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Sample records for partial thromboplastin time

  1. Activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is a commonly used coagulation assay that is easy to perform, is affordable, and is therefore performed in most coagulation laboratories, both clinical and research, worldwide. The APTT is based on the principle that in citrated plasma, the addition of a platelet substitute, factor XII activator, and CaCl2 allows for formation of a stable clot. The time required for the formation of a stable clot is recorded in seconds and represents the actual APTT result.

  2. Abnormal activated partial thromboplastin time and malignancy.

    PubMed

    Delicata, M; Hambley, H

    2011-08-01

    Malignancy often results in clotting abnormalities. The aetiology of haemostasis problems in cancer is complex, and is still not completely understood. We describe a case of a patient with malignant mesothelioma, who was found to have elevated activated partial thromboplastin time, due to lupus anticoagulant. We suggest that patients with malignancy should have their coagulation checked prior to any invasive procedures.

  3. Activated partial thromboplastin time and minor coagulopathies.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, W E; Assmus, S L; Montgomery, R R; Dubansky, A S

    1979-01-01

    Five commercially available activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test systems were compared with the kaolin partial thromboplastin time (KPTT) method to determine sensitivity in detecting minor coagulation defects. All reagent systems detected severe factor VIII-, IX-, and XI-deficient hemophilia. Homozygous states of factor XII deficiency, Fletcher factor deficiency, and high-molecular-weight kininogen deficiency (Fitzgerald trait) also showed abnormally long APTTs by all systems. Of 19 samples from patients with deficiencies of factors XII, VIII, IX, XI, and II ranging from 2.5 to 52%, eight had deficiencies that were not detected by reagent A (ellagic acid); two, by reagent B (ellagic acid); two, by reagent C (kaolin); one, by reagent D (silica); one, by the KPTT method. All deficiencies were detected by reagent E (celite). Heparin effect on plasma was less well detected by reagent A (ellagic acid) than with the other test systems. APTT test systems can vary greatly in their abilities to detect minor coagulation abnormalities.

  4. Activated partial thromboplastin time of owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) plasma.

    PubMed

    Mrema, J E; Johnson, G S; Kelley, S T; Green, T J

    1984-06-01

    Owl monkey plasma samples produced short, reproducible activated partial thromboplastin times, similar to those obtained with samples from many other mammalian species. This was an apparent contradiction to an earlier report of long irreproducible activated partial thromboplastin times from owl monkey samples. The discrepant data could not be explained by differences in anticoagulants (citrate or oxalate), assay reagents (partial thromboplastin with either diatomaceous earth or ellagic acid), or activation incubation times (2, 5, or 10 minutes); nor could they be explained by differences in the monkeys' sex, age or previous experimental exposure to Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

  5. 21 CFR 864.7925 - Partial thromboplastin time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partial thromboplastin time tests. 864.7925 Section 864.7925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7925...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7925 - Partial thromboplastin time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partial thromboplastin time tests. 864.7925 Section 864.7925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7925...

  7. 21 CFR 864.7925 - Partial thromboplastin time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial thromboplastin time tests. 864.7925 Section 864.7925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7925...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7925 - Partial thromboplastin time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial thromboplastin time tests. 864.7925 Section 864.7925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... screening for coagulation abnormalities, for evaluation of the effect of therapy on procoagulant...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7925 - Partial thromboplastin time tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partial thromboplastin time tests. 864.7925 Section 864.7925 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... screening for coagulation abnormalities, for evaluation of the effect of therapy on procoagulant...

  10. Monitoring Heparin Therapy with the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, R. K.; Michel, A.

    1971-01-01

    Difficulties associated with the whole blood clotting time (W.B.C.T.) as a method of monitoring heparin therapy have led to the investigation of the activated partial thromboplastin time (A.P.T.T.) as an alternative. The conclusion is reached that the latter procedure possesses several advantages. Using the method described and a citrate-preserved blood sample collected just prior to the administration of the next serial dose of heparin, the suggested therapeutic duration of the A.P.T.T. is 70 seconds or twice the mean control value. A practical range for this method is 60 to 70 seconds. PMID:5557913

  11. Kaolin-correctable prolongation of the activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Briselli, M F; Ellman, L

    1980-11-01

    Seven patients who had normal prothrombin times but prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (aPTT) are described. The prolonged aPTT, obtained with micronized silica as the contact activating agent in a semi-automated optical end-point system, a nonautomated optical end-point system, and a conductivity end-point system, corrected to normal when kaolin was used as the contact activating agent. Abnormal results were also obtained with celite and ellagic acid as contact activating agents. The activities of various clotting factors were within normal limits in all cases where they were assayed. The thromboplastin dilution test was uniformly negative, and mixtures of one patient's plasma with that of another patient failed to correct the abnormal aPTT. No patients had a personal or family history of bleeding, and all underwent surgery without bleeding difficulties. This pattern of a prolonged aPTT that corrects to normal when kaolin is used as the contact activator appears to represent a previously unrecognized laboratory phenomenon.

  12. Submitting Canine Blood for Prothrombin Time and Partial Thromboplastin Time Determinations

    PubMed Central

    Smalko, Donna; Johnstone, Ian B.; Crane, Stewart

    1985-01-01

    Practitioners commonly submit samples from dogs for partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time determinations. Controversy exists as to the necessity for rapid separation of plasma and cells, and submission of the plasma on ice (or frozen). The purpose of this study was to address three questions. First, is it better to submit plasma or is whole blood satisfactory? Second, is it necessary to refrigerate the sample or is maintenance at room temperature (20° C) adequate? Third, does the sample have to arrive at the laboratory within a few hours of collection or can reliable partial thromboplastin time/prothrombin time determinations be made on samples up to 48 hours old? It has been shown by this study that reliable partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time determinations can be carried out on canine plasma for up to 48 hours after collection regardless of whether or not the plasma is separated immediately; however the samples must be kept at 4°C. If the samples are maintained at room temperature, reliable prothrombin time determinations can be obtained for up to six hours after collection regardless of whether or not the plasma is separated immediately. Reliable partial thromboplastin time determinations can be made on plasma stored at 20°C for up to 24 hours after collection and possibly longer (up to 48 hours) if the plasma has been separated immediately. PMID:17422523

  13. Is the activated partial thromboplastin time suitable to screen for von Willebrand factor deficiencies?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Franchini, Massimo; Poli, Giovanni; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Montagnana, Martina; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2007-06-01

    The diagnostic approach to von Willebrand factor deficiencies is challenging and requires discretionary use of laboratory resources. Although extensive preoperative testing is not recommended, the activated partial thromboplastin time may be useful, especially in selected categories of patients. To establish the diagnostic sensitivity of this test to identify isolate von Willebrand factor deficiencies, 204 consecutive patients underwent a routine preoperative screening consisting of activated partial thromboplastin time, von Willebrand factor antigen, intrinsic pathway clotting factors activity, lupus anticoagulants and thrombin time. Thirty-seven patients were diagnosed with haemostasis disturbances other than von Willebrand factor deficiencies and were excluded from the evaluation. Isolated von Willebrand factor deficiency was diagnosed in 11 of the remaining 167 patients. A significant correlation was observed between von Willebrand factor antigen and activated partial thromboplastin time. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.982 (95% confidence interval: 0.972-0.992; P < 0.001). At the 1.17 upper limit of the activated partial thromboplastin time, sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 85%, respectively, with negative and positive predictive values of 100 and 31%, respectively. These results demonstrate that activated partial thromboplastin time has an excellent diagnostic sensitivity and a satisfactory specificity for identifying isolated von Willebrand factor deficiencies.

  14. Polyvinylpyrrolidone induced artefactual prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin times in intravenous drug users with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersen, A H; Bjånes, T K; Jordal, S; Leh, S; Leh, F; Svarstad, E

    2016-05-01

    Essentials Prolonged activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) were found in drug users with renal failure. An oral methadone solution containing polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) had been injected intravenously. Spiking normal plasma with increasing concentrations of PVP resulted in artifically prolonged APTT. APTT prolongation may indicate PVP deposits as underlying cause in patients with renal failure.

  15. Dilute Russell's viper venom and activated partial thromboplastin time in lupus anticoagulant diagnosis: is mixing essential?

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2016-06-01

    Dilute Russell's viper venom (DRVV) testing and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) have been effectively used in combination for lupus anticoagulant testing. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the role of mixing in activated partial thromboplastin and dilute Russell's viper venom testing for evaluation of lupus anticoagulants. Citrated blood from patients who were not on oral anticoagulant therapy was studied. Mixing study with 1 : 1 normal plasma for elevated APTT and also few samples with elevated screen time was carried out. Elevated APTT was seen in only 48.1% of patients with lupus anticoagulant. Correction of APTT was seen in 27.8% of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients. DRVV test on mixing resulted in 83.8% false-negative values. Integrated DRVV test could be a standalone test for testing lupus anticoagulant. Mixing study may be restricted for patients on oral anticoagulants or patients with strong lupus anticoagulant.

  16. A comparison between two commercially available activators for determining the partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Smith, L G; Kitchens, C S

    1985-03-01

    Activators that are used to determine the activated partial thromboplastin time should be sensitive enough to detect mild deficiencies of coagulation factors in a reproducible fashion. We compared two commercially available activators--a newly modified preparation of ellagic acid activator and a silica activator. Both reagents produced results that were reproducible over a broad range of concentrations of factors involved in the intrinsic coagulation pathway. The ellagic acid activator was more sensitive in detecting a partial deficiency of nearly all of these factors.

  17. [Test for detection of activated partial thromboplastin time using ellagic acid].

    PubMed

    Berkovskiĭ, A L; Sergeeva, E V; Kachalova, N D; Prostakova, T M; Kozlov, A A

    1999-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method for estimation of activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is developed, making use a complex reagent containing the activator (plant phospholipids) and contact factor (ellagic acid). The test requires additionally only 0.025 M CaCl2. The test is more sensitive to the presence of heparin in the blood and to insufficiency of blood clotting factors VIII and IX than the reagents containing insoluble substances (kaolin and animal phosphatides). Addition of soluble ellagic acid into reagent for APTT estimation allows studies on optic coagulometers.

  18. Prolonged Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time: Difficulties in Discriminating Coexistent Factor VIII Inhibitor and Lupus Anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Ames, Paul R J; Graf, Maria; Archer, Jeremy; Scarpato, Nicola; Iannaccone, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    To review the diagnostic difficulties of a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) when 2 inhibitors with opposite clinical presentations coexist, we searched MEDLINE from January 1970 to November 2013 using acquired, factor VIII (FVIII), factor IX, hemophilia A and B, inhibitor, lupus anticoagulant (LA), antiphospholipid, anticardiolipin, anti-β2-glycoprotein I, antibodies, syndrome, bleeding, and thrombosis. We identified 13 articles for a total of 15 cases of possible coexistence of FVIII inhibitor and LA. The presenting clinical manifestation was thrombosis in 6 cases and bleeding in 9 cases. Activated partial thromboplastin time was the presenting laboratory abnormality in all cases, and first-line investigations suggested the coexistence of LA and acquired FVIII inhibitor. None of the articles addressed the diagnostic accuracy of the screening tests by performing "second line" assays. We reviewed the diagnostic pitfalls of the cases under study and provide some guidance for alternative tests when facing a prolonged aPTT that may have a double meaning.

  19. Sensitivity of three activated partial thromboplastin time reagents to coagulation factor deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Turi, D C; Peerschke, E I

    1986-01-01

    Three activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagent test systems, General Diagnostics Automated APTT, American Dade Actin FS, and Pacific Hemostasis (Thromboscreen KAPTT) reagent, containing different activators for the APTT assay, were evaluated for their precision and sensitivity to factor deficiencies in the intrinsic coagulation system. The data suggest that micronized silica and ellagic acid reagent systems were similar in sensitivity to Factor VIII, X, and XII deficiencies, whereas, the micronized kaolin reagent was significantly less sensitive to these deficiencies. Factor XI deficiency was detected equally well with the use of all three reagent systems. The ellagic acid reagent was somewhat more sensitive to Factor IX deficiency than the micronized silica reagent, and the micronized kaolin reagent was again least sensitive. Both the micronized silica and ellagic acid based reagents were insensitive to all but severe deficiencies in prekallikrein, whereas the micronized kaolin reagent was unable to detect this deficiency. All three reagents were insensitive to all but severe deficiencies in high-molecular-weight kininogen. The authors conclude that the reagent systems tested, containing micronized silica or ellagic acid as activators, are similar in sensitivity when used in a routine activated partial thromboplastin time to screen for factor deficiencies, whereas the reagent system containing micronized kaolin as an activator is less sensitive.

  20. How to report results of prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) are the most widely used tests to investigate coagulation abnormalities. Varied result reporting have been introduced over the years for the two tests, thus making their interpretation rather confusing in different clinical settings. PT results have been reported as clotting time, percentage activity, PT-ratio (patient-to-normal clotting time) and as international normalized ratio (INR). The INR scale has been devised to harmonize results stemming from different thromboplastins from patients on treatment with vitamin K antagonists. Therefore, there are some theoretical and evidence-based considerations that make the INR formally invalid when the test is used to analyze patients in other clinical settings. Unfortunately, this limitation has been frequently overlooked, and the INR has been (and is currently) used as a universal system of results harmonization. The APTT has been historically reported as clotting time or as ratio (patient-to-normal clotting time). In this opinion paper we review the current state-of-the-art for result reporting and attempt to give practical guidance on how PT and APTT should be reported in different clinical conditions for which the tests are requested.

  1. A patient with a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and a deep intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schindhelm, Roger K; Wondergem, Mariëlle J; Admiraal, Joke; Nap, Gert; Boekel, Edwin Ten; Hani, Lahcen

    2012-05-01

    We report on a 57-year-old woman with a pontine haemorrhage and an extremely prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of more than 240 s, suggestive of a coagulation disorder. Given the location of the haemorrhage, which is associated with a high mortality rate, recombinant factor VIIa was administered, although not all necessary laboratory analyses could be performed at that time. In our case, a deficiency of factor XII was found, which is not associated with an increased bleeding risk. In an acute setting, evaluation of a prolonged aPTT may cause diagnostic and therapeutic challenges, in particular in situations where additional laboratory investigations may not be readily available.

  2. Relationship between short activated partial thromboplastin times, thrombin generation, procoagulant factors and procoagulant phospholipid activity.

    PubMed

    Mina, Ashraf; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Koutts, Jerry

    2012-04-01

    Short activated partial thromboplastin times (APTTs) are associated with thrombosis. However, what short APTTs actually represent in terms of possible mechanistic pathways is not well characterized. We have assessed thrombin generation as compared with levels of procoagulant factor (fibrinogen, V, VIII, IX, XI and XII) activities, von Willebrand factor level and activity using collagen binding, as well as procoagulant phospholipid activity, in 113 consecutive samples exhibiting a short APTT compared with an equal number of age-matched and sex-matched samples yielding a normal APTT. We found a significant difference in peak thrombin generation, velocity index and area under the curve between the two groups, and that thrombin generation markers correlated with the APTT, procoagulant phospholipid activity and several procoagulant clotting factors. We conclude that short APTTs represent a procoagulant milieu, as represented by heightened thrombin generation and several other heightened procoagulant activities, which may help explain the association with thrombosis.

  3. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Monitoring of Unfractionated Heparin Therapy: Issues and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Marlar, Richard A; Clement, Bernadette; Gausman, Jana

    2016-06-06

    When administering unfractionated heparin (UFH), therapeutic levels of anticoagulation must be achieved rapidly and maintained consistently in the therapeutic range. The basic assays for monitoring UFH therapy are the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and/or the chromogenic antifactor Xa or antithrombin assays. For many laboratories, the APTT is the preferred standard of practice; however, the APTT is a surrogate marker that only estimates the heparin concentration. Many factors, including patient variation, reagents of the APTT, UFH composition, and concentration can influence the APTT result. This article reviews various methods to determine the heparin therapeutic range and presents recommendations for the laboratory to establish an APTT heparin therapeutic range for all sizes of hospitals.

  4. Mixing tests: diagnostic aides in the investigation of prolonged prothrombin times and activated partial thromboplastin times.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Geoffrey; Orellana, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Mixing tests are a relatively simple procedure used in the hemostasis laboratory as a first-line investigation into the cause of an abnormal screening test, typically a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time and/or a prolonged prothrombin time. The mixing test involves combining the test plasma with normal plasma, then repeating the screening test on the mixture to assess whether the clotting time becomes normal or remains prolonged. The primary purpose of a mixing test is to guide further investigations. When mixing test results "normalize," this suggests the test plasma is deficient in clotting factor(s) and thus specific factor assays can be performed to determine which are reduced. When the mixing test result does not "normalize," this suggests the presence of an inhibitor or other type of interference (e.g., the presence of an anticoagulant such as high-dose heparinoids), and so the laboratory needs to determine if this is a lupus anticoagulant or a specific coagulation factor inhibitor, or another type of inhibitor. Because these follow-up investigations are more costly and time-consuming than the basic screening tests, the appropriate performance and interpretation of mixing tests is advantageous for the laboratory. Moreover, the correct laboratory approach is also clinically relevant, as patient management is ultimately affected, and an incorrect interpretation may lead to inappropriate therapies being established. Components of a mixing test that can influence result interpretation include the sensitivity of the used screening reagents to various factor deficiencies and inhibitors, the source or composition of the normal plasma, and the setting of cutoffs for the formula used in expressing mixing test results. Numerous and differing criteria for mixing test interpretation have been suggested historically, which can lead to confusion as to which approach is the most appropriate. The use of differing criteria will also lead to differing

  5. [Effect of composition of reagents for activated partial thromboplastin time on their sensitivity during analysis of blood coagulation factors].

    PubMed

    Berkovskiĭ, A L; Vasil'ev, S A; Sergeeva, E V; Kozlov, A A

    2000-04-01

    Brain cephaline-based reagents for evaluating activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and soybean phosphatides with ellagic acid complex activator with intermediate metal ions have been studied. The sensitivity of these reagents to internal clotting factors (VIII and IX) and heparin is determined by phospholipid nature and type of metal. The results help obtain highly active and sensitive APTT reagents.

  6. Fluorescence-based blood coagulation assay device for measuring activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Magdalena M; Kent, Nigel; Gustafsson, Kerstin M; Lindahl, Tomas L; Killard, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of blood clotting time is important in a range of clinical applications such as assessing coagulation disorders and controlling the effect of various anticoagulant drug therapies. Clotting time tests essentially measure the onset of clot formation which results from the formation of fibrin fibers in the blood sample. However, such assays are inherently imprecise due to the highly variable nature of the clot formation process and the sample matrix. This work describes a clotting time measurement assay which uses a fluorescent probe to very precisely detect the onset of fibrin clot formation. It uses a microstructured surface which enhances the formation of multiple localized clot loci and which results in the abrupt redistribution of the fluorescent label at the onset of clot formation in both whole blood and plasma. This methodology was applied to the development of an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test in a lateral flow microfluidic platform and used to monitor the effect of heparin dosage where it showed linearity from 0 to 2 U/mL in spiked plasma samples (R(2)=0.996, n = 3), correlation against gold standard coagulometry of 0.9986, and correlation against standard hospital aPTT in 32 patient samples of 0.78.

  7. Analysis of factors for poor activated partial thromboplastin time control after dabigatran administration.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Sato, R; An, T; Kikkawa, A; Matsumoto, Y; Kawakubo, T; Hayashi, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared patients whose activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was prolonged excessively with those whose APTT was controlled within the normal range after dabigatran administration. We analyzed the factors for the APTT prolongation. We divided the patients into two groups: those whose APTTs prolonged to more than 65 s and those whose APTTs were less than 65 s after dabigatran administration. There were 130 patients from March 2011 to July 2013, and we analyzed the background features and laboratory data of these patients. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the patients' background and laboratory data except for the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level. However, details of the relationship between the APTT prolongation and the HDL-C level are currently unknown. We hypothesize that the reason for the APTT prolongation is the variability in such parameters as the time of blood drawing, internal time of dabigatran, individual variability, and blood concentration. Therefore, we consider that these parameters need to be carefully evaluated even if APTT does not show prolongation.

  8. Artifactual prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time with PEGylated compounds in silica-based assays.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Bethanne; Parrula, Maria C M; Perigard, Christopher J; Li, Jinze

    2014-12-01

    Conjugation of polyethylene glycol (PEG) to another molecule prolongs its half-life in the body, but has a potential to artifactually increase the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) as measured with certain assays. Studies conducted in-house at Bristol-Myers Squibb using the STA-PTT Automate 5 assay, the routine assay used to measure aPTT, demonstrated prolongation of aPTT in plasma samples spiked in vitro with 40-kDa branched PEG (PEG40) conjugated compounds or PEG40 alone, but not in samples spiked with vehicle or non-PEGylated compound, suggesting that the interference is because of the PEG40 moiety. To investigate the cause of this phenomenon, cynomolgus monkey and rat plasma samples were spiked with different concentrations of PEG40 and the aPTT was measured using different proprietary assays. With one exception, prolongation of aPTT was observed with all assays containing silica as the contact activator. No changes in aPTT were noted in assays using kaolin as a contact activator. The findings indicated that the observed prolongation of aPTT is largely because of interference of PEG40 with the silica, but other features of the reagent mixture may also influence aPTT times.

  9. Analysis of the activated partial thromboplastin time test using mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Kogan, A E; Kardakov, D V; Khanin, M A

    2001-02-15

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is a laboratory test for the diagnosis of blood coagulation disorders. The test consists of two stages: The first one is the preincubation of a plasma sample with negatively charged materials (kaolin, ellagic acid etc.) to activate factors XII and XI; the second stage begins after the addition of calcium ions that triggers a chain of calcium-dependent enzymatic reactions resulting in fibrinogen clotting. Mathematical modeling was used for the analysis of the APTT test. The process of coagulation was described by a set of coupled differential equations that were solved by the numerical method. It was found that as little as 2.3 x 10(-9) microM of factor XIIa (1/10000 of its plasma concentration) is enough to cause the complete activation of factor XII and prekallikrein (PK) during the first 20 s of the preincubation phase. By the end of this phase, kallikrein (K) is completely inhibited, residual activity of factor XIIa is 54%, and factor XI is activated by 26%. Once a clot is formed, factor II is activated by 4%, factor X by 5%, factor IX by 90%, and factor XI by 39%. Calculated clotting time using protein concentrations found in the blood of healthy people was 40.5 s. The most pronounced prolongation of APTT is caused by a decrease in factor X concentration.

  10. Exogenous Magnesium Chloride Reduces the Activated Partial Thromboplastin Times of Lupus Anticoagulant-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tokutake, Takayoshi; Baba, Hisami; Shimada, Yuji; Takeda, Wataru; Sato, Keijiro; Hiroshima, Yuki; Kirihara, Takehiko; Shimizu, Ikuo; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay is a basic hemostatic assay based on the time it takes for clots to form in plasma samples after the addition of calcium chloride. It is used to screen for various coagulation disorders. Several previous reports have suggested that magnesium (Mg) might contribute to coagulation reactions by binding to specific coagulation proteins. We investigated the effects of Mg on the APTT. In healthy controls, the APTT was significantly prolonged in proportion to the increase in the concentration of magnesium chloride in the range from 2.1 to 16.7 mmol/L. Among eight samples from patients with various disorders that exhibited prolonged APTT, two samples demonstrated shorter APTT when Mg was added, both of which were from patients that were positive for lupus anticoagulant. When we examined 206 clinical APTT samples, we found that Mg shortened the APTT of two samples. These two samples were also from lupus anticoagulant-positive patients (p-value: <0.003). Our findings regarding the unique effects of exogenous Mg on the APTT of lupus anticoagulant-positive patients might shed light on the role of Mg in APTT assays and lead to the development of a novel screening method for lupus anticoagulant. PMID:27355205

  11. Recommendations for appropriate activated partial thromboplastin time reagent selection and utilization.

    PubMed

    Fritsma, George A; Dembitzer, Francine R; Randhawa, Ankush; Marques, Marisa B; Van Cott, Elizabeth M; Adcock-Funk, Dorothy; Peerschke, Ellinor I

    2012-06-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is widely used as a screening coagulation test and for monitoring unfractionated heparin therapy. Various commercial reagents are available, with different performance characteristics, particularly responsiveness to the lupus anticoagulant (LA). Because aPTT reagent selection significantly affects the interpretation of results, we reviewed College of American Pathologists proficiency testing data involving approximately 4,000 coagulation laboratories, and conducted a survey of coagulation laboratories (n = 93) using The Fritsma Factor hemostasis Web site to determine the basis for aPTT reagent selection. The data demonstrate that for routine aPTT testing, most laboratories use reagents with high/moderate responsiveness to LA. Significant misunderstanding was apparent regarding the use of appropriate aPTT reagent for routine testing and LA identification. We recommend aPTT reagents with low LA responsiveness to screen for coagulation factor deficiencies and heparin monitoring, and suggest continued education of laboratory professionals and reagent manufacturers about appropriate aPTT reagent use.

  12. Activated partial thromboplastin time and anti-xa measurements in heparin monitoring: biochemical basis for discordance.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Clifford M; Streiff, Michael B; Shermock, Kenneth M; Kraus, Peggy S; Chen, Junnan; Jani, Jayesh; Kickler, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    We examined the concordance of heparin levels measured by a chromogenic anti-Xa assay and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) during unfractionated heparin therapy (UFH) and the biochemical basis for differences between these measures. We also investigated the endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) as a possible measure of anticoagulation. Paired measures of anti-Xa and APTT were performed on 569 samples from 149 patients on UFH. The anti-Xa values and the APTT were concordant in only 54% of measurements. One hundred twelve samples from 59 patients on UFH were assayed for APTT, anti-Xa, factor II, factor VIII, and ETP. Supratherapeutic APTT values but therapeutic anti-Xa results had decreased factor II activity. Subtherapeutic APTT but therapeutic anti-Xa values had high factor VIII activity. ETP correlated with anticoagulation status and UFH dose. In conclusion, factor II and VIII activity contributes to discordance between APTT and anti-Xa results. ETP measurements may provide an additional assessment of anticoagulation status.

  13. Addition of prothrombin to plasma can result in a paradoxical increase in activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Kenny M; Björkqvist, Jenny; Deinum, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    In the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay, a variety of nonphysiological reagents is used to induce contact activation. The sensitivity of the APTT response for different thrombin inhibitors has previously been found to be dependent on the used reagent. Recently, infusion of prothrombin (FII) has been used in in-vivo coagulopathy models and its effect has been analyzed in different assays. Therefore, we investigated whether the FII plasma concentration might affect APTT using different commercial reagents, applying both turbidimetry and viscometry. We compared both plasma-derived human FII (pd-hFII) and recombinant human FII (r-hFII). Similar results were found for pd-hFII and r-hFII with different APTT reagents. As expected, no effect on APTT was found by increasing the plasma concentration of FII using APTT reagents consisting of ellagic acid (Actin FS or Actin). Although with Pathromtin SL, consisting of SiO2, only a slight increase was found, with most other commercial APTT reagents, consisting of SiO2 or kaolin, APTT dose-dependently increased by increasing concentration of FII. Therefore, both Pathromtin SL and Actin FS were used to compare r-hFII and pd-hFII by determining the KM at 37C using FII-depleted plasma, providing values of 6 ± 0.3 nmol/l FII for both. Thus, at normal plasma concentrations of FII, the maximal initial thrombin generation rate should be reached and no effect on the coagulation time is expected at higher FII concentrations. To completely avoid the paradoxical effect in the APTT assay at FII concentrations higher than normal, Actin or Actin FS is the preferable reagent.

  14. The activated partial thromboplastin time of diluted plasma: variability due to the method of fibrin detection.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, I B

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the dilution of plasma (1/3 in saline) on the kinetics of fibrin generation in the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) assay. The diluted APTT is considered to increase the sensitivity of the APTT test however, studies in our laboratory using an electro-optical fibrin detection system failed to show significant differences in APTT values obtained with diluted and undiluted canine plasma. Seventeen plasmas, including plasmas moderately and markedly deficient in intrinsic factor activity were assayed in the undiluted and diluted APTT assay using two methods for fibrin endpoint detection; a visual "tilt-tube" technique and an electro-optical detection system. In the former technique the endpoint was the formation of a visible fibrin web or clot; in the latter procedure the end point was the first detection of a change in optical density of the plasma. Optical density changes during fibrin formation were also recorded ( thrombokinetograms ). The results indicated that the electro-optical fibrin detection system failed to identify a prolongation of the APTT as a result of 1/3 plasma dilution; a prolongation that was consistently observed with the visual fibrin detection technique. Plasma dilution however, did significantly reduce the rate of fibrin production as indicated by the thrombokinetogram profile. It was concluded that the dilution of plasma with saline, as has been used to increase the sensitivity of the APTT assay procedure, has little effect on the time of onset of fibrin formation in a given plasma. The major effect appears to be on the way in which fibrin forms in that the polymerization/crosslinkage events associated with macroscopic fibrin production are delayed. PMID:6722646

  15. Antifactor Xa levels versus activated partial thromboplastin time for monitoring unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Jeremy W; Vondracek, Thomas G

    2012-06-01

    Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) remains an important therapeutic agent, particularly in the inpatient setting, for anticoagulation. Historically, the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) has been the primary laboratory test used to monitor and adjust UFH. The aPTT test has evolved since the 1950s, and the historical goal range of 1.5-2.5 times the control aPTT, which first gained favor in the 1970s, has fallen out of favor due to a high degree of variability in aPTT readings from one laboratory to another, and even from one reagent to another. As a result, it is now recommended that the aPTT goal range be based on a corresponding heparin concentration of 0.2-0.4 unit/ml by protamine titration or 0.3-0.7 unit/ml by antifactor Xa assay. Given that several biologic factors can influence the aPTT independent of the effects of UFH, many institutions have transitioned to monitoring heparin with antifactor Xa levels, rather than the aPTT. Clinical data from the last 10-20 years have begun to show that a conversion from aPTT to antifactor Xa monitoring may offer a smoother dose-response curve, such that levels remain more stable, requiring fewer blood samples and dosage adjustments. Given the minimal increased acquisition cost of the antifactor Xa reagents, it can be argued that the antifactor Xa is a cost-effective method for monitoring UFH. In this review, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of the aPTT, antifactor Xa, and protamine titration tests, and provide a clinical framework to guide practitioners who are seeking to optimize UFH monitoring within their own institutions.

  16. Significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of 'normal' activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Eui-Hoon; Ma, Youngeun; Park, In-Ae; Kim, Seon-Woo; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2012-01-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a widely used coagulation screening test in routine laboratories. The aPTT level in the control population varies and is reflected by the reference interval. However, there have been no studies to investigate the coagulation status determining the variability of the aPTT. The aim of this study was to investigate the coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in the population. The study participants were reference individuals with prothrombin time and aPTT within reference intervals. The aPTT was determined using STA-PTT Automate (Diagnostica Stago, Asnieres, France; local reference interval, 29.1-41.9 s). Those with aPTT within the marginal ranges of reference interval were selected for factor assays. We defined the lower marginal group as the lowest 10 percentile of reference interval (29.1-30.9 s) and the upper marginal group as the highest 10 percentile (38.0-41.9 s). Activities of factor II, V, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were determined in both groups. The lower marginal and upper marginal groups consisted of 220 and 209 individuals, respectively. All coagulation factors were significantly higher in the lower marginal than in the upper marginal group (P = 0.0127 for factor II and P < 0.0001 for the others). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed factor XII and VIII were two strongest contributors determining the aPTT level, whereas factor XI was not significantly different between the groups (P = 0.095). This study firstly demonstrated significantly different coagulation factor activities underlying the variability of aPTT in reference individuals. The results suggested the possibility of disease association or phenotypic contribution of variable coagulation activities in the population.

  17. Effect of dermatan sulphate on activated partial thromboplastin time determined with different reagents.

    PubMed

    Iorio, A; Nucciarelli, F; Renga, C; Nenci, G G; Gianese, F; Agnelli, G

    1997-01-01

    Five widely used activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) reagents (Actin-FS, Actin-FSL, Hemolab Silimat, IL-Test APTT Ellagic Acid and Thrombofax Activated) were compared for their sensitivity and precision in measuring the effect of dermatan sulphate on blood coagulation. On each of 4 days, aliquots of the same normal human plasma pool were mixed with dermatan sulphate (MF701) at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 micrograms/ml, and APTT was measured in duplicate with all reagents by a photo-optical coagulometer. The order of testing between and within reagents was changed every day. The relationship of APTT ratio to dermatan sulphate concentration was linear with all the reagents. There were statistically significant differences between reagents in their sensitivity to DS, as reflected by linear regression slopes. IL-Test was the most sensitive reagent. At dermatan sulphate concentrations of 20, 50, and 80 micrograms/ml APTT ratio ranged from 1.5 to 1.7, 1.9 to 2.3 and 2.3 to 2.9, respectively, according to the reagent. The lambda coefficient and coefficient of variation derived from regression analysis, both reflecting assay precision, ranged from 0.57 to 0.71 and from 4.6 to 5.1%, respectively, with all but the least precise reagent. The best sensitivity/precision balance was displayed by IL-Test. The APTT reagent should therefore be standardized, with special regard to sensitivity to DS, when testing the relationship of dermatan sulphate clinical effects to APTT response.

  18. Effect of isotretinoin on prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT).

    PubMed

    Kaptanoglu, Asli Feride; Uncu, Murat; Ozyurt, Selcuk; Hincal, Evren

    2013-08-01

    Patients with severe acne may need elective/urgent surgical interventions during treatment with isotretinoin and it is critical for the surgeon to consider the possible effects of this medication on coagulation systems. The aim of this study is to determine the changes in prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) during isotretinoin treatment. PT, aPTT, and INR values of 51 severe acne patients were evaluated during routine pre-treatment biochemical analysis. Only patients with normal values were included in the study. The results of before and after 1 month treatment were compared statistically. There were no statistically significant change in mean alanine aminotranferease (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), PT, and INR values after treatment. A significant increase in aPTT was detected. The INR values, which are more trusted and safe, showed no difference. Isotretinoin seems to have no effect on these coagulation parameters.

  19. Effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration on canine plasma samples

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Stefania; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta

    2010-01-01

    The present study was to assess the effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and fibrinogen concentration in blood samples of healthy dogs. Thirty-five dogs of various breeds were included in the study. Citrated blood samples were obtained and plasma was divided into four aliquots to assess selected clotting parameters by means of a coagulometer. The first aliquot was analysed within 1 h after collection, while the remaining 3 were stored at 8℃ for 4, 8 and 24 h, respectively. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance documented a significant decreasing effect on PT at 24 h compared to 8 h and on fibrinogen concentration after 8 and 24 h compared to sampling time and at 4 and 24 h compared to 8 h post sampling. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that only fibrinogen appears prone to significant decrease. In fact, aPTT is not substantially affected by refrigeration for at least 24 h post sampling and PT showed a statistical difference that does not necessary indicate biological significance as the results obtained were within reference intervals for the dog. PMID:20458152

  20. Evaluation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time in hypertensive patients attending a tertiary hospital in calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Nnenna Adaeze, Nnamani; Uchenna Emeribe, Anthony; Abdullahi Nasiru, Idris; Babayo, Adamu; Uko, Emmanuel K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Several biomedical findings have established the effects of hypertension on haemostasis and roles of blood coagulation products in the clinical course of hypertension. Methods. This cross-sectional study aimed at determining effects of hypertension on prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in hypertensive patients in comparison with normotensive subjects attending a tertiary hospital in Calabar. Forty-two (42) hypertensive patients and thirty-nine (39) normotensive control subjects were investigated for PT and APTT using Quick one-stage methods. Results. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) correlated positively with APTT (r = 0.3072, r = 0.4988; P < 0.05) in hypertensive patients. DBP, SBP, PT, and APTT were significantly higher in hypertensive patients when compared to normotensive subjects (P < 0.05). DBP correlated negatively with duration of illness (r = -0.3097; P < 0.05) in hypertensive patients and positively with age of normotensive subjects (r = 0.3523; P < 0.05). Conclusion. The results obtained indicated that measurements of PT and APTT may serve as indices for evaluating hemostatic abnormalities in hypertensive patients and guide for antihypertensive therapy. However, to have better understanding of hemostatic activities in hypertension, it is recommended to conduct D-dimer, platelet factors, and protein assays.

  1. Evaluation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time mixing studies using an estimated factor correction method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Phillips, Bonnie; Chandler, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Mixing studies for prolonged prothrombin time (PT)/activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are used to estimate whether the prolongation is due to an inhibitor or factor deficiency. We propose a new method of mixing study interpretation based on estimation of average factor level changes. Factor level vs. PT/aPTT curves were prepared for single factor, vitamin K-dependent factor, and all factor deficiencies. These curves were used to predict the factor level in the sample and the correction needed to differentiate deficiencies from inhibitors. We compared this estimated factor correction (EFC) method to normal range, percentage correction, and Rosner index. For a given factor level, multiple factor deficiencies prolonged the PT/aPTT more than single factor deficiency, necessitating different thresholds for defining correction on mixing studies. The EFC method was superior to other the correction methods, correctly identifying 38 of 39 known inhibitors, single and multiple factor deficiencies, and correctly identifying inhibitor vs. deficiency in 50 of 59 patient samples. In 99 adult patient mixing studies over 18 months, 30% showed deficiency only, 30% inhibitor only, whereas 40% showed evidence of both. The EFC method for PT/aPTT mixing study interpretation was more accurate than the comparison methods at determining deficiency versus inhibitor.

  2. Determining the effect of storage conditions on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen concentration in rat plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Vinod Kumar; Kakade, Somesh; Pandey, Santosh Kumar; Gothi, Anil Kalidas; Nirogi, Ramakrishna

    2015-10-01

    Coagulation parameters are usually included in clinical and preclinical safety studies to evaluate the effect of xenobiotics on the extrinsic or intrinsic pathways of coagulation. The analysis is generally performed at the time of terminal sacrifice where many activities are scheduled. Chances of delay in analysis are likely particularly when blood is collected for coagulation via the abdominal vena cava. This experiment was planned to assess the variations in coagulation parameters caused by delay in analysis as well as by storage conditions. Blood was collected from the posterior vena cava under isoflurane anesthesia, and the plasma was separated immediately. Coagulation parameters were evaluated at 0, 6, 24 and 48 h from the plasma stored at room temperature, as well as plasma stored under refrigerated and freezing conditions. Stability of the analytes in blood was also evaluated under refrigerated conditions for 6 h. All parameters were analyzed using a semi-automated coagulometer. Prothrombin time (PT) was stable under all three storage conditions for up to 6 h. Although statistically significant differences were observed for activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) at room and refrigeration temperatures for up to 6 h, the difference was clinically non-relevant. Fibrinogen was found to be the most stable parameter that showed consistency in results even up to 48 h under all three storage conditions. Plasma for PT can be stored and analyzed without any significant changes for up to 6 h from the actual blood collection, while fibrinogen level testing can be extended for up to 48 h after collection under any storage condition. For reliable APTT results, plasma samples should be run immediately after collection.

  3. Impact of telavancin on prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time as determined using point-of-care coagulometers.

    PubMed

    Ero, Michael P; Harvey, Nathaniel R; Harbert, Jack L; Janc, James W; Chin, Kay H; Barriere, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    Telavancin is approved in the United States, Canada, and Europe (At the time of submission, the telavancin European marketing authorization for nosocomial pneumonia was suspended until Theravance provides evidence of a new European Medicines Agency approved supplier) as an antibiotic to treat certain Gram-positive bacterial skin infections. Telavancin has been shown to prolong plasmatic prothrombin (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT) clotting times in clinical diagnostic lab-based assays. In this study, we evaluated the potential for telavancin to prolong whole blood PT/International Normalized Ratio (INR) and aPTT tests on point-of-care (POC) instruments. Whole blood collected from 8 healthy subjects was supplemented with telavancin to final concentrations of 0, 10, 20, and 100 μg/ml. Final concentrations were selected to match trough, twice trough, and peak plasma levels following the approved 10 mg/kg dose. Four widely employed POC coagulation instruments were chosen to be representative of the POC platforms currently in use.. These systems were the Roche Coaguchek XS, the Abbott iSTAT, the ITC Hemochron SIG+, and the Alere INRatio2 POC devices. The PT/INR measured by the Coaguchek XS showed the greatest sensitivity to the presence of telavancin. The PT/INR measured by the Hemochron SIG+ and iSTAT were sensitive to telavancin but to a lesser extent. The INRatio2 was the least sensitive to the presence of telavancin when testing the whole blood PT/INR. Only the Hemochron SIG+ device was capable of measuring aPTT and showed a concentration-dependent increase in aPTT. This study supports the current recommendation that PT and aPTT monitoring be conducted immediately to the next dose of telavancin when coagulation parameters are tested using POC instrumentation.

  4. Genetic associations for activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time, their gene expression profiles, and risk of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D; Samani, Nilesh J; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D O; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W G; Porteous, David J; Starr, John M; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J; Hicks, Andrew A; Folsom, Aaron R

    2012-07-13

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10(-24)). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10(-9)) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10(-8)). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10(-56)) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10(-13)). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data.

  5. Genetic Associations for Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time and Prothrombin Time, their Gene Expression Profiles, and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M.; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S.; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B.; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J.; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W.G.; Porteous, David J.; Starr, John M.; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Folsom, Aaron R.

    2012-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10−24). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10−9) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10−8). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10−56) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10−13). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data. PMID:22703881

  6. Clinical use of the activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time for screening: a review of the literature and current guidelines for testing.

    PubMed

    Levy, Jerrold H; Szlam, Fania; Wolberg, Alisa S; Winkler, Anne

    2014-09-01

    Although the activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and international normalized ratio are widely used in routine preoperative testing, these hemostatic tests are not reliable predictors of perioperative bleeding in patients without known bleeding risk factors. In contrast, a preoperative bleeding history and physical examination are usually obtained in an attempt to identify important bleeding risk factors. However, these coagulation tests are used extensively for monitoring anticoagulation with different pharmacologic agents.

  7. Prothrombin Time and Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time Testing: A Comparative Effectiveness Study in a Million-Patient Sample

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Manu N.; Stonemetz, Jerry L.; Baird, John C.; Ahmed, Fahad S.; Awan, Ahsan; Birkenmaier, Christof; Inchiosa, Mario A.; Magid, Steven K.; McGoldrick, Kathryn; Molmenti, Ernesto; Naqvi, Sajjad; Parker, Stephen D.; Pothula, S. M.; Shander, Aryeh; Steen, R. Grant; Urban, Michael K.; Wall, Judith; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A substantial fraction of all American healthcare expenditures are potentially wasted, and practices that are not evidence-based could contribute to such waste. We sought to characterize whether Prothrombin Time (PT) and activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT) tests of preoperative patients are used in a way unsupported by evidence and potentially wasteful. Methods and Findings We evaluated prospectively-collected patient data from 19 major teaching hospitals and 8 hospital-affiliated surgical centers in 7 states (Delaware, Florida, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania) and the District of Columbia. A total of 1,053,472 consecutive patients represented every patient admitted for elective surgery from 2009 to 2012 at all 27 settings. A subset of 682,049 patients (64.7%) had one or both tests done and history and physical (H&P) records available for analysis. Unnecessary tests for bleeding risk were defined as: PT tests done on patients with no history of abnormal bleeding, warfarin therapy, vitamin K-dependent clotting factor deficiency, or liver disease; or aPTT tests done on patients with no history of heparin treatment, hemophilia, lupus anticoagulant antibodies, or von Willebrand disease. We assessed the proportion of patients who received PT or aPTT tests who lacked evidence-based reasons for testing. Conclusions This study sought to bring the availability of big data together with applied comparative effectiveness research. Among preoperative patients, 26.2% received PT tests, and 94.3% of tests were unnecessary, given the absence of findings on H&P. Similarly, 23.3% of preoperative patients received aPTT tests, of which 99.9% were unnecessary. Among patients with no H&P findings suggestive of bleeding risk, 6.6% of PT tests and 7.1% of aPTT tests were either a false positive or a true positive (i.e. indicative of a previously-undiagnosed potential bleeding risk). Both PT and aPTT, designed as diagnostic tests, are

  8. Low intraindividual variability of activated partial thromboplastin time revealed in a population of 10,487 control individuals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Youngeun; Huh, Hee Jae; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-10-01

    The activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a routine coagulation test that reflects the activities of multiple coagulation proteins. Given the known genetic elements underlying the different coagulation factor activities, a low intraindividual variability is expected in aPTT values, but has not been demonstrated in a large population. In this regard, we evaluated the intraindividual variability of aPTT by analyzing serial aPTTs from a large population. The study population consisted of control individuals who had three or more consecutive aPTT values at at least 6-month intervals at a single institution. The coefficient of variation of serial aPTT values was determined in each control individual, and the mean value of the coefficient of variations in the control population was calculated. The aPTT values from a total of 10,487 individuals [mean age 57 years (range 21-93 years); male-to-female ratio 1 : 0.9] were included. The mean value of the coefficient of variation of aPTTs in those individuals was 3.75%, which indicates a very low intraindividual variability. This is the first study to demonstrate a low intraindividual variability of aPTT in a large population. The result supports the previous notion that aPTT is a genetically determined parameter and has potential clinical implications.

  9. Evaluation of a bedside device to assess the activated partial thromboplastin time for heparin monitoring in infants.

    PubMed

    Klein, Richard H; van der Vorst, Marja M J; de Wilde, Rob B P; Hogenbirk, Karin; de Kam, Marieke L; Burggraaf, Jacobus

    2013-04-01

    To determine the relationship between the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) measured with a standard laboratory assay and the aPTT measured with a bedside device in infants on heparin therapy after cardiothoracic surgery. Twenty infants aged below 1 year who were on heparin therapy were included. Exclusion criteria were prematurity, dysmaturity and the use of anticoagulants other than heparin. Nineteen samples were obtained from four adults in intensive care who were on heparin. The aPTT values were analyzed with the Coaguchek Pro/DM bedside device (aPTTbed) and compared with the aPTT values obtained from the laboratory Electra 1800C coagulation analyzer (aPTTlab). Correlation analysis was performed by linear regression. The agreement was calculated using Bland-Altman analysis. The correlation coefficient of samples obtained from infants was lower (r = 0.48) compared with samples from adults (r = 0.85). A substantial positive bias (27 s) and scatter [95% confidence interval (CI) -11; +65 s) was found. The bias showed a genuine trend to increase at higher aPTT values (r = 0.90; P < 0.001). The bedside device overestimates the aPTT in infants treated with heparin. The disagreement between the bedside device and laboratory increases at higher aPTTs. Bedside devices should not be used to monitor heparin therapy in infants in intensive care.

  10. Prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time using a point-of-care analyser (Abaxis VSpro®) in Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus).

    PubMed

    Nevitt, B N; Chinnadurai, S K; Watson, M K; Langan, J N; Adkesson, M J

    2016-10-01

    There are few reports of coagulation times in marsupial species. Blood samples collected from 14 Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus) under anaesthesia during routine health assessments were analysed for prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) using a point-of-care analyser (POC) (Abaxis VSPro®). The wallabies had an aPTT mean of 78.09 s and median of 78.1 s. The PT for all wallabies was greater than 35 s, exceeding the longest time measured on the POC. Although PT was significantly longer, aPTT was similar to the manufacturer's domestic canine reference range.

  11. Effects of hirudin on activated partial thromboplastin time determined with ten different reagents.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, A; Chantarangkul, V; Arbini, A A; Moia, M; Mannucci, P M

    1993-08-02

    Hirudin prolongs the APTT when added to normal plasma and the extent of prolongation depends on the type of reagent used. The aim of this study was to compare the dose-response curves of 10 widely used APTT reagents for linearity and parallelism. On each of 10 working days a normal pooled plasma was mixed with increasing amounts of recombinant hirudin (HBW023) ranging from 0 to 5 micrograms/ml and tested for APTT by photo optical coagulometer. Within each working day, clotting times were measured in duplicate and the order of testing with each reagent was changed every day. Results were expressed as ratios of clotting times with hirudin to clotting times without hirudin, and the values plotted against the hirudin concentration on a log-log scale. The dose-response curves for all reagents were linear over 0.3-1.2 micrograms/ml. The reagent-related slopes ranged from 0.225 +/- 0.003 to 0.303 +/- 0.003 (mean +/- SE) and were significantly different. Precision studies indicated that the least sensitive reagent was also the least precise. These findings indicate that the clotting time values obtained for patients treated with hirudin will vary depending on the APTT reagent used.

  12. Use of a modified activated partial thromboplastin time to detect lupus anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Cloherty, T; Golden, E A; Lind, S E

    1996-07-15

    Laboratory evidence for the presence of lupus anticoagulants (LAs) is sought when patients experience thrombotic events or when coagulation assays are abnormal. Although a number of tests for LAs have been proposed, none detect all LAs, and laboratories may be confronted with the need to perform more than one test to confirm a suspected LA. Recently, a modification of the aPTT, performed by varying the initial time of incubation of the aPTT reagent with the patient's plasma, was reported to detect LAs. The difference in clotting times when plasma is subjected to a 1- or 10- minute incubation (called here the "Delta one minus ten" or DOT) using a particular micronized silica-based aPTT reagent was shown to provide good discrimination between normal and LA plasmas. Because of the low cost of this test and its relative ease of performance, we attempted to replicate the results of this test using previously characterized LA plasmas. The DOT of 23 normal plasmas was 5.1 +/- 2.1 seconds, with a range of 0.5 - 9.3 seconds. The DOT of 20 of 34 LA samples tested (59%) was > 11 seconds. The DOT was abnormal in 8 of 22 (36%) samples diagnosed with a dilute Russell's viper venom time. It was abnormal in 12 of 12 patients diagnosed by other criteria, prior to the use of the dilute Russell's viper venom time. The DOT performed with a kaolin or ellagic acid-based aPTT reagent failed to discriminate normal from LA plasma. We conclude that the DOT performed with a specific silica-based reagent is an apparently simple and moderately sensitive test for detecting the lupus anticoagulant that deserves further evaluation.

