P < 0.01) T cells were found in gut compared with PBMC. The difference in gamma delta T cell repertoire observed between gut and blood may reflect differences in the nature of the antigens usually encountered in these two compartments. The over-representation of TCR V delta 3 in patients with coeliac disease suggests a specific role for these cells in the induction or maintenance of the jejunal abnormality associated with this disease. PMID:7923889

  16. Multifactorial T-cell hypofunction that is reversible can limit the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced human T cells in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edmund K; Wang, Liang-Chuan; Dolfi, Douglas V; Wilson, Caleph B; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Scholler, John; Puré, Ellen; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H; Riley, James L; Wherry, E John; Albelda, Steven M

    2014-08-15

    Immunotherapy using vaccines or adoptively transferred tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is limited by T-cell functional inactivation within the solid tumor microenvironment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a similar tumor-induced inhibition occurred with genetically modified cytotoxic T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) targeting tumor-associated antigens. Human T cells expressing CAR targeting mesothelin or fibroblast activation protein and containing CD3ζ and 4-1BB cytoplasmic domains were intravenously injected into immunodeficient mice bearing large, established human mesothelin-expressing flank tumors. CAR TILs were isolated from tumors at various time points and evaluated for effector functions and status of inhibitory pathways. CAR T cells were able to traffic into tumors with varying efficiency and proliferate. They were able to slow tumor growth, but did not cause regressions or cures. The CAR TILs underwent rapid loss of functional activity that limited their therapeutic efficacy. This hypofunction was reversible when the T cells were isolated away from the tumor. The cause of the hypofunction seemed to be multifactorial and was associated with upregulation of intrinsic T-cell inhibitory enzymes (diacylglycerol kinase and SHP-1) and the expression of surface inhibitory receptors (PD1, LAG3, TIM3, and 2B4). Advanced-generation human CAR T cells are reversibly inactivated within the solid tumor microenvironment of some tumors by multiple mechanisms. The model described here will be an important tool for testing T cell-based strategies or systemic approaches to overcome this tumor-induced inhibition. Our results suggest that PD1 pathway antagonism may augment human CAR T-cell function. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew J S; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367-16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, -0.218 to 0.465). 3-93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches.

  18. T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer with lentiviral vectors allows efficient redirection of tumor specificity in naive and memory T cells without prior stimulation of endogenous TCR.

    PubMed

    Circosta, Paola; Granziero, Luisa; Follenzi, Antonia; Vigna, Elisa; Stella, Stefania; Vallario, Antonella; Elia, Angela Rita; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Vitaggio, Katiuscia; Orso, Francesca; Geuna, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Todorovic, Maja; Giachino, Claudia; Cignetti, Alessandro

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of introducing exogenous T cell receptor (TCR) genes into T cells by lentiviral transduction, without prior stimulation of endogenous TCR with anti-CD3. TCR transfer is used to impose tumor antigen specificity on recipient T cells, but sustained activation required for retroviral transduction may affect the clinical efficacy of engineered T cells. Cytokine stimulation makes T cells susceptible to lentiviral transduction in the absence of TCR triggering, but this advantage has never been exploited for TCR transfer. Autoimmune diseases are a source of high-affinity TCRs specific for self/tumor antigens. We selected, from a patient with vitiligo, a Mart1-specific TCR based on intrinsic interchain pairing properties and functional avidity. After lentiviral transduction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, preferential pairing of exogenous alpha and beta chains was observed, together with effective recognition of Mart1(+) melanoma cells. We tested transduction efficiency on various T cell subsets prestimulated with interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 (alone or in combination). Both naive and unfractionated CD8(+) T cells could be transduced without requiring endogenous TCR triggering. IL-7 plus IL-15 was the most powerful combination, allowing high levels of transgene expression without inducing T cell differentiation (34 +/- 5% Mart1-TCR(+) cells in naive CD8(+) and 16 +/- 6% in unfractionated CD8(+)). Cytokine-prestimulated, Mart1-redirected naive and unfractionated CD8(+) cells expanded better than CD3-CD28-prestimulated counterparts in response to both peptide-pulsed antigen-presenting cells and Mart1(+) melanoma cells. This strategy allows the generation of tumor-specific T cells encompassing truly naive T cells, endowed with an intact proliferative potential and a preserved differentiation stage.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for the treatment of solid tumors: Defining the challenges and next steps☆

    PubMed Central

    Beatty, Gregory L.; O’Hara, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has shown promise in CD19 expressing hematologic malignancies, but how to translate this success to solid malignancies remains elusive. Effective translation of CAR T cells to solid tumors will require an understanding of potential therapeutic barriers, including factors that regulate CAR T cells expansion, persistence, trafficking, and fate within tumors. Herein, we describe the current state of CAR T cells in solid tumors; define key barriers to CAR T cell efficacy and mechanisms underlying these barriers, outline potential avenues for overcoming these therapeutic obstacles, and discuss the future of translating CAR T cells for the treatment of patients with solid malignancies. PMID:27373504

  20. CD8 Co-receptor promotes susceptibility of CD8+ T cells to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zloza, Andrew; Jagoda, Michael C.; Lyons, Gretchen E.; Graves, Michael C.; Kohlhapp, Frederick J.; O’Sullivan, Jeremy A.; Lacek, Andrew T.; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cell function depends on a finely orchestrated balance of activation/suppression signals. While the stimulatory role of the CD8 co-receptor and pleiotropic capabilities of TGF-β have been studied individually, the influence of CD8 co-receptor on TGF-β function in CD8+ T cells is unknown. Here, we show that while CD8 enhances T cell activation, it also enhances susceptibility to TGF-β-mediated immune suppression. Using Jurkat cells expressing a full-length, truncated or no αβCD8 molecule, we demonstrate that cells expressing full-length αβCD8 were highly susceptible, αβCD8-truncated cells were partially susceptible, and CD8-deficient cells were completely resistant to suppression by TGF-β. Additionally, we determined that inhibition of Lck rendered mouse CD8+ T cells highly resistant to TGF-β suppression. Resistance was not associated with TGF-β receptor expression but did correlate with decreased Smad3 and increased Smad7 levels. These findings highlight a previously unrecognized third role for CD8 co-receptor which appears to prepare activated CD8+ T cells for response to TGF-β. Based on the important role which TGF-β-mediated suppression plays in tumor immunology, these findings unveil necessary considerations in formulation of CD8+ T cell-related cancer immunotherapy strategies. PMID:21193909

  1. T-cell receptor-CD4 physical association in a murine T-cell hybridoma: induction by antigen receptor ligation.

    PubMed Central

    Mittler, R S; Goldman, S J; Spitalny, G L; Burakoff, S J

    1989-01-01

    By employing flow cytometric analysis and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we examined the physical relationship between the T-cell receptor-CD3 complex (Ti-CD3) and the CD4 molecule on helper T cells. Through the use of an L3T4-negative murine T-cell hybridoma infectant expressing the human CD4 gene and having antigen specificity for HLA-DR, we show that binding of the Ti-CD3 complex with an anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody induces its redistribution proximal to cell-surface CD4. FRET efficiency was 9.4% on cells labeled with rhodaminated anti-CD3 and fluoresceinated anti-CD4. FRET was found to be temperature dependent, since similarly treated cells held at 4 degrees C displayed a FRET efficiency of less than 1%. Energy transfer was evident within 3 min after warming cells to 37 degrees C. Energy transfer was not detected between Ti-CD3 and the abundantly expressed leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Of greater significance was our observation that hybridomas infected with a truncated CD4 gene lacking the cytoplasmic domain failed to transfer energy despite the fact that CD4 was expressed on the cell surface at levels equivalent to or greater than the wild type. These studies suggest that after crosslinking of the Ti-CD3 on CD4+ T cells, a physical association occurs between the antigen receptor complex and CD4 and that the association is dependent upon the presence of the cytoplasmic domain of CD4. PMID:2530583

  2. Expression of T cell antigen receptor during differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, J.P.; Lanier, L.L.; Guyden, J.; Richie, E.R.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have used flow cytometry with monoclonal antibodies, radioimmuneprecipitation with a rabbit antiserum to common epitopes of the TCR, and Northern and Southern blot analysis with cloned TCR genes to study antigen receptor (TCR) expression by normal murine and human thymocytes and by primary murine thymomas. L3T4-,Lyt2- murine thymomas corresponding to the earliest stage of thymic differentiation, were found to have rearranged TCR beta genes, and to express low levels of beta transcript, but lacked alpha gene transcript and failed to express TCR on the cell surface. L3T4+,Lyt2+ thymomas were variable, but the majority were found to contain significant levels of both alpha and beta transcripts and to express TCR at the cell surface. Similarly, alpha and beta transcripts and TCR protein were detected in sorted L3T4+,Lyt2+ murine thymocytes. Using three color fluorescence, the authors determined that app. 70% of human T4+T8+ thymocytes also expressed T3, a component of the TCR complex. These data indicate that in mouse and man expression of TCR occurs in the immature, or cortical, thymic population.

  3. Persisting fetal clonotypes influence the structure and overlap of adult human T cell receptor repertoires.

    PubMed

    Pogorelyy, Mikhail V; Elhanati, Yuval; Marcou, Quentin; Sycheva, Anastasiia L; Komech, Ekaterina A; Nazarov, Vadim I; Britanova, Olga V; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Mamedov, Ilgar Z; Lebedev, Yury B; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M

    2017-07-01

    The diversity of T-cell receptors recognizing foreign pathogens is generated through a highly stochastic recombination process, making the independent production of the same sequence rare. Yet unrelated individuals do share receptors, which together constitute a "public" repertoire of abundant clonotypes. The TCR repertoire is initially formed prenatally, when the enzyme inserting random nucleotides is downregulated, producing a limited diversity subset. By statistically analyzing deep sequencing T-cell repertoire data from twins, unrelated individuals of various ages, and cord blood, we show that T-cell clones generated before birth persist and maintain high abundances in adult organisms for decades, slowly decaying with age. Our results suggest that large, low-diversity public clones are created during pre-natal life, and survive over long periods, providing the basis of the public repertoire.

  4. Persisting fetal clonotypes influence the structure and overlap of adult human T cell receptor repertoires

    PubMed Central

    Pogorelyy, Mikhail V.; Elhanati, Yuval; Sycheva, Anastasiia L.; Nazarov, Vadim I.; Britanova, Olga V.; Mamedov, Ilgar Z.

    2017-01-01

    The diversity of T-cell receptors recognizing foreign pathogens is generated through a highly stochastic recombination process, making the independent production of the same sequence rare. Yet unrelated individuals do share receptors, which together constitute a “public” repertoire of abundant clonotypes. The TCR repertoire is initially formed prenatally, when the enzyme inserting random nucleotides is downregulated, producing a limited diversity subset. By statistically analyzing deep sequencing T-cell repertoire data from twins, unrelated individuals of various ages, and cord blood, we show that T-cell clones generated before birth persist and maintain high abundances in adult organisms for decades, slowly decaying with age. Our results suggest that large, low-diversity public clones are created during pre-natal life, and survive over long periods, providing the basis of the public repertoire. PMID:28683116

  5. T-cell receptor V(alpha) usage by effector CD4+Vbeta11+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease directed to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Christine G; Murphy, George F; Friedman, Thea M; Korngold, Robert

    2007-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) Valpha (TRAV) and Vbeta (TRBV) chains provide the T-cell specificity for recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound antigens. However, there is limited information on the diversity of TRAV use within an antigen response. Previous investigation of CD4(+) T-cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched C57BL/6 (B6)-->BALB.B irradiated murine model determined that Vbeta11(+) T cells were associated with disease severity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3)-sized spectratype analysis of B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells from the spleens of recipient BALB.B mice undergoing GVHD indicated biased use within the V(alpha)6, 9, 13, 14, 18, and 22 families. To probe deeper into this limited V(alpha) response, the current study was undertaken to further define TRAV-Jalpha (TRAJ) nucleotide sequences found in host-presensitized B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells proliferating in response to in vitro stimulation with BALB.B splenocytes. Using the nonpalindromic adaptor PCR method, we found dominant use of the TRAV13-TRAJ16 transcript combination. Then, using laser capture microdissection, we found use of the identical TRAV-TRAJ nucleotide sequence in areas dominated by infiltrating Vbeta11(+) CD4(+) T cells during the development of GVHD in both the rete-like prominences of the dorsal lingual epithelium and the ileal crypts of the small intestine.

  6. Case Report of a Fatal Serious Adverse Event Upon Administration of T Cells Transduced With a MART-1-specific T-cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Joost H; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; van de Wiel, Bart; Hulshoff, Lenie; van den Broek, Daan; Bins, Adriaan; Tan, Hanno L; Harper, Jane V; Hassan, Namir J; Jakobsen, Bent K; Jorritsma, Annelies; Blank, Christian U; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2015-01-01

    Here, we describe a fatal serious adverse event observed in a patient infused with autologous T-cell receptor (TCR) transduced T cells. This TCR, originally obtained from a melanoma patient, recognizes the well-described HLA-A*0201 restricted 26–35 epitope of MART-1, and was not affinity enhanced. Patient 1 with metastatic melanoma experienced a cerebral hemorrhage, epileptic seizures, and a witnessed cardiac arrest 6 days after cell infusion. Three days later, the patient died from multiple organ failure and irreversible neurologic damage. After T-cell infusion, levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, C-reactive protein (CRP), and procalcitonin increased to extreme levels, indicative of a cytokine release syndrome or T-cell-mediated inflammatory response. Infused T cells could be recovered from blood, broncho-alveolar lavage, ascites, and after autopsy from tumor sites and heart tissue. High levels of NT-proBNP indicate semi-acute heart failure. No cross reactivity of the modified T cells toward a beating cardiomyocyte culture was observed. Together, these observations suggest that high levels of inflammatory cytokines alone or in combination with semi-acute heart failure and epileptic seizure may have contributed substantially to the occurrence of the acute and lethal event. Protocol modifications to limit the risk of T-cell activation-induced toxicity are discussed. PMID:25896248

  7. T Cell Receptor Activation of NF-κB in Effector T Cells: Visualizing Signaling Events Within and Beyond the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Traver, Maria K; Paul, Suman; Schaefer, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) to NF-κB signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulation of proliferation and effector T cell differentiation and function. In naïve T cells, data suggest that most or all key cytoplasmic NF-κB signaling occurs in a TCR-proximal manner at the immunological synapse (IS). However, the subcellular organization of cytoplasmic NF-κB-activating complexes in effector T cells is more complex, involving signaling molecules and regulatory mechanisms beyond those operative in naïve cells. Additionally, in effector T cells, much signaling occurs at cytoplasmic locations distant from the IS. Visualization of these cytoplasmic signaling complexes has provided key insights into the complex and dynamic regulation of NF-κB signal transduction in effector T cells. In this chapter, we provide in-depth protocols for activating and preparing effector T cells for fluorescence imaging, as well as a discussion of the effective application of distinct imaging methodologies, including confocal and super-resolution microscopy and imaging flow cytometry.

  8. Case Report of a Fatal Serious Adverse Event Upon Administration of T Cells Transduced With a MART-1-specific T-cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Joost H; Gomez-Eerland, Raquel; van de Wiel, Bart; Hulshoff, Lenie; van den Broek, Daan; Bins, Adriaan; Tan, Hanno L; Harper, Jane V; Hassan, Namir J; Jakobsen, Bent K; Jorritsma, Annelies; Blank, Christian U; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2015-09-01

    Here, we describe a fatal serious adverse event observed in a patient infused with autologous T-cell receptor (TCR) transduced T cells. This TCR, originally obtained from a melanoma patient, recognizes the well-described HLA-A*0201 restricted 26-35 epitope of MART-1, and was not affinity enhanced. Patient 1 with metastatic melanoma experienced a cerebral hemorrhage, epileptic seizures, and a witnessed cardiac arrest 6 days after cell infusion. Three days later, the patient died from multiple organ failure and irreversible neurologic damage. After T-cell infusion, levels of IL-6, IFN-γ, C-reactive protein (CRP), and procalcitonin increased to extreme levels, indicative of a cytokine release syndrome or T-cell-mediated inflammatory response. Infused T cells could be recovered from blood, broncho-alveolar lavage, ascites, and after autopsy from tumor sites and heart tissue. High levels of NT-proBNP indicate semi-acute heart failure. No cross reactivity of the modified T cells toward a beating cardiomyocyte culture was observed. Together, these observations suggest that high levels of inflammatory cytokines alone or in combination with semi-acute heart failure and epileptic seizure may have contributed substantially to the occurrence of the acute and lethal event. Protocol modifications to limit the risk of T-cell activation-induced toxicity are discussed.

  9. Assessment of T-cell receptor repertoire and clonal expansion in peripheral T-cell lymphoma using RNA-seq data.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qiang; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Weiwei; Iqbal, Javeed; Hu, Yang; Greiner, Timothy C; Cornish, Adam; Kim, Jo-Heon; Rabadan, Raul; Abate, Francesco; Wang, Xin; Inghirami, Giorgio G; McKeithan, Timothy W; Chan, Wing C

    2017-09-12

    T-cell clonality of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is routinely evaluated with a PCR-based method using genomic DNA. However, there are limitations with this approach. The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of RNA-seq for assessing T-cell clonality and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of the neoplastic T-cells in 108 PTCL samples. TCR transcripts, including complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequences, were assessed. In normal T cells, the CDR3 sequences were extremely diverse, without any clonotype representing more than 2% of the overall TCR population. Dominant clones could be identified in 65 out of 76 PTCL cases (86%) with adequate TCR transcript expression. In monoclonal cases, the dominant clone varied between 11% and 99% of TCRβ transcripts. No unique Vα or Vβ usage was observed. Small T-cell clones were often observed in T- and NK-cell tumors in a percentage higher than observed in reactive conditions. γ chain expression was very low in tumors expressing TCRαβ, but its expression level was high and clonality was detected in a TCRγδ expressing tumor. NK cell lymphoma (NKCL) did not express significant levels of TCR Vβ or Vγ genes. RNA-seq is a useful tool for detecting and characterizing clonal TCR rearrangements in PTCL.

  10. T cell receptor-dependent activation of mTOR signaling in T cells is mediated by Carma1 and MALT1, but not Bcl10.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristia S; Phong, Binh; Corey, Catherine; Cheng, Jing; Gorentla, Balachandra; Zhong, Xiaoping; Shiva, Sruti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2014-06-10

    Signaling to the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates diverse cellular processes, including protein translation, cellular proliferation, metabolism, and autophagy. Most models place Akt upstream of the mTOR complex, mTORC1; however, in T cells, Akt may not be necessary for mTORC1 activation. We found that the adaptor protein Carma1 [caspase recruitment domain (CARD)-containing membrane-associated protein 1] and at least one of its associated proteins, the paracaspase MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1), were required for optimal activation of mTOR in T cells in response to stimulation of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the co-receptor CD28. However, Bcl10, which binds to Carma1 and MALT1 to form a complex that mediates signals from the TCR to the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor κB), was not required. The catalytic activity of MALT1 was required for the proliferation of stimulated CD4+ T cells, but not for early TCR-dependent activation events. Consistent with an effect on mTOR, MALT1 activity was required for the increased metabolic flux in activated CD4+ T cells. Together, our data suggest that Carma1 and MALT1 play previously unappreciated roles in the activation of mTOR signaling in T cells after engagement of the TCR.

  11. C-C chemokine receptor type-4 transduction of T cells enhances interaction with dendritic cells, tumor infiltration and therapeutic efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Moritz; Grassmann, Simon; Chaloupka, Michael; Layritz, Patrick; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Rataj, Felicitas; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David; Kobold, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    T cell infiltration at the tumor site has been identified as a major predictor for the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. The chemokine C-C motif ligand 22 (CCL22) is highly expressed by immune cells in murine and human pancreatic cancer. Expression of its corresponding receptor, C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4), is restricted to regulatory T cells (Treg). We show that transduction of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) with CCR4 enhances their immigration into a pancreatic cancer model. Further, we show that binding of CCR4 with CCL22 strengthens the binding of T cell LFA-1 to dendritic cell (DC) ICAM-1 and increases CTL activation. In vivo, in a model of subcutaneous pancreatic cancer, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with CCR4-transduced CTL led to the eradication of established tumors in 40% of the mice. In conclusion, CCR4 overexpression in CTL is a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer (ACT).

  12. The Affinity of Elongated Membrane-Tethered Ligands Determines Potency of T Cell Receptor Triggering

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bing-Mae; Al-Aghbar, Mohammad Ameen; Lee, Chien-Hsin; Chang, Tien-Ching; Su, Yu-Cheng; Li, Ya-Chen; Chang, Shih-En; Chen, Chin-Chuan; Chung, Tsai-Hua; Liao, Yuan-Chun; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Roffler, Steve R.

