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Sample records for partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon

  1. US appearance of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: Application of the string theory. Pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Guerini, H; Fermand, M; Godefroy, D; Feydy, A; Chevrot, A; Morvan, G; Gault, N; Drapé, J L

    2012-02-01

    The supraspinatus tendon is composed of 5 different layers consisting of intertwining bundles. On a front portion of the tendon, the layers become coated bundles which insert on the trochanter. At the insertion, the superficial or bursal surface of the tendon corresponding to the tendon fibers in contact with the subacromial bursa can be distinguished from the deep surface corresponding to the fibers in contact with the glenohumeral joint. A tendon tear may involve partial or total disruption of the tendon fibers and is called full-thickness tear if it affects the entire tendon, and partial-thickness tear if it involves only part of the tendon. Partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus tendon include lesions of the superficial, deep and central surface or tendon delamination.A contrast enhanced examination requires injection of contrast agent into the joint (arthrography followed by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) to study the deep surface, and injection into the subacromial bursa (bursography followed by CT) to study the superficial surface. MRI and ultrasound (US) examination allow the study of these different tendon layers without the use of contrast agent (which is not possible at CT).

  2. The "paraglider-wing" sign: an arthroscopic indicator of partial-thickness bursal-surface tears of the supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Deepak N; van Rooyen, Karin S; de Beer, Joe F

    2007-06-01

    Partial-thickness bursal-surface tears of supraspinatus tendon may be missed on preoperative investigations and can be overlooked at surgery if not specifically sought. The authors describe an arthroscopic sign to detect these tears, when they involve more than half the tendon fibres, from the articular-side of the joint. The "paraglider-wing" sign, visualized during diagnostic glenohumeral arthroscopy, is demonstrated as an upward bulge of the capsulo-tendinous layer through the bursal-surface tear, under pressure of the inflow fluid. A positive sign indicates (1) presence of a partial-thickness bursal-side tear of the supraspinatus tendon, (2) significant depth (stage II or III) of the tear, and (3) the medial extent of the tear along the length of the tendon. A meticulous subacromial bursoscopy and excision of the bursa is then performed to visualize the tear from the subacromial space. Repair of the tear is performed with a double-row suture anchor fixation technique; the medial row of sutures is passed through the intact region of the tendon using the "paraglider-wing" sign as a guide. PMID:17119924

  3. Supraspinatus Intramuscular Calcified Hematoma or Necrosis Associated with Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Lädermann, Alexandre; Genevay, Muriel; Abrassart, Sophie; Schwitzguébel, Adrien Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Rotator cuff intramuscular calcification is a rare condition usually caused by heterotopic ossification and myositis ossificans. Case Presentation. We describe a patient with voluminous calcified mass entrapped in supraspinatus muscle associated with corresponding tendon tear. Histological examination corresponded to a calcified hematoma or necrosis. Patient was surgically managed with open excision of the calcified hematoma and rotator cuff arthroscopic repair. At 6 months, supraspinatus muscle was healed, and functional outcome was good. Discussion and Conclusion. We hypothesized that supraspinatus intramuscular calcified hematoma was responsible for mechanical stress on the tendon. This association has never been described. PMID:26380138

  4. Detection of partial-thickness tears in ligaments and tendons by Stokes-polarimetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; John, Raheel; Walsh, Joseph T.

    2008-02-01

    A Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system utilizes an algorithm developed to construct degree of polarization (DoP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination. Partial-thickness tears of turkey tendons were imaged by the SPI system in order to examine the feasibility of the system to detect partial-thickness rotator cuff tear or general tendon pathology. The rotating incident polarization angle (IPA) for the linearly polarized light provides a way to analyze different tissue types which may be sensitive to IPA variations. Degree of linear polarization (DoLP) images revealed collagen fiber structure, related to partial-thickness tears, better than standard intensity images. DoLP images also revealed structural changes in tears that are related to the tendon load. DoLP images with red-wavelength-filtered incident light may show tears and related organization of collagen fiber structure at a greater depth from the tendon surface. Degree of circular polarization (DoCP) images exhibited well the horizontal fiber orientation that is not parallel to the vertically aligned collagen fibers of the tendon. The SPI system's DOLP images reveal alterations in tendons and ligaments, which have a tissue matrix consisting largely of collagen, better than intensity images. All polarized images showed modulated intensity as the IPA was varied. The optimal detection of the partial-thickness tendon tears at a certain IPA was observed. The SPI system with varying IPA and spectral information can improve the detection of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears by higher visibility of fiber orientations and thereby improve diagnosis and treatment of tendon related injuries.

  5. Emergency department diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and shoulder impingement syndrome using bedside ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riley, David C; Kaufman, Martha; Ward, Theresa M; Acevedo, Yesenia; Guerra, Rodney; Folorunsho, Adenike

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of severe left shoulder pain made worse with movement. Emergency department (ED) bedside point-of-care static and dynamic ultrasound examination of the supraspinatus tendon revealed supraspinatus tendon calcification with impingement syndrome, and the patient was urgently referred to orthopedics after ED pain control was achieved. Bedside shoulder and supraspinatus tendon evaluation with static and dynamic ultrasonography can assist in the rapid diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and supraspinatus tendon impingement syndrome in the emergency department.

  6. Genetic Response of Rat Supraspinatus Tendon and Muscle to Exercise.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Tobias, John W; Bhatt, Pankti R; Kuntz, Andrew F; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex, biologic event that aims to protect and repair tissue. Previous studies suggest that inflammation is critical to induce a healing response following acute injury; however, whether similar inflammatory responses occur as a result of beneficial, non-injurious loading is unknown. The objective of this study was to screen for alterations in a subset of inflammatory and extracellular matrix genes to identify the responses of rat supraspinatus tendon and muscle to a known, non-injurious loading condition. We sought to define how a subset of genes representative of specific inflammation and matrix turnover pathways is altered in supraspinatus tendon and muscle 1) acutely following a single loading bout and 2) chronically following repeated loading bouts. In this study, Sprague-Dawley rats in the acute group ran a single bout of non-injurious exercise on a flat treadmill (10 m/min, 1 hour) and were sacrificed 12 or 24 hours after. Rats in the chronic group ran 5 days/wk for 1 or 8 weeks. A control group maintained normal cage activity. Supraspinatus muscle and tendon were harvested for RNA extractions, and a custom Panomics QuantiGene 2.0 multiplex assay was used to detect 48 target and 3 housekeeping genes. Muscle/tendon and acute/chronic groups had distinct gene expression. Components of the arachidonic acid cascade and matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors were altered with acute and chronic exercise. Collagen expression increased. Using a previously validated model of non-injurious exercise, we have shown that supraspinatus tendon and muscle respond to acute and chronic exercise by regulating inflammatory- and matrix turnover-related genes, suggesting that these pathways are involved in the beneficial adaptations to exercise. PMID:26447778

  7. Tensile properties of a morphologically split supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Tomoya; Hooke, Alexander W; Zhao, Kristin D; Goto, Akira; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; An, Kai-Nan

    2014-07-01

    The supraspinatus tendon consists morphologically of two sub-regions, anterior and posterior. The anterior sub-region is thick and tubular while the posterior is thin and strap-like. The purpose of this study was to compare the structural and mechanical properties of the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the supraspinatus tendon. The supraspinatus tendons from seven human cadaveric shoulders were morphologically divided into the anterior and posterior sub-regions. Length, width, and thickness were measured. A servo-hydraulic testing machine (MTS Systems Corporation, Minneapolis, MN) was used for tensile testing. The maximal load at failure, modulus of elasticity and ultimate tendon stress were calculated. Repeated measures were used for statistical comparisons. The mean anterior tendon cross-sectional area was 47.3 mm(2) and the posterior was 32.1 mm(2) . Failure occurred most often at the insertion site: anterior (5/7) and posterior (6/7). All parameters of the anterior sub-region were significantly greater than those of the posterior sub-region. The moduli of elasticity at the insertion site were 592.4 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 217.7 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.01). The ultimate failure loads were 779.2 N in the anterior sub-region and 335.6 N in the posterior (P = 0.003). The ultimate stresses were 22.1 MPa in the anterior sub-region and 11.6 MPa in the posterior (P = 0.008). We recognized that the anterior and posterior sub-regions of the SSP tendon have significantly different mechanical properties. In a future study, we need to evaluate how best to repair an SSP tendon considering these region-specific properties. PMID:24214830