  13. Indium-111-labeled platelets: effect of heparin on uptake by venous thrombi and relationship to the activated partial thromboplastin time

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Moser, K.M.; Moser, K.S.; Konopka, R.; Hartman, M.T.

    1982-09-01

    The goal of heparin thepapy in deep vein thrombosis is to prevent thrombus extension. The relationship between thrombus extension and the results of coagulation tests used to monitor heparin thepapy is unclear. To expose this relationship, we studied the effect of several heparin regimens on the accretion of indium-111-labeled platelets on fresh venous thrombi, as detected by gamma imaging, and monitored the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Six dogs were treated with a 300-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 90-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, a dose of heparin sufficient to increase the APTT to levels greater than eight times baseline (APTT ratio); platelet accretion (thrombus imaging) occurred only after the heparin effect was reversed with protamine sulfate. Nineteen dogs were treated with a 150-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 4-hour, 45-U/kg/hour heparin infusion; a thrombus was demonstrated only after protamine injection in 12 (mean APTT ratio 1.3 +/- 0.19) and before protamine injection in seven. In thirteen of these 19 dogs, 30 minutes separated the platelet injection from heparin therapy, while in six this duration was less than 30 minutes. In four of these six dogs, thrombi were demonstrated before protamine therapy and at APTT ratios greater than 3.0. Finally, 10 dogs were treated with a 100-U/kg bolus followed by a 3-hour, 50-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, after which the APTT was allowed to return to baseline values spontaneously. In all 10 dogs, a thrombus was demonstrated only after cessation of the heparin infusion, and at a mean APTT ratio of 1.4 +/- 0.15 times baseline. These results suggest that, except with very early platelet injection, platelet accretion by thrombi is consistently inhibited by heparin at APTT ratios greater than 2.5.

  14. Partial thromboplastin time (PTT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... which there is a problem with the body's blood clotting process Disorder in which the proteins that control blood clotting become over active ( disseminated intravascular coagulation ) Liver disease ...

  15. The PiCT(®) test is a reliable alternative to the activated partial thromboplastin time in unfractionated heparin therapy management: results from a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Brisset, A C; Ferrández, A; Krause, M; Rathbun, S; Marlar, R; Korte, W

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) or anti-Xa tests are used to monitor heparin. Prothrombinase-induced Clotting Time (PiCT) was compared to APTT in a clinical study. PiCT shows higher correlation to anti-Xa than APTT does and is more comparable between centers. PiCT demonstrates significantly higher accuracy and reliability than APTT in heparin monitoring.

  16. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S.; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R.; Tang, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10−8), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10−7). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10−6) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT. PMID:25552651

  17. Circuit life versus bleeding risk: the impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time versus achieved filtration fraction.

    PubMed

    MacEwen, Clare; Watkinson, Peter; Winearls, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    Whilst prolonging hemofilter (circuit) life, heparin increases bleeding risk. The impact of achieved activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) on circuit life and bleeding risk has not been assessed in a modern critically ill cohort. Lowering filtration fraction may be an alternative means of prolonging circuit life, but is often overlooked in critical care. An observational study of 309 consecutive circuits in a general intensive care unit was conducted using a wide target APTT range. Multilevel modeling was used to predict circuit life and bleeding according to achieved APTT and filtration fraction. Independent predictors of circuit failure (i.e. unplanned ending of treatment) included filtration fraction (P<0.001, HR 1.07 per 1% increase), peak APTT (P<0.001, HR 0.8 per 10 s increase or 0.3 APTR increase) and baseline PT (P=0.014, HR 0.91 for every 50% increase). The only significant predictor of bleeding was peak APTT (P=0.017, OR 1.05 per 10 s increase). Every 10 s APTT increase was associated with a 20% reduction in circuit failure, but a 5% increase in hemorrhage. A 3% reduction in filtration fraction was associated with the same improvement in circuit life as a 10 s increase in APTT. Increasing APTT prolongs circuit life but carries a substantial risk of bleeding even in modern practice. Filtration fraction has a large impact on circuit life in the critically ill: a 3% reduction in filtration fraction, e.g. by increasing blood flow or delivering some of the clearance via dialysis, would be expected to reduce circuit failure as much as a 10 s increase in APTT.

  18. A genetic association study of activated partial thromboplastin time in European Americans and African Americans: the ARIC Study.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lu-Chen; Cushman, Mary; Pankow, James S; Basu, Saonli; Boerwinkle, Eric; Folsom, Aaron R; Tang, Weihong

    2015-04-15

    Reduced activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is a risk marker for incident and recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE). Genetic factors influencing aPTT are not well understood, especially in populations of non-European ancestry. The present study aimed to identify aPTT-related gene variants in both European Americans (EAs) and African Americans (AAs). We conducted a genetic association study for aPTT in 9719 EAs and 2799 AAs from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. Using the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe) consortium candidate gene array, the analyses were based on ∼50 000 SNPs in ∼2000 candidate genes. In EAs, the analyses identified a new independent association for aPTT in F5 (rs2239852, P-value = 1.9 × 10(-8)), which clusters with a coding variant rs6030 (P-value = 7.8 × 10(-7)). The remaining significant signals were located on F5, HRG, KNG1, F11, F12 and ABO and have been previously reported in EA populations. In AAs, significant signals were identified in KNG1, HRG, F12, ABO and VWF, with the leading variants in KNG1, HRG and F12 being the same as in the EAs; the significant variant in VWF (rs2229446, P-value = 1.2 × 10(-6)) was specific to the AA sample (minor allele frequency = 19% in AAs and 0.2% in EAs) and has not been previously reported. This is the first study to report aPTT-related genetic variants in AAs. Our findings in AAs demonstrate transferability of previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG and F12 in EAs. We also identified new associations at F5 in EAs and VWF in AAs that have not been previously reported for aPTT.

  19. Unusual Initial Manifestation of Acquired Hemophilia A: A Normal Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Intramuscular Hematoma and Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tsuyama, Nobuaki; Ichiba, Toshihisa; Naito, Hiroshi

    We herein present a case of acquired hemophilia A with a normal activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT), intramuscular hematoma and cerebral hemorrhage occurring in a 73-year-old man. The patient visited our emergency department with gait disturbance, pain and swelling in his right leg. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intramuscular hematoma and intracranial hemorrhage. The results of initial coagulation studies were normal, but repeated coagulation studies revealed an isolated prolongation of the aPTT. Additional laboratory tests confirmed the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A. If the initial aPTT is normal, we should therefore repeat the aPTT and also perform other coagulation studies including a mixing study, factor VIII level and inhibitor, to investigate the underlying diseases in elderly patients with spontaneous hemorrhaging of unknown etiology.

  20. Influence of 8 and 24-h storage of whole blood at ambient temperature on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, thrombin time, antithrombin and D-dimer.

    PubMed

    Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina; Fischer, Ronald; Peetz, Dirk

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluates the effect of whole blood storage on common coagulation parameters in order to confirm or revise acceptable storage limits as defined by current guidelines and diverse study reports. Aliquots were taken from the citrated whole blood of inpatients and outpatients (n = 147) within 4 h after blood withdrawal and after extended storage of whole blood for 8 and 24 h at ambient temperature. Aliquots were centrifuged and analyzed for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin (AT), thrombin time (TT) and D-dimer. For each parameter, samples from 33-56 patients were investigated covering a wide range of normal and pathological values. Samples from patients receiving heparin were excluded from analyses of APTT and TT. All assays were performed using reagents and an analyzer from Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Products GmbH. The mean percentage change after 8 and 24-h storage was below 10% for all parameters. Considering the changes in individual samples, all parameters can be reliably tested after 8-h storage, since less than 15% of the samples demonstrated individual changes of above 10%. The acceptable storage time can be extended to 24 h for PT, TT and D-dimer. Clinically relevant changes were detected after 24-h storage for APTT: 41% of the investigated samples demonstrated changes of above 10%. After 24-h storage, changes for Fbg and AT values were more than 15% in five out of 49 and in three out of 45 samples, respectively. This sporadic increase of values is clinically acceptable except for borderline samples.

  1. Troubleshooting an isolate prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time in a patient with acute myocardial infarction-a paradigmatic case report.

    PubMed

    Poli, Giovanni; Castiglioni, Piero; Montagnana, Martina; Favaloro, Emmanuel J; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    We describe here the case of a 46-year-old man admitted to the emergency department (ED) and diagnosed with a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction. Before referring the patient to the coronary care unit and initiating antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy, a highly prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was observed among results of laboratory testing. Results of mixing test showed complete correction of APTT, thus ruling out the presence of inhibitors of blood coagulation. On the following day, second line coagulation testing revealed normal activity of all clotting factors except factor XII, the concentration of which was found to be 1.5%. This result was suggestive for a diagnosis of inherited factor XII deficiency, thus highlighting the importance of combining clinical history, symptoms and results of first-line coagulation tests in similar emergency conditions.

  2. Relation between dabigatran concentration, as assessed using the direct thrombin inhibitor assay, and activated clotting time/activated partial thromboplastin time in patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kenji; Kuwahara, Taishi; Takagi, Katsumasa; Takigawa, Masateru; Nakajima, Jun; Watari, Yuji; Nakashima, Emiko; Yamao, Kazuya; Fujino, Tadashi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Atsushi

    2015-06-15

    Dabigatran is a direct thrombin inhibitor that has been approved for preventing stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. In this study, we aimed to assess the associations between the dabigatran concentration (calculated through plasma-diluted thrombin time, as assessed using the Hemoclot assay) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and activated clotting time (ACT). We recruited 137 patients with atrial fibrillation who were receiving a normal dose of dabigatran (300 mg/d) or a reduced dose of dabigatran (220 mg/d, usually administered to patients who were elderly, had moderate renal dysfunction, or who were also receiving verapamil). We then assessed the aPTT, ACT, and Hemoclot results of the patients and calculated the plasma dabigatran concentration. The mean plasma concentration of dabigatran was 127 ± 88 ng/ml, although no significant differences in dabigatran concentration, ACT, or aPTT were observed when we compared the 2 doses of dabigatran (300 or 220 mg/d). The dabigatran concentration was within the therapeutic levels in most patients, although a high value (>300 ng/ml) was observed in several patients, which indicated a high risk of bleeding. The dabigatran concentration was strongly and positively correlated with ACT and aPTT (r = 0.87, p <0.001; and r = 0.76, p <0.001; respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that verapamil use was independently associated with elevated dabigatran concentrations (p <0.001). Therefore, ACT and aPTT may be useful for bedside assessment of the anticoagulant activity of dabigatran, and verapamil use may be a risk factor for elevated dabigatran concentrations.

  3. The effect of dabigatran on the activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time as determined by the Hemoclot thrombin inhibitor assay in patient plasma samples.

    PubMed

    Hapgood, Greg; Butler, Jenny; Malan, Erica; Chunilal, Sanjeev; Tran, Huyen

    2013-08-01

    Dabigatran is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor that does not require routine laboratory monitoring. However, an assessment of its anticoagulant effect in certain clinical settings is desirable. We examined the relationship between dabigatran levels, as determined by the Hemoclot thrombin inhibitor assay (HTI), the thrombin time (TT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) using different reagents. We describe these parameters with the clinical outcomes of patients receiving dabigatran. Seventy-five plasma samples from 47 patients were analysed. The HTI assay was established to measure dabigatran level. aPTTs were performed using TriniCLOT aPTT S reagent (TC) and three additional aPTT reagents. From linear regression lines, we established the aPTT ranges corresponding to the therapeutic drug levels for dabigatran (90-180 ng/ml). The aPTT demonstrated a modest correlation with the dabigatran level (r= 0.80) but the correlation became less reliable at higher dabigatran levels. The therapeutic aPTT ranges for reagents were clinically and statistically different compared with our reference reagent (46-54 s (TC) vs 51-60 s (SP), 54-64 s (SS) and 61-71 s (Actin FS) (p<0.05)). The TT was sensitive to the presence of dabigatran with a level of 60 ng/ml resulting in a TT > 300 s. In conclusion, the aPTT demonstrated a modest correlation with the dabigatran level and was less responsive with supra-therapeutic levels. aPTT reagents differed in their responsiveness, suggesting individual laboratories must determine their own therapeutic range for their aPTT reagent. The TT is too sensitive to quantify dabigatran levels, but a normal TT suggests minimal or no plasma dabigatran.

  4. A gene-centric analysis of activated partial thromboplastin time and activated protein C resistance using the HumanCVD focused genotyping array.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Tom R; Lowe, Gordon D O; Lawlor, Debbie A; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Day, Ian N M

    2013-07-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) is an important routine measure of intrinsic blood coagulation. Addition of activated protein C (APC) to the aPTT test to produce a ratio, provides one measure of APC resistance. The associations of some genetic mutations (eg, factor V Leiden) with these measures are established, but associations of other genetic variations remain to be established. The objective of this work was to test for association between genetic variants and blood coagulation using a high-density genotyping array. Genetic association with aPTT and APC resistance was analysed using a focused genotyping array that tests approximately 50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nearly 2000 cardiovascular candidate genes, including coagulation pathway genes. Analyses were conducted on 2544 European origin women from the British Women's Heart and Health Study. We confirm associations with aPTT at the coagulation factor XII (F12)/G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) and kininogen 1 (KNG1)/histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG) loci, and identify novel SNPs at the ABO locus and novel locus kallikrein B (KLKB1)/F11. In addition, we confirm association between APC resistance and factor V Leiden mutation, and identify novel SNP associations with APC resistance in the HRG and F5/solute carrier family 19 member 2 (SLC19A2) regions. In conclusion, variation at several genetic loci influences intrinsic blood coagulation as measured by both aPTT and APC resistance.

  5. Changes in activated partial thromboplastin time and international normalised ratio after on-pump and off-pump surgical revascularization of the heart.

    PubMed

    Selimović Čeke, Lejla; Imamović, Semir; Ljuca, Farid; Jerkić, Zoran; Imamović, Goran; Hadžimešić, Munevera; Pojskić, Aida; Kovčić, Jasmina

    2014-05-01

    Surgical revascularization of the heart (CABG - coronary artery bypass grafting) is one way of treating coronary heart disease. Bleeding is one of the serious and frequent complications of heart surgery and can result in increased mortality and morbidity. Hemostasis disorder may be secondary consequences of surgical bleeding, preoperative anticoagulant therapy, and the use of cardiopulmonary bypass. Tests used for routine evaluation of the coagulation system are activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and international normalized ratio (INR). The study encountered 60 patients who were hospitalized at the Clinic for Cardiovascular Diseases, University Clinical Center Tuzla. Patients underwent elective coronary artery bypass heart surgery either with cardiopulmonary bypass (on-pump CABG) or without it (off-pump CABG). The aim of this study was to compare the changes in coagulation tests (APTT, INR) in patients who were operated on-pump and patients operated off-pump. Our study showed that the values of APTT and INR tend to increase immediately after surgery. Twenty-four hours after surgery these values are declining and they are approaching the preoperative values in all observed patients (p <0.05). Comparing APTT between the groups we found that postoperative APTT levels are significantly higher in the group of patients who underwent surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (p <0.05). Changes in coagulation tests after surgical revascularization of the heart are more pronounced in patients who were operated with on-pump technique compared to patients operated off-pump technique.

  6. Lupus Anticoagulant Positivity in Pediatric Patients With Prolonged Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time: A Single-Center Experience and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Malbora, Baris; Bilaloglu, Eris

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lupus anticoagulants (LAs) is an important cause of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) prolongation found in children after an infection or during screening tests before surgical intervention. The authors retrospectively reviewed the charts of 68 patients who have been consulted from surgery departments with prolonged aPTT. These patients were reevaluated with aPTT analysis after 1 week. Thirteen patients had normal aPTTs. Therefore, 55 patients remained with prolonged aPTTs. LA positivity was detected in 39 patients. Sixteen of these had prolonged aPTT prior to surgery (41%). Others with LA positivity had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 6), infection (n = 5), leukemia (n = 3), hemolytic uremic syndrome (n = 2), epistaxis (n = 2), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS; n = 1), chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (n = 1), acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (n = 1), central nervous system (CNS) thrombosis (n = 1), and congenital heart disease (n = 1). None of the patients had bleeding history. LA positivity rarely leads to bleeding and/or thrombosis. Specific therapy is usually not needed. Further prospective multicenter studies are required to understand clinical outcomes and laboratory correlation in children with positive LA.

  7. Development of a photometric assay for activated partial thromboplastin time and its application to the Cobas Bio centrifugal analyzer.

    PubMed

    Becker, U; Bartl, K; Lill, H; Wahlefeld, A W

    1985-12-15

    We describe a two-step procedure for APTT that can be performed on photometric devices. It includes preincubation of diluted plasma with ellagic acid and phospholipids and a starting reagent that contains calcium and a chromogenic peptide substrate for thrombin, Tos-Gly-Pro-Arg-pNA. Reaction time is recorded from addition of the starting reagent until thrombin formation occurs, and a prefixed amount of substrate is cleaved. The pattern of sensitivity to clotting factors and heparin was similar to clotting assays and the substrate used did not interfere with the activity of factor Xa. An application of the method was made for the Cobas(R) Bio centrifugal analyzer. Absorbance readings were sent to an external computer and were transformed into reaction times by a computer program. Although the results are independent on fibrinogen concentrations, from kinetic data of the reaction curve fibrinogen concentrations can be estimated. Correlation studies showed good correspondence to clotting methods (r = 0.92, n = 53) as well as an excellent precision (CV 3% for inter-assays, n = 15) and high throughput of samples (greater than 100/h) in the automated assay.

  8. /sup 111/In-labeled platelets: effects of heparin on uptake by venous thrombi and relationship to the activated partial thromboplastin time

    SciTech Connect

    Fedullo, P.F.; Moser, K.M.; Moser, K.S.; Konopka, R.; Hartman, M.T.

    1982-09-01

    The goal of heparin therapy in deep vein thrombosis is to prevent thrombus extension. The relationship between thrombus extension and the results of coagulation tests used to monitor heparin therapy is unclear. To explore this relationship, we studied the effect of several heparin regimens on the accretion of /sup 111/In-labeled platelets on fresh venous thrombi, as detected by gamma imaging, and monitored the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT). Six dogs were treated with a 300-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 90-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, a dose of heparin sufficient to increase the APTT to levels greater than eight times baseline (APTT ratio); platelet accretion (thrombus imaging) occurred only after the heparin effect was reversed with protamine sulfate. Nineteen dogs were treated with a 150-U/kg bolus of heparin followed by a 4-hour, 45-U/kg/hour heparin infusion; a thrombus was demonstrated only after protamine injection in 12 (mean APTT ratio 1.3 +/- 0.19) and before protamine injection in seven. In thirteen of these 19 dogs, 30 minutes separated the platelet injection from heparin therapy, while in six this duration was less than 30 minutes. In four of these six dogs, thrombi were demonstrated before protamine therapy and at APTT ratios greater than 3.0. Finally, 10 dogs were treated with a 100-U/kg bolus followed by a 3-hour, 50-U/kg/hour heparin infusion, after which the APTT was allowed to return to baseline values spontaneously. In all 10 dogs, a thrombus was demonstrated only after cessation of the heparin infusion, and at a mean APTT ratio of 1.4 +/- 0.15 times baseline. These results suggest that, except with very early platelet injection, platelet accretion by thrombi is consistently inhibited by heparin at APTT ratios greater than 2.5. Platelet accretion by venous thrombi occurs within narrow limits of heparin effect as reflected by the APTT.

  9. Evaluation of the activated partial thromboplastin time assay for clinical monitoring of PEGylated recombinant factor VIII (BAY 94-9027) for haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Gu, J-M; Ramsey, P; Evans, V; Tang, L; Apeler, H; Leong, L; Murphy, J E; Laux, V; Myles, T

    2014-07-01

    Patients with haemophilia (PWH) are usually monitored by the one-stage activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) factor VIII (FVIII) assay. Different aPTT activators may affect clotting time (CT) and FVIII:C levels in patients treated with PEGylated FVIII. To evaluate the characteristics of PEGylated FVIII (BAY 94-9027) in various aPTT clotting assays, and to identify suitable aPTT reagents for monitoring BAY 94-9027 during the treatment of PWH, BAY 94-9027 and World Health Organization (WHO) 8th FVIII standards (WHO-8) were spiked into pooled and individual severe haemophilia A plasma at 1.0, 0.25 and 0.05 IU mL(-1) . Five commercial aPTT reagents widely used in clinical laboratories were compared and evaluated for BAY 94-9027 activity in plasma from PWH. BAY 94-9027 and WHO-8 bestowed similar CT and excellent precision when ellagic acid (SynthAFax, Dade Actin, and Cephascreen) aPTT reagents were used. In contrast, BAY 94-9027 showed significantly prolonged CT and poor precision compared with WHO-8 using silica aPTT reagents (APTT-SP and STA PTT 5). Furthermore, free 60-kDa polyethylene glycol (PEG), used for the conjugation of FVIII, showed a dose-dependent prolongation of CT in the APTT-SP assay. There was no effect on the SynthAFax-APTT, prothrombin time, or FXIa-initiated thrombin generation assay, demonstrating that the PEG moiety on FVIII has no general effect on the coagulation cascade. In summary, ellagic aPTT reagents (SynthAFax, Dade Actin, and Cephascreen) are most suitable for evaluating potency of BAY 94-9027 and should be the preferred aPTT reagents used in clinical laboratories for monitoring FVIII activity after infusion of BAY 94-9027 to PWH.

  10. Comparative effects of the human protein C activator, Protac, on the activated partial thromboplastin clotting times of plasmas, with special reference to the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, I B; Martin, C A

    2000-01-01

    The commercial snake venom extract, Protac, is a specific activator of the anticoagulant zymogen, protein C (PC) in human plasma. This specific action has led to its use in developing coagulation-based and amidolytic-based assays for the diagnosis of quantitative and/or qualitative PC deficiency states in human beings. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of Protac on the activated partial thromboplastin times (APTT) of human, bovine, equine, and canine plasmas in order to determine the potential value of this venom extract as an activator in functional PC assays in these domestic animal species. As expected, Protac significantly prolonged the APTT of normal human plasma, but had no effect on plasma known to be devoid of PC. Clotting times were prolonged by 34%-214% with concentrations of venom activator ranging from 0.1-1.0 U/mL. Under identical conditions, Protac prolonged the APTT of equine plasma by 11%-98% over control times. Even more dramatic was the inhibitory effect of Protac on the clotting of bovine plasma, extending the APTT more than 3-fold at a venom concentration of 0.1 U/mL. At higher venom concentrations, most bovine plasmas remained unclotted after 300 s (control time 34.1 s). Under similar conditions, the canine APTT was unaffected by Protac, even when the venom concentration was increased to 3 U/mL. In order to determine the reason for the lack in response of canine plasma, the concentration of the APTT reagent was altered (decreased), exposure time of the plasma to the Protac was increased from 2 min to 9 min, and the plasma was diluted to assess for the potential existence of plasma PC inhibitors. Protac caused an unexpected shortening of the APTT when the contact activator reagent was diluted. Increasing the exposure time had no effect. Although a slight prolongation of the canine APTT was detected when the plasma was diluted, the presence of strong plasma PC inhibition was considered an unlikely cause of the lack of

  11. Effect of freezing plasma at -20°C for 2 weeks on prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, dilute Russell viper venom time, activated protein C resistance, and D-dimer levels.

    PubMed

    Foshat, Michelle; Bates, Stephanie; Russo, Wendy; Huerta, Araceli; Albright, Kathleen; Giddings, Karen; Indrikovs, Alexander; Qian, You-Wen

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of preanalytical variables of time and temperature on prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), dilute Russell viper venom time (DRVVT), activated protein C resistance (APCR), and d-dimer, samples from 23 healthy individuals and 18 patients having coagulopathy with known abnormal PT and aPTT were collected. Plasma from each individual was separately pooled and aliquoted; the first 2 aliquots were stored at room temperature then analyzed at 2 hours (baseline) and 4 hours postcollection. The remaining aliquots were stored at -20°C and thawed for analysis at 48 hours, 1, and 2 weeks. In both healthy participants and participants with coagulopathy, PT, aPTT, APCR, DRVVT, and D-dimer had no significant changes at 4 and 48 hours, and 1 and 2 weeks postcollection compared to baseline, or the changes were less than 10%. The results indicate PT, aPTT, DRVVT, APCR, and d-dimer can be stored for 2 weeks at -20°C without compromising clinical interpretation in both healthy individuals and individuals with coagulopathy. Increasing storage time will facilitate sample processing from off-site clinics.

  12. Pneumatic tube system transport does not alter platelet function in optical and whole blood aggregometry, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count and fibrinogen in patients on anti-platelet drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Enko, Dietmar; Mangge, Harald; Münch, Andreas; Niedrist, Tobias; Mahla, Elisabeth; Metzler, Helfried; Prüller, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess pneumatic tube system (PTS) alteration on platelet function by the light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and whole blood aggregometry (WBA) method, and on the results of platelet count, prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and fibrinogen. Materials and methods Venous blood was collected into six 4.5 mL VACUETTE® 9NC coagulation sodium citrate 3.8% tubes (Greiner Bio-One International GmbH, Kremsmünster, Austria) from 49 intensive care unit (ICU) patients on dual anti-platelet therapy and immediately hand carried to the central laboratory. Blood samples were divided into 2 Groups: Group 1 samples (N = 49) underwent PTS (4 m/s) transport from the central laboratory to the distant laboratory and back to the central laboratory, whereas Group 2 samples (N = 49) were excluded from PTS forces. In both groups, LTA and WBA stimulated with collagen, adenosine-5’-diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin-receptor-activated-peptide 6 (TRAP-6) as well as platelet count, PT, APTT, and fibrinogen were performed. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between blood samples with (Group 1) and without (Group 2) PTS transport (P values from 0.064 – 0.968). The AA-induced LTA (bias: 68.57%) exceeded the bias acceptance limit of ≤ 25%. Conclusions Blood sample transportation with computer controlled PTS in our hospital had no statistically significant effects on platelet aggregation determined in patients with anti-platelet therapy. Although AA induced LTA showed a significant bias, the diagnostic accuracy was not influenced. PMID:28392742

  13. Rapid loss of factor XII and XI activity in ellagic acid-activated normal plasma: role of plasma inhibitors and implications for automated activated partial thromboplastin time recording.

    PubMed

    Joist, J H; Cowan, J F; Khan, M

    1977-12-01

    Rapid prolongation of the aPTT of normal plasma upon incubation with ellagic acid containing aPTT reagents was observed. The aPTT prolongation was not due to time-dependent changes in pH in the incubation mixture or loss of activity of the labile coagulation factors VIII and V but occurred as a result of rapid progressive inactivation of ellagic acid-activated factors XII and XI. Prolongation of the aPTT and loss of contact factor activities was not observed in plasma incubated with particulate activator reagents. This finding seemed to indicate that adsorption of factors XII and XI to larger particles during the activation process might protect these factors from inactivation by naturally occurring plasma inhibitors. Evidence is presented which supports previous findings that C1-INH, alpha1-AT, and antithrombin (in the presence of heparin) contribute to factor XIIa and XI a inactivation in ellagic acid-activated plasma and that plasma albumin may compete with factor XII for ellagic acid binding. The data indicate that ellagic acid-containing aPTT reagents have unfavorable properties which seriously limit their usefulness in the clinical laboratory, particularly in respect to recording of the aPTT with certain fully automated clot timers.

  14. Activated partial thromboplastin time measurement is not associated with clinical outcomes in patients with high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes treated with unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael P; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Chiswell, Karen; Cohen, Marc; Kontos, Michael C; Antman, Elliott M; Ferguson, James J; Califf, Robert M; Goodman, Shaun G; Becker, Richard C

    2012-07-01

    Our objective was to determine the association of activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) with recurrent ischemic events and non-coronary artery bypass surgery-related thrombolysis in myocardial infarction major bleeding. We studied 4,985 patients with high-risk non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE ACS) participating in SYNERGY, a prospective, randomized, international trial designed to emulate contemporary practice wherein unfractionated heparin (UFH) is given intravenously and titrated according to a weight-adjusted dosing nomogram to a target aPTT of 1.5-2 times the upper limit of normal (approximately 50-70 s). Aspirin was administered to 95% of patients, clopidogrel to 63%, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa receptor inhibitors to 58%. More than 90% of patients underwent early coronary angiography, and 69% were revascularized. Used as a time-dependent covariate, aPTT was evaluated as a predictor of time to ischemic or major hemorrhagic events in proportional hazards regression models. Using discrete variable analysis, aPTT was categorized as persistently below a lower threshold of anticoagulation (<50 vs. ≥50 s) for recurrent ischemic events and above an upper threshold (>70 vs. ≤70 s) for major hemorrhagic events. UFH treatment lasted a median of 42 (30, 78) h. At >6-12 (n = 3,021), >12-24 (n = 3,406), and >24-48 (n = 2,497) h, 34, 41, and 46% of patients achieved the target aPTT range, respectively. Both before and after adjusting for baseline predictors of anticoagulant response and risk score (age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, ST depression, and renal function), no significant relationship between aPTT values and recurrent ischemic events or major bleeding was found. No relationship was observed between clinical outcomes and aPTT values persistently above or below the designated thresholds. Measurements of aPTT were not associated with clinical outcomes among patients with NSTE ACS treated with UFH. The required intensity of

  15. A comparison of red blood cell transfusion utilization between anti-activated factor X and activated partial thromboplastin monitoring in patients receiving unfractionated heparin.

    PubMed

    Belk, K W; Laposata, M; Craver, C

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Anti-activated factor X (Anti-Xa) monitoring is more precise than activated partial thromboplastin (aPTT). 20 804 hospitalized cardiovascular patients monitored with Anti-Xa or aPTT were analyzed. Adjusted transfusion rates were significantly lower for patients monitored with Anti-Xa. Adoption of Anti-Xa protocols could reduce transfusions among cardiovascular patients in the US.

  16. Thromboelastography as a Better Indicator of Postinjury Hypercoagulable State Than Prothrombin Time or Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    recently (21). Activated coagulation factor XI (FXIa) is considerably higher in patients with acute coronary syndrome than in those with stable angina ... pectoris (22–24). Finally, key anticoagulant factors such as protein C, antithrombin III (AT III), and the tissue factor pathway inhibitor are

  17. Determination of an international sensitivity index of thromboplastin reagents using a WHO thromboplastin as calibrator for plasma spiked with rivaroxaban.

    PubMed

    Harenberg, Job; Marx, Svetlana; Krämer, Roland; Giese, Christina; Weiss, Christel

    2011-12-01

    Rivaroxaban and other direct factor Xa inhibitors are used at fixed doses without drug monitoring and dose adjustment. Patients may require determination of the anticoagulant effect during treatment. The aim of this study was to develop a method to reduce the differences between thromboplastin reagents and coagulation analysers for determination of the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban in human plasma. Purity of rivaroxaban extracted from commercially available drug was confirmed by mass spectrometry, elemental analysis and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Coagulation times of pooled human plasma spiked with 50-900  ng/ml rivaroxaban were analysed. Thromboplastin reagents, WHO RBT/90, Innovin, RecombiPlasTin 2G, STA Neoplastin Plus, Technoclot PT Plus and Thromborel S, the manual Kolle-Hook method and the KC10 analyser were used. An international sensitivity index (ISI) was determined for each reagent and coagulation method using the RBT/90 thromboplastin reagent as reference. The orthogonal, used for the determination of the ISI of coumarin plasmas, and ordinary regression analyses were compared. The results showed than increasing concentrations of rivaroxaban prolonged coagulation values of all thromboplastin assays linearly (r (2)= 0.96 and r(2) = 0.99, respectively). The coefficient of variation between the slopes of the dilution curves and the ratios of the thromboplastin reagents were reduced using the international normalized ratio (INR) and ISI calculated for rivaroxaban. The ISIs of the thromboplastin reagents ranged from 0.73 to 1.67 as compared with the WHO reagent using the manual technique. The coefficient of variations between the thromboplastin reagents comparing the orthogonal and the ordinary regression analysis were 6.8 versus 3.7% (Kolle-Hook method, P = 0.0011) and 8.5 versus 4.8% (KC10 method, P < 0.0001). Using ISI for vitamin-K antagonist and rivaroxaban, the INRs for the rivaroxaban-containing samples were significantly different for

  18. FRACTIONATION OF PLASMA GLOBULIN FOR PROTHROMBIN, THROMBOKINASE, AND ACCESSORY THROMBOPLASTIN

    PubMed Central

    Milstone, J. H.

    1951-01-01

    1. Crude globulin from more than 1,000 liters of citrated bovine plasma has been used in developing a procedure for moderately large scale separation of clotting factors. Fraction A, prothrombin, kinase, and thrombin fractions were prepared. Fraction A contained both kinase and accessory thromboplastin, the latter predominating when fraction A was diluted. 2. When prothrombin was activated by kinase, the rate of thrombin production was enhanced by the addition of platelets, or brain lipid, or dilute fraction A. These accessory thromboplastins caused this acceleration only when calcium chloride was added. Even with calcium, they were not effective unless kinase was present. 3. In contrast, the action of kinase was not entirely dependent on either ionic calcium or accessory thromboplastin. The concentrated kinase fraction activated prothrombin in the presence of excess oxalate. Although kinase often contaminates highly purified thrombins, it is probably distinct from thrombin. The ratio of kinase to thrombin was 100 times as great in the kinase fraction as in the thrombin fraction. 4. The kinase fraction, diluted 45,000-fold, to protein-nitrogen concentrations as low as 0.02 microgram per ml., accelerated the conversion of crude prokinase in three-stage tests. 5. The findings are consistent with the following concept of the basic enzymatic mechanism: See PDF for Structure It is now added that calcium and accessory thromboplastin exert their effects by impinging on the basic mechanism, in a chemically secondary or indirect manner. PMID:14873922

  19. Alternative pathways of thromboplastin-dependent activation of human factor X in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marlar, R.A.; Griffin, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the interrelationships of the major coagulation pathways, the activation of 3H-labeled factor X in normal and various deficient human plasmas was evaluated when clotting was triggered by dilute rabbit or human thromboplastin. Various dilutions of thromboplastin and calcium were added to plasma samples containing 3H-factor X, and the time course of factor X activation was determined. At a 1/250 dilution of rabbit brain thromboplastin, the rate of factor X activation in plasmas deficient in factor VIII or factor IX was 10% of the activation rate of normal plasma or of factor XI deficient plasma. Reconstitution of the deficient plasmas with factors VIII or IX, respectively, reconstituted normal factor X activation. Similar results were obtained when various dilutions of human thromboplastin replaced the rabbit thromboplastin. From these plasma experiments, it is inferred that the dilute thromboplastin-dependent activation of factor X requires factors VII, IX, and VIII. An alternative extrinsic pathway that involves factors IX and VIII may be the physiologic extrinsic pathway and hence help to explain the consistent clinical observations of bleeding diatheses in patients deficient in factors IX or VIII.

  20. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Thromboplastin generation test. (a) Identification. A thromboplastin generation test is a device used to...

  1. Prothrombin-activator (thromboplastin) generation in the blood of water snake (Natrix piscator).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, V M; Dube, B; Dube, R K; Agarwal, G P

    1981-12-23

    The generation of prothrombin-activator (thromboplastin) in water snake (Natrix piscator) is clearly delayed, compared to a mammalian system, but the final activity is well comparable to that in man, when homologous sources of "phospholipid" (erythrocyte-lysate) and of substrate plasma are employed in one stage "thromboplastin generation test". The use of heterologous source of either of the above reagents resulted in significantly longer clotting times; hence the need for homologous source of above reagents in the test is emphasized for comparative studies on animal haemostasis.

  2. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  3. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7900 - Thromboplastin generation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thromboplastin generation test. 864.7900 Section 864.7900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages §...

  7. Stable, Ultra-Low Residence Time Partial Oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Hickman, Daniel A.

    1997-07-15

    A process for the catalytic partial oxidation of methane in gas phase at very short residence time (800,000 to 12,000,000 hr.sup.-1) by contacting a gas stream containing methane and oxygen with a metal supported catalyst, such as platinum deposited on a ceramic monolith.

  8. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of PDE solutions in the least-squares norm are reported.

  9. Effect of Timing of Surgery in Partially Injured ACLs.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Bai, Lunhao; Fu, Yonghui; Wang, Guangbin; He, Ming; Wang, Jiashi

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the optimal timing for surgical intervention of partially injured anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Thirty-eight patients were divided into early (n=17) or delayed (n=21) surgery groups based on the interval between injury and surgery. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. The outcome measures used were the International Knee Documentation Committee score, Lysholm knee score, Tegner activity rating, range of motion, and arthrometer measurements. The findings of this study indicate that early surgical reconstruction of partially ruptured ACLs did not result in arthrofibrosis but may prevent secondary loosening of the intact bundles and further meniscal and chondral injury.

  10. Spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1983-01-01

    The theory of spectral methods for time dependent partial differential equations is reviewed. When the domain is periodic Fourier methods are presented while for nonperiodic problems both Chebyshev and Legendre methods are discussed. The theory is presented for both hyperbolic and parabolic systems using both Galerkin and collocation procedures. While most of the review considers problems with constant coefficients the extension to nonlinear problems is also discussed. Some results for problems with shocks are presented.

  11. Parallelizing across time when solving time-dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.H.

    1991-09-01

    The standard numerical algorithms for solving time-dependent partial differential equations (PDEs) are inherently sequential in the time direction. This paper describes algorithms for the time-accurate solution of certain classes of linear hyperbolic and parabolic PDEs that can be parallelized in both time and space and have serial complexities that are proportional to the serial complexities of the best known algorithms. The algorithms for parabolic PDEs are variants of the waveform relaxation multigrid method (WFMG) of Lubich and Ostermann where the scalar ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that make up the kernel of WFMG are solved using a cyclic reduction type algorithm. The algorithms for hyperbolic PDEs use the cyclic reduction algorithm to solve ODEs along characteristics. 43 refs.

  12. Exact solutions and maximal dimension of invariant subspaces of time fractional coupled nonlinear partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahadevan, R.; Prakash, P.

    2017-01-01

    We show how invariant subspace method can be extended to time fractional coupled nonlinear partial differential equations and construct their exact solutions. Effectiveness of the method has been illustrated through time fractional Hunter-Saxton equation, time fractional coupled nonlinear diffusion system, time fractional coupled Boussinesq equation and time fractional Whitman-Broer-Kaup system. Also we explain how maximal dimension of the time fractional coupled nonlinear partial differential equations can be estimated.

  13. Time Parallel Solution of Linear Partial Differential Equations on the Intel Touchstone Delta Supercomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomarian, N.; Fijany, A.; Barhen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Evolutionary partial differential equations are usually solved by decretization in time and space, and by applying a marching in time procedure to data and algorithms potentially parallelized in the spatial domain.

  14. Interactions among Hageman factor (HG, Factor XII), plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, Factor XI), plasma prekallikrein (PK, Fletcher factor) and high molecular weight kininogen (HMW-K, Fitzgerald factor) in blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Ratnoff, O D

    1979-01-01

    Studies of plasmas from individuals with Hageman trait (factor XII deficiency), plasma thromboplastin antecedent (PTA, factor XI) deficiency, Fletcher trait (plasma prekallikrein deficiency) and Fitzgerald trait (high molecular weight-kininogen deficiency) have revealed the importance of these proteins in blood coagulation. The interactions among them, however, are not fully elucidated. We have studied these reactions by two different approaches. (1) In a purified system, high molecular weight kininogen was absolutely required for activation of PTA by HF and ellagic acid (EA). The yield of activated PTA was proportional to the amount of HF, HMW-K, and PTA in the mixtures, suggesting that these three proteins may form a complex in the presence of EA. (2) In experiments with whole plasma, we took advantage of the adsorption of EA to Sephadex gels. When normal plasma or plasma deficient in HF, PK, HMW-K or PTA was exposed to Sephadex-EA and was separated by centrifugation, each supernatant plasma except that deficient in HF shortened the prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT) of HF-deficient plasma. Plasma simultaneously depleted of HMW-K, PK and PTA also shortened the PTT of HF-deficient plasma and of plasma depleted of HF and PK, but had virtually no procoagulant effect upon the PTT of plasma depleted of HF and MHW-K. Thus, exposure of HF in plasma to Sephadex-EA appeared to generate a clot-promoting form of HF in the absence of other clotting factors, but its expression required the presence of HMW-K.

  15. Multi-input partial eigenvalue assignment for high order control systems with time delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we consider the partial eigenvalue assignment problem for high order control systems with time delay. Ram et al. (2011) [1] have shown that a hybrid method can be used to solve partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem of single-input vibratory system. Based on this theory, a rather simple algorithm for solving multi-input partial eigenvalue assignment for high order control systems with time delay is proposed. Our method can assign the expected eigenvalues and keep the no spillover property. The solution can be implemented with only partial information of the eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors of the matrix polynomial. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of our approach.

  16. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  17. Graphic processing unit accelerated real-time partially coherent beam generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xiaolong; Liu, Zhi; Chen, Chunyi; Jiang, Huilin; Fang, Hanhan; Song, Lujun; Zhang, Su

    2016-07-01

    A method of using liquid-crystals (LCs) to generate a partially coherent beam in real-time is described. An expression for generating a partially coherent beam is given and calculated using a graphic processing unit (GPU), i.e., the GeForce GTX 680. A liquid-crystal on silicon (LCOS) with 256 × 256 pixels is used as the partially coherent beam generator (PCBG). An optimizing method with partition convolution is used to improve the generating speed of our LC PCBG. The total time needed to generate a random phase map with a coherence width range from 0.015 mm to 1.5 mm is less than 2.4 ms for calculation and readout with the GPU; adding the time needed for the CPU to read and send to LCOS with the response time of the LC PCBG, the real-time partially coherent beam (PCB) generation frequency of our LC PCBG is up to 312 Hz. To our knowledge, it is the first real-time partially coherent beam generator. A series of experiments based on double pinhole interference are performed. The result shows that to generate a laser beam with a coherence width of 0.9 mm and 1.5 mm, with a mean error of approximately 1%, the RMS values needed 0.021306 and 0.020883 and the PV values required 0.073576 and 0.072998, respectively.

  18. Separation of time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect.

    PubMed

    Bouton, Mark E; Woods, Amanda M; Todd, Travis P

    2014-01-01

    Two appetitive conditioning experiments with rats examined time-based and trial-based accounts of the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). In the PREE, the loss of responding that occurs in extinction is slower when the conditioned stimulus (CS) has been paired with a reinforcer on some of its presentations (partially reinforced) instead of every presentation (continuously reinforced). According to a time-based or "time-accumulation" view (e.g., Gallistel and Gibbon, 2000), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger amount of time has accumulated in the CS over trials. In contrast, according to a trial-based view (e.g., Capaldi, 1967), the PREE occurs because the organism has learned in partial reinforcement to expect the reinforcer after a larger number of CS presentations. Experiment 1 used a procedure that equated partially and continuously reinforced groups on their expected times to reinforcement during conditioning. A PREE was still observed. Experiment 2 then used an extinction procedure that allowed time in the CS and the number of trials to accumulate differentially through extinction. The PREE was still evident when responding was examined as a function of expected time units to the reinforcer, but was eliminated when responding was examined as a function of expected trial units to the reinforcer. There was no evidence that the animal responded according to the ratio of time accumulated during the CS in extinction over the time in the CS expected before the reinforcer. The results thus favor a trial-based account over a time-based account of extinction and the PREE. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Associative and Temporal Learning.

  19. Quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time delay for active vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. M.; Singh, K. V.; Datta, B. N.

    2009-08-01

    Partial pole assignment in active vibration control refers to reassigning a small set of unwanted eigenvalues of the quadratic eigenvalue problem (QEP) associated with the second order system of a vibrating structure, by using feedback control force, to suitably chosen location without altering the remaining large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors. There are several challenges of solving this quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem (QPEVAP) in a computational setting which the traditional pole-placement problems for first-order control systems do not have to deal with. In order to these challenges, there has been some work in recent years to solve QPEVAP in a computationally viable way. However, these works do not take into account of the practical phenomenon of the time-delay effect in the system. In this paper, a new "direct and partial modal" approach of the quadratic partial eigenvalue assignment problem with time-delay is proposed. The approach works directly in the quadratic system without requiring transformation to a standard state-space system and requires the knowledge of only a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors that can be computed or measured in practice. Two illustrative examples are presented in the context of active vibration control with constant time-delay to illustrate the success of our proposed approach. Future work includes generalization of this approach to a more practical complex time-delay system and extension of this work to the multi-input problem.

  20. Robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment with time delay using the receptance and the system matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zheng-Jian; Yang, Jin-Ku; Datta, Biswa Nath

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we consider the robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem in vibration by active feedback control. Based on the receptance measurements and the system matrices, we propose an optimization method for the robust and minimum norm partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem. We provide a new cost function and the closed-loop eigenvalue sensitivity and the feedback norms can be minimized simultaneously. Our method is also extended to the case of time delay between measurements of state and actuation of control. Numerical tests demonstrate the effectiveness of our method.

  1. Combining instruction prefetching with partial cache locking to improve WCET in real-time systems.

    PubMed

    Ni, Fan; Long, Xiang; Wan, Han; Gao, Xiaopeng

    2013-01-01

    Caches play an important role in embedded systems to bridge the performance gap between fast processor and slow memory. And prefetching mechanisms are proposed to further improve the cache performance. While in real-time systems, the application of caches complicates the Worst-Case Execution Time (WCET) analysis due to its unpredictable behavior. Modern embedded processors often equip locking mechanism to improve timing predictability of the instruction cache. However, locking the whole cache may degrade the cache performance and increase the WCET of the real-time application. In this paper, we proposed an instruction-prefetching combined partial cache locking mechanism, which combines an instruction prefetching mechanism (termed as BBIP) with partial cache locking to improve the WCET estimates of real-time applications. BBIP is an instruction prefetching mechanism we have already proposed to improve the worst-case cache performance and in turn the worst-case execution time. The estimations on typical real-time applications show that the partial cache locking mechanism shows remarkable WCET improvement over static analysis and full cache locking.

  2. Synthesizing time-evolving partially-coherent Schell-model sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Zandt, Noah R.; Hyde, Milo W.; Bose-Pillai, Santasri R.; Voelz, David G.; Xiao, Xifeng; Fiorino, Steven T.

    2017-03-01

    Time-evolving simulation of sources with partial spatial and temporal coherence is sometimes instructive or necessary to explain optical coherence effects. Yet, existing time-evolving synthesis techniques often require prohibitive amounts of computer memory. This paper discusses three methods for the synthesis of continuous or pulsed time-evolving sources with nearly arbitrary spatial and temporal coherence. One method greatly reduces computer memory requirements, making this type of synthesis more practical. The utility of all three methods is demonstrated via a modified form of Young's experiment. Numerical simulation and laboratory results for time-averaged irradiance are presented and compared with theory to validate the synthesis techniques.

  3. Numerical methods for large-scale, time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turkel, E.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of numerical methods for time dependent partial differential equations is presented. The emphasis is on practical applications to large scale problems. A discussion of new developments in high order methods and moving grids is given. The importance of boundary conditions is stressed for both internal and external flows. A description of implicit methods is presented including generalizations to multidimensions. Shocks, aerodynamics, meteorology, plasma physics and combustion applications are also briefly described.

  4. On invariant analysis of some time fractional nonlinear systems of partial differential equations. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singla, Komal; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-10-01

    An investigation of Lie point symmetries for systems of time fractional partial differential equations including Ito system, coupled Burgers equations, coupled Korteweg de Vries equations, Hirota-Satsuma coupled KdV equations, and coupled nonlinear Hirota equations has been done. Using the obtained symmetries, each one of the systems is reduced to the nonlinear system of fractional ordinary differential equations involving Erdélyi-Kober fractional differential operator depending on a parameter α.

  5. A new mixed element method for a class of time-fractional partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hong; Gao, Wei; He, Siriguleng; Fang, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    A kind of new mixed element method for time-fractional partial differential equations is studied. The Caputo-fractional derivative of time direction is approximated by two-step difference method and the spatial direction is discretized by a new mixed element method, whose gradient belongs to the simple (L (2)(Ω)(2)) space replacing the complex H(div; Ω) space. Some a priori error estimates in L (2)-norm for the scalar unknown u and in (L (2))(2)-norm for its gradient σ. Moreover, we also discuss a priori error estimates in H (1)-norm for the scalar unknown u.