    2017-01-01

    T lymphocytes are important mediators of adoptive immunity but the mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) triggering remains uncertain. The interspatial distance between engaged T cells and antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is believed to be important for topological rearrangement of membrane tyrosine phosphatases and initiation of TCR signaling. We investigated the relationship between ligand topology and affinity by generating a series of artificial APCs that express membrane-tethered anti-CD3 scFv with different affinities (OKT3, BC3, and 2C11) in addition to recombinant class I and II pMHC molecules. The dimensions of membrane-tethered anti-CD3 and pMHC molecules were progressively increased by insertion of different extracellular domains. In agreement with previous studies, elongation of pMHC molecules or low-affinity anti-CD3 scFv caused progressive loss of T cell activation. However, elongation of high-affinity ligands (BC3 and OKT3 scFv) did not abolish TCR phosphorylation and T cell activation. Mutation of key amino acids in OKT3 to reduce binding affinity to CD3 resulted in restoration of topological dependence on T cell activation. Our results show that high-affinity TCR ligands can effectively induce TCR triggering even at large interspatial distances between T cells and APCs. PMID:28740495

  13. Diversification of the antigen-specific T cell receptor repertoire after varicella zoster vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Qian; Cavanagh, Mary M.; Le Saux, Sabine; NamKoong, Hong; Kim, Chulwoo; Turgano, Emerson; Liu, Yi; Wang, Chen; Mackey, Sally; Swan, Gary E.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Olshen, Richard A.; Boyd, Scott D.; Weyand, Cornelia M.; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Diversity and size of the antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire are two critical determinants for successful control of chronic infection. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) that establishes latency during childhood is able to escape control mechanisms, in particular with increasing age. We examined the TCR diversity of VZV-reactive CD4 T cells in individuals older than 50 years by studying three identical twin pairs and three unrelated individuals before and after vaccination with live attenuated VZV. While all individuals had a small number of dominant T cell clones, the breadth of the VZV-specific repertoire differed markedly. A genetic influence was seen for the sharing of individual TCR sequences from antigen-reactive cells, but not for repertoire richness or the selection of dominant clones. VZV vaccination favored the expansion of infrequent VZV antigen-reactive TCRs including those from naïve T cells with lesser boosting of dominant T cell clones. Thus, vaccination does not reinforce the in vivo selection occurred during chronic infection but leads to a diversification of the VZV-reactive T cell repertoire. However, a single booster immunization seems insufficient to establish new clonal dominance. Our results suggest that repertoire analysis of antigen-specific TCRs can be an important read-out to assess whether a vaccination was able to generate memory cells in clonal sizes that are necessary for immune protection. PMID:27030598

  14. Lymphocyte toxicity and T cell receptor excision circles in workers exposed to benzene.

    PubMed

    Lan, Qing; Zhang, Luoping; Hakim, Fran; Shen, Min; Memon, Sarfraz; Li, Guilan; Vermeulen, Roel; Smith, Martyn T; Rappaport, Stephen M; Hayes, Richard; Linet, Martha; Yin, Songnian; Rothman, Nathaniel; Rabkin, Charles S

    2005-05-30

    We have previously reported that benzene decreases peripheral white blood cell and platelet counts and specifically lowers subsets of several blood cell types, including CD4+-T cells, B cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. Diminished thymus function has been implicated as a mechanism for CD4+-T cell loss in other conditions such as AIDS by assays of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs), a marker of naive T cells that have recently emigrated from the thymus. To evaluate alteration of thymic function as a mechanism for benzene's effects on CD4+-T cell counts, we measured total TREC levels in 45 benzene-exposed workers and 45 unexposed controls. There was no significant difference in TREC levels per 10(6) peripheral blood leukocytes in the benzene-exposed workers compared to the controls. Although our study does not rule out counterbalancing alterations of TREC levels in specific T cell subsets, benzene's lymphotoxicity does not appear to be mediated through diminished thymus function.

  15. Antitumor Effects of Chimeric Receptor Engineered Human T Cells Directed to Tumor Stroma

    PubMed Central

    Kakarla, Sunitha; Chow, Kevin KH; Mata, Melinda; Shaffer, Donald R; Song, Xiao-Tong; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Wang, Lisa L; Rowley, David R; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the principle component of the tumor-associated stroma, form a highly protumorigenic and immunosuppressive microenvironment that mediates therapeutic resistance. Co-targeting CAFs in addition to cancer cells may therefore augment the antitumor response. Fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP), a type 2 dipeptidyl peptidase, is expressed on CAFs in a majority of solid tumors making it an attractive immunotherapeutic target. To target FAP-positive CAFs in the tumor-associated stroma, we genetically modified T cells to express a FAP-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The resulting FAP-specific T cells recognized and killed FAP-positive target cells as determined by proinflammatory cytokine release and target cell lysis. In an established A549 lung cancer model, adoptive transfer of FAP-specific T cells significantly reduced FAP-positive stromal cells, with a concomitant decrease in tumor growth. Combining these FAP-specific T cells with T cells that targeted the EphA2 antigen on the A549 cancer cells themselves significantly enhanced overall antitumor activity and conferred a survival advantage compared to either alone. Our study underscores the value of co-targeting both CAFs and cancer cells to increase the benefits of T-cell immunotherapy for solid tumors. PMID:23732988

  16. Retroviral transformation in vitro of chicken T cells expressing either alpha/beta or gamma/delta T cell receptors by reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T.

    PubMed

    Marmor, M D; Benatar, T; Ratcliffe, M J

    1993-03-01

    Exposure of normal juvenile chicken bone marrow cells to the replication defective avian reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T (REV-T) (chicken syncytial virus [CSV]) in vitro resulted in the generation of transformed cell lines containing T cells. The transformed T cells derived from bone marrow included cells expressing either alpha/beta or gamma/delta T cell receptors (TCRs) in proportions roughly equivalent to the proportions of TCR-alpha/beta and TCR-gamma/delta T cells found in the normal bone marrow in vivo. Essentially all TCR-alpha/beta-expressing transformed bone marrow-derived T cells expressed CD8, whereas few, if any, expressed CD4. In contrast, among TCR-gamma/delta T cells, both CD8+ and CD8- cells were derived, all of which were CD4-. Exposure of ex vivo spleen cells to REV-T(CSV) yielded transformed polyclonal cell lines containing > 99% B cells. However, REV-T(CSV) infection of mitogen-activated spleen cells in vitro resulted in transformed populations containing predominantly T cells. This may be explained at least in part by in vitro activation resulting in dramatically increased levels of T cell REV-T(CSV) receptor expression. In contrast to REV-T(CSV)-transformed lines derived from normal bone marrow, transformed lines derived from activated spleen cells contained substantial numbers of CD4+ cells, all of which expressed TCR-alpha/beta. While transformed T cells derived from bone marrow were stable for extended periods of in vitro culture and were cloned from single cells, transformed T cells from activated spleen were not stable and could not be cloned. We have therefore dissociated the initial transformation of T cells with REV-T(CSV) from the requirements for long-term growth. These results provide the first demonstration of efficient in vitro transformation of chicken T lineage cells by REV-T(CSV). Since productive infection with REV-T(CSV) is not sufficient to promote long-term growth of transformed cells, these results further suggest

  17. Specificity, Privacy, and Degeneracy in the CD4 T Cell Receptor Repertoire Following Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuxin; Best, Katharine; Cinelli, Mattia; Heather, James M.; Reich-Zeliger, Shlomit; Shifrut, Eric; Friedman, Nir; Shawe-Taylor, John; Chain, Benny

    2017-01-01

    T cells recognize antigen using a large and diverse set of antigen-specific receptors created by a complex process of imprecise somatic cell gene rearrangements. In response to antigen-/receptor-binding-specific T cells then divide to form memory and effector populations. We apply high-throughput sequencing to investigate the global changes in T cell receptor sequences following immunization with ovalbumin (OVA) and adjuvant, to understand how adaptive immunity achieves specificity. Each immunized mouse contained a predominantly private but related set of expanded CDR3β sequences. We used machine learning to identify common patterns which distinguished repertoires from mice immunized with adjuvant with and without OVA. The CDR3β sequences were deconstructed into sets of overlapping contiguous amino acid triplets. The frequencies of these motifs were used to train the linear programming boosting (LPBoost) algorithm LPBoost to classify between TCR repertoires. LPBoost could distinguish between the two classes of repertoire with accuracies above 80%, using a small subset of triplet sequences present at defined positions along the CDR3. The results suggest a model in which such motifs confer degenerate antigen specificity in the context of a highly diverse and largely private set of T cell receptors. PMID:28450864

  18. Expression of chemokine receptors on peripheral blood T cells in children with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Szczepańska, Maria; Sędek, Łukasz; Makulska, Irena; Szprynger, Krystyna; Mazur, Bogdan; Bulsa, Joanna; Zwolińska, Danuta; Karpe, Jacek; Ziora, Katarzyna; Szczepański, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptors play a role in leukocyte recruitment, activation, and maintaining effector functions and regulate adaptive immune response and angiogenesis. The study aimed at flow cytometric analysis of T cell subsets with selected surface chemokine receptors (CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4) or receptor combination in peripheral blood of children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on hemodialysis (HD). The percentage of T lymphocytes with CD8 and combined CD28,CCR7 expression was higher in HD children. The percentage of T lymphocytes expressing CCR7, CD28,CCR7, and CXCR4,CD8 was increased in children on conservative treatment. Total number (tn) of CXCR4+ cells was reduced in children on hemodialysis. The tn of T CXCR3+ cells was lower in children on conservative treatment. During HD the percentage of T CD4+ cells was higher and of T CXCR3+ lymphocytes was lower after HD session as compared to 15 min of session duration. During HD tn of T cells with expression of CCR4, CCR5, CCR7, CXCR3, and CXCR4 was constant. The alteration of chemokine receptors expression in children with CKD occurs early in the development. Diminished expression of CXCR3, CXCR4 on T cells in patients with CKD on HD might result in impaired inflammatory response. Increased CCR7+ T cell percentage could be responsible for the alteration of migration of cells into secondary lymphatic organs.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for liver cancers, progress and obstacles.

    PubMed

    Li, Keyu; Lan, Yaliang; Wang, Jiabei; Liu, Lianxin

    2017-03-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells therapy has become the hottest topic of immunotherapy, as its great successes achieved in treating refractory hematological malignancies. These successes also paved the road to novel strategies of treating various solid tumors including liver cancer. Many specific proteins can be expressed aberrantly in liver cancers; therefore, a series of experimental and clinical researches exploring chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells and liver cancer are in progress, acquiring obvious antitumor effect and revealing its feasibility in treating liver cancer. However, lots of challenges and obstacles are emerging simultaneously, such as low infiltration, side effects, safety of chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells, and limited data of studies or clinical trials. Researchers have been working out many innovative ways to directly stroke these obstacles, theoretically or practically. This review focuses more on the progress and obstacles from chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells therapy to treat liver cancer, summarizing new breakthroughs in shooting those obstacles, meanwhile, hoping to provide enlightenment to this promising immunotherapeutic method.

  20. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    PubMed

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  1. Inducible T cell tyrosine kinase regulates actin-dependent cytoskeletal events induced by the T cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Grasis, Juris A; Browne, Cecille D; Tsoukas, Constantine D

    2003-04-15

    The tec family kinase, inducible T cell tyrosine kinase (Itk), is critical for both development and activation of T lymphocytes. We have found that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events. Expression of Src homology (SH) 2 domain mutant Itk transgenes into Jurkat T cells inhibits these events. Furthermore, Itk(-/-) murine T cells display significant defects in TCR/CD3-induced actin polymerization. In addition, Jurkat cells deficient in linker for activation of T cells expression, an adaptor critical for Itk activation, display impaired cytoskeletal events and expression of SH3 mutant Itk transgenes reconstitutes this impairment. Interestingly, expression of an Itk kinase-dead mutant transgene into Jurkat cells has no effect on cytoskeletal events. Collectively, these data suggest that Itk regulates TCR/CD3-induced actin-dependent cytoskeletal events, possibly in a kinase-independent fashion.

  2. Cooperative B7-1/2 (CD80/CD86) and B7-DC Costimulation of CD4+ T Cells Independent of the PD-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tahiro; Kennedy, Gene; Gorski, Kevin; Tsuchiya, Haruo; Koseki, Haruhiko; Azuma, Miyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Chen, Lieping; Powell, Jonathan; Pardoll, Drew; Housseau, Franck

    2003-01-01

    B7-DC is a recently discovered member of the B7 family that binds to PD-1 and is selectively expressed by dendritic cells (DCs). It has been shown to either costimulate or inhibit T cell responses. To assess the role of B7-DC in DC–T cell interactions, DCs from B7-DC knockout (KO) mice were generated and compared with DCs from wild-type (WT) and B7–1/B7–2 double KO mice. B7–1/B7–2–deficient DCs, while strongly diminished in their ability to stimulate naive CD4+ T cells, nonetheless retain partial activity. DCs from B7-DC KO mice are diminished in their ability to activate CD4+ T cells, demonstrating that DC-expressed B7-DC serves a predominantly stimulatory rather than inhibitory function in the initiation of T cell responses. B7-DC costimulates expression of CD40L with faster kinetics than B7–1 and displays potent synergy with B7–1 and B7–2 for T cell proliferation and cytokine production, indicating that these B7 family members work in concert to stimulate T cells. Finally, costimulation with B7-DC alone or in conjunction with B7–1 is PD-1 independent, indicating that B7-DC costimulates T cells via a second receptor. PMID:12847135

  3. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    PubMed

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Human mesenchymal stem cells target adhesion molecules and receptors involved in T cell extravasation.

    PubMed

    Benvenuto, Federica; Voci, Adriana; Carminati, Enrico; Gualandi, Francesca; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Uccelli, Antonio; Vergani, Laura

    2015-12-10

    Systemic delivery of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seems to be of benefit in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) sustained by migration of T cells across the brain blood barrier (BBB) and subsequent induction of inflammatory lesions into CNS. MSC have been found to modulate several effector functions of T cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of MSC on adhesion molecules and receptors on T cell surface that sustain their transendothelial migration. We used different co-culture methods combined with real-time PCR and flow cytometry to evaluate the expression both at the mRNA and at the plasma-membrane level of α4 integrin, β2 integrin, ICAM-1 and CXCR3. In parallel, we assessed if MSC are able to modulate expression of adhesion molecules on the endothelial cells that interact with T cells during their transendothelial migration. Our in vitro analyses revealed that MSC: (i) inhibit proliferation and activation of both peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and CD3(+)-selected lymphocytes through the release of soluble factors; (ii) exert suppressive effects on those surface molecules highly expressed by activated lymphocytes and involved in transendothelial migration; (iii) inhibit CXCL10-driven chemotaxis of CD3(+) cells; (iv) down-regulated expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the immunosuppressive effect of MSC does not exclusively depends on their anti-proliferative activity on T cells, but also on the impairment of leukocyte migratory potential through the inhibition of the adhesion molecules and receptors that are responsible for T cell trafficking across BBB. This could suggest a new mechanism through which MSC modulate T cell responses.

  5. T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes infiltrating murine tumors are not induced to express foxp3

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) that express the transcription factor Foxp3 are enriched within a broad range of murine and human solid tumors. The ontogeny of these Foxp3 Tregs - selective accumulation or proliferation of natural thymus-derived Treg (nTreg) or induced Treg (iTreg) converted in the periphery from naïve T cells - is not known. We used several strains of mice in which Foxp3 and EGFP are coordinately expressed to address this issue. We confirmed that Foxp3-positive CD4 T cells are enriched among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and splenocytes (SPL) in B16 murine melanoma-bearing C57BL/6 Foxp3EGFP mice. OT-II Foxp3EGFP mice are essentially devoid of nTreg, having transgenic CD4 T cells that recognize a class II-restricted epitope derived from ovalbumin; Foxp3 expression could not be detected in TIL or SPL in these mice when implanted with ovalbumin-transfected B16 tumor (B16-OVA). Likewise, TIL isolated from B16 tumors implanted in Pmel-1 Foxp3EGFP mice, whose CD8 T cells recognize a class I-restricted gp100 epitope, were not induced to express Foxp3. All of these T cell populations - wild-type CD4, pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 - could be induced in vitro to express Foxp3 by engagement of their T cell receptor (TCR) and exposure to transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). B16 melanoma produces TGFβ and both pmel CD8 and OTII CD4 express TCR that should be engaged within B16 and B16-OVA respectively. Thus, CD8 and CD4 transgenic T cells in these animal models failed to undergo peripheral induction of Foxp3 in a tumor microenvironment. PMID:22112546

  6. Coevolution of T-cell receptors with MHC and non-MHC ligands

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Caitlin C.; Luoma, Adrienne M.; Adams, Erin J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The structure and amino acid diversity of the T-cell receptor (TCR), similar in nature to that of Fab portions of antibodies, would suggest these proteins have a nearly infinite capacity to recognize antigen. Yet all currently defined native T cells expressing an α and β chain in their TCR can only sense antigen when presented in the context of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. This MHC molecule can be one of many that exist in vertebrates, presenting small peptide fragments, lipid molecules, or small molecule metabolites. Here we review the pattern of TCR recognition of MHC molecules throughout a broad sampling of species and T-cell lineages and also touch upon T cells that do not appear to require MHC presentation for their surveillance function. We review the diversity of MHC molecules and information on the corresponding T-cell lineages identified in divergent species. We also discuss TCRs with structural domains unlike that of conventional TCRs of mouse and human. By presenting this broad view of TCR sequence, structure, domain organization, and function, we seek to explore how this receptor has evolved across time and been selected for alternative antigen-recognition capabilities in divergent lineages. PMID:26284470

  7. Evaluation of bovine thymic function by measurement of signal joint T-cell receptor excision circles.

    PubMed

    Hisazumi, Rinnosuke; Kayumi, Miya; Zhang, Weidong; Kikukawa, Ryuji; Nasu, Tetuo; Yasuda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    A signal joint T-cell receptor excision circle (sjTREC) is a circular DNA produced by T-cell receptor α gene rearrangement in the thymus. Measurements of sjTREC values have been used to evaluate thymic function. We recently established a quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay of bovine sjTREC. In the present study, we used this QPCR assay to measure the sjTREC value in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and we then evaluated the relationships between sjTREC values and peripheral blood T-cell number, growth stage, gender, and meteorological season. The sjTREC value was highest at the neonatal stage, and its value subsequently decreased with age. On the other hand, the peripheral T-cell number increased with age. The sjTREC value in calves up to 50-days old was significantly higher for males than for females, suggesting that thymic function might differ by gender. In addition, the sjTREC value and the peripheral T-cell number were significantly higher in calves in the summer season than in calves in the winter season. These data suggest that bovine thymic function is highly variable and varies according to the growth stage, gender, and environmental factors such as air temperature or the UV index.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus-Specific T Cell Receptor mRNA-Engineered Human T Cells: Impact of Antigen Specificity on Functional Properties.

    PubMed

    Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Davanian, Haleh; Aleman, Soo; Pasetto, Anna; Frelin, Lars; Sällberg, Matti; Lohmann, Volker; Koh, Sarene; Bertoletti, Antonio; Chen, Margaret

    2017-05-01

    Therapy with genetically modified autologous T cells has shown great promise in cancer therapy. For an efficient control of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, cytotoxic T cells (CTL) are pivotal, but persistence of activated T cells may lead to liver toxicity. Here, anti-HCV T cell receptors (TCRs) recognizing the HCV nonstructural (NS) NS3 or NS5 viral peptide target were examined by mRNA transfection of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) derived from healthy donors as well as chronically infected HCV patients. Immunological analysis shows that while the CTLs expressing the NS5-specific TCR reduced HCV RNA replication by a noncytotoxic mechanism, the NS3-specific TCR-redirected CTLs were polyfunctional and inhibited HCV RNA replication through antigen-specific cytotoxicity. Transcriptome signatures from these two types of CTL responses revealed uniquely expressed gene clusters upon encountering hepatoma target cells presenting endogenously expressed HCV proteins. The NS3 TCR induced a rapid expression of apoptotic signaling pathways and formation of embryonic gene clusters, whereas the NS5A TCR activation induced extended proliferative and metabolic pathways as the HCV target cells survived. Our results provide detailed insights into basic HCV T cell immunology and have clinical relevance for redirecting T cells to target virally infected hepatoma cells.IMPORTANCE Due to the protective ability of HCV-specific T cells and the hepatotoxic potential that they possess, there is a great need for the understanding of the functional aspects of HCV-specific T cells. To circumvent the low level of precursor frequency in patients, we engineered primary CD8(+) T cells by mRNA TCR vectors to confer HCV specificity to new T cells. HCV TCRs that differ in antigen specificity and polyfunctionality were examined. mRNA TCR engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors or chronically infected HCV patients resulted in strikingly high levels of HCV TCR

  9. Chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillerdal, Victoria; Essand, Magnus

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy was selected as the Breakthrough of the Year 2013 by the editors of Science, in part because of the successful treatment of refractory hematological malignancies with adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells. Effective treatment of B cell leukemia may pave the road to future treatment of solid tumors, using similar approaches. The prostate expresses many unique proteins and, since the prostate gland is a dispensable organ, CAR T cells can potentially be used to target these tissue-specific antigens. However, the location and composition of prostate cancer metastases complicate the task of treating these tumors. It is therefore likely that more sophisticated CAR T cell approaches are going to be required for prostate metastasis than for B cell malignancies. Two main challenges that need to be resolved are how to increase the migration and infiltration of CAR T cells into prostate cancer bone metastases and how to counteract the immunosuppressive microenvironment found in bone lesions. Inclusion of homing (chemokine) receptors in CAR T cells may improve their recruitment to bone metastases, as may antibody-based combination therapies to normalize the tumor vasculature. Optimal activation of CAR T cells through the introduction of multiple costimulatory domains would help to overcome inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. Likewise, combination therapy with checkpoint inhibitors that can reduce tumor immunosuppression may help improve efficacy. Other elegant approaches such as induced expression of immune stimulatory cytokines upon target recognition may also help to recruit other effector immune cells to metastatic sites. Although toxicities are difficult to predict in prostate cancer, severe on-target/off-tumor toxicities have been observed in clinical trials with use of CAR T cells against hematological malignancies; therefore, the choice of the target antigen is going to be crucial. This review

  10. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    PubMed

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  11. The Pathogen Recognition Receptor NOD2 Regulates Human FOXP3+ T Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Meher K.; Midtling, Emilie H.; Svingen, Phyllis A.; Xiong, Yuning; Bell, Michael P.; Tung, Jeanne; Smyrk, Tom; Egan, Larry J.; Faubion, William A.