  8. Open fracture of the acromion associated with a supraspinatus tendon rupture: an exceptional case report.

    PubMed

    Mardy, Abdelhak; Mechchat, Atif; El Ghazi, Amine; El Idrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    The combination of the acromion Open fracture to a section of the supraspinatus tendon is an exceptional situation. The author reports the case of a young patient with a wound of the posterolateral side of the right shoulder. Screwing was done for the fracture of the acromion after supraspinatus tendon suture with good clinical and radiological outcome after an appropriate rehabilitation. PMID:25918565

  9. Open fracture of the acromion associated with a supraspinatus tendon rupture: an exceptional case report

    PubMed Central

    Mardy, Abdelhak; Mechchat, Atif; El Ghazi, Amine; El Idrissi, Mohammed; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    The combination of the acromion Open fracture to a section of the supraspinatus tendon is an exceptional situation. The author reports the case of a young patient with a wound of the posterolateral side of the right shoulder. Screwing was done for the fracture of the acromion after supraspinatus tendon suture with good clinical and radiological outcome after an appropriate rehabilitation. PMID:25918565

  10. Overuse of training increases mechanoreceptors in supraspinatus tendon of rats SHR.

    PubMed

    de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno; de Seixas Alves, Maria Teresa; Uyeda, Luiz Fernando; Nouailhetas, Viviane Louise Andree; Han, Sang W; Cohen, Moises; Albertoni, Walter Manna

    2011-11-01

    The presence of mechanoreceptors in tendon after overuse activities can be a further step to learn about tendinopathy and overuse. Studies of tendons mechanoreceptors in rats are rare. We studied 12 isogenic spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR), which underwent an overuse protocol consisting of an hour per daily session of treadmill running at a speed of 17 m/min, 5 times/week for 4 months. Supraspinatus tendons were evaluated with immunohistochemistry using S100 protein antibodies and histological protocol. Supraspinatus tendons at the end of 4 months of overuse protocol had a high number of media mechanoreceptors (4.3) than controls (0.6). The overexpression of S100 protein antibody in overuse activities maybe could represent a adaptative effort to tendon before the tear.

  11. Prevention of peritendinous adhesions using a hyaluronan-derived hydrogel film following partial-thickness flexor tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanchun; Skardal, Aleksander; Shu, Xiao Zheng; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-04-01

    Peritendinous adhesions are an important complication of flexor tendon injury. Three hyaluronan (HA)-derived biomaterials were evaluated for the reduction of peritendinous adhesions following partial-thickness tendon injury in rabbits. Rabbits (n = 24) were divided into three groups (n = 8 per group), which were used for gross evaluation, histologic assessment, or biomechanical testing. The fourth and third toes from both hindpaws of each rabbit were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: (i) untreated control, (ii) Seprafilm, (iii) Carbylan-SX in situ crosslinked hydrogel, and (iv) preformed Carbylan-SX film. Rabbits were sacrificed at 3 weeks postsurgery and evaluated anatomically, histologically, and mechanically. All materials used reduced adhesions relative to untreated controls for all three evaluations. Both the gross anatomic and histologic results revealed that Carbylan-SX film was statistically superior to Seprafilm and Carbylan-SX gel in preventing tendon adhesion formation. In biomechanical tests, the Carbylan-SX film-treated hindpaws required the least force to pull the tendon from the sheath. This force was statistically indistinguishable from that required to extrude an unoperated tendon (n = 8). Carbylan-SX gel was less effective than Carbylan-SX film but superior to Seprafilm for all evaluations. A crosslinked HA-derived film promoted healing of a flexor tendon injury without the formation of fibrosis at 3 weeks postoperatively.

  12. Ultrasonographic Measurement of the Achilles and Supraspinatus Tendon Thicknesses in Patients with Chronic Lead Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Baki, AE; Yıldızgören, MT; Kara, M; Ekiz, T; Tutkun, E; Özçakar, L

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The study aimed to assess tendon thickness in patients with chronic occupational lead exposure by using ultrasonography. Methods: Twenty-seven male workers (mean age 32.9 ± 6.2 years, range 25–44 years) with occupational lead exposure and 27 age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy male subjects (mean age 33.1 ± 5.6 years, range 25–44 years) were enrolled. Ultrasonographic measurements were obtained from the supraspinatus and Achilles tendons by using a linear probe (5–10 MHz). Results: Mean Achilles tendon values at long axis (p = 0.034) and tendon cross-sectional area (p = 0.013) were significantly smaller in the lead-exposed group than the control group. On the other hand, no significant difference was found regarding the thickness of the supraspinatus tendon (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Our preliminary results imply that subjects with occupational lead exposure have smaller Achilles tendons than healthy subjects. Chronic lead exposure may affect the tendons due to reduction of collagen synthesis. Further studies are definitely needed to confirm our initial findings. PMID:26624578

  13. Arthroscopic transtendinous repair of articular-sided pasta (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Lu, Liangyu; Lu, Zhe; Xiao, Lei; Kang, Yifan; Wang, Zimin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical efficacy of arthroscopic transtendinous repair of partial articular-sided PASTA (partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion) injury. Methods: From February 2011 to July 2014, 12 cases of PASTA, aged 29 to 72 years with an average of 52.9 ± 13.3 years, were treated arthoscopically. To repair PASTA, articular-sided rotator cuff tear was explored, injury site was punctured and labeled with PDS absorbable monofilament suture (Ethicon, Somerville, NJ, USA) suture, subacromial bursa was cleaned up with acromioplasty, and integrity of bursa-side rotator cuff was assessed. Then with arthroscope in glenohumeral joint, footprint of the bursa-side supraspinatus tendon was preserved, rivets were introduced into the joint through supraspinatus tendon, joint-side partial tear was sutured, and anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint was established. The patients were followed up post-operatively for 12-36 months, average 22 ± 7.3 months. The clinical outcomes were emulated with ASES (American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons) Shoulder Score system and UCLA (University of California at Los Angeles) Shoulder rating scale. Results: The post-operative ASES score was 89.7 ± 5.6, higher than the pre-operative one 49.8 ± 9.8 (t = 12.25, P <0.0001). While UCLA scale increased from the pre-operative 17.3, ± 3.3 to the post-operative 30.4 ± 3.2 points (t = 9.87, P <0.0001), with a satisfaction rate of 11/12 (91.7%). Conclusion: Trans-tendon repair is ideal for PASTA with advantage of maximal preservation of the normal rotator cuff tissue, anatomical reconstruction of the rotator cuff footprint and stable fixation of tendon-bone interface. PMID:25784979

  14. In situ fibril stretch and sliding is location-dependent in mouse supraspinatus tendons.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Sarver, Joseph J; Han, Lin; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-12-18

    Tendons are able to transmit high loads efficiently due to their finely optimized hierarchical collagen structure. Two mechanisms by which tendons respond to load are collagen fibril sliding and deformation (stretch). Although many studies have demonstrated that regional variations in tendon structure, composition, and organization contribute to the full tendon׳s mechanical response, the location-dependent response to loading at the fibril level has not been investigated. In addition, the instantaneous response of fibrils to loading, which is clinically relevant for repetitive stretch or fatigue injuries, has also not been studied. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the instantaneous response of collagen fibrils throughout a mechanical loading protocol, both in the insertion site and in the midsubstance of the mouse supraspinatus tendon. Utilizing a novel atomic force microscopy-based imaging technique, tendons at various strain levels were directly visualized and analyzed for changes in fibril d-period with increasing tendon strain. At the insertion site, d-period significantly increased from 0% to 1% tendon strain, increased again from 3% to 5% strain, and decreased after 5% strain. At the midsubstance, d-period increased from 0% to 1% strain and then decreased after 7% strain. In addition, fibril d-period heterogeneity (fibril sliding) was present, primarily at 3% strain with a large majority occurring in the tendon midsubstance. This study builds upon previous work by adding information on the instantaneous and regional-dependent fibrillar response to mechanical loading and presents data proposing that collagen fibril sliding and stretch are directly related to tissue organization and function.