  6. A New Mixed Element Method for a Class of Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Gao, Wei; He, Siriguleng; Fang, Zhichao

    2014-01-01

    A kind of new mixed element method for time-fractional partial differential equations is studied. The Caputo-fractional derivative of time direction is approximated by two-step difference method and the spatial direction is discretized by a new mixed element method, whose gradient belongs to the simple (L2(Ω)2) space replacing the complex H(div; Ω) space. Some a priori error estimates in L2-norm for the scalar unknown u and in (L2)2-norm for its gradient σ. Moreover, we also discuss a priori error estimates in H1-norm for the scalar unknown u. PMID:24737957

  7. Space-time analogy for partially coherent plane-wave-type pulses.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jesús; Torres-Company, Víctor; Silvestre, Enrique; Andrés, Pedro

    2005-11-15

    In this Letter we extend the well-known space-time duality to partially coherent wave fields and, as a limit case, to incoherent sources. We show that there is a general analogy between the paraxial diffraction of quasi-monochromatic beams of limited spatial coherence and the temporal distortion of partially coherent plane-wave pulses in parabolic dispersive media. Next, coherence-dependent effects in the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulses are retrieved from that of their spatial counterpart, the Gaussian Schell-model beam. Finally, the last result allows us to present a source linewidth analysis in an optical fiber communication system operating around the 1.55 microm wavelength window.

  8. Partial eigenvalue assignment and its stability in a time delayed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kumar V.; Dey, Rajeeb; Datta, Biswa N.

    2014-01-01

    Active vibration control strategy is an effective way to control dangerous vibrations in a structure, caused by resonance and to manipulate the dynamics of vibrational response. Implementation of this strategy requires real-time computations of two feedback control matrices such that a small amount of eigenvalues of the associated quadratic matrix pencil are replaced by suitably chosen ones while the remaining large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors remain unchanged ensuring the no spill-over. This mathematical problem is referred to as the Quadratic Partial Eigenvalue Assignment problem. The greatest challenge there is to solve the problems using the knowledge of only a small number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors that are computable using state-of-the-art techniques. This paper generalizes the earlier work on partial assignment to constant time-delay systems. Furthermore, a posterior stability analysis is carried out to identify the ranges of the time-delay that maintains the closed-loop assignment while keeping the stability of the infinite number of eigenvalues for the time-delayed systems. The practical features of the proposed methods are that it is implemented in the second-order setting itself using only those small number of eigenvalues and the eigenvectors that are to be assigned and the no spill-over is established by means of mathematical results. The results of our numerical experiments support the validity of our proposed methods.

  9. Detrended partial cross-correlation analysis of two nonstationary time series influenced by common external forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Min; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Podobnik, Boris; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Stanley, H Eugene

    2015-06-01

    When common factors strongly influence two power-law cross-correlated time series recorded in complex natural or social systems, using detrended cross-correlation analysis (DCCA) without considering these common factors will bias the results. We use detrended partial cross-correlation analysis (DPXA) to uncover the intrinsic power-law cross correlations between two simultaneously recorded time series in the presence of nonstationarity after removing the effects of other time series acting as common forces. The DPXA method is a generalization of the detrended cross-correlation analysis that takes into account partial correlation analysis. We demonstrate the method by using bivariate fractional Brownian motions contaminated with a fractional Brownian motion. We find that the DPXA is able to recover the analytical cross Hurst indices, and thus the multiscale DPXA coefficients are a viable alternative to the conventional cross-correlation coefficient. We demonstrate the advantage of the DPXA coefficients over the DCCA coefficients by analyzing contaminated bivariate fractional Brownian motions. We calculate the DPXA coefficients and use them to extract the intrinsic cross correlation between crude oil and gold futures by taking into consideration the impact of the U.S. dollar index. We develop the multifractal DPXA (MF-DPXA) method in order to generalize the DPXA method and investigate multifractal time series. We analyze multifractal binomial measures masked with strong white noises and find that the MF-DPXA method quantifies the hidden multifractal nature while the multifractal DCCA method fails.

  10. Time to Decide? Dynamical Analysis Predicts Partial Tip/Stalk Patterning States Arise during Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Regan, Erzsébet Ravasz; Bentley, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly dynamic morphogenesis process; however, surprisingly little is known about the timing of the different molecular processes involved. Although the role of the VEGF-notch-DLL4 signaling pathway has been established as essential for tip/stalk cell competition during sprouting, the speed and dynamic properties of the underlying process at the individual cell level has not been fully elucidated. In this study, using mathematical modeling we investigate how specific, biologically meaningful, local conditions around and within an individual cell can influence their unique tip/stalk phenotype switching kinetics. To this end we constructed an ordinary differential equation model of VEGF-notch-DLL4 signaling in a system of two, coupled endothelial cells (EC). Our studies reveal that at any given point in an angiogenic vessel the time it takes a cell to decide to take on a tip or stalk phenotype may be drastically different, and this asynchrony of tip/stalk cell decisions along vessels itself acts to speed up later competitions. We unexpectedly uncover intermediate "partial" yet stable states lying between the tip and stalk cell fates, and identify that internal cellular factors, such as NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) and Lunatic fringe 1 (Lfng1), can specifically determine the length of time a cell spends in these newly identified partial tip/stalk states. Importantly, the model predicts that these partial EC states can arise during normal angiogenesis, in particular during cell rearrangement in sprouts, providing a novel two-stage mechanism for rapid adaptive behavior to the cells highly dynamic environment. Overall, this study demonstrates that different factors (both internal and external to EC) can be used to modulate the speed of tip/stalk decisions, opening up new opportunities and challenges for future biological experiments and therapeutic targeting to manipulate vascular network topology, and our basic understanding of

  11. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent.

  12. Evaluation of Partial k-space strategies to speed up Time-domain EPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; McMillan, Alan; Gullapalli, Rao P; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Mitchell, James B.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C

    2012-01-01

    Narrow-line spin probes derived from the trityl radical have led to the development of fast in vivo time-domain EPR imaging. Pure phase-encoding imaging modalities based on the Single Point Imaging scheme (SPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of 3D oximetric images with functional information in minutes. In this paper, we explore techniques to improve the temporal resolution and circumvent the relatively short biological half-lives of trityl probes using partial k-space strategies. There are two main approaches: one involves the use of the Hermitian character of the k-space by which only part of the k-space is measured and the unmeasured part is generated using the Hermitian symmetry. This approach is limited in success by the accuracy of numerical estimate of the phase roll in the k-space that corrupts the Hermiticy. The other approach is to measure only a judicially chosen reduced region of k-space (a centrosymmetric ellipsoid region) that more or less accounts for >70% of the k-space energy. Both of these aspects were explored in FT-EPR imaging with a doubling of scan speed demonstrated by considering ellipsoid geometry of the k-space. Partial k-space strategies help improve the temporal resolution in studying fast dynamics of functional aspects in vivo with infused spin probes. PMID:23045171

  13. Time to Decide? Dynamical Analysis Predicts Partial Tip/Stalk Patterning States Arise during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Erzsébet Ravasz; Bentley, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly dynamic morphogenesis process; however, surprisingly little is known about the timing of the different molecular processes involved. Although the role of the VEGF-notch-DLL4 signaling pathway has been established as essential for tip/stalk cell competition during sprouting, the speed and dynamic properties of the underlying process at the individual cell level has not been fully elucidated. In this study, using mathematical modeling we investigate how specific, biologically meaningful, local conditions around and within an individual cell can influence their unique tip/stalk phenotype switching kinetics. To this end we constructed an ordinary differential equation model of VEGF-notch-DLL4 signaling in a system of two, coupled endothelial cells (EC). Our studies reveal that at any given point in an angiogenic vessel the time it takes a cell to decide to take on a tip or stalk phenotype may be drastically different, and this asynchrony of tip/stalk cell decisions along vessels itself acts to speed up later competitions. We unexpectedly uncover intermediate “partial” yet stable states lying between the tip and stalk cell fates, and identify that internal cellular factors, such as NAD-dependent deacetylase sirtuin-1 (Sirt1) and Lunatic fringe 1 (Lfng1), can specifically determine the length of time a cell spends in these newly identified partial tip/stalk states. Importantly, the model predicts that these partial EC states can arise during normal angiogenesis, in particular during cell rearrangement in sprouts, providing a novel two-stage mechanism for rapid adaptive behavior to the cells highly dynamic environment. Overall, this study demonstrates that different factors (both internal and external to EC) can be used to modulate the speed of tip/stalk decisions, opening up new opportunities and challenges for future biological experiments and therapeutic targeting to manipulate vascular network topology, and our basic understanding of

  14. Separation of sources in radiofrequency measurements of partial discharges using time-power ratio maps.

    PubMed

    Albarracin, R; Robles, G; Martinez-Tarifa, J M; Ardila-Rey, J

    2015-09-01

    Partial discharges measurement is one of the most useful tools for condition monitoring of high-voltage (HV) equipment. These phenomena can be measured on-line in radiofrequency (RF) with sensors such as the Vivaldi antenna, used in this paper, which improves the signal-to-noise ratio by rejecting FM and low-frequency TV bands. Additionally, the power ratios (PR), a signal-processing technique based on the power distribution of the incoming signals in frequency bands, are used to characterize different sources of PD and electromagnetic noise (EMN). The calculation of the time length of the pulses is introduced to separate signals where the PR alone do not give a conclusive solution. Thus, if several EM sources could be previously calibrated, it is possible to detect pulses corresponding to PD activity.

  15. Soft sensor modelling by time difference, recursive partial least squares and adaptive model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Yang, W.; Xu, O.; Zhou, L.; Wang, J.

    2017-04-01

    To investigate time-variant and nonlinear characteristics in industrial processes, a soft sensor modelling method based on time difference, moving-window recursive partial least square (PLS) and adaptive model updating is proposed. In this method, time difference values of input and output variables are used as training samples to construct the model, which can reduce the effects of the nonlinear characteristic on modelling accuracy and retain the advantages of recursive PLS algorithm. To solve the high updating frequency of the model, a confidence value is introduced, which can be updated adaptively according to the results of the model performance assessment. Once the confidence value is updated, the model can be updated. The proposed method has been used to predict the 4-carboxy-benz-aldehyde (CBA) content in the purified terephthalic acid (PTA) oxidation reaction process. The results show that the proposed soft sensor modelling method can reduce computation effectively, improve prediction accuracy by making use of process information and reflect the process characteristics accurately.

  16. Kaolin clotting time.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kottayam

    2013-01-01

    The kaolin clotting time (KCT) is a sensitive test used in the laboratory detection of lupus anticoagulants (LA) (Derksen and de Groot, Thromb Res 114:521-526, 2004). It is essentially an activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test with no added phospholipid. Kaolin acts as the activator in the KCT. In the absence of additional phospholipid reagent, the quality of the test sample is extremely important since the generation of thrombin completely depends on the presence of residual cell membranes and plasma lipids (Derksen and de Groot, Thromb Res 114:521-526, 2004). Since the test contains no exogenous phospholipid, a confirmatory test using excess phospholipid is required to confirm the presence of lupus anticoagulant in the sample (Court, Br J Biomed Sci 54:287-298, 1997).

  17. Dissecting the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets using the partial triadic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967-2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967-2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets.

  18. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    SciTech Connect

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David; Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as observations from

  19. Dissecting the Space-Time Structure of Tree-Ring Datasets Using the Partial Triadic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967–2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967–2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets. PMID:25247299

  20. Actor-critic-based optimal tracking for partially unknown nonlinear discrete-time systems.

    PubMed

    Kiumarsi, Bahare; Lewis, Frank L

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a partially model-free adaptive optimal control solution to the deterministic nonlinear discrete-time (DT) tracking control problem in the presence of input constraints. The tracking error dynamics and reference trajectory dynamics are first combined to form an augmented system. Then, a new discounted performance function based on the augmented system is presented for the optimal nonlinear tracking problem. In contrast to the standard solution, which finds the feedforward and feedback terms of the control input separately, the minimization of the proposed discounted performance function gives both feedback and feedforward parts of the control input simultaneously. This enables us to encode the input constraints into the optimization problem using a nonquadratic performance function. The DT tracking Bellman equation and tracking Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) are derived. An actor-critic-based reinforcement learning algorithm is used to learn the solution to the tracking HJB equation online without requiring knowledge of the system drift dynamics. That is, two neural networks (NNs), namely, actor NN and critic NN, are tuned online and simultaneously to generate the optimal bounded control policy. A simulation example is given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. 76 FR 68128 - Fresh Garlic From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Partial Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... Garlic From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit for Partial Preliminary Results of... (Department) published a notice of initiation of an administrative review of fresh garlic from the People's... extended the time limit to issue the preliminary results by 100 days. See Fresh Garlic From the...

  2. A Comparison of Momentary Time Sampling and Partial-Interval Recording for Assessment of Effects of Social Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radley, Keith C.; O'Handley, Roderick D.; Labrot, Zachary C.

    2015-01-01

    Assessment in social skills training often utilizes procedures such as partial-interval recording (PIR) and momentary time sampling (MTS) to estimate changes in duration in social engagements due to intervention. Although previous research suggests PIR to be more inaccurate than MTS in estimating levels of behavior, treatment analysis decisions…

  3. In Vivo Gene Therapy of Hemophilia B: Sustained Partial Correction in Factor IX-Deficient Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Mark A.; Rothenberg, Steven; Landen, Charles N.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Leland, Frances; Toman, Carol; Finegold, Milton; Thompson, Arthur R.; Read, M. S.; Brinkhous, Kenneth M.; Woo, Savio L. C.

    1993-10-01

    The liver represents a model organ for gene therapy. A method has been developed for hepatic gene transfer in vivo by the direct infusion of recombinant retroviral vectors into the portal vasculature, which results in the persistent expression of exogenous genes. To determine if these technologies are applicable for the treatment of hemophilia B patients, preclinical efficacy studies were done in a hemophilia B dog model. When the canine factor IX complementary DNA was transduced directly into the hepatocytes of affected dogs in vivo, the animals constitutively expressed low levels of canine factor IX for more than 5 months. Persistent expression of the clotting. factor resulted in reductions of whole blood clotting and partial thromboplastin times of the treated animals. Thus, long-term treatment of hemophilia B patients may be feasible by direct hepatic gene therapy in vivo.

  4. Point-of-care monitoring of oral anticoagulation therapy in children. Comparison of the CoaguChek XS system with venous INR and venous INR using an International Reference Thromboplastin preparation (rTF/95).

    PubMed

    Greenway, Anthea; Ignjatovic, Vera; Summerhayes, Robyn; Newall, Fiona; Burgess, Janet; DeRosa, Lydia; Monagle, Paul

    2009-07-01

    Point-of-care (POC) monitoring of oral anticoagulation has been widely adopted in both paediatric and adult patients. A new POC system, the CoaguChek XS has recently been developed to measure the international normalised ratio (INR) and may offer significant advantages. The CoaguChek XS utilises a new method of electrochemical clot detection based on thrombin generation. This system has not been previously evaluated in children with reference to the laboratory gold standard, the prothrombin time using reference thromboplastin. It was the objective to compare values obtained by the CoaguChek XS system with both the venous INR and the gold standard for anticoagulant monitoring, prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95). To evaluate the impact of testing using the CoaguChek XS on clinical anticoagulant dosing decisions. Fifty paired venous INR and capillary CoaguChek XS results were obtained from 31 children (aged up to 16 years). The laboratory gold standard, a manual prothrombin time with reference thromboplastin (rTF/95) was additionally performed on 26 samples. Correlation between the CoaguChek XS result and the venous INR was r = 0.810. Agreement between the CoaguChek XS result and the reference INR was shown to be higher (r=0.95), in the subset analysed by this method. Correlation between the venous INR and reference INR was r=0.90. Despite changes to the methodology of testing with the CoaguChek XS POC monitoring system, the accuracy of this method when compared with both the venous INR and gold standard reference INR was satisfactory. This resulted in infrequent changes to clinical decision making regarding anticoagulation.

  5. Relaxation of quantum systems weakly coupled to a bath. II. Formal analysis of the total-time-ordering-cumulant and partial-time-ordering-cumulant spectral line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretón, J.; Hardisson, A.; Mauricio, F.; Velasco, S.

    1984-07-01

    Given a quantum system of a few degrees of freedom in weak interaction with a bath, the expressions which connect its total-time-ordering-cumulant and partial-time-ordering-cumulant relaxation with the corresponding spectral line shapes of dipolar absorption are deduced. For simplicity we consider a system with a nondegenerate and nonequidistant energy spectrum. A special study in the cases of isolated resonances and of a weak interference effect between resonances is made.

  6. Isostable reduction with applications to time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-07-01

    Isostables and isostable reduction, analogous to isochrons and phase reduction for oscillatory systems, are useful in the study of nonlinear equations which asymptotically approach a stationary solution. In this work, we present a general method for isostable reduction of partial differential equations, with the potential power to reduce the dimensionality of a nonlinear system from infinity to 1. We illustrate the utility of this reduction by applying it to two different models with biological relevance. In the first example, isostable reduction of the Fokker-Planck equation provides the necessary framework to design a simple control strategy to desynchronize a population of pathologically synchronized oscillatory neurons, as might be relevant to Parkinson's disease. Another example analyzes a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation with relevance to action potential propagation in a cardiac system.

  7. Isostable reduction with applications to time-dependent partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Dan; Moehlis, Jeff

    2016-07-01

    Isostables and isostable reduction, analogous to isochrons and phase reduction for oscillatory systems, are useful in the study of nonlinear equations which asymptotically approach a stationary solution. In this work, we present a general method for isostable reduction of partial differential equations, with the potential power to reduce the dimensionality of a nonlinear system from infinity to 1. We illustrate the utility of this reduction by applying it to two different models with biological relevance. In the first example, isostable reduction of the Fokker-Planck equation provides the necessary framework to design a simple control strategy to desynchronize a population of pathologically synchronized oscillatory neurons, as might be relevant to Parkinson's disease. Another example analyzes a nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation with relevance to action potential propagation in a cardiac system.

  8. Timing and duration of partial melting and magmatism in the Variscan Montagne Noire gneiss dome (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trap, Pierre; Roger, Françoise; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    Unravelling the detailed pressure-temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-D) evolution of magmatic and metamorphic rocks provides essential insights into the timing and duration of partial melting and related plutonism during crustal flow and migmatitic dome formation. The Montagne Noire Axial Zone (MNAZ) is a migmatitic dome located within the Variscan orogen in the southern French Massif Central. The timing of the main thermal event that was responsible for intense partial melting is still highly debated. In this study we present new laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) age data on micaschists, migmatites and granites that clarify the P-T-t-D evolution of the MNAZ. Structurally controlled samples were collected in order to constrain the timing of metamorphism, migmatization and plutonism regarding the main structural pattern D1, D2 and D3. D1 and D2 correspond to nappe stacking and dextral transpression, respectively. D3 is related to vertical shortening and coaxial thinning with a preferential NE-SW- to E-W-directed stretching. LA-ICP-MS analyses on the syntectonic Anglès, Soulié and Martys granites yielded U-Th/Pb monazite ages of 305 ± 1.5, 306 ± 1.9 and 314 ± 2 Ma, respectively. Five migmatitic rocks sampled in the eastern and central Espinouse area yielded in situ ages ranging between 312 ± 2 and 301 ± 2 Ma. Along the dome envelope, two garnet-staurolite-bearing micaschists near Saint-Pons-de-Thomières village gave in situ U-Th-Pb ages of 312.1 ± 2.1 and 309.0 ± 3.1 Ma. A fine-grained gneiss with a D3 fabrics in the eastern dome envelope yield a 208Pb/232Th mean age at 305.7 ± 3.9 Ma. All ages obtained in this study for the micaschists, migmatites and granites range between 315 and 301 Ma. We interpret this time span as the record of the high thermal event responsible for intense crustal partial melting within the lower and middle crust. The onset of partial melting occurred at ca. 315 Ma that marked the beginning of

  9. Timing and duration of partial melting and magmatism in the Variscan Montagne Noire gneiss dome (French Massif Central)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trap, Pierre; Roger, Françoise; Cenki-Tok, Bénédicte; Paquette, Jean-Louis

    2016-11-01

    Unravelling the detailed pressure-temperature-time-deformation (P-T-t-D) evolution of magmatic and metamorphic rocks provides essential insights into the timing and duration of partial melting and related plutonism during crustal flow and migmatitic dome formation. The Montagne Noire Axial Zone (MNAZ) is a migmatitic dome located within the Variscan orogen in the southern French Massif Central. The timing of the main thermal event that was responsible for intense partial melting is still highly debated. In this study we present new laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) age data on micaschists, migmatites and granites that clarify the P-T-t-D evolution of the MNAZ. Structurally controlled samples were collected in order to constrain the timing of metamorphism, migmatization and plutonism regarding the main structural pattern D1, D2 and D3. D1 and D2 correspond to nappe stacking and dextral transpression, respectively. D3 is related to vertical shortening and coaxial thinning with a preferential NE-SW- to E-W-directed stretching. LA-ICP-MS analyses on the syntectonic Anglès, Soulié and Martys granites yielded U-Th/Pb monazite ages of 305 ± 1.5, 306 ± 1.9 and 314 ± 2 Ma, respectively. Five migmatitic rocks sampled in the eastern and central Espinouse area yielded in situ ages ranging between 312 ± 2 and 301 ± 2 Ma. Along the dome envelope, two garnet-staurolite-bearing micaschists near Saint-Pons-de-Thomières village gave in situ U-Th-Pb ages of 312.1 ± 2.1 and 309.0 ± 3.1 Ma. A fine-grained gneiss with a D3 fabrics in the eastern dome envelope yield a 208Pb/232Th mean age at 305.7 ± 3.9 Ma. All ages obtained in this study for the micaschists, migmatites and granites range between 315 and 301 Ma. We interpret this time span as the record of the high thermal event responsible for intense crustal partial melting within the lower and middle crust. The onset of partial melting occurred at ca. 315 Ma that marked the beginning of

  10. Modeling partial nitrification and denitrification in a hybrid biofilm reactor: calibration by retention time distribution and respirometric tests.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming; Soric, Audrey; Roche, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    In this study, partial nitrification coupled with denitrification is modeled in a hybrid biofilm reactor with different hydraulic saturation conditions. The activated sludge model with two-step nitrification is implemented in GPS-X software. Hydrodynamic modeling by retention time distribution analysis and biokinetic measurement by respirometric tests are two significant parts of model calibration. By combining these two parts, partial nitrification in the aerobic part of the column is well simulated with a good agreement between experimental and modeled effluent concentrations of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-). Particularly, fully hydraulic saturation condition contributes to the large hydraulic volume of 1.9 L and high produced NO2 (-) concentration around 40 mg L(-1). However, modeling denitrification still needs to be improved with more calibrated parameters. Furthermore, three alternatives are proposed for the optimization of reactor design and operation.

  11. The large discretization step method for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haras, Zigo; Taasan, Shlomo

    1995-01-01

    A new method for the acceleration of linear and nonlinear time dependent calculations is presented. It is based on the Large Discretization Step (LDS) approximation, defined in this work, which employs an extended system of low accuracy schemes to approximate a high accuracy discrete approximation to a time dependent differential operator. Error bounds on such approximations are derived. These approximations are efficiently implemented in the LDS methods for linear and nonlinear hyperbolic equations, presented here. In these algorithms the high and low accuracy schemes are interpreted as the same discretization of a time dependent operator on fine and coarse grids, respectively. Thus, a system of correction terms and corresponding equations are derived and solved on the coarse grid to yield the fine grid accuracy. These terms are initialized by visiting the fine grid once in many coarse grid time steps. The resulting methods are very general, simple to implement and may be used to accelerate many existing time marching schemes.

  12. Merging Multiple-Partial-Depth Data Time Series Using Objective Empirical Orthogonal Function Fitting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    structure, but the extrapolated does not. As a result, four incorrect eigenrays are found in using the incorrect extrapolated profile. The arrival time...of each eigenray is summarized in Table II. B. Final Sound-Speed Profiles and Improvements of Ray Tracing Modeling Sound-speed profiles were computed...four incorrect eigenrays are found (bottom panel of Fig. 11). The arrival time of each eigenray in both models is summarized in Table II, and the

  13. Real-Time Monitoring of Singlet Oxygen and Oxygen Partial Pressure During the Deep Photodynamic Therapy In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weitao; Huang, Dong; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yangyang; Gu, Yueqing; Qian, Zhiyu

    2016-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective noninvasive method for the tumor treatment. The major challenge in current PDT research is how to quantitatively evaluate therapy effects. To our best knowledge, this is the first time to combine multi-parameter detection methods in PDT. More specifically, we have developed a set of system, including the high-sensitivity measurement of singlet oxygen, oxygen partial pressure and fluorescence image. In this paper, the detection ability of the system was validated by the different concentrations of carbon quantum dots. Moreover, the correlation between singlet oxygen and oxygen partial pressure with laser irradiation was observed. Then, the system could detect the signal up to 0.5 cm tissue depth with 660 nm irradiation and 1 cm tissue depth with 980 nm irradiation by using up-conversion nanoparticles during PDT in vitro. Furthermore, we obtained the relationship among concentration of singlet oxygen, oxygen partial pressure and tumor cell viability under certain conditions. The results indicate that the multi-parameter detection system is a promising asset to evaluate the deep tumor therapy during PDT. Moreover, the system might be potentially used for the further study in biology and molecular imaging.

  14. The adaptive CCCG({eta}) method for efficient solution of time dependent partial differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, F.F.; Birkett, N.R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Controlled Cholesky factorisation has been shown to be a robust preconditioner for the Conjugate Gradient method. In this scheme the amount of fill-in is defined in terms of a parameter {eta}, the number of extra elements allowed per column. It is demonstrated how an optimum value of {eta} can be automatically determined when solving time dependent p.d.e.`s using an implicit time step method. A comparison between CCCG({eta}) and the standard ICCG solving parabolic problems on general grids shows CCCG({eta}) to be an efficient general purpose solver.

  15. A real-time autostereoscopic display method based on partial sub-pixel by general GPU processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duo; Sang, Xinzhu; Cai, Yuanfa

    2013-08-01

    With the progress of 3D technology, the huge computing capacity for the real-time autostereoscopic display is required. Because of complicated sub-pixel allocating, masks providing arranged sub-pixels are fabricated to reduce real-time computation. However, the binary mask has inherent drawbacks. In order to solve these problems, weighted masks are used in displaying based on partial sub-pixel. Nevertheless, the corresponding computations will be tremendously growing and unbearable for CPU. To improve calculating speed, Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) processing with parallel computing ability is adopted. Here the principle of partial sub-pixel is presented, and the texture array of Direct3D 10 is used to increase the number of computable textures. When dealing with a HD display and multi-viewpoints, a low level GPU is still able to permit a fluent real time displaying, while the performance of high level CPU is really not acceptable. Meanwhile, after using texture array, the performance of D3D10 could be double, and sometimes be triple faster than D3D9. There are several distinguishing features for the proposed method, such as the good portability, less overhead and good stability. The GPU display system could also be used for the future Ultra HD autostereoscopic display.

  16. Randomly accelerated particle in a box: mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Kotsev, Stanislav N; Burkhardt, Theodore W

    2005-04-01

    Consider a particle which is randomly accelerated by Gaussian white noise on the line segment 0time T(x,v), where x and v denote the initial position and velocity, was calculated exactly by Masoliver and Porrà in 1995. We consider a more general boundary condition. On arriving at either boundary, the particle is absorbed with probability 1-p and reflected with probability p. The reflections are inelastic, with coefficient of restitution, r. With exact analytical and numerical methods and simulations, we study the mean absorption time as a function of p and r.

  17. Acceleration of yoghurt fermentation time by yeast extract and partial characterisation of the active components.

    PubMed

    Smith, Esti-Andrine; Myburgh, Jacobus; Osthoff, Gernot; de Wit, Maryna

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble autolysate of yeast, usually utilised for microbial growth support, was used as additive in yoghurt fermentation. The yeast extract (YE) resulted in a decrease of fermentation time by 21% to reach a pH of 4·6. However, the YE resulted in unacceptable flavour and taste. By size exclusion chromatography, a fraction of the YE was obtained that could account for the observed 21% decrease in fermentation time. The fraction contained molecules of low molecular weight, consisting of minerals, free amino acids and peptides. The acceleration of the yoghurt fermentation was ascribed to the short peptides in the fraction. It is proposed that the application of this extract in industrial yoghurt manufacture would result in savings for both the industry and the consumer.

  18. Real-time performance analysis of wireless multimedia networks based on partially observed multivariate point processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2000-07-01

    Third-generation (3G) wireless networks will support integrated multimedia services based on a cellular extension of a packet-switched architecture using variants of the Internet protocol (IP). Services can be categorized as real- time and delay-sensitive, or non-real-time and delay- insensitive. Each call, arriving to or active within the network, carries demand for one or more services in parallel; each service type with a guaranteed quality of service (QoS). Admission of new calls to the wireless IP network (WIN) from the gateway of a wired network or from a mobile subscriber (MS) is allowed by call admission control procedures. Roaming of the MSs among the nodes of the WIN is controlled by handoff procedures between base stations (BSs), or BS controllers, and the MSs. Metrics such as the probabilities of call blocking and dropping, handoff transition time, processing latency of a call, throughput, and capacity are used to evaluate the performance of network control procedures. The metrics are directly related to the network resources required to provide the QoS for the integrated services.

  19. Expectation-maximization algorithms for learning a finite mixture of univariate survival time distributions from partially specified class values

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Youngrok

    2013-05-15

    Heterogeneity exists on a data set when samples from di erent classes are merged into the data set. Finite mixture models can be used to represent a survival time distribution on heterogeneous patient group by the proportions of each class and by the survival time distribution within each class as well. The heterogeneous data set cannot be explicitly decomposed to homogeneous subgroups unless all the samples are precisely labeled by their origin classes; such impossibility of decomposition is a barrier to overcome for estimating nite mixture models. The expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm has been used to obtain maximum likelihood estimates of nite mixture models by soft-decomposition of heterogeneous samples without labels for a subset or the entire set of data. In medical surveillance databases we can find partially labeled data, that is, while not completely unlabeled there is only imprecise information about class values. In this study we propose new EM algorithms that take advantages of using such partial labels, and thus incorporate more information than traditional EM algorithms. We particularly propose four variants of the EM algorithm named EM-OCML, EM-PCML, EM-HCML and EM-CPCML, each of which assumes a specific mechanism of missing class values. We conducted a simulation study on exponential survival trees with five classes and showed that the advantages of incorporating substantial amount of partially labeled data can be highly signi cant. We also showed model selection based on AIC values fairly works to select the best proposed algorithm on each specific data set. A case study on a real-world data set of gastric cancer provided by Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program showed a superiority of EM-CPCML to not only the other proposed EM algorithms but also conventional supervised, unsupervised and semi-supervised learning algorithms.

  20. Parallel Numerical Solution Process of a Two Dimensional Time Dependent Nonlinear Partial Differential Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, I.; Tirado, F.; Vazquez, L.

    We present a process to achieve the solution of the two dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation using a multigrid technique on a distributed memory machine. Some features about the multigrid technique as its good convergence and parallel properties are explained in this paper. This makes multigrid method the optimal one to solve the systems of equations arising at each time step from an implicit numerical scheme. We give some experimental results about the parallel numerical simulation of this equation on a message passing parallel machine.

  1. A Time-Limited and Partially Reversible Model of Hypoganglionosis Induced by Benzalkonium Chloride Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Pan, Weikang; Wang, HuaiJie; Gao, Ya

    2016-05-01

    Serosal application of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been previously applied to produce a model of aganglionosis; however, confusion remains regarding the extent of chemical ablation of enteric myenteric plexus after BAC treatment. The time sequence of BAC-induced effects on the myenteric plexus of the rat colon was determined and followed the morphologic changes. After sacrifice of animals 7, 14, 28, 56, 84 or 168 days postintervention, colonic tissue samples were removed, fixed in formalin, and cut into 5-μm longitudinal sections for histological analysis. The neural analysis was used to re-evaluate BAC treatments for the appropriate model. Compared with rats in sham groups, rats in 0.1 %-30-min BAC group maintained only 15.27 ± 4.80 % of ganglia per section in a 1-cm/5-μm slice and 11.76 ± 2.30 % of ganglionic cells after 28 days, the lower and stable number of ganglionic cells between Day 7 and 84 (from 11.67 ± 2.10 to 19.05 ± 5.10 %). Although an increase, ganglionic cell numbers did not recover at Day168 when compared with the numbers in sham groups. The results showed that characteristics of rats in the 0.1 %-30-min BAC group between Day 7 and 84 most closely kept in stable state, suggesting that these treatment parameters are ideal for producing a hypoganglia model of hypoganglionosis.

  2. Reliable Real-Time Solution of Parametrized Partial Differential Equations: Reduced-Basis Output Bound Methods. Appendix 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prudhomme, C.; Rovas, D. V.; Veroy, K.; Machiels, L.; Maday, Y.; Patera, A. T.; Turinici, G.; Zang, Thomas A., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a technique for the rapid and reliable prediction of linear-functional outputs of elliptic (and parabolic) partial differential equations with affine parameter dependence. The essential components are (i) (provably) rapidly convergent global reduced basis approximations, Galerkin projection onto a space W(sub N) spanned by solutions of the governing partial differential equation at N selected points in parameter space; (ii) a posteriori error estimation, relaxations of the error-residual equation that provide inexpensive yet sharp and rigorous bounds for the error in the outputs of interest; and (iii) off-line/on-line computational procedures, methods which decouple the generation and projection stages of the approximation process. The operation count for the on-line stage, in which, given a new parameter value, we calculate the output of interest and associated error bound, depends only on N (typically very small) and the parametric complexity of the problem; the method is thus ideally suited for the repeated and rapid evaluations required in the context of parameter estimation, design, optimization, and real-time control.

  3. Effects of time-of-day and partial sleep deprivation on short-term maximal performances of judo competitors.

    PubMed

    Souissi, Nizar; Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Dogui, Mohamed; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim

    2013-09-01

    This study assessed the effects of partial sleep deprivation on short-term maximal performances of judokas in the morning and afternoon of the following day. In a randomized design, 12 judokas completed the maximal voluntary contraction, the handgrip, and the Wingate tests before and after a judo combat. Measurements were performed at 09:00 and 16:00 hours after a reference-normal sleep night and 2 conditions of 4-hour partial sleep deprivation timed at the beginning (SDB) or at the end of the night (SDE). The results showed that muscle power and strength were significantly higher at 16:00 than 09:00 hours (p < 0.05). These diurnal variations disappeared after SDB and SDE and after the combat. In addition, SDE resulted in significant decreases of short-term maximal performance in the afternoon (p < 0.01). In conclusion, SDE decreased muscle strength and power at 16:00 hours and, therefore, might have blunted the diurnal variations of short-term maximal exercise. Thus, early rising is more detrimental than late bedtime to muscle strength and power for judo athletes when competitions are scheduled in the afternoon hours.

  4. Minimum norm partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment with time delay in vibrating structures using the receptance and the system matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zheng-Jian; Chen, Mei-Xiang; Datta, Biswa Nath

    2013-02-01

    The partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (PQEAP) is to compute a pair of feedback matrices such that a small number of unwanted eigenvalues in a structure are reassigned to suitable locations while keeping the remaining large number of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors unchanged. The problem arises in active vibration control of structures. For real-life applications, it is not enough just to compute the feedback matrices. They should be computed in such a way that both closed-loop eigenvalue sensitivity and feedback norms are as small as possible. Also, for practical effectiveness, the time-delay between the measurement of the state and implementation of the feedback controller should be considered while solving the PQEAP. These problems are usually solved using only system matrices and do not necessarily take advantage of the receptances which are available by measurements. In this paper, we propose hybrid methods, combining the system matrices and measured receptances, for solutions of the multi-input PQEAP and the minimum-norm PQEAP, both for systems with and without time-delay. These hybrid methods are more efficient than the standard methods which only use the system matrices and not the receptances. These hybrid methods also offer several other computational advantages over the standard methods. Our results generalize the recent work by Ram et al. [Partial pole placement with time delay in structures using the receptance and the system matrices, Linear Algebra and its Applications 434 (2011) 1689-1696]. The results of numerical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  5. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays using a partial reconstruction technique

    DOE PAGES

    Bahinipati, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Kinoshita, K.; ...

    2011-07-05

    We report results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays based on a data sample containing 657×10⁶ BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at the Υ(4S) resonance. We use a partial reconstruction technique, wherein signal B→D*∓π± events are identified using information only from the fast pion from the B decay and the slow pion from the subsequent decay of the D*∓, where the former (latter) corresponds to D*⁺(D*⁻) final states. We obtain CP violation parameters S⁺=+0.061±0.018 (stat)±0.012 (syst) and S⁻=+0.031±0.019 (stat)±0.015 (syst).

  6. Effect of storage time and framework design on the accuracy of maxillary cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    Viswambaran, M.; Sundaram, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Inaccuracies in the fit of palatal major connectors may be related to distortion of the wax pattern due to prolonged storage time and faulty major connector design. Purpose: This in vitro study was carried out to find out the effect of storage time and major connector design on the accuracy of cobalt-chromium cast removable partial dentures (RPDs). Materials and Methods: A brass metal die with a Kennedy Class III, modification 1, the partially edentulous arch was used as a master die. Thirty-six refractory casts were fabricated from the master die. The refractory casts were divided into three groups (Group I: Anterior-posterior palatal bar, Group II: Palatal strap and Group III: Palatal plate) based on the design of maxillary major connector and subdivided into four groups (sub Group A: 01 h, sub Group B: 03 h, Sub Group C: 06 h, and sub Group D: 24 h) based on the storage time. For each group, 12 frameworks were fabricated. The influence of wax pattern storage time and the accuracy of the fit palatal major connector designs on the master die were compared. Casting defects (nodules/incompleteness) of the frameworks were also evaluated before finishing and polishing. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Results: The gap discrepancy was least in sub Group A (01 h) followed by sub Group B (03 h) and C (06 h) and most in sub Group D (24 h). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05 in all locations L1–L5) in the fit of the framework were related to the design of the major connector. The gap discrepancy was least in Group I (anterior-posterior palatal bar) followed by Group II (palatal strap) and most in Group II (palatal plate). Conclusions: It is recommended that the wax patterns for RPD to be invested immediately on completion of the wax procedure. The selection of a major connector design is crucial for an accurate fit of RPD. PMID:26681850

  7. Time-dependency of improvements in arterial oxygenation during partial liquid ventilation in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Max, Martin; Kuhlen, Ralf; Dembinski, Rolf; Rossaint, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    Background: The mechanisms by which partial liquid ventilation (PLV) can improve gas exchange in acute lung injury are still unclear. Therefore, we examined the time- and dose-dependency of the improvements in arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) due to PLV in eight pigs with experimental lung injury, in order to discriminate increases due to oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon before its intrapulmonary instillation from a persistent diffusion of the respiratory gas through the liquid column. Results: Application of four sequential doses of perfluorocarbon resulted in a dose-dependent increase in PaO2. Comparison of measurements 5 and 30 min after instillation of each dose revealed a time-dependent decrease in PaO2 for doses that approximated the functional residual capacity of the animals. Conclusion: Although oxygen dissolved in perfluorocarbon at the onset of PLV can cause a short-term improvement in arterial oxygenation, diffusion of oxygen through the liquid may not be sufficient to maintain the initially observed increase in PaO2. PMID:11056747

  8. Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry of Partially Reconstructed B0 to D*+D*- Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.

    2012-08-13

    We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B{sup 0} {yields}D*{sup +}D*{sup -} decays using (471 {+-} 5) million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Using the technique of partial reconstruction, we measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S = -0.34 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05 and C = +0:15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. Using the value for the CP-odd fraction R{perpendicular} = 0.158 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.006, previously measured by BABAR with fully reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup *+}D{sup *-} events, we extract the CP-even components S{sub +} = -0.49 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and C{sub +} = +0.15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic; the third uncertainty on S{sub +} is the contribution from the uncertainty on R{perpendicular}. The measured value of the CP-even component S{sub +} is consistent with the value of sin 2{beta} measured in b {yields} (c{bar c})s transitions, and with the Standard Model expectation of small penguin contributions.

  9. Inter-costal Liver Ablation Under Real Time MR-Thermometry With Partial Activation Of A HIFU Phased Array Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quesson, Bruno; Merle, Mathilde; Köhler, Max; Mougenot, Charles; Roujol, Sebastien; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Moonen, Chrit

    2010-03-01

    HIFU ablation of tumours located inside the liver is hampered by the rib cage, which partially obstructs the beam path and may create adverse effects such as skin burns. This study presents a method for selectively deactivating the transducer elements causing undesired temperature increases near the bones. A manual segmentation of the bones visualized on 3D anatomical MR images acquired prior to sonication was performed to identify the beam obstruction. The resulting mask was projected (ray tracing starting from the focal point) on the transducer and elements with more than 50% obstruction of their active surface were deactivated. The effectiveness of the method for HIFU ablations is demonstrated ex vivo and in vivo in the liver of pigs with real-time MR thermometry, using the proton resonant frequency (PRF) method. For both ex vivo and in vivo experiments, the temperature increase near the bones was significantly reduced when the elements located in front of the ribs were deactivated. The temperature evolution at the focal point were similar, indicative of the absence of loss of heating efficacy when the elements were deactivated. This method is simple, rapid and reliable and allows to perform intercostal MRgHIFU ablation of the liver while sparing the ribs.

  10. Optimizing the Microscopy Time Schedule for Chromosomal Dosimetry of High-dose and Partial-body Irradiations

    PubMed Central

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr A.

    2017-01-01

    The methodology of cytogenetic triage can be improved by optimizing a schedule of microscopy for different exposure scenarios. Chromosome aberrations were quantified by microscopy in human blood lymphocytes irradiated in vitro to ~2, 4, and 12 Gy acute 60Co γ-rays mixed with the unirradiated blood simulating 10%, 50%, 90%, and 100% exposure and in along with a sample from a homogeneous exposure to ~20 Gy. Biodosimetry workload was statistically modeled assuming that 0.5, 1, 5, or 25 h was available for scoring one case or for analysis of up to 1000 cells or 100 dicentrics plus centric rings by one operator. A strong negative correlation was established between the rates of aberration acquisition and cell recording. Calculations showed that the workload of 1 case per operator per·day (5 h of scoring by microscopy) allows dose estimates with high accuracy for either 90%–100% irradiations of 2 Gy or 50%–90% irradiations of 4–12 Gy; lethal homogeneous (100%) exposures of 12 and 20 Gy can be evaluated with just 1 h of microscopy. Triage analysis of 0.5 h scoring per case results in the minimum tolerable accuracy only for partial- and total-body exposure of 4–20 Gy. Time-related efficacy of conventional biodosimetry depends primarily on the aberration yield in the sample, which is dependent on the radiation dose and its distribution in the patient's body. An optimized schedule of microscopy scoring should be developed for different exposure scenarios in each laboratory to increase their preparedness to radiological emergencies. PMID:28250910

  11. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature or in iced water and blood gas analysis was performed at baseline and after 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. RESULTS--In the first 10 minutes measured PaO2 in plastic syringes at room temperature fell by an average of 1.21 kPa/min; placing the sample on ice reduced the rate of PaO2 decline to 0.19 kPa/min. The rate of fall of PaO2 in glass at room temperature was 0.49 kPa/min. The changes in PaCO2 were less dramatic and at room temperature averaged increases of 0.47 kPa for plastic syringes and 0.71 kPa for glass syringes over the entire two hour period. These changes in gas tension for plastic syringes would lead to an overestimation of pulmonary shunt measured by the 100% oxygen technique of 0.6% for each minute left at room temperature before analysis. CONCLUSIONS--Glass syringes are superior to plastic syringes in preserving samples with a high PaO2, and prompt and adequate cooling of such samples is essential for accurate blood gas analysis. PMID:8016801

  12. European Concerted Action on Anticoagulation. A multicentre calibration study of WHO international reference preparations for thromboplastin, rabbit (RBT/90) and human (rTF/95)

    PubMed Central

    Poller, L; Keown, M; Chauhan, N; van den Besselaar, A M H P; Tripodi, A; Shiach, C; Jespersen, J

    2005-01-01

    A 10 centre calibration was performed after six years to determine the international sensitivity index (ISI) of rTF/95 relative to RBT/90, and to assess any international normalised ratio (INR) bias compared with the original multicentre calibration. After exclusion of one outlying centre, the follow up calibration gave a mean ISI for rTF/95 of 0.99, which although a small difference, is significantly greater than the mean ISI of 0.94 obtained previously. The change in ISI for international reference preparation (IRP) rTF/95 relative to RBT/90 would lead to a slight bias in INR for human compared with rabbit thromboplastins. At a theoretical INR of 3.0, the INR bias is 6.0%, and this is below the accepted 10% level of clinical relevance. Ongoing stability monitoring of World Health Organisation thromboplastin IRP is advised. PMID:15917425

  13. 5 CFR 831.612 - Election at time of retirement of a fully reduced annuity or a partially reduced annuity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election at time of retirement of a fully reduced annuity or a partially reduced annuity to provide a former spouse annuity. 831.612 Section 831.612 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Survivor...

  14. Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls with dynamic partial slip boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Felderhof, B U

    2012-06-01

    Time-dependent Poiseuille flow of a viscous compressible fluid confined between two planar walls is studied for a partial slip boundary condition with frequency-dependent slip length. After an initial uniform impulse parallel to the walls, the flow pattern quickly becomes nearly parabolic. For a narrow gap, a dynamic slip length can lead to damped oscillations of total fluid momentum.

  15. Partial volume correction of brain perfusion estimates using the inherent signal data of time-resolved arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, André; Wirestam, Ronnie; Petersen, Esben Thade; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Knutsson, Linda

    2014-09-01

    Quantitative perfusion MRI based on arterial spin labeling (ASL) is hampered by partial volume effects (PVEs), arising due to voxel signal cross-contamination between different compartments. To address this issue, several partial volume correction (PVC) methods have been presented. Most previous methods rely on segmentation of a high-resolution T1 -weighted morphological image volume that is coregistered to the low-resolution ASL data, making the result sensitive to errors in the segmentation and coregistration. In this work, we present a methodology for partial volume estimation and correction, using only low-resolution ASL data acquired with the QUASAR sequence. The methodology consists of a T1 -based segmentation method, with no spatial priors, and a modified PVC method based on linear regression. The presented approach thus avoids prior assumptions about the spatial distribution of brain compartments, while also avoiding coregistration between different image volumes. Simulations based on a digital phantom as well as in vivo measurements in 10 volunteers were used to assess the performance of the proposed segmentation approach. The simulation results indicated that QUASAR data can be used for robust partial volume estimation, and this was confirmed by the in vivo experiments. The proposed PVC method yielded probable perfusion maps, comparable to a reference method based on segmentation of a high-resolution morphological scan. Corrected gray matter (GM) perfusion was 47% higher than uncorrected values, suggesting a significant amount of PVEs in the data. Whereas the reference method failed to completely eliminate the dependence of perfusion estimates on the volume fraction, the novel approach produced GM perfusion values independent of GM volume fraction. The intra-subject coefficient of variation of corrected perfusion values was lowest for the proposed PVC method. As shown in this work, low-resolution partial volume estimation in connection with ASL perfusion

  16. Purification, partial characterization and bioactivity of sulfated polysaccharides from Grateloupia livida.

    PubMed

    Tang, Liu; Chen, Yicun; Jiang, Zebin; Zhong, Shuping; Chen, Weizhou; Zheng, Fuchun; Shi, Ganggang

    2017-01-01

    Purification, preliminary characterization and bioactivity of polysaccharides from Grateloupia livida (GL) were investigated. Three water-soluble sulfated polysaccharide fractions (GLP-1, GLP-2 and GLP-3) were isolated and purified from the edible and medicinal red seaweed, Grateloupia livida (Harv.) Yamada by DEAE Sepharose CL-6B and Sephadex G-100 column chromatography, and chemical characterization was performed by HPGPC, GC-MS, FT-IR and SEM. In addition, anticoagulant activities were determined by activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and prothrombin time (PT) using normal human plasma in vitro. The antioxidant activities against DPPH and ABTS(+) radicals were evaluated and compared. The molecular weights of GLP-1, GLP-2 and GLP-3 were 39.5, 60.4 and 3.36kDa, respectively. Monosaccharide analysis revealed that three polysaccharide fractions were homopolysaccharides and comprised of galactose only. Anticoagulant assays indicated that crude GLP, and purified GLP-1 and GLP-2 effectively prolonged APTT and TT, but not PT. All polysaccharide fractions exhibited significant in vitro antioxidant activities in a dose-dependent manner. GLP-2 showed consistently better anticoagulant and antioxidant activities compared with GLP, GLP-1 and GLP-3. These results demonstrate that sulfated polysaccharides isolated from Grateloupia livida can serve as readily available alternative natural sources of anticoagulant and antioxidant agents.

  17. The determination of area and time comparison of the partial solar eclipse at space science center, LAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filawati, S.; Gammamerdianti; Hidayat, E. E.; Suryana, Y.; Kesumaningrum, R.

    2016-11-01

    The observation of the partial solar eclipse in Bandung on March, 9th 2016 was done to measure the surface coverage area and to compare to NASA calculation. We have calculated solar disk coverage area based on image data at the maximum contact until final contact of the eclipse. We obtained that maximum eclipse was at 7:21 a.m. (UT+7) with 84.81% area of solar disk covered by Moon and the end of eclipse was at 8:31 a.m. (UT+7).