    2013-01-01

    The expression of pathogen recognition receptors in human FOXP3+ T regulatory cells is established, yet the function of these receptors is currently obscure. In the process of studying the function of both peripheral and lamina propria FOXP3+ lymphocytes in patients with the human inflammatory bowel disease Crohn’s disease, we observed a clear deficiency in the quantity of FOXP3+ lymphocytes in patients with disease-associated polymorphisms in the pathogen recognition receptor gene NOD2. Subsequently, we determined that the NOD2 ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), activates NF-κB in primary human FOXP3+ T cells. This activation is functionally relevant, as MDP-stimulated human FOXP3+ T cells are protected from death receptor Fas-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, apoptosis protection was not evident in MDP-stimulated FOXP3+ T cells isolated from a patient with the disease-associated polymorphism. Thus, we propose that one function of pathogen recognition receptors in human T regulatory cells is the protection against death receptor-mediated apoptosis in a Fas ligand-rich environment, such as that of the inflamed intestinal subepithelial space. PMID:20483763

  12. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  13. Genomic organization of the mouse T-cell receptor beta-chain gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, E; Barth, R K; Hood, L

    1987-01-01

    We have combined three different methods, deletion mapping of T-cell lines, field-inversion gel electrophoresis, and the restriction mapping of a cosmid clone, to construct a physical map of the murine T-cell receptor beta-chain gene family. We have mapped 19 variable (V beta) gene segments and the two clusters of diversity (D beta) and joining (J beta) gene segments and constant (C beta) genes. These members of the beta-chain gene family span approximately equal to 450 kilobases of DNA, excluding one potential gap in the DNA fragment alignments. Images PMID:3035555

  14. Pappalysin-1 T cell receptor transgenic allo-restricted T cells kill Ewing sarcoma in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Andreas; Thiede, Melanie; Alba Rubio, Rebeca; Richter, Günther H. S.; Kirchner, Thomas; Busch, Dirk H.; Burdach, Stefan; Thiel, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPPA), also known as pappalysin, is a member of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. PAPPA acts as a protease, cleaving IGF inhibitors, i.e., IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), thereby setting free IGFs. The insulin/IGF-axis is involved in cancer in general and in Ewing sarcoma (ES) in particular. ES is a highly malignant bone tumor characterized by early metastatic spread. PAPPA is associated with various cancers. It is overexpressed and required for proliferation in ES. PAPPA also stimulates normal bone growth. We isolated HLA-A*02:01+/peptide-restricted T cells from A*02:01− healthy donors directed against PAPPA, generated by priming with A*02:01+ PAPPA peptide loaded dendritic cells. After TCR identification, retrovirally TCR transduced CD8+ T cells were assessed for their in vitro specificity and in vivo efficacy in human ES bearing Rag2−/−γc−/− mice. Engraftment in mice and tumor infiltration of TCR transgenic T cells in the mice was evaluated. The TCR transgenic T cell clone PAPPA-2G6 demonstrated specific reactivity toward HLA-A*02:01+/PAPPA+ ES cell lines. We furthermore detected circulating TCR transgenic T cells in the blood in Rag2−/−γc−/− mice and in vivo engraftment in bone marrow. Tumor growth in mice with xenografted ES was significantly reduced after treatment with PAPPA-2G6 TCR transgenic T cells in contrast to controls. Tumors of treated mice revealed tumor-infiltrating PAPPA-2G6 TCR transgenic T cells. In summary, we demonstrate that PAPPA is a first-rate target for TCR-based immunotherapy of ES. PMID:28344885

  15. Single-cell TCRseq: paired recovery of entire T-cell alpha and beta chain transcripts in T-cell receptors from single-cell RNAseq.

    PubMed

    Redmond, David; Poran, Asaf; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-07-27

    Accurate characterization of the repertoire of the T-cell receptor (TCR) alpha and beta chains is critical to understanding adaptive immunity. Such characterization has many applications across such fields as vaccine development and response, clone-tracking in cancer, and immunotherapy. Here we present a new methodology called single-cell TCRseq (scTCRseq) for the identification and assembly of full-length rearranged V(D)J T-cell receptor sequences from paired-end single-cell RNA sequencing reads. The method allows accurate identification of the V(D)J rearrangements for each individual T-cell and has the novel ability to recover paired alpha and beta segments. Source code is available at https://github.com/ElementoLab/scTCRseq .

  16. Quantifying signaling-induced reorientation of T cell receptors during immunological synapse formation

    PubMed Central

    Moss, William C.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Davis, Mark M.; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2002-01-01

    Productive T cell recognition of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is normally accompanied by the formation of a cell–cell contact called the “immunological synapse.” Our understanding of the steps leading up to this formation has been limited by the absence of tools for analyzing 3D surfaces and surface distributions as they change over time. Here we use a 3D fluorescence quantitation method to show that T cell receptors are recruited in bulk within the first minute after the onset of activation and with velocities ranging from 0.04 to 0.1 μm/s; a speed significantly greater than unrestricted diffusion. Our method reveals a second feature of this reorientation: a conformational change as the T cell pushes more total membrane into the interface creating a larger contact area for additional receptors. Analysis of individual T cell receptor velocities using a single-particle tracking method confirms our velocity measurement. This method should permit the quantitation of other dynamic membrane events and the associated movement of cell-surface molecules. PMID:12415110

  17. A phorbol ester response element within the human T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, H M; Wotton, D; Gegonne, A; Ghysdael, J; Wang, S; Speck, N A; Owen, M J

    1992-01-01

    The activity of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene enhancer is increased by activators of the protein kinase C pathway during T-cell activation. Analysis of mutant enhancer constructs identified two elements, beta E2 and beta E3, conferring phorbol ester inducibility. Multimerized beta E2 acted in isolation as a phorbol ester-responsive element. Both beta E2 and beta E3, which contain a consensus Ets-binding site, were shown to bind directly to the product of the c-ets-1 protooncogene. Both regions also bound a second factor, core-binding factor. Mutation of the beta E2 Ets site abolished the inducibility of the beta E2 multimer. beta E2 and beta E3 Ets site mutations also profoundly affected activity and inducibility of the enhancer. In contrast, enhancer activity but not its inducibility was affected by mutation of the beta E2 core-binding factor site. Cotransfection studies showed that Ets-1 specifically repressed activity of the multimerized beta E2 element and the complete T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer. These data show that the T-cell receptor beta-chain enhancer responds to protein kinase C-mediated activation signals via a functional domain, composed of two elements, which contains binding sites for Ets transcription factors and which is negatively regulated by Ets-1. Images PMID:1409722

  18. Surface expression of functional T cell receptor chains formed by interlocus recombination on human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Structural diversity of lymphocyte antigen receptors (the immunoglobulin [Ig] of B cells and the alpha/beta or gamma/delta T cell receptor [TCR] of T cells) is generated through somatic rearrangements of V, D, and J gene segments. Classically, these recombination events involve gene segments from the same Ig or TCR locus. However, occurrence of "trans" rearrangements between distinct loci has also been described, although in no instances was the surface expression of the corresponding protein under normal physiological conditions demonstrated. Here we show that hybrid TCR genes generated by trans rearrangement between V gamma and (D) J beta elements are translated into functional antigen receptor chains, paired with TCR alpha chains. Like classical alpha/beta T cells, cells expressing these hybrid TCR chains express either CD4 or CD8 coreceptors and are frequently alloreactive. These results have several implications in terms of T cell repertoire selection and relationships between TCR structure and specificity. First, they suggest that TCR alloreactivity is determined by the repertoire selection processes operating during lymphocyte development rather than by structural features specific to V alpha V beta regions. Second, they suggest the existence of close structural relationships between gamma/delta and alpha/beta TCR and more particularly, between V gamma and V beta regions. Finally, since a significant fraction of PBL (at least 1/10(4)) expressed hybrid TCR chains on their surface, these observations indicate that trans rearrangements significantly contribute to the combinatorial diversification of the peripheral immune repertoire. PMID:7964454

  19. Biological characterization and partial purification of an idiotype and antigen specific T cell lymphokine

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    An idiotype (Id) and antigen-specific T cell lymphokine has been partially purified and characterized biologically. This lymphokine appears to be derived from the T helper/sub 2/ (Th/sub 2/) lymphocyte and plays a key role in the optimal expression of the cross-reactive idiotype (CRI/sup +/-TMA) associated with both anti-phenyltrimethylammonium (TMA) and anti-trinitrophenyl (TNP) antibodies. An apparent molecular weight of 30-35 Kd was determined using molecular sieve chromatography. Upon SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) however, the biological activity migrated to 68 Kd as well as 35 Kd. Equivalent amounts of activity are found in both SDS-PAGE fractions. The Th/sub 2/F has two isoelectric points, 5.7 and 6.3, although 99% of the activity is found at pH 6.3. The Id-enhancing factor is an acid stable and heat labile protein. As in the case for the expression of serum CRI-TMA, the production of the Th/sub 2/F is linked to the allotype (Igh-1/sup e/) of the heavy chain locus. Using Con A Sns from various genetically distinct strains of mice, it has been shown that the production of the Th/sub 2/F is allotype-linked, and works across major histocompatibility (MHC) barriers. Isolation of Th/sub 2/F has been carried out using a combination of affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The partially purified material has been /sup 125/I labeled and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and flat bed isoelectric focusing. Two radiolabeled proteins which could be the Th/sub 2/F were identified.

  20. T-Cell Receptor (TCR) Clonotype-Specific Differences in Inhibitory Activity of HIV-1 Cytotoxic T-Cell Clones Is Not Mediated by TCR Alone.

    PubMed

    Flerin, Nina C; Chen, Huabiao; Glover, Tynisha D; Lamothe, Pedro A; Zheng, Jian Hua; Fang, Justin W; Ndhlovu, Zaza M; Newell, Evan W; Davis, Mark M; Walker, Bruce D; Goldstein, Harris

    2017-03-15

    Functional analysis of T-cell responses in HIV-infected individuals has indicated that virus-specific CD8(+) T cells with superior antiviral efficacy are well represented in HIV-1 controllers but are rare or absent in HIV-1 progressors. To define the role of individual T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes in differential antiviral CD8(+) T-cell function, we performed detailed functional and mass cytometric cluster analysis of multiple CD8(+) T-cell clones recognizing the identical HLA-B*2705-restricted HIV-1 epitope KK10 (KRWIILGLNK). Effective and ineffective CD8(+) T-cell clones segregated based on responses to HIV-1-infected and peptide-loaded target cells. Following cognate peptide stimulation, effective HIV-specific clones displayed significantly more rapid TCR signal propagation, more efficient initial lytic granule release, and more sustained nonlytic cytokine and chemokine secretion than ineffective clones. To evaluate the TCR clonotype contribution to CD8(+) T-cell function, we cloned the TCR α and β chain genes from one effective and two ineffective CD8(+) T-cell clones from an elite controller into TCR-expressing lentivectors. We show that Jurkat/MA cells and primary CD8(+) T cells transduced with lentivirus expressing TCR from one of the ineffective clones exhibited a level of activation by cognate peptide and inhibition of in vitro HIV-1 infection, respectively, that were comparable to those of the effective clonotype. Taken together, these data suggest that the potent antiviral capacity of some HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells is a consequence of factors in addition to TCR sequence that modulate functionality and contribute to the increased antiviral capacity of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in elite controllers to inhibit HIV infection.IMPORTANCE The greater ex vivo antiviral inhibitory activity of CD8(+) T cells from elite controllers than from HIV-1 progressors supports the crucial role of effective HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in controlling HIV-1

  1. Dominant and shared T cell receptor beta chain variable regions of T cells inducing synovial hyperplasia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mima, T; Ohshima, S; Sasai, M; Nishioka, K; Shimizu, M; Murata, N; Yasunami, R; Matsuno, H; Suemura, M; Kishimoto, T; Saeki, Y

    1999-09-16

    Previously, we demonstrated the presence of at least two distinct subpopulations of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) employing a cell-transfer experiment using severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. One group of patients, whose T cells derived from the rheumatoid joints, induced synovial hyperplasia (SH) in the SCID mice (the positive group). The other group did not display the induction of SH (the negative group). TCR/Vbeta gene usage analysis indicated that some dominant T cell subpopulations were oligoclonally expanding only in the rheumatoid joints, and not in the periphery of the patients of the positive group. Moreover, these T cell subpopulations were not seen in the joints of patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. In addition, the preferential uses of certain TCR/Vbetas (Vbeta8, Vbeta12, Vbeta13, and Vbeta14) genes were demonstrated in these T cells. In this study, to investigate whether these T cells are driven by a certain antigen(s), the third complementarity determining regions (CDR3s) of TCR/Vbeta, especially Vbeta8 and Vbeta14 PCR products, were cloned and sequenced. As a result, a dominant CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was found in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of a patient (Patient 1) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. The identical CDR3 sequence also predominated in Vbeta14+ T cells from the rheumatoid joint of another patient (Patient 7) of the positive group with a Vbeta14 skew. In addition, in the patients (Patients 4, 7, 8) of the positive group with a Vbeta8 skew, other dominant CDR3 sequences, CASS-ENS-YEQ and CASS-LTEP-DTQ, were found as in the case of Vbeta14. However, no identical CDR3 sequences were detected dominantly in the joints of the patients in the negative group or in non-RA patients. A Vbeta14+ T cell clone (TCL), named G3, with the identical CDR3 sequence, CASS-PRERAT-YEQ, was isolated successfully from Patient 1, and cell transfer of G3 with autologous irradiated peripheral

  2. Transduction of human T cells with a novel T-cell receptor confers anti-HCV reactivity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yeuying; Moxley, Kelly M; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Hughes, Michael G; Liu, Tongxin; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Rosen, Hugo R; Nishimura, Michael I

    2010-07-29

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major public health concern, with no effective vaccines currently available and 3% of the world's population being infected. Despite the existence of both B- and T-cell immunity in HCV-infected patients, chronic viral infection and HCV-related malignancies progress. Here we report the identification of a novel HCV TCR from an HLA-A2-restricted, HCV NS3:1073-1081-reactive CTL clone isolated from a patient with chronic HCV infection. We characterized this HCV TCR by expressing it in human T cells and analyzed the function of the resulting HCV TCR-transduced cells. Our results indicate that both the HCV TCR-transduced CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells recognized the HCV NS3:1073-1081 peptide-loaded targets and HCV(+) hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) in a polyfunctional manner with cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, and TNF-alpha) production as well as cytotoxicity. Tumor cell recognition by HCV TCR transduced CD8(-) Jurkat cells and CD4(+) PBL-derived T cells indicated this TCR was CD8-independent, a property consistent with other high affinity TCRs. HCV TCR-transduced T cells may be promising for the treatment of patients with chronic HCV infections.

  3. Transduction of Human T Cells with a Novel T-Cell Receptor Confers Anti-HCV Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Yeuying; Moxley, Kelly M.; Golden-Mason, Lucy; Hughes, Michael G.; Liu, Tongxin; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Rosen, Hugo R.; Nishimura, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a major public health concern, with no effective vaccines currently available and 3% of the world's population being infected. Despite the existence of both B- and T-cell immunity in HCV-infected patients, chronic viral infection and HCV-related malignancies progress. Here we report the identification of a novel HCV TCR from an HLA-A2-restricted, HCV NS3:1073–1081-reactive CTL clone isolated from a patient with chronic HCV infection. We characterized this HCV TCR by expressing it in human T cells and analyzed the function of the resulting HCV TCR-transduced cells. Our results indicate that both the HCV TCR-transduced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognized the HCV NS3:1073–1081 peptide-loaded targets and HCV+ hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) in a polyfunctional manner with cytokine (IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α) production as well as cytotoxicity. Tumor cell recognition by HCV TCR transduced CD8− Jurkat cells and CD4+ PBL-derived T cells indicated this TCR was CD8-independent, a property consistent with other high affinity TCRs. HCV TCR-transduced T cells may be promising for the treatment of patients with chronic HCV infections. PMID:20686664

  4. Use of anti-idiotypic antibodies to identify a receptor for the T-cell I-J determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Zupko, K; Waltenbaugh, C; Diamond, B

    1985-01-01

    In order to identify the molecule(s) interacting with the I-J determinant on suppressor T cells, we have generated two anti-idiotypic sera: one to monoclonal anti-I-Jd antibody and one to monoclonal anti-I-Jk antibody. These antisera specifically block suppressor T-cell function in a genetically restricted manner and have no effect on helper T-cell activation. Both recognize a marker on primary monocytes and B cells but not on T cells. A myeloma cell line bearing this marker has been identified. Therefore, these antisera may recognize a molecule on cells interacting with suppressor T cells that is involved in mediating suppressor T-cell activity. The relationship between the T-cell I-J determinant and the molecule identified by the anti-idiotype may be similar to the relationship between the receptor on helper T cells and Ia molecules. Images PMID:2932739

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor in T cells mediates protection from autoimmunity in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Engler, Jan Broder; Kursawe, Nina; Solano, María Emilia; Patas, Kostas; Wehrmann, Sabine; Heckmann, Nina; Lühder, Fred; Reichardt, Holger M.; Arck, Petra Clara; Gold, Stefan M.

    2017-01-01

    Pregnancy is one of the strongest inducers of immunological tolerance. Disease activity of many autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS) is temporarily suppressed by pregnancy, but little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here, we investigated the endocrine regulation of conventional and regulatory T cells (Tregs) during reproduction. In vitro, we found the pregnancy hormone progesterone to robustly increase Treg frequencies via promiscuous binding to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in T cells. In vivo, T-cell–specific GR deletion in pregnant animals undergoing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the animal model of MS, resulted in a reduced Treg increase and a selective loss of pregnancy-induced protection, whereas reproductive success was unaffected. Our data imply that steroid hormones can shift the immunological balance in favor of Tregs via differential engagement of the GR in T cells. This newly defined mechanism confers protection from autoimmunity during pregnancy and represents a potential target for future therapy. PMID:28049829

  6. Rebalancing immune specificity and function in cancer by T-cell receptor gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Udyavar, Akshata; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-specific T lymphocytes has demonstrated clinical benefit in some cancers, particularly melanoma. Yet isolating and expanding tumor-specific cells from patients is challenging, and there is limited ability to control T cell affinity and response characteristics. T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy, in which T lymphocytes for immunotherapy are redirected using introduced rearranged TCR, has emerged as an important alternative. Successful TCR gene therapy requires consideration of a number of issues, including TCR specificity and affinity, optimal gene therapy constructs, types of T cells administered, and the survival and activity of the modified cells. In this review, we highlight the rationale for and experience with, as well as new approaches to enhance TCR gene therapy. PMID:20680493

  7. Inhibition of T cell receptor signaling by cholesterol sulfate, a naturally occurring derivative of membrane cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Beck-García, Katharina; Zorzin, Carina; Schamel, Wolfgang W. A.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Most adaptive immune responses require the activation of specific T cells through the T cell antigen receptor–CD3 complex (TCR). Here we show that cholesterol sulfate (CS), a naturally occurring analog of cholesterol, inhibits CD3 ITAM phosphorylation, a crucial first step in T cell activation. Biochemical studies show that CS disrupted TCR multimers, apparently by displacing cholesterol, known to bind TCRβ. Moreover, CS-deficient mice displayed a heightened sensitivity to a self-antigen, whereas increasing CS content by intrathymic injection inhibited thymic selection, indicating that this molecule is an intrinsic regulator of thymocyte development. These results reveal a regulatory role for CS in TCR signaling and thymic selection, highlighting the importance of the membrane microenvironment in modulating cell surface receptor activation. PMID:27213689

  8. An intermolecular FRET sensor detects the dynamics of T cell receptor clustering.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanqing; Pandzic, Elvis; Nicovich, Philip R; Yamamoto, Yui; Kwiatek, Joanna; Pageon, Sophie V; Benda, Aleš; Rossy, Jérémie; Gaus, Katharina

    2017-04-28

    Clustering of the T-cell receptor (TCR) is thought to initiate downstream signalling. However, the detection of protein clustering with high spatial and temporal resolution remains challenging. Here we establish a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensor, named CliF, which reports intermolecular associations of neighbouring proteins in live cells. A key advantage of the single-chain FRET sensor is that it can be combined with image correlation spectroscopy (ICS), single-particle tracking (SPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We test the sensor with a light-sensitive actuator that induces protein aggregation upon radiation with blue light. When applied to T cells, the sensor reveals that TCR triggering increases the number of dense TCR-CD3 clusters. Further, we find a correlation between cluster movement within the immunological synapse and cluster density. In conclusion, we develop a sensor that allows us to map the dynamics of protein clustering in live T cells.

  9. The Promise of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Engineered T cells in the Treatment of Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Nagle, Sarah J.; Garfall, Alfred L.; Stadtmauer, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory hematologic malignancies have a very poor prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are emerging as a powerful therapy in this setting. Early clinical trials of genetically modified T cells for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have shown high complete response rates in patients with few therapeutic options. Exploration is ongoing for other hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma (MM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). At the same time, the design and production of CAR T cells is being advanced so that this therapy can be more widely utilized. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) and neurotoxicity are common, but they are treatable and fully reversible. This review will review currently available data as well as future developments and challenges in the field. PMID:26841014

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor deficiency in T cells suppresses the development of collagen-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nakahama, Taisuke; Kimura, Akihiro; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chinen, Ichino; Hanieh, Hamza; Nohara, Keiko; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Kishimoto, Tadamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis have not been elucidated. Here, we show that Ahr deficiency ameliorated collagen-induced arthritis, a mouse model of RA. Collagen-immunized Ahr KO mice showed decreased serum levels of such proinflammatory cytokines as IL-1β and IL-6. The Th17 and Th1 cell populations in lymph nodes from these mice decreased and increased, respectively, whereas the percentage of regulatory T cells was unchanged. Interestingly, a lack of Ahr specifically in T cells significantly suppressed collagen-induced arthritis development, whereas Ahr deficiency in macrophages had no effect. These finding indicate that the development of experimental autoimmune arthritis depends on the presence of Ahr in T cells, and that Th1/Th17 balance may be particularly important for this process. PMID:21825138

  11. Themis controls thymocyte selection through regulation of T cell receptor-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guo; Vallée, Sébastien; Rybakin, Vasily; McGuire, Marielena V.; Ampudia, Jeanette; Brockmeyer, Claudia; Salek, Mogjiborahman; Fallen, Paul R.; Hoerter, John A.H.; Munshi, Anil; Huang, Yina H.; Hu, Jianfang; Fox, Howard S.; Sauer, Karsten; Acuto, Oreste; Gascoigne, Nicholas R.J.

    2009-01-01

    Themis (Thymocyte expressed molecule involved in selection), a member of a family of proteins with unknown functions, is highly conserved among vertebrates. Here we found that Themis is expressed in high amounts in thymocytes between the pre-T cell receptor (TCR) and positive selection checkpoints, and in low amounts in mature T cells. Themis-deficient thymocytes exhibit defective positive selection, which results in reduced numbers of mature thymocytes. Negative selection is also impaired in Themis-deficient mice. A higher percentage of Themis-deficient T cells exhibit CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory and CD62LloCD44hi memory phenotypes than in wild-type mice. Supporting a role for Themis in TCR signaling, this protein is phosphorylated quickly after TCR stimulation, and is needed for optimal TCR-driven Ca2+ mobilization and Erk activation. PMID:19597499

  12. Identification of putative human T cell receptor delta complementary DNA clones

    SciTech Connect

    Hata, S.; Brenner, M.B.; Krangel, M.S.