  15. Repair versus shaving of partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis tendon. A prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    RANDELLI, PIETRO; ARRIGONI, PAOLO; ALIPRANDI, ALBERTO; SDAO, SILVANA; RAGONE, VINCENZA; D’AMBROSI, RICCARDO; RANDELLI, FILIPPO; CABITZA, PAOLO; BANFI, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    Purpose the purpose of this study was to evaluate whether treating partial-thickness articular-sided tears of the upper subscapularis (SSC) tendon with a dedicated suture anchor would result in an internal rotation strength improvement compared with simple shaving of the SSC tendon and footprint. Methods twenty-six patients with a limited SSC tendon tear (equal or inferior to the most superior centimeter) in association with a posterosuperior cuff lesion were prospectively randomized to two treatments: repair with a dedicated suture anchor versus shaving of the tendon and footprint. The patients also underwent long head of the biceps (LHB) treatment and posterosuperior cuff tear repair. In each patient the following parameters were measured both preoperatively and at a minimum follow-up of 2.5 years: strength in internal rotation in the bear-hug testing position (using a digital tensiometer), DASH score and Constant scores. MRI assessment of tendon healing was performed at the final follow-up. Results twenty of the 26 patients (76%) were reviewed after a mean follow-up time of 42 months: 11 patients had undergone SSC tendon repair and nine simple shaving. At final follow-up no significant differences were found between the repaired and shaving group in strength in internal rotation (9.5 ± 3.8 kg versus 10.3±5.4 kg; p=0.7). The DASH score and Constant score also failed to show significant differences between the two groups. Furthermore, no significant difference in SSC tendon healing rate was observed on MRI evaluation. Conclusions partial-thickness articular-sided tear of the upper SSC tendon in association with a posterosuperior rotator cuff repair and LHB treatment, when limited to the superior centimeter of the SSC tendon, shows a comparable performance in terms of strength in internal rotation either after simple shaving or a tendon-to-bone repair. Level of evidence Level II, prospective comparative study. PMID:26889466

  16. The Effect of Size and Location of Tears in the Supraspinatus Tendon on Potential Tear Propagation.

    PubMed

    Thunes, James; Matthew Miller, R; Pal, Siladitya; Damle, Sameer; Debski, Richard E; Maiti, Spandan

    2015-08-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common problem in patients over the age of 50 yr. Tear propagation is a potential contributing factor to the failure of physical therapy for treating rotator cuff tears, thus requiring surgical intervention. However, the evolution of tears within the rotator cuff is not well understood yet. The objective of this study is to establish a computational model to quantify initiation of tear propagation in the supraspinatus tendon and examine the effect of tear size and location. A 3D finite element (FE) model of the supraspinatus tendon was constructed from images of a healthy cadaveric tendon. A tear of varying length was placed at six different locations within the tendon. A fiber-reinforced Mooney-Rivlin material model with spatial variation in material properties along the anterior-posterior (AP) axis was utilized to obtain the stress state of the computational model under uniaxial stretch. Material parameters were calibrated by comparing computational and experimental stress-strain response and used to validate the computational model. The stress state of the computational model was contrasted against the spatially varying material strength to predict the critical applied stretch at which a tear starts propagating further. It was found that maximum principal stress (as well as the strain) was localized at the tips of the tear. The computed critical stretch was significantly lower for the posterior tip of the tear than for the anterior tip suggesting a propensity to propagate posteriorly. Onset of tear propagation was strongly correlated with local material strength and stiffness in the vicinity of the tear tip. Further, presence of a stress-shielded zone along the edges of the tear was observed. This study illustrates the complex interplay between geometry and material properties of tendon up to the initiation of tear propagation. Future work will examine the evolution of tears during the propagation process as well as under more complex

  17. Multiscale mechanical integrity of human supraspinatus tendon in shear after elastin depletion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-10-01

    Human supraspinatus tendon (SST) exhibits region-specific nonlinear mechanical properties under tension, which have been attributed to its complex multiaxial physiological loading environment. However, the mechanical response and underlying multiscale mechanism regulating SST behavior under other loading scenarios are poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution of elastin to tendon mechanics. We hypothesized that (1) SST exhibits region-specific shear mechanical properties, (2) fiber sliding is the predominant mode of local matrix deformation in SST in shear, and (3) elastin helps maintain SST mechanical integrity by facilitating force transfer among collagen fibers. Through the use of biomechanical testing and multiphoton microscopy, we measured the multiscale mechanical behavior of human SST in shear before and after elastase treatment. Three distinct SST regions showed similar stresses and microscale deformation. Collagen fiber reorganization and sliding were physical mechanisms observed as the SST response to shear loading. Measures of microscale deformation were highly variable, likely due to a high degree of extracellular matrix heterogeneity. After elastase treatment, tendon exhibited significantly decreased stresses under shear loading, particularly at low strains. These results show that elastin contributes to tendon mechanics in shear, further complementing our understanding of multiscale tendon structure-function relationships.

  18. Distributions of types I, II and III collagen by region in the human supraspinatus tendon.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Mark R; Evans, Elisabeth B; Matuszewski, Paul E; Chen, Yi-Ling; Satchel, Lauren N; Elliott, Dawn M; Soslowsky, Louis J; Dodge, George R

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the human supraspinatus tendon (SST) are highly heterogeneous and may reflect an important adaptive response to its complex, multiaxial loading environment. However, these functional properties are associated with a location-dependent structure and composition that have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the concentrations of types I, II and III collagen in six distinct regions of the SST and compare changes in collagen concentration across regions with local changes in mechanical properties. We hypothesized that type I collagen content would be high throughout the tendon, type II collagen would be restricted to regions of compressive loading and type III collagen content would be high in regions associated with damage. We further hypothesized that regions of high type III collagen content would correspond to regions with low tensile modulus and a low degree of collagen alignment. Although type III collagen content was not significantly higher in regions that are frequently damaged, all other hypotheses were supported by our results. In particular, type II collagen content was highest near the insertion while type III collagen was inversely correlated with tendon modulus and collagen alignment. The measured increase in type II collagen under the coracoacromial arch provides evidence of adaptation to compressive loading in the SST. Moreover, the structure-function relationship between type III collagen content and tendon mechanics established in this study demonstrates a mechanism for altered mechanical properties in pathological tendons and provides a guideline for identifying therapeutic targets and pathology-specific biomarkers.

  19. Multiscale mechanical integrity of human supraspinatus tendon in shear after elastin depletion.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-10-01

    Human supraspinatus tendon (SST) exhibits region-specific nonlinear mechanical properties under tension, which have been attributed to its complex multiaxial physiological loading environment. However, the mechanical response and underlying multiscale mechanism regulating SST behavior under other loading scenarios are poorly understood. Furthermore, little is known about the contribution of elastin to tendon mechanics. We hypothesized that (1) SST exhibits region-specific shear mechanical properties, (2) fiber sliding is the predominant mode of local matrix deformation in SST in shear, and (3) elastin helps maintain SST mechanical integrity by facilitating force transfer among collagen fibers. Through the use of biomechanical testing and multiphoton microscopy, we measured the multiscale mechanical behavior of human SST in shear before and after elastase treatment. Three distinct SST regions showed similar stresses and microscale deformation. Collagen fiber reorganization and sliding were physical mechanisms observed as the SST response to shear loading. Measures of microscale deformation were highly variable, likely due to a high degree of extracellular matrix heterogeneity. After elastase treatment, tendon exhibited significantly decreased stresses under shear loading, particularly at low strains. These results show that elastin contributes to tendon mechanics in shear, further complementing our understanding of multiscale tendon structure-function relationships. PMID:27472764

  20. Ultrasound assessment for grading structural tendon changes in supraspinatus tendinopathy: an inter-rater reliability study