  18. A flowing liquid test system for assessing the linearity and time-response of rapid fibre optic oxygen partial pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Hahn, C E W; Farmery, A D

    2012-08-15

    The development of a methodology for testing the time response, linearity and performance characteristics of ultra fast fibre optic oxygen sensors in the liquid phase is presented. Two standard medical paediatric oxygenators are arranged to provide two independent extracorporeal circuits. Flow from either circuit can be diverted over the sensor under test by means of a system of rapid cross-over solenoid valves exposing the sensor to an abrupt change in oxygen partial pressure, P O2. The system is also capable of testing the oxygen sensor responses to changes in temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure P CO2 and pH in situ. Results are presented for a miniature fibre optic oxygen sensor constructed in-house with a response time ≈ 50 ms and a commercial fibre optic sensor (Ocean Optics Foxy), when tested in flowing saline and stored blood.

  19. A Bayesian approach for inferring the dynamics of partially observed endemic infectious diseases from space-time-genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Mollentze, Nardus; Nel, Louis H.; Townsend, Sunny; le Roux, Kevin; Hampson, Katie; Haydon, Daniel T.; Soubeyrand, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a statistical framework for reconstructing the sequence of transmission events between observed cases of an endemic infectious disease using genetic, temporal and spatial information. Previous approaches to reconstructing transmission trees have assumed all infections in the study area originated from a single introduction and that a large fraction of cases were observed. There are as yet no approaches appropriate for endemic situations in which a disease is already well established in a host population and in which there may be multiple origins of infection, or that can enumerate unobserved infections missing from the sample. Our proposed framework addresses these shortcomings, enabling reconstruction of partially observed transmission trees and estimating the number of cases missing from the sample. Analyses of simulated datasets show the method to be accurate in identifying direct transmissions, while introductions and transmissions via one or more unsampled intermediate cases could be identified at high to moderate levels of case detection. When applied to partial genome sequences of rabies virus sampled from an endemic region of South Africa, our method reveals several distinct transmission cycles with little contact between them, and direct transmission over long distances suggesting significant anthropogenic influence in the movement of infected dogs. PMID:24619442

  20. Analysis of location-aware QoS-routing protocols based on partial temporal and spatial topology for real-time multimedia in mobile ad hoc networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hortos, William S.

    2004-08-01

    In the distributed operations of route discovery and maintenance, strong interaction occurs across mobile ad hoc network (MANET) protocol layers in the transport of service packets between source and destination nodes. Quality of service (QoS) requirements are specified for multimedia service classes by the application layer. Due to node mobility, knowledge of their locations is inherently incomplete. Network topology is thus only partially known in time and in space. Cross-layer interactions in the protocol are modeled in terms of a set of concatenated design parameters, updates on node positions and associated energy costs. Functional dependencies of the QoS metrics on the concatenated parameters are described. An analytical framework is established for development of new cross-layer designs that optimize layer interdependencies to achieve the "best" QoS available in the MANET given a partially known, time-varying topology. The designs, based on a reactive MANET protocol, adapt provisioned QoS to dynamic network conditions and residual energy capacities. Cross-layer optimization, given partially known topology, is based on stochastic dynamic programming and predictive estimation conditions derived from time-dependent models of MANET behavior. Models of real-time behavior are based on the control of conditional rates of multivariate point processes (MVPPs). These rates depend on the concatenated protocol and resource parameters. The analytical framework supports predictive models to estimate node mobility in addition to measurement-based estimates of probability distributions for voice, video, data, and other Internet traffic. Estimates of QoS metrics are given in terms of recursive stochastic filters of the network state, based on complete or partial observations of topology and events.

  1. Neuro-fuzzy modeling to predict physicochemical and microbiological parameters of partially dried cherry tomato during storage: effects on water activity, temperature and storage time.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yang; Li, Yong; Zhou, Ruiyun; Chu, Dinh-Toi; Su, Lijuan; Han, Yongbin; Zhou, Jianzhong

    2016-10-01

    In the study, osmotically dehydrated cherry tomatoes were partially dried to water activity between 0.746 and 0.868, vacuum-packed and stored at 4-30 °C for 60 days. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) was utilized to predict the physicochemical and microbiological parameters of these partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage. Satisfactory accuracies were obtained when ANFIS was used to predict the lycopene and total phenolic contents, color and microbial contamination. The coefficients of determination for all the ANFIS models were higher than 0.86 and showed better performance for prediction compared with models developed by response surface methodology. Through ANFIS modeling, the effects of storage conditions on the properties of partially dried cherry tomatoes were visualized. Generally, contents of lycopene and total phenolics decreased with the increase in water activity, temperature and storage time, while aerobic plate count and number of yeasts and molds increased at high water activities and temperatures. Overall, ANFIS approach can be used as an effective tool to study the quality decrease and microbial pollution of partially dried cherry tomatoes during storage, as well as identify the suitable preservation conditions.

  2. Comparison of multiple linear regression, partial least squares and artificial neural networks for prediction of gas chromatographic relative retention times of trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Farmaki, E; Thomaidis, N; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Georgakopoulos, C

    2012-09-21

    The comparison among different modelling techniques, such as multiple linear regression, partial least squares and artificial neural networks, has been performed in order to construct and evaluate models for prediction of gas chromatographic relative retention times of trimethylsilylated anabolic androgenic steroids. The performance of the quantitative structure-retention relationship study, using the multiple linear regression and partial least squares techniques, has been previously conducted. In the present study, artificial neural networks models were constructed and used for the prediction of relative retention times of anabolic androgenic steroids, while their efficiency is compared with that of the models derived from the multiple linear regression and partial least squares techniques. For overall ranking of the models, a novel procedure [Trends Anal. Chem. 29 (2010) 101-109] based on sum of ranking differences was applied, which permits the best model to be selected. The suggested models are considered useful for the estimation of relative retention times of designer steroids for which no analytical data are available.

  3. Student Level Factors That Influence the Employability of TAFE Graduates over Time: A Partial Least-Squares Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afrassa, Tilahun Mengesha

    Student level factors influencing the employability of technical and further education (TAFE) graduates over time were examined. Student Outcomes Survey (SOS) data were collected from 4,673 South Australian 1998 TAFE graduates and 2,819 South Australian 1999 TAFE graduates. Some students were employed (part time or full time), whereas others were…

  4. Partial characterization and anticoagulant activity of a heterofucan from the brown seaweed Padina gymnospora.

    PubMed

    Silva, T M A; Alves, L G; de Queiroz, K C S; Santos, M G L; Marques, C T; Chavante, S F; Rocha, H A O; Leite, E L

    2005-04-01

    The brown algae Padina gymnospora contain different fucans. Powdered algae were submitted to proteolysis with the proteolytic enzyme maxataze. The first extract of the algae was constituted of polysaccharides contaminated with lipids, phenols, etc. Fractionation of the fucans with increasing concentrations of acetone produced fractions with different proportions of fucose, xylose, uronic acid, galactose, and sulfate. One of the fractions, precipitated with 50% acetone (v/v), contained an 18-kDa heterofucan (PF1), which was further purified by gel-permeation chromatography on Sephadex G-75 using 0.2 M acetic acid as eluent and characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis in 0.05 M 1,3 diaminopropane/acetate buffer at pH 9.0, methylation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Structural analysis indicates that this fucan has a central core consisting mainly of 3-beta-D-glucuronic acid 1-> or 4-beta-D-glucuronic acid 1 ->, substituted at C-2 with alpha-L-fucose or beta-D-xylose. Sulfate groups were only detected at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units. The anticoagulant activity of the PF1 (only 2.5-fold lesser than low molecular weight heparin) estimated by activated partial thromboplastin time was completely abolished upon desulfation by solvolysis in dimethyl sulfoxide, indicating that 3-O-sulfation at C-3 of 4-alpha-L-fucose 1-> units is responsible for the anticoagulant activity of the polymer.

  5. Living in the Fast Lane: Evidence for a Global Perceptual Timing Deficit in Childhood ADHD Caused by Distinct but Partially Overlapping Task-Dependent Cognitive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Ivo; Weirich, Steffen; Berger, Christoph; Herpertz, Sabine C.; Cohrs, Stefan; Wandschneider, Roland; Höppner, Jacqueline; Häßler, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunctions in perceptual timing have been reported in children with ADHD, but so far only from studies that have not used the whole set of timing paradigms available from the literature, with the diversity of findings complicating the development of a unified model of timing dysfunctions and its determinants in ADHD. Therefore, we employed a comprehensive set of paradigms (time discrimination, time estimation, time production, and time reproduction) in order to explore the perceptual timing deficit profile in our ADHD sample. Moreover, we aimed to detect predictors responsible for timing task performance deficits in children with ADHD and how the timing deficits might be positively affected by methylphenidate. Male children with ADHD and healthy control children, all aged between 8 and 13 years, participated in this longitudinal study with three experimental sessions, where children with ADHD were medicated with methylphenidate at the second session but discontinued their medication at the remaining sessions. The results of our study reveal that children with ADHD were impaired in all timing tasks, arguing for a general perceptual timing deficit in ADHD. In doing so, our predictor analyses support the notion that distinct but partially overlapping cognitive mechanisms might exist for discriminating, estimating/producing, and reproducing time intervals. In this sense, working memory deficits in terms of an abnormally fast internal counting process might be common to dysfunctions in the time estimation/time production tasks and in the time reproduction task, with attention deficits (e.g., in terms of disruptions of the counting process) additionally contributing to time estimation/time production deficits and motivational alterations additionally contributing to time reproduction deficits. Methylphenidate did not significantly alter performance of the ADHD sample, presumably due to limited statistical power of our study. The findings of our study demonstrate a

  6. Open partial horizontal laryngectomies: is it time to adopt a modular form of consent for the intervention?

    PubMed

    Giordano, L; Di Santo, D; Crosetti, E; Bertolin, A; Rizzotto, G; Succo, G; Bussi, M

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, open partial horizontal laryngectomies (OPHLs) are well-established procedures for treatment of laryngeal cancer. Their uniqueness is the possibility to modulate the intervention intraoperatively, according to eventual tumour extension. An OPHL procedure is not easy to understand: there are several types of procedures and the possibility to modulate the intervention can produce confusion and lack of adherence to the treatment from the patient. Even if the surgery is tailored to a patient's specific lesion, a unified consent form that discloses any possible extensions, including a total laryngectomy, is still needed. We reviewed the English literature on informed consent, and propose comprehensive Information and Consent Forms for OPHLs. The Information Form is intended to answer any possible questions about the procedure, while remaining easy to read and understand for the patient. It includes sections on laryngeal anatomy and physiology, surgical aims and indications, alternatives to surgery, complications, and physiology of the operated larynx. The Consent Form is written in a "modular" way: the surgeon defines the precise extension of the lesion, chooses the best OPHL procedure and highlights all possible expected extensions specific for the patient. Our intention, providing these forms both in Italian and in English, is to optimise communication between the patient and surgeon, improving surgical procedure arrangements and preventing any possible misunderstandings and medico-legal litigation.

  7. On time discretizations for spectral methods. [numerical integration of Fourier and Chebyshev methods for dynamic partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, D.; Turkel, E.

    1980-01-01

    New methods are introduced for the time integration of the Fourier and Chebyshev methods of solution for dynamic differential equations. These methods are unconditionally stable, even though no matrix inversions are required. Time steps are chosen by accuracy requirements alone. For the Fourier method both leapfrog and Runge-Kutta methods are considered. For the Chebyshev method only Runge-Kutta schemes are tested. Numerical calculations are presented to verify the analytic results. Applications to the shallow water equations are presented.

  8. Novel thrombolytic protease from edible and medicinal plant Aster yomena (Kitam.) Honda with anticoagulant activity: purification and partial characterization.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Kim, Dae-Won; Park, Se-Eun; Choi, Bong-Suk; Sapkota, Kumar; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2014-10-01

    A thrombolytic protease named kitamase possessing anticoagulant property was purified from edible and medicinal plant Aster yomena (Kitam.) Honda. Kitamase showed a molecular weight of 50 kDa by SDS-PAGE and displayed a strong fibrin zymogram lysis band corresponding to the similar molecular mass. The enzyme was active at high temperatures (50°C). The fibrinolytic activity of kitamase was strongly inhibited by EDTA, EGTA, TPCK and PMSF, inhibited by Zn(2+). The Km and Vmax values for substrate S-2251 were determined as 4.31 mM and 23.81 mM/mg respectively. It dissolved fibrin clot directly and specifically cleaved the α, Aα and γ-γ chains of fibrin and fibrinogen. In addition, kitamase delayed the coagulation time and increased activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time. Kitamase exerted a significant protective effect against collagen and epinephrine induced pulmonary thromboembolism in mice. These results suggest that kitamase may have the property of metallo-protease like enzyme, novel fibrino(geno)lytic enzyme and a potential to be a therapeutic agent for thrombosis.

  9. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and constraints on sin(2beta+gamma) with partial reconstruction of B0-->D*-/+pi+/- decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Layter, J; Shen, B C; Wang, K; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Erwin, R J; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Diberder, F Le; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; SafaiTehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-06-25

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D(*-/+)pi(+/-), using approximately 82x10(6) BBmacr; events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum pi(+/-) from the B decay and the low-momentum pi(-/+) from the D(*-/+) decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063+/-0.024(stat)+/-0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2beta+gamma)|.

  10. A fast direct method for block triangular Toeplitz-like with tri-diagonal block systems from time-fractional partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Rihuan; Ng, Michael K.; Sun, Hai-Wei

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study the block lower triangular Toeplitz-like with tri-diagonal blocks system which arises from the time-fractional partial differential equation. Existing fast numerical solver (e.g., fast approximate inversion method) cannot handle such linear system as the main diagonal blocks are different. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a fast direct method for solving this linear system, and to illustrate that the proposed method is much faster than the classical block forward substitution method for solving this linear system. Our idea is based on the divide-and-conquer strategy and together with the fast Fourier transforms for calculating Toeplitz matrix-vector multiplication. The complexity needs O (MNlog2 ⁡ M) arithmetic operations, where M is the number of blocks (the number of time steps) in the system and N is the size (number of spatial grid points) of each block. Numerical examples from the finite difference discretization of time-fractional partial differential equations are also given to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  11. 75 FR 55741 - Honey From Argentina: Notice of Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary Results and Partial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... International Trade Administration Honey From Argentina: Notice of Extension of Time Limit for Preliminary... Department) is rescinding in part the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on honey from... antidumping duty order on, inter alia, honey from Argentina. See Antidumping or Countervailing Duty...

  12. Quantitative detection of Cucumber vein yellowing virus in susceptible and partially resistant plants using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Picó, Belén; Sifres, Alicia; Nuez, Fernando

    2005-09-01

    A method for the detection of Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) that combines reverse transcription with real-time PCR (SYBR((R)) Green chemistry) was developed using specific primers designed from a nucleotide sequence of the RNA polymerase gene (NIb) conserved among all the available CVYV strains. This method provided a linear assay over five to six orders of magnitude and reproducibly detected titres as low as 10(3) molecules of the target CVYV cDNA. Real-time PCR gave reproducible results for the quantification of CVYV in young leaves of susceptible and resistant cucumber landraces after mechanical inoculation. Significant differences in the starting amount of target cDNA were found between the analyzed genotypes, indicating differences in viral accumulation that correlated to their different levels of resistance. Real-time PCR results validated our previous findings using slot-blot hybridization, the dominance of the strong resistance to CVYV displayed by C.sat 10, and provided improved reliability and sensitivity of detection. This method has great potential in resistance breeding for germplasm screening, characterization of resistance mechanisms and genetic studies.

  13. Start up partial nitrification at low temperature with a real-time control strategy based on blower frequency and pH.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shengbo; Wang, Shuying; Yang, Qing; Yang, Pei; Peng, Yongzhen

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the performance of partial nitrification via nitrite at low temperature was investigated in a pilot-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) with a working volume of 7.0m(3). A novel real-time control strategy, based on blower frequency (BF) and pH, was designed and evaluated. The nitrogen break point (NBP) in the BF curve and the nitrate/nitrite apex point (NAP) in the pH curve were used to identify the endpoint of the aerobic and anoxic phases, respectively. The nitrite accumulation rate (NAR) rapidly increased from 19.8% to 90%. Partial nitrification was achieved at low temperature (11-16°C) in 40 days and was stably maintained for as long as 140 days by applying a real-time control strategy based on pH and BF. Fluorescence in situ hybirdization (FISH) results demonstrated that ammonia oxidation bacteria (AOB) had developed into the dominant nitrifying bacteria compared to nitrite oxidation bacteria (NOB) in the system.

  14. Defect detection of partially complete SAW and TIG welds using the ultrasonic time-of-flight diffraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Shaun W.; Bonser, Gary R.

    1998-03-01

    An application of machine vision applied to the analysis of ultrasonic images formed using the time-of-flight diffraction (TOFD) method on incomplete weld geometries is described. The rationale of the work being to identify weld defects as soon as they are produced, thereby reducing the costs of any subsequent repairs. The analysis uses TOFD scans as input to a filtering and 'window' based variance operator for the segmentation of suspect defect areas inside the weld region. A suite of pc based software and a high temperature TOFD data acquisition system have been benchmarked through a series of demonstration trials on both 80mm thick carbon steel submerged arc welded testpieces, and 25mm thick carbon steel tungsten inert gas welded testpieces. The range of intentionally implanted defects, from root cracks to lack of side wall fusion, were detected with an overall accuracy of 79 percent on a data set of 174 defects on scans performed at 10-90 percent weld completion.

  15. Inferring Weighted Directed Association Network from Multivariate Time Series with a Synthetic Method of Partial Symbolic Transfer Entropy Spectrum and Granger Causality

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yanzhu; Ai, Xinbo

    2016-01-01

    Complex network methodology is very useful for complex system explorer. However, the relationships among variables in complex system are usually not clear. Therefore, inferring association networks among variables from their observed data has been a popular research topic. We propose a synthetic method, named small-shuffle partial symbolic transfer entropy spectrum (SSPSTES), for inferring association network from multivariate time series. The method synthesizes surrogate data, partial symbolic transfer entropy (PSTE) and Granger causality. A proper threshold selection is crucial for common correlation identification methods and it is not easy for users. The proposed method can not only identify the strong correlation without selecting a threshold but also has the ability of correlation quantification, direction identification and temporal relation identification. The method can be divided into three layers, i.e. data layer, model layer and network layer. In the model layer, the method identifies all the possible pair-wise correlation. In the network layer, we introduce a filter algorithm to remove the indirect weak correlation and retain strong correlation. Finally, we build a weighted adjacency matrix, the value of each entry representing the correlation level between pair-wise variables, and then get the weighted directed association network. Two numerical simulated data from linear system and nonlinear system are illustrated to show the steps and performance of the proposed approach. The ability of the proposed method is approved by an application finally. PMID:27832153

  16. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays using a partial reconstruction technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bahinipati, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Kinoshita, K.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. J.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, C. W.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, P.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2011-07-05

    We report results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in B→D*∓π± decays based on a data sample containing 657×10⁶ BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at the Υ(4S) resonance. We use a partial reconstruction technique, wherein signal B→D*∓π± events are identified using information only from the fast pion from the B decay and the slow pion from the subsequent decay of the D*∓, where the former (latter) corresponds to D*⁺(D*⁻) final states. We obtain CP violation parameters S⁺=+0.061±0.018 (stat)±0.012 (syst) and S⁻=+0.031±0.019 (stat)±0.015 (syst).

  17. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and Constraints on sin((2β+γ) with Partial Reconstruction of B0→D*∓π± Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Gary, J. W.; Layter, J.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Erwin, R. J.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Diberder, F. Le; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Simani, M. C.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Hart, P. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; Nardo, G. De; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Anulli, F.; Biasini, M.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Pioppi, M.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; del Gamba, V.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Elsen, E. E.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Libby, J.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saeed, M. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-06-01

    We present a measurement of time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D*∓π±, using approximately 82×106 BB¯ events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum π± from the B decay and the low-momentum π∓ from the D*∓ decay are used. We measure the amplitude of the asymmetry to be -0.063±0.024(stat)±0.014(syst) and compute bounds on |sin((2β+γ)|.

  18. Quantifying Immune Response to Influenza Virus Infection via Multivariate Nonlinear ODE Models with Partially Observed State Variables and Time-Varying Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Miao, Hongyu; Xue, Hongqi; Topham, David J; Zand, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection continues to be a global health threat, as evidenced by the outbreak of the novel A/California/7/2009 IAV strain. Previous flu vaccines have proven less effective than hoped for emerging IAV strains, indicating a more thorough understanding of immune responses to primary infection is needed. One issue is the difficulty in directly measuring many key parameters and variables of the immune response. To address these issues, we considered a comprehensive workflow for statistical inference for ordinary differential question (ODE) models with partially observed variables and time-varying parameters, including identifiability analysis, two-stage and NLS estimation, and model selection etc‥ In particular, we proposed a novel one-step method to verify parameter identifiability and formulate estimating equations simultaneously. Thus, the pseudo-LS method can now deal with general ODE models with partially observed state variables for the first time. Using this workflow, we verified the relative significance of various immune factors to virus control, including target epithelial cells, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CD8+) cells and IAV specific antibodies (IgG and IgM). Factors other than cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) killing contributed the most to the loss of infected epithelial cells, though the effects of CTL are still significant. IgM antibody was found to be the major contributor to neutralization of free infectious viral particles. Also, the maximum viral load, which correlates well with mortality, was found to depend more on viral replication rates than infectivity. In contrast to current hypotheses, the results obtained via our methods suggest that IgM antibody and viral replication rates may be worth of further explorations in vaccine development.

  19. Partial correlation between lower muscle thickness, 10-meter walk test, and the timed up & go test in children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Yun, Chang-Kyo; Kim, Won-Hyo; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability through the 10-meter walk and timed up and go tests. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 children (20 males and 8 females) with spastic cerebral palsy undergoing physical therapy at D hospital in D city, South Korea participated in this study. Partial correlation analysis was performed to analyze the correlation between lower extremity muscle thickness and gait ability (10-meter walk test and timed up and go test). [Results] There was a positive correlation between muscle thickness and the 10-meter walk test (RF=0.41 and VL=0.52). Correlation between the muscle thickness and the timed up and go had a negative correlation (VL=-0.45, MG=-0.51, and LG=-0.39). [Conclusion] In children with cerebral palsy, knee extensor muscles that are more developed increased gait ability and calf muscles that are more developed increased sit to stand ability.

  20. Towards multiple hazard resilient bridges: a methodology for modeling frequent and infrequent time-varying loads Part I, Comprehensive reliability and partial failure probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zach; Lee, George C.

    2012-09-01

    The current AASHTO load and resistance factor design (LRFD) guidelines are formulated based on bridge reliability, which interprets traditional design safety factors into more rigorously deduced factors based on the theory of probability. This is a major advancement in bridge design specifications. However, LRFD is only calibrated for dead and live loads. In cases when extreme loads are significant, they need to be individually assessed. Combining regular loads with extreme loads has been a major challenge, mainly because the extreme loads are time variables and cannot be directly combined with time invariant loads to formulate the probability of structural failure. To overcome these difficulties, this paper suggests a methodology of comprehensive reliability, by introducing the concept of partial failure probability to separate the loads so that each individual load combination under a certain condition can be approximated as time invariant. Based on these conditions, the extreme loads (also referred to as multiple hazard or MH loads) can be broken down into single effects. In Part II of this paper, a further breakdown of these conditional occurrence probabilities into pure conditions is discussed by using a live truck and earthquake loads on a bridge as an example. There are three major steps in establishing load factors from MH load distributions: (1) formulate the failure probabilities; (2) normalize various load distributions; and (3) establish design limit state equations. This paper describes the formulation of the failure probabilities of single and combined loads.

  1. Performance comparison of partial least squares-related variable selection methods for quantitative structure retention relationships modelling of retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Talebi, Mohammad; Schuster, Georg; Shellie, Robert A; Szucs, Roman; Haddad, Paul R

    2015-12-11

    The relative performance of six multivariate data analysis methods derived from or combined with partial least squares (PLS) has been compared in the context of quantitative structure-retention relationships (QSRR). These methods include, GA (genetic algorithm)-PLS, Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MC-UVE), competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), iteratively retaining informative variables (IRIV), variable iterative space shrinkage approach (VISSA) and PLS with automated backward selection of predictors (autoPLS). A set of 825 molecular descriptors was computed for 86 suspected sports doping compounds and used for predicting their gradient retention times in reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). The correlation between molecular descriptors selected by each technique and the retention time was established using the PLS method. All models derived from a selected subset of descriptors outperformed the reference PLS model derived from all descriptors, with very small demands of computational time and effort. A performance comparison indicated great diversity of these methods in selecting the most relevant molecular descriptors, ranging from 28 for CARS to 263 for MC-UVE. While VISSA provided the lowest degree of over-fitting for the training set, CARS demonstrated the best compromise between the prediction accuracy and the number of selected descriptors, with the prediction error of as low as 46s for the external test set. Only ten descriptors were found to be common for all models, with the characteristics of these descriptors being representative of the retention mechanism in RPLC.

  2. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  3. Sensitized luminescence from water-soluble LaF3:Eu nanocrystals via partially-capped 1,10-phenanthroline: time-gated emission and multiple lifetimes.

    PubMed

    Irfanullah, Mir; Bhardwaj, Navneet; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2016-08-02

    Water dispersible citrate-capped LaF3:Eu(5%) nanocrystals (NCs) have been partially surface-functionalized by 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) via a ligand exchange method to produce novel water dispersed citrate/phen-capped LaF3:Eu(5%) NCs in which citrate ligands preserve the water dispersibility of the NCs and phen ligands act as sensitizers of surface Eu(3+)-dopant sites. The partial ligand exchange and the formation of water dispersed NCs have been monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, as well as luminescence measurements at different time intervals during the reaction. These NCs display a distinct phen-sensitized Eu(3+)-emission profile with enhanced intensity in water as compared to the emission profile and intensity obtained upon direct excitation. Time-resolved (or time-gated) emission spectroscopy (TRES) has been used to probe PL dynamics of Eu(3+)-sites of LaF3:Eu(5%) NCs by taking advantage of selectively sensitizing surface Eu(3+)-dopant sites by phen ligands as well as by exciting all the Eu(3+)-sites in the NCs upon direct excitation. TRES upon direct excitation of the citrate-capped LaF3:Eu(5%) NCs reveals that Eu(3+)-dopants occupy at least three different sites, each with a different emission profile and lifetime, and emission from purely interior Eu(3+)-sites has been resolved due to their long lifetime as compared to the lifetime of purely surface and near surface Eu(3+)-sites. In contrast, the phen-sensitized emission from citrate/phen-capped LaF3:Eu(5%) NCs displays similar emission profiles and lifetimes in TRES measurements, which reveal that phen truly sensitizes purely surface dopant sites of the NCs in water, all of which have nearly the same local environment. The phen-sensitized Eu(3+)-emission of the NCs in water remains stable even upon addition of various buffer solutions at physiological pH, as well as upon addition of water-miscible organic solvents. Furthermore, the two-photon excitation (λex. = 720 nm) of these water-soluble phen

  4. [Investigation of coagulation time: PT and APTT].

    PubMed

    Ramakers, Christian; van der Heul, Cees; van Wijk, Eduard M

    2012-01-01

    The first case report describes an extremely prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. Heparin use was excluded. The APTT mixing study combined with the medical history suggests a deficiency in one of the non-essential coagulation factors. This was confirmed by factor XII activity of <1%. The second case report describes a prolonged APTT in a patient with no history of increased bleeding tendency. The negative bleeding tendency in combination with a failure of the mixing study to correct the coagulation assay results suggests a factor inhibitor, most probably lupus anticoagulant. Indeed, the lupus anticoagulant was positive and the anti-cardiolipin antibody titre was also positive. Aberrations in the process of haemostasis can be efficiently screened using a platelet count, an APTT, a PT and a thorough physical examination combined with a thorough medical history taking. Common causes of prolonged PT and/or APTT are the use of oral anticoagulants or heparin, vitamin K deficiency and liver disease. Other causes include coagulation factor deficiencies, coagulation factor inhibitors and diffuse intravascular coagulation.

  5. An Ultrahigh Frequency Partial Discharge Signal De-Noising Method Based on a Generalized S-Transform and Module Time-Frequency Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yushun; Zhou, Wenjun; Li, Pengfei; Yang, Shuai; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Due to electromagnetic interference in power substations, the partial discharge (PD) signals detected by ultrahigh frequency (UHF) antenna sensors often contain various background noises, which may hamper high voltage apparatus fault diagnosis and localization. This paper proposes a novel de-noising method based on the generalized S-transform and module time-frequency matrix to suppress noise in UHF PD signals. The sub-matrix maximum module value method is employed to calculate the frequencies and amplitudes of periodic narrowband noise, and suppress noise through the reverse phase cancellation technique. In addition, a singular value decomposition de-noising method is employed to suppress Gaussian white noise in UHF PD signals. Effective singular values are selected by employing the fuzzy c-means clustering method to recover the PD signals. De-noising results of simulated and field detected UHF PD signals prove the feasibility of the proposed method. Compared with four conventional de-noising methods, the results show that the proposed method can suppress background noise in the UHF PD signal effectively, with higher signal-to-noise ratio and less waveform distortion. PMID:27338409

  6. Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area

    PubMed Central

    Rawluk, Ashley A.; Crow, Gary; Legesse, Getahun; Veira, Douglas M.; Bullock, Paul R.; González, Luciano A.; Dubois, Melanie; Ominski, Kim H.

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary The implementation of off-stream waterers (OSW) may reduce the amount of time cattle spend in riparian areas, thus minimizing impacts such as removal of vegetation, soil compaction, and deterioration in water quality. Furthermore, when used with natural barriers as a partial exclusion method, these management strategies may offer a cost-effective alternative to completely excluding cattle via streambank fencing. This study was conducted to determine the impact of OSW and barriers on animal performance and watering behavior. The presence of OSW had no significant effect on cow and calf weights averaged over the grazing season. Although the results were not consistent over the periods and locations, the data provided some indication of the efficacy of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area. Cattle watered at the OSW when available, but they did not use the OSW exclusively. The observed inconsistency may, in part, be attributed to the environmental conditions present during this field trial. Abstract A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture—which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size—was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the

  7. Partially supervised P300 speller adaptation for eventual stimulus timing optimization: target confidence is superior to error-related potential score as an uncertain label

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyl, Timothy; Yin, Erwei; Keightley, Michelle; Chau, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Error-related potentials (ErrPs) have the potential to guide classifier adaptation in BCI spellers, for addressing non-stationary performance as well as for online optimization of system parameters, by providing imperfect or partial labels. However, the usefulness of ErrP-based labels for BCI adaptation has not been established in comparison to other partially supervised methods. Our objective is to make this comparison by retraining a two-step P300 speller on a subset of confident online trials using naïve labels taken from speller output, where confidence is determined either by (i) ErrP scores, (ii) posterior target scores derived from the P300 potential, or (iii) a hybrid of these scores. We further wish to evaluate the ability of partially supervised adaptation and retraining methods to adjust to a new stimulus-onset asynchrony (SOA), a necessary step towards online SOA optimization. Approach. Eleven consenting able-bodied adults attended three online spelling sessions on separate days with feedback in which SOAs were set at 160 ms (sessions 1 and 2) and 80 ms (session 3). A post hoc offline analysis and a simulated online analysis were performed on sessions two and three to compare multiple adaptation methods. Area under the curve (AUC) and symbols spelled per minute (SPM) were the primary outcome measures. Main results. Retraining using supervised labels confirmed improvements of 0.9 percentage points (session 2, p < 0.01) and 1.9 percentage points (session 3, p < 0.05) in AUC using same-day training data over using data from a previous day, which supports classifier adaptation in general. Significance. Using posterior target score alone as a confidence measure resulted in the highest SPM of the partially supervised methods, indicating that ErrPs are not necessary to boost the performance of partially supervised adaptive classification. Partial supervision significantly improved SPM at a novel SOA, showing promise for eventual online SOA

  8. Modeling RP-1 fuel advanced distillation data using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry and partial least squares analysis.

    PubMed

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Parsons, Brendon A; Hoggard, Jamin C; Billingsley, Matthew C; Bruno, Thomas J; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-01-01

    Recent efforts in predicting rocket propulsion (RP-1) fuel performance through modeling put greater emphasis on obtaining detailed and accurate fuel properties, as well as elucidating the relationships between fuel compositions and their properties. Herein, we study multidimensional chromatographic data obtained by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) to analyze RP-1 fuels. For GC × GC separations, RTX-Wax (polar stationary phase) and RTX-1 (non-polar stationary phase) columns were implemented for the primary and secondary dimensions, respectively, to separate the chemical compound classes (alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, etc.), providing a significant level of chemical compositional information. The GC × GC-TOFMS data were analyzed using partial least squares regression (PLS) chemometric analysis to model and predict advanced distillation curve (ADC) data for ten RP-1 fuels that were previously analyzed using the ADC method. The PLS modeling provides insight into the chemical species that impact the ADC data. The PLS modeling correlates compositional information found in the GC × GC-TOFMS chromatograms of each RP-1 fuel, and their respective ADC, and allows prediction of the ADC for each RP-1 fuel with good precision and accuracy. The root-mean-square error of calibration (RMSEC) ranged from 0.1 to 0.5 °C, and was typically below ∼0.2 °C, for the PLS calibration of the ADC modeling with GC × GC-TOFMS data, indicating a good fit of the model to the calibration data. Likewise, the predictive power of the overall method via PLS modeling was assessed using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) yielding root-mean-square error of cross-validation (RMSECV) ranging from 1.4 to 2.6 °C, and was typically below ∼2.0 °C, at each % distilled measurement point during the ADC analysis.

  9. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  10. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  11. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  12. Fluid theory and simulations of instabilities, turbulent transport and coherent structures in partially-magnetized plasmas of \\mathbf{E}\\times \\mathbf{B} discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolyakov, A. I.; Chapurin, O.; Frias, W.; Koshkarov, O.; Romadanov, I.; Tang, T.; Umansky, M.; Raitses, Y.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Lakhin, V. P.

    2017-01-01

    Partially-magnetized plasmas with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions are common in Hall thrusters for electric propulsion and magnetron material processing devices. These plasmas are usually in strongly non-equilibrium state due to presence of crossed electric and magnetic fields, inhomogeneities of plasma density, temperature, magnetic field and beams of accelerated ions. Free energy from these sources make such plasmas prone to various instabilities resulting in turbulence, anomalous transport, and appearance of coherent structures as found in experiments. This paper provides an overview of instabilities that exist in such plasmas. A nonlinear fluid model has been developed for description of the Simon-Hoh, lower-hybrid and ion-sound instabilities. The model also incorporates electron gyroviscosity describing the effects of finite electron temperature. The nonlinear fluid model has been implemented in the BOUT++ framework. The results of nonlinear simulations are presented demonstrating turbulence, anomalous current and tendency toward the formation of coherent structures.

  13. 5 CFR 831.612 - Election at time of retirement of a fully reduced annuity or a partially reduced annuity to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Election at time of retirement of a fully... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Survivor Annuities Elections at the Time of Retirement § 831.612 Election at time of retirement...

  14. Clinical usefulness of the dilute Russell viper venom time test for patients taking warfarin.

    PubMed

    Kanouchi, Kazunori; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Ohnuma, Okio; Morikane, Keita; Fukao, Akira

    2017-04-07

    Warfarin use often causes false-positive results in the dilute Russell viper venom time test (DRVVT). Thus, three sets of guidelines-those presented by the International Society on Haemostasis and Thrombosis (ISTH), the British Committee for Standards in Haematology (BCSH), and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI)-are advocated. We evaluated the clinical usefulness of the testing methods recommended in these three guidelines using laboratory samples. Of the 242 samples from patients using warfarin, 38 were positive for lupus anticoagulant (LA). After adding normal pooled plasma (NPP) as recommended in the ISTH, BCSH, and CLSI guidelines, the number of samples testing positive for LA decreased to 13, 18, and 19, respectively. The number of samples with inconsistent results between the activated partial thromboplastin time and mixing test, and the DRVVT following the ISTH, BCSH, and CLSI guidelines were four of 205 (1.9%), 15 of 242 (6.2%), and 17 of 242 (7.0%), respectively. In patients with an international normalized ratio (INR) ≥3.0, 11 of 37 (29.7%) and 12 of 37 (32.4%) samples showed inconsistent results according to the BCSH and CLSI guidelines, respectively. The accuracy of the DRVVT result may thus decrease in markedly anticoagulated patients.

  15. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  16. Impact of partial urethral obstruction on bladder function: time-dependent changes and functional correlates of altered expression of Ca²⁺ signaling regulators.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, David; AbouShwareb, Tamer; D'Agostino, Ralph; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Christ, George J

    2012-06-15

    In animal models of partial urethral obstruction (PUO), altered smooth muscle function/contractility may be linked to changes in molecules that regulate calcium signaling/sensitization. PUO was created in male rats, and urodynamic studies were conducted 2 and 6 wk post-PUO. Cystometric recordings were analyzed for the presence or absence of nonvoiding contractions [i.e., detrusor overactivity (DO)]. RT-PCR and Western blots were performed on a subpopulation of rats to study the relationship between the expression of RhoA, L-type Ca(2+) channels, Rho kinase-1, Rho kinase-2, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, ryanodine receptor, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase 2 and protein kinase C (PKC)-potentiated phosphatase inhibitor of 17 kDa, and urodynamic findings in the same animal. Animals displayed DO at 2 (38%) and 6 wk (43%) post-PUO, increases were seen in in vivo pressures at 2 wk, and residual volume at 6 wk. Statistical analysis of RT-PCR and Western blot data at 2 wk, during the compensatory phase of detrusor hypertrophy, documented that expression of molecules that regulate calcium signaling and sensitization was consistently lower in obstructed rats without DO than those with DO or control rats. Among rats with DO at 2 wk, linear regression analysis revealed positive correlations between in vivo pressures and protein and mRNA expression of several regulatory molecules. At 6 wk, in the presence of overt signs of bladder decompensation, no clear or consistent alterations in expression of these same targets were observed at the protein level. These data extend prior work to suggest that molecular profiling of key regulatory molecules during the progression of PUO-mediated bladder dysfunction may shed new light on potential biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets.

  17. Hemophilia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cell count can be low. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) Test This test measures how long it ... among people with hemophilia A or B. Prothrombin Time (PT) Test This test also measures the time ...

  18. Hemophilia B

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect has been identified, other people in your family will need tests to diagnose the disorder. Tests to diagnose hemophilia B include: Partial thromboplastin time (PTT) Prothrombin time Bleeding time Fibrinogen level Serum factor IX activity

  19. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  20. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  1. A comparison of the Method of Lines to finite difference techniques in solving time-dependent partial differential equations. [with applications to Burger equation and stream function-vorticity problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, L. A.; Smith, R. E.; Parks, C. L.; Boney, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    Steady state solutions to two time dependent partial differential systems have been obtained by the Method of Lines (MOL) and compared to those obtained by efficient standard finite difference methods: (1) Burger's equation over a finite space domain by a forward time central space explicit method, and (2) the stream function - vorticity form of viscous incompressible fluid flow in a square cavity by an alternating direction implicit (ADI) method. The standard techniques were far more computationally efficient when applicable. In the second example, converged solutions at very high Reynolds numbers were obtained by MOL, whereas solution by ADI was either unattainable or impractical. With regard to 'set up' time, solution by MOL is an attractive alternative to techniques with complicated algorithms, as much of the programming difficulty is eliminated.

  2. Quantitative determination and evaluation of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis with different harvesting times using UPLC-UV-MS and FT-IR spectroscopy in combination with partial least squares discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuan-Gui; Zhang, Ji; Zhao, Yan-Li; Zhang, Jin-Yu; Wang, Yuan-Zhong

    2016-12-09

    A rapid method was developed and validated by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectroscopy with ultraviolet detection (UPLC-UV-MS) for simultaneous determination of paris saponin I, paris saponin II, paris saponin VI and paris saponin VII. Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) based on UPLC and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was employed to evaluate Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis (PPY) at different harvesting times. Quantitative determination implied that the various contents of bioactive compounds with different harvesting times may lead to different pharmacological effects; the average content of total saponins for PPY harvested at 8 years was higher than that from other samples. The PLS-DA of FT-IR spectra had a better performance than that of UPLC for discrimination of PPY from different harvesting times.

  3. Time-course changes of hematology and clinical chemistry values in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Tatsuya; Honda, Katsuya; Kokubun, Chisato; Nishimura, Tomonari; Hasegawa, Mina; Nishida, Atsuyuki; Inui, Toshihide; Kitamura, Kazuyuki

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study is to report how pregnancy alters hematology and clinical chemistry values in rats. Female and male Sprague-Dawley rats were mated; the day of copulation was designated as Day 0. Hematology and clinical chemistry measurements were conducted on Days 7, 14, 17 and 21 in pregnant rats. Measurements were also conducted in non-pregnant rats. Red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht), total protein and albumin decreased on Days 7, 14, 17 and 21; sodium, chloride and glucose decreased on Days 14, 17 and 21; iron decreased on Days 17 and 21; hemoglobin content of reticulocytes (CHr), calcium, inorganic phosphorus and the albumin/globulin ratio decreased on Day 21; and total cholesterol, phospholipid and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased on Day 14 in pregnant rats compared with non-pregnant rats. Reticulocyte increased on Days 7, 14 and 17; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, neutrophil count and rate increased on Days 14, 17 and 21; platelets, fibrinogen, triglyceride and free fatty acid increased on Days 17 and 21; and activated partial thromboplastin time was prolonged on Days 17 and 21 in pregnant rats compared with non-pregnant rats. The decreased RBC, Hb, Ht, CHr and iron in pregnant rats indicated that they suffered from iron deficiency anemia. These data can be used as background information for effective evaluation in reproductive toxicology studies.

  4. [Molecular phylogeny and the time of divergence of minges (Chironomidae, Nematocera, Diptera) inferred from a partial nucleotide sequence of the cytochrome oxidase I gene (COI)].

    PubMed

    Demin, A G; Polukonova, N V; Miuge, N S

    2011-10-01

    This is the first study to infer the phylogenetic structure of minges of the subfamily Chironominae from the amino acid sequence of cytochrome oxidase I (COI). The subdivision of Chironominae into two tribes, Chironomini and Tanytarsini, has been confirmed. The segregation of the genera Pseudochironomus and Riethia into a separate tribe has not been confirmed. Stenochironomus gibbus forms a branch considerably deviating from the subfamily Chironominae. The genus Micropsectra is formed by a large polyphyletic cluster that also includes the genera Virgotanytharsus, Reotanytharsus, Kenopsectra, and Parapsectra. Tanytarsus is the basal genus of the tribe Tanytarsini. The times of divergence of the main taxa of Chironominae have been estimated. The calculated time of divergence of the genus Chironomus disproves the assumption that it is phylogenetically old.

  5. Off-Stream Watering Systems and Partial Barriers as a Strategy to Maximize Cattle Production and Minimize Time Spent in the Riparian Area.

    PubMed

    Rawluk, Ashley A; Crow, Gary; Legesse, Getahun; Veira, Douglas M; Bullock, Paul R; González, Luciano A; Dubois, Melanie; Ominski, Kim H

    2014-10-29

    A study was conducted in 2009 at two locations in Manitoba (Killarney and Souris), Canada to determine the impact of off-stream waterers (OSW) with or without natural barriers on (i) amount of time cattle spent in the 10 m buffer created within the riparian area, referred to as the riparian polygon (RP), (ii) watering location (OSW or stream), and (iii) animal performance measured as weight gain. This study was divided into three 28-day periods over the grazing season. At each location, the pasture-which ranged from 21.0 ha to 39.2 ha in size-was divided into three treatments: no OSW nor barriers (1CONT), OSW with barriers along the stream bank to deter cattle from watering at the stream (2BARR), and OSW without barriers (3NOBARR). Cattle in 2BARR spent less time in the RP in Periods 1 (p = 0.0002), 2 (p = 0.1116), and 3 (p < 0.0001) at the Killarney site compared to cattle in 3NOBARR at the same site. Cattle in 2BARR at the Souris site spent more time in the RP in Period 1 (p < 0.0001) and less time in Period 2 (p = 0.0002) compared to cattle in 3NOBARR. Cattle did use the OSW, but not exclusively, as watering at the stream was still observed. The observed inconsistency in the effectiveness of the natural barriers on deterring cattle from the riparian area between periods and locations may be partly attributable to the environmental conditions present during this field trial as well as difference in pasture size and the ability of the established barriers to deter cattle from using the stream as a water source. Treatment had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on cow and calf weights averaged over the summer period. These results indicate that the presence of an OSW does not create significant differences in animal performance when used in extensive pasture scenarios such as those studied within the present study. Whereas the barriers did not consistently discourage watering at the stream, the results provide some indication of the efficacy of the OSW as well as the

  6. Partial synchronization and partial amplitude death in mesoscale network motifs.

    PubMed

    Poel, Winnie; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-02-01

    We study the interplay between network topology and complex space-time patterns and introduce a concept to analytically predict complex patterns in networks of Stuart-Landau oscillators with linear symmetric and instantaneous coupling based solely on the network topology. These patterns consist of partial amplitude death and partial synchronization and are found to exist in large variety for all undirected networks of up to 5 nodes. The underlying concept is proved to be robust with respect to frequency mismatch and can also be extended to larger networks. In addition it directly links the stability of complete in-phase synchronization to only a small subset of topological eigenvalues of a network.

  7. Time-independent states of a non-neutral plasma diode when emitted electrons are partially turned around by a transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Sourav; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Gerasimenko, A. B.; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2016-10-01

    An analytical study is presented on the steady states of a plasma diode that is uniformly occupied by infinitely massive ions of constant density and driven by a cold electron beam in the presence of an external transverse magnetic field. In contrast to our previous work [Pramanik et al., Phys. Plasmas 23, 062118 (2016)], here, we investigate the case when electrons are reflected back to the emitter by the magnetic field for arbitrary values of the neutralization parameter. Using the emitter electric field as a characteristic parameter, the steady-state solutions have been evaluated for the specific values of the diode gap, applied voltage, neutralization parameter, and magnetic field strength. It was found that unlike vacuum diodes (e.g., the Bursian diode), steady state solutions also exist for negative values of the emitter field strength. In case of the Bursian diode, only a single type of solutions (Bursian branches) was observed. However, for the Pierce diode, the new family of solutions appeared along with the Bursian ones. In the absence of the external magnetic field as well as when it is weak, the potential distribution shows a wavy nature. However, when the Larmor radius was ten times the beam Debye length, the wavy potential profile and non-Bursian branches disappeared. Based on this phenomenon, a non-neutral diode can be used to operate fast electronic switches.

  8. Detection and partial discrimination of atypical and classical bovine spongiform encephalopathies in cattle and primates using real-time quaking-induced conversion assay

    PubMed Central

    Levavasseur, Etienne; Biacabe, Anne-Gaëlle; Comoy, Emmanuel; Culeux, Audrey; Grznarova, Katarina; Privat, Nicolas; Simoneau, Steve; Flan, Benoit; Sazdovitch, Véronique; Seilhean, Danielle; Baron, Thierry; Haïk, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    The transmission of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE) through contaminated meat product consumption is responsible for variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in humans. More recent and atypical forms of BSE (L-BSE and H-BSE) have been identified in cattle since the C-BSE epidemic. Their low incidence and advanced age of onset are compatible with a sporadic origin, as are most cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. Transmissions studies in primates and transgenic mice expressing a human prion protein (PrP) indicated that atypical forms of BSE may be associated with a higher zoonotic potential than classical BSE, and require particular attention for public health. Recently, methods designed to amplify misfolded forms of PrP have emerged as promising tools to detect prion strains and to study their diversity. Here, we validated real-time quaking-induced conversion assay for the discrimination of atypical and classical BSE strains using a large series of bovine samples encompassing all the atypical BSE cases detected by the French Centre of Reference during 10 years of exhaustive active surveillance. We obtained a 100% sensitivity and specificity for atypical BSE detection. In addition, the assay was able to discriminate atypical and classical BSE in non-human primates, and also sporadic CJD and vCJD in humans. The RT-QuIC assay appears as a practical means for a reliable detection of atypical BSE strains in a homologous or heterologous PrP context. PMID:28231300

  9. Landsliding in partially saturated materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godt, J.W.; Baum, R.L.; Lu, N.

    2009-01-01

    [1] Rainfall-induced landslides are pervasive in hillslope environments around the world and among the most costly and deadly natural hazards. However, capturing their occurrence with scientific instrumentation in a natural setting is extremely rare. The prevailing thinking on landslide initiation, particularly for those landslides that occur under intense precipitation, is that the failure surface is saturated and has positive pore-water pressures acting on it. Most analytic methods used for landslide hazard assessment are based on the above perception and assume that the failure surface is located beneath a water table. By monitoring the pore water and soil suction response to rainfall, we observed shallow landslide occurrence under partially saturated conditions for the first time in a natural setting. We show that the partially saturated shallow landslide at this site is predictable using measured soil suction and water content and a novel unified effective stress concept for partially saturated earth materials. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Partial Derivatives of the Lambert Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arora, Nitin; Russell, Ryan P.; Strange, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    A procedure for deriving analytic partial derivatives of the Lambert problem is presented. Using the universal, cosine based Lambert formulation; first order partial derivatives of the velocities with respect to the positions and times are developed. Taking advantage of inherent symmetries and intermediate variables, the derivatives are expressed in a computationally efficient form. The added cost of computing these partials is found to be approximately 10% to approximately 60% of the Lambert compute cost. The availability of analytic partial derivatives increases optimization speed, efficiency and allows for trajectory optimization formulations that implicitly enforce continuity constraints via embedded Lambert problems.