    1987-10-30

    A novel T cell receptor (TCR) subunit termed TCR delta, associated with TCY ..gamma.. and CD3 polypeptides, were recently found on a subpopulation of human T lymphocytes. T cell-specific complementary DNA clones present in a human TCR..gamma..delta T cell complementary DNA library were obtained and characterized in order to identify candidate clones encoding TCR delta. One cross-hybridizing group of clones detected transcripts that are expressed in lymphocytes bearing TCR ..gamma..delta but not in other T lymphocytes and are encoded by genes that are rearranged in TCR ..gamma..delta lymphocytes but deleted in other T lymphocytes. Their sequences indicate homology to the variable, joining, and constant elements of other TCR and immunoglobulin genes. These characteristics are strong evidence that the complementary DNA clones encode TCR delta.

  13. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  14. A new way to generate cytolytic tumor-specific T cells: electroporation of RNA coding for a T cell receptor into T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Schaft, Niels; Dörrie, Jan; Müller, Ina; Beck, Verena; Baumann, Stefanie; Schunder, Tanja; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold

    2006-09-01

    Effective T cell receptor (TCR) transfer until now required stable retroviral transduction. However, retroviral transduction poses the threat of irreversible genetic manipulation of autologous cells. We, therefore, used optimized RNA transfection for transient manipulation. The transfection efficiency, using EGFP RNA, was >90%. The electroporation of primary T cells, isolated from blood, with TCR-coding RNA resulted in functional cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) (>60% killing at an effector to target ratio of 20:1) with the same HLA-A2/gp100-specificity as the parental CTL clone. The TCR-transfected T cells specifically recognized peptide-pulsed T2 cells, or dendritic cells electroporated with gp100-coding RNA, in an IFNgamma-secretion assay and retained this ability, even after cryopreservation, over 3 days. Most importantly, we show here for the first time that the electroporated T cells also displayed cytotoxicity, and specifically lysed peptide-loaded T2 cells and HLA-A2+/gp100+ melanoma cells over a period of at least 72 h. Peptide-titration studies showed that the lytic efficiency of the RNA-transfected T cells was similar to that of retrovirally transduced T cells, and approximated that of the parental CTL clone. Functional TCR transfer by RNA electroporation is now possible without the disadvantages of retroviral transduction, and forms a new strategy for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  15. Immunochemical techniques. Part K: In Vitro models of B and T cell functions and lymphoid cell receptors

    SciTech Connect

    DiSabato, G

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 55 papers. Some of the paper titles are: Isolation of Genes Encoding Proteins of Immunological Importance; Human Interleukin 2 Receptor; Clq Receptor; Murine T Cell Clones; Cloning of Human Alloreactive T Cells; Direct and Indirect Plaque Assays; and Growth of B Cell Colonies in Double-Layer Agar Cultures.

  16. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibits expression of receptors for T cell regulatory cytokines and their downstream signaling in mouse CD4+ T cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We previously showed a suppressive effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on T cell cycling and expansion as well as a paradoxical effect on IL-2 levels (up-regulating) and IL-2 receptor (IL-2R)alpha expression (down-regulating). Thus, in the current study we tested the hypothesis that EGCG aff...

  17. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Automated Manufacturing of Potent CD20-Directed Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Lock, Dominik; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Drechsel, Katharina; Barth, Carola; Mauer, Daniela; Schaser, Thomas; Kolbe, Carolin; Al Rawashdeh, Wael; Brauner, Janina; Hardt, Olaf; Pflug, Natali; Holtick, Udo; Borchmann, Peter; Assenmacher, Mario; Kaiser, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    The clinical success of gene-engineered T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), as manifested in several clinical trials for the treatment of B cell malignancies, warrants the development of a simple and robust manufacturing procedure capable of reducing to a minimum the challenges associated with its complexity. Conventional protocols comprise many open handling steps, are labor intensive, and are difficult to upscale for large numbers of patients. Furthermore, extensive training of personnel is required to avoid operator variations. An automated current Good Manufacturing Practice-compliant process has therefore been developed for the generation of gene-engineered T cells. Upon installation of the closed, single-use tubing set on the CliniMACS Prodigy™, sterile welding of the starting cell product, and sterile connection of the required reagents, T cells are magnetically enriched, stimulated, transduced using lentiviral vectors, expanded, and formulated. Starting from healthy donor (HD) or lymphoma or melanoma patient material (PM), the robustness and reproducibility of the manufacturing of anti-CD20 specific CAR T cells were verified. Independent of the starting material, operator, or device, the process consistently yielded a therapeutic dose of highly viable CAR T cells. Interestingly, the formulated product obtained with PM was comparable to that of HD with respect to cell composition, phenotype, and function, even though the starting material differed significantly. Potent antitumor reactivity of the produced anti-CD20 CAR T cells was shown in vitro as well as in vivo. In summary, the automated T cell transduction process meets the requirements for clinical manufacturing that the authors intend to use in two separate clinical trials for the treatment of melanoma and B cell lymphoma.

  19. Insights into the Relationship between Toll Like Receptors and Gamma Delta T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Asif Amin; Patil, Rushikesh Sudam; Chiplunkar, Shubhada Vivek

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is an important aspect of cancer biology that contributes to tumor initiation, tumor progression and responses to therapy. The composition and characteristics of the tumor microenvironment vary widely and are important in determining the anti-tumor immune response. Successful immunization requires activation of both innate and adaptive immunity. Generally, immune system is compromised in patients with cancer due to immune suppression, loss of tumor antigen expression and dysfunction of antigen presenting cells (APC). Thus, therapeutic immunization leading to cancer regression remains a significant challenge. Certain cells of the immune system, including dendritic cells (DCs) and gamma delta (γδ) T cells are capable of driving potent anti-tumor responses. The property of MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, high potential of cytokine release, tissue tropism and early activation in infections and malignant disease makes γδ T cells as an emerging candidate for immunotherapy. Various strategies are being developed to enhance anti-tumor immune responses of γδ T cells and DCs one of them is the use of novel adjuvants like toll like receptors (TLR) agonists, which enhance γδ T cell function directly or through DC activation, which has ability to prime γδ T cells. TLR agonists are being used clinically either alone or in combination with tumor antigens and has shown initial success in both enhancing immune responses and eliciting anti-tumor activity. TLR activated γδ T cells and DCs nurture each other’s activation. This provides a potent base for first line of defense and manipulation of the adaptive response against pathogens and cancer. The available data provides a strong rationale for initiating combinatorial therapy for the treatment of diseases and this review will summarize the application of adjuvants (TLRs) for boosting immune response of γδ T cells to treat cancer and infectious diseases and their use in combinatorial therapy

  20. NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive T cell receptors exhibit diverse therapeutic capability

    PubMed Central

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Conrad, Heinke; Krönig, Holger; Gelfort, Haike; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been used as a target for different immunotherapies like vaccinations and adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, as it is expressed in various tumor types and has limited expression in normal cells. The in vitro generation of T cells with defined antigen specificity by T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an established method to create cells for immunotherapy. However, an extensive characterization of TCR which are candidates for treatment of patients is crucial for successful therapies. The TCR has to be efficiently expressed, their affinity to the desired antigen should be high enough to recognize low amounts of endogenously processed peptides on tumor cells, and the TCR should not be cross-reactive to other antigens. We characterized three NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones which were generated by different approaches of T cell priming (autologous, allogeneic), and transferred their TCR into donor T cells for more extensive evaluations. Although one TCR most efficiently bound MHC-multimers loaded with NY-ESO-1 peptide, T cells expressing this transgenic TCR were not able to recognize endogenously processed antigen. A second TCR recognized HLA-A2 independent of the bound peptide beside its much stronger recognition of NY-ESO-1 bound to HLA-A2. A third TCR displayed an intermediate but peptide-specific performance in all functional assays and, therefore, is the most promising candidate TCR for further clinical development. Our data indicate that multiple parameters of TCR gene-modified T cells have to be evaluated to identify an optimal TCR candidate for adoptive therapy. PMID:22907642

  1. Erythropoietin Receptor-Mediated Molecular Crosstalk Promotes T Cell Immunoregulation and Transplant Survival.

    PubMed

    Purroy, Carolina; Fairchild, Robert L; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Baldwin, William M; Manrique, Joaquin; Madsen, Joren C; Colvin, Robert B; Alessandrini, Alessandro; Blazar, Bruce R; Fribourg, Miguel; Donadei, Chiara; Maggiore, Umberto; Heeger, Peter S; Cravedi, Paolo

    2017-08-01

    Although spontaneous kidney transplant acceptance/tolerance occurs in mice and occasionally in humans, mechanisms remain unclear. Herein we test the hypothesis that EPO, a hormone predominantly produced by the adult kidney, has immunomodulating properties that are required for spontaneous kidney graft acceptance. In vitro, in a manner dependent on the EPO receptor and CD131 on antigen-presenting cells, EPO induced the secretion of active TGFβ by antigen-presenting cells, which in turn converted naïve CD4(+) T cells into functional Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). In murine transplant models, pharmacologic downregulation of kidney-derived EPO prevented spontaneous Treg generation. In a controlled, prospective cohort clinical study, EPO administration at doses used to correct anemia augmented the frequency of peripheral CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo) T cells in humans with CKD. Furthermore, EPO directly inhibited conventional T cell proliferation in vitro via tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1-dependent uncoupling of IL-2Rβ signaling. Conversely, EPO-initiated signals facilitated Treg proliferation by augmenting IL-2Rγ signaling and maintaining constitutively quenched IL-2Rβ signaling. In additional murine transplant models, recombinant EPO administration prolonged heart allograft survival, whereas pharmacologic downregulation of kidney-derived EPO reduced the expression of TGFβ mRNA and abrogated kidney allograft acceptance. Together, our findings delineate the protolerogenic properties of EPO in inhibiting conventional T cells while simultaneously promoting Treg induction, and suggest that manipulating the EPO/EPO receptor signaling axis could be exploited to prevent and/or treat T cell-mediated pathologies, including transplant rejection. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Human ovarian tumor ascites fluids rapidly and reversibly inhibit T cell receptor-induced NF-κB and NFAT signaling in tumor-associated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Abelson, Michelle R.; Loyall, Jenni L.; Lehman, Heather K.; Barnas, Jennifer L.; Minderman, Hans; O’Loughlin, Kieran L.; Wallace, Paul K.; George, Thaddeus C.; Peng, Peng; Kelleher, Raymond J.; Odunsi, Kunle; Bankert, Richard B.

    2013-01-01

    Human memory T cells present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids fail to respond normally to stimulation via the T cell receptor (TCR). This immunosuppression is manifested by decreases in NF-κB and NFAT activation, IFN-γ production, and cell proliferation in response to TCR stimulation with immobilized antibodies to CD3 and CD28. The anergy of the tumor-associated T cells (TATs) is mediated by soluble factors present in ovarian tumor ascites fluids. The non-responsiveness of the T cells is quickly reversed when the cells are assayed in the absence of the ascites fluid, and is rapidly reestablished when a cell-free ascites fluid is added back to the T cells. Based upon the observed normal phosphorylation patterns of the TCR proximal signaling molecules, the inhibition of NF-κB, and NFAT activation in response to TCR stimulation, as well as the ability of the diacylglycerol analog PMA and the ionophore ionomycin to bypass the ascites fluid-induced TCR signaling arrest, the site of the arrest in the activation cascade appears to be at or just upstream of PLC-γ. An identical TCR signaling arrest pattern was observed when T cells derived from normal donor peripheral blood were incubated with either malignant or nonmalignant (cirrhotic) ascites fluids. The immunosuppressive activity of ascites fluids reported here suggests that soluble factors acting directly or indirectly upon T cells present within tumors contribute to the anergy that has previously been observed in T cells derived from malignant and nonmalignant inflammatory microenvironments. The soluble immunosuppressive factors represent potential therapeutic targets for ovarian cancer. PMID:23882159

  3. Triggering of toll-like receptor signaling pathways in T cells contributes to the anti-tumor efficacy of T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed Labib

    2011-06-30

    Traditionally, expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) has been associated with innate immune cells in particular professional antigen presenting cells and natural killer cells. This led to the concept that the adjuvant effects of ligation of TLR in a host occur mainly in innate immune cells. However, this concept has been challenged by recent studies including ours demonstrating that T cells express appreciated levels of different TLRs, which can serve as costimulatory co-receptors during polyclonal and antigen-specific stimulation of T cells. Because T cells express low levels of TLRs as compared to innate immune cells, increasing the expression levels of TLRs in T cells can significantly maximize their responses to the costimulatory effects of TLR ligation. This review article focuses on the potential role of TLR expression in T cells in their responses to vaccination regimen containing TLR agonists and how it can be modulated to optimize anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Changing the peptide specificity of a human T cell receptor by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Wang, Yuhang; Baylon, Javier L.; Singh, Nishant K.; Baker, Brian M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a T cell receptor (TCR) to a peptide/major histocompatibility complex is the key interaction involved in antigen specificity of T cells. The recognition involves up to six complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the TCR. Efforts to examine the structural basis of these interactions and to exploit them in adoptive T cell therapies has required the isolation of specific T cell clones and their clonotypic TCRs. Here we describe a strategy using in vitro, directed evolution of a single TCR to change its peptide specificity, thereby avoiding the need to isolate T cell clones. The human TCR A6, which recognizes the viral peptide Tax/HLA-A2, was converted to TCR variants that recognized the cancer peptide MART1/HLA-A2. Mutational studies and molecular dynamics simulations identified CDR residues that were predicted to be important in the specificity switch. Thus, in vitro engineering strategies alone can be used to discover TCRs with desired specificities. PMID:25376839

  5. Analysis of T-Cell Receptor-γ Gene Rearrangements Using Oligonucleotide Microchip

    PubMed Central

    Gra, Olga A.; Sidorova, Julia V.; Nikitin, Eugene A.; Turygin, Alexander Y.; Surzhikov, Sergey A.; Melikyan, Anait L.; Sudarikov, Andrey B.; Zasedatelev, Alexander S.; Nasedkina, Tatyana V.

    2007-01-01

    T-cell clonality estimation is important for the differential diagnosis between malignant and nonmalignant T-cell proliferation. Routinely used methods include polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of T-cell receptor-γ (TCR-γ) gene rearrangements followed by Genescan analysis, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, or heteroduplex analysis to visualize amplification products. Here, we present a new method for the analysis after PCR of TCR-γ rearrangements using hybridization on oligonucleotide microchip. A microchip was designed to contain specific probes for all functional variable (V) and joining (J) gene segments involved in rearrangements of the TCR-γ locus. Fluorescently labeled fragments of rearranged γ-chain from patients and donors were obtained in a multiplex nested PCR and hybridized with a microchip. The results were detected using a portable microchip analyzer. Samples from 49 patients with T-cell lymphomas or leukemias and 47 donors were analyzed for T-cell clonality by microchip and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, which served as a standard reference method. Comparison of two techniques showed full concordance of the results. The microchip-based approach also allowed the identification of V and J gene segments involved in the particular TCR-γ rearrangement. The sensitivity of the method is sufficient to determine 10% of clonal cells in the sample. PMID:17384218

  6. Lymphotoxin β Receptor Controls T Cell Progenitor Entry to the Thymus.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Beth; James, Kieran D; Cosway, Emilie J; Parnell, Sonia M; Tumanov, Alexi V; Ware, Carl F; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2016-10-01

    The recruitment of lymphoid progenitors to the thymus is essential to sustain T cell production throughout life. Importantly, it also limits T lineage regeneration following bone marrow transplantation, and so contributes to the secondary immunodeficiency that is caused by delayed immune reconstitution. Despite this significance, the mechanisms that control thymus colonization are poorly understood. In this study, we show that in both the steady-state and after bone marrow transplant, lymphotoxin β receptor (LTβR) controls entry of T cell progenitors to the thymus. We show that this requirement maps to thymic stroma, further underlining the key importance of this TNFR superfamily member in regulation of thymic microenvironments. Importantly, analysis of the requirement for LTβR in relationship to known regulators of thymus seeding suggests that it acts independently of its regulation of thymus-homing chemokines. Rather, we show that LTβR differentially regulates intrathymic expression of adhesion molecules known to play a role in T cell progenitor entry to the thymus. Finally, Ab-mediated in vivo LTβR stimulation following bone marrow transplant enhances initial thymus recovery and boosts donor-derived T cell numbers, which correlates with increased adhesion molecule expression by thymic stroma. Collectively, we reveal a novel link between LTβR and thymic stromal cells in thymus colonization, and highlight its potential as an immunotherapeutic target to boost T cell reconstitution after transplantation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors.

  7. Kinetics of Tumor Destruction by Chimeric Antigen Receptor-modified T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Anurathapan, Usanarat; Chan, Robert C; Hindi, Hakeem F; Mucharla, Roopa; Bajgain, Pradip; Hayes, Brendan C; Fisher, William E; Heslop, Helen E; Rooney, Cliona M; Brenner, Malcolm K; Leen, Ann M; Vera, Juan F

    2014-01-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)–modified T cells as a therapy for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors is becoming more widespread. However, the infusion of a T-cell product targeting a single tumor-associated antigen may lead to target antigen modulation under this selective pressure, with subsequent tumor immune escape. With the purpose of preventing this phenomenon, we have studied the impact of simultaneously targeting two distinct antigens present on tumor cells: namely mucin 1 and prostate stem cell antigen, both of which are expressed in a variety of solid tumors, including pancreatic and prostate cancer. When used individually, CAR T cells directed against either tumor antigen were able to kill target-expressing cancer cells, but tumor heterogeneity led to immune escape. As a combination therapy, we demonstrate superior antitumor effects using both CARs simultaneously, but this was nevertheless insufficient to achieve a complete response. To understand the mechanism of escape, we studied the kinetics of T-cell killing and found that the magnitude of tumor destruction depended not only on the presence of target antigens but also on the intensity of expression—a feature that could be altered by administering epigenetic modulators that upregulated target expression and enhanced CAR T-cell potency. PMID:24213558

  8. T cell receptor peptide therapy for autoimmune encephalomyelitis: stronger immunization is necessary for effective vaccination.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Tsuchida, M; Hanawa, H; Abo, T

    1994-02-01

    Although T cell receptor (TCR) peptide therapy was initially reported to be a very effective method for prevention of the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), it was recently demonstrated that the same peptide immunization led to enhanced and chronic EAE in some cases. In the present study, we examined the effect of the TCR peptide (V beta 8.2-39-59) vaccination on the development of EAE by employing several immunization protocols. We found that TCR peptide vaccination effectively prevented EAE development only when the peptide was injected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-enriched CFA in the vicinity of the challenge site. Under such conditions, a sufficient number of peptide-reactive T cells were generated. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analyses using anti-peptide antibody and anti-V beta 8.2 mAb revealed that despite the presence of V beta 8.2+ cells, very few peptide-positive T cells appeared in the lymphoid organs throughout the course of EAE. These findings imply that antibodies that are generated after immunization with V beta 8P are hardly accessible to their specific epitopes in the native protein. Insufficient generation of both T cells and antibodies against V beta 8.2-positive T cells may be attributable to the outcome of the therapy. To establish effective TCR peptide immunotherapy, these disadvantages should be overcome by using other TCR sequences and/or by employing a more suitable adjuvant.

  9. Those other mammals: The immunoglobulins and T cell receptors of marsupials and monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    This review summarizes analyses of marsupial and monotreme immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genetics and expression published over the past decade. Analyses of recently completed whole genome sequences from the opossum and the platypus have yielded insight into the evolution of the common antigen receptor systems, as well as discovery of novel receptors that appear to have been lost in eutherian mammals. These species are also useful for investigation of the development of the immune system in organisms notable for giving birth to highly altricial young, as well as the evolution of maternal immunity through comparison of oviparous and viviparous mammals. PMID:20004116

  10. Those other mammals: the immunoglobulins and T cell receptors of marsupials and monotremes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert D

    2010-02-01

    This review summarizes analyses of marsupial and monotreme immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genetics and expression published over the past decade. Analyses of recently completed whole genome sequences from the opossum and the platypus have yielded insight into the evolution of the common antigen receptor systems, as well as discovery of novel receptors that appear to have been lost in eutherian mammals. These species are also useful for investigation of the development of the immune system in organisms notable for giving birth to highly altricial young, as well as the evolution of maternal immunity through comparison of oviparous and viviparous mammals.

  11. Negative regulation of T cell receptor signaling by Siglec-7 (p70/AIRM) and Siglec-9.

    PubMed

    Ikehara, Yuzuru; Ikehara, Sanae Kabata; Paulson, James C

    2004-10-08

    Siglec-7 (p70/AIRM) and Siglec-9 are "CD33"-related siglecs expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and subsets of peripheral T cells. Like other inhibitory NK cell receptors, they contain immunoglobulin receptor family tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs in their cytoplasmic domains, and Siglec-7 has been demonstrated to negatively regulate NK cell activation. Based on reports of the presence of these siglecs on T cells, we sought to determine if they are capable of modulating T cell receptor (TCR) signaling using Jurkat T cells stably and transiently transfected with Siglec-7 or Siglec-9. Following either pervanadate stimulation or TCR engagement, both Siglecs exhibited increased tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of SHP-1. Effects of Siglec-7 and -9 were also evident in downstream events in the signaling pathway. Both siglecs reduced phosphorylation of Tyr319 on ZAP-70, known to play a pivotal role in up-regulation of gene transcription following TCR stimulation. There was also a corresponding decreased transcriptional activity of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) as determined using a luciferase reporter gene. Like all siglecs, Siglec-7 and -9 recognize sialic acid-containing glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids as ligands. Mutation of the conserved Arg in the ligand binding site of Siglec-7 (Arg124) or Siglec-9 (Arg120) resulted in reduced inhibitory function in the NFAT/luciferase transcription assay, suggesting that ligand binding is required for optimal inhibition of TCR signaling. The combined results demonstrate that both Siglec-7 and Siglec-9 are capable of negative regulation of TCR signaling and that ligand binding is required for optimal activity.