    PubMed Central

    Hjarbaek, John; Eshoej, Henrik; Larsen, Camilla Marie; Vobbe, Jette; Juul-Kristensen, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the inter-rater reliability of measuring structural changes in the tendon of patients, clinically diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy (cases) and healthy participants (controls), on ultrasound (US) images captured by standardised procedures. Methods A total of 40 participants (24 patients) were included for assessing inter-rater reliability of measurements of fibrillar disruption, neovascularity, as well as the number and total length of calcifications and tendon thickness. Linear weighted κ, intraclass correlation (ICC), SEM, limits of agreement (LOA) and minimal detectable change (MDC) were used to evaluate reliability. Results ‘Moderate—almost perfect’ κ was found for grading fibrillar disruption, neovascularity and number of calcifications (k 0.60–0.96). For total length of calcifications and tendon thickness, ICC was ‘excellent’ (0.85–0.90), with SEM(Agreement) ranging from 0.63 to 2.94 mm and MDC(group) ranging from 0.28 to 1.29 mm. In general, SEM, LOA and MDC showed larger variation for calcifications than for tendon thickness. Conclusions Inter-rater reliability was moderate to almost perfect when a standardised procedure was applied for measuring structural changes on captured US images and movie sequences of relevance for patients with supraspinatus tendinopathy. Future studies should test intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of the method in vivo for use in clinical practice, in addition to validation against a gold standard, such as MRI. Trial registration number NCT01984203; Pre-results. PMID:27221128

  1. PARTIAL ARTICULAR SUPRASPINATUS TENDON AVULSION (PASTA) LESION. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rotator cuff pathology can contribute to shoulder pain and may affect the performance of sport activities, work, and activities of daily living. The partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA) lesion represents a very common type of rotator cuff pathology seen in rehabilitation. When conservative treatment fails, surgery is generally required. Success of recovery depends on several factors, including: repair techniques, healing process related to timing, rehabilitation programs, and patient compliance with home exercises. To date, most treatment modalities and rehabilitation programs are based on clinical experience rather than scientific evidence. Therefore, the purpose of this clinical commentary is to provide an overview on the PASTA lesion, discuss the common treatment approaches adopted to date and to propose a rehabilitation program based on the available scientific evidence. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27274431

  2. Inter-rater reliability in the classification of supraspinatus tendon tears using 3D ultrasound – a question of experience?

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christian; Micheroli, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound of the shoulder is characterized by a comparable accuracy to two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. No studies investigating 2D versus 3D inter-rater reliability in the detection of supraspinatus tendon tears taking into account the level of experience of the raters have been carried out so far. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability in the analysis of 3D ultrasound image sets of the supraspinatus tendon between sonographer with different levels of experience. Patients and methods Non-interventional, prospective, observational pilot study of 2309 images of 127 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. 3D ultrasound image sets were scored by three raters independently. The intra-and interrater reliabilities were calculated. Results There was an excellent intra-rater reliability of rater A in the overall classification of supraspinatus tendon tears (2D vs 3D κ = 0.892, pairwise reliability 93.81%, 3D scoring round 1 vs 3D scoring round 2 κ = 0.875, pairwise reliability 92.857%). The inter-rater reliability was only moderate compared to rater B on 3D (κ = 0.497, pairwise reliability 70.95%) and fair compared to rater C (κ = 0.238, pairwise reliability 42.38%). Conclusions The reliability of 3D ultrasound of the supraspinatus tendon depends on the level of experience of the sonographer. Experience in 2D ultrasound does not seem to be sufficient for the analysis of 3D ultrasound imaging sets. Therefore, for a 3D ultrasound analysis new diagnostic criteria have to be established and taught even to experienced 2D sonographers to improve reproducibility. PMID:27679728

  3. Inter-rater reliability in the classification of supraspinatus tendon tears using 3D ultrasound – a question of experience?

    PubMed Central

    Marx, Christian; Micheroli, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound of the shoulder is characterized by a comparable accuracy to two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound. No studies investigating 2D versus 3D inter-rater reliability in the detection of supraspinatus tendon tears taking into account the level of experience of the raters have been carried out so far. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability in the analysis of 3D ultrasound image sets of the supraspinatus tendon between sonographer with different levels of experience. Patients and methods Non-interventional, prospective, observational pilot study of 2309 images of 127 adult patients suffering from unilateral shoulder pain. 3D ultrasound image sets were scored by three raters independently. The intra-and interrater reliabilities were calculated. Results There was an excellent intra-rater reliability of rater A in the overall classification of supraspinatus tendon tears (2D vs 3D κ = 0.892, pairwise reliability 93.81%, 3D scoring round 1 vs 3D scoring round 2 κ = 0.875, pairwise reliability 92.857%). The inter-rater reliability was only moderate compared to rater B on 3D (κ = 0.497, pairwise reliability 70.95%) and fair compared to rater C (κ = 0.238, pairwise reliability 42.38%). Conclusions The reliability of 3D ultrasound of the supraspinatus tendon depends on the level of experience of the sonographer. Experience in 2D ultrasound does not seem to be sufficient for the analysis of 3D ultrasound imaging sets. Therefore, for a 3D ultrasound analysis new diagnostic criteria have to be established and taught even to experienced 2D sonographers to improve reproducibility.

  4. Effect of Return to Overuse Activity Following an Isolated Supraspinatus Tendon Tear on Adjacent Intact Tendons and Glenoid Cartilage in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Sarver, Joseph J.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F.; Glaser, David L.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients. PMID:23280495

  5. Effect of return to overuse activity following an isolated supraspinatus tendon tear on adjacent intact tendons and glenoid cartilage in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Katherine E; Thomas, Stephen J; Sarver, Joseph J; Tucker, Jennica J; Lee, Chang-Soo; Gray, Chancellor F; Glaser, David L; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2013-05-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that can alter shoulder mechanics and may lead to damage of intact joint tissues. These injuries are of particular concern in populations who perform tasks requiring repetitive overhead activity (e.g., athletes and laborers) and who are likely to return to aggressive pre-injury activity levels despite limited understanding of the potentially damaging effects on the remaining tissues. Therefore, we investigated the effect of returning to overuse activity following a supraspinatus tear on shoulder function and the mechanical properties of the remaining intact tendons and glenoid cartilage. Forty rats underwent 4 weeks of overuse activity to create a tendinopathic condition followed by detachment of the supraspinatus tendon and were then randomized into two groups: continued overuse or cage activity. Ambulatory measurements were performed throughout the 8 weeks prior to euthaniasia, and properties of the adjacent tendons and cartilage were evaluated. Results demonstrated that shoulder function was not compromised in the return to overuse group. However, alterations of the glenoid cartilage and biceps tendon properties occurred. Our results help define the contributory roles of common mechanical injury mechanisms and provide a framework by which physicians could better prescribe long-term treatment strategies for patients.

  6. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed.

  7. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  8. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  9. Collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons exhibit altered dynamic mechanical behaviour at multiple hierarchical scales.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Han, Lin; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-02-01

    Tendons function using a unique set of mechanical properties governed by the extracellular matrix and its ability to respond to varied multi-axial loads. Reduction of collagen V expression, such as in classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, results in altered fibril morphology and altered macroscale mechanical function in both clinical and animal studies, yet the mechanism by which changes at the fibril level lead to macroscale functional changes has not yet been investigated. This study addresses this by defining the multiscale mechanical response of wild-type, collagen V-heterozygous and -null supraspinatus tendons. Tendons were subjected to mechanical testing and analysed for macroscale properties, as well as microscale (fibre re-alignment) and nanoscale (fibril deformation and sliding) responses. In many macroscale parameters, results showed a dose-dependent response with severely decreased properties in the null group. In addition, both heterozygous and null groups responded to load faster than in wild-type tendons via earlier fibre re-alignment and fibril stretch. However, the heterozygous group exhibited increased fibril sliding, while the null group exhibited no fibril sliding. These studies demonstrate that dynamic responses play an important role in determining overall function and that collagen V is a critical regulator in the development of these relationships. PMID:26855746