  11. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  12. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Pucci, Giuseppe; Bush, John W. M.

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  13. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  14. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  15. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  16. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  17. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, Jie

    2010-07-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  18. [Renal function and plasma dabigatran level measured at trough by diluted thrombin time assay].

    PubMed

    Martinuzzo, Marta E; Duboscq, Cristina; Viñuales, Estela S; Girardi, Beatriz; Penchasky, Diana; Ceresetto, José; Stemmelin, Germán; Otero, Victoria; Barrera, Luis H; López, Marina S; Otaso, Juan C; Hoyhamburu, José

    2017-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate (direct thrombin inhibitor) is effective in preventing embolic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. It does not require laboratory control, but given the high renal elimination, its measurement in plasma is important in renal failure. The objectives of the study were to verify the analytical quality of the diluted thrombin time assay for measurement of dabigatran plasma concentration (cc), correlate cc with classic coagulation assays, prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and evaluate them according to the creatinine clearance (CLCr). Forty plasma samples of patients (34 consecutive and 6 suspected of drug accumulation) receiving dabigatran at 150 (n = 19) or 110 (n = 21) mg/12 hours were collected. Blood samples were drawn at 10-14 hours of the last intake. Dabigatran concentration was determined by diluted thrombin time (HemosIl DTI, Instrumentation Laboratory (IL). PT and APTT (IL) were performed on two fotooptical coagulometers, ACL TOP 300 and 500 (IL). DTI presented intra-assay coefficient of variation < 5.4% and inter-assay < 6%, linearity range 0-493 ng/ml. Patients' cc: median 83 (4-945) ng/ml. Individuals with CLCr in the lowest tertile (22.6-46.1 ml/min) showed significantly higher median cc: 308 (49-945), compared to the average 72 (12-190) and highest tertile, 60 (4-118) ng/ml. Correlation between cc and APTT or PT were moderate, r2 = 0.59 and -0.66, p < 0.0001, respectively. DTI test allowed us to quantify plasma dabigatran levels, both in patients with normal or altered renal function, representing a useful tool in clinical situations such as renal failure, pre surgery or emergencies.

  19. Honey Bee Venom (Apis mellifera) Contains Anticoagulation Factors and Increases the Blood-clotting Time

    PubMed Central

    Zolfagharian, Hossein; Mohajeri, Mohammad; Babaie, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Bee venom (BV) is a complex mixture of proteins and contains proteins such as phospholipase and melittin, which have an effect on blood clotting and blood clots. The mechanism of action of honey bee venom (HBV, Apis mellifera) on human plasma proteins and its anti-thrombotic effect were studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anti-coagulation effect of BV and its effects on blood coagulation and purification. Methods: Crude venom obtained from Apis mellifera was selected. The anti-coagulation factor of the crude venom from this species was purified by using gel filtration chromatography (sephadex G-50), and the molecular weights of the anti-coagulants in this venom estimated by using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Blood samples were obtained from 10 rabbits, and the prothrombin time (PT) and the partial thromboplastin time (PTT) tests were conducted. The approximate lethal dose (LD) values of BV were determined. Results: Crude BV increased the blood clotting time. For BV concentrations from 1 to 4 mg/mL, clotting was not observed even at more than 300 seconds, standard deviations (SDs) = ± 0.71; however, clotting was observed in the control group 13.8 s, SDs = ± 0.52. Thus, BV can be considered as containing anti-coagulation factors. Crude BV is composed 4 protein bands with molecular weights of 3, 15, 20 and 41 kilodalton (kDa), respectively. The LD50 of the crude BV was found to be 177.8 μg/mouse. Conclusion: BV contains anti-coagulation factors. The fraction extracted from the Iranian bees contains proteins that are similar to anti-coagulation proteins, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and melittin, and that can increase the blood clotting times in vitro. PMID:26998384

  20. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K. ); Warnow, T.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n[sup 3]) time and from POM experiments in O(n[sup 4]) time.

  1. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K.; Warnow, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n{sup 3}) time and from POM experiments in O(n{sup 4}) time.

  2. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  3. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  4. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  5. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  6. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  7. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  8. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  9. Interference of M-protein on prothrombin time test – case report

    PubMed Central

    Margetić, Sandra; Ćelap, Ivana; Dukić, Lora; Vukasović, Ines; Virović-Jukić, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report was to present a case of interference on prothrombin time (PT) test that directed further laboratory diagnostics and resulted with final detection of monoclonal gammopathy in an 88-year old man. Routine coagulation testing during medical examination at Emergency Department revealed unmeasurable PT (< 7% activity) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) within reference range. After repeated sampling for coagulation testing, PT was unmeasurable again, as well as fibrinogen level (< 0.8 g/L), thrombin time (TT) was significantly prolonged (107 seconds) and aPTT was within reference range. In both plasma samples refrigerated at 4 ˚C overnight, white gelatinous precipitate was visible between the cell and plasma layers and the presence of monoclonal protein (M-protein) was suggested in our patient. Further laboratory diagnostics revealed total serum proteins at concentration of 123 g/L and the presence of M-protein IgG lambda (λ) at concentration of 47.1 g/L. These results suggested monoclonal gammopathy as an underlying pathophysiological condition in our patient. Activities of coagulation factors II, V, VII and X were within reference ranges or increased. These results and correction of unmeasurable PT result to 67% in mixing test with commercial normal plasma suggest in vitro rather than in vivo interference of M-protein on PT result. In contrast, significantly prolonged TT results in all analysed samples suggest impact of M-protein on this global coagulation test due to possible effect on fibrin polymerization. PMID:27346971

  10. Dilemmas of partial cooperation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    Related to the often applied cooperation models of social dilemmas, we deal with scenarios in which defection dominates cooperation, but an intermediate fraction of cooperators, that is, "partial cooperation," would maximize the overall performance of a group of individuals. Of course, such a solution comes at the expense of cooperators that do not profit from the overall maximum. However, because there are mechanisms accounting for mutual benefits after repeated interactions or through evolutionary mechanisms, such situations can constitute "dilemmas" of partial cooperation. Among the 12 ordinally distinct, symmetrical 2 x 2 games, three (barely considered) variants are correspondents of such dilemmas. Whereas some previous studies investigated particular instances of such games, we here provide the unifying framework and concisely relate it to the broad literature on cooperation in social dilemmas. Complementing our argumentation, we study the evolution of partial cooperation by deriving the respective conditions under which coexistence of cooperators and defectors, that is, partial cooperation, can be a stable outcome of evolutionary dynamics in these scenarios. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such models for research on the large biodiversity and variation in cooperative efforts both in biological and social systems.

  11. Partial coalescence of soap bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pucci, G.; Harris, D. M.; Bush, J. W. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present the results of an experimental investigation of the merger of a soap bubble with a planar soap film. When gently deposited onto a horizontal film, a bubble may interact with the underlying film in such a way as to decrease in size, leaving behind a smaller daughter bubble with approximately half the radius of its progenitor. The process repeats up to three times, with each partial coalescence event occurring over a time scale comparable to the inertial-capillary time. Our results are compared to the recent numerical simulations of Martin and Blanchette ["Simulations of surfactant effects on the dynamics of coalescing drops and bubbles," Phys. Fluids 27, 012103 (2015)] and to the coalescence cascade of droplets on a fluid bath.

  12. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C; Marney, Luke C; Billingsley, Matthew C; Fraga, Carlos G; Bruno, Thomas J; Synovec, Robert E

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene-based rocket propulsion fuels such as RP-1. In particular, it is critical to make better quantitative connections among the following three attributes: fuel performance (thermal stability, sooting propensity, engine specific impulse, etc.), fuel properties (such as flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and hydrogen content), and the chemical composition of a given fuel, i.e., amounts of specific chemical compounds and compound classes present in a fuel as a result of feedstock blending and/or processing. Recent efforts in predicting fuel chemical and physical behavior through modeling put greater emphasis on attaining detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel composition information. Often, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches that used GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical information from these complex fuels, we recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional (2D) gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) using a "reversed column" format: RTX-wax column for the first dimension, and a RTX-1 column for the second dimension. In this report, by applying chemometric data analysis, specifically partial least-squares (PLS) regression analysis, we are able to readily model (and correlate) the chemical compositional information provided by use of GC×GC-TOFMS to RP-1 fuel property information such as density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, and so on. Furthermore, we readily identified compounds that contribute significantly to measured differences in fuel properties based on results from the PLS models. We anticipate this new chemical analysis strategy will have broad implications for the development of high fidelity composition-property models, leading to an

  13. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  14. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  15. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  16. Laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Takami, H; Tajima, G; Sasaki, Y; Takayama, J; Kurihara, H; Niimi, M

    2002-01-01

    Since corticosteroids are indispensable hormones, partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomies may be adopted for the surgical treatment of adrenal diseases. In this article, we describe the technique and results of these procedures. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomy has been performed in 10 patients. Seven cases had an aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and three had a pheochromocytoma. Three cases with an APA and a case with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located far from the adrenal central vein, and the vein could be preserved. Four cases with an APA and two with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located close to the adrenal central vein, and it was necessary to section the central vein to resect them. All endoscopic procedures were performed successfully. There were no postoperative complications. At follow-up, adrenal 131I-adosterol scintigrams showed the preservation of remnant adrenal function in all patients. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenal surgery was safely performed, and adrenal function was preserved irrespective of whether the adrenal central vein could be preserved or not. We consider this to be a useful operative technique for selected cases.

  17. Partial Southwest Elevation Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (with Section of Courtyard) (Parts 1 & 2) - Boott Cotton Mills, John Street at Merrimack River, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  18. Paternalism and partial autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, O

    1984-01-01

    A contrast is often drawn between standard adult capacities for autonomy, which allow informed consent to be given or withheld, and patients' reduced capacities, which demand paternalistic treatment. But patients may not be radically different from the rest of us, in that all human capacities for autonomous action are limited. An adequate account of paternalism and the role that consent and respect for persons can play in medical and other practice has to be developed within an ethical theory that does not impose an idealised picture of unlimited autonomy but allows for the variable and partial character of actual human autonomy. PMID:6520849

  19. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  20. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  1. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  2. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  3. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  4. Partial Dynamical Symmetry in Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Jia-Lun; Chen, Jin-Quan

    1997-03-01

    It is shown that any Hamiltonian involving only one- and two-bond interactions for a molecule withnbonds and having a point groupPas its symmetry group may have theSn⊃Ppartial dynamical symmetry, i.e., the Hamiltonian can be solved analytically for a part of the states, called the unique states. For example, theXY6molecule has theS6⊃Ohpartial dynamical symmetry. The model of Iachello and Oss forncoupled anharmonic oscillators is revisited in terms of the partial dynamical symmetry. The energies are obtained analytically for the nine unique levels of theXY6molecule and the structures of the eigenstates are disclosed for the first time, while for non-unique states they are obtained by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian in theS6⊃Ohsymmetry adapted basis with greatly reduced dimension.

  5. Partial masslessness and conformal gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deser, S.; Joung, E.; Waldron, A.

    2013-05-01

    We use conformal, but ghostful, Weyl gravity to study its ghost-free, second derivative, partially massless (PM) spin-2 component in the presence of Einstein gravity with positive cosmological constant. Specifically, we consider both gravitational- and self-interactions of PM via the fully nonlinear factorization of conformal gravity’s Bach tensor into Einstein times Schouten operators. We find that extending PM beyond linear order suffers from familiar higher spin consistency obstructions: it propagates only in Einstein backgrounds, and the conformal gravity route generates only the usual safe, Noether, cubic order vertices. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Higher spin theories and holography’.

  6. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  7. Removable partial denture occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, John R; Plummer, Kevin D

    2004-07-01

    No single occlusal morphology, scheme, or material will successfully treat all patients. Many patients have been treated, both successfully and unsuccessfully, using widely varying theories of occlusion, choices of posterior tooth form, and restorative materials. Therefore, experience has demonstrated that there is no one righ r way to restore the occlusion of all patients. Partially edentulous patients have many and varied needs. Clinicians must understand the healthy physiologic gnathostomatic system and properly diagnose what is or may become pathologic. Henderson [3] stated that the occlusion of the successfully treated patient allows the masticating mechanism to carry out its physiologic functions while the temporomandibular joints, the neuromuscular mechanism, the teeth and their supporting structures remain in a good state of health. Skills in diagnosis and treatment planning are of utmost importance in treating these patients, for whom the clinician's goals are not only an esthetic and functional restoration but also a lasting harmonious state. Perhaps this was best state by DeVan [55] more than 60 years ago in his often-quoted objective. "The patient's fundamental need is the continued meticulous restoration of what is missing, since what is lost is in a sense irretrievably lost." Because it is clear that there is no one method, no one occlusal scheme, or one material that guarantees success for all patients, recommendations for consideration when establishing or reestablishing occlusal schemes have been presented. These recommendations must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic and technical skills.

  8. Partially solidified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The evolution of magmas is a topic of considerable importance in geology and geophysics because it affects volcanology, igneous petrology, geothermal energy sources, mantle convection, and the thermaland chemical evolution of the earth. The dynamics and evolution of magmas are strongly affected by the presence of solid crystals that occur either in suspension in liquid or as a rigid porous matrix through which liquid magma can percolate. Such systems are physically complex and difficult to model mathematically. Similar physical situations are encountered by metallurgists who study the solidification of molten alloys, and applied mathematicians have long been interested in such moving boundary problems. Clearly, it would be of mutual benefit to bring together scientists, engineers, and mathematicians with a common interest in such systems. Such a meeting is being organized as a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advanced Research Workshop on the Structure and Dynamics of Partially Solidified Systems, to be held at Stanford University's Fallen Leaf Lodge at Tahoe, Calif., May 12-16, 1986 The invited speakers and their topics are

  9. Partial disassembly of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rat liver peroxisomes were subjected to a variety of procedures intended to partially disassemble or damage them; the effects were analyzed by recentrifugation into sucrose gradients, enzyme analyses, electron microscopy, and SDS PAGE. Freezing and thawing or mild sonication released some matrix proteins and produced apparently intact peroxisomal "ghosts" with crystalloid cores and some fuzzy fibrillar content. Vigorous sonication broke open the peroxisomes but the membranes remained associated with cores and fibrillar and amorphous matrix material. The density of both ghosts and more severely damaged peroxisomes was approximately 1.23. Pyrophosphate (pH 9) treatment solubilized the fibrillar content, yielding ghosts that were empty except for cores. Some matrix proteins such as catalase and thiolase readily leak from peroxisomes. Other proteins were identified that remain in mechanically damaged peroxisomes but are neither core nor membrane proteins because they can be released by pyrophosphate treatment. These constitute a class of poorly soluble matrix proteins that appear to correspond to the fibrillar material observed morphologically. All of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes are located in the matrix, but they vary greatly in how easily they leak out. Palmitoyl coenzyme A synthetase is in the membrane, based on its co-distribution with the 22-kilodalton integral membrane polypeptide. PMID:2989301

  10. On-Chip Titration of an Anticoagulant Argatroban and Determination of the Clotting Time within Whole Blood or Plasma Using a Plug-Based Microfluidic System

    PubMed Central

    Song, Helen; Li, Hung-Wing; Munson, Matthew S.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes extending plug-based microfluidics to handling complex biological fluids such as blood, solving the problem of injecting additional reagents into plugs, and applying this system to measuring of clotting time in small volumes of whole blood and plasma. Plugs are droplets transported through microchannels by fluorocarbon fluids. A plug-based microfluidic system was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test. To carry out these experiments, the following techniques were developed for a plug-based system: (i) using Teflon AF coating on the microchannel wall to enable formation of plugs containing blood and transport of the solid fibrin clots within plugs, (ii) using a hydrophilic glass capillary to enable reliable merging of a reagent from an aqueous stream into plugs, (iii) using bright-field microscopy to detect the formation of a fibrin clot within plugs and using fluorescent microscopy to detect the production of thrombin using a fluorogenic substrate, and (iv) titration of argatroban (0–1.5 μg/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature (23 °C) and physiological temperature (37 °C). APTT measurements were conducted with normal pooled plasma (platelet-poor plasma) and with donor’s blood samples (both whole blood and platelet-rich plasma). APTT values and APTT ratios measured by the plug-based microfluidic device were compared to the results from a clinical laboratory at 37 °C. APTT obtained from the on-chip assay were about double those from the clinical laboratory but the APTT ratios from these two methods agreed well with each other. PMID:16841902

  11. On-chip titration of an anticoagulant argatroban and determination of the clotting time within whole blood or plasma using a plug-based microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Song, Helen; Li, Hung-Wing; Munson, Matthew S; Van Ha, Thuong G; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2006-07-15

    This paper describes extending plug-based microfluidics to handling complex biological fluids such as blood, solving the problem of injecting additional reagents into plugs, and applying this system to measuring of clotting time in small volumes of whole blood and plasma. Plugs are droplets transported through microchannels by fluorocarbon fluids. A plug-based microfluidic system was developed to titrate an anticoagulant (argatroban) into blood samples and to measure the clotting time using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) test. To carry out these experiments, the following techniques were developed for a plug-based system: (i) using Teflon AF coating on the microchannel wall to enable formation of plugs containing blood and transport of the solid fibrin clots within plugs, (ii) using a hydrophilic glass capillary to enable reliable merging of a reagent from an aqueous stream into plugs, (iii) using bright-field microscopy to detect the formation of a fibrin clot within plugs and using fluorescent microscopy to detect the production of thrombin using a fluorogenic substrate, and (iv) titration of argatroban (0-1.5 microg/mL) into plugs and measurement of the resulting APTTs at room temperature (23 degrees C) and physiological temperature (37 degrees C). APTT measurements were conducted with normal pooled plasma (platelet-poor plasma) and with donor's blood samples (both whole blood and platelet-rich plasma). APTT values and APTT ratios measured by the plug-based microfluidic device were compared to the results from a clinical laboratory at 37 degrees C. APTT obtained from the on-chip assay were about double those from the clinical laboratory but the APTT ratios from these two methods agreed well with each other.

  12. Modeling Covariance Matrices via Partial Autocorrelations

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, M.J.; Pourahmadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We study the role of partial autocorrelations in the reparameterization and parsimonious modeling of a covariance matrix. The work is motivated by and tries to mimic the phenomenal success of the partial autocorrelations function (PACF) in model formulation, removing the positive-definiteness constraint on the autocorrelation function of a stationary time series and in reparameterizing the stationarity-invertibility domain of ARMA models. It turns out that once an order is fixed among the variables of a general random vector, then the above properties continue to hold and follows from establishing a one-to-one correspondence between a correlation matrix and its associated matrix of partial autocorrelations. Connections between the latter and the parameters of the modified Cholesky decomposition of a covariance matrix are discussed. Graphical tools similar to partial correlograms for model formulation and various priors based on the partial autocorrelations are proposed. We develop frequentist/Bayesian procedures for modelling correlation matrices, illustrate them using a real dataset, and explore their properties via simulations. PMID:20161018

  13. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  14. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  15. The future of partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Malthouse, Theo; Kasivisvanathan, Veeru; Raison, Nicholas; Lam, Wayne; Challacombe, Ben

    2016-12-01

    Innovation in recent times has accelerated due to factors such as the globalization of communication; but there are also more barriers/safeguards in place than ever before as we strive to streamline this process. From the first planned partial nephrectomy completed in 1887, it took over a century to become recommended practice for small renal tumours. At present, identified areas for improvement/innovation are 1) to preserve renal parenchyma, 2) to optimise pre-operative eGFR and 3) to reduce global warm ischaemia time. All 3 of these, are statistically significant predictors of post-operative renal function. Urologists, have a proud history of embracing innovation & have experimented with different clamping techniques of the renal vasculature, image guidance in robotics, renal hypothermia, lasers and new robots under development. The DaVinci model may soon no longer have a monopoly on this market, as it loses its stranglehold with novel technology emerging including added features, such as haptic feedback with reduced costs. As ever, our predictions of the future may well fall wide of the mark, but in order to progress, one must open the mind to the possibilities that already exist, as evolution of existing technology often appears to be a revolution in hindsight.

  16. Regularized Partial and/or Constrained Redundancy Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takane, Yoshio; Jung, Sunho

    2008-01-01

    Methods of incorporating a ridge type of regularization into partial redundancy analysis (PRA), constrained redundancy analysis (CRA), and partial and constrained redundancy analysis (PCRA) were discussed. The usefulness of ridge estimation in reducing mean square error (MSE) has been recognized in multiple regression analysis for some time,…

  17. Chiral and continuum extrapolation of partially quenched lattice results

    SciTech Connect

    C.R. Allton; W. Armour; D.B. Leinweber; A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-04-01

    The vector meson mass is extracted from a large sample of partially quenched, two-flavor lattice QCD simulations. For the first time, discretization, finite-volume and partial quenching artifacts are treated in a unified chiral effective field theory analysis of the lattice simulation results.

  18. 20 CFR 10.402 - What is partial disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is partial disability? 10.402 Section 10... AMENDED Compensation and Related Benefits Compensation for Disability and Impairment § 10.402 What is partial disability? An injured employee who cannot return to the position held at the time of injury...

  19. Partial Retirement and Pension Policy in Industrialized Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latulippe, Denis; Turner, John

    2000-01-01

    Examines the advantages and disadvantages of partial retirement--the transitional period between full-time employment and complete retirement--including easing the transition, labor market effects, and financial implications for social security systems and employers. Reviews partial retirement policies in eight countries and concludes that there…

  20. 20 CFR 10.402 - What is partial disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is partial disability? 10.402 Section 10... AMENDED Compensation and Related Benefits Compensation for Disability and Impairment § 10.402 What is partial disability? An injured employee who cannot return to the position held at the time of injury...

  1. 20 CFR 10.402 - What is partial disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What is partial disability? 10.402 Section 10... AMENDED Compensation and Related Benefits Compensation for Disability and Impairment § 10.402 What is partial disability? An injured employee who cannot return to the position held at the time of injury...

  2. 20 CFR 10.402 - What is partial disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is partial disability? 10.402 Section 10... AMENDED Compensation and Related Benefits Compensation for Disability and Impairment § 10.402 What is partial disability? An injured employee who cannot return to the position held at the time of injury...

  3. 20 CFR 10.402 - What is partial disability?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true What is partial disability? 10.402 Section 10... AMENDED Compensation and Related Benefits Compensation for Disability and Impairment § 10.402 What is partial disability? An injured employee who cannot return to the position held at the time of injury...

  4. Partial fasciectomy for Dupuytren's contractures.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Spyridonos, Sarantis G; Ignatiadis, Ioannis A; Antonopoulos, Dimitrios; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2009-01-01

    One hundred ninety-six patients with Dupuytren's contractures were treated by partial fasciectomy and adequate postoperative rehabilitation. All patients had flexion contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint of >20 degrees ; 93 patients had flexion contracture of the associated metacarpophalangeal joint of >30 degrees ; 143 patients had risk factors for Dupuytren's disease. Primary skin closure and splinting were done in all patients. Range of motion was begun by the 1st week. Splinting was discontinued by the 2nd week, followed by night-time splinting until the 8th week. The mean follow-up was 6.6 years (range, 2-9 years). At the latest examination, 72.5% of the patients had complete range of motion of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints; 20.2% had 5 degrees -10 degrees of extension deficit and 7.3% had recurrent contractures of >20 degrees at the proximal interphalangeal joint and were subjected to reoperation. Complications included digital neurovascular injury in 5%, complex regional pain syndrome in 10.1%, and wound-healing problems and superficial infections in 15.1%.

  5. Experimental generating the partially coherent and partially polarized electromagnetic source.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey S; Rodríguez-Zurita, Gustavo; Meneses-Fabián, Cruz; Olvera-Santamaría, Miguel A; Rickenstorff-Parrao, Carolina

    2010-06-07

    The technique for generating the partially coherent and partially polarized source starting from the completely coherent and completely polarized laser source is proposed and analyzed. This technique differs from the known ones by the simplicity of its physical realization. The efficiency of the proposed technique is illustrated with the results of physical experiment in which an original technique for characterizing the coherence and polarization properties of the generated source is employed.

  6. A partial snake for the AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    Based on snake experiments at the Indian University Cyclotron Facility and computer simulations at Brookhaven National Laboratory, as well as the conclusions of a BNL mini-workshop, we feel that a partial Siberian snake is a practical device for the AGS. It is anticipated that such a device could reduce the polarized beam tune-up time from 2--3 weeks to 2--3 days.

  7. Partial differential equation models in macroeconomics.

    PubMed

    Achdou, Yves; Buera, Francisco J; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Moll, Benjamin

    2014-11-13

    The purpose of this article is to get mathematicians interested in studying a number of partial differential equations (PDEs) that naturally arise in macroeconomics. These PDEs come from models designed to study some of the most important questions in economics. At the same time, they are highly interesting for mathematicians because their structure is often quite difficult. We present a number of examples of such PDEs, discuss what is known about their properties, and list some open questions for future research.

  8. Partial Data Traces: Efficient Generation and Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, F; De Supinski, B R; McKee, S A; Yoo, A

    2001-08-20

    Binary manipulation techniques are increasing in popularity. They support program transformations tailored toward certain program inputs, and these transformations have been shown to yield performance gains beyond the scope of static code optimizations without profile-directed feedback. They even deliver moderate gains in the presence of profile-guided optimizations. In addition, transformations can be performed on the entire executable, including library routines. This work focuses on program instrumentation, yet another application of binary manipulation. This paper reports preliminary results on generating partial data traces through dynamic binary rewriting. The contributions are threefold. First, a portable method for extracting precise data traces for partial executions of arbitrary applications is developed. Second, a set of hierarchical structures for compactly representing these accesses is developed. Third, an efficient online algorithm to detect regular accesses is introduced. The authors utilize dynamic binary rewriting to selectively collect partial address traces of regions within a program. This allows partial tracing of hot paths for only a short time during program execution in contrast to static rewriting techniques that lack hot path detection and also lack facilities to limit the duration of data collection. Preliminary results show reductions of three orders of a magnitude of inline instrumentation over a dual process approach involving context switching. They also report constant size representations for regular access patters in nested loops. These efforts are part of a larger project to counter the increasing gap between processor and main memory speeds by means of software optimization and hardware enhancements.

  9. Partial-Payload Support Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, R.; Freeman, M.

    1984-01-01

    Partial-payload support structure (PPSS) is modular, bridge like structure supporting experiments weighing up to 2 tons. PPSS handles such experiments more economically than standard Spacelab pallet system.

  10. Partial arthrodeses of the wrist.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, A; Cristiani, G; Castagnini, L; Castagnetti, C; Caroli, A

    1995-01-01

    The authors report 16 cases of partial arthrodeses of the wrist for the treatment of Kienboeck's disease, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, rotatory subluxation of the scaphoid, rheumatoid arthritis, etc. Based on the good results obtained (76.6%) the authors believe that partial arthrodeses constitute the type of treatment indicated for the treatment of pathologies that involve only some of the carpal bones, and they also emphasize that this type of surgery represents a valid alternative to total arthrodesis of the wrist.

  11. Simulation of human plasma concentration-time profiles of the partial glucokinase activator PF-04937319 and its disproportionate N-demethylated metabolite using humanized chimeric mice and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi; Chijiwa, Hiroyuki; Okuzono, Takeshi; Ishiguro, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Nishinoaki, Sho; Ninomiya, Shin-Ichi; Mitsui, Marina; Kalgutkar, Amit S; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Suemizu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-07

    1. The partial glucokinase activator N,N-dimethyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide (PF-04937319) is biotransformed in humans to N-methyl-5-((2-methyl-6-((5-methylpyrazin-2-yl)carbamoyl)benzofuran-4-yl)oxy)pyrimidine-2-carboxamide (M1), accounting for ∼65% of total exposure at steady state. 2. As the disproportionately abundant nature of M1 could not be reliably predicted from in vitro metabolism studies, we evaluated a chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on TK-NOG background for its ability to retrospectively predict human disposition of PF-04937319. Since livers of chimeric mice were enlarged by hyperplasia and contained remnant mouse hepatocytes, hepatic intrinsic clearances normalized for liver weight, metabolite formation and liver to plasma concentration ratios were plotted against the replacement index by human hepatocytes and extrapolated to those in the virtual chimeric mouse with 100% humanized liver. 3. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic analyses using the above parameters revealed that simulated concentration curves of PF-04937319 and M1 were approximately superimposed with the observed clinical data in humans. 4. Finally, qualitative profiling of circulating metabolites in humanized chimeric mice dosed with PF-04937319 or M1 also revealed the presence of a carbinolamide metabolite, identified in the clinical study as a human-specific metabolite. The case study demonstrates that humanized chimeric mice may be potentially useful in preclinical discovery towards studying disproportionate or human-specific metabolism of drug candidates.

  12. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy for complex renal masses.

    PubMed

    Patton, Michael W; Salevitz, Daniel A; Tyson, Mark D; Andrews, Paul E; Ferrigni, Erin N; Nateras, Rafael N; Castle, Erik P

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether the approach for partial nephrectomy is influenced by tumor complexity and if the introduction of robotic techniques has allowed us to treat more complex tumors minimally invasively. Data from 292 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy for renal masses from November 1999 to July 2013 at a tertiary referral center were retrospectively reviewed. Nephrometry scores and perioperative outcomes were stratified based on when robotic techniques were introduced. Mean follow-up time was 2.6 years. Preoperative RENAL nephrometry scores and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. Of the 292 patients, 31.5 % underwent robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, 46.2 % laparoscopic partial nephrectomy and 22.9 % open partial nephrectomy. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy mean nephrometry score was significantly higher than laparoscopic and equivalent to open. Significant perioperative differences were estimated blood loss (p = 0.0001), length of stay (p = 0.0001) and Clavien score (p = 0.0069), all favoring robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. Limitations include retrospective design and single center data. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy is a safe and effective surgical modality that allows for complex renal tumors that were previously reserved for open partial nephrectomy in the pure laparoscopic era to be managed with a minimally invasive approach.

  13. [Influence of reagent storage in Sysmex CA7000 for different time on 4 test RESULTS: of the plasma coagulation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong-Qing; Li, Zhen-Xing

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of blood coagulation reagents stored for different time on test results of the specimens prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT) and fibrinogen (Fib). A total of 21 patient plasma specimens was taken and measured for homeostasis by Sysmex CA7000 automated blood coagulation analyzer and supporting reagent. The PT, APTT, TT and Fib of specimens were measured with the reagents stored in Sysmex CA7000 for different time. The differences of PT, APTT, TT and Fib were analyzed between values measured of the reagents stored for 0 hour and different time (TS:12, 24, 36,48, 60, 72 h; DA:24, 48, 72, 96, 120 h; TT:2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 h; TR:4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 h; OVB:1, 2, 3, 4, 5 ,6 h), respectively. The results showed that when coagulation reagent TS were stored for more than 48 h , DA 96 h, TT 10 h, TR 16 h and OVB 4 h, the values of PT, APTT, TT and Fib of samples were statistically different from the values measured with fresh coagulation reagent (P < 0.01), respectively. Compared 0 h with TS stored for 48-72, DA 96-120, TT 10-12, TR 16-24 and OVB 4-6 h, the percentage difference of PT, APTT, TT and Fib is in -2.6% ∼ 10.8%, -3.44% ∼ 4.8%, -3.9% ∼ 5.52%, -10.8% ∼ 3.3% and -17.2% ∼ 0.5%, the PT and Fib changes were more significant. Accordingly, the result of PT, APTT and TT had a uptrend as the reagent stored in Sysmex CA7000 analyzer for a long time, while Fib downtrend. It is concluded that the reagents showed be timely replaced when the plasma coagulation test is performed so as to obtain accurate results of examination.

  14. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2004-09-28

    The effective coherence of an undulator beamline can be tailored to projection lithography requirements by using a simple single moving element and a simple stationary low-cost spherical mirror. The invention is particularly suited for use in an illuminator device for an optical image processing system requiring partially coherent illumination. The illuminator includes: (i) source of coherent or partially coherent radiation which has an intrinsic coherence that is higher than the desired coherence; (ii) a reflective surface that receives incident radiation from said source; (iii) means for moving the reflective surface through a desired range of angles in two dimensions wherein the rate of the motion is fast relative to integration time of said image processing system; and (iv) a condenser optic that re-images the moving reflective surface to the entrance plane of said image processing system, thereby, making the illumination spot in said entrance plane essentially stationary.

  15. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  16. Transitive Properties of Some Partial Differential Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    A partial differential operator L:C∞(Rn)→C∞(Rn) is by definition transitive if one can find a function f∈C∞(Rn) for which the forward orbit OL(f) = {Lp(f)|f∞C∞(Rn)} is a dense subset of C∞Rn). Here the orbit OL(f) consists as usual of the iterations of L:Lp(f) = L∘L∘L∘⋯L∘(f) (p times.) It was shown [1] that if L(u) = bu+ ∑ 0<|α|≤paα∂αu is a partial differential operator with constant coefficients then L is transitive if it does not contains a term of the type bu; in other words if b = 0. In this note we show that it is possible to omit the condition b = 0 for operators of first order as well for some operators of a Dirac type.

  17. Designing successful removable partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Daher, Tony; Hall, Dan; Goodacre, Charles J

    2006-03-01

    In today's busy dental offices, removable partial denture design is often abdicated by dentists, both as a result of a lack of experience and consensus of design and because of educational failure on the part of dental schools. The result is delegation of the clinical design process to the lab technician. The lack of clinical data provided to the dental technician jeopardizes the quality of care. This article will focus on a logical and simple approach to this problem, making removable partial denture design simple and predictably achievable. The clinical evidence related to removable partial denture design will be described, along with a checklist to simplify the process and make it practical and applicable to everyday clinical practice.

  18. Partial Priapism Treated with Pentoxifylline

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Meghan A.; Carrion, Rafael E.; Yang, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Main findings: A 26-year-old man suffering from partial priapism was successfully treated with a regimen including pentoxifylline, a nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor that is often used to conservatively treat Peyronie's disease. Case hypothesis: Partial priapism is an extremely rare urological condition that is characterized by thrombosis within the proximal segment of a single corpus cavernosum. There have only been 36 reported cases to date. Although several factors have been associated with this unusual disorder, such as trauma or bicycle riding, the etiology is still not completely understood. Treatment is usually conservative and consists of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic. Promising future implications: This case report supports the utilization of pentoxifylline in patients with partial priapism due to its anti-fibrogenic and anti-thrombotic properties. PMID:26401875

  19. Partially coherent vectorial nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-10-01

    Generalized vectorial Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integrals are developed for the cross-spectral-density matrices of spatially partially coherent beams. Using the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam as an example, we derive the expressions for the propagation of cross-spectral-density matrices and intensity of partially coherent vectorial nonparaxial beams, and the corresponding far-field asymptotic forms, beyond the paraxial approximation. The propagation of the vectorial nonparaxial GSM beams are evaluated and analyzed. It is shown that a 3 x 3 cross-spectral-density matrix or a vector theory is required for the exact description of nonparaxial GSM beams.

  20. Apparatus for generating partially coherent radiation

    DOEpatents

    Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2005-02-22

    Techniques for generating partially coherent radiation and particularly for converting effectively coherent radiation from a synchrotron to partially coherent EUV radiation suitable for projection lithography.

  1. Partial comparison of the NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay with the Luminex xTAG Respiratory Panel Fast Assay V2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction for detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Scala, Alessia; Bianchini, Sonia; Presicce, Maria Lory; Mori, Alessandro; Sciarrabba, Calogero Sathya; Fior, Giulia; Principi, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    In this study, 185 nasopharyngeal swabs were tested to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex NxTAG (NxTAG) Respiratory Pathogen Panel (RPP) Assay with those of the Luminex Respiratory Virus Panel (RVP) Fast Assay v2 and singleplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The NxTAG Assay identified at least one infectious agent in 164 (88.7%) of the swabs. In 91 (6.2%) tests with negative results with the RVP Fast Assay v2, a virus was identified by the NxTAG (P < 0.001). With the NxTAG Assay, the detection rates were significantly higher for respiratory syncytial virus (P = 0.003), human metapneumovirus (P < 0.001), human rhinovirus/human enterovirus (P = 0.009) and human adenovirus (P < 0.001). Finally, the NxTAG Assay identified M. pneumoniae in 32 of 44 (72.7%) PCR-positive samples. However, the concordance with real-time PCR results was low for both assays. In conclusion, the results indicate that the NxTAG Assay overcomes some of the limitations of previous Luminex assays, although further studies are needed for a more complete evaluation of the new assay.

  2. Planarian immobilization, partial irradiation, and tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guedelhoefer, Otto C; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-08-06

    The planarian, a freshwater flatworm, has proven to be a powerful system for dissecting metazoan regeneration and stem cell biology. Planarian regeneration of any missing or damaged tissues is made possible by adult stem cells termed neoblasts. Although these stem cells have been definitively shown to be pluripotent and singularly capable of reconstituting an entire animal, the heterogeneity within the stem cell population and the dynamics of their cellular behaviors remain largely unresolved. Due to the large number and wide distribution of stem cells throughout the planarian body plan, advanced methods for manipulating subpopulations of stem cells for molecular and functional study in vivo are needed. Tissue transplantation and partial irradiation are two methods by which a subpopulation of planarian stem cells can be isolated for further study. Each technique has distinct advantages. Tissue transplantation allows for the introduction of stem cells, into a naïve host, that are either inherently genetically distinct or have been previously treated pharmacologically. Alternatively, partial irradiation allows for the isolation of stem cells within a host, juxtaposed to tissue devoid of stem cells, without the introduction of a wound or any breech in tissue integrity. Using these two methods, one can investigate the cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors that control stem cell functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Both tissue transplantation and partial irradiation have been used historically in defining many of the questions about planarian regeneration that remain under study today. However, these techniques have remained underused due to the laborious and inconsistent nature of previous methods. The protocols presented here represent a large step forward in decreasing the time and effort necessary to reproducibly generate large numbers of grafted or partially irradiated animals with efficacies approaching 100 percent. We cover the

  3. Planarian Immobilization, Partial Irradiation, and Tissue Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Guedelhoefer IV, Otto C.; Sánchez Alvarado, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    The planarian, a freshwater flatworm, has proven to be a powerful system for dissecting metazoan regeneration and stem cell biology1,2. Planarian regeneration of any missing or damaged tissues is made possible by adult stem cells termed neoblasts3. Although these stem cells have been definitively shown to be pluripotent and singularly capable of reconstituting an entire animal4, the heterogeneity within the stem cell population and the dynamics of their cellular behaviors remain largely unresolved. Due to the large number and wide distribution of stem cells throughout the planarian body plan, advanced methods for manipulating subpopulations of stem cells for molecular and functional study in vivo are needed. Tissue transplantation and partial irradiation are two methods by which a subpopulation of planarian stem cells can be isolated for further study. Each technique has distinct advantages. Tissue transplantation allows for the introduction of stem cells, into a naïve host, that are either inherently genetically distinct or have been previously treated pharmacologically. Alternatively, partial irradiation allows for the isolation of stem cells within a host, juxtaposed to tissue devoid of stem cells, without the introduction of a wound or any breech in tissue integrity. Using these two methods, one can investigate the cell autonomous and non-autonomous factors that control stem cell functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Both tissue transplantation5,6 and partial irradiation7 have been used historically in defining many of the questions about planarian regeneration that remain under study today. However, these techniques have remained underused due to the laborious and inconsistent nature of previous methods. The protocols presented here represent a large step forward in decreasing the time and effort necessary to reproducibly generate large numbers of grafted or partially irradiated animals with efficacies approaching 100 percent. We

  4. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-21

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 . Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  5. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen, Wei; Craft, David

    2012-09-01

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 s. Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets.

  6. Partially molten magma ocean model

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, D.N.

    1983-02-15

    The properties of the lunar crust and upper mantle can be explained if the outer 300-400 km of the moon was initially only partially molten rather than fully molten. The top of the partially molten region contained about 20% melt and decreased to 0% at 300-400 km depth. Nuclei of anorthositic crust formed over localized bodies of magma segregated from the partial melt, then grew peripherally until they coverd the moon. Throughout most of its growth period the anorthosite crust floated on a layer of magma a few km thick. The thickness of this layer is regulated by the opposing forces of loss of material by fractional crystallization and addition of magma from the partial melt below. Concentrations of Sr, Eu, and Sm in pristine ferroan anorthosites are found to be consistent with this model, as are trends for the ferroan anorthosites and Mg-rich suites on a diagram of An in plagioclase vs. mg in mafics. Clustering of Eu, Sr, and mg values found among pristine ferroan anorthosites are predicted by this model.

  7. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  8. Leadership in Partially Distributed Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plotnick, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Inter-organizational collaboration is becoming more common. When organizations collaborate they often do so in partially distributed teams (PDTs). A PDT is a hybrid team that has at least one collocated subteam and at least two subteams that are geographically distributed and communicate primarily through electronic media. While PDTs share many…

  9. Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Marney, Luke C.; Billingsley, Matthew; Fraga, Carlos G.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2014-01-31

    There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene based rocket propulsion fuels, namely RP-1 and RP-2. In particular, it is crucial to be able to make better quantitative connections between the following three attributes: (a) fuel performance, (b) fuel properties (flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, etc) and (c) the chemical composition of a given fuel (i.e., specific chemical compounds and compound classes present as a result of feedstock blending and processing). Indeed, recent efforts in predicting fuel performance through modeling put greater emphasis on detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel compositional information. In this regard, advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology provides improved data relative to classical boiling point and volatility curve techniques. Using ADC metrology, data obtained from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provides compositional variation information that is directly relevant to predictive modeling of fuel performance. Often, in such studies, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is typically employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches using GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical composition information from these complex fuels, we have recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC - TOFMS) to provide chemical composition data that is significantly richer than that provided by GC-MS methods. In this report, by applying multivariate data analysis techniques, referred to as chemometrics, we are able to readily model (correlate) the chemical compositional information from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provided using GC × GC - TOFMS, to the fuel property information such as that provided by the ADC method and other specification properties. We anticipate that this new chemical analysis

  10. [Partial lease squares approach to functional analysis].

    PubMed

    Preda, C

    2006-01-01

    We extend the partial least squares (PLS) approach to functional data represented in our models by sample paths of stochastic process with continuous time. Due to the infinite dimension, when functional data are used as a predictor for linear regression and classification models, the estimation problem is an ill-posed one. In this context, PLS offers a simple and efficient alternative to the methods based on the principal components of the stochastic process. We compare the results given by the PLS approach and other linear models using several datasets from economy, industry and medical fields.

  11. An Ultrasonic Clamp for Bloodless Partial Nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Bouchoux, Guillaume; Murat, François Joseph; Birer, Alain; Theillère, Yves; Chapelon, Jean Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2007-05-01

    Maximum conservation of the kidney is preferable through partial nephrectomy for patients at risk of disease recurrence of renal cancers. Haemostatic tools are needed in order to achieve bloodless surgery and reduce post surgery morbidity. Two piezo-ceramic transducers operating at a frequency of 4 MHz were mounted on each arm of a clamp. When used for coagulation purposes, two transducers situated on opposite arms of the clamp were driven simultaneously. Heat delivery was optimized as each transducers mirrored back to targeted tissues the wave generated by the opposite transducer. Real-time treatment monitoring with an echo-based technique was also envisaged with this clamp. Therapy was periodically interrupted so one transducer could generate a pulse. The echo returning from the opposite transducer was treated. Coagulation necroses were obtained in vitro on substantial thicknesses (23-38mm) of pig liver over exposure durations ranging from 30s to 130s, and with acoustic intensities of less than 15W/cm2 per transducer. Both kidneys of two pigs were treated in vivo with the clamp (14.5W/cm2 for 90s), and the partial nephrectomies performed proved to be bloodless. In vitro and in vivo, wide transfixing lesions corresponded to an echo energy decrease superior to -10dB and parabolic form of the time of flight versus treatment time. In conclusion, this ultrasound clamp has proven to be an excellent mean for achieving monitored haemostasis in kidney.

  12. Inferring directed climatic interactions with renormalized partial directed coherence and directed partial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Sommerlade, Linda; Masoller, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Inferring interactions between processes promises deeper insight into mechanisms underlying network phenomena. Renormalised partial directed coherence is a frequency-domain representation of the concept of Granger causality, while directed partial correlation is an alternative approach for quantifying Granger causality in the time domain. Both methodologies have been successfully applied to neurophysiological signals for detecting directed relationships. This paper introduces their application to climatological time series. We first discuss the application to El Niño-Southern Oscillation—Monsoon interaction and then apply the methodologies to the more challenging air-sea interaction in the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). In the first case, the results obtained are fully consistent with the present knowledge in climate modeling, while in the second case, the results are, as expected, less clear, and to fully elucidate the SACZ air-sea interaction, further investigations on the specificity and sensitivity of these methodologies are needed.

  13. Partial polarization by quantum distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, Mayukh; Hochrainer, Armin; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Lemos, Gabriela Barreto; Zeilinger, Anton

    2017-03-01

    We establish that a connection exists between wave-particle duality of photons and partial polarization of a light beam. We perform a two-path lowest-order (single photon) interference experiment and demonstrate both theoretically and experimentally that the degree of polarization of the light beam emerging from an output of the interferometer depends on path distinguishability. In our experiment, we are able to change the quantum state of the emerging photon from a pure state to a fully mixed state without any direct interaction with the photon. Although most lowest-order interference experiments can be explained by classical theory, our experiment has no genuine classical analog. Our results show that a case exists where the cause of partial polarization is beyond the scope of classical theory.

  14. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    PubMed Central

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The dependence of the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. Here, we systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Further, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle. PMID:27072195

  15. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; ...

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquidmore » interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.« less

  16. Wettability of partially suspended graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Thomas, Vincent; Nuñez, Marc; Dujardin, Erik; Rahman, Atikur; Black, Charles T.; Checco, Antonio

    2016-04-13

    Dependence on the wettability of graphene on the nature of the underlying substrate remains only partially understood. We systematically investigate the role of liquid-substrate interactions on the wettability of graphene by varying the area fraction of suspended graphene from 0 to 95% by means of nanotextured substrates. We find that completely suspended graphene exhibits the highest water contact angle (85° ± 5°) compared to partially suspended or supported graphene, regardless of the hydrophobicity (hydrophilicity) of the substrate. Moreover, 80% of the long-range water-substrate interactions are screened by the graphene monolayer, the wettability of which is primarily determined by short-range graphene-liquid interactions. By its well-defined chemical and geometrical properties, supported graphene therefore provides a model system to elucidate the relative contribution of short and long range interactions to the macroscopic contact angle.

  17. Matching games with partial information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laureti, Paolo; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2003-06-01

    We analyze different ways of pairing agents in a bipartite matching problem, with regard to its scaling properties and to the distribution of individual “satisfactions”. Then we explore the role of partial information and bounded rationality in a generalized Marriage Problem, comparing the benefits obtained by self-searching and by a matchmaker. Finally we propose a modified matching game intended to mimic the way consumers’ information makes firms to enhance the quality of their products in a competitive market.

  18. Microflora of partially processed lettuce.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, J A; King, A D; Török, T

    1990-12-01

    Bacteria, yeasts, and molds isolated from partially processed iceberg lettuce were taxonomically classified. The majority of bacterial isolates were gram-negative rods. Pseudomonas, Erwinia, and Serratia species were commonly found. Yeasts most frequently isolated from lettuce included members of the genera Candida, Cryptococcus, Pichia, Torulaspora, and Trichosporon. Comparatively few molds were isolated; members of the genera Rhizopus, Cladosporium, Phoma, Aspergillus, and Penicillium were identified.