  12. Profiling the T-cell receptor beta-chain repertoire by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, J Douglas; Warren, René L; Webb, John R; Nelson, Brad H; Holt, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) genomic loci undergo somatic V(D)J recombination, plus the addition/subtraction of nontemplated bases at recombination junctions, in order to generate the repertoire of structurally diverse T cells necessary for antigen recognition. TCR beta subunits can be unambiguously identified by their hypervariable CDR3 (Complement Determining Region 3) sequence. This is the site of V(D)J recombination encoding the principal site of antigen contact. The complexity and dynamics of the T-cell repertoire remain unknown because the potential repertoire size has made conventional sequence analysis intractable. Here, we use 5'-RACE, Illumina sequencing, and a novel short read assembly strategy to sample CDR3(beta) diversity in human T lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Assembly of 40.5 million short reads identified 33,664 distinct TCR(beta) clonotypes and provides precise measurements of CDR3(beta) length diversity, usage of nontemplated bases, sequence convergence, and preferences for TRBV (T-cell receptor beta variable gene) and TRBJ (T-cell receptor beta joining gene) gene usage and pairing. CDR3 length between conserved residues of TRBV and TRBJ ranged from 21 to 81 nucleotides (nt). TRBV gene usage ranged from 0.01% for TRBV17 to 24.6% for TRBV20-1. TRBJ gene usage ranged from 1.6% for TRBJ2-6 to 17.2% for TRBJ2-1. We identified 1573 examples of convergence where the same amino acid translation was specified by distinct CDR3(beta) nucleotide sequences. Direct sequence-based immunoprofiling will likely prove to be a useful tool for understanding repertoire dynamics in response to immune challenge, without a priori knowledge of antigen.

  13. An electrostatic selection mechanism controls sequential kinase signaling downstream of the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neel H; Wang, Qi; Yan, Qingrong; Karandur, Deepti; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Fallahee, Ian R; Russ, William P; Ranganathan, Rama; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of events that initiates T cell signaling is dictated by the specificities and order of activation of the tyrosine kinases that signal downstream of the T cell receptor. Using a platform that combines exhaustive point-mutagenesis of peptide substrates, bacterial surface-display, cell sorting, and deep sequencing, we have defined the specificities of the first two kinases in this pathway, Lck and ZAP-70, for the T cell receptor ζ chain and the scaffold proteins LAT and SLP-76. We find that ZAP-70 selects its substrates by utilizing an electrostatic mechanism that excludes substrates with positively-charged residues and favors LAT and SLP-76 phosphosites that are surrounded by negatively-charged residues. This mechanism prevents ZAP-70 from phosphorylating its own activation loop, thereby enforcing its strict dependence on Lck for activation. The sequence features in ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 that underlie electrostatic selectivity likely contribute to the specific response of T cells to foreign antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20105.001 PMID:27700984

  14. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-01-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  15. Progression of Lung Cancer Is Associated with Increased Dysfunction of T Cells Defined by Coexpression of Multiple Inhibitory Receptors.

    PubMed

    Thommen, Daniela S; Schreiner, Jens; Müller, Philipp; Herzig, Petra; Roller, Andreas; Belousov, Anton; Umana, Pablo; Pisa, Pavel; Klein, Christian; Bacac, Marina; Fischer, Ozana S; Moersig, Wolfgang; Savic Prince, Spasenija; Levitsky, Victor; Karanikas, Vaios; Lardinois, Didier; Zippelius, Alfred

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional T cells present in malignant lesions are characterized by a sustained and highly diverse expression of inhibitory receptors, also referred to as immune checkpoints. Yet, their relative functional significance in different cancer types remains incompletely understood. In this study, we provide a comprehensive characterization of the diversity and expression patterns of inhibitory receptors on tumor-infiltrating T cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer. In spite of the large heterogeneity observed in the amount of PD-1, Tim-3, CTLA-4, LAG-3, and BTLA expressed on intratumoral CD8(+) T cells from 32 patients, a clear correlation was established between increased expression of these inhibitory coreceptors and progression of the disease. Notably, the latter was accompanied by a progressively impaired capacity of T cells to respond to polyclonal activation. Coexpression of several inhibitory receptors was gradually acquired, with early PD-1 and late LAG-3/BTLA expression. PD-1 blockade was able to restore T-cell function only in a subset of patients. A high percentage of PD-1(hi) T cells was correlated with poor restoration of T-cell function upon PD-1 blockade. Of note, PD-1(hi) expression marked a particularly dysfunctional T-cell subset characterized by coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors and thus may assist in identifying patients likely to respond to inhibitory receptor-specific antibodies. Overall, these data may provide a framework for future personalized T-cell-based therapies aiming at restoration of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte effector functions.

  16. Molecular Pathways: Breaking the Epithelial Cancer Barrier for Chimeric Antigen Receptor and T-cell Receptor Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Christian S

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered to express a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) or T-cell receptor (TCR) can mediate cancer regression in some patients. CARs are synthetic single-chain proteins that use antibody domains to target cell surface antigens. TCRs are natural heterodimeric proteins that can target intracellular antigens through recognition of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigens. CARs have shown promise in B-cell malignancies and TCRs in melanoma, but neither approach has achieved clear success in an epithelial cancer. Treatment of epithelial cancers may be particularly challenging because of a paucity of target antigens expressed by carcinomas and not by important healthy tissues. In addition, epithelial cancers may be protected by inhibitory ligands and soluble factors in the tumor microenvironment. One strategy to overcome these negative regulators is to modulate expression of T-cell genes to enhance intrinsic T-cell function. Programmable nucleases, which can suppress inhibitory genes, and inducible gene expression systems, which can enhance stimulatory genes, are entering clinical testing. Other work is delineating whether control of genes for immune checkpoint receptors (e.g.,PDCD1, CTLA4) and cytokine and TCR signaling regulators (e.g.,CBLB, CISH, IL12, IL15) can increase the antitumor activity of therapeutic T cells.

  17. VCP, the mammalian homolog of cdc48, is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell antigen receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, M; Ashe, O R; Chen, D; Druker, B J; Burgess, W H; Samelson, L E

    1992-01-01

    Activation of T cells through the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) results in the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of a number of cellular proteins, one of the earliest being a 100 kDa protein. We have sought to identify this 100 kDa substrate by partially purifying the protein by antiphosphotyrosine (APT) affinity purification, in order to obtain amino acid sequence data and, using this information, to isolate the cDNA clone encoding the molecule. We report here that the amino acid sequence data showed pp100 to be the murine equivalent of porcine valosin containing protein (VCP), a finding confirmed from the cloning and sequencing of the murine pp100 cDNA. Sequence analysis has shown VCP to be a member of a family of ATP binding, homo-oligomeric proteins, and the mammalian homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc48p, a protein essential to the completion of mitosis in yeast. We also provide proof that both endogenous and expressed murine VCP are tyrosine phosphorylated in response to T cell activation. Thus we have identified a novel component of the TCR mediated tyrosine kinase activation pathway that may provide a link between TCR ligation and cell cycle control. Images PMID:1382975

  18. Treatment of solid tumors with chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Di, Shengmeng; Li, Zonghai

    2016-04-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are artificial recombinant receptors that generally combine the antigen-recognition domain of a monoclonal antibody with T cell activation domains. Recent years have seen great success in clinical trials employing CD19-specific CAR-T cell therapy for B cell leukemia. Nevertheless, solid tumors remain a major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies on the treatment of solid tumors with CAR-T cells. The major hurdles for the success of CAR-T and the novel strategies to address these hurdles have also been described and discussed.

  19. Tthyd, a new thymocyte alloantigen linked to Igh-1. Implications for a switch mechanism for T cell antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Owen, F L; Spurll, G M; Panageas, E

    1982-01-01

    Tthyd is an alloantigen coded for by a gene(s) near the immunoglobulin locus on chromosome 12 in the mouse. This T cell-specific antigen may be the third member of a family of antigen receptors on T cells encoded by a cluster of genes in the IgT-C region. This antigen is preferentially expressed on thymocytes in contrast to Tindd or Tsud that are expressed on peripheral T cells. The hypothesis that T cell receptors undergo a switch in surface isotype upon maturation is discussed.

  20. Tthyd, a new thymocyte alloantigen linked to Igh-1. Implications for a switch mechanism for T cell antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Tthyd is an alloantigen coded for by a gene(s) near the immunoglobulin locus on chromosome 12 in the mouse. This T cell-specific antigen may be the third member of a family of antigen receptors on T cells encoded by a cluster of genes in the IgT-C region. This antigen is preferentially expressed on thymocytes in contrast to Tindd or Tsud that are expressed on peripheral T cells. The hypothesis that T cell receptors undergo a switch in surface isotype upon maturation is discussed. PMID:6976417

  1. Macroautophagy inhibition maintains fragmented mitochondria to foster T cell receptor-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Mauro; Mariotti, Francesca R; Trapani, Laura; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Nazio, Francesca; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Schrepfer, Emilie; Cecconi, Francesco; Scorrano, Luca; Campello, Silvia

    2016-08-15

    Mitochondrial dynamics and functionality are linked to the autophagic degradative pathway under several stress conditions. However, the interplay between mitochondria and autophagy upon cell death signalling remains unclear. The T-cell receptor pathway signals the so-called activation-induced cell death (AICD) essential for immune tolerance regulation. Here, we show that this apoptotic pathway requires the inhibition of macroautophagy. Protein kinase-A activation downstream of T-cell receptor signalling inhibits macroautophagy upon AICD induction. This leads to the accumulation of damaged mitochondria, which are fragmented, display remodelled cristae and release cytochrome c, thereby driving apoptosis. Autophagy-forced reactivation that clears the Parkin-decorated mitochondria is as effective in inhibiting apoptosis as genetic interference with cristae remodelling and cytochrome c release. Thus, upon AICD induction regulation of macroautophagy, rather than selective mitophagy, ensures apoptotic progression. © 2016 The Authors.

  2. T-cell receptor gamma--delta lymphocytes and Eimeria vermiformis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, M E; Hesketh, P; Rothwell, L; Gramzinski, R A

    1996-01-01

    The role of T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes in coccidiosis was examined by determining the course of infection with Eimeria vermiformis in BALB/c mice depleted of gamma--delta lymphocytes by treatment with GL3 monoclonal antibody. The replication of the parasite in primary infections was not greatly, or consistently, affected by this treatment, and there was no correlation between the extent of depletion of small intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes and the number of oocysts produced. The resistance of immunized mice to challenge was not compromised by depletion of intraintestinal epithelial lymphocytes when their depletion was effected at the time of primary infection and/or administration of the challenge inoculum. Thus, T-cell receptor gamma--delta T lymphocytes do not appear to be crucial to the establishment, or the control, of primary infection with E. vermiformis and are not principal mediators of the solid immunity to challenge that this infection induces. PMID:8890252

  3. Identification of Inhibitors of the Association of ZAP-70 with the T Cell Receptor by High-Throughput Screen

    DOE PAGES

    Visperas, Patrick R.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Winger, Jonathan A.; ...

    2016-12-13

    ZAP-70 is a critical molecule in the transduction of T cell antigen receptor signaling and the activation of T cells. Upon activation of the T cell antigen receptor, ZAP-70 is recruited to the intracellular ζ-chains of the T cell receptor, where ZAP-70 is activated and colocalized with its substrates. Inhibitors of ZAP-70 could potentially function as treatments for autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation. In this work, we present the design, optimization, and implementation of a screen for inhibitors that would disrupt the interaction between ZAP-70 and the T cell antigen receptor. Finally, the screen is based on a fluorescence polarizationmore » assay for peptide binding to ZAP-70.« less

  4. Identification of Inhibitors of the Association of ZAP-70 with the T Cell Receptor by High-Throughput Screen

    SciTech Connect

    Visperas, Patrick R.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Winger, Jonathan A.; Yan, Qingrong; Lin, Kevin; Arkin, Michelle R.; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-12-13

    ZAP-70 is a critical molecule in the transduction of T cell antigen receptor signaling and the activation of T cells. Upon activation of the T cell antigen receptor, ZAP-70 is recruited to the intracellular ζ-chains of the T cell receptor, where ZAP-70 is activated and colocalized with its substrates. Inhibitors of ZAP-70 could potentially function as treatments for autoimmune diseases or organ transplantation. In this work, we present the design, optimization, and implementation of a screen for inhibitors that would disrupt the interaction between ZAP-70 and the T cell antigen receptor. Finally, the screen is based on a fluorescence polarization assay for peptide binding to ZAP-70.

  5. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U.; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E.; Posey, Avery D.; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Platt, Jesse M.; Johnson, F. Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C.; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    This study compared second generation chimeric antigen receptors encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS and 4-1BB. Here we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T-cell with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to three months following a single stimulation through the TCR. Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet, EOMES and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-kB, Akt, Erk and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore the design of CARs that have a non-constitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or non-constitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. PMID:25600436

  6. Characterization of the T cell receptor repertoire causing collagen arthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Collagen type II-induced arthritis (CIA) is generated in susceptible rodent strains by intradermal injections of homologous or heterologous native type II collagen in complete Freund's adjuvant. Symptoms of CIA are analogous to those of the human autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis. CIA is a model system for T cell-mediated autoimmune disease. To study the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of bovine type II-specific T cells that may be involved in the pathogenesis of CIA in DBA/1Lac.J (H-2q) mice, 13 clonally distinct T cell hybridomas specific for bovine type II collagen have been established and the alpha and beta chains of their TCRs have been analyzed. These T cell hybridomas recognize epitopes that are shared by type II collagens from distinct species and not by type I collagens, and exhibit a highly restricted TCR-alpha/beta repertoire. The alpha chains of the TCRs employ three V alpha gene subfamilies (V alpha 11, V alpha 8, and V alpha 22) and four J alpha gene segments (J alpha 42, J alpha 24, J alpha 37, and J alpha 32). The V alpha 22 is a newly identified subfamily consisting of approximately four to six members, and exhibits a high degree of polymorphism among four mouse strains of distinct V alpha haplotypes. In addition, the beta chains of the TCRs employ three V beta gene subfamilies (V beta 8, V beta 1, and V beta 6), however the V beta 8.2 gene segment is preferentially utilized (58.3%). In contrast, the J beta gene segment usage is more heterogeneous. On the basis of the highly limited TCR-alpha/beta repertoire of the TCRs of the panel of bovine type II-specific T cell hybrid clones, a significant reduction (60%) of the incidence of arthritis in DBA/1Lac.J mice is accomplished by the use of anti-V beta 8.2 antibody therapy. PMID:8381155

  7. T cell receptor (TCR) signal strength controls arthritis severity in proteoglycan-specific TCR transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Olasz, K; Boldizsar, F; Kis-Toth, K; Tarjanyi, O; Hegyi, A; van Eden, W; Rauch, T A; Mikecz, K; Glant, T T

    2012-01-01

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the arthritogenic 5/4E8 epitope in the G1 domain of cartilage proteoglycan were generated and back-crossed into arthritis-prone BALB/c background. Although more than 90% of CD4+ T cells of all TCR-Tg lines were 5/4E8-specific, one (TCR-TgA) was highly sensitive to G1-induced or spontaneous arthritis, while another (TCR-TgB) was less susceptible. Here we studied whether fine differences in TCR signalling controlled the onset and severity of arthritis. Mice from the two TCR-Tg lines were immunized side by side with purified recombinant human G1 (rhG1) domain for G1 domain of cartilage proteoglycan (PG)-induced arthritis (GIA). TCR-TgA mice developed severe and early-onset arthritis, whereas TCR-TgB mice developed weaker arthritis with delayed onset, although TCR-TgB CD4+ T cells expressed approximately twice more TCR-Vβ4 chain protein. The more severe arthritis in TCR-TgA mice was associated with higher amounts of anti-G1 domain-specific antibodies, larger numbers of B cells and activated T helper cells. Importantly, TCR-TgB CD4+ T cells were more sensitive to in vitro activation-induced apoptosis, correlating with their higher TCR and CD3 expression and with the increased TCR signal strength. These findings indicate that TCR signal strength determines the clinical outcome of arthritis induction: ‘optimal’ TCR signal strength leads to strong T cell activation and severe arthritis in TCR-TgA mice, whereas ‘supra-optimal’ TCR signal leads to enhanced elimination of self-reactive T cells, resulting in attenuated disease. PMID:22236012

  8. Interleukin-21 (IL-21) synergizes with IL-2 to enhance T-cell receptor-induced human T-cell proliferation and counteracts IL-2/transforming growth factor-β-induced regulatory T-cell development

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Baranello, Cinzia; Fanelli, Mara; Fossati, Marco; Catzola, Valentina; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a mainstay for current immunotherapeutic protocols but its usefulness in patients is reduced by severe toxicities and because IL-2 facilitates regulatory T (Treg) cell development. IL-21 is a type I cytokine acting as a potent T-cell co-mitogen but less efficient than IL-2 in sustaining T-cell proliferation. Using various in vitro models for T-cell receptor (TCR)-dependent human T-cell proliferation, we found that IL-21 synergized with IL-2 to make CD4+ and CD8+ T cells attain a level of expansion that was impossible to obtain with IL-2 alone. Synergy was mostly evident in naive CD4+ cells. IL-2 and tumour-released transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) are the main environmental cues that cooperate in Treg cell induction in tumour patients. Interleukin-21 hampered Treg cell expansion induced by IL-2/TGF-β combination in naive CD4+ cells by facilitating non-Treg over Treg cell proliferation from the early phases of cell activation. Conversely, IL-21 did not modulate the conversion of naive activated CD4+ cells into Treg cells in the absence of cell division. Treg cell reduction was related to persistent activation of Stat3, a negative regulator of Treg cells associated with down-modulation of IL-2/TGF-β-induced phosphorylation of Smad2/3, a positive regulator of Treg cells. In contrast to previous studies, IL-21 was completely ineffective in counteracting the suppressive activity of Treg cells on naive and memory, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Present data provide proof-of-concept for evaluating a combinatorial approach that would reduce the IL-2 needed to sustain T-cell proliferation efficiently, thereby reducing toxicity and controlling a tolerizing mechanism responsible for the contraction of the T-cell response. PMID:23278180

  9. Ultra-deep T cell receptor sequencing reveals the complexity and intratumour heterogeneity of T cell clones in renal cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gerlinger, Marco; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S; Furness, Andrew JS; Fisher, Rosalie; Marafioti, Teresa; Shende, Vishvesh H; McGranahan, Nicholas; Rowan, Andrew J; Hazell, Steven; Hamm, David; Robins, Harlan S; Pickering, Lisa; Gore, Martin; Nicol, David L; Larkin, James; Swanton, Charles

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of cancer cells by T cells can impact upon prognosis and be exploited for immunotherapeutic approaches. This recognition depends on the specific interaction between antigens displayed on the surface of cancer cells and the T cell receptor (TCR), which is generated by somatic rearrangements of TCR α- and β-chains (TCRb). Our aim was to assess whether ultra-deep sequencing of the rearranged TCRb in DNA extracted from unfractionated clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples can provide insights into the clonality and heterogeneity of intratumoural T cells in ccRCCs, a tumour type that can display extensive genetic intratumour heterogeneity (ITH). For this purpose, DNA was extracted from two to four tumour regions from each of four primary ccRCCs and was analysed by ultra-deep TCR sequencing. In parallel, tumour infiltration by CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 regulatory T cells was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and correlated with TCR-sequencing data. A polyclonal T cell repertoire with 367–16 289 (median 2394) unique TCRb sequences was identified per tumour region. The frequencies of the 100 most abundant T cell clones/tumour were poorly correlated between most regions (Pearson correlation coefficient, –0.218 to 0.465). 3–93% of these T cell clones were not detectable across all regions. Thus, the clonal composition of T cell populations can be heterogeneous across different regions of the same ccRCC. T cell ITH was higher in tumours pretreated with an mTOR inhibitor, which could suggest that therapy can influence adaptive tumour immunity. These data show that ultra-deep TCR-sequencing technology can be applied directly to DNA extracted from unfractionated tumour samples, allowing novel insights into the clonality of T cell populations in cancers. These were polyclonal and displayed ITH in ccRCC. TCRb sequencing may shed light on mechanisms of cancer immunity and the efficacy of immunotherapy approaches. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of

  10. Impact of cell culture media on the expansion efficiency and T-cell receptor Vbeta (TRBV) repertoire of in vitro expanded T cells using feeder cells.

    PubMed

    Block, Andrea; Rohde, Maria; Erben, Ulrike; Hammer, Markus; Hummel, Michael; Blunert, Katja; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Noutsias, Michel

    2008-05-01

    The effects of different cell culture media on expansion efficiency and alterations in T-cell receptor V beta (TRBV) expression of in vitro expanded lymphocytes are not well established. Low numbers of CD3+ T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors were subjected to polyclonal in vitro expansion in the presence of autologous CD3-depleted mononuclear cells as feeder cells (FCs) and their numbers and TRBV expressions were compared in media containing human (HS-RPMI) or fetal bovine serum (FBS-RPMI), Panserin413, or X-Vivo 15TM designed for lymphocyte culture. During three courses of restimulation within 28 days with CD3-antibody (OKT-3), IL-2, and initial CD3+, T-cell: FC ratios of 1:50 lowered to 1:5 and T cells expanded more than 1,000-fold in the media containing complete sera. Loss of cluster formation, associated with expansion failure, was only observed in cultures using synthetic media and resulted in only about 70-fold expansion. Whereas TRVB expression as determined by real-time PCR was substantially altered after 14 days of culture in X-Vivo 15, at day 28 only T cells from long-term culture in HS-RPMI presented the initial TRBV composition. Culture media have substantial impact on in vitro T-cell expansion. In the presence of FCs, medium containing human serum is superior to synthetic media and FBS-RPMI for long-term culture regarding T-cell number and TRBV repertoire. In contrast, the synthetic media Panserin413 and XVivo15 show lower expansion efficiency and reproducibility and, as RPMI1640+10%FBS, can contribute to overstimulation of certain TRBVs at advanced culture time points.

  11. Interaction of the pertussis toxin peptide containing residues 30-42 with DR1 and the T-cell receptors of 12 human T-cell clones.