  10. ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR OF SMALL AND MEDIUM TEARS OF THE SUPRASPINATUS MUSCLE TENDON: EVALUATION OF THE CLINICAL AND FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES AFTER TWO YEARS OF FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Roberto Yukio; Murachovsky, Joel; Nascimento, Luís Gustavo Prata; Bueno, Rogério Serpone; Almeida, Luis Henrique; Strose, Eric; Castiglia, Marcello Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical and functional outcomes from arthroscopic repairs on small and medium-sized tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon. Methods: 129 cases of isolated small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon were evaluated retrospectively. The average duration of pain was 29 months. The average joint range of motion comprised active elevation of 136°, lateral rotation of 58° and medial rotation at T12 level; and the preoperative functional UCLA score averaged 17 points. In all the cases, complete repair could be achieved. Results: The average score on the UCLA functional scale in the postoperative period was 32 points. The average length of follow-up was 39 months. Seventy-five cases (58%) had excellent results and 42 (32%) had good results. The average final active elevation was 156° with an average gain of 20°, and the average final lateral rotation was 57° with an average gain of 9°. Both of these were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The patients who underwent tenotomy of the long head of the biceps (LHB), with or without tenodesis, did not present statistically inferior functional outcomes, in comparison with the patients who only underwent decompression and lesion repair (P = 1.00). Fourteen cases (10.8%) presented complications during the postoperative period. Six (4.6%) developed adhesive capsulitis and four (3.1%) presented re-rupture of the tendon, proven by means of magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusions: Arthroscopic repair of small and medium tears of the supraspinatus muscle tendon provided a functional clinical improvement, with good and excellent results in 90% of the cases. PMID:27047846

  11. Effect of fiber distribution and realignment on the nonlinear and inhomogeneous mechanical properties of human supraspinatus tendon under longitudinal tensile loading

    PubMed Central

    Lake, Spencer P.; Miller, Kristin S.; Elliott, Dawn M.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    Tendon exhibits nonlinear stress-strain behavior that may be due, in part, to movement of collagen fibers through the extracellular matrix. While a few techniques have been developed to evaluate the fiber architecture of other soft tissues, the organizational behavior of tendon under load has not been determined. The supraspinatus tendon (SST) of the rotator cuff is of particular interest for investigation due to its complex mechanical environment and corresponding inhomogeneity. In addition, SST injury occurs frequently with limited success in treatment strategies, illustrating the need for a better understanding of SST properties. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the inhomogeneous tensile mechanical properties, fiber organization and fiber realignment under load of human SST utilizing a novel polarized light technique. Fiber distributions were found to become more aligned under load, particularly during the low stiffness toe-region, suggesting that fiber realignment may be partly responsible for observed nonlinear behavior. Fiber alignment was found to correlate significantly with mechanical parameters, providing evidence for strong structure-function relationships in tendon. Human SST exhibits complex, inhomogeneous mechanical properties and fiber distributions, perhaps due to its complex loading environment. Surprisingly, histological grade of degeneration did not correlate with mechanical properties. PMID:19544524

  12. Strain on the repaired supraspinatus tendon during manual traction and translational glide mobilization on the glenohumeral joint: a cadaveric biomechanics study.

    PubMed

    Muraki, Takayuki; Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Uchiyama, Eiichi; Miyasaka, Tomoya; Murakami, Gen; Miyamoto, Shigenori

    2007-08-01

    There has been no report on the mechanical effects of joint mobilization on rotator cuffs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether it is safe to use grade 3 joint mobilization techniques after rotator cuff repair. Nine fresh frozen cadaveric shoulders were used in this study. The strains on the artificially repaired supraspinatus tendon during joint mobilization were measured at 0 degrees and 30 degrees of shoulder abduction and were compared with those at the maximal stretching position and relaxing position. Additionally, gap distances were measured during this experiment. The strain at 30 degrees of abduction of the repaired tendon during each joint mobilization was significantly smaller than that at 0 degrees abduction (P<0.05). At 30 degrees of abduction, the strain during joint mobilization was not statistically different from that of the shoulder in the relaxing position, except during the inferior glide technique. Gap distances were 0mm at 30 degrees , while the distances were 1.06-1.46 mm at 0 degrees. Our findings suggest that joint mobilization techniques, except inferior glide, can be performed safely without significantly straining the repaired tendon at 30 degrees of abduction, if rotator cuff repair is performed at 0 degrees of abduction.

  13. [Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) as therapeutic option in supraspinatus tendon syndrome? One year results of a placebo controlled study].

    PubMed

    Schmitt, J; Tosch, A; Hünerkopf, M; Haake, M

    2002-07-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is seen as a therapeutic option in the treatment of chronic supraspinatus tendinitis by some authors. To test whether ESWT comprising 3 x 2000 pulses with the positive energy flux density ED+ of 0.33 mJ/mm2 is clinically superior to a sham ESWT treatment, a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study with an independent observer was performed. Forty patients were treated either by verum ESWT or sham ESWT under local anesthesia. Target criteria were the age-corrected Constant score, pain at rest and during activity on a visual analogue scale, and subjective improvement. Patients who reported no subjective improvement after 12 weeks were deblinded and received verum ESWT if they had belonged to the placebo group (partial crossover). The results of the verum group lie within the range of results for ESWT published by other authors. Patients in the placebo group with local anesthetic showed equally good results. At 12 weeks, and 1 year after intervention, no difference could be found between the verum and placebo groups regarding Constant score, pain, shoulder function, or subjective improvement. The nonresponders to the placebo ESWT continued to show no improvement after receiving verum ESWT. This contradicts a specific ESWT effect. Based on the results of this placebo-controlled study, ESWT appears to have no clinically relevant effect on supraspinatus tendinitis. The study underlines the importance of a control group in evaluating new treatment methods for diseases with unknown natural history.

  14. Evidence of healing of partial-thickness rotator cuff tears following arthroscopic augmentation with a collagen implant: a 2-year MRI follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Desmond John; Sonnabend, David; Deady, Luke; Cass, Ben; Young, Allan; Van Kampen, Craig; Arnoczky, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background partial-thickness rotator cuff tears frequently enlarge due to increased local strain and often progress to full-thickness tears. Studies suggest the addition of new tendinous tissue to injured cuff tendons would significantly decrease peak strain, possibly protecting against tear progression. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of a highly-porous collagen implant to induce new tissue formation and limit tear progression when placed on the bursal surface of partial-thickness cuff tears. Methods following arthroscopic subacromial decompression, the implant was attached to the bursal surface of the supraspinatus tendon in a prospective series of 13 consecutive patients with intermediate – (3–6 mm) to high-grade (>6 mm) partial – thickness cuff tears (5 articular, 3 bursal, 5 intra-substance). Tendon thickness, defect size, and tendon quality were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Constant and American Shoulder and Elbow Society scores at the same preoperative and follow-up times. All 13 patients completed all follow-up exams (mean length of follow-up 27.0 months, range 23.3–32.0); no patients were lost to follow-up. Results the implant induced significant new tissue formation in all patients by 3 months (mean increase in tendon thickness 2.2 ± 0.26 mm). This tissue matured over time and became radiologically indistinguishable from the underlying tendon. The partial-thickness cuff tears showed consistent filling of the defects, with complete healing in 7 patients at 12 months, and a progressive improvement in tendon quality in the remaining patients. No tear progression was observed by MRI in any of the patients at 24 months. All clinical scores improved significantly over time. At 24 months, 12 of 13 patients (92%) had satisfactory or better results. Conclusions the results of this clinical study demonstrated

  15. Possible involvement of IGF-1 signaling on compensatory growth of the infraspinatus muscle induced by the supraspinatus tendon detachment of rat shoulder.