  19. The partial fission of fast spinning asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardivel, Simon; Sanchez, Paul; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2016-10-01

    The spin rates of asteroids systematically change over time due the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect. Above a certain spin rate that depends on the body's density, regions of an asteroid can enter in tension, with components held to the body by cohesive forces. When the body fails, deformation or fission can occur. Catastrophic fission leading to complete disruption has been directly observed in active asteroid P/2013 R3. Partial fission, the loss of only part of the body, has been proposed as a mechanism for the formation of binaries and is explored here.The equatorial cavities of (341843) 2008 EV5 and of (185851) 2000 DP107 (a binary system) are consistent with a localized partial fission of the body (LPSC 2016 #1036). The examination of the gravity field of these bodies reveals that a mass placed within these cavities could be shed. In this mechanism, the outward pull of inertial forces creates an average stress at the cavity interface of ≈1 Pa for 2008 EV5 and ≈3 Pa for 2000 DP107 at spin periods of ≈3.15 h for the assumed densities of 1.3 g/cm3.This work continues the study of this partial, localized fission. Specifically, it addresses the issue of the low cohesion necessary to the mechanism. These cohesion values are typically lower than global strength values inferred on other asteroids (10 - 200 Pa), meaning that partial fission may occur prior to larger-scale deformations. Yet, several processes can explain the discrepancy, as they can naturally segregate particles by size. For instance, landslides or granular convection (Brazil nut effect) could bring larger boulders to the equator of the body, while finer particles are left at higher latitudes or sink to the center. Conversely, failure of the interior could bring boulders to the surface. The peculiar profile shape of these asteroids, shared by many binaries (e.g. 1999 KW4, 1996 FG3) may also be a clue of this heterogeneity, as this "spin top" shape is obtained in simulations with

  20. Large Time Asymptotics for Partially Dissipative Hyperbolic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchard, Karine; Zuazua, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    This work is concerned with ( n-component) hyperbolic systems of balance laws in m space dimensions. First, we consider linear systems with constant coefficients and analyze the possible behavior of solutions as t → ∞. Using the Fourier transform, we examine the role that control theoretical tools, such as the classical Kalman rank condition, play. We build Lyapunov functionals allowing us to establish explicit decay rates depending on the frequency variable. In this way we extend the previous analysis by Shizuta and Kawashima under the so-called algebraic condition (SK). In particular, we show the existence of systems exhibiting more complex behavior than the one that the (SK) condition allows. We also discuss links between this analysis and previous literature in the context of damped wave equations, hypoellipticity and hypocoercivity. To conclude, we analyze the existence of global solutions around constant equilibria for nonlinear systems of balance laws. Our analysis of the linear case allows proving existence results in situations that the previously existing theory does not cover.

  1. Laparoscopic radical and partial cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, Ben J.; Rose, Kristen; Dasgupta, Prokar

    2005-01-01

    Radical cystectomy remains the standard treatment for muscle invasive organ confined bladder carcinoma. Laparoscopic radical cystoprostatectomy (LRC) is an advanced laparoscopic procedure that places significant demands on the patient and the surgeon alike. It is a prolonged procedure which includes several technical steps and requires highly developed laparoscopic skills including intra-corporeal suturing. Here we review the development of the technique, the indications, complications and outcomes. We also examine the potential benefits of robotic-assisted LRC and explore the indications and technique of laparoscopic partial cystectomy. PMID:21206662

  2. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: current perspectives and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Gagan; Benway, Brian M; Bhayani, Sam B; Zorn, Kevin C

    2009-10-01

    The widespread adoption of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has been curtailed by its technical complexity. With the introduction of robotic technology, there is a potential for a shorter learning curve for minimally invasive nephron-sparing surgery (NSS). Initial published data on robot-assisted partial nephrectomy show promising perioperative outcomes comparable to large LPN series performed by highly experienced laparoscopic surgeons. Intraoperative parameters (operating room time, warm ischemia time, and blood loss) and short-term oncologic results demonstrate that this technique, unlike LPN, has a relatively short learning curve. Economic factors, as well as the necessity of an experienced bedside assistant, present the potential shortcomings of the procedure.

  3. Partial pressure analysis in space testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilford, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    For vacuum-system or test-article analysis it is often desirable to know the species and partial pressures of the vacuum gases. Residual gas or Partial Pressure Analyzers (PPA's) are commonly used for this purpose. These are mass spectrometer-type instruments, most commonly employing quadrupole filters. These instruments can be extremely useful, but they should be used with caution. Depending on the instrument design, calibration procedures, and conditions of use, measurements made with these instruments can be accurate to within a few percent, or in error by two or more orders of magnitude. Significant sources of error can include relative gas sensitivities that differ from handbook values by an order of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with pressure by as much as two orders of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with time after exposure to chemically active gases, and the dependence of the sensitivity for one gas on the pressures of other gases. However, for most instruments, these errors can be greatly reduced with proper operating procedures and conditions of use. In this paper, data are presented illustrating performance characteristics for different instruments and gases, operating parameters are recommended to minimize some errors, and calibrations procedures are described that can detect and/or correct other errors.

  4. Partial accretion regime of accreting millisecond pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eksi, Kazim

    2016-07-01

    The inner parts of the disks around neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries may become geometrically thick due to inhibition of accretion at the disk mid-plane when the central object is rotating rapidly. In such a case matter inflowing through the disk may keep accreting onto the poles of the neutron star from the parts of the disk away from the disk mid-plane while the matter is propelled at the disk mid-plane. An important ingredient of the evolution of millisecond pulsars is then the fraction of the inflowing matter that can accrete onto the poles in the fast rotation regime depending on the fastness parameter. This ``soft'' propeller regime may be associated with the rapid decay stage observed in the light curves of several accreting millisecond pulsars. To date only a few studies considered the partial accretion regime. By using geometrical arguments we improve the existing studies and test the model by reproducing the lightcurves of millisecond X-ray pulsars via time dependent simulations of disk evolution. We also present analytical solutions that represent disks with partial accretion.

  5. Energetics and mechanics for partial gravity locomotion.

    PubMed

    Newman, D J; Alexander, H L; Webbon, B W

    1994-09-01

    The role of gravitational acceleration on human locomotion is not clearly understood. It is hypothesized that the mechanics and energetics of locomotion depend upon the prevailing gravity level. A unique human-rated underwater treadmill and an adjustable ballasting harness were used to stimulate partial gravity environments. This study has two research aspects, biomechanics and energetics. Vertical forces which are exerted by subjects on the treadmill-mounted, split-plate force platform show that peak vertical force and stride frequency significantly decrease (p < 0.05) as the gravity level is reduced, while ground contact time is independent of gravity level. A loping gait is employed over a wide range of speeds (approximately 1.5 m/s to approximately 2.3 m/s) suggesting a change in the mechanics for lunar (1/6 G) and Martian (3/8 G) locomotion. As theory predicts, locomotion energy requirements for partial gravity levels are significantly less than at 1 G (p < 0.05).

  6. Junction point on partially singular trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odia, Ameze; Bell, David J.

    2012-12-01

    In recent times, several works have been performed on the design of fuel optimal trajectories for space navigation. These works show the possibility of the existence of partially singular trajectories for systems that are linear analytic (Park et al. 2010). Linear analytic systems may show the existence of partially singular subarcs, and the point where these subarcs meet is called a junction point. Thus, knowledge about junction conditions became necessary when solving the optimal control problem for such systems. This led to the development of two 'theorems' on junction conditions, given by McDanell and Powers (McDanell, J.P. and Powers W.F. (1971), 'Necessary Conditions for Joining Optimal Singular and Nonsingular Sub Arcs', SIAM Journal of Control, 9, 161-173). However, the second 'theorem', which is now known as a conjecture, could not satisfy all classes of linear analytic system. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect and correct the errors in the derivation of the McDanell and Powers conjecture. The error in their derivations was corrected and then tested on two newly mathematically constructed systems. The results of these tests were found to be satisfactory. This implies that by making the necessary corrections, the conjecture can still be useful in generating a general theorem for all classes of systems.

  7. Modeling Partial Attacks with Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Amerson; Bond, Mike; Clulow, Jolyon

    The automated and formal analysis of cryptographic primitives, security protocols and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) up to date has been focused on discovering attacks that completely break the security of a system. However, there are attacks that do not immediately break a system but weaken the security sufficiently for the adversary. We term these attacks partial attacks and present the first methodology for the modeling and automated analysis of this genre of attacks by describing two approaches. The first approach reasons about entropy and was used to simulate and verify an attack on the ECB|ECB|OFB triple-mode DES block-cipher. The second approach reasons about possibility sets and was used to simulate and verify an attack on the personal identification number (PIN) derivation algorithm used in the IBM 4758 Common Cryptographic Architecture.

  8. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  9. Simplified partial digest problem: enumerative and dynamic programming algorithms.

    PubMed

    Blazewicz, Jacek; Burke, Edmund; Kasprzak, Marta; Kovalev, Alexandr; Kovalyov, Mikhail

    2007-01-01

    We study the Simplified Partial Digest Problem (SPDP), which is a mathematical model for a new simplified partial digest method of genome mapping. This method is easy for laboratory implementation and robust with respect to the experimental errors. SPDP is NP-hard in the strong sense. We present an $O(n2;n)$ time enumerative algorithm and an O(n(2q)) time dynamic programming algorithm for the error-free SPDP, where $n$ is the number of restriction sites and n is the number of distinct intersite distances. We also give examples of the problem, in which there are 2(n+2)/(3)-1 non-congruent solutions. These examples partially answer a question recently posed in the literature about the number of solutions of SPDP. We adapt our enumerative algorithm for handling SPDP with imprecise input data. Finally, we describe and discuss the results of the computer experiments with our algorithms.

  10. Partial Synchronization of Interconnected Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Lu, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the partial synchronization problem for the interconnected Boolean networks (BNs) via the semi-tensor product (STP) of matrices. First, based on an algebraic state space representation of BNs, a necessary and sufficient criterion is presented to ensure the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs. Second, by defining an induced digraph of the partial synchronized states set, an equivalent graphical description for the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs is established. Consequently, the second partial synchronization criterion is derived in terms of adjacency matrix of the induced digraph. Finally, two examples (including an epigenetic model) are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  11. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    SciTech Connect

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  12. A partial pelvis of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Kibii, Job M; Churchill, Steven E; Schmid, Peter; Carlson, Kristian J; Reed, Nichelle D; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Berger, Lee R

    2011-09-09

    The fossil record of the hominin pelvis reflects important evolutionary changes in locomotion and parturition. The partial pelves of two individuals of Australopithecus sediba were reconstructed from previously reported finds and new material. These remains share some features with australopiths, such as large biacetabular diameter, small sacral and coxal joints, and long pubic rami. The specimens also share derived features with Homo, including more vertically oriented and sigmoid-shaped iliac blades, greater robusticity of the iliac body, sinusoidal anterior iliac borders, shortened ischia, and more superiorly oriented pubic rami. These derived features appear in a species with a small adult brain size, suggesting that the birthing of larger-brained babies was not driving the evolution of the pelvis at this time.

  13. 77 FR 61724 - Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans for Florida...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans for... partially disapprove revisions to the State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for Florida, Mississippi, and South... address the 2006 PM 2.5 NAAQS or any requirements related to that NAAQS. Today's partial disapproval...

  14. 76 FR 4601 - Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 RIN 2060-AQ66 Determinations Concerning Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval, and Federal Implementation Plan Regarding Texas Prevention of Significant... Determination Concerning the Need for Error Correction, Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval, and...

  15. Energy conservation by partial recirculation of peanut drying air

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    Conventional, recirculating, and intermittent type peanut dryers were compared in a three-year study. Comparisons indicate that partial recirculation of peanut drying air may reduce energy consumption per unit of water removed by approximately 25% while also reducing required drying time and maintaining high quality.

  16. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Jorand, R.; Nordlund, C.; Klitzsch, N.

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. Estimations of these properties are based on the direct link of the initial NMR signal amplitude to porosity (water content) and of the NMR relaxation time to pore size. Herein, pore shapes are usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks may differ strongly from the responses calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes do not account for water menisci remaining in the corners of desaturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of desaturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, the NMR amplitudes and NMR relaxation times at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape, i.e., arising from the capillary pressure and pore shape-dependent water distribution in desaturated pores with triangular cross sections. Even so, the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface-to-volume ratio of the pore. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation-dependent relaxation-time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  17. Current status of robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Komninos, Christos; Tuliao, Patrick; Rha, Koon Ho

    2014-10-01

    Robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy is increasingly carried out in an attempt to improve the cosmetic outcome of minimally-invasive procedures. However, the actual role of this novel technique remains to be determined. The present article reviews evidence and examines updates of robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy outcomes reported in more contemporary studies. A comprehensive online systematic search of PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses criteria recommendations was carried out in January 2014, identifying data from 2008 to 2014 regarding robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy. The majority of medical evidence to date is based on case reports or retrospective studies. Current studies show that robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy is a feasible procedure carried out in an acceptable length of operative time, and resulting in a desirable cosmetic outcome and less postoperative pain. However, comparable studies show that robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy is inferior to the conventional approach, especially with regard to warm ischemia time. Furthermore, the numerous limitations that exist with the utilization of the current commercial single-site devices make robotic laparoendoscopic single-site PN more challenging and more complicated for surgeons compared with conventional procedures. Further significant improvements, along with more studies, are required in order to develop the ideal robotic laparoendoscopic single-site robotic platform and overcome the current limitations. For the time being, robotic laparoendoscopic single-site partial nephrectomy procedures could be applicable in patients with low tumor size and complexity, and should not be routinely applied in all cases.

  18. Channeled partial Mueller matrix polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alenin, Andrey S.; Tyo, J. S.

    2015-09-01

    In prior work,1,2 we introduced methods to treat channeled systems in a way that is similar to Data Reduction Method (DRM), by focusing attention on the Fourier content of the measurement conditions. Introduction of Q enabled us to more readily extract the performance of the system and thereby optimize it to obtain reconstruction with the least noise. The analysis tools developed for that exercise can be expanded to be applicable to partial Mueller Matrix Polarimeters (pMMPs), which were a topic of prior discussion as well. In this treatment, we combine the principles involved in both of those research trajectories and identify a set of channeled pMMP families. As a result, the measurement structure of such systems is completely known and the design of a channeled pMMP intended for any given task becomes a search over a finite set of possibilities, with the additional channel rotation allowing for a more desirable Mueller element mixing.

  19. Theory of spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Vahimaa, Pasi; Tervo, Jani

    2005-08-01

    A coherent-mode representation for spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses is derived both in the space-frequency domain and in the space-time domain. It is shown that both the cross-spectral density and the mutual coherence function of partially coherent pulses can be expressed as a sum of spatially and spectrally and temporally completely coherent modes. The concept of the effective degree of coherence for nonstationary fields is introduced. As an application of the theory, the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulsed beams in the space-frequency domain is considered and their coherent-mode representation is presented.

  20. Area estimation using multiyear designs and partial crop identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sielken, R. L., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Statistical procedures were developed for large area assessments using both satellite and conventional data. Crop acreages, other ground cover indices, and measures of change were the principal characteristics of interest. These characteristics are capable of being estimated from samples collected possibly from several sources at varying times, with different levels of identification. Multiyear analysis techniques were extended to include partially identified samples; the best current year sampling design corresponding to a given sampling history was determined; weights reflecting the precision or confidence in each observation were identified and utilized, and the variation in estimates incorporating partially identified samples were quantified.

  1. Understanding NMR relaxometry of partially water-saturated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohnke, O.; Nordlund, C.; Jorand, R.; Klitzsch, N.

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) relaxometry measurements are commonly used to characterize the storage and transport properties of water-saturated rocks. These assessments are based on the proportionality of NMR signal amplitude and relaxation time to porosity (water content) and pore size, respectively. The relationship between pore size and NMR relaxation time depends on pore shape, which is usually assumed to be spherical or cylindrical. However, the NMR response at partial water saturation for natural sediments and rocks differs strongly from the response calculated for spherical or cylindrical pores, because these pore shapes cannot account for water menisci remaining in the corners of de-saturated angular pores. Therefore, we consider a bundle of pores with triangular cross-sections. We introduce analytical solutions of the NMR equations at partial saturation of these pores, which account for water menisci of de-saturated pores. After developing equations that describe the water distribution inside the pores, we calculate the NMR response at partial saturation for imbibition and drainage based on the deduced water distributions. For this pore model, NMR amplitude and NMR relaxation time at partial water saturation strongly depend on pore shape even so the NMR relaxation time at full saturation only depends on the surface to volume ratio of the pore. The pore-shape-dependence at partial saturation arises from the pore shape and capillary pressure dependent water distribution in pores with triangular cross-sections. Moreover, we show the qualitative agreement of the saturation dependent relaxation time distributions of our model with those observed for rocks and soils.

  2. Partially Blind Signatures Based on Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Niu, Hui-Fang

    2012-12-01

    In a partially blind signature scheme, the signer explicitly includes pre-agreed common information in the blind signature, which can improve the availability and performance. We present a new partially blind signature scheme based on fundamental properties of quantum mechanics. In addition, we analyze the security of this scheme, and show it is not possible to forge valid partially blind signatures. Moreover, the comparisons between this scheme and those based on public-key cryptography are also discussed.

  3. 20% PARTIAL SIBERIAN SNAKE IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H; Bai, M; Brown, K A; Glenn, W; Luccio, A U; Mackay, W W; Montag, C; Ptitsyn, V; Roser, T; Tsoupas, N; Zeno, K; Ranjbar, V; Spinka, H; Underwood, D

    2002-11-06

    An 11.4% partial Siberian snake was used to successfully accelerate polarized proton through a strong intrinsic depolarizing spin resonance in the AGS. No noticeable depolarization was observed. This opens up the possibility of using a 20% to 30% partial Siberian snake in the AGS to overcome all weak and strong depolarizing spin resonances. Some design and operation issues of the new partial Siberian snake are discussed.

  4. Quantum states with strong positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Jurkowski, Jacek; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2008-02-15

    We construct a large class of bipartite M x N quantum states which defines a proper subset of states with positive partial transposes (PPTs). Any state from this class has PPT but the positivity of its partial transposition is recognized with respect to canonical factorization of the original density operator. We propose to call elements from this class states with strong positive partial transposes (SPPTs). We conjecture that all SPPT states are separable.

  5. Study of phase retrieval algorithm from partially coherent light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liu; Hong, Cheng; Wei, Sui; Wei, Zhang

    2014-11-01

    The goal of phase retrieval is to recover the phase information from intensity distribution which is an important topic in optics and image processing. The algorithm based on the transport of intensity equation only need to measure the spatial intensity of the center plane and adjacent light field plane, and reconstruct the phase object by solving second order differential equations. The algorithm is derived in the coherent light field. And the partially coherent light field is described more complex. The field at any point in the space experiences statistical fluctuations over time. Therefore, traditional TIE algorithms cannot be applied in calculating the phase of partially coherent light field. In this thesis, the phase retrieval algorithm is proposed for partially coherent light field. First, the description and propagation equation of partially coherent light field is established. Then, the phase is retrieved by TIE Fourier transform. Experimental results with simulated uniform and non-uniform illumination demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in phase retrieval for partially coherent light field.

  6. Partial squeeze film levitation modulates fingertip friction.

    PubMed

    Wiertlewski, Michaël; Fenton Friesen, Rebecca; Colgate, J Edward

    2016-08-16

    When touched, a glass plate excited with ultrasonic transverse waves feels notably more slippery than it does at rest. To study this phenomenon, we use frustrated total internal reflection to image the asperities of the skin that are in intimate contact with a glass plate. We observed that the load at the interface is shared between the elastic compression of the asperities of the skin and a squeeze film of air. Stroboscopic investigation reveals that the time evolution of the interfacial gap is partially out of phase with the plate vibration. Taken together, these results suggest that the skin bounces against the vibrating plate but that the bounces are cushioned by a squeeze film of air that does not have time to escape the interfacial separation. This behavior results in dynamic levitation, in which the average number of asperities in intimate contact is reduced, thereby reducing friction. This improved understanding of the physics of friction reduction provides key guidelines for designing interfaces that can dynamically modulate friction with soft materials and biological tissues, such as human fingertips.

  7. Partial squeeze film levitation modulates fingertip friction

    PubMed Central

    Wiertlewski, Michaël; Fenton Friesen, Rebecca; Colgate, J. Edward

    2016-01-01

    When touched, a glass plate excited with ultrasonic transverse waves feels notably more slippery than it does at rest. To study this phenomenon, we use frustrated total internal reflection to image the asperities of the skin that are in intimate contact with a glass plate. We observed that the load at the interface is shared between the elastic compression of the asperities of the skin and a squeeze film of air. Stroboscopic investigation reveals that the time evolution of the interfacial gap is partially out of phase with the plate vibration. Taken together, these results suggest that the skin bounces against the vibrating plate but that the bounces are cushioned by a squeeze film of air that does not have time to escape the interfacial separation. This behavior results in dynamic levitation, in which the average number of asperities in intimate contact is reduced, thereby reducing friction. This improved understanding of the physics of friction reduction provides key guidelines for designing interfaces that can dynamically modulate friction with soft materials and biological tissues, such as human fingertips. PMID:27482117

  8. Distinguishing between direct and indirect directional couplings in large oscillator networks: Partial or non-partial phase analyses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rings, Thorsten; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the relative merit of phase-based methods for inferring directional couplings in complex networks of weakly interacting dynamical systems from multivariate time-series data. We compare the evolution map approach and its partialized extension to each other with respect to their ability to correctly infer the network topology in the presence of indirect directional couplings for various simulated experimental situations using coupled model systems. In addition, we investigate whether the partialized approach allows for additional or complementary indications of directional interactions in evolving epileptic brain networks using intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from an epilepsy patient. For such networks, both direct and indirect directional couplings can be expected, given the brain's connection structure and effects that may arise from limitations inherent to the recording technique. Our findings indicate that particularly in larger networks (number of nodes ≫10 ), the partialized approach does not provide information about directional couplings extending the information gained with the evolution map approach.

  9. Distinguishing between direct and indirect directional couplings in large oscillator networks: Partial or non-partial phase analyses?

    PubMed

    Rings, Thorsten; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the relative merit of phase-based methods for inferring directional couplings in complex networks of weakly interacting dynamical systems from multivariate time-series data. We compare the evolution map approach and its partialized extension to each other with respect to their ability to correctly infer the network topology in the presence of indirect directional couplings for various simulated experimental situations using coupled model systems. In addition, we investigate whether the partialized approach allows for additional or complementary indications of directional interactions in evolving epileptic brain networks using intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from an epilepsy patient. For such networks, both direct and indirect directional couplings can be expected, given the brain's connection structure and effects that may arise from limitations inherent to the recording technique. Our findings indicate that particularly in larger networks (number of nodes ≫10), the partialized approach does not provide information about directional couplings extending the information gained with the evolution map approach.

  10. Hippocampal body changes in pure partial onset sleep and pure partial onset waking epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Mahmood; Zandieh, Ali; Hajimirzabeigi, Alireza; Tahsini, Majid; Vakhshiteh, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Elham

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate for the first time the hippocampal changes in patients with pure sleep and pure waking epilepsy. A total of 35 patients with pure partial onset sleep epilepsy and 35 patients with pure partial onset waking epilepsy matched for age and sex ratio were enrolled. MR images were analyzed to determine hippocampal body changes. Rounding ratio of hippocampal body was defined as short axis divided by long axis and hippocampal bodies with ratios ≥ 0.70 were considered rounded. Hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy were found in nine (25.7 %) and seven (20.0 %) patients with pure sleep epilepsy, and in 12 (34.3 %) and 11 (31.4 %) patients with pure waking epilepsy, respectively (P > 0.05 for the comparison between sleep and waking epilepsy). However, proportion of subjects with rounded hippocampal bodies (15, 42.9 % vs. 3, 8.6 % for patients with sleep and waking epilepsy, respectively) and rounding ratios of both left and right hippocampal bodies (0.66 ± 0.13 and 0.61 ± 0.12, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in sleep epileptic patients vs. 0.57 ± 0.11 and 0.55 ± 0.11, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in waking epileptic patients) were increased in patients with sleep epilepsy (P < 0.05). Further, in sleep epileptic patients with left sided hippocampal body rounding, epileptiform discharges were more readily lateralized to the left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy are not different between pure partial onset sleep and waking epileptic patients. However, rounding ratio and frequency of hippocampal body rounding are increased in sleep epileptic patients.

  11. Generalized partial dynamical symmetry in nuclei.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, A; Isacker, P Van

    2002-11-25

    We introduce the notion of a generalized partial dynamical-symmetry for which part of the eigenstates have part of the dynamical symmetry. This general concept is illustrated with the example of Hamiltonians with a partial dynamical O(6) symmetry in the framework of the interacting boson model. The resulting spectrum and electromagnetic transitions are compared with empirical data in 162Dy.

  12. Partial dynamical symmetry in a fermion system

    PubMed

    Escher; Leviatan

    2000-02-28

    The relevance of the partial dynamical symmetry concept for an interacting fermion system is demonstrated. Hamiltonians with partial SU(3) symmetry are presented in the framework of the symplectic shell model of nuclei and shown to be closely related to the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction. Implications are discussed for the deformed light nucleus 20Ne.

  13. 47 CFR 5.69 - Partial grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Partial grants. 5.69 Section 5.69...) Applications and Licenses § 5.69 Partial grants. In cases in which the Commission grants an application in part... interference that may result to a station if designated application or applications are subsequently...

  14. 49 CFR 234.106 - Partial activation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partial activation. 234.106 Section 234.106..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY AND STATE ACTION PLANS Response to Reports of Warning System Malfunction § 234.106 Partial activation. Upon receipt of a credible report of...

  15. [Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy: technique and outcomes].

    PubMed

    Colombo, J R; Gill, I S

    2006-05-01

    The indication of laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) has evolved considerably, and the technique is approaching established status at our institution. Over the past 5 years, the senior author has performed more than 450 laparoscopic partial nephrectomies at the Cleveland Clinic. Herein we present our current technique, review contemporary data and oncological outcomes of LPN.

  16. [Voice function in patients after partial laryngectomy].

    PubMed

    Kosztyła-Hojna, B; Chodynicki, S; Lazarczyk, B; Tupalska, M; Mikiel, W

    1998-01-01

    103 patients with cancer of the larynx treated with partial laryngectomy were presented. Voice quality before and after surgery was compared. Voice was analysed by subjective and objective-spectrographic methods. Partial laryngectomies consisted of: vertical, horizontal and supraglottic subtotal procedures. The least dysphony was found in horizontal laryngectomy, the biggest--in supraglottic subtotal laryngectomy.

  17. Nested hierarchical controller with partial autonomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meystel, A.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of computer architecture for intelligent robots with partial autonomy is addressed. A robot with partial autonomy is considered a degenerated case of a fully autonomous robot. Thus, the problem of man-machine communication is formulated, and the conditions are determined for generating a language for such a communication. The duties of the master are determined.

  18. 47 CFR 5.69 - Partial grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Partial grants. 5.69 Section 5.69...) Applications and Licenses § 5.69 Partial grants. In cases in which the Commission grants an application in part... interference that may result to a station if designated application or applications are subsequently...

  19. Fractional-time quantum dynamics.

    PubMed

    Iomin, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Application of the fractional calculus to quantum processes is presented. In particular, the quantum dynamics is considered in the framework of the fractional time Schrödinger equation (SE), which differs from the standard SE by the fractional time derivative: partial differential/partial differentialt --> partial differential(alpha)/partial differentialt(alpha). It is shown that for alpha=1/2 the fractional SE is isospectral to a comb model. An analytical expression for the Green's functions of the systems are obtained. The semiclassical limit is discussed.

  20. Mechanism of partial agonism in AMPA-type glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Hector; Eibl, Clarissa; Chebli, Miriam; Plested, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Neurotransmitters trigger synaptic currents by activating ligand-gated ion channel receptors. Whereas most neurotransmitters are efficacious agonists, molecules that activate receptors more weakly—partial agonists—also exist. Whether these partial agonists have weak activity because they stabilize less active forms, sustain active states for a lesser fraction of the time or both, remains an open question. Here we describe the crystal structure of an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR) ligand binding domain (LBD) tetramer in complex with the partial agonist 5-fluorowillardiine (FW). We validate this structure, and others of different geometry, using engineered intersubunit bridges. We establish an inverse relation between the efficacy of an agonist and its promiscuity to drive the LBD layer into different conformations. These results suggest that partial agonists of the AMPAR are weak activators of the receptor because they stabilize multiple non-conducting conformations, indicating that agonism is a function of both the space and time domains. PMID:28211453

  1. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  2. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  3. 77 FR 43018 - Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans for Florida...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans for... partially disapprove revisions to the State Implementation Plans (SIPs) for Florida, Mississippi, and South... enforcement'' of such NAAQS. Section 110(a)(2) includes a list of specific elements that `` ach such...

  4. Partially Observed Mixtures of IRT Models: An Extension of the Generalized Partial-Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Davier, Matthias; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2004-01-01

    The generalized partial-credit model (GPCM) is used frequently in educational testing and in large-scale assessments for analyzing polytomous data. Special cases of the generalized partial-credit model are the partial-credit model--or Rasch model for ordinal data--and the two parameter logistic (2PL) model. This article extends the GPCM to the…

  5. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-06-10

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate.

  6. Precise Point Positioning with Partial Ambiguity Fixing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pan; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Reliable and rapid ambiguity resolution (AR) is the key to fast precise point positioning (PPP). We propose a modified partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) method, in which an elevation and standard deviation criterion are first used to remove the low-precision ambiguity estimates for AR. Subsequently the success rate and ratio-test are simultaneously used in an iterative process to increase the possibility of finding a subset of decorrelated ambiguities which can be fixed with high confidence. One can apply the proposed PAR method to try to achieve an ambiguity-fixed solution when full ambiguity resolution (FAR) fails. We validate this method using data from 450 stations during DOY 021 to 027, 2012. Results demonstrate the proposed PAR method can significantly shorten the time to first fix (TTFF) and increase the fixing rate. Compared with FAR, the average TTFF for PAR is reduced by 14.9% for static PPP and 15.1% for kinematic PPP. Besides, using the PAR method, the average fixing rate can be increased from 83.5% to 98.2% for static PPP, from 80.1% to 95.2% for kinematic PPP respectively. Kinematic PPP accuracy with PAR can also be significantly improved, compared to that with FAR, due to a higher fixing rate. PMID:26067196

  7. Modification of integrated partial payload lifting assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groah, Melodie; Haddock, Michael; Woodworth, Warren

    1986-01-01

    The Integrated Partial Payload Lifting Assembly (IPPLA) is currently used to transport and load experimental payloads into the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle. It is unable to carry the astronaut/passenger tunnel without a structural modification. The purpose of this design is to create a removalbe modification that will allow the IPPLA to lift and carry the passenger tunnel. Modifications evaluated were full-length insert beams which would extend through the existing strongback arms. These beam proposals were eliminated because of high cost and weight. Other proposals evaluated were attachments of cantilever beams to the existing strongback areas. The cantilever proposals reduced cost and weight compared to the full-length modifications. A third method evaluated was to simply make modifications to one side of the IPPLA therefore reducing the materials of the cantilever proposals by 40 percent. The design of the modification selected was completed with two channel beams jointly welded to a centered steel plate. The extension arm modification is inserted into the existing strongback channel beams and bolted into place. Two extension arms are added to one side of the IPPLA to provide the extra length needed to accommodate the passenger tunnel. The center counterbalance will then be offset about 20 inches to center gravity and therefore maintain horizontal status. The extension arm modification was selected because of minimum cost, low weight, and minimal installation time.

  8. Robust PCA With Partial Subspace Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jinchun; Vaswani, Namrata

    2015-07-01

    In recent work, robust Principal Components Analysis (PCA) has been posed as a problem of recovering a low-rank matrix $\\mathbf{L}$ and a sparse matrix $\\mathbf{S}$ from their sum, $\\mathbf{M}:= \\mathbf{L} + \\mathbf{S}$ and a provably exact convex optimization solution called PCP has been proposed. This work studies the following problem. Suppose that we have partial knowledge about the column space of the low rank matrix $\\mathbf{L}$. Can we use this information to improve the PCP solution, i.e. allow recovery under weaker assumptions? We propose here a simple but useful modification of the PCP idea, called modified-PCP, that allows us to use this knowledge. We derive its correctness result which shows that, when the available subspace knowledge is accurate, modified-PCP indeed requires significantly weaker incoherence assumptions than PCP. Extensive simulations are also used to illustrate this. Comparisons with PCP and other existing work are shown for a stylized real application as well. Finally, we explain how this problem naturally occurs in many applications involving time series data, i.e. in what is called the online or recursive robust PCA problem. A corollary for this case is also given.

  9. Characterization of partially coherent ultrashort XUV pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, Charles; Couprie, Marie-Emmanuelle

    2015-05-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, i.e. that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. As an example, the lack of longitudinal coherence, that is shot-to-shot fluctuations, of Free-Electron Lasers (FEL) has prevented so far their full amplitude and phase temporal characterization. To sort out this issue, we have adapted Frequency-Resolved Optical Gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, to enable the measurement of partially coherent XUV pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. Especially, this technique allows one to overcome the sources of decoherence that normally prevent a pulse measurement, such as the spectrometer resolution or the presence of XUV/laser arrival time jitter.

  10. Partiality and distributive justice in African bioethics.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Christopher Simon

    2017-04-01

    African ethical theories tend to hold that moral agents ought to be partial, in the sense that they should favour members of their family or close community. This is considered an advantage over the impartiality of many Western moral theories, which are regarded as having counterintuitive implications, such as the idea that it is unethical to save a family member before a stranger. The partiality of African ethics is thought to be particularly valuable in the context of bioethics. Thaddeus Metz, in particular, argues that his African-derived theory best accounts for a number of plausible intuitions, such as the intuition that health care practitioners ought to be biased towards the patients for whom they are directly responsible. In this article, I claim that the plausible intuitions drawn on in favour of partiality can be satisfactorily explained on the basis of impartial moral theories. Moreover, I argue that blanket acceptance of partiality has problematic consequences for distributive justice in resource allocation in biomedical contexts. By contrast, impartial theories can justify plausible instances of partiality whilst avoiding the pitfalls of fully partial moral theories. Although this provides grounds for abandoning partiality in principle, I claim that this finding should not be seen as damaging to African medical ethics. Instead, it prompts investigation of underexplored possibilities of impartial African moral theories. To demonstrate the value of this direction, I sketch some novel and attractive conceptions that combine impartiality with elements of African ethics.

  11. Partially decentralized control for ALSTOM gasifier.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen; Lou, Guannan; Liang, Luping

    2011-07-01

    The gasifier plays a key role in the operation of the whole IGCC power plant. It is a typical multivariable control system with strict constraints on the inputs and outputs which makes it very difficult to control. This paper presents a partially decentralized controller design method based on the stabilizer idea. The method only requires identifying some closed-loop transfer functions and solving an H(∞) optimization problem. The final partially decentralized controller is easy to implement and test in practice. Two partially decentralized controllers are designed for the ALSTOM gasifier benchmark problem, and simulation results show that they both meet the design specifications.

  12. Complex partial status epilepticus: a recurrent problem.

    PubMed Central

    Cockerell, O C; Walker, M C; Sander, J W; Shorvon, S D

    1994-01-01

    Twenty patients with complex partial status epilepticus were identified retrospectively from a specialist neurology hospital. Seventeen patients experienced recurrent episodes of complex partial status epilepticus, often occurring at regular intervals, usually over many years, and while being treated with effective anti-epileptic drugs. No unifying cause for the recurrences, and no common epilepsy aetiologies, were identified. In spite of the frequency of recurrence and length of history, none of the patients showed any marked evidence of cognitive or neurological deterioration. Complex partial status epilepticus is more common than is generally recognised, should be differentiated from other forms of non-convulsive status, and is often difficult to treat. PMID:8021671

  13. Fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Naoto; Sagawa, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    We establish a generalization of the fluctuation theorem for partially masked nonequilibrium dynamics. We introduce a partial entropy production with a subset of all possible transitions, and show that the partial entropy production satisfies the integral fluctuation theorem. Our result reveals the fundamental properties of a broad class of autonomous as well as nonautonomous nanomachines. In particular, our result gives a unified fluctuation theorem for both autonomous and nonautonomous Maxwell's demons, where mutual information plays a crucial role. Furthermore, we derive a fluctuation-dissipation theorem that relates nonequilibrium stationary current to two kinds of equilibrium fluctuations.

  14. Circulant states with positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-09-15

    We construct a large class of quantum dxd states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure - that is why we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. This class contains many well-known examples of PPT states from the literature and gives rise to a huge family of completely new states.

  15. Effect of partial absorption on diffusion with resetting.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Justin; Evans, Martin R; Majumdar, Satya N

    2013-02-01

    The effect of partial absorption on a diffusive particle which stochastically resets its position with a finite rate r is considered. The particle is absorbed by a target at the origin with absorption "velocity" a; as the velocity a approaches ∞ the absorption property of the target approaches that of a perfectly absorbing target. The effect of partial absorption on first-passage time problems is studied, in particular, it is shown that the mean time to absorption (MTA) is increased by an additive term proportional to 1/a. The results are extended to multiparticle systems where independent searchers, initially uniformly distributed with a given density, look for a single immobile target. It is found that the average survival probability P(av) is modified by a multiplicative factor which is a function of 1/a, whereas the decay rate of the typical survival probability P(typ) is decreased by an additive term proportional to 1/a.

  16. Effect of partial absorption on diffusion with resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, Justin; Evans, Martin R.; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2013-02-01

    The effect of partial absorption on a diffusive particle which stochastically resets its position with a finite rate r is considered. The particle is absorbed by a target at the origin with absorption “velocity” a; as the velocity a approaches ∞ the absorption property of the target approaches that of a perfectly absorbing target. The effect of partial absorption on first-passage time problems is studied, in particular, it is shown that the mean time to absorption (MTA) is increased by an additive term proportional to 1/a. The results are extended to multiparticle systems where independent searchers, initially uniformly distributed with a given density, look for a single immobile target. It is found that the average survival probability Pav is modified by a multiplicative factor which is a function of 1/a, whereas the decay rate of the typical survival probability Ptyp is decreased by an additive term proportional to 1/a.

  17. Where did you go wrong? Errors, partial errors, and the nature of human information processing.

    PubMed

    Coles, M G; Scheffers, M K; Fournier, L

    1995-11-01

    Human performance is seldom perfect, and even when an overt response is correct it may be accompanied by partial-error activity that does not achieve the level of a complete incorrect response. Partial errors can be detected in measures of the lateralized readiness potential, of the electromyogram, and of response force. Correct responses accompanied by partial errors tend to have slower reaction times than "clean" correct responses (because of response competition), and condition differences in reaction time can, on some occasions, be explained in terms of differences in the incidence of partial errors. In two-choice reaction time tasks, partial errors are more frequent when the imperative stimulus contains information that favors both responses, than when it contains information that favors only one response. The non-random nature of partial errors supports the inference that partial information about the stimulus is used to guide responses. A similar inference is supported by the observation that, in hybrid choice Go/No-go tasks, the kinds of partial errors that follow a No-go stimulus represent activation of the response that would have been correct had the stimulus been a Go stimulus. Finally, we note that the human processing system is capable of monitoring its own behavior and of initiating remedial actions if necessary. The activity of an error-detection system, as revealed by measures of the error-related negativity, is related to the degree to which responses are slowed after errors.

  18. ML Partial Evaluation Using Set-Based Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Copenhagen, May 15-18, 1990. 7 [51 Charles Consel . Binding time analysis for higher order untyped functional languages. In Mitchell Wand, editor...Proceedings of the 1990 ACM Confer- ence on Lisp and Functional Programming, pages 264-272, Nice, Friace, June 1990. ACM Press. [61 Charles Consel . A tour of...Schism: A partial evaluation system for higher- order applicative languages. In Schmidt [ 171, pages 145-154. [71 Charles Consel and Olivier Danvy

  19. Exp-function method for solving fractional partial differential equations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Bin

    2013-01-01

    We extend the Exp-function method to fractional partial differential equations in the sense of modified Riemann-Liouville derivative based on nonlinear fractional complex transformation. For illustrating the validity of this method, we apply it to the space-time fractional Fokas equation and the nonlinear fractional Sharma-Tasso-Olver (STO) equation. As a result, some new exact solutions for them are successfully established.

  20. Fabrication of interim acrylic resin removable partial dentures with clasps.

    PubMed

    Reitz, P V; Weiner, M G

    1978-12-01

    An orderly sequence of steps for construction of an interim acrylic resin partial denture has been presented. The technique allows the dentist to fabricate an effective restoration that has a definite path of insertion and removal that can be placed in the patient's mouth with little time spent on adjustment and correction. This technique may be used with heat- or cold-curing acrylic resin.

  1. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Vein Oxygenation Using Partial Volume Correction.

    PubMed

    Ward, Phillip G D; Fan, Audrey P; Raniga, Parnesh; Barnes, David G; Dowe, David L; Ng, Amanda C L; Egan, Gary F

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) enables cerebral venous characterization and physiological measurements, such as oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The exquisite sensitivity of QSM to deoxygenated blood makes it possible to image small veins; however partial volume effects must be addressed for accurate quantification. We present a new method, Iterative Cylindrical Fitting (ICF), to estimate voxel-based partial volume effects for susceptibility maps and use it to improve OEF quantification of small veins with diameters between 1.5 and 4 voxels. Materials and Methods: Simulated QSM maps were generated to assess the performance of the ICF method over a range of vein geometries with varying echo times and noise levels. The ICF method was also applied to in vivo human brain data to assess the feasibility and behavior of OEF measurements compared to the maximum intensity voxel (MIV) method. Results: Improved quantification of OEF measurements was achieved for vessels with contrast to noise greater than 3.0 and vein radii greater than 0.75 voxels. The ICF method produced improved quantitative accuracy of OEF measurement compared to the MIV approach (mean OEF error 7.7 vs. 12.4%). The ICF method provided estimates of vein radius (mean error <27%) and partial volume maps (root mean-squared error <13%). In vivo results demonstrated consistent estimates of OEF along vein segments. Conclusion: OEF quantification in small veins (1.5-4 voxels in diameter) had lower error when using partial volume estimates from the ICF method.

  2. Design of partially supervised classifiers for multispectral image data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeon, Byeungwoo; Landgrebe, David

    1993-01-01

    A partially supervised classification problem is addressed, especially when the class definition and corresponding training samples are provided a priori only for just one particular class. In practical applications of pattern classification techniques, a frequently observed characteristic is the heavy, often nearly impossible requirements on representative prior statistical class characteristics of all classes in a given data set. Considering the effort in both time and man-power required to have a well-defined, exhaustive list of classes with a corresponding representative set of training samples, this 'partially' supervised capability would be very desirable, assuming adequate classifier performance can be obtained. Two different classification algorithms are developed to achieve simplicity in classifier design by reducing the requirement of prior statistical information without sacrificing significant classifying capability. The first one is based on optimal significance testing, where the optimal acceptance probability is estimated directly from the data set. In the second approach, the partially supervised classification is considered as a problem of unsupervised clustering with initially one known cluster or class. A weighted unsupervised clustering procedure is developed to automatically define other classes and estimate their class statistics. The operational simplicity thus realized should make these partially supervised classification schemes very viable tools in pattern classification.

  3. Evaluation of analytical performance based on partial order methodology.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars; Bruggemann, Rainer; Kenessova, Olga; Erzhigitov, Erkin

    2015-01-01

    Classical measurements of performances are typically based on linear scales. However, in analytical chemistry a simple scale may be not sufficient to analyze the analytical performance appropriately. Here partial order methodology can be helpful. Within the context described here, partial order analysis can be seen as an ordinal analysis of data matrices, especially to simplify the relative comparisons of objects due to their data profile (the ordered set of values an object have). Hence, partial order methodology offers a unique possibility to evaluate analytical performance. In the present data as, e.g., provided by the laboratories through interlaboratory comparisons or proficiency testings is used as an illustrative example. However, the presented scheme is likewise applicable for comparison of analytical methods or simply as a tool for optimization of an analytical method. The methodology can be applied without presumptions or pretreatment of the analytical data provided in order to evaluate the analytical performance taking into account all indicators simultaneously and thus elucidating a "distance" from the true value. In the present illustrative example it is assumed that the laboratories analyze a given sample several times and subsequently report the mean value, the standard deviation and the skewness, which simultaneously are used for the evaluation of the analytical performance. The analyses lead to information concerning (1) a partial ordering of the laboratories, subsequently, (2) a "distance" to the Reference laboratory and (3) a classification due to the concept of "peculiar points".

  4. Improved Quantification of Cerebral Vein Oxygenation Using Partial Volume Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Phillip G. D.; Fan, Audrey P.; Raniga, Parnesh; Barnes, David G.; Dowe, David L.; Ng, Amanda C. L.; Egan, Gary F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) enables cerebral venous characterization and physiological measurements, such as oxygen extraction fraction (OEF). The exquisite sensitivity of QSM to deoxygenated blood makes it possible to image small veins; however partial volume effects must be addressed for accurate quantification. We present a new method, Iterative Cylindrical Fitting (ICF), to estimate voxel-based partial volume effects for susceptibility maps and use it to improve OEF quantification of small veins with diameters between 1.5 and 4 voxels. Materials and Methods: Simulated QSM maps were generated to assess the performance of the ICF method over a range of vein geometries with varying echo times and noise levels. The ICF method was also applied to in vivo human brain data to assess the feasibility and behavior of OEF measurements compared to the maximum intensity voxel (MIV) method. Results: Improved quantification of OEF measurements was achieved for vessels with contrast to noise greater than 3.0 and vein radii greater than 0.75 voxels. The ICF method produced improved quantitative accuracy of OEF measurement compared to the MIV approach (mean OEF error 7.7 vs. 12.4%). The ICF method provided estimates of vein radius (mean error <27%) and partial volume maps (root mean-squared error <13%). In vivo results demonstrated consistent estimates of OEF along vein segments. Conclusion: OEF quantification in small veins (1.5–4 voxels in diameter) had lower error when using partial volume estimates from the ICF method. PMID:28289372

  5. Partial ASL extensions for stochastic programming.

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, David

    2010-03-31

    partially completed extensions for stochastic programming to the AMPL/solver interface library (ASL).modeling and experimenting with stochastic recourse problems. This software is not primarily for military applications

  6. Clustering stocks using partial correlation coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sean S.; Chang, Woojin

    2016-11-01

    A partial correlation analysis is performed on the Korean stock market (KOSPI). The difference between Pearson correlation and the partial correlation is analyzed and it is found that when conditioned on the market return, Pearson correlation coefficients are generally greater than those of the partial correlation, which implies that the market return tends to drive up the correlation between stock returns. A clustering analysis is then performed to study the market structure given by the partial correlation analysis and the members of the clusters are compared with the Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS). The initial hypothesis is that the firms in the same GICS sector are clustered together since they are in a similar business and environment. However, the result is inconsistent with the hypothesis and most clusters are a mix of multiple sectors suggesting that the traditional approach of using sectors to determine the proximity between stocks may not be sufficient enough to diversify a portfolio.

  7. Retroperitoneoscopic partial adrenalectomy for large adrenocortical oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Modi, Pranjal; Goel, Rajiv; Kadam, Gaurang

    2007-04-01

    A young woman had mild hypertension, and on evaluation, a large tumor arising from the right adrenal gland was found. The tumor was hormonally inactive. Retroperitoneoscopic partial adrenalectomy was carried out. The histopathology report described adrenocortical oncocytoma.

  8. Prolonged partial epilepsy: a case report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, M.A.

    1980-11-01

    The case study of a patient with prolonged partial epilepsy is presented. There was a discrepancy between the extent of the abnormality seen on the radionuclide angiogram and that seen on the static brain scan.

  9. Partial focusing by indefinite complementary metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Liu, Ruopeng; Mock, Jack J.; Cui, Tie Jun; Smith, David R.

    2008-09-01

    We have experimentally realized a two-dimensional partial focusing within a planar waveguide using complementary indefinite metamaterials. When the electric fields emitted from the dipole are TE polarized, the focusing condition requires negative magnetic response in the propagation direction of the waveguide, which can be achieved by the complementary electric resonator (CELC) structures. We have carefully designed the experimental configurations and the dimensions for the CELC structures. The experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction, which validates the partial focusing phenomenon.

  10. The conversion partial denture: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Michael P; Brudvik, James S

    2004-04-01

    The treatment alternative described maximizes the benefit of remaining teeth while allowing simplified alteration of the prosthesis if abutments are lost during the life span of the removable partial denture (RPD). A conversion partial is an RPD whose tooth-frame assembly components are individually fabricated and then joined with an acrylic resin major connector. The conversion RPD optimizes retention and stabilization of a terminal dentition and can be easily converted to an immediate complete denture.