    PubMed Central

    De Magistris, M T; Di Tommaso, A; Domenighini, M; Censini, S; Tagliabue, A; Oksenberg, J R; Steinman, L; Judd, A K; O'Sullivan, D; Rappuoli, R

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of the immunodominant pertussis toxin peptide containing residues 30-42 (p30-42) with soluble DR1 molecules and the T-cell receptor (TCR) of 12 DR1-restricted human T-cell clones has been analyzed. Peptide analogues of p30-42 containing single alanine substitutions were used in DR1-binding and T-cell proliferation assays to identify the major histocompatibility complex and TCR contact residues. Each T-cell clone was found to recognize p30-42 with a different fine specificity. However, a common core comprising amino acids 33-39 was found to be important for stimulation of all T-cell clones. Within this core two residues, Leu33 and Leu36, interact with the DR1 molecule, whereas Asp34, His35, Thr37, and Arg39 are important for TCR recognition in most of the clones. Computer modeling of the structure of p30-42 showed that an alpha-helical conformation is compatible with the experimental data. The analysis of TCR rearrangement revealed that the peptide was recognized by T-cell clones expressing different variable region alpha (V alpha) and variable region beta (V beta) chains, although a preferential use of V alpha 8-V beta 13 and V alpha 11-V beta 18 combinations was found in clones from the same donor. Understanding the details of the interaction of antigenic peptides with the major histocompatibility complex and TCR molecules should provide the theoretical basis to design T-cell epitopes and obtain more immunogenic vaccines. Images PMID:1313575

  12. T-cell subsets and T-cell receptor V beta utilization by Igh-1-congenic mice in herpetic retinal necrosis.

    PubMed

    Berra, A; Heiligenhaus, A; Foster, C S

    1996-08-01

    After unilateral anterior chamber (AC) inoculation with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), C.B-17 and BALB/c congenic mice, which differ only in a limited region around the lgh-1 locus on chromosome 12, show a striking difference in susceptibility to development of encephalitis and contralateral necrotizing chorioretinitis. After AC inoculation with HSV-1 (KOS), C.B-17 and BALB/c mice were followed up for the clinical signs of encephalitis and chorioretinitis. At different time points following inoculation, lymphocytes isolated from the spleen were triple-stained with antibodies directed against CD4 or CD8, IL-2R, and various V beta T-cell receptor (TCR) subsets, and were analyzed by flow cytometry. These lgh-1-disparate congenic mice showed differences in the time course of splenic V beta T-cell receptor (TCR) usage in both CD4+, IL-2R+ and CD8+, IL-2R+ T cells. By day 1 post infection (p.i.), C.B-17 mice showed an increase of V beta 8 and V beta 9 TCR by both CD4+, IL-2R+ and CD8+, IL-2R+ splenic T cells. Susceptible BALB/c mice delayed the increase of splenic V beta 8 and V beta 9 TCR by CD4+, IL-2R+ T cells, which was noted by day 4 p.i. Furthermore, in BALB/c mice the usage of V beta 9 by CD8+ cells was increased by day 6 p.i. Our findings indicate that early preferential splenic usage of a restricted repertoire of TCR occurs after ocular inoculation with HSV-1 in resistant C.B-17 mice. Such preferential TCR usage by activated T cells may prevent viral replication in the brain and contralateral eye and may be linked to protection from development of encephalitis and destructive herpesmediated ocular inflammation.

  13. Circulating regulatory anti–T cell receptor antibodies in patients with myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Jambou, Florence; Zhang, Wei; Menestrier, Monique; Klingel-Schmitt, Isabelle; Michel, Olivier; Caillat-Zucman, Sophie; Aissaoui, Abderrahim; Landemarre, Ludovic; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia

    2003-01-01

    Serum anti–T cell receptor (TCR) Ab’s are involved in immune regulation directed against pathogenic T cells in experimental models of autoimmune diseases. Our identification of a dominant T cell population expressing the Vβ5.1 TCR gene (TCRBV5-1), which is responsible for the production of pathogenic anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) autoantibodies in HLA-DR3 patients with early-onset myasthenia gravis (EOMG), prompted us to explore the occurrence, reactivity, and regulatory role of anti-TCR Ab’s in EOMG patients and disease controls with clearly defined other autoantibodies. In the absence of prior vaccination against the TCR, EOMG patients had elevated anti-Vβ5.1 Ab’s of the IgG class. This increase was restricted largely to EOMG cases with HLA-DR3 and with less severe disease, and it predicted clinical improvement in follow-up studies. EOMG patient sera containing anti-TCR Ab’s bound specifically the native TCR on intact Vβ5.1-expressing cells and specifically inhibited the proliferation and IFN-γ production of purified Vβ5.1-expressing cells to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reaction and the proliferation of a Vβ5.1-expressing T cell clone to an AChR peptide, indicating a regulatory function for these Ab’s. This evidence of spontaneously active anti-Vβ5.1 Ab’s in EOMG patients suggests dynamic protective immune regulation directed against the excess of pathogenic Vβ5.1-expressing T cells. Though not sufficient to prevent a chronic, exacerbated autoimmune process, it might be boosted using a TCR peptide as vaccine. PMID:12865414

  14. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-06-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11.5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8(+) TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. © 2014 The Authors. Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Stimulatory and Inhibitory Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Molecules are Expressed and Functional on Lupus T Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J.; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C.; Strickland, Faith M.; Richardson, Bruce C.

    2009-01-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin–like receptor (KIR3) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Antibodies to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-γ release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, crosslinking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and suggest that antibodies to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease. PMID:19675166

  16. Stimulatory and inhibitory killer Ig-like receptor molecules are expressed and functional on lupus T cells.

    PubMed

    Basu, Dhiman; Liu, Ying; Wu, Ailing; Yarlagadda, Sushma; Gorelik, Gabriela J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Hewagama, Anura; Hinderer, Robert C; Strickland, Faith M; Richardson, Bruce C

    2009-09-01

    T cells from lupus patients have hypomethylated DNA and overexpress genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. We found that stimulatory and inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR) genes are aberrantly overexpressed on experimentally demethylated T cells. We therefore asked if lupus T cells also overexpress KIR, and if the proteins are functional. T cells from lupus patients were found to overexpress KIR genes, and expression was proportional to disease activity. Abs to the stimulatory molecule KIR2DL4 triggered IFN-gamma release by lupus T cells, and production was proportional to disease activity. Similarly, cross-linking the inhibitory molecule KIR3DL1 prevented the autoreactive macrophage killing that characterizes lupus T cells. These results indicate that aberrant T cell KIR expression may contribute to IFN overproduction and macrophage killing in human lupus, and they suggest that Abs to inhibitory KIR may be a treatment for this disease.

  17. Comparison of the T cell patterns in leprous and cutaneous sarcoid granulomas. Presence of Valpha24-invariant natural killer T cells in T-cell-reactive leprosy together with a highly biased T cell receptor Valpha repertoire.

    PubMed

    Mempel, M; Flageul, B; Suarez, F; Ronet, C; Dubertret, L; Kourilsky, P; Gachelin, G; Musette, P

    2000-08-01

    The T-cell-reactive (eg, tuberculoid and reversal) forms of leprosy represent a well-defined granulomatous reaction pattern against an invading pathogen. The immune response in cutaneous sarcoidosis is a granulomatous condition that pathologically is very similar to T-cell reactive leprosy. However, it lacks a defined causative agent. In view of the role of NKT cells in murine granulomas induced by mycobacterial cell walls, we have searched for the presence of NKT cells in the cutaneous lesions of both leprosy and sarcoidosis. These cells were present in T-cell-reactive leprosy but were undetectable in cutaneous sarcoidosis. We have also studied the TCR Valpha repertoire in the two diseases. In addition to Valpha24(+) NKT cells, all patients with T-cell-reactive leprosy showed a very restricted T-cell-reactive Valpha repertoire with a strong bias toward the use of the Valpha6 and Valpha14 segments. Valpha6 and Valpha14(+) T cells were polyclonal in terms of CDR3 length and Jalpha usage. In contrast, most sarcoidosis patients showed a diverse usage of Valpha chains associated with clonal or oligoclonal expansions reminiscent of antigen-driven activation of conventional T cells. Thus the origin and perpetuation of the two kinds of granulomatous lesions appear to depend on altogether distinct T-cell recruiting mechanisms.

  18. Immunotherapy of HCC metastases with autologous T cell receptor redirected T cells, targeting HBsAg in a liver transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Waseem; Brunetto, Maurizia; Gehring, Adam J; Xue, Shao-An; Schurich, Anna; Khakpoor, Atefeh; Zhan, Hong; Ciccorossi, Pietro; Gilmour, Kimberly; Cavallone, Daniela; Moriconi, Francesco; Farzhenah, Farzin; Mazzoni, Alessandro; Chan, Lucas; Morris, Emma; Thrasher, Adrian; Maini, Mala K; Bonino, Ferruccio; Stauss, Hans; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2015-02-01

    HBV-DNA integration frequently occurs in HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but whether HBV antigens are expressed in HCC cells and can be targeted by immune therapeutic strategies remains controversial. Here, we first characterized HBV antigen expression in HCC metastases, occurring in a patient who had undergone liver transplantation for HBV-related HCC. We then deployed for the first time in HCC autologous T cells, genetically modified to express an HBsAg specific T cell receptor, as therapy against chemoresistant extrahepatic metastases. We confirmed that HBV antigens were expressed in HCC metastases (but not in the donor liver) and demonstrated that tumour cells were recognized in vivo by lymphocytes, engineered to express an HBV-specific T cell receptor (TCR). Gene-modified T cells survived, expanded and mediated a reduction in HBsAg levels without exacerbation of liver inflammation or other toxicity. Whilst clinical efficacy was not established in this subject with end-stage metastatic disease, we confirm the feasibility of providing autologous TCR-redirected therapy against HCC and advocate this strategy as a novel therapeutic opportunity in hepatitis B-associated malignancies. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genomics-based identification of self-ligands with T cell receptor-specific biological activity.

    PubMed

    Santori, Fabio R; Brown, Stuart M; Vukmanović, Stanislav

    2002-12-01

    Self-peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complexes profoundly influence the biology of T lymphocytes. They promote the selection of the T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire in the thymus, maintain the homeostasis of peripheral T cells prior to encounter with antigen, and modify the responsiveness of T cells to foreign antigens. In addition, they can serve as antigens for autoaggressive T cells that induce autoimmune diseases. The complete sequencing of the genomes of human, mouse, and many pathogenic organisms now provides us with a comprehensive list of all possible proteins that may be the source of foreign antigenic and self-peptides. A computational approach using profile-based similarity searches on potential self-MHC-binding peptides can be used to efficiently predict self-peptides with biological activities. The common feature of the identified peptides is similarity to antigen. Thus, self-peptides may form 'hazy' images of the universe of antigens that are used as templates to create and maintain the TCR repertoire.

  20. ɣδ T cell receptor ligands and modes of antigen recognition

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Eric

    2011-01-01

    T lymphocytes expressing the γδ-type of T cell receptors for antigens contribute to all aspects of immune responses, including defenses against viruses, bacteria, parasites and tumors, allergy and autoimmunity. Multiple subsets have been individualized in humans as well as in mice and they appear to recognize in a TCR-dependent manner antigens as diverse as small non-peptidic molecules, soluble or membrane-anchored polypeptides and molecules related to MHC antigens on cell surfaces, implying diverse modes of antigen recognition. We review here the γδ TCR ligands which have been identified along the years and their characteristics, with emphasis on a few systems which have been extensively studied such as human γδ T cells responding to phosphoantigens or murine γδ T cells activated by allogeneic MHC antigens. We discuss a speculative model of antigen recognition involving simultaneous TCR recognition of MHC-like and non-MHC ligands which could fit with most available data and shares many similarities with the classical model of MHC-restricted antigen recognition for peptides or lipids by T cells subsets with αβ-type TCRs. PMID:21298486

  1. Hotspot autoimmune T cell receptor binding underlies pathogen and insulin peptide cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Cole, David K.; Bulek, Anna M.; Dolton, Garry; Schauenberg, Andrea J.; Szomolay, Barbara; Trimby, Andrew; Jothikumar, Prithiviraj; Fuller, Anna; Skowera, Ania; Rossjohn, Jamie; Zhu, Cheng; Miles, John J.; Wooldridge, Linda; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Sewell, Andrew K.

    2016-01-01

    The cross-reactivity of T cells with pathogen- and self-derived peptides has been implicated as a pathway involved in the development of autoimmunity. However, the mechanisms that allow the clonal T cell antigen receptor (TCR) to functionally engage multiple peptide–major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) are unclear. Here, we studied multiligand discrimination by a human, preproinsulin reactive, MHC class-I–restricted CD8+ T cell clone (1E6) that can recognize over 1 million different peptides. We generated high-resolution structures of the 1E6 TCR bound to 7 altered peptide ligands, including a pathogen-derived peptide that was an order of magnitude more potent than the natural self-peptide. Evaluation of these structures demonstrated that binding was stabilized through a conserved lock-and-key–like minimal binding footprint that enables 1E6 TCR to tolerate vast numbers of substitutions outside of this so-called hotspot. Highly potent antigens of the 1E6 TCR engaged with a strong antipathogen-like binding affinity; this engagement was governed though an energetic switch from an enthalpically to entropically driven interaction compared with the natural autoimmune ligand. Together, these data highlight how T cell cross-reactivity with pathogen-derived antigens might break self-tolerance to induce autoimmune disease. PMID:27183389

  2. Toll receptor agonist therapy of skin cancer and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huen, Auris O; Rook, Alain H

    2014-03-01

    The use of agents which exhibit the ability to potently activate the innate immune response has gained significant interest as therapeutics to treat cancer. We will review the history and the current applications of these agents to treat skin cancer and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Particular attention has been focused upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists, including imidazoquinolines, which can trigger TLR 7 and TLR 8, and cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotides, which activate TLR 9-expressing cells. Imiquimod, a TLR 7 agonist, has been found to be efficacious for basal cell and squamous cell cancers, as well as cutaneous T-cell lymphoma and lentigo maligna melanoma. CpGs have demonstrated efficacy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Additional more potent compounds, including resiquimod, are presently in clinical trials for several types of skin cancers. TLR agonists that can activate the innate immune response have been used to treat a variety of skin cancers including basal cell cancer, squamous cell cancer, lentigo maligna melanoma and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Significant clinical efficacy has been observed for all of these conditions. It is anticipated that additional members of the TLR agonist family will be available in the clinic for the future treatment of skin cancers as well as other malignancies.

  3. A Novel Ex Vivo Isolation and Expansion Procedure for Chimeric Antigen Receptor Engrafted Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cartellieri, Marc; Koristka, Stefanie; Arndt, Claudia; Feldmann, Anja; Stamova, Slava; von Bonin, Malte; Töpfer, Katrin; Krüger, Thomas; Geib, Mathias; Michalk, Irene; Temme, Achim; Bornhäuser, Martin; Lindemann, Dirk; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bachmann, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered T lymphocytes are a promising option for cancer therapy. Prior to adoptive transfer they have to be expanded in vitro to reach therapeutically sufficient numbers. So far, no universal method exists for selective in vitro expansion of engineered T lymphocytes. In order to overcome this problem and for proof of concept we incorporated a novel unique peptide sequence of ten amino acids as epitope (E-Tag) into the binding domains of two novel chimeric antigen receptors (ECARs) directed against either prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) or CD33 for the treatment of acute myeloide leukemia (AML). The epitope tag then was utilized for expanding ECAR engrafted T cells by triggering the modified T cells via a monoclonal antibody directed against the E-Tag (Emab). Moreover, the E-Tag served as an efficient selection epitope for immunomagnetic isolation of modified T cells to high purity. ECAR engrafted T cells were fully functional and mediated profound anti-tumor effects in the respective models of PCa or AML both in vitro and in vivo. The method can be integrated straightforward into clinical protocols to improve therapeutic efficiency of tumor treatment with CAR modified T lymphocytes. PMID:24699869

  4. First-in-class inhibitor of the T cell receptor for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Borroto, Aldo; Reyes-Garau, Diana; Jiménez, M Angeles; Carrasco, Esther; Moreno, Beatriz; Martínez-Pasamar, Sara; Cortés, José R; Perona, Almudena; Abia, David; Blanco, Soledad; Fuentes, Manuel; Arellano, Irene; Lobo, Juan; Heidarieh, Haleh; Rueda, Javier; Esteve, Pilar; Cibrián, Danay; Martinez-Riaño, Ana; Mendoza, Pilar; Prieto, Cristina; Calleja, Enrique; Oeste, Clara L; Orfao, Alberto; Fresno, Manuel; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Alcamí, Antonio; Bovolenta, Paola; Martín, Pilar; Villoslada, Pablo; Morreale, Antonio; Messeguer, Angel; Alarcon, Balbino

    2016-12-21

    Modulating T cell activation is critical for treating autoimmune diseases but requires avoiding concomitant opportunistic infections. Antigen binding to the T cell receptor (TCR) triggers the recruitment of the cytosolic adaptor protein Nck to a proline-rich sequence in the cytoplasmic tail of the TCR's CD3ε subunit. Through virtual screening and using combinatorial chemistry, we have generated an orally available, low-molecular weight inhibitor of the TCR-Nck interaction that selectively inhibits TCR-triggered T cell activation with an IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) ~1 nM. By modulating TCR signaling, the inhibitor prevented the development of psoriasis and asthma and, furthermore, exerted a long-lasting therapeutic effect in a model of autoimmune encephalomyelitis. However, it did not prevent the generation of a protective memory response against a mouse pathogen, suggesting that the compound might not exert its effects through immunosuppression. These results suggest that inhibiting an immediate TCR signal has promise for treating a broad spectrum of human T cell-mediated autoimmune and inflammatory diseases.

  5. New role for the (pro)renin receptor in T-cell development.

    PubMed

    Geisberger, Sabrina; Maschke, Ulrike; Gebhardt, Matthias; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Manzel, Arndt; Linker, Ralf A; Chidgey, Ann; Dechend, Ralf; Nguyen, Genevieve; Daumke, Oliver; Muller, Dominik N; Wright, Mark D; Binger, Katrina J

    2015-07-23

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) was originally thought to be important for regulating blood pressure via the renin-angiotensin system. However, it is now emerging that PRR has instead a generic role in cellular development. Here, we have specifically deleted PRR from T cells. T-cell-specific PRR-knockout mice had a significant decrease in thymic cellularity, corresponding with a 100-fold decrease in the number of CD4(+) and CD8(+) thymocytes, and a large increase in double-negative (DN) precursors. Gene expression analysis on sorted DN3 thymocytes indicated that PRR-deficient thymocytes have perturbations in key cellular pathways essential at the DN3 stage, including transcription and translation. Further characterization of DN T-cell progenitors leads us to propose that PRR deletion affects thymocyte survival and development at multiple stages; from DN3 through to DN4, double-positive, and single-positive CD4 and CD8. Our study thus identifies a new role for PRR in T-cell development.

  6. Single-cell analysis of glandular T cell receptors in Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Christina; Pelikan, Richard C.; Moore, Jacen S.; Pan, Zijian; Radfar, Lida; Lewis, David M.; Grundahl, Kiely M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Wiley, Graham B.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Stone, Donald U.; Scofield, R. Hal; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Thompson, Linda F.; Farris, A. Darise

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T cells predominate in salivary gland (SG) inflammatory lesions in Sjögren’s syndrome (SS). However, their antigen specificity, degree of clonal expansion, and relationship to clinical disease features remain unknown. We used multiplex reverse-transcriptase PCR to amplify paired T cell receptor α (TCRα) and β transcripts of single CD4+CD45RA– T cells from SG and peripheral blood (PB) of 10 individuals with primary SS, 9 of whom shared the HLA DR3/DQ2 risk haplotype. TCRα and β sequences were obtained from a median of 91 SG and 107 PB cells per subject. The degree of clonal expansion and frequency of cells expressing two productively rearranged α genes were increased in SG versus PB. Expanded clones from SG exhibited complementary-determining region 3 (CDR3) sequence similarity both within and among subjects, suggesting antigenic selection and shared antigen recognition. CDR3 similarities were shared among expanded clones from individuals discordant for canonical Ro and La autoantibodies, suggesting recognition of alternative SG antigen(s). The extent of SG clonal expansion correlated with reduced saliva production and increased SG fibrosis, linking expanded SG T cells with glandular dysfunction. Knowledge of paired TCRα and β sequences enables further work toward identification of target antigens and development of novel therapies. PMID:27358913

  7. T-cell receptor analysis in Omenn's syndrome: evidence for defects in gene rearrangement and assembly.

    PubMed

    Brooks, E G; Filipovich, A H; Padgett, J W; Mamlock, R; Goldblum, R M

    1999-01-01

    Patients with Omenn's syndrome have a form of severe immune deficiency that is associated with pathological features of graft-versus-host disease, except for the lack of foreign engraftment. It has been hypothesized that the disease's unique clinical features are mediated by an expanded population of autologous self-reactive T cells of limited clonality. In the current study, an investigation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire was undertaken to identify defects in T-cell rearrangement and development. The TCR repertoire in this group of patients was exquisitely restricted in the number of different TCR clonotypes, and some of these clonotypes seemed to have similar recognition motifs in the antigen-binding region, indicating antigen-driven proliferation of T lymphocytes. The TCRs from some patients lacked N- or P-nucleotide insertions and used proximal variable and joining gene segments, suggesting abnormal intrathymic T-cell development. Finally, abnormal assembly of gene segments and truncated rearrangements within nonproductive alleles suggested abnormalities in TCR rearrangement mechanisms. Overall, the findings suggest that inefficient and/or abnormal generation of TCRs may be a consistent feature of this disease.

  8. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Teachey, David T.; Porter, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell–specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. PMID:25999455

  9. CTLA-4 and PD-1 Receptors Inhibit T-Cell Activation by Distinct Mechanisms†

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Richard V.; Chemnitz, Jens M.; Frauwirth, Kenneth A.; Lanfranco, Anthony R.; Braunstein, Inbal; Kobayashi, Sumire V.; Linsley, Peter S.; Thompson, Craig B.; Riley, James L.

    2005-01-01

    CTLA-4 and PD-1 are receptors that negatively regulate T-cell activation. Ligation of both CTLA-4 and PD-1 blocked CD3/CD28-mediated upregulation of glucose metabolism and Akt activity, but each accomplished this regulation using separate mechanisms. CTLA-4-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation is sensitive to okadaic acid, providing direct evidence that PP2A plays a prominent role in mediating CTLA-4 suppression of T-cell activation. In contrast, PD-1 signaling inhibits Akt phosphorylation by preventing CD28-mediated activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). The ability of PD-1 to suppress PI3K/AKT activation was dependent upon the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motif located in its cytoplasmic tail, adding further importance to this domain in mediating PD-1 signal transduction. Lastly, PD-1 ligation is more effective in suppressing CD3/CD28-induced changes in the T-cell transcriptional profile, suggesting that differential regulation of PI3K activation by PD-1 and CTLA-4 ligation results in distinct cellular phenotypes. Together, these data suggest that CTLA-4 and PD-1 inhibit T-cell activation through distinct and potentially synergistic mechanisms. PMID:16227604

  10. Expression and function of a variant T cell receptor complex lacking CD3-gamma

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    A T cell line termed DIL2 has been derived from an infant with a polyclonal T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 cell surface expression defect. Indirect immunofluorescence showed that the expression of certain TCR/CD3 epitopes (like those detected by WT31 and BMA031 monoclonals) was strongly reduced (around five-fold) on DIL2, whereas other epitopes (like those detected by SP34 and Leu4) were only around two-fold lower than in normal T cell lines. Specific immunoprecipitates of surface- radioiodinated DIL2 cells contained TCR-alpha, TCR-beta, CD3-delta, CD3- epsilon and TCR-zeta chains, but lacked CD3-gamma. This structural TCR/CD3 variant was, however, capable of transducing certain activation signals, since normal proliferation and a low but significant calcium flux was observed in DIL2 cells after engagement with specific antibodies. Our data suggest that a functional TCR/CD3 complex can be expressed on the surface of T cells in the absence of CD3-gamma. PMID:1713248

  11. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L; Teachey, David T; Porter, David L; Grupp, Stephan A

    2015-06-25

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell-specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Chemokine Receptor-Dependent Control of Skin Tissue-Resident Memory T Cell Formation.