    PubMed

    Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Lesmana, Ronny; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Takatsuru, Yusuke; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Shimokawa, Noriaki; Takagishi, Kenji; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2014-01-01

    A rotator cuff tear (RCT) is a common musculoskeletal disorder among elderly people. RCT is often treated conservatively for functional compensation by the remaining muscles. However, the mode of such compensation after RCT has not yet been fully understood. Here, we used the RCT rat model to investigate the compensatory process in the remaining muscles. The involvement of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)/Akt signaling which potentially contributes to the muscle growth was also examined. The RCT made by transecting the supraspinatus (SSP) tendon resulted in atrophy of the SSP muscle. The remaining infraspinatus (ISP) muscle weight increased rapidly after a transient decrease (3 days), which could be induced by posttraumatic immobilization. The IGF-1 mRNA levels increased transiently at 7 days followed by a gradual increase thereafter in the ISP muscle, and those of IGF-1 receptor mRNA significantly increased after 3 days. IGF-1 protein levels biphasically increased (3 and 14 days), then gradually decreased thereafter. The IGF-1 protein levels tended to show a negative correlation with IGF-1 mRNA levels. These levels also showed a negative correlation with the ISP muscle weight, indicating that the increase in IGF-1 secretion may contribute to the ISP muscle growth. The pAkt/Akt protein ratio decreased transiently by 14 days, but recovered later. The IGF-1 protein levels were negatively correlated with the pAkt/Akt ratio. These results indicate that transection of the SSP tendon activates IGF-1/Akt signaling in the remaining ISP muscle for structural compensation. Thus, the remaining muscles after RCT can be a target for rehabilitation through the activation of IGF-1/Akt signaling. PMID:24744876

  16. Multiscale regression modeling in mouse supraspinatus tendons reveals that dynamic processes act as mediators in structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Adams, Thomas H; Jawad, Abbas F; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-06-14

    Recent advances in technology have allowed for the measurement of dynamic processes (re-alignment, crimp, deformation, sliding), but only a limited number of studies have investigated their relationship with mechanical properties. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the role of composition, structure, and the dynamic response to load in predicting tendon mechanical properties in a multi-level fashion mimicking native hierarchical collagen structure. Multiple linear regression models were investigated to determine the relationships between composition/structure, dynamic processes, and mechanical properties. Mediation was then used to determine if dynamic processes mediated structure-function relationships. Dynamic processes were strong predictors of mechanical properties. These predictions were location-dependent, with the insertion site utilizing all four dynamic responses and the midsubstance responding primarily with fibril deformation and sliding. In addition, dynamic processes were moderately predicted by composition and structure in a regionally-dependent manner. Finally, dynamic processes were partial mediators of the relationship between composition/structure and mechanical function, and results suggested that mediation is likely shared between multiple dynamic processes. In conclusion, the mechanical properties at the midsubstance of the tendon are controlled primarily by fibril structure and this region responds to load via fibril deformation and sliding. Conversely, the mechanical function at the insertion site is controlled by many other important parameters and the region responds to load via all four dynamic mechanisms. Overall, this study presents a strong foundation on which to design future experimental and modeling efforts in order to fully understand the complex structure-function relationships present in tendon. PMID:27067362

  17. Multiscale regression modeling in mouse supraspinatus tendons reveals that dynamic processes act as mediators in structure-function relationships.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Adams, Sheila M; Adams, Thomas H; Jawad, Abbas F; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2016-06-14

    Recent advances in technology have allowed for the measurement of dynamic processes (re-alignment, crimp, deformation, sliding), but only a limited number of studies have investigated their relationship with mechanical properties. The overall objective of this study was to investigate the role of composition, structure, and the dynamic response to load in predicting tendon mechanical properties in a multi-level fashion mimicking native hierarchical collagen structure. Multiple linear regression models were investigated to determine the relationships between composition/structure, dynamic processes, and mechanical properties. Mediation was then used to determine if dynamic processes mediated structure-function relationships. Dynamic processes were strong predictors of mechanical properties. These predictions were location-dependent, with the insertion site utilizing all four dynamic responses and the midsubstance responding primarily with fibril deformation and sliding. In addition, dynamic processes were moderately predicted by composition and structure in a regionally-dependent manner. Finally, dynamic processes were partial mediators of the relationship between composition/structure and mechanical function, and results suggested that mediation is likely shared between multiple dynamic processes. In conclusion, the mechanical properties at the midsubstance of the tendon are controlled primarily by fibril structure and this region responds to load via fibril deformation and sliding. Conversely, the mechanical function at the insertion site is controlled by many other important parameters and the region responds to load via all four dynamic mechanisms. Overall, this study presents a strong foundation on which to design future experimental and modeling efforts in order to fully understand the complex structure-function relationships present in tendon.

  18. Partial Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Matthewson, Graeme; Beach, Cara J.; Nelson, Atiba A.; Woodmass, Jarret M.; Ono, Yohei; Boorman, Richard S.; Lo, Ian K. Y.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2015-01-01

    Partial thickness rotator cuff tears are a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Despite their high prevalence, the diagnosis and treatment of partial thickness rotator cuff tears remains controversial. While recent studies have helped to elucidate the anatomy and natural history of disease progression, the optimal treatment, both nonoperative and operative, is unclear. Although the advent of arthroscopy has improved the accuracy of the diagnosis of partial thickness rotator cuff tears, the number of surgical techniques used to repair these tears has also increased. While multiple repair techniques have been described, there is currently no significant clinical evidence supporting more complex surgical techniques over standard rotator cuff repair. Further research is required to determine the clinical indications for surgical and nonsurgical management, when formal rotator cuff repair is specifically indicated and when biologic adjunctive therapy may be utilized. PMID:26171251

  19. Single ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injection for treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Louisa K.; Baltzer, Wendy I.; Nemanic, Sarah; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a single platelet-rich plasma injection for supraspinatus tendinopathy was assessed in 10 dogs. Subjective (owner-assessed) improvement in lameness and function were seen in 40% of dogs with improved tendon heterogeneity and echogenicity in 60%. There were no significant changes in gait reaction forces 6 wk after treatment. PMID:26246631

  20. Effect of Scapular Dyskinesis on Supraspinatus Repair Healing in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Reuther, Katherine E.; Tucker, Jennica J.; Thomas, Stephen J.; Vafa, Rameen P.; Liu, Stephen S.; Gordon, Joshua A.; Caro, Adam C.; Yannascoli, Sarah M.; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tears are common conditions that often require surgical repair to improve function and relieve pain. Unfortunately, repair failure remains a common problem following rotator cuff repair surgery. Several factors may contribute to repair failure including age, tear size, and time from injury. However, the mechanical mechanisms resulting in repair failure are not well understood making clinical management difficult. Specifically, altered scapular motion (termed scapular dyskinesis) may be one important and modifiable factor contributing to the risk of repair failure. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the effect of scapular dyskinesis on supraspinatus tendon healing following repair. Methods A rat model of scapular dyskinesis was used. 70 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (400-450 grams) were randomized into two groups: nerve transection of the accessory and long-thoracic nerves (SD) or sham nerve transection (Sham Control). Following this procedure, all rats underwent unilateral detachment and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. All rats were sacrificed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. Shoulder function, passive joint mechanics, and tendon properties (mechanical, histological, organizational, and compositional) were evaluated. Results Scapular dyskinesis alters joint function and may lead to compromised supraspinatus tendon properties. Specifically, diminished mechanical properties, altered histology, and decreased tendon organization was observed for some parameters. Conclusion This study identifies scapular dyskinesis as one underlying mechanism leading to compromise of supraspinatus healing following repair. Identifying modifiable factors that lead to compromised tendon healing will help improve clinical outcomes following repair. Level of evidence Basic Science, in-vivo Animal Study. PMID:25745826

  1. High-Grade Articular, Bursal, and Intratendinous Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: A Retrospective Study Comparing Functional Outcomes After Completion and Repair.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Nicholas K; Nickel, Brian T; Grindel, Steven I

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess the impact of tear location on functional outcomes in high-grade partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) after arthroscopic completion and repair. Retrospectively, we evaluated the preoperative and postoperative findings of 60 patients who underwent arthroscopic completion and repair of Ellman grade 3 partial-thickness tears of the supraspinatus. The 60 patients were grouped by tear subtype (20 articular, 20 bursal, 20 intratendinous) as identified by preoperative imaging and confirmed at time of surgery. After surgery, the 3 subtypes showed similar significant (P < .001) improvements in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores (articular, 46.9, 85.1; bursal, 44.3, 80.3; intratendinous, 43.6, 86.1), Constant scores (articular, 54.3, 79.4; bursal, 49.9, 75.0; intratendinous, 56.8, 80.9), and visual analog scale scores (articular, 5.1, 1.2; bursal, 5.8, 1.6; intratendinous, 6.0, 1.2). Our study findings validate use of the current algorithm for Ellman grade 3 PTRCTs of the supraspinatus and advocate their completion and repair, regardless of tear location. PMID:27552462