  11. Systems of Nonlinear Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    McKinney) Travelling wave solutions of the modified Korteweg - deVries -Burgers Equation . J. Differential Equations , 116 (1995), 448-467. 4. (with D.G...SUBTITLE Systems of Nonlinear Hyperbolic Partial Differential Equations 6. AUTHOR’S) Michael Shearer PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES(S) AND...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This project concerns properties of wave propagation in partial differential equations that are nonlinear

  12. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Siu Tsin Au; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F.; Colloca, Luana

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electro-cutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both continuous and partial reinforcement produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger following continuous reinforcement. However, while the placebo analgesia established under continuous reinforcement extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under partial reinforcement did not. These findings indicate that partial reinforcement can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via continuous reinforcement. Partial reinforcement may, therefore, reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect. PMID:24602997

  13. Spreading paths in partially observed social networks

    PubMed Central

    Onnela, Jukka-Pekka; Christakis, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how and how far information, behaviors, or pathogens spread in social networks is an important problem, having implications for both predicting the size of epidemics, as well as for planning effective interventions. There are, however, two main challenges for inferring spreading paths in real-world networks. One is the practical difficulty of observing a dynamic process on a network, and the other is the typical constraint of only partially observing a network. Using a static, structurally realistic social network as a platform for simulations, we juxtapose three distinct paths: (1) the stochastic path taken by a simulated spreading process from source to target; (2) the topologically shortest path in the fully observed network, and hence the single most likely stochastic path, between the two nodes; and (3) the topologically shortest path in a partially observed network. In a sampled network, how closely does the partially observed shortest path (3) emulate the unobserved spreading path (1)? Although partial observation inflates the length of the shortest path, the stochastic nature of the spreading process also frequently derails the dynamic path from the shortest path. We find that the partially observed shortest path does not necessarily give an inflated estimate of the length of the process path; in fact, partial observation may, counterintuitively, make the path seem shorter than it actually is. PMID:22587148

  14. High-frequency gamblers show increased resistance to extinction following partial reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Horsley, Rachel R; Osborne, Matthew; Norman, Christine; Wells, Timothy

    2012-04-15

    Behaviours that have been rewarded intermittently persist for longer during periods of non-reward than behaviours that have been rewarded continuously. This classic phenomenon is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect. For decades it has been generally understood that this phenomenon is fundamental to the persistence of gambling in the absence of winning. One obvious, yet untested hypothesis arising from this is that persistent (here, high-frequency) gamblers might be more sensitive to partial reinforcement contingencies. Therefore, our aim was to test the hypothesis that compared to low-frequency gamblers, high-frequency gamblers would show greater resistance to extinction following partial reinforcement in a computer based experiment. Participants were 19 high-frequency gamblers and 21 low-frequency gamblers, all healthy non-smokers aged between 18 and 52. Following partial or continuous reinforcement, persistence of responding in extinction was measured as the number of times a target response was made. After partial reinforcement, high-frequency gamblers made the target response a greater number of times in extinction (compared to low-frequency gamblers). Moreover, the partial reinforcement extinction effect was larger in high-frequency gamblers than in low-frequency gamblers. It remains to be seen whether increased sensitivity to partial reinforcement is a cause or effect of persistent gambling. Nevertheless, the present study represents an important first step in investigating the role of simple partial reinforcement contingencies in determining resistance to extinction in gamblers, the importance of which, whilst hitherto recognised, has never been demonstrated experimentally.

  15. Prospective study on laser-assisted laparascopic partial nephrectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Hennig, Georg; Zilinberg, Katja; Khoder, Wael Y.

    2012-02-01

    Introduction: Developments in laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) opened a demand for surgical tools compatible with laparoscopic manipulations to make laser assisted technique safe, feasible and reproducible. Warm ischemia and bleeding during laparoscopic partial nephrectomy place technical constraints on surgeons. Therefore it was the aim to develop a safe and effective laser assisted partial nephrectomy technique without need for ischemia. Patients and methods: A diode laser emitting light at 1318nm in cw mode was coupled into a bare fibre (core diameter 600 μm) thus able to transfer up to 100W to the tissue. After dry lab experience, a total of 10 patients suffering from kidney malformations underwent laparoscopic/retroperitoneoscopic partial nephrectomy. Clinically, postoperative renal function and serum c-reactive protein (CRP) were monitored. Laser induced coagulation depth and effects on resection margins were evaluated. Demographic, clinical and follow-up data are presented. Using a commercial available fibre guidance instrument for lanringeal intervention, the demands on an innovative laser fibre guidance instrument for the laser assisted laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LLPN) are summarized. Results: Overall, all laparascopic intervention were succesfull and could be performed without conversion to open surgery. Mean operative time and mean blood loss were comparable to conventional open and laparascopic approaches. Laser assisted resection of the kidney tissue took max 15min. After extirpation of the tumours all patients showed clinical favourable outcome during follow up period. Tumour sizes were measured to be up 5cm in diameter. The depth of the coagulation on the removed tissue ranged between <1 to 2mm without effect on histopathological evaluation of tumours or resection margin. As the surface of the remaining kidney surface was laser assisted coagulated after removal. The sealing of the surface was induced by a slightly larger coagulation

  16. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  17. Partial breast radiotherapy with simple teletherapy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fekete, Gábor; Újhidy, Dóra; Együd, Zsófia; Kiscsatári, Laura; Marosi, Gusztáv; Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Varga, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    A prospective pilot study of partial breast irradiation (PBI) with conventional vs hypofractionated schedules was set out. The study aimed to determine efficacy, acute and late side effects, and the preference of photon vs electron irradiation based on individual features. Patients were enrolled according to internationally accepted guidelines on PBI. Conformal radiotherapy plans were generated with both photon and electron beams, and the preferred technique based on dose homogeneity and the radiation exposure of healthy tissues was applied. For electron dose verification, a special phantom was constructed. Patients were randomized for fractionation schedules of 25 × 2 vs 13 × 3 Gy. Skin and breast changes were registered at the time of and ≥1 year after the completion of radiotherapy. Dose homogeneity was better with photons. If the tumor bed was located in the inner quadrants, electron beam gave superior results regarding conformity and sparing of organ at risk (OAR). If the tumor was situated in the lateral quadrants, conformity was better with photons. A depth of the tumor bed ≥3.0 cm predicted the superiority of photon irradiation (odds ratio [OR] = 23.6, 95% CI: 5.2 to 107.5, p < 0.001) with >90% sensitivity and specificity. After a median follow-up of 39 months, among 72 irradiated cases, 1 local relapse out of the tumor bed was detected. Acute radiodermatitis of grade I to II, hyperpigmentation, and telangiectasia developed ≥1 year after radiotherapy, exclusively after electron beam radiotherapy. The choice of electrons or photons for PBI should be based on tumor bed location; the used methods are efficient and feasible.

  18. Detrecting and Locating Partial Discharges in Transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Shourbaji, A.; Richards, R.; Kisner, R. A.; Hardy, J.

    2005-02-04

    A collaborative research between the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the American Electric Power (AEP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the State of Ohio Energy Office (OEO) has been formed to conduct a feasibility study to detect and locate partial discharges (PDs) inside large transformers. The success of early detection of the PDs is necessary to avoid costly catastrophic failures that can occur if the process of PD is ignored. The detection method under this research is based on an innovative technology developed by ORNL researchers using optical methods to sense the acoustical energy produced by the PDs. ORNL researchers conducted experimental studies to detect PD using an optical fiber as an acoustic sensor capable of detecting acoustical disturbances at any point along its length. This technical approach also has the potential to locate the point at which the PD was sensed within the transformer. Several optical approaches were experimentally investigated, including interferometric detection of acoustical disturbances along the sensing fiber, light detection and ranging (LIDAR) techniques using frequency modulation continuous wave (FMCW), frequency modulated (FM) laser with a multimode fiber, FM laser with a single mode fiber, and amplitude modulated (AM) laser with a multimode fiber. The implementation of the optical fiber-based acoustic measurement technique would include installing a fiber inside a transformer allowing real-time detection of PDs and determining their locations. The fibers are nonconductive and very small (core plus cladding are diameters of 125 μm for single-mode fibers and 230 μm for multimode fibers). The research identified the capabilities and limitations of using optical technology to detect and locate sources of acoustical disturbances such as in PDs in large transformers. Amplitude modulation techniques showed the most promising results and deserve further research to better quantify the technique’s sensitivity

  19. 24 CFR 203.495 - Transfers of partial interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfers of partial interests. 203... Transfers of partial interests. A partial interest in an insured loan may be transferred under a...) Qualification for holding partial interest. A partial interest in an insured loan shall be issued to and...

  20. Linear algebraic theory of partial coherence: continuous fields and measures of partial coherence.

    PubMed

    Ozaktas, Haldun M; Gulcu, Talha Cihad; Alper Kutay, M

    2016-11-01

    This work presents a linear algebraic theory of partial coherence for optical fields of continuous variables. This approach facilitates use of linear algebraic techniques and makes it possible to precisely define the concepts of incoherence and coherence in a mathematical way. We have proposed five scalar measures for the degree of partial coherence. These measures are zero for incoherent fields, unity for fully coherent fields, and between zero and one for partially coherent fields.

  1. Texture of fermion mass matrices in partially unified theories

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, B. |; Nandi, S. |

    1996-12-31

    We investigate the texture of fermion mass matrices in theories with partial unification (for example, SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2){sub R} {times} SU(4){sub c}) at a scale of {approximately} 10{sup 12} GeV. Starting with the low energy values of the masses and the mixing angles, we find only two viable textures with at most four texture zeros. One of these corresponds to a somewhat modified Fritzsch textures. A theoretical derivation of these textures leads to new interesting relations among the masses and the mixing angles. 13 refs.

  2. Simultaneous robotic-assisted adrenalectomy and partial nephrectomy: technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aditya Prakash; Devana, Sudheer Kumar; Bora, Girdhar Singh; Mavuduru, Ravimohan; Mandal, Arup Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy has become a safe and feasible procedure for small renal masses (SRM). Similarly, robot-assisted adrenalectomy has also been well established. Robotic surgery has provided the possibility to manage complex cases that are considered technically challenging for traditional laparoscopy. We describe in this video the details of performing simultaneous robotic adrenalectomy with partial nephrectomy highlighting the technical aspects of the same. A 62-year-old gentleman presented to us with incidentally detected left renal complex cyst (Bosniak IIF) and a concomitant left adrenal mass. Hormonal evaluation of adrenal tumor revealed raised levels of serum estrogen and DHEAS. A robotic-assisted simultaneous procedure was planned. Patient was positioned in right lateral position. After port placement, robot was brought from the shoulder of the patient and docked. We first excised the adrenal tumor followed by the renal cyst. Total operative time was 180 min with warm ischemia time of 20 min for renal cyst excision. Drain was removed on post-operative day 2. Patient was discharged on post-operative day 3. Histopathology revealed adrenocortical adenoma and benign hemorrhagic renal cyst. We found simultaneous ipsilateral adrenalectomy with partial nephrectomy using robotic assistance is feasible and safe with minimal morbidity. Port placement in such cases should be individualized according to the location of the SRM. The robot provides the ergonomic advantage and 3D vision for better anatomic definition as compared to laparoscopy.

  3. Is robotic partial nephrectomy convenient for solitary kidney?

    PubMed Central

    Kaouk, Jihad H.; Malkoç, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Nephron sparing surgery (NSS) is the gold standard treatment option for patients with a solitary kidney in order to preserve renal function. Open partial nephrectomy (OPN) has been long considered the standard care for NSS. Robotic partial nephrectomy (RPN) is being gradually used more commonly even for solitary kidney and complex tumors. There was no difference between RPN and OPN regarding the rate of intraoperative-postoperative complications and positive surgical margin (PSM) (RPN: 7.5%, OPN: 8%) for patients with solitary kidney who underwent partial nephrectomy for small renal masses. Warm ischemia time (WIT) in all of our studies was within the safe range of <25 minutes which is acceptable ischemia time for robotic approaches. More studies are needed in order to evaluate kidney function. In conclusion with increasing experience, solitary kidney tumors can be managed safely with robotic approach. For patients having complex tumors with a potential of WIT >25 minutes, administration of intracorporeal ice slush during surgery may be considered. PMID:27635284

  4. Partial pulpotomy in young permanent teeth with deep carious lesions.

    PubMed

    Mejàre, I; Cvek, M

    1993-12-01

    The material comprised 37 young posterior teeth with deep carious lesions and exposed pulps, treated with partial pulpotomy and dressed with calcium hydroxide. The teeth were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 31 teeth with no clinical or radiographic symptoms before treatment, Group 2 of 6 teeth with temporary pain, widened periodontal space periapically and/or productive osteitis, i.e. increased density of the surrounding alveolar bone. After an observation time of 24 to 140 months (mean = 56 months), healing had occurred in 29 of 31 teeth in Group 1 (93.5%) and in 4 of 6 teeth in Group 2. It was concluded that the present, as well as previously reported results indicate that partial pulpotomy may be an adequate treatment for young permanent molars with a carious exposure, although more studies are needed before the treatment can be recommended for routine clinical use.

  5. Skin friction measurement with partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.; Holmes, H. K.

    1993-01-01

    Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film (10-25 microns) deposited on a flat glass substrate has been used for the first time to measure skin friction. Utilizing the shear-stress-induced director reorientation in the partially exposed liquid-crystal droplets, optical transmission under crossed polarization has been measured as a function of the air flow differential pressure. Direct measurement of the skin friction with a skin friction drag balance, under the same aerodynamic conditions, lets us correlate the skin friction with optical transmission. This provides a unique technique for the direct measurement of skin friction from the transmitted light intensity. The results are in excellent agreement with the model suggested in this paper.

  6. Optimal Variational Asymptotic Method for Nonlinear Fractional Partial Differential Equations.

    PubMed

    Baranwal, Vipul K; Pandey, Ram K; Singh, Om P

    2014-01-01

    We propose optimal variational asymptotic method to solve time fractional nonlinear partial differential equations. In the proposed method, an arbitrary number of auxiliary parameters γ 0, γ 1, γ 2,… and auxiliary functions H 0(x), H 1(x), H 2(x),… are introduced in the correction functional of the standard variational iteration method. The optimal values of these parameters are obtained by minimizing the square residual error. To test the method, we apply it to solve two important classes of nonlinear partial differential equations: (1) the fractional advection-diffusion equation with nonlinear source term and (2) the fractional Swift-Hohenberg equation. Only few iterations are required to achieve fairly accurate solutions of both the first and second problems.

  7. Ultrasound-Assisted Endoscopic Partial Plantar Fascia Release

    PubMed Central

    Ohuchi, Hiroshi; Ichikawa, Ken; Shinga, Kotaro; Hattori, Soichi; Yamada, Shin; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Various surgical treatment procedures for plantar fasciitis, such as open surgery, percutaneous release, and endoscopic surgery, exist. Skin trouble, nerve disturbance, infection, and persistent pain associated with prolonged recovery time are complications of open surgery. Endoscopic partial plantar fascia release offers the surgeon clear visualization of the anatomy at the surgical site. However, the primary medial portal and portal tract used for this technique have been shown to be in close proximity to the posterior tibial nerves and their branches, and there is always the risk of nerve damage by introducing the endoscope deep to the plantar fascia. By performing endoscopic partial plantar fascia release under ultrasound assistance, we could dynamically visualize the direction of the endoscope and instrument introduction, thus preventing nerve damage from inadvertent insertion deep to the fascia. Full-thickness release of the plantar fascia at the ideal position could also be confirmed under ultrasound imaging. We discuss the technique for this new procedure. PMID:24265989

  8. Electrical conductivity anisotropy of partially molten peridotite under shear deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Yoshino, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Manthilake, G. M.; Katsura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Recent ocean bottom magnetotelluric investigations have revealed a high-conductivity layer (HCL) with high anisotropy characterized by higher conductivity values in the direction parallel to the plate motion beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (Evans et al., 2005) and beneath the edge of the Cocos plate at the Middle America trench offshore of Nicaragua (Naif et al., 2013). These geophysical observations have been attributed to either hydration (water) of mantle minerals or the presence of partial melt. Currently, aligned partial melt has been regarded as the most preferable candidate for explaining the conductivity anisotropy because of the implausibility of proton conduction (Yoshino et al., 2006). In this study, we report development of the conductivity anisotropy between parallel and normal to shear direction on the shear plane in partial molten peridotite as a function of time and shear strain. Starting samples were pre-synthesized partial molten peridotite, showing homogeneous melt distribution. The partially molten peridotite samples were deformed in simple shear geometry at 1 GPa and 1723 K in a DIA-type apparatus with uniaxial deformation facility. Conductivity difference between parallel and normal to shear direction reached one order, which is equivalent to that observed beneath asthenosphere. In contrast, such anisotropic behavior was not found in the melt-free samples, suggesting that development of the conductivity anisotropy was generated under shear stress. Microstructure of the deformed partial molten peridotite shows partial melt tends to preferentially locate grain boundaries parallel to shear direction, and forms continuously thin melt layer sub-parallel to the shear direction, whereas apparently isolated distribution was observed on the section perpendicular to the shear direction. The resultant melt morphology can be approximated by tube like geometry parallel to the shear direction. This observation suggests that the development of

  9. Partial Volume Correction in Quantitative Amyloid Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi; Blazey, Tyler M.; Snyder, Abraham Z.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Marcus, Daniel S.; Ances, Beau M.; Bateman, Randall J.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Aldea, Patricia; Cash, Lisa; Christensen, Jon J.; Friedrichsen, Karl; Hornbeck, Russ C.; Farrar, Angela M.; Owen, Christopher J.; Mayeux, Richard; Brickman, Adam M.; Klunk, William; Price, Julie C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Saykin, Andrew J.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Schofield, Peter R.; Buckles, Virginia; Morris, John C.; Benzinger, Tammie. LS.

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid imaging is a valuable tool for research and diagnosis in dementing disorders. As positron emission tomography (PET) scanners have limited spatial resolution, measured signals are distorted by partial volume effects. Various techniques have been proposed for correcting partial volume effects, but there is no consensus as to whether these techniques are necessary in amyloid imaging, and, if so, how they should be implemented. We evaluated a two-component partial volume correction technique and a regional spread function technique using both simulated and human Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET imaging data. Both correction techniques compensated for partial volume effects and yielded improved detection of subtle changes in PiB retention. However, the regional spread function technique was more accurate in application to simulated data. Because PiB retention estimates depend on the correction technique, standardization is necessary to compare results across groups. Partial volume correction has sometimes been avoided because it increases the sensitivity to inaccuracy in image registration and segmentation. However, our results indicate that appropriate PVC may enhance our ability to detect changes in amyloid deposition. PMID:25485714

  10. Partial splenic embolization to permit continuation of systemic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Luz, Jose Hugo M; Luz, Paula M; Marchiori, Edson; Rodrigues, Leonardo A; Gouveia, Hugo R; Martin, Henrique S; Faria, Igor M; Souza, Roberto R; Gil, Roberto de Almeida; Palladino, Alexandre de M; Pimenta, Karina B; de Souza, Henrique S

    2016-10-01

    Systemic chemotherapy treatments, commonly those that comprise oxaliplatin, have been linked to the appearance of distinctive liver lesions that evolves to portal hypertension, spleen enlargement, platelets sequestration, and thrombocytopenia. This outcome can interrupt treatment or force dosage reduction, decreasing efficiency of cancer therapy. We conducted a prospective phase II study for the evaluation of partial splenic embolization in patients with thrombocytopenia that impeded systemic chemotherapy continuation. From August 2014 through July 2015, 33 patients underwent partial splenic embolization to increase platelets count and allow their return to treatment. Primary endpoint was the accomplishment of a thrombocyte level superior to 130 × 10(9) /L and the secondary endpoints were the return to chemotherapy and toxicity. Partial splenic embolization was done 36 times in 33 patients. All patients presented gastrointestinal cancer and colorectal malignancy was the commonest primary site. An average of 6.4 cycles of chemotherapy was done before splenic embolization and the most common regimen was Folfox. Mean platelet count prior to embolization was 69 × 10(9) /L. A total of 94% of patients achieved primary endpoint. All patients in need reinitiated treatment and median time to chemotherapy return was 14 days. No grade 3 or above adverse events were identified. Aiming for a 50% to 70% infarction area may be sufficient to achieve success without the complications associated with more extensive infarction. Combined with the better safety profile, partial splenic embolization is an excellent option in the management of thrombocytopenia, enabling the resumption of systemic chemotherapy with minimal procedure-related morbidity.

  11. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  12. On partially massless theory in 3 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Deffayet, Cédric

    2015-03-24

    We analyze the first-order formulation of the ghost-free bigravity model in three-dimensions known as zwei-dreibein gravity. For a special choice of parameters, it was argued to have an additional gauge symmetry and give rise to a partially massless theory. We provide a thorough canonical analysis and identify that whether the theory becomes partially massless depends on the form of the stability condition of the secondary constraint responsible for the absence of the ghost. Generically, it is found to be an equation for a Lagrange multiplier implying that partially massless zwei-dreibein gravity does not exist. However, for special backgrounds this condition is identically satisfied leading to the presence of additional symmetries, which however disappear at quadratic order in perturbations.

  13. Telecloning of qudits via partially entangled states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araneda, Gabriel; Cisternas, Nataly; Delgado, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    We study the process of quantum telecloning of d-dimensional pure quantum states using partially entangled pure states as quantum channel. This process efficiently mixes optimal universal symmetric cloning with quantum teleportation. It is shown that it is possible to implement universal symmetric telecloning in a probabilistic way using unambiguous state discrimination and quantum state separation schemes. It is also shown that other strategies, such as minimum error discrimination, lead to a decrease in the fidelity of the copies and that certain partially entangled pure states with maximal Schmidt rank lead to an average telecloning fidelity which is always above the optimal fidelity of measuring and preparation of quantum states. We also discuss the case of partially entangled pure states with non-maximal Schmidt rank. The results presented here are valid for arbitrary numbers of copies of a single-input qudit state of any dimension.

  14. Partial transpose criteria for symmetric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Braun, D.; Giraud, O.

    2016-10-01

    We express the positive-partial-transpose (PPT) separability criterion for symmetric states of multiqubit systems in terms of matrix inequalities based on the recently introduced tensor representation for spin states. We construct a matrix from the tensor representation of the state and show that it is similar to the partial transpose of the density matrix written in the computational basis. Furthermore, the positivity of this matrix is equivalent to the positivity of a correlation matrix constructed from tensor products of Pauli operators. This allows for a more transparent experimental interpretation of the PPT criteria for an arbitrary spin-j state. The unitary matrices connecting our matrix to the partial transpose of the state generalize the so-called magic basis that plays a central role in Wootters' explicit formula for the concurrence of a two-qubit system and the Bell bases used for the teleportation of a one- or two-qubit state.

  15. Virtual environment application with partial gravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Vanchau, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    To support manned missions to the surface of Mars and missions requiring manipulation of payloads and locomotion in space, a training facility is required to simulate the conditions of both partial and microgravity. A partial gravity simulator (Pogo) which uses pneumatic suspension is being studied for use in virtual reality training. Pogo maintains a constant partial gravity simulation with a variation of simulated body force between 2.2 and 10 percent, depending on the type of locomotion inputs. this paper is based on the concept and application of a virtual environment system with Pogo including a head-mounted display and glove. The reality engine consists of a high end SGI workstation and PC's which drive Pogo's sensors and data acquisition hardware used for tracking and control. The tracking system is a hybrid of magnetic and optical trackers integrated for this application.

  16. Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups.

    PubMed

    Derex, Maxime; Boyd, Robert

    2016-03-15

    Complex technologies used in most human societies are beyond the inventive capacities of individuals. Instead, they result from a cumulative process in which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population's ability to develop complex technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present a simple computer-based experiment that compares the accumulation of innovations by fully and partially connected groups of the same size in a complex fitness landscape. We find that the propensity to learn from successful individuals drastically reduces cultural diversity within fully connected groups. In comparison, partially connected groups produce more diverse solutions, and this diversity allows them to develop complex solutions that are never produced in fully connected groups. These results suggest that explanations of ancestral patterns of cultural complexity may need to consider levels of population fragmentation and interaction patterns between partially isolated groups.

  17. On partially massless theory in 3 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Deffayet, Cédric

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the first-order formulation of the ghost-free bigravity model in three-dimensions known as zwei-dreibein gravity. For a special choice of parameters, it was argued to have an additional gauge symmetry and give rise to a partially massless theory. We provide a thorough canonical analysis and identify that whether the theory becomes partially massless depends on the form of the stability condition of the secondary constraint responsible for the absence of the ghost. Generically, it is found to be an equation for a Lagrange multiplier implying that partially massless zwei-dreibein gravity does not exist. However, for special backgrounds this condition is identically satisfied leading to the presence of additional symmetries, which however disappear at quadratic order in perturbations.

  18. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  19. Partial connectivity increases cultural accumulation within groups

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Complex technologies used in most human societies are beyond the inventive capacities of individuals. Instead, they result from a cumulative process in which innovations are gradually added to existing cultural traits across many generations. Recent work suggests that a population’s ability to develop complex technologies is positively affected by its size and connectedness. Here, we present a simple computer-based experiment that compares the accumulation of innovations by fully and partially connected groups of the same size in a complex fitness landscape. We find that the propensity to learn from successful individuals drastically reduces cultural diversity within fully connected groups. In comparison, partially connected groups produce more diverse solutions, and this diversity allows them to develop complex solutions that are never produced in fully connected groups. These results suggest that explanations of ancestral patterns of cultural complexity may need to consider levels of population fragmentation and interaction patterns between partially isolated groups. PMID:26929364

  20. Adult case of partial trisomy 9q

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Complete and partial trisomy 9 is the fourth most common chromosomal disorder. It is also associated with various congenital characteristics affecting the cranio-facial, skeletal, central nervous, gastrointestinal, cardiac and renal systems. Very few cases have been reported in adults. Partial trisomy 9q is also associated with short stature, poor growth and growth hormone deficiency. This is the first reported case of an extensive endocrinology investigation of short stature in trisomy 9q and the outcome of growth hormone treatment. Case Presentation The case involves a 23-year-old female of pure partial trisomy 9q. The case involves a 23-year old female with pure partial trisomy 9q involving a duplication of 9q22.1 to q32, de novo, confirmed by genetic studies using fluorescene in situ hybridization (FISH) method. The diagnosis was at 6 years of age. She did not demonstrate all the congenital morphologies identified with trisomy 9q disorders especially in relation to multi-organ morphologies. There is also a degree of associated intellectual impairment. At prepuberty, she was referred for poor growth and was diagnosed with partial growth hormone deficiency. She responded very well to treatment with growth hormone and is currently living an independent life with some support. Conclusions Trisomy 9q is associated with short stature and failure to thrive. Growth hormone deficiency should be identified in cases of trisomy 9q and treatment offered. This is the first reported case of response to growth hormone replacement in partial trisomy 9. PMID:20158889

  1. Third Partial and 3.0L Second Partial and 2.0L Partial and Amended Consent Decree

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The settlement partially resolves allegations that Volkswagen violated the Clean Air Act (“CAA”) by the sale of approximately 500,000 model year 2009 to 2015 motor vehicles containing 2.0 liter diesel engines equipped with “defeat devices” (“CAA 2.0 liter.

  2. Partial siamese twin as potential organ donor

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Maheshwari, Ruchir; Srivastava, Aneesh; Sharma, Raj K.

    2010-01-01

    During evaluation of a partial Siamese twin for removal of nonviable parasitic part in an 8-year-old male child, a fully functional kidney was found. The functional status of the extra kidney was found to be within acceptable limits for the purpose of transplant, which was subsequently done in a 24-year-old patient with end-stage renal disease. The recipient is healthy 19 months after the surgery. The possibility of using organs from a partial Siamese twin makes this a unique case report. PMID:20877612

  3. Self-steering partially coherent beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a class of shape-invariant partially coherent beams with a moving guiding center which we term self-steering partially coherent beams. The guiding center of each such beam evolves along a straight line trajectory which can be engineered to make any angle with the x-axis. We show that the straight line trajectory of the guiding center is the only option in free space due to the linear momentum conservation. We experimentally generate a particular subclass of new beams, self-steering Gaussian Schell beams and argue that they can find applications for mobile target tracing and trapped micro- and/or nanoparticle transport.

  4. Partially coherent interferometric biometry in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Findl, Oliver; Menapace, Rupert; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-02-01

    In an earlier study we showed that precise axial eye length measurement on cataract eyes is possible with the dual beam partial coherence interferometry technique (PCI). A high correlation with the standard ultrasound technique has been obtained. Recently, in a prospective study, partially coherent interferometry and ultrasound biometry were compared in cataract surgery using the SRK II formula based on US applanation biometry. Three months after surgery PCI was repeated and refractive outcome was determined. The use of PCI would have improved refractive outcome by about 30%.

  5. DEVICE FOR CONTROL OF OXYGEN PARTIAL PRESSURE

    DOEpatents

    Bradner, H.; Gordon, H.S.

    1957-12-24

    A device is described that can sense changes in oxygen partial pressure and cause a corresponding mechanical displacement sufficient to actuate meters, valves and similar devices. A piston and cylinder arrangement contains a charge of crystalline metal chelate pellets which have the peculiar property of responding to variations in the oxygen content of the ambient atmosphere by undergoing a change in dimension. A lever system amplifies the relative displacement of the piston in the cylinder, and actuates the controlled valving device. This partial pressure oxygen sensing device is useful in controlled chemical reactions or in respiratory devices such as the oxygen demand meters for high altitude aircraft.

  6. Partial Kluver-Bucy syndrome: two cases.

    PubMed

    Carroll, B T; Goforth, H W; Raimonde, L A

    2001-04-01

    Kluver-Bucy syndrome (KBS) is a rare neuropsychiatric disorder that may be characterized by visual agnosia, placidity, altered sexual activity, hypermetamorphosis, and hyperorality. Patients with KBS present with a complex behavioral syndrome. KBS is usually associated with lesions of the amygdala or amygdaloid pathways. However, partial KBS may occur in the absence of the classic bilateral temporal lesions. Pharmacologic treatment options have been developed from the results of case reports, which suggest that carbamazepine and antipsychotics may be helpful. We present the cases of two patients with partial KBS who responded favorably to antipsychotic medication.

  7. Self-steering partially coherent beams

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a class of shape-invariant partially coherent beams with a moving guiding center which we term self-steering partially coherent beams. The guiding center of each such beam evolves along a straight line trajectory which can be engineered to make any angle with the x-axis. We show that the straight line trajectory of the guiding center is the only option in free space due to the linear momentum conservation. We experimentally generate a particular subclass of new beams, self-steering Gaussian Schell beams and argue that they can find applications for mobile target tracing and trapped micro- and/or nanoparticle transport. PMID:28051164

  8. 77 FR 64737 - Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans; Nevada...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... CFR 52.21 for all regulated NSR pollutants, pursuant to delegation agreements with EPA. See 40 CFR 52... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality State Implementation Plans... September 21, 2006.\\3\\ Each of these actions triggered a requirement for states to submit an...

  9. 76 FR 55842 - Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Partial Approval and Partial Disapproval of Air Quality Implementation Plans; California; San Joaquin Valley; Reasonably Available Control Technology for Ozone AGENCY: Environmental... disapprove a revision to the San Joaquin Valley Unified Air Pollution Control District (SJVUAPCD or...

  10. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  11. An observational and thermodynamic investigation of carbonate partial melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floess, David; Baumgartner, Lukas P.; Vonlanthen, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Melting experiments available in the literature show that carbonates and pelites melt at similar conditions in the crust. While partial melting of pelitic rocks is common and well-documented, reports of partial melting in carbonates are rare and ambiguous, mainly because of intensive recrystallization and the resulting lack of criteria for unequivocal identification of melting. Here we present microstructural, textural, and geochemical evidence for partial melting of calcareous dolomite marbles in the contact aureole of the Tertiary Adamello Batholith. Petrographic observations and X-ray micro-computed tomography (X-ray μCT) show that calcite crystallized either in cm- to dm-scale melt pockets, or as an interstitial phase forming an interconnected network between dolomite grains. Calcite-dolomite thermometry yields a temperature of at least 670 °C, which is well above the minimum melting temperature of ∼600 °C reported for the CaO-MgO-CO2-H2O system. Rare-earth element (REE) partition coefficients (KDcc/do) range between 9-35 for adjacent calcite-dolomite pairs. These KD values are 3-10 times higher than equilibrium values between dolomite and calcite reported in the literature. They suggest partitioning of incompatible elements into a melt phase. The δ18O and δ13C isotopic values of calcite and dolomite support this interpretation. Crystallographic orientations measured by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) show a clustering of c-axes for dolomite and interstitial calcite normal to the foliation plane, a typical feature for compressional deformation, whereas calcite crystallized in pockets shows a strong clustering of c-axes parallel to the pocket walls, suggesting that it crystallized after deformation had stopped. All this together suggests the formation of partial melts in these carbonates. A Schreinemaker analysis of the experimental data for a CO2-H2O fluid-saturated system indeed predicts formation of calcite-rich melt between 650-880 °C, in

  12. Consequences and Resolution of Lunar Lower Mantle Partial Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuqua, H.; Bremner, P. M.; Diamond, M. R.; Garapic, G.; Lock, S. J.; Mallik, A.; Nishikawa, Y.; Panovska, S.; Shahar, A.; Lognonne, P. H.; Panero, W. R.; Faul, U.; Panning, M. P.; Jimenez-Perez, H.; Schmerr, N. C.; Williams, Q. C.

    2014-12-01

    Existence of a partially molten layer at depth has been proposed to explain the lack of observed farside deep moonquakes, the observation of reflected phases from deep moonquakes, and the dissipation of tidal energy within the lunar interior. However, subsequent models explore the possibility that dissipation due to elevated temperatures alone can explain the observed dissipation factor (Q) and tidal love numbers. We have explored the hypothesis that high titanium melt compositions associated with lunar mantle overturn may sink to the base of the mantle, locally or regionally. We have performed forward calculations varying composition and thickness of layers to evaluate if a partially molten layer at the base of the mantle is well constrained by the observational data. Self-consistent physical parameters are calculated for each compositional model that are then compared against the observed data to determine a subset of permissible models. The data constraints considered by this study include bulk density, moment of inertia, real and imaginary parts of the Love numbers, seismic travel times, and electrical conductivity. Dynamic calculations using ASPECT have also been considered to determine the implications of early lunar mantle convection for the survivability of the partially molten layer. Finally, and as a perspective for a future NASA New Frontiers Geophysical Network, we present 1D synthetic seismograms calculated for each proposed structure of the Moon to investigate the future seismological resolution of these deep lunar structure features. This work was initiated at the CIDER 2014 program.

  13. Reconsidering harmonic and anharmonic coherent states: Partial differential equations approach

    SciTech Connect

    Toutounji, Mohamad

    2015-02-15

    This article presents a new approach to dealing with time dependent quantities such as autocorrelation function of harmonic and anharmonic systems using coherent states and partial differential equations. The approach that is normally used to evaluate dynamical quantities involves formidable operator algebra. That operator algebra becomes insurmountable when employing Morse oscillator coherent states. This problem becomes even more complicated in case of Morse oscillator as it tends to exhibit divergent dynamics. This approach employs linear partial differential equations, some of which may be solved exactly and analytically, thereby avoiding the cumbersome noncommutative algebra required to manipulate coherent states of Morse oscillator. Additionally, the arising integrals while using the herein presented method feature stability and high numerical efficiency. The correctness, applicability, and utility of the above approach are tested by reproducing the partition and optical autocorrelation function of the harmonic oscillator. A closed-form expression for the equilibrium canonical partition function of the Morse oscillator is derived using its coherent states and partial differential equations. Also, a nonequilibrium autocorrelation function expression for weak electron–phonon coupling in condensed systems is derived for displaced Morse oscillator in electronic state. Finally, the utility of the method is demonstrated through further simplifying the Morse oscillator partition function or autocorrelation function expressions reported by other researchers in unevaluated form of second-order derivative exponential. Comparison with exact dynamics shows identical results.

  14. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  15. Transport of engineered silver (Ag) nanoparticles through partially fractured sandstones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukum, Christoph; Braun, Anika; Azzam, Rafig

    2014-08-01

    Transport behavior and fate of engineered silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in the subsurface is of major interest concerning soil and groundwater protection in order to avoid groundwater contamination of vital resources. Sandstone aquifers are important groundwater resources which are frequently used for public water supply in many regions of the world. The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of AgNP transport behavior in partially fractured sandstones. We executed AgNP transport studies on partially fissured sandstone drilling cores in laboratory experiments. The AgNP concentration and AgNP size in the effluent were analyzed using flow field-flow fractionation mainly. We employed inverse mathematical models on the measured AgNP breakthrough curves to identify and quantify relevant transport processes. Physicochemical filtration, time-dependent blocking due to filling of favorable attachment sites and colloid-facilitated transport were identified as the major processes for AgNP mobility. Physicochemical filtration was found to depend on solute chemistry, mineralogy, pore size distribution and probably on physical and chemical heterogeneity. Compared to AgNP transport in undisturbed sandstone matrix reported in the literature, their mobility in partially fissured sandstone is enhanced probably due to larger void spaces and higher hydraulic conductivity.

  16. Partial aphid resistance in lettuce negatively affects parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Lanteigne, Marie-Eve; Brodeur, Jacques; Jenni, Sylvie; Boivin, Guy

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of partial plant resistance on the lettuce aphid Nasonovia ribisnigri (Mosley) (Hemiptera: Aphididae), a major pest of cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), and one of its parasitoids, Aphidius ervi Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae). Aphids were reared on susceptible (L. sativa variety Estival; S) or partially resistant (Lactuca serriola L. PI 491093; PR) lettuce, and next parasitized by A. ervi females. Fitness proxies were measured for both aphids and parasitoids. Developmental time to adult stage took longer for alate and apterous aphids (an average of 3.5 and 1.5 additional days, respectively) on PR than on S lettuce, and fecundity of alate aphids reared on PR lettuce was reduced by 37.8% relative to those reared on S lettuce. Size (tibia length) and weight of aphids reared on PR lettuce were lower than for aphids reared on S lettuce from the third and second instar onward, respectively. Parasitism of aphids reared on PR plants resulted in lower parasitoid offspring emergence (-49.9%), lower adult female (-30.3%) and male (-27.5%) weight, smaller adult female (-17.5%) and male (-11.9%) size, and lower female fecundity (37.8% fewer eggs) than when parasitoids developed from aphids reared on S plants. Our results demonstrate that partial aphid resistance in lettuce negatively affects both the second and third trophic levels. Host plant resistance in cultivated lettuce may therefore create an ecological sink for aphid parasitoids.

  17. Partial Granger causality--eliminating exogenous inputs and latent variables.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shuixia; Seth, Anil K; Kendrick, Keith M; Zhou, Cong; Feng, Jianfeng

    2008-07-15

    Attempts to identify causal interactions in multivariable biological time series (e.g., gene data, protein data, physiological data) can be undermined by the confounding influence of environmental (exogenous) inputs. Compounding this problem, we are commonly only able to record a subset of all related variables in a system. These recorded variables are likely to be influenced by unrecorded (latent) variables. To address this problem, we introduce a novel variant of a widely used statistical measure of causality--Granger causality--that is inspired by the definition of partial correlation. Our 'partial Granger causality' measure is extensively tested with toy models, both linear and nonlinear, and is applied to experimental data: in vivo multielectrode array (MEA) local field potentials (LFPs) recorded from the inferotemporal cortex of sheep. Our results demonstrate that partial Granger causality can reveal the underlying interactions among elements in a network in the presence of exogenous inputs and latent variables in many cases where the existing conditional Granger causality fails.

  18. Partial colpocleisis for the treatment of sacrocolpopexy mesh erosions.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Lieschen H; Gutman, Robert E; Fagan, Matthew J; Cundiff, Geoffrey W

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the outcomes of partial colpocleisis for mesh erosions after sacrocolpopexy. We retrospectively report our surgical management of mesh erosion after sacrocolpopexy. Between 1998 and 2006, we performed 499 sacral colpopexies and treated 21 patients for mesh erosion, including three referrals. Mean (range) time to diagnosis was 10.3 months (1-49). Grafts materials included: Mersilene (13), Prolene (7), and Pelvicol (1). Surgical outcomes were available for 19 patients. Ten (48%) patients were cured by the initial partial colpocleisis, while nine (45%) required a second or third (2, 10%) vaginal operation. All of the second and third vaginal excisions failed. Eight patients had an abdominal excision, and two patients required a second abdominal procedure. The success rate for the first and second abdominal resections was 38% (3/8) and 100% (2/2). Abdominal surgeries had higher blood loss (84 vs 378 cc, p = 0.012) longer hospitalization (outpatient vs 4.2 days p = 0.001), and additional morbidity (18.6%). Potential contributing factors to surgical failure were the presence of Actinomyces and current smoking. We recommend initial transvaginal mesh resection with partial colpocleisis for synthetic mesh erosions after sacrocolpopexy. Vaginal failures may be better served by an abdominal excision. Potential contributors to failure include current smoking and the presence of Actinomyces.

  19. Partially Decentralized Control Architectures for Satellite Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Bauer, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    In a partially decentralized control architecture, more than one but less than all nodes have supervisory capability. This paper describes an approach to choosing the number of supervisors in such au architecture, based on a reliability vs. cost trade. It also considers the implications of these results for the design of navigation systems for satellite formations that could be controlled with a partially decentralized architecture. Using an assumed cost model, analytic and simulation-based results indicate that it may be cheaper to achieve a given overall system reliability with a partially decentralized architecture containing only a few supervisors, than with either fully decentralized or purely centralized architectures. Nominally, the subset of supervisors may act as centralized estimation and control nodes for corresponding subsets of the remaining subordinate nodes, and act as decentralized estimation and control peers with respect to each other. However, in the context of partially decentralized satellite formation control, the absolute positions and velocities of each spacecraft are unique, so that correlations which make estimates using only local information suboptimal only occur through common biases and process noise. Covariance and monte-carlo analysis of a simplified system show that this lack of correlation may allow simplification of the local estimators while preserving the global optimality of the maneuvers commanded by the supervisors.

  20. A Rasch Model for Partial Credit Scoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Geoff N.

    1982-01-01

    An extension of the Rasch model for partial credit scoring of test items is presented. An unconditional maximum likelihood procedure for estimating the model parameters is developed. The relationship of this model to Andrich's Rating Scale model and Samejima's Graded Response model are discussed. (Author/JKS)

  1. 24 CFR 203.341 - Partial claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial claim. 203.341 Section 203.341 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  2. 24 CFR 203.341 - Partial claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partial claim. 203.341 Section 203.341 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  3. 24 CFR 203.341 - Partial claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partial claim. 203.341 Section 203.341 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  4. 24 CFR 203.341 - Partial claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Partial claim. 203.341 Section 203.341 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  5. 24 CFR 203.341 - Partial claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partial claim. 203.341 Section 203.341 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  6. 20 CFR 655.54 - Partial certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Partial certification. 655.54 Section 655.54 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY EMPLOYMENT OF... Temporary Employment in Occupations Other Than Agriculture or Registered Nursing in the United States...

  7. Partial intravenous anesthesia in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Duke, Tanya

    2013-03-01

    The partial intravenous anesthesia technique (PIVA) is used to lower the inspired concentration of an inhalational anesthetic by concurrent use of injectable drugs. This technique reduces the incidence of undesirable side-effects and provides superior quality of anesthesia and analgesia. Drugs commonly used for PIVA include opioids, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, injectable anesthetic agents, and lidocaine. Most are administered by intravenous infusion.

  8. A case of partial trisomy 15

    PubMed Central

    Watson, E. Janet; Gordon, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    A girl with mental retardation but few distinctive physical abnormalities is described. Chromosome analysis revealed an extra small acrocentric chromosome with both long and short arms satellited which was identified as a deleted chromosome No. 15. The origin of this chromosome is discussed and the clinical findings compared with those of previously reported cases of partial trisomy 15. Images PMID:4443991

  9. Partial excision of residual burn lesions.

    PubMed

    Engrav, L H; Gottlieb, J R; Millard, S P; Walkinshaw, M D; Heimbach, D M; Marvin, J A

    1987-01-01

    Most burn victims have unattractive residual lesions, which may include hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, hypertrophic scars, and mature scars with altered pigmentation or texture. Some of these lesions can be treated by total excision in one or more stages or they can be reconstructed utilizing grafts, flaps, Z-plasties, or tissue expansion. But frequently these procedures are either not indicated or not elected by the patient. In such a situation, the only surgical option is partial excision, with the goal of making the lesion less conspicuous and more easily concealed by clothing. Whether or not such partial excisions are worthwhile is the obvious question. We could not find an answer in the literature and therefore decided to review our own experience. Between 6/30/81 and 3/12/86, 92 such procedures were performed and followed in 25 patients. Partial excision of hypertrophic donor sites, unsightly skin grafts, and hypertrophic scars did yield improved appearance in most patients. However, partial excision of mature scars, ie, areas of altered pigmentation or texture, did not have the same success. We continue to treat the first three types of lesions in this fashion but no longer include the latter.

  10. Canonical coordinates for partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, L. R.; Villarreal, Ramiro

    1987-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient conditions are found under which operators of the form Sigma(m, j=1) X(2)sub j + X sub 0 can be made constant coefficient. In addition, necessary and sufficient conditions are derived which classify those linear partial differential operators that can be moved to the Kolmogorov type.

  11. 20 CFR 655.165 - Partial certification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certification. The CO may issue a partial certification, reducing either the period of need or the number of H-2A workers being requested or both for certification, based upon information the CO receives during... the CO. The notice will also state that the employer may submit any legal arguments which the...

  12. Conservation Development in the Partially Sighted Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Lee; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A comparative study of conservation development in partially sighted, sighted, and sighted blindfolded children at four age levels was assessed. Conservation on tasks of mass, weight, and volume were evaluated using Piaget and Inhelder's prediction, judgment, and explanation questions. The significant differences were found between groups, task,…

  13. Partially Correct Constructs Illuminate Students' Inconsistent Answers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ron, Gila; Dreyfus, Tommy; Hershkowitz, Rina

    2010-01-01

    We present a view of knowledge construction processes, focusing on partially correct constructs. Motivated by unexpected and seemingly inconsistent quantitative data based on the written reports of students working on an elementary probability task, we analyze in detail the knowledge construction processes of a representative student. We show how…

  14. Some Considerations on the Partial Credit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhelst, N. D.; Verstralen, H. H. F. M.

    2008-01-01

    The Partial Credit Model (PCM) is sometimes interpreted as a model for stepwise solution of polytomously scored items, where the item parameters are interpreted as difficulties of the steps. It is argued that this interpretation is not justified. A model for stepwise solution is discussed. It is shown that the PCM is suited to model sums of binary…

  15. Monotherapy for partial epilepsy: focus on levetiracetam

    PubMed Central

    Gambardella, Antonio; Labate, Angelo; Colosimo, Eleonora; Ambrosio, Roberta; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    Levetiracetam (LEV), the S-enantiomer of alpha-ethyl-2-oxo-1-pyrollidine acetamide, is a recently licensed antiepileptic drug (AED) for adjunctive therapy of partial seizures. Its mechanism of action is uncertain but it exhibits a unique profile of anticonvulsant activity in models of chronic epilepsy. Five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials enrolling adult or pediatric patients with refractory partial epilepsy have demonstrated the efficacy of LEV as adjunctive therapy, with a responder rate (≥50% reduction in seizure frequency) of 28%–45%. Long-term efficacy studies suggest retention rates of 60% after one year, with 13% of patients seizure-free for 6 months of the study and 8% seizure-free for 1 year. More recent studies illustrated successful conversion to monotherapy in patients with refractory epilepsy, and its effectiveness as a single agent in partial epilepsy. LEV has also efficacy in generalized epilepsies. Adverse effects of LEV, including somnolence, lethargy, and dizziness, are generally mild and their occurrence rate seems to be not significantly different from that observed in placebo groups. LEV also has no clinically significant pharmacokinetic interactions with other AEDs, or with commonly prescribed medications. The combination of effective antiepileptic properties with a relatively mild adverse effect profile makes LEV an attractive therapy for partial seizures. PMID:18728811

  16. A Partial Theory of Executive Succession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiemann, Francis C.

    This study has two purposes: (1) To construct a partial theory of succession, and (2) to utilize a method of theory construction which combines some of the concepts of Hans Zetterberg with the principles of formal symbolic logic. A bibliography on succession in complex organizations with entries on descriptive and empirical studies from various…

  17. Some Partial Models for Urban Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Harold W.

    This paper focuses on partial models for solving urban problems to contrast our achievements as social scientists with our aspirations as prescribers of public policy. The objectives of this paper are (1) to review some of the reasons that an ideal set of solutions for urban problems has not been produced by social scientists and (2) to describe…

  18. Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Gary Wayne (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System (PAAIS) used to automate the alignment and integration of space vehicle components. A PAAIS includes ground support apparatuses, a track assembly with a plurality of energy-emitting components and an energy-receiving component containing a plurality of energy-receiving surfaces. Communication components and processors allow communication and feedback through PAAIS.

  19. A Partially Cavitating Hydrofoil in a Gust.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    TECHNOLOGYI DAVIDSON LABORATORY CASTLE POINT STATION H4OBOKEN. NEW JERSEY REPORT SIT-DL-80-21 18 November 1980 A PARTIALLY CA VITA TING HYDROFOIL * IN A...Engineering Building 315 CORNELL UNIVERSITY ARMY MOBILITY EQUIPMENT RESEARCH Ithaca, NY 14851 CENTER Fort Belvoir, VA 22060 1 Dr. D.E. Ordway SAGE ACTION, INC

  20. Using a Visible Light-Polymerized Resin to Fabricate an Interim Partial Removable Dental Prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Segal, Aaron; Yu, Hui Wen; Elkassaby, Heba

    2017-02-01

    An interim partial removable dental prosthesis (RDP) is any dental prosthesis that replaces some teeth in a partially dentate arch designed to enhance esthetics, stabilization, and/or function for a limited period of time, after which it is to be replaced by a definitive dental prosthesis. This article describes a technique that uses a visible light-polymerized (VLP) resin as the base material for an interim partial RDP. This technique can be easily accomplished in a dental office or laboratory and results in a predictable dental prosthesis. This technique eliminates the need for laboratory processing.

  1. New advances in the partial-reflection-drifts experiment using microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggerio, R. L.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1982-01-01

    Improvements to the partial reflection drifts experiment are completed. The results of the improvements include real time processing and simultaneous measurements of the D region with coherent scatter. Preliminary results indicate a positive correlation between drift velocities calculated by both methods during a two day interval. The possibility now exists for extended observations between partial reflection and coherent scatter. In addition, preliminary measurements could be performed between partial reflection and meteor radar to complete a comparison of methods used to determine velocities in the D region.

  2. Permeability of Partially Molten Rocks from Lattice-Boltzmann Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garapic, G.; Faul, U.