    PubMed

    Zaid, Ali; Hor, Jyh Liang; Christo, Susan N; Groom, Joanna R; Heath, William R; Mackay, Laura K; Mueller, Scott N

    2017-10-01

    Infection or inflammation of the skin recruits effector CD8(+) T cells that enter the epidermis and form populations of long-lived tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells. These skin TRM cells migrate within the constrained epidermal environment by extending multiple dynamic dendritic projections and squeezing between keratinocytes to survey the tissue for pathogens. In this study, we examined the signals required for this distinctive mode of T cell migration by inhibiting key cytoskeletal components and performing intravital two-photon microscopy to visualize TRM cell behavior. We found that TRM cell motility and dendrite formation required an intact actomyosin cytoskeleton and the Rho-associated coiled-coil containing kinases. We also identified an essential role for microtubules for maintaining skin TRM cell shape and cellular integrity. We reveal a role for pertussis toxin-sensitive signaling for TRM cell dendritic morphology and migration that is independent of CXCR3 or CXCR6, or the skin-selective chemokine receptors CCR10 and CCR8. However, we found that CXCR6 and CCR10 expression by CD8(+) T cells was required for the optimal formation of memory T cell populations, in particular TRM cell populations in the skin. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. T-Cell Receptor Gene Therapy of Established Tumors in a Murine Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Abad, John D.; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A.; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Gary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-γ secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies. PMID:18157006

  14. T-cell receptor gene therapy of established tumors in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Abad, John D; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Cary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Palmer, Douglas C; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Morgan, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-gamma secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies.

  15. Diversity and divergence of the glioma-infiltrating T-cell receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Jennifer S.; Grinshpun, Boris; Feng, Yaping; Ung, Timothy H.; Neira, Justin A.; Samanamud, Jorge L.; Canoll, Peter; Shen, Yufeng; Sims, Peter A.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Although immune signaling has emerged as a defining feature of the glioma microenvironment, how the underlying structure of the glioma-infiltrating T-cell population differs from that of the blood from which it originates has been difficult to measure directly in patients. High-throughput sequencing of T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoires (TCRseq) provides a population-wide statistical description of how T cells respond to disease. We have defined immunophenotypes of whole repertoires based on TCRseq of the α- and β-chains from glioma tissue, nonneoplastic brain tissue, and peripheral blood from patients. Using information theory, we partitioned the diversity of these TCR repertoires into that from the distribution of VJ cassette combinations and diversity due to VJ-independent factors, such as selection due to antigen binding. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) possessed higher VJ-independent diversity than nonneoplastic tissue, stratifying patients according to tumor grade. We found that the VJ-independent components of tumor-associated repertoires diverge more from their corresponding peripheral repertoires than T-cell populations in nonneoplastic brain tissue, particularly for low-grade gliomas. Finally, we identified a “signature” set of TCRs whose use in peripheral blood is associated with patients exhibiting low TIL divergence and is depleted in patients with highly divergent TIL repertoires. This signature is detectable in peripheral blood, and therefore accessible noninvasively. We anticipate that these immunophenotypes will be foundational to monitoring and predicting response to antiglioma vaccines and immunotherapy. PMID:27261081

  16. High Throughput Sequencing of T Cell Antigen Receptors Reveals a Conserved TCR Repertoire.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xianliang; Lu, Chong; Chen, Sisi; Xie, Qian; Cui, Guangying; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Zhi; Wu, Zhongwen; Ding, Yulong; Ye, Ping; Dai, Yong; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-03-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is a mirror of the human immune system that reflects processes caused by infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and aging. Next-generation sequencing has become a powerful tool for deep TCR profiling. Herein, we used this technology to study the repertoire features of TCR beta chain in the blood of healthy individuals.Peripheral blood samples were collected from 10 healthy donors. T cells were isolated with anti-human CD3 magnetic beads according to the manufacturer's protocol. We then combined multiplex-PCR, Illumina sequencing, and IMGT/High V-QUEST to analyze the characteristics and polymorphisms of the TCR.Most of the individual T cell clones were present at very low frequencies, suggesting that they had not undergone clonal expansion. The usage frequencies of the TCR beta variable, beta joining, and beta diversity gene segments were similar among T cells from different individuals. Notably, the usage frequency of individual nucleotides and amino acids within complementarity-determining region (CDR3) intervals was remarkably consistent between individuals. Moreover, our data show that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity was biased toward the insertion of G (31.92%) and C (27.14%) over A (21.82%) and T (19.12%) nucleotides.Some conserved features could be observed in the composition of CDR3, which may inform future studies of human TCR gene recombination.

  17. High Throughput Sequencing of T Cell Antigen Receptors Reveals a Conserved TCR Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xianliang; Lu, Chong; Chen, Sisi; Xie, Qian; Cui, Guangying; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Zhi; Wu, Zhongwen; Ding, Yulong; Ye, Ping; Dai, Yong; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is a mirror of the human immune system that reflects processes caused by infections, cancer, autoimmunity, and aging. Next-generation sequencing has become a powerful tool for deep TCR profiling. Herein, we used this technology to study the repertoire features of TCR beta chain in the blood of healthy individuals. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 10 healthy donors. T cells were isolated with anti-human CD3 magnetic beads according to the manufacturer's protocol. We then combined multiplex-PCR, Illumina sequencing, and IMGT/High V-QUEST to analyze the characteristics and polymorphisms of the TCR. Most of the individual T cell clones were present at very low frequencies, suggesting that they had not undergone clonal expansion. The usage frequencies of the TCR beta variable, beta joining, and beta diversity gene segments were similar among T cells from different individuals. Notably, the usage frequency of individual nucleotides and amino acids within complementarity-determining region (CDR3) intervals was remarkably consistent between individuals. Moreover, our data show that terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase activity was biased toward the insertion of G (31.92%) and C (27.14%) over A (21.82%) and T (19.12%) nucleotides. Some conserved features could be observed in the composition of CDR3, which may inform future studies of human TCR gene recombination. PMID:26962778

  18. Antigen-receptor gene-modified T cells for treatment of glioma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Immunological effector cells and molecules have been shown to access intracranial tumor sites despite the existence of blood brain barrier (BBB) or immunosuppressive mechanisms associated with brain tumors. Recent progress in T-cell biology and tumor immunology made possible to develop strategies of tumor-associated antigen-specific immunotherapeutic approaches such as vaccination with defined antigens and adoptive T-cell therapy with antigen-specific T cells including gene-modified T cells for the treatment of patients with brain tumors. An array of recent reports on the trials of active and passive immunotherapy for patients with brain tumors have documented safety and some preliminary clinical efficacy, although the ultimate judgment for clinical benefits awaits rigorous evaluation in trials of later phases. Nevertheless, treatment with lymphocytes that are engineered to express tumor-specific receptor genes is a promising immunotherapy against glioma, based on the significant efficacy reported in the trials for patients with other types of malignancy. Overcoming the relative difficulty to apply immunotherapeutic approach to intracranial region, current advances in the understanding of human tumor immunology and the gene-therapy methodology will address the development of effective immunotherapy of brain tumors.

  19. T cell receptor restriction of diabetogenic autoimmune NOD T cells

    PubMed Central

    Simone, E.; Daniel, D.; Schloot, N.; Gottlieb, P.; Babu, S.; Kawasaki, E.; Wegmann, D.; Eisenbarth, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Restricted use of T cell receptor (TCR) gene segments is characteristic of several induced autoimmune disease models. TCR sequences have previously been unavailable for pathogenic T cells which react with a defined autoantigen in a spontaneous autoimmune disease. The majority of T cell clones, derived from islets of NOD mice which spontaneously develop type I diabetes, react with insulin peptide B-(9–23). We have sequenced the α and β chains of TCRs from these B-(9–23)-reactive T cell clones. No TCR β chain restriction was found. In contrast, the clones (10 of 13) used Vα13 coupled with one of two homologous Jα segments (Jα45 or Jα34 in 8 of 13 clones). Furthermore, 9 of 10 of the Vα13 segments are a novel NOD sequence that we have tentatively termed Vα13.3. This dramatic α chain restriction, similar to the β chain restriction of other autoimmune models, provides a target for diagnostics and immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:9122227

  20. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin drive ligand-independent T-cell antigen receptor nanoclustering.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Eszter; Swamy, Mahima; Holzer, Martin; Beck-García, Katharina; Worch, Remigiusz; Thiele, Christoph; Guigas, Gernot; Boye, Kristian; Luescher, Immanuel F; Schwille, Petra; Schubert, Rolf; Schamel, Wolfgang W A

    2012-12-14

    The T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) exists in monomeric and nanoclustered forms independently of antigen binding. Although the clustering is involved in the regulation of T-cell sensitivity, it is unknown how the TCR nanoclusters form. We show that cholesterol is required for TCR nanoclustering in T cells and that this clustering enhances the avidity but not the affinity of the TCR-antigen interaction. Investigating the mechanism of the nanoclustering, we found that radioactive photocholesterol specifically binds to the TCRβ chain in vivo. In order to reduce the complexity of cellular membranes, we used a synthetic biology approach and reconstituted the TCR in liposomes of defined lipid composition. Both cholesterol and sphingomyelin were required for the formation of TCR dimers in phosphatidylcholine-containing large unilamellar vesicles. Further, the TCR was localized in the liquid disordered phase in giant unilamellar vesicles. We propose a model in which cholesterol and sphingomyelin binding to the TCRβ chain causes TCR dimerization. The lipid-induced TCR nanoclustering enhances the avidity to antigen and thus might be involved in enhanced sensitivity of memory compared with naive T cells. Our work contributes to the understanding of the function of specific nonannular lipid-membrane protein interactions.

  1. Proliferation of thymocytes in relation to T-cell receptor beta-chain expression.

    PubMed

    Parkin, I G; Owen, J J; Jenkinson, E J

    1988-05-01

    During proliferation and differentiation of maturing thymocytes, T-cell receptor beta-chain products are first expressed in the cytoplasm. Only subsequently are they expressed on the cell surface, presumably as part of the alpha beta/CD3 receptor complex. This study uses double immunofluorescence labelling to identify these cytoplasmic and surface phases separately in relationship to cell-cycle parameters. The use of a mitotic arrest agent and tritiated thymidine autoradiography both show that cells with cytoplasmic beta-chains are in cell cycle, whereas cells with surface beta-chains are cycling slowly, if at all.

  2. Expression of EBV/C3d receptors on T cells: biological significance.

    PubMed

    Tsoukas, C D; Lambris, J D

    1993-02-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that a single polypeptide serves as a receptor for both the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), and for certain enzymatic fragments of C3. This receptor, termed CR2 (CD21), is known to be expressed on the surfaces of B cells, and a large body of evidence suggests that CR2, or related structures, are also expressed on cells of the T lineage. Here, Constantine Tsoukas and John Lambris review the studies of CR2 expression in T cells and offer some speculation on its possible biological significance.

  3. Statistical inference of the generation probability of T-cell receptors from sequence repertoires.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Anand; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Callan, Curtis G

    2012-10-02

    Stochastic rearrangement of germline V-, D-, and J-genes to create variable coding sequence for certain cell surface receptors is at the origin of immune system diversity. This process, known as "VDJ recombination", is implemented via a series of stochastic molecular events involving gene choices and random nucleotide insertions between, and deletions from, genes. We use large sequence repertoires of the variable CDR3 region of human CD4+ T-cell receptor beta chains to infer the statistical properties of these basic biochemical events. Because any given CDR3 sequence can be produced in multiple ways, the probability distribution of hidden recombination events cannot be inferred directly from the observed sequences; we therefore develop a maximum likelihood inference method to achieve this end. To separate the properties of the molecular rearrangement mechanism from the effects of selection, we focus on nonproductive CDR3 sequences in T-cell DNA. We infer the joint distribution of the various generative events that occur when a new T-cell receptor gene is created. We find a rich picture of correlation (and absence thereof), providing insight into the molecular mechanisms involved. The generative event statistics are consistent between individuals, suggesting a universal biochemical process. Our probabilistic model predicts the generation probability of any specific CDR3 sequence by the primitive recombination process, allowing us to quantify the potential diversity of the T-cell repertoire and to understand why some sequences are shared between individuals. We argue that the use of formal statistical inference methods, of the kind presented in this paper, will be essential for quantitative understanding of the generation and evolution of diversity in the adaptive immune system.

  4. Myeloid cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cell concentrates inhibit the expansion of chimeric antigen receptor T cells

    PubMed Central

    STRONCEK, DAVID F.; REN, JIAQIANG; LEE, DANIEL W.; TRAN, MINH; FRODIGH, SUE ELLEN; SABATINO, MARIANNA; KHUU, HANH; MERCHANT, MELINDA S.; MACKALL, CRYSTAL L.

    2016-01-01

    Background aims Autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies have shown promising clinical outcomes, but T-cell yields have been variable. CD19- and GD2-CAR T-cell manufacturing records were reviewed to identify sources of variability. Methods CD19-CAR T cells were used to treat 43 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia or lymphoma and GD2-CAR T cells to treat eight patients with osteosarcoma and three with neuroblastoma. Both types of CAR T cells were manufactured using autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) concentrates and anti-CD3/CD28 beads for T-cell enrichment and simulation. Results A comparison of the first 6 GD2- and the first 22 CD19-CAR T-cell products manufactured revealed that GD2-CAR T-cell products contained fewer transduced cells than CD19-CAR T-cell products (147 ± 102 × 106 vs 1502 ± 1066 × 106; P = 0.0059), and their PBMC concentrates contained more monocytes (31.4 ± 12.4% vs 18.5 ± 13.7%; P = 0.019). Among the first 28 CD19-CAR T-cell products manufactured, four had poor expansion yielding less than 1 × 106 transduced T cells per kilogram. When PBMC concentrates from these four patients were compared with the 24 others, PBMC concentrates of poorly expanding products contained greater quantities of monocytes (39.8 ± 12.9% vs. 15.3 ± 10.8%, P = 0.0014). Among the patients whose CD19-CAR T cells expanded poorly, manufacturing for two patients was repeated using cryopreserved PBMC concentrates but incorporating a monocyte depleting plastic adherence step, and an adequate dose of CAR T cells was produced for both patients. Conclusions Variability in CAR T-cell expansion is due, at least in part, to the contamination of the starting PBMC concentrates with monocytes. PMID:27210719

  5. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells for the immunotherapy of patients with EGFR-expressing advanced relapsed/refractory non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kaichao; Guo, Yelei; Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Li, Xiang; Jia, Hejin; Han, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    The successes achieved by chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cells in hematological malignancies raised the possibility of their use in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC). In this phase I clinical study (NCT01869166), patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive (>50% expression), relapsed/refractory NSCLC received escalating doses of EGFR-targeted CAR-T cell infusions. The EGFR-targeted CAR-T cells were generated from peripheral blood after a 10 to 13-day in vitro expansion. Serum cytokines in peripheral blood and copy numbers of CAR-EGFR transgene in peripheral blood and in tissue biopsy were monitored periodically. Clinical responses were evaluated with RECIST1.1 and immune- related response criteria, and adverse events were graded with CTCAE 4.0. The EGFR-targeted CAR-T cell infusions were well-tolerated without severe toxicity. Of 11 evaluable patients, two patients obtained partial response and five had stable disease for two to eight months. The median dose of transfused CAR(+) T cells was 0.97×10(7) cells kg(-1) (interquartile range (IQR), 0.45 to 1.09×10(7) cells kg(-1)). Pathological eradication of EGFR positive tumor cells after EGFR-targeted CAR-T cell treatment can be observed in tumor biopsies, along with the CAR-EGFR gene detected in tumor-infiltrating T cells in all four biopsied patients. The EGFR-targeted CAR-T cell therapy is safe and feasible for EGFR-positive advanced relapsed/refractory NSCLC.

  6. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Aileen G; Witkover, Aviva; Melamed, Anat; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Cook, Lucy B M; Fields, Paul; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  7. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Witkover, Aviva; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fields, Paul; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease. PMID:27893842

  8. Vitamin D receptor activation and downregulation of renin-angiotensin system attenuate morphine-induced T cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Nirupama; Sharma, Bipin; Salhan, Divya; Husain, Mohammad; Malhotra, Ashwani; Buch, Shilpa

    2012-01-01

    Opiates have been reported to induce T cell loss. We evaluated the role of vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in morphine-induced T cell loss. Morphine-treated human T cells displayed downregulation of VDR and the activation of the RAS. On the other hand, a VDR agonist (EB1089) enhanced T cell VDR expression both under basal and morphine-stimulated states. Since T cells with silenced VDR displayed the activation of the RAS, whereas activation of the VDR was associated with downregulation of the RAS, it appears that morphine-induced T cell RAS activation was dependent on the VDR status. Morphine enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in a dose-dependent manner. Naltrexone (an opiate receptor antagonist) inhibited morphine-induced ROS generation and thus, suggested the role of opiate receptors in T cell ROS generation. The activation of VDR as well as blockade of ANG II (by losartan, an AT1 receptor blocker) also inhibited morphine-induced T cell ROS generation. Morphine not only induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) in T cells but also attenuated DNA repair response, whereas activation of VDR not only inhibited morphine-induced DSBs but also enhanced DNA repair. Morphine promoted T cell apoptosis; however, this effect of morphine was inhibited by blockade of opiate receptors, activation of the VDR, and blockade of the RAS. These findings indicate that morphine-induced T cell apoptosis is mediated through ROS generation in response to morphine-induced downregulation of VDR and associated activation of the RAS. PMID:22763121

  9. Fetal exposure to HIV-1 alters chemokine receptor expression by CD4+T cells and increases susceptibility to HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Bunders, Madeleine J; van Hamme, John L; Jansen, Machiel H; Boer, Kees; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-10-24

    Absolute numbers of lymphocytes are decreased in uninfected infants born to HIV-1-infected women (HIV-1-exposed). Although the exact mechanism is unknown, fetal exposure to maternal HIV-1-infection could prime the immune system and affect T cell trafficking. We compared the expression of chemokine receptors on cord blood CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-exposed children and healthy controls. At baseline CD4(+) T cells had a largely naïve phenotype. However, stimulation with cytokines resulted in an upregulation of inflammatory response-related chemokine receptors on CD4(+) T cells, with HIV-1-exposed infants having a significantly higher frequency of CD4(+) T cells expressing, in particularly Th2 associated chemokine receptors (CCR3 p < 0.01, CCR8 p = 0.03). Numbers of naive CCR7(+) CD4(+) T cells were reduced (p = 0.01) in HIV-1-exposed infants. We further assessed whether the inflammatory phenotype was associated with susceptibility to HIV-1 and detected higher levels of p24 upon in in vitro infection of stimulated CD4(+) T cells of HIV-1-exposed infants. In summary, fetal exposure to HIV-1 primes the immune system in the infant leading to an enhanced immune activation and altered T cell homing, with potential ramifications regarding T cell responses and the acquisition of HIV-1 as an infant.

  10. The mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 modulates T-cell receptor signalling at the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Morlino, Giulia; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Veiga, Esteban; Serrador, Juan M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    During antigen-specific T-cell activation, mitochondria mobilize towards the vicinity of the immune synapse. We show here that the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) docks at mitochondria, regulating their positioning and activity near the actin-rich ring of the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) of the immune synapse. Mitochondrial redistribution in response to T-cell receptor engagement was abolished by Drp1 silencing, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant Drp1S637D and the Drp1-specific inhibitor mdivi-1. Moreover, Drp1 knockdown enhanced mitochondrial depolarization and T-cell receptor signal strength, but decreased myosin phosphorylation, ATP production and T-cell receptor assembly at the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC). Our results indicate that Drp1-dependent mitochondrial positioning and activity controls T-cell activation by fuelling central supramolecular activation cluster assembly at the immune synapse. PMID:21326213

  11. Mannose receptor induces T-cell tolerance via inhibition of CD45 and up-regulation of CTLA-4

    PubMed Central

    Schuette, Verena; Embgenbroich, Maria; Ulas, Thomas; Welz, Meike; Schulte-Schrepping, Jonas; Draffehn, Astrid M.; Quast, Thomas; Koch, Katharina; Nehring, Melanie; König, Jessica; Zweynert, Annegret; Harms, Frederike L.; Steiner, Nancy; Limmer, Andreas; Förster, Irmgard; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike; Knolle, Percy A.; Wohlleber, Dirk; Kolanus, Waldemar; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L.; Burgdorf, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The mannose receptor (MR) is an endocytic receptor involved in serum homeostasis and antigen presentation. Here, we identify the MR as a direct regulator of CD8+ T-cell activity. We demonstrate that MR expression on dendritic cells (DCs) impaired T-cell cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. This regulatory effect of the MR was mediated by a direct interaction with CD45 on the T cell, inhibiting its phosphatase activity, which resulted in up-regulation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated Protein 4 (CTLA-4) and the induction of T-cell tolerance. Inhibition of CD45 prevented expression of B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl-6), a transcriptional inhibitor that directly bound the CTLA-4 promoter and regulated its activity. These data demonstrate that endocytic receptors expressed on DCs contribute to the regulation of T-cell functionality. PMID:27601670

  12. The mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 modulates T-cell receptor signalling at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Morlino, Giulia; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Veiga, Esteban; Serrador, Juan M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-04-06

    During antigen-specific T-cell activation, mitochondria mobilize towards the vicinity of the immune synapse. We show here that the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) docks at mitochondria, regulating their positioning and activity near the actin-rich ring of the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) of the immune synapse. Mitochondrial redistribution in response to T-cell receptor engagement was abolished by Drp1 silencing, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant Drp1S637D and the Drp1-specific inhibitor mdivi-1. Moreover, Drp1 knockdown enhanced mitochondrial depolarization and T-cell receptor signal strength, but decreased myosin phosphorylation, ATP production and T-cell receptor assembly at the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC). Our results indicate that Drp1-dependent mitochondrial positioning and activity controls T-cell activation by fuelling central supramolecular activation cluster assembly at the immune synapse.