  2. The Hug-up Test: A New, Sensitive Diagnostic Test for Supraspinatus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Lei; Ao, Ying-Fang; Yan, Hui; Cui, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Background: The supraspinatus tendon is the most commonly affected tendon in rotator cuff tears. Early detection of a supraspinatus tear using an accurate physical examination is, therefore, important. However, the currently used physical tests for detecting supraspinatus tears are poor diagnostic indicators and involve a wide range of sensitivity and specificity values. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish a new physical test for the diagnosis of supraspinatus tears and evaluate its accuracy in comparison with conventional tests. Methods: Between November 2012 and January 2014, 200 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy were prospectively evaluated preoperatively. The hug-up test, empty can (EC) test, full can (FC) test, Neer impingement sign, and Hawkins-Kennedy impingement sign were used and compared statistically for their accuracy in terms of supraspinatus tears, with arthroscopic findings as the gold standard. Muscle strength was precisely quantified using an electronic digital tensiometer. Results: The prevalence of supraspinatus tears was 76.5%. The hug-up test demonstrated the highest sensitivity (94.1%), with a low negative likelihood ratio (NLR, 0.08) and comparable specificity (76.6%) compared with the other four tests. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the hug-up test was 0.854, with no statistical difference compared with the EC test (z = 1.438, P = 0.075) or the FC test (z = 1.498, P = 0.067). The hug-up test showed no statistical difference in terms of detecting different tear patterns according to the position (χ2 = 0.578, P = 0.898) and size (Fisher's exact test, P > 0.999) compared with the arthroscopic examination. The interobserver reproducibility of the hug-up test was high, with a kappa coefficient of 0.823. Conclusions: The hug-up test can accurately detect supraspinatus tears with a high sensitivity, comparable specificity, and low NLR compared with the conventional clinical tests and

  3. Exercise protocol induces muscle, tendon, and bone adaptations in the rat shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Loro, Emanuele; Sarver, Joseph J.; Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hast, Michael W.; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Liu, X. Sherry; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: a rat model of supraspinatus overuse has suggested mechanisms governing tendon degeneration; however, delineating which changes are pathologic or simply physiologic adaptations to increased loading remains a question. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a rat exercise model that induces systemic and local shoulder adaptations without mechanical injury to the supraspinatus tendon. Methods: exercise rats completed a treadmill training protocol for 12 weeks. Body, fat pad, and heart weights were determined. Supraspinatus tendon collagen content, cross-sectional area, and mechanical properties were measured. Supraspinatus muscle cross-sectional area, weight, and the expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins were measured. Humeri were analyzed with μCT and mechanically tested. Results: exercise decreased fat pad mass. Supraspinatus muscle hypertrophied and had increased OXPHOS proteins. Humerus trabecular bone had increased anisotropic orientation, and cortical bone showed increased bone and tissue mineral density. Importantly, the supraspinatus tendon did not have diminished mechanical properties, indicating that this protocol was not injurious to the tendon. Conclusion: this study establishes the first rat exercise protocol that induces adaptations in the shoulder. Future research can use this as a comparison model to study how the supraspinatus tendon adapts to loading and undergoes degeneration with overuse. PMID:25767777

  4. EVALUATION OF THE EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX OF INJURED SUPRASPINATUS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luiz Henrique Oliveira; Ikemoto, Roberto; Mader, Ana Maria; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva; Munhoz, Bruna; Murachovsky, Joel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the evolution of injuries of the supraspinatus muscle by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and anatomopathological analysis in animal model (Wistar rats). Methods: Twenty-five Wistar rats were submitted to complete injury of the supraspinatus tendon, then subsequently sacrificed in groups of five animals at the following periods: immediately after the injury, 24h after the injury, 48h after, 30 days after and three months after the injury. All groups underwent histological and IHC analysis. Results: Regarding vascular proliferation and inflammatory infiltrate, we found a statistically significant difference between groups 1(control group) and 2 (24h after injury). IHC analysis showed that expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) showed a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2, and collagen type 1 (Col-1) evaluation presented a statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 4. Conclusion: We observed changes in the extracellular matrix components compatible with remodeling and healing. Remodeling is more intense 24h after injury. However, VEGF and Col-1 are substantially increased at 24h and 30 days after the injury, respectively. Level of Evidence I, Experimental Study. PMID:26997907

  5. Change in the Pathologic Supraspinatus: A Three-Dimensional Model of Fiber Bundle Architecture within Anterior and Posterior Regions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Y.; Sachdeva, Rohit; Li, Zi; Lee, Dongwoon; Rosser, Benjamin W. C.

    2015-01-01

    Supraspinatus tendon tears are common and lead to changes in the muscle architecture. To date, these changes have not been investigated for the distinct regions and parts of the pathologic supraspinatus. The purpose of this study was to create a novel three-dimensional (3D) model of the muscle architecture throughout the supraspinatus and to compare the architecture between muscle regions and parts in relation to tear severity. Twelve cadaveric specimens with varying degrees of tendon tears were used. Three-dimensional coordinates of fiber bundles were collected in situ using serial dissection and digitization. Data were reconstructed and modeled in 3D using Maya. Fiber bundle length (FBL) and pennation angle (PA) were computed and analyzed. FBL was significantly shorter in specimens with large retracted tears compared to smaller tears, with the deeper fibers being significantly shorter than other parts in the anterior region. PA was significantly greater in specimens with large retracted tears, with the superficial fibers often demonstrating the largest PA. The posterior region was absent in two specimens with extensive tears. Architectural changes associated with tendon tears affect the regions and varying depths of supraspinatus differently. The results provide important insights on residual function of the pathologic muscle, and the 3D model includes detailed data that can be used in future modeling studies. PMID:26413533

  6. Keratin dressings speed epithelialization of deep partial-thickness wounds.

    PubMed

    Pechter, Patricia M; Gil, Joel; Valdes, Jose; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Kirsner, Robert S; Davis, Stephen C

    2012-01-01

    Keratin gene expression is regarded as a hallmark of epidermal biology. It demarcates the three keratinocyte phenotypes: basal (expressing KRT5 and KRT14), differentiating (expressing KRT1 and KRT10), and activated (wound healing), which is characterized by expression of KRT6, KRT16, and KRT17. Activated keratinocytes are among the first signals of epidermal wound healing. In addition, they are found deregulated in nonhealing chronic wounds. To examine keratins as a potential modality for wound-healing disorders, we evaluated two different keratin dressings, liquid or solid, and assessed their effects of epithelialization and closure using porcine partial-thickness wound-healing model in vivo. We found that both forms of keratin dressings accelerated closure and epithelialization, achieving statistically significant differences on day 5. Evidence suggesting early onset of epithelialization was corroborated further by gene expression analyses revealing induction of KRT6A, KRT16, and KRT17 by day 2 postwounding. The data suggest that keratin dressings may stimulate epithelialization by enhancing the activation of keratinocytes. We conclude that keratin-containing dressings can accelerate wound healing and closure. Further studies are needed to determine the molecular mechanisms of this activation.

  7. Distal Triceps Tendon Injuries.

    PubMed

    Keener, Jay D; Sethi, Paul M

    2015-11-01

    Acute triceps ruptures are an uncommon entity, occurring mainly in athletes, weight lifters (especially those taking anabolic steroids), and following elbow trauma. Accurate diagnosis is made clinically, although MRI may aid in confirmation and surgical planning. Acute ruptures are classified on an anatomic basis based on tear location and the degree of tendon involvement. Most complete tears are treated surgically in medically fit patients. Partial-thickness tears are managed according to the tear severity, functional demands, and response to conservative treatment. We favor an anatomic footprint repair of the triceps to provide optimal tendon to bone healing and, ultimately, functional outcome. PMID:26498552

  8. Innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve within supraspinatus: a three-dimensional computer modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hermenegildo, J A; Roberts, S L; Kim, S Y

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and the muscle architecture of supraspinatus has not been thoroughly investigated. The supraspinatus is composed of two architecturally distinct regions: anterior and posterior. Each of these regions is further subdivided into three parts: superficial, middle and deep. The purpose of this study was to investigate the course of the SSN throughout the volume of supraspinatus and to relate the intramuscular branches to the distinct regions and parts of the supraspinatus. The SSN was dissected in thirty formalin embalmed cadaveric specimens and digitized throughout the muscle volume in six of those specimens. The digitized data were modeled using Autodesk(®) Maya(®) 2011. The three-dimensional (3D) models were used to relate the intramuscular innervation pattern to the muscle and tendon architecture defined by Kim et al. (2007, Clin Anat 20:648-655). The SSN bifurcated into two main trunks: medial and lateral. All parts of the anterior region were predominantly innervated by the medial trunk and its proximal and medial branches, whereas all parts of the posterior region predominantly by the lateral trunk and its posterolateral and/or posteromedial branches. The posterior region also received innervation from the proximal branch of the medial trunk in half of the specimens. These findings provide evidence that the anterior and posterior regions are distinct with respect to their innervation. The 3D map of the innervation pattern will aid in planning future clinical studies investigating muscle activation patterns and provide insight into possible injury of the nerve with supraspinatus pathology and surgical techniques. PMID:23649406

  9. Innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve within supraspinatus: a three-dimensional computer modeling study.