    2013-12-01

    Timescales of melt transport at mid-ocean ridges from mantle source to the surface depend on permeability of the partially molten mantle. The permeability is usually predicted indirectly from experimental observations based on porosities that are much higher than the porosities inferred for the partially molten mantle. Low porosities are for example predicted by geochemical models from the onset of melt migration. Since melting starts at the grain scale, permeability of the partially molten mantle will depend on the grain-scale melt distribution. We reconstructed a 3-D view of melt geometry of two experimentally produced samples of partially molten olivine which demonstrates that melt exists in thin layers on two-grain boundaries (Garapić et al.,G3, 2013). The wetted two-grain boundaries have a width about 100 times smaller than the average grain size. Additionally, the pore space consists of a network of triple-junction tubules at all porosities, and large 'melt pools'. Due to the relative size of the wetted two-grain boundaries as well as the size of the triple-junction network compared to the grain size imagining and numerical analyses of partially molten samples require high resolution. Since no direct experimental permeability measurements are possible on partially molten aggregates, we investigate numerically the permeability as a function of porosity for this system. We simulate porous flow through an artificial pore volume using the lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM) and Palabos LB code. Flow simulations were done on a computer cluster on three or four 125 GB nodes with 16 processors per node. With the available memory and allowed run time the maximum size of our pore structure was 1100 voxels per edge. In its simplest form the pore structure consists of a network of cylinders within a matrix of cubic grains. To approximate the observed 3-D melt geometry we added randomly distributed sheets on cube faces ('wetted two-grain boundaries') as well as randomly

  3. Dynamics of column stability with partial end restraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Peyton B.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of columns with partial end restraints and loads consisting of a dead load and a pulsating load are investigated. The differential equation is solved using a lumped impulse recurrence formula relative to time coupled with a finite difference discretization along the member length. A computer program is written from which the first critical frequencies are found as a function of end stiffness. The case of a pinned ended column compares very well with the exact solution. Also, the natural frequency and buckling load formulas are derived for equal and unequal end restraints.

  4. Partial splenic resection using the TA-stapler.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Kronberger, L; Kraft-Kine, J

    1994-07-01

    Since 1987, we have used the TA-stapler for 15 partial resections of the spleen. The cases included 5 second- to third-degree traumatic ruptures, 4 splenic cysts, 3 injuries resulting from accidents during upper-abdominal surgery, 2 diagnostic resections, and 1 intralienal pancreatic cyst. The TA-55 stapler was used 14 times and the TA-90 once. No patient developed postoperative bleeding or required further surgery. Postoperative laboratory chemistry and scintigraphy findings were within the limits indicative of normal function in all cases. The TA-stapler expands the technical possibilities for organ-conserving splenic surgery.

  5. Acute partial rupture of the common extensor tendon.

    PubMed

    Kachrimanis, G; Papadopoulou, O

    2010-06-01

    Rupture of the common extensor tendon is the most common acute tendon injury of the elbow. The authors describe a case of a patient with a clinical history of tendinopathy caused by functional overload of the common extensor tendon, treated also with infiltrations of steroids, and subsequent partial rupture of the tendon during sport activity. The diagnosis was made clinically and at ultrasound (US) examination; US follow-up after some time showed the healing of the lesion. This case confirms that injections of steroids may be a contributory cause of tendon rupture, and emphasizes the sensitivity and specificity of US in the study of pathologies of the elbow tendons.

  6. Learning from partially annotated OPT images by contextual relevance ranking.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenqi; Zhang, Jianguo; Zheng, Wei-Shi; Coats, Maria; Carey, Frank A; McKenna, Stephen J

    2013-01-01

    Annotations delineating regions of interest can provide valuable information for training medical image classification and segmentation methods. However the process of obtaining annotations is tedious and time-consuming, especially for high-resolution volumetric images. In this paper we present a novel learning framework to reduce the requirement of manual annotations while achieving competitive classification performance. The approach is evaluated on a dataset with 59 3D optical projection tomography images of colorectal polyps. The results show that the proposed method can robustly infer patterns from partially annotated images with low computational cost.

  7. Two types of quasiperiodic partial synchrony in oscillator ensembles.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2015-07-01

    We analyze quasiperiodic partially synchronous states in an ensemble of Stuart-Landau oscillators with global nonlinear coupling. We reveal two types of such dynamics: in the first case the time-averaged frequencies of oscillators and of the mean field differ, while in the second case they are equal, but the motion of oscillators is additionally modulated. We describe transitions from the synchronous state to both types of quasiperiodic dynamics, and a transition between two different quasiperiodic states. We present an example of a bifurcation diagram, where we show the borderlines for all these transitions, as well as domain of bistability.

  8. Spectral Deferred Corrections for Parabolic Partial Differential Equations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-08

    linear differential equation ϕ′(t) = λϕ(t), t ≥ 0 ϕ(0) = 1, (3.31) where λ ∈ C, has exact solution ϕ(t) = eλt. (3.32) Traditionally, for a fixed time step...the second-order differentiation matrix with 16 subintervals and 16 points per subinterval. From Figure 5.2, this matrix approximates the exact ...We describe a new class of algorithms for the solution of parabolic partial differential equa- tions (PDEs). This class of schemes is based on three

  9. Asymmetric hollow nanorod formation through a partial galvanic replacement reaction.

    PubMed

    Seo, Daeha; Song, Hyunjoon

    2009-12-30

    An asymmetric single hollow structure was generated from Ag-Au-Ag heterometal nanorods by a partial galvanic replacement reaction for the first time. The C(2)-symmetry breaking took place because of the random generation of a single pit on only one end of the silver domain at an early stage of the reaction. Careful control of the reaction kinetics could also yield a double-hollow structure on both ends of the silver domain. The resulting single- and double-hollow nanorods exhibited characteristic extinctions in the near-IR range.

  10. Behavior of Photovoltaic during the Partial Solar Eclipse in Bandung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Rusli, A.; Purnamasari, A.; Abdullah, A. G.; Riza, L. S.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the behavior of photovoltaic system during the partial solar eclipse phenomenon of 9 March 2016 in Bandung, Indonesia. In the experimental method, we monitored the impact of the solar eclipse on the photovoltaic system in solar cell system. To qualitatively explain the experimental observations, we compared the behavior of photovoltaic system in the solar eclipse day (9 March 2016) with the two sunny days (8 and 10 March 2016). The experimental results showed that the intensity and electricity power increased along with the solar light irradiation time. However, when there is a solar eclipse phenomenon, the intensity and electricity power is suddenly down.

  11. 24 CFR 203.435 - Transfers of partial interests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transfers of partial interests. 203... Insured Mortgage § 203.435 Transfers of partial interests. A partial interest in an insured mortgage may... account a financial interest in the insured mortgage. (c) Qualification for holding partial interest....

  12. 38 CFR 36.4316 - Acceptability of partial payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acceptability of partial... Acceptability of partial payments. A partial payment is a remittance by or on behalf of the borrower on a loan... any partial payment and either apply it to the mortgagor's account or identify it with the...

  13. Partial rectangular metric spaces and fixed point theorems.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satish

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of partial rectangular metric spaces as a generalization of rectangular metric and partial metric spaces. Some properties of partial rectangular metric spaces and some fixed point results for quasitype contraction in partial rectangular metric spaces are proved. Some examples are given to illustrate the observed results.

  14. PARTIAL TRISOMY 4p AND PARTIAL MONOSOMY 13q: CASE REPORT AND A LITERATURE REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Puvabanditsin, S; Herrera-Garcia, G; Gengel, N; Hussein, K; February, M; Mayne, J; Mehta, R

    2016-01-01

    We report on a term first born dichorionic-diamniotic twin with deletion of the distal long arm of chromosome 13, partial trisomy of the short arm of chromosome 4, intrauterine growth retardation, and multiple anomalies including microcephaly, colpocephaly, absent corpus callosum, bulbous tip of the nose, large and low set ears, macroglossia, thin upper lip, double outlet right ventricle, atria/ventricular septal defect, cleft mitral valve, pulmonary stenosis, single umbilical artery, multicystic dysplastic left kidney, sacral dimple, anterior displacement of anus, simian creases, abnormal thumb (congenital clasped thumb), overlapping toes, and congenital hypothyroidism. This is the first report of a patient with partial trisomy 4p and partial monosomy 13q.

  15. Bulk YBa2Cu3O(x) superconductors through pressurized partial melt growth processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, S.; Hojaji, H.; Barkatt, A.; Boroomand, M.; Hung, M.; Buechele, A. C.; Thorpe, A. N.; Davis, D. D.; Alterescu, S.

    1992-01-01

    A novel pressurized partial melt growth process has been developed for producing large pieces of bulk Y-Ba-Cu-O superconductors. During long-time partial melt growth stage, an additional driving force for solidification is obtained by using pressurized oxygen gas. The microstructure and superconducting properties of the resulting samples were investigated. It was found that this new technique can eliminate porosity and inhomogeneity, promote large-scale grain-texturing, and improve interdomain coupling as well.

  16. Least Squares Orbit Determination Using Partials of Mean Elements from Generalized Method of Averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Srinivas; Cefola, Paul

    Orbital debris is a well-known challenge of the space age. Maintaining a precise catalogue of space objects’ ephemeris is required to monitor and actively conduct collision avoidance maneuvers of functioning satellites. Maintaining a catalogue of hundreds of thousands of objects is computationally cumbersome. For this purpose, accurate and fast propagators along with similarly fast and accurate orbit determination method to update the catalogue with new tracking data are required. After investigating a semi-analytical satellite theory for cataloguing, we are now presenting an orbit determination system using partial derivatives of mean elements set, which is used in semi-analytical methods. In this study, combining the mean elements of semi-analytical satellite theory with well-established estimation procedures for orbit determination is performed. The selected mean elements are in equinoctial coordinate system, and are averaged for a specific theory - Draper Semi-analytical Satellite Theory (DSST). Forming a state transition matrix for least squares orbit determination from DSST’s mean elements involves the following partial derivatives: 1.the partial derivatives of the equinoctial short-periodic variations with respect to the mean equinoctial elements at the same time (within propagation) 2.the partial derivatives of the equinoctial mean elements at an arbitrary time with respect to the epoch time equinoctial mean elements 3.the partial derivatives of the equinoctial mean elements at an arbitrary time with respect to the dynamical parameters (atmospheric drag coefficient and solar radiation pressure coefficient), and 4.the partial derivatives of the equinoctial short-periodic variations with respect to the dynamical parameters The semi-analytical partial derivatives are composed of averaged partial derivatives and short periodic partial derivatives. Averaged partial derivatives are updated in time using analytical expressions, which includes certain

  17. Clinical and cytogenetic features of a patient with partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Young Bae; Yun, Jun No; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Moon Sung; Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Partial trisomy 8q is rare and has distinctive clinical features, including severe mental retardation, growth impairment, dysmorphic facial appearances, cleft palate, congenital heart disease, and urogenital anomalies. Partial monosomy 13q is a rare genetic disorder displaying a variety of phenotypic characteristics including mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, and congenital anomalies. Here, we describe for the first time clinical observations and cytogenetic analysis of a patient with a concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy of 8q (8q21.3→qter) and partial monosomy 13q(13q34→qter). The patient was a female neonate with facial dysmorphia, agenesis of the corpus callosum, cleft palate, and congenital heart disease. G-band standard karyotype was 46,XX,add(13)(q34). To determine the origin of additional genomic gain in chromosome 13, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was performed. Array CGH showed a 56.8 Mb sized gain on chromosome 8q and a 0.28 Mb sized loss on chromosome 13q. Therefore, the final karyotype of the patient was defined as 46,XX, der(13)t(8;13)(q21.3;q34). In conclusion, we described the clinical and cytogenetic analysis of the patient with concomitant occurrence of partial trisomy 8q and partial monosomy 13q delineated by array CGH. This report suggests that the array CGH would be a valuable diagnostic tool for identifying the origin of small additional genetic materials.

  18. Study of haemostatic disorders in experimentally induced leishmaniasis in Beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Valladares, J E; Ruiz De Gopegui, R; Riera, C; Alberola, J; Gállego, M; Espada, Y; Portús, M; Arboix, M

    1998-01-01

    Haemostatic alterations in dogs experimentally infected with Leishmania infantum were studied before and after therapy with meglumine antimonate. Haemostatic function tests including platelet count, collagen-induced platelet aggregation, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, plasma fibrinogen determination, and serum fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products concentration were performed. In the course of infection and before treatment, moderate thrombocytopenia (P<0.00001), decreased collagen induced platelet aggregation (P=0.0003), prolonged thrombin time (P=0.0117) and increased fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products were observed. Statistically significant differences of plasma fibrinogen concentration, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time were not encountered. Haemostatic parameters returned to normal values after therapy. The results indicate that Leishmania infection may impair haemostasis suggesting induction of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and that treating dogs in an early stage of infection may potentially avoid the possibility of developing an uncompensated DIC.

  19. Pneumatic conveying of materials at partial gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Thomas A.; Koenig, Elissa; Knudsen, Christian W.; Gibson, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of pneumatic transfer for the movement of regolith at a lunar base is evaluated. Operation of pneumatic conveying systems at partial (lunar and Mars) gravity on NASA's KC-135 aircraft allowed the determination of some key parameters necessary for the design of an operable system. Both horizontal and vertical transfer is studied. In the vertical experiment, the choking velocity for 150-micron glass spheres was determined to be 1/2 to 1/3 the velocity required at 1 g. Pressure drops were reduced by roughly the same amount. Determination of the saltation velocity in the horizontal run was problematic, but qualitatively similar results were obtained. Comparison of the partial g results to 1-g behavior and theoretical analysis is made.

  20. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome Presenting with Gynecomastia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Won; Kwak, Dong Shin; Jung, In Sub; Kwak, Joo Hee; Park, Jung Hwan; Hong, Sang Mo; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Yong Soo; Kim, Dong Sun; Choi, Woong Hwan; Ahn, You Hern

    2015-06-01

    Gynecomastia is a benign enlargement of the male breast caused by the proliferation of glandular breast tissue. Determining the various causes of gynecomastia such as physiological causes, drugs, systemic diseases, and endocrine disorders is important. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a rare endocrine disorder presenting with gynecomastia and is a disorder of male sexual differentiation caused by mutations within the androgen receptor gene. All individuals with AIS have the 46 XY karyotype, although AIS phenotypes can be classified as mild, partial or complete and can differ among both males and females including ambiguous genitalia or infertility in males. We experienced a case of partial AIS presenting with gynecomastia and identified the androgen receptor gene mutation.

  1. Multiple teleportation via partially entangled GHZ state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Pei-Ying; Yu, Xu-Tao; Zhan, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Zai-Chen

    2016-08-01

    Quantum teleportation is important for quantum communication. We propose a protocol that uses a partially entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state for single hop teleportation. Quantum teleportation will succeed if the sender makes a Bell state measurement, and the receiver performs the Hadamard gate operation, applies appropriate Pauli operators, introduces an auxiliary particle, and applies the corresponding unitary matrix to recover the transmitted state.We also present a protocol to realize multiple teleportation of partially entangled GHZ state without an auxiliary particle. We show that the success probability of the teleportation is always 0 when the number of teleportations is odd. In order to improve the success probability of a multihop, we introduce the method used in our single hop teleportation, thus proposing a multiple teleportation protocol using auxiliary particles and a unitary matrix. The final success probability is shown to be improved significantly for the method without auxiliary particles for both an odd or even number of teleportations.

  2. The Lockheed alternate partial polarizer universal filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tunable birefringent filter using an alternate partial polarizer design has been built. The filter has a transmission of 38% in polarized light. Its full width at half maximum is .09A at 5500A. It is tunable from 4500 to 8500A by means of stepping motor actuated rotating half wave plates and polarizers. Wave length commands and thermal compensation commands are generated by a PPD 11/10 minicomputer. The alternate partial polarizer universal filter is compared with the universal birefringent filter and the design techniques, construction methods, and filter performance are discussed in some detail. Based on the experience of this filter some conclusions regarding the future of birefringent filters are elaborated.

  3. Molecular orbital imaging for partially aligned molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Meiyan; Zhu, Xiaosong

    2017-01-01

    We investigate molecular orbital reconstruction using high-order harmonic emissions from partially aligned molecular ensembles. By carrying out the reconstruction procedure using the harmonic sampling with or without the spectral minimum, the roles of the harmonic phase and amplitude modulation due to the partial alignment can be separately studied. It is found that with the prior knowledge of the orbital symmetry, the reconstructed result is very sensitive to the modulation of the harmonic phase for the πg orbital, while in the case of σg orbital, the reconstructed result is mainly determined by the harmonic amplitude. These results can provide an important reference for the future experiment of molecular orbital imaging.

  4. Partial Data Traces: Efficient Generation and Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller,F; Mohan,T; de R. Supinski, B; McKee,S A; Yoo,A

    2001-07-16

    Binary manipulation techniques are increasing in popularity. They support program transformations tailored toward certain program inputs, and these transformations have been shown to yield performance gains beyond the scope of static code optimizations without profile-directed feedback. They even deliver moderate gains in the presence of profile-guided optimizations. In addition, transformations can be performed on the entire executable, including library routines. This work focuses on program instrumentation, yet another application of binary manipulation. This paper reports preliminary results on generating partial data traces through dynamic binary rewriting. The contributions are threefold. First, a portable method for extracting precise data traces for partial executions of arbitrary applications is developed. Second, a set of hierarchical structures for compactly representing these accesses is developed. Third, an efficient online algorithm to detect regular accesses is introduced. These efforts are part of a larger project to counter the increasing gap between processor and main memory speeds by means of software optimization and hardware enhancements.

  5. Optimal partial deterministic quantum teleportation of qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Mista, Ladislav Jr.; Filip, Radim

    2005-02-01

    We propose a protocol implementing optimal partial deterministic quantum teleportation for qubits. This is a teleportation scheme realizing deterministically an optimal 1{yields}2 asymmetric universal cloning where one imperfect copy of the input state emerges at the sender's station while the other copy emerges at receiver's possibly distant station. The optimality means that the fidelities of the copies saturate the asymmetric cloning inequality. The performance of the protocol relies on the partial deterministic nondemolition Bell measurement that allows us to continuously control the flow of information among the outgoing qubits. We also demonstrate that the measurement is optimal two-qubit operation in the sense of the trade-off between the state disturbance and the information gain.

  6. Applications of partially quenched chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Golterman, M.F.; Leung, K.C.

    1998-05-01

    Partially quenched theories are theories in which the valence- and sea-quark masses are different. In this paper we calculate the nonanalytic one-loop corrections of some physical quantities: the chiral condensate, weak decay constants, Goldstone boson masses, B{sub K}, and the K{sup +}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay amplitude, using partially quenched chiral perturbation theory. Our results for weak decay constants and masses agree with, and generalize, results of previous work by Sharpe. We compare B{sub K} and the K{sup +} decay amplitude with their real-world values in some examples. For the latter quantity, two other systematic effects that plague lattice computations, namely, finite-volume effects and unphysical values of the quark masses and pion external momenta, are also considered. We find that typical one-loop corrections can be substantial. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Bactericidal activity of partially oxidized nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Wehling, Julia; Dringen, Ralf; Zare, Richard N; Maas, Michael; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2014-06-24

    Nanodiamonds are a class of carbon-based nanoparticles that are rapidly gaining attention, particularly for biomedical applications, i.e., as drug carriers, for bioimaging, or as implant coatings. Nanodiamonds have generally been considered biocompatible with a broad variety of eukaryotic cells. We show that, depending on their surface composition, nanodiamonds kill Gram-positive and -negative bacteria rapidly and efficiently. We investigated six different types of nanodiamonds exhibiting diverse oxygen-containing surface groups that were created using standard pretreatment methods for forming nanodiamond dispersions. Our experiments suggest that the antibacterial activity of nanodiamond is linked to the presence of partially oxidized and negatively charged surfaces, specifically those containing acid anhydride groups. Furthermore, proteins were found to control the bactericidal properties of nanodiamonds by covering these surface groups, which explains the previously reported biocompatibility of nanodiamonds. Our findings describe the discovery of an exciting property of partially oxidized nanodiamonds as a potent antibacterial agent.

  8. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  9. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  10. Partial peritoneal alimentation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Merritt, R J; Atkinson, J B; Whalen, T V; Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Roloson, G J

    1988-01-01

    We provided partial peritoneal alimentation to a 1.69-kg 11-month-old premature infant who had no available central venous access, depleted peripheral venous access, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. A cuffed silastic catheter was surgically inserted into the suprahepatic space. An alimentation solution was continuously infused into the peritoneum for 28 days to supplement peripheral venous and nasogastric alimentation and contributed 42 +/- 15% of total calories daily. Weight gain was achieved, but complications included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, intravascular dehydration, catheter site leakage, ascites, and hydrocele. At autopsy 11 months later, lipid accumulation was present in the upper peritoneum and the hilar regions of the lungs secondary to preexisting lymphatic obstruction. Partial peritoneal alimentation may be feasible when other access routes are inadequate, but lymphatic obstruction is a contraindication to the peritoneal administration of lipid emulsions.

  11. Partial atrioventricular canal defect in a dog.

    PubMed

    Santamarina, G; Espino, L; Vila, M; Suarez, M L

    2002-01-01

    A case of a partial atrial canal defect is described in a nine-month-old female English setter. The patient had a large ostium primum atrial septal defect and a concurrent malformation of the mitral valve. Electrocardiographic and radiographic findings were suggestive of marked enlargement of the right heart and pulmonary overcirculation. Definitive diagnosis and assessment of the haemodynamic consequences were made using echocardiography. The magnitude of the left-to-right intracardiac shunt was estimated by measuring the pulmonary to systemic flow ratio (Qp/Qs) from Doppler-derived pulmonary and aortic blood flow. The results of this report suggest that dogs with a partial atrioventricular canal defect and concurrent mild mitral regurgitation may exhibit no clinical signs during the first years of life, even in cases with a Qp/Qs ratio of greater than 2.

  12. Electrochemical and partial oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Rahul

    2008-10-01

    negligible coke formation on the novel fabricated anode by electroless plating process. Hydrogen is an environmentally cleaner source of energy. The recent increase in the demand of hydrogen as fuel for all types of fuel cells and petroleum refining process has boosted the need of production of hydrogen. Methane, a major component of natural gas is the major feedstock for production of hydrogen. The route of partial oxidation of methane to produce syngas (CO + H2) offers significant advantages over commercialized steam reforming process for higher efficiency and lower energy requirements. Partial oxidation of methane was studied by pulsing O2 into a CH4 flow over Rh/Al2O3 in a sequence of in situ infrared (IR) cell and fixed bed reactor at 773 K. The results obtained from the sequence of an IR cell followed by a fixed bed reactor show that (i) adsorbed CO produced possesses a long residence time, indicating that adsorbed oxygen leading to the formation of CO is significantly different from those leading to CO2 and (ii) CO2 is not an intermediate species for the formation of CO. In situ IR of pulse reaction coupled with alternating reactor sequence is an effective approach to study the primary and secondary reactions as well as the nature of their adsorbed species. As reported earlier, hydrogen remains to be the most effective fuel for fuel cells, the production of high purity hydrogen from naturally available resources such as coal, petroleum, and natural gas requires a number of energy-intensive steps, making fuel cell processes for stationary electric power generation prohibitively uneconomic. Direct use of coal or coal gas as the feed is a promising approach for low cost electricity generation. Coal gas solid oxide fuel cell was studied by pyrolyzing Ohio #5 coal to coal gas and transporting to a Cu anode solid oxide fuel cell to generate power. The study of coal-gas solid oxide fuel cell is divided into two sections, i.e., (i) understanding the composition of coal gas by

  13. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  14. Pseudopotential Method for Higher Partial Wave Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Idziaszek, Zbigniew; Calarco, Tommaso

    2006-01-13

    We present a zero-range pseudopotential applicable for all partial wave interactions between neutral atoms. For p and d waves, we derive effective pseudopotentials, which are useful for problems involving anisotropic external potentials. Finally, we consider two nontrivial applications of the p-wave pseudopotential: we solve analytically the problem of two interacting spin-polarized fermions confined in a harmonic trap, and we analyze the scattering of p-wave interacting particles in a quasi-two-dimensional system.

  15. Discrete Surface Modelling Using Partial Differential Equations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoliang; Pan, Qing; Bajaj, Chandrajit L

    2006-02-01

    We use various nonlinear partial differential equations to efficiently solve several surface modelling problems, including surface blending, N-sided hole filling and free-form surface fitting. The nonlinear equations used include two second order flows, two fourth order flows and two sixth order flows. These nonlinear equations are discretized based on discrete differential geometry operators. The proposed approach is simple, efficient and gives very desirable results, for a range of surface models, possibly having sharp creases and corners.

  16. Partial discharge testing under direct voltage conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, R. S.; Westrom, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    DC partial discharge (PD) (corona) testing is performed using a multichannel analyzer for pulse storing, and data is collected during increase of voltage and at quiescent voltage levels. Thus high voltage ceramic disk capacitors were evaluated by obtaining PD data interspersed during an accelerated life test. Increased PD activity was found early in samples that later failed catastrophically. By this technique, trends of insulation behavior are revealed sensitively and nondestructively in high voltage dc components.

  17. Class of positive partial transposition states

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2006-08-15

    We construct a class of quantum bipartite d(multiply-in-circle sign)d states which are positive under partial transposition (PPT states). This class is invariant under the maximal commutative subgroup of U(d) and contains as special cases many well-known examples of PPT states. States from our class provide criteria for testing the indecomposability of positive maps. Such maps are crucial for constructing entanglement witnesses.

  18. Simple technique for generating the partially coherent and partially polarized electromagnetic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovsky, A. S.; Rodríguez, G.; Meneses, C.; Olvera, M. Á.; Juárez, E.

    2011-01-01

    The technique for generating the partially coherent and partially polarized source starting from the completely coherent and completely polarized laser source is proposed and analyzed. This technique differs from the known ones by the simplicity of its physical realization. An original technique for measuring the cross-spectral density matrix is employed. Experimental results of the characterization the coherence and polarization properties of the generated source are shown.

  19. Autosomal Trisomies and Partial Trisomy Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zaleski, W. A.

    1963-01-01

    The establishing of 46 chromosomes as the normal complement in man and the report of the sex chromatin bodies in buccal smears were followed by reports of trisomies and other abnormal patterns of the X and Y chromosomes in Klinefelter's and Turner's syndromes. Abnormal autosomal complements were described in mongolism, in the E-trisomy syndrome, the D-trisomy syndrome, in the Sturge-Weber syndrome, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, benign congenital hypotonia, atrial septal defect and in the schizoid personality. Certain of these conditions, as well as the “oral-facial-digital” syndrome, were also found to exist as partial trisomies. The mechanism of a trisomy is one of non-disjunction and of partial trisomy translocation or insertion. Two cases of the partial trisomy in the E group are described; these are of especial interest because of the familial incidence, longer survival and male sex occurrence, features which are rarely seen in the full E-trisomy syndrome. ImagesFig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:20327419

  20. Full and Partial Cloaking in Electromagnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Youjun; Liu, Hongyu; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider two regularized transformation-optics cloaking schemes for electromagnetic (EM) waves. Both schemes are based on the blowup construction with the generating sets being, respectively, a generic curve and a planar subset. We derive sharp asymptotic estimates in assessing the cloaking performances of the two constructions in terms of the regularization parameters and the geometries of the cloaking devices. The first construction yields an approximate full-cloak, whereas the second construction yields an approximate partial-cloak. Moreover, by incorporating properly chosen conducting layers, both cloaking constructions are capable of nearly cloaking arbitrary EM contents. This work complements the existing results in Ammari et al. (SIAM J Appl Math 73:2055-2076, 2013), Bao and Liu (SIAM J Appl Math 74:724-742, 2014), Bao et al. (J Math Pure Appl (9) 101:716-733, 2014) on approximate EM cloaks with the generating set being a singular point, and it also extends Deng et al. (On regularized full- and partial-cloaks in acoustic scat- tering. Preprint, arXiv:1502.01174, 2015), Li et al. (Commun Math Phys, 335:671-712, 2015) on regularized full and partial cloaks for acoustic waves governed by the Helmholtz system to the more challenging EM case governed by the full Maxwell system.

  1. Acute renal injury after partial hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Peres, Luis Alberto Batista; Bredt, Luis Cesar; Cipriani, Raphael Flavio Fachini

    2016-01-01

    Currently, partial hepatectomy is the treatment of choice for a wide variety of liver and biliary conditions. Among the possible complications of partial hepatectomy, acute kidney injury (AKI) should be considered as an important cause of increased morbidity and postoperative mortality. Difficulties in the data analysis related to postoperative AKI after liver resections are mainly due to the multiplicity of factors to be considered in the surgical patients, moreover, there is no consensus of the exact definition of AKI after liver resection in the literature, which hampers comparison and analysis of the scarce data published on the subject. Despite this multiplicity of risk factors for postoperative AKI after partial hepatectomy, there are main factors that clearly contribute to its occurrence. First factor relates to large blood losses with renal hypoperfusion during the operation, second factor relates to the occurrence of post-hepatectomy liver failure with consequent distributive circulatory changes and hepatorenal syndrome. Eventually, patients can have more than one factor contributing to post-operative AKI, and frequently these combinations of acute insults can be aggravated by sepsis or exposure to nephrotoxic drugs. PMID:27478539

  2. Viscous fingering with partial miscible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojing; Cueto-Felgueroso, Luis; Juanes, Ruben

    2015-11-01

    When a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid, the contrast in viscosity destabilizes the interface between the two fluids, leading to the formation of fingers. Studies of viscous fingering have focused on fluids that are either fully miscible or perfectly immiscible. In practice, however, the miscibility of two fluids can change appreciably with temperature and pressure, and often falls into the case of partial miscibility, where two fluids have limited solubility in each other. Following our recent work for miscible (Jha et al., PRL 2011, 2013) and immiscible systems (Cueto-Felgueroso and Juanes, PRL 2012, JFM 2014), here we propose a phase-field model for fluid-fluid displacements in a Hele-Shaw cell, when the two fluids have limited (but nonzero) solubility in one another. Partial miscibility is characterized through the design of thermodynamic free energy of the two-fluid system. We elucidate the key dimensionless groups that control the behavior of the system. We present high-resolution numerical simulations of the model applied to the viscous fingering problem. On one hand, we demonstrate the effect of partial miscibility on the hydrodynamic instability. On the other, we elucidate the role of the degree of fingering on the rate of mutual fluid dissolution.

  3. Partially massless higher-spin theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, Christopher; Hinterbichler, Kurt

    2017-02-01

    We study a generalization of the D-dimensional Vasiliev theory to include a tower of partially massless fields. This theory is obtained by replacing the usual higher-spin algebra of Killing tensors on (A)dS with a generalization that includes "third-order" Killing tensors. Gauging this algebra with the Vasiliev formalism leads to a fully non-linear theory which is expected to be UV complete, includes gravity, and can live on dS as well as AdS. The linearized spectrum includes three massive particles and an infinite tower of partially massless particles, in addition to the usual spectrum of particles present in the Vasiliev theory, in agreement with predictions from a putative dual CFT with the same symmetry algebra. We compute the masses of the particles which are not fixed by the massless or partially massless gauge symmetry, finding precise agreement with the CFT predictions. This involves computing several dozen of the lowest-lying terms in the expansion of the trilinear form of the enlarged higher-spin algebra. We also discuss nuances in the theory that occur in specific dimensions; in particular, the theory dramatically truncates in bulk dimensions D = 3 , 5 and has non-diagonalizable mixings which occur in D = 4 , 7.

  4. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, C.P.; Booth, D.B.; Burges, S.J.; Montgomery, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial patterns of bed material entrainment by floods were documented at seven gravel bars using arrays of metal washers (bed tags) placed in the streambed. The observed patterns were used to test a general stochastic model that bed material entrainment is a spatially independent, random process where the probability of entrainment is uniform over a gravel bar and a function of the peak dimensionless shear stress ??*0 of the flood. The fraction of tags missing from a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect to ??*0 with a mean value (50% of the tags entrained) of 0.085 and standard deviation of 0.022 (root-mean-square error of 0.09). Variation in partial entrainment for a given ??*0 demonstrated the effects of flow conditioning on bed strength, with lower values of partial entrainment after intermediate magnitude floods (0.065 < ??*0 < 0.08) than after higher magnitude floods. Although the probability of bed material entrainment was approximately uniform over a gravel bar during individual floods and independent from flood to flood, regions of preferential stability and instability emerged at some bars over the course of a wet season. Deviations from spatially uniform and independent bed material entrainment were most pronounced for reaches with varied flow and in consecutive floods with small to intermediate magnitudes.

  5. Conformal Visualization for Partially-Immersive Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Kaloian; Papadopoulos, Charilaos; Zhang, Min; Kaufman, Arie E.; Gu, Xianfeng

    2010-01-01

    Current immersive VR systems such as the CAVE provide an effective platform for the immersive exploration of large 3D data. A major limitation is that in most cases at least one display surface is missing due to space, access or cost constraints. This partially-immersive visualization results in a substantial loss of visual information that may be acceptable for some applications, however it becomes a major obstacle for critical tasks, such as the analysis of medical data. We propose a conformal deformation rendering pipeline for the visualization of datasets on partially-immersive platforms. The angle-preserving conformal mapping approach is used to map the 360°3D view volume to arbitrary display configurations. It has the desirable property of preserving shapes under distortion, which is important for identifying features, especially in medical data. The conformal mapping is used for rasterization, realtime raytracing and volume rendering of the datasets. Since the technique is applied during the rendering, we can construct stereoscopic images from the data, which is usually not true for image-based distortion approaches. We demonstrate the stereo conformal mapping rendering pipeline in the partially-immersive 5-wall Immersive Cabin (IC) for virtual colonoscopy and architectural review. PMID:26279083

  6. Partial-Vacuum-Gasketed Electrochemical Corrosion Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonifas, Andrew P.; Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical cell for making corrosion measurements has been designed to prevent or reduce crevice corrosion, which is a common source of error in prior such cells. The present cell (see figure) includes an electrolyte reservoir with O-ring-edged opening at the bottom. In preparation for a test, the reservoir, while empty, is pressed down against a horizontal specimen surface to form an O-ring seal. A purge of air or other suitable gas is begun in the reservoir, and the pressure in the reservoir is regulated to maintain a partial vacuum. While maintaining the purge and partial vacuum, and without opening the interior of the reservoir to the atmosphere, the electrolyte is pumped into the reservoir. The reservoir is then slowly lifted a short distance off the specimen. The level of the partial vacuum is chosen such that the differential pressure is just sufficient to keep the electrolyte from flowing out of the reservoir through the small O-ring/specimen gap. Electrochemical measurements are then made. Because there is no gasket (and, hence, no crevice between the specimen and the gasket), crevice corrosion is unlikely to occur.

  7. Partial rotor-to-stator rub demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grissom, R.

    1985-01-01

    A rotor radial rub typically occurs in seals or at a blade tip or shroud when there is insufficient clearance, high vibration, or the shaft equilibrium position has been displaced to effectively limit the clearance (eccentricity). There are two extreme cases of radial rubs: full annular rub, when the rotor maintains continuous contact with the seal, etc.; and a partial rub, when the contact occurs during a fraction of the precession period. They both involve similar physical phenomena such as friction and modification of stiffness. In partial rubs with consecutive impacts, a significant average value of radial force is generated. This results in shaft average displacement in the direction opposite the rub location. The rotor rig demonstrates the characteristics of a partial lateral rub of varying severity and location. These characteristics include: (1) subharmonic components as a function of rotative speed/first balance resonance ratio and radial force; (2) higher harmonic content as a function of severity; (3) increased average rotor stiffness resulting in increased first balance resonance speed; and (4) change in overall orbital pattern as a sum of the unbalance response (1x) and subharmonic response (1nx).

  8. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN PARTIALLY IONIZED COMPRESSIBLE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A. J.; Ballester, J. L. E-mail: roberto.soler@wis.kuleuven.be

    2012-07-20

    We study the modification of the classical criterion for the linear onset and growing rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a partially ionized plasma in the two-fluid description. The plasma is composed of a neutral fluid and an electron-ion fluid, coupled by means of particle collisions. The governing linear equations and appropriate boundary conditions, including gravitational terms, are derived and applied to the case of the RTI in a single interface between two partially ionized plasmas. The limits of collisionless, no gravity, and incompressible fluids are checked before addressing the general case. We find that both compressibility and ion-neutral collisions lower the linear growth rate, but do not affect the critical threshold of the onset of the RTI. The configuration is always unstable when a lighter plasma is below a heavier plasma regardless the value of the magnetic field strength, the ionization degree, and the ion-neutral collision frequency. However, ion-neutral collisions have a strong impact on the RTI growth rate, which can be decreased by an order of magnitude compared to the value in the collisionless case. Ion-neutral collisions are necessary to accurately describe the evolution of the RTI in partially ionized plasmas such as prominences. The timescale for the development of the instability is much longer than in the classical incompressible fully ionized case. This result may explain the existence of prominence fine structures with life times of the order of 30 minutes. The timescales derived from the classical theory are about one order of magnitude shorter and incompatible with the observed life times.

  9. Does partial Granger causality really eliminate the influence of exogenous inputs and latent variables?

    PubMed

    Roelstraete, Bjorn; Rosseel, Yves

    2012-04-30

    Partial Granger causality was introduced by Guo et al. (2008) who showed that it could better eliminate the influence of latent variables and exogenous inputs than conditional G-causality. In the recent literature we can find some reviews and applications of this type of Granger causality (e.g. Smith et al., 2011; Bressler and Seth, 2010; Barrett et al., 2010). These articles apparently do not take into account a serious flaw in the original work on partial G-causality, being the negative F values that were reported and even proven to be plausible. In our opinion, this undermines the credibility of the obtained results and thus the validity of the approach. Our study is aimed to further validate partial G-causality and to find an answer why negative partial Granger causality estimates were reported. Time series were simulated from the same toy model as used in the original paper and partial and conditional causal measures were compared in the presence of confounding variables. Inference was done parametrically and using non-parametric block bootstrapping. We counter the proof that partial Granger F values can be negative, but the main conclusion of the original article remains. In the presence of unknown latent and exogenous influences, it appears that partial G-causality will better eliminate their influence than conditional G-causality, at least when non-parametric inference is used.

  10. The pharmacology of epanolol (ICI 141292)--a new beta 1-selective adrenoceptor partial agonist.

    PubMed

    Bilski, A J; Hadfield, S E; Wale, J L

    1988-08-01

    The clinical benefit of beta-adrenoceptor partial agonists is still debated. To clarify the situation, epanolol, ICI 141,292 [N-[-2-(3-o-cyanophenoxy-2-hydroxypropylamino)ethyl]-4- hydroxyphenylactamide], has been developed to assess the role of modest beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist activity in humans. Animal studies have shown that epanolol is a potent beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist with a greater affinity for beta 1- than beta 2-adrenoceptors. In vitro, the PA2 values obtained for espanolol at atrial and tracheal beta-adrenoceptors were 8.42 and 6.33, respectively (isoproterenol as agonist), giving a selectivity ratio of 123. The potency was studied in vivo in the dog, where it was also shown that as an antagonist at the cardiac beta 1-adrenoceptor, it was 18 and 40 times more potent than atenolol and practolol, respectively. Espanolol has less partial agonist activity in the rat than pindolol, but more than practolol. In this species, it is also a classical partial agonist, exhibiting agonist activity at all beta-adrenoceptor blocking doses. This is in contrast to pindolol, which caused predominantly beta-adrenoceptor blockade at low doses and partial agonist activity at higher doses. These differences were confirmed in haemodynamic studies in the dog. In contrast to many other partial agonists, the partition coefficient, log P, of epanolol in octanol and water is low (0.92).

  11. 5 CFR 831.631 - Post-retirement election of fully reduced annuity or partially reduced annuity to provide a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., within 1 year after a post-retirement marriage, a fully reduced annuity or a partially reduced annuity to... partially reduced annuity at the time of retirement may elect, within 1 year after a postretirement marriage... month beginning 1 year after the date of the post-retirement marriage. (b) Except as provided...

  12. Data-driven discovery of partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Samuel; Brunton, Steven; Proctor, Joshua; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2016-11-01

    Fluid dynamics is inherently governed by spatial-temporal interactions which can be characterized by partial differential equations (PDEs). Emerging sensor and measurement technologies allowing for rich, time-series data collection motivate new data-driven methods for discovering governing equations. We present a novel computational technique for discovering governing PDEs from time series measurements. A library of candidate terms for the PDE including nonlinearities and partial derivatives is computed and sparse regression is then used to identify a subset which accurately reflects the measured dynamics. Measurements may be taken either in a Eulerian framework to discover field equations or in a Lagrangian framework to study a single stochastic trajectory. The method is shown to be robust, efficient, and to work on a variety of canonical equations. Data collected from a simulation of a flow field around a cylinder is used to accurately identify the Navier-Stokes vorticity equation and the Reynolds number to within 1%. A single trace of Brownian motion is also used to identify the diffusion equation. Our method provides a novel approach towards data enabled science where spatial-temporal information bolsters classical machine learning techniques to identify physical laws.

  13. Partially Polyurethane-Covered Stent for Cerebral Aneurysm Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rangwala, Hussain S.; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Rudin, Stephen; Baier, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Partially polyurethane-covered stent (PPCS) is proposed for the treatment of cerebral aneurysms. The PPCSs were observed to substantially modify the flow entering the aneurysm in a patient-specific aneurysm phantom (PSAP). These stents can act as flow modulators and the polyurethane (PU) membrane can provide a smooth scaffold for restoring the structural integrity of the diseased vessel. Partial coating of the stent aids in sealing only the entrance to the aneurysm while keeping the perforators around the aneurysm open and patent. Biocompatibility of the PU membrane was monitored using contact angle measurements to show that critical surface tension (CST) values remained in the thromboresistant range of 20–30 mN/m. Stent flexibility, stiffness, and pressure–diameter relationship showed no significant change after asymmetric PU film application. No delamination of the PU membrane from the stent was observed within the working strains of the stent. The flow modulating capability of the PPCS was monitored by intentionally orienting the stent to cover either the proximal or the distal regions along the neck of the PSAP. Time density curves (TDCs) compared the relative metrics of input rate, washout rate, residence time, and influx in the aneurysm before and after the stent placement. PMID:18837459

  14. Clotting profile in cattle showing chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Di Loria, A; Piantedosi, D; Cortese, L; Roperto, S; Urraro, C; Paciello, O; Guccione, J; Britti, D; Ciaramella, P

    2012-08-01

    Primary haemostasis (bleeding and blood clotting time), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), antithrombin III (ATIII), protein C, protein S, fibrinogen and D-dimer were determined in 13 cattle affected by chronic enzootic haematuria (CEH) and bladder neoplasms and 10 healthy cattle (control group). Increases in antithrombin III and protein S activities (P<0.01) and protein C and fibrinogen plasma levels (P<0.05) were observed in sick animals, while activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, and D-dimer did not show significant differences when compared to healthy animals. The clotting profile observed does not seem responsible for the chronic bleeding typical of CEH. The observed modification of some coagulation markers may derive from multiple interactions among cancer, inflammation and viral infection status typical of this syndrome.

  15. Vertical Framing of Superimposed Signature Files Using Partial Evaluation of Queries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocberber, Seyit; Can, Fazli

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of data storage technology for multimedia materials highlights a new signature file method that divides files into variable-sized vertical frames to optimize response time using partial query evaluation. Real data experiments that tested the response time are reported, and future work is discussed. (Author/LRW)

  16. Congenital deficiency of factor VII.

    PubMed

    Sikka, M; Gomber, S; Madan, N; Rusia, U; Sharma, S

    1996-01-01

    A case of congenital factor VII deficiency in a five-year-old child is reported. The patient, born of a non-consanguineous marriage, presented with repeated bouts of epistaxis since childhood. The prothrombin time (PT) was markedly prolonged with a normal bleeding time (BT), partial thromboplastin time with Kaolin (PTTK) and platelet count. The patient has been on follow up for the last four years and is doing apparently well.

  17. Partially coherent flat-topped beam and its propagation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Di; Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang

    2004-08-20

    A partially coherent beam with flat-topped profile is proposed. The cross-spectral density of this beam can be expressed as a finite series of the cross-spectral density of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model beams with different parameters. Analytical propagation formulas for partially coherent flat-topped beams are derived through aligned and misaligned optical systems. The propagation property of partially coherent flat-topped beams in free space is illustrated numerically. The fractional Fourier transform of partially coherent fiat-topped beams is also studied. Our method provides a convenient way to describe partially coherent flat-topped beams and treat their propagation and transformation.

  18. Turbulent flame propagation in partially premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T.; Veynante, D.; Trouve, A.; Ruetsch, G.

    1996-01-01

    Turbulent premixed flame propagation is essential in many practical devices. In the past, fundamental and modeling studies of propagating flames have generally focused on turbulent flame propagation in mixtures of homogeneous composition, i.e. a mixture where the fuel-oxidizer mass ratio, or equivalence ratio, is uniform. This situation corresponds to the ideal case of perfect premixing between fuel and oxidizer. In practical situations, however, deviations from this ideal case occur frequently. In stratified reciprocating engines, fuel injection and large-scale flow motions are fine-tuned to create a mean gradient of equivalence ratio in the combustion chamber which provides additional control on combustion performance. In aircraft engines, combustion occurs with fuel and secondary air injected at various locations resulting in a nonuniform equivalence ratio. In both examples, mean values of the equivalence ratio can exhibit strong spatial and temporal variations. These variations in mixture composition are particularly significant in engines that use direct fuel injection into the combustion chamber. In this case, the liquid fuel does not always completely vaporize and mix before combustion occurs, resulting in persistent rich and lean pockets into which the turbulent flame propagates. From a practical point of view, there are several basic and important issues regarding partially premixed combustion that need to be resolved. Two such issues are how reactant composition inhomogeneities affect the laminar and turbulent flame speeds, and how the burnt gas temperature varies as a function of these inhomogeneities. Knowledge of the flame speed is critical in optimizing combustion performance, and the minimization of pollutant emissions relies heavily on the temperature in the burnt gases. Another application of partially premixed combustion is found in the field of active control of turbulent combustion. One possible technique of active control consists of pulsating

  19. Estimation of partial decoupling of cavity events

    SciTech Connect

    Garbin, H D

    1993-03-01

    One proven method of evading the detection of a nuclear test is to decouple the explosion with a large air-filled cavity. Past tests have shown it is possible to substantially reduce the seismic energy emanating from a nuclear explosion by as much as two, orders of magnitude. The problem is not whether it can be done; the problem is the expense involved in mining a large cavity to fully decouple any reasonable size test. It has been suggested that partial decoupling may exist so some fraction of decoupling may be attained between factors of 1 to 100. MISTY ECHO and MINERAL QUARRY are two nuclear tests which were instrumented to look at this concept. MISTY ECHO was a nuclear explosion conducted in an 11 m hemispherical cavity such that the walls were over driven and reacted in a non-linear manner. MINERAL QUARRY was a nearby tamped event that is used as a reference to compare with MISTY ECHO. The scaled cavity radius of MISTY ECHO was greater than 2m/kt[sup l/3]. Both of these tests had free-field accelerometers located within 400 m of their respective sources. Analysis of surface ground motion is inconclusive on the question of partial decoupling. This is due to the difference in medium properties that the ray paths take to the surface. The free-field configuration alleviates this concern. The analysis consists of cube-root signal MINERAL QUARRYs signal to MISTY ECHO's yield and calculating the ratio of the Fourier amplitudes of both the acceleration and the reduced displacement potentials. The results do not indicate the presence of partial decoupling. In fact, there is a coupling enhancement factor of 2.

  20. Gravity Effects Observed In Partially Premixed Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puri, Ishwar K.; Aggarwal, Suresh K.; Lock, Andrew J.; Gauguly, Ranjan; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    Partially premixed flames (PPFs) contain a rich premixed fuel air mixture in a pocket or stream, and, for complete combustion to occur, they require the transport of oxidizer from an appropriately oxidizer-rich (or fuel-lean) mixture that is present in another pocket or stream. Partial oxidation reactions occur in fuel-rich portions of the mixture and any remaining unburned fuel and/or intermediate species are consumed in the oxidizer-rich portions. Partial premixing, therefore, represents that condition when the equivalence ratio (phi) in one portion of the flowfield is greater than unity, and in another section its value is less than unity. In general, for combustion to occur efficiently, the global equivalence ratio is in the range fuel-lean to stoichiometric. These flames can be established by design by placing a fuel-rich mixture in contact with a fuel-lean mixture, but they also occur otherwise in many practical systems, which include nonpremixed lifted flames, turbulent nonpremixed combustion, spray flames, and unwanted fires. Other practical applications of PPFs are reported elsewhere. Although extensive experimental studies have been conducted on premixed and nonpremixed flames under microgravity, there is a absence of previous experimental work on burner stabilized PPFs in this regard. Previous numerical studies by our group employing a detailed numerical model showed gravity effects to be significant on the PPF structure. We report on the results of microgravity experiments conducted on two-dimensional (established on a Wolfhard-Parker slot burner) and axisymmetric flames (on a coannular burner) that were investigated in a self-contained multipurpose rig. Thermocouple and radiometer data were also used to characterize the thermal transport in the flame.