  13. Surface expression of the beta T cell receptor (TCR) chain in the absence of other TCR or CD3 proteins on immature T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, H; Borgulya, P; Scott, B; Karjalainen, K; Traunecker, A; Kaufman, J; von Boehmer, H

    1991-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) beta genes are rearranged prior to TCR alpha genes. A productively rearranged TCR beta gene suppresses further V beta gene rearrangement. Here we show that in beta TCR transgenic mice the TCR beta-chain can be expressed on the surface of immature CD4-8- thymocytes, but not on mature T cells, in the absence of any other known TCR chain and proteins of the CD3 complex. Analysis by NEPHGE and SDS-PAGE showed that at least some beta TCR exists on the surface as a large disulfide-linked complex with unknown acidic molecules. The introduction of the beta TCR gene into scid mice resulted in the expression of the beta TCR on the cell surface of thymocytes and induced the expression of CD4 and CD8 co-receptors as well as transcription of the alpha TCR locus. Images PMID:1703490

  14. Peptide-MHC-based nanomedicines for autoimmunity function as T-cell receptor microclustering devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singha, Santiswarup; Shao, Kun; Yang, Yang; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Solé, Patricia; Clemente, Antonio; Blanco, Jesús; Dai, Qin; Song, Fayi; Liu, Shang Wan; Yamanouchi, Jun; Umeshappa, Channakeshava Sokke; Nanjundappa, Roopa Hebbandi; Detampel, Pascal; Amrein, Matthias; Fandos, César; Tanguay, Robert; Newbigging, Susan; Serra, Pau; Khadra, Anmar; Chan, Warren C. W.; Santamaria, Pere

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as ligand-multimerization platforms to activate specific cellular receptors in vivo. Nanoparticles coated with autoimmune disease-relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) blunted autoimmune responses by triggering the differentiation and expansion of antigen-specific regulatory T cells in vivo. Here, we define the engineering principles impacting biological activity, detail a synthesis process yielding safe and stable compounds, and visualize how these nanomedicines interact with cognate T cells. We find that the triggering properties of pMHC-NPs are a function of pMHC intermolecular distance and involve the sustained assembly of large antigen receptor microclusters on murine and human cognate T cells. These compounds show no off-target toxicity in zebrafish embryos, do not cause haematological, biochemical or histological abnormalities, and are rapidly captured by phagocytes or processed by the hepatobiliary system. This work lays the groundwork for the design of ligand-based NP formulations to re-program in vivo cellular responses using nanotechnology.

  15. Overcoming the Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment of Hodgkin Lymphoma Using Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells.

    PubMed

    Ruella, Marco; Klichinsky, Michael; Kenderian, Saad S; Shestova, Olga; Ziober, Amy; Kraft, Daniel O; Feldman, Michael; Wasik, Mariusz A; June, Carl H; Gill, Saar

    2017-10-01

    Patients with otherwise treatment-resistant Hodgkin lymphoma could benefit from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CART) therapy. However, Hodgkin lymphoma lacks CD19 and contains a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME). We hypothesized that in Hodgkin lymphoma, CART should target both malignant cells and the TME. We demonstrated CD123 on both Hodgkin lymphoma cells and TME, including tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). In vitro, Hodgkin lymphoma cells convert macrophages toward immunosuppressive TAMs that inhibit T-cell proliferation. In contrast, anti-CD123 CART recognized and killed TAMs, thus overcoming immunosuppression. Finally, we showed in immunodeficient mouse models that CART123 eradicated Hodgkin lymphoma and established long-term immune memory. A novel platform that targets malignant cells and the microenvironment may be needed to successfully treat malignancies with an immunosuppressive milieu.Significance: Anti-CD123 chimeric antigen receptor T cells target both the malignant cells and TAMs in Hodgkin lymphoma, thereby eliminating an important immunosuppressive component of the tumor microenvironment. Cancer Discov; 7(10); 1154-67. ©2017 AACR.This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1047. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 3 Ligand Dampens Liver Inflammation by Stimulating Vα14 Invariant Natural Killer T Cells to Negatively Regulate γδT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Tommy R.; Chen, Qingling; Jin, Yijun; Ajuebor, Maureen N.

    2010-01-01

    Vα14 invariant natural killer T (Vα14iNKT) cells are at the interface between the innate and adaptive immune responses and are thus critical for providing full engagement of host defense. We investigated the role of polyriboinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), a replication-competent viral double-stranded RNA mimic and a specific agonist that recognizes the cellular sensor Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), in regulating Vα14iNKT cell activation. We established for the first time that hepatic Vα14iNKT cells up-regulate TLR3 extracellularly after poly I:C treatment. Notably, activation of TLR3-expressing hepatic Vα14iNKT cells by a TLR3 ligand was suppressed by TLR3 deficiency. Our studies also revealed that Vα14iNKT cell activation in response to poly I:C administration uniquely suppressed the accumulation and activation of intrahepatic γδT cells (but not natural killer cells) by inducing apoptosis. Furthermore, we established that activated hepatic Vα14iNKT cells (via cytokines and possibly reactive oxygen species) influenced the frequency and absolute number of intrahepatic γδT cells, as evidenced by increased hepatic γδT cell accumulation in Vα14iNKT cell-deficient mice after poly I:C treatment relative to wild-type mice. Thus, hepatic Vα14iNKT cells and intrahepatic γδT cells are functionally linked on application of TLR3 agonist. Overall, our results demonstrate a novel and previously unrecognized anti-inflammatory role for activated hepatic Vα14iNKT cells in negatively regulating intrahepatic γδT cell accumulation (probably through TLR3 signaling) and thereby preventing potentially harmful activation of intrahepatic γδT cells. PMID:20167870

  17. A T cell receptor antagonist peptide induces T cells that mediate bystander suppression and prevent autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with multiple myelin antigens

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Lindsay B.; Murtaza, Anwar; Hafler, Brian P.; Sette, Alessandro; Kuchroo, Vijay K.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced with myelin proteolipid protein (PLP) residues 139–151 (HSLGKWLGHPDKF) can be prevented by treatment with a T cell receptor (TCR) antagonist peptide (L144/R147) generated by substituting at the two principal TCR contact residues in the encephalitogenic peptide. The TCR antagonist peptide blocks activation of encephalitogenic Th1 helper cells in vitro, but the mechanisms by which the antagonist peptide blocks EAE in vivo are not clear. Immunization with L144/R147 did not inhibit generation of PLP-(139–151)-specific T cells in vivo. Furthermore, preimmunization with L144/R147 protected mice from EAE induced with the encephalitogenic peptides PLP-(178–191) and myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG) residues 92–106 and with mouse myelin basic protein (MBP). These data suggest that the L144/R147 peptide does not act as an antagonist in vivo but mediates bystander suppression, probably by the generation of regulatory T cells. To confirm this we generated T cell lines and clones from animals immunized with PLP-(139–151) plus L144/R147. T cells specific for L144/R147 peptide were crossreactive with the native PLP-(139–151) peptide, produced Th2/Th0 cytokines, and suppressed EAE upon adoptive transfer. These studies demonstrate that TCR antagonist peptides may have multiple biological effects in vivo. One of the principal mechanisms by which these peptides inhibit autoimmunity is by the induction of regulatory T cells, leading to bystander suppression of EAE. These results have important implications for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where there are autopathogenic responses to multiple antigens in the target organ. PMID:9256473

  18. A fast and robust method to clone and functionally validate T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Katrin; Hofmann, Christian; Hoyer, Stefanie; Schulz, Birgit; Harrer, Thomas; Kämpgen, Eckhart; Schuler, Gerold; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels

    2009-07-31

    Sequencing, cloning and functional testing of T-cell-receptor (TCR) alpha- and beta-chains from T-cell clones is often required in immunotherapy and in immunological research. However, the determination of the TCR chains by a simple PCR is not possible, since, in contrast to the 3' constant domain and untranslated region (UTR), no conserved sequences are present in the 5' region. Furthermore, subsequent functional testing of cloned TCRs requires laborious cell culture experiments, often involving primary human material and time-consuming viral transduction strategies. Here we present a universal PCR-based protocol, adapted from the capswitch technology, that allows for amplification of the TCR alpha- and beta-chain mRNAs without knowledge of the TCR variable domain subtype by attaching a designed sequence to the mRNA's 5' end. Two different MelanA/HLA-A2-specific and one HIVgag/HLA-A2-specific TCR were cloned that way, and were functionally tested by a newly developed easy, fast, and low-cost method: we electroporated Jurkat T cells simultaneously with TCR-encoding RNA and an NFAT-reporter construct, and measured the activation status of the cells upon specific stimulation. The results of this assay correlated with the cytokine release, functional avidity, proliferative activity, and the ability to recognize MelanA/HLA-A2-presenting tumor cells of bulk T cells electroporated with RNA encoding the same TCR. Together these two protocols represent a rapid and low-cost tool for the identification and functional testing of TCRs of T-cell clones, which can then be applied in immunotherapy or immunological research.

  19. IL-20 receptor 2 signaling down-regulates antigen-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Christian; Müller, Werner; Leithäuser, Frank; Adler, Guido; Oswald, Franz; Reimann, Jörg; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Seier, Anne; Weiss, Johannes Martin; Prochnow, Blair; Wegenka, Ursula Maria

    2009-01-15

    The recently described cytokines IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 share structural homology with IL-10 and are therefore classified as members of the IL-10 family of cytokines. Although it has long been speculated that signaling by their heterodimeric receptor complexes (IL-20R1/IL-20R2 and IL-22R/IL-20R2) influences immunological processes, the target cells for this group of cytokines are still unclear. By generating a knockout mouse strain deficient for the common IL-20R beta-chain (IL-20R2), we show that IFN-gamma and IL-2 secretion is significantly elevated after stimulation of IL-20R2-/--deficient CD8 and CD4 T cells with Con A or anti-CD3/CD28 in vitro. IL-10 secretion by activated IL-20R2-/- CD4 cells was diminished. Consistent with our in vitro results, significantly more Ag-specific CD8 IFN-gamma+ and CD4 IFN-gamma+ T cells developed to locally applied DNA vaccines in IL-20R2-deficient mice. In a T cell-dependent model of contact hypersensitivity, IL-20R2 knockout mice were more sensitive to the contact allergen trinitro-chloro-benzene. Thus, IL-20R2 signaling directly regulates CD8 and CD4 T cell answers in vitro and in vivo. For the first time, we provide evidence that IL-19, IL-20, and IL-24 are part of a signaling network that normally down-modulates T cell responses in mice.

  20. Evolution of T-Cell Receptor Gamma and Delta Constant Region and Other T-Cell-Related Proteins in the Human-Rodent-Artiodactyl Triplet

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarese, S.; Lanave, C.; Saccone, C.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we report a detailed comparative and evolutionary analysis of the sequences of constant T-cell receptor (Tcr) Cγδ genes of artiodactyls compared to the homologous sequences of rodents and primates. Because of the frequency and physiological distribution of γδ T-cells in different animals, rodents and humans are defined as ``γδ low'' species and ruminants as ``γδ high'' species. Such a characteristic seems to be due to an adaptive role of γδ T-cell function. By analyzing the ruminant gene phylogeny of Tcr Cγ we were able to estimate the distance between cattle and sheep at 18 million years ago, a time that is in agreement with other nonmolecular estimates. For Tcr Cγδ genes a peculiar phylogenetic relationship was found, with human and mouse clustering together and leaving artiodactyls apart. By using appropriate outgroups, the same phylogenetic pattern was obtained with other T-cell related sequences: namely, Tcr Cα chain, CD3 γ and δ invariant subunits, Interleukin-2, Interleukin-2 receptor α chain and Interleukin-1β with the exception of Tcr Cβ chain and Interleukin-1α. In contrast, the analysis of all other T-cell nonrelated genes available in primary databases reveals a different tree, where primates and artiodactyls are sister taxa and rodents are apart in accordance with the current view of mammalian phylogeny. These data are relevant to important evolutionary issues. They show how misleading a phylogeny based on a single or on a few homologous genes may be. In addition they demonstrate that genes with correlated functions may evolve in a lineage specific manner probably in relation to environmental conditions. PMID:9071594

  1. In vitro membrane reconstitution of the T cell receptor proximal signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Enfu; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) phosphorylation is controlled by a complex network that includes Lck, a Src family kinase (SFK), the tyrosine phosphatase CD45, and the Lck-inhibitory kinase Csk. How these competing phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions are modulated to produce T-cell triggering is not fully understood. Here we reconstituted this signaling network using purified enzymes on liposomes, recapitulating the membrane environment in which they normally interact. We demonstrate that Lck's enzymatic activity can be regulated over a ~10-fold range by controlling its phosphorylation state. By varying kinase and phosphatase concentrations, we constructed phase diagrams that reveal ultrasensitivity in the transition from the quiescent to the phosphorylated state and demonstrate that coclustering TCR-Lck or detaching Csk from the membrane can trigger TCR phosphorylation. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of TCR signaling as well as other signaling pathways involving SFKs. PMID:24463463

  2. End-binding protein 1 controls signal propagation from the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Baixauli, Francesc; López, María J; Gil, Diana; Monjas, Alicia; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The role of microtubules (MTs) in the control and dynamics of the immune synapse (IS) remains unresolved. Here, we show that T cell activation requires the growth of MTs mediated by the plus-end specific protein end-binding 1 (EB1). A direct interaction of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex with EB1 provides the molecular basis for EB1 activity promoting TCR encounter with signalling vesicles at the IS. EB1 knockdown alters TCR dynamics at the IS and prevents propagation of the TCR activation signal to LAT, thus inhibiting activation of PLCγ1 and its localization to the IS. These results identify a role for EB1 interaction with the TCR in controlling TCR sorting and its connection with the LAT/PLCγ1 signalosome. PMID:22922463

  3. End-binding protein 1 controls signal propagation from the T cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Baixauli, Francesc; López, María J; Gil, Diana; Monjas, Alicia; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2012-11-05

    The role of microtubules (MTs) in the control and dynamics of the immune synapse (IS) remains unresolved. Here, we show that T cell activation requires the growth of MTs mediated by the plus-end specific protein end-binding 1 (EB1). A direct interaction of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex with EB1 provides the molecular basis for EB1 activity promoting TCR encounter with signalling vesicles at the IS. EB1 knockdown alters TCR dynamics at the IS and prevents propagation of the TCR activation signal to LAT, thus inhibiting activation of PLCγ1 and its localization to the IS. These results identify a role for EB1 interaction with the TCR in controlling TCR sorting and its connection with the LAT/PLCγ1 signalosome.

  4. T cell receptor repertoire in the peripheral blood and intestinal mucosa of coeliac patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, N; Ben-Nun, A; Cohen, L; Kinarty, A; Lerner, A

    1995-01-01

    The alpha beta and gamma delta T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire in the peripheral blood and intestinal mucosa of six coeliac and six age-matched controls was analysed by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). No TCR alpha and gamma delta restriction was observed in coeliacs and controls. However, V gamma 3 was expressed only in coeliac peripheral and intestinal T cells. V delta 2 was strongly expressed in coeliacs and scarcely transcribed in control cells. The unique expression of these gamma delta TCR in coeliac patients suggests that V gamma 3 and perhaps V delta 2 TCR-bearing lymphocytes may play a role in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7664488

  5. A natural anti-T-cell receptor monoclonal antibody protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Malavé, Edgar; Stark-Aroeira, Luiz

    2011-05-01

    The therapeutic potential of natural anti-T-cell receptor (TCR) antibodies is largely unknown. We investigated whether passive administration of C1-19, a novel natural anti-TCRVβ8 monoclonal antibody, could interfere with the development of EAE. Treatment with C1-19 prevented myelin basic protein (MBP)-induced EAE in Vβ8-sufficient B10.PL but not in Vβ8-deficient SJL mice. Furthermore, C1-19 reduced disease severity when administrated shortly after disease onset. These protective effects of C1-19 correlated with a Th2 bias of the cytokine response, in the absence of T-cell deletion or anergy. Together, these findings indicate that natural anti-TCR antibodies could function as therapeutic tools in autoimmune inflammatory diseases.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of kinases downstream of the T cell receptor: another immunomodulatory mechanism of glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glucocorticoids affect peripheral immune responses, including modulation of T-cell activation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The quantity and quality of T-cell receptor (TCR)-triggered intracellular signals modulate T-cell function. Thus, glucocorticoids may affect T cells by interfering with the TCR signaling cascade. The purpose of the study was to search for glucocorticoid-modulated kinases downstream of the TCR. Methods Gene modulation in lymphoid cells either treated with glucocorticoids or from glucocorticoid-treated mice was studied using a RNase protection assay, real-time PCR, and western blotting. The sensitivity of genetically modified thymocytes to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis was studied by performing hypotonic propidium iodide staining and flow cytometry. The Student’s t-test was employed for statistical evaluation. Results We found that transcription of Itk, a non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, was up-regulated in a mouse T-cell hybridoma by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. In contrast, dexamethasone down-regulated the expression of Txk, a Tec kinase that functions redundantly with Itk, and Lck, the Src kinase immediately downstream of the TCR. We investigated the expression of Itk, Txk, and Lck in thymocytes and mature lymphocytes following in vitro and in vivo dexamethasone treatment at different time points and doses. Kinase expression was differentially modulated and followed distinct kinetics. Itk was up-regulated in all cell types and conditions tested. Txk was strongly up-regulated in mature lymphocytes but only weakly up-regulated or non-modulated in thymocytes in vitro or in vivo, respectively. Conversely, Lck was down-regulated in thymocytes, but not modulated or up-regulated in mature lymphocytes in the different experimental conditions. This complex behaviour correlates with the presence of both positive and negative glucocorticoid responsive elements (GRE and nGRE, respectively) in the Itk, Txk

  7. Nanoclusters of the resting T cell antigen receptor (TCR) localize to non-raft domains.

    PubMed

    Beck-García, Katharina; Beck-García, Esmeralda; Bohler, Sheila; Zorzin, Carina; Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Alarcón, Balbino; Schamel, Wolfgang W A

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade an increasing number of plasma membrane (PM) proteins have been shown to be non-randomly distributed but instead forming submicron-sized oligomers called nanoclusters. Nanoclusters exist independently of the ligand-bound state of the receptors and their existence implies a high degree of lateral organisation of the PM and its proteins. The mechanisms that drive receptor nanoclustering are largely unknown. One well-defined example of a transmembrane receptor that forms nanoclusters is the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), a multisubunit protein complex whose nanoclustering influences its activity. Membrane lipids, namely cholesterol and sphingomyelin, have been shown to contribute to TCR nanoclustering. However, the identity of the membrane microdomain in which the TCR resides remains controversial. Using a GFP-labeled TCR we show here that the resting TCR localized in the disordered domain of giant PM vesicles (GPMVs) and PM spheres (PMSs) and that single and nanoclustered TCRs are found in the high-density fractions in sucrose gradients. Both findings are indicative of non-raft localization. We discuss possible mechanisms of TCR nanoclustering in T cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nanoscale membrane organisation and signalling.

  8. All-trans retinoic acid enhances cytotoxic effect of T cells with an anti-CD38 chimeric antigen receptor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tetsumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Takei, Yoshifumi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Kubo, Takanori; Bhattacharyya, Joyeeta; Imai, Chihaya; Mino, Tatsuji; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2016-12-01

    We reported that T cells with anti-CD38-chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) eliminated B-cell lymphoma cells expressing CD38. To employ anti-CD38-CAR against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts not expressing CD38, it is necessary to induce or increase the intensity of CD38 expression. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-releasing assay and flow cytometry showed that anti-CD38-CAR T cells were cytotoxic against AML lines (THP-1 and CMK) expressing high CD38 levels (>99%), in time- and number of effector-dependent manners. In other AML lines (KG1, U937 and HL60) partially expressing CD38, CD38(+) AML cells were killed by CD38-specific T cells, but CD38(-) AML cells remained survived. Intriguingly, 10 nM all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) augmented CD38 expression in KG1, U937 and HL60 cells and primary leukemic cells from AML patients. Moreover, the withdrawal of ATRA from the medium decreased CD38 expression in AML cells. Killing effects of anti-CD38-CAR T cells against AML lines and AML cells were limited without ATRA, whereas CD38-specific T cells enhanced cytotoxicity on AML cells by ATRA in association with enhanced CD38 expression. These results indicate that anti-CD38-CAR T cells eliminate AML cells through CD38 expression induced by ATRA.

  9. All-trans retinoic acid enhances cytotoxic effect of T cells with an anti-CD38 chimeric antigen receptor in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Tetsumi; Mihara, Keichiro; Takei, Yoshifumi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Kubo, Takanori; Bhattacharyya, Joyeeta; Imai, Chihaya; Mino, Tatsuji; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    We reported that T cells with anti-CD38-chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) eliminated B-cell lymphoma cells expressing CD38. To employ anti-CD38-CAR against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts not expressing CD38, it is necessary to induce or increase the intensity of CD38 expression. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-releasing assay and flow cytometry showed that anti-CD38-CAR T cells were cytotoxic against AML lines (THP-1 and CMK) expressing high CD38 levels (>99%), in time- and number of effector-dependent manners. In other AML lines (KG1, U937 and HL60) partially expressing CD38, CD38+ AML cells were killed by CD38-specific T cells, but CD38− AML cells remained survived. Intriguingly, 10 nM all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) augmented CD38 expression in KG1, U937 and HL60 cells and primary leukemic cells from AML patients. Moreover, the withdrawal of ATRA from the medium decreased CD38 expression in AML cells. Killing effects of anti-CD38-CAR T cells against AML lines and AML cells were limited without ATRA, whereas CD38-specific T cells enhanced cytotoxicity on AML cells by ATRA in association with enhanced CD38 expression. These results indicate that anti-CD38-CAR T