    PubMed

    Hermenegildo, J A; Roberts, S L; Kim, S Y

    2014-05-01

    The relationship between the innervation pattern of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) and the muscle architecture of supraspinatus has not been thoroughly investigated. The supraspinatus is composed of two architecturally distinct regions: anterior and posterior. Each of these regions is further subdivided into three parts: superficial, middle and deep. The purpose of this study was to investigate the course of the SSN throughout the volume of supraspinatus and to relate the intramuscular branches to the distinct regions and parts of the supraspinatus. The SSN was dissected in thirty formalin embalmed cadaveric specimens and digitized throughout the muscle volume in six of those specimens. The digitized data were modeled using Autodesk(®) Maya(®) 2011. The three-dimensional (3D) models were used to relate the intramuscular innervation pattern to the muscle and tendon architecture defined by Kim et al. (2007, Clin Anat 20:648-655). The SSN bifurcated into two main trunks: medial and lateral. All parts of the anterior region were predominantly innervated by the medial trunk and its proximal and medial branches, whereas all parts of the posterior region predominantly by the lateral trunk and its posterolateral and/or posteromedial branches. The posterior region also received innervation from the proximal branch of the medial trunk in half of the specimens. These findings provide evidence that the anterior and posterior regions are distinct with respect to their innervation. The 3D map of the innervation pattern will aid in planning future clinical studies investigating muscle activation patterns and provide insight into possible injury of the nerve with supraspinatus pathology and surgical techniques.

  10. Efficiency of Microbial Cellulose Dressing in Partial-Thickness Burn Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Muangman, Pornprom; Opasanon, Supaporn; Suwanchot, Supaparn; Thangthed, Orapin

    2011-01-01

    Microbial cellulose is a natural polymer that can hold a quantity of water without any disconformities. Therefore, it is proposed for use as wound dressing material. We report a case of 28% total body surface area partial-thickness flame burn: approximately 4.5% superficial partial-thickness burns on anterior face and 23.5% combined superficial and deep partial-thickness burns on both upper arms and anterior trunk. A microbial cellulose dressing, Nanocell (Thai Nano Cellulose Co Ltd, Bangkok, Thailand), was applied to the face wound only once, without any further dressing change. Progress of healing, until full epithelialization on the face, was observed for 2 weeks. During the treatment period, the patient did not show any irritation or allergic reaction to this new dressing, and wound swab culture showed no evidence of bacteria presence. This innovative material can be an alternative dressing for superficial partial-thickness burn wounds. PMID:24527162

  11. Tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Repair of tendon ... Tendon repair can be performed using: Local anesthesia (the immediate area of the surgery is pain-free) ... a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon ...

  12. Use of Suprathel® for partial thickness burns in children.

    PubMed

    Highton, Lyndsey; Wallace, Christopher; Shah, Mamta

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the use of Suprathel(®), a synthetic skin substitute, for partial thickness burns in children. Thirty-three children (20 females, 13 males; mean age 29 months, range 5 months to 11 years) with burns were treated with Suprathel(®). The burns were superficial partial thickness (n=24) or mid-dermal (n=19); the median %TBSA was 4% (range 1-13%). Suprathel(®) was applied after debridement, followed by Vaseline gauze, dry gauze and crepe bandage. The outer dressings were changed every 5-10 days unless clinical problems dictated otherwise. Median healing time was 16 days (range 9-38 days). Ten patients took longer than 21 days to heal, of whom four developed hypertrophic scarring, which was strongly associated with wound infection (p<0.05). Healing time of superficial partial thickness and mid-dermal burns was not significantly different (p=0.494). Suprathel(®) is an effective skin substitute for the treatment of partial thickness burns in children. The majority of burns in children are mixed depth, and Suprathel(®) has the advantage that it may also be used to treat mid-dermal burns. It behaves like a biological dressing but is not animal derived, so is acceptable to all religious and ethnic groups. Further studies to evaluate the efficacy and cost effectiveness of Suprathel(®) compared to other dressings in children are warranted.

  13. Novel characteristics of normal supraspinatus insertion in rats: an ultrastructural analysis using three-dimensional reconstruction using focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the histological architecture of the insertion after a rotator cuff repair is completely different from that of normal tendon-bone insertions. Analysis of normal insertions by electron microscopy may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiology of tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair. The present study examined the normal supraspinatus insertion in rats using a new three-dimensional (3D) electron microscopic method, focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography. Methods: normal supraspinatus insertion of adult Sprague-Dawley rats was analyzed. FIB/SEM tomography was performed on the entire insertion. The obtained serial images were reconstructed, and the 3D cellular morphology and organization of collagen bundles was observed. Results: the cellular shapes between the tendon-cartilage interface were successfully reconstructed. The cells in the cartilage region were spherical without any cellular processes, while the cells in the intermediate region had some cellular processes oriented longitudinally along the collagen bundles. In addition, these 2 regions were smoothly transferred under ultrastructural resolution. Conclusions: structures at the normal insertion gradually changed from the fibrous cartilage to the tendon midsubstance, which may contribute to the biomechanical strength of the site. These novel cell characteristics may provide necessary knowledge for better regeneration of tendon-to-bone insertions after rotator cuff repair. PMID:25332933

  14. HydroColloid dressing (Duoderm) for the treatment of superficial and deep partial thickness burns.

    PubMed

    Hermans, M H

    1987-01-01

    HydroColloid Dressing (Duoderm, HCD) is a new kind of dressing, based on the fact that occlusion can provide an optimum wound environment for quick re-epithelialization. Seventy patients with superficial and deep partial thickness burns of up to 7% TBSA were treated with HCD. In 16 patients a second burned area, similar in size and depth of the burn treated with HCD, was treated with human allografts or silversulfadiazine (SSD). Five patients with very small full thickness burns were also treated with HCD. In three patients (4.5%) the treatment with HCD had to be discontinued before total re-epithelialization had occurred, for various reasons. Statistically, HCD provided faster re-epithelialization than allografts or SSD. The cosmetic and functional results were excellent. After six months only one patient was found to have a small area of hypertrophy. In this study HCD was found to be a very good dressing for the treatment of smaller partial thickness burns.

  15. Tendonitis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tendon. It can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. Any action that places prolonged repetitive strain on the forearm muscles can cause tendonitis. The ...

  16. Matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact portion of those tendons.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Cesari, Eugenio; Garofalo, Raffaele; Gigante, Antonio; Conti, Marco; Markopoulos, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon, more than 1 cm lateral to the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior margin of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon, used as control. The collagenases, the stromelysins, and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease arrays were analyzed blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA in each specimen. Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a rotator cuff tear, but not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There were significantly increased levels of MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and the subscapularis (control specimens). The levels of specific matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact tendons. These changes extended medially to the site of tendon tear, and to other tendons. PMID:24367772

  17. Myocardial infarct associated with a partial thickness left atrial tear in a dog with mitral insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Sleeper, Meg M; Maczuzak, Meredith E; Bender, Susan J

    2015-09-01

    A 10-year-old male neutered cavalier King Charles Spaniel with a 1-year history of degenerative mitral valve disease presented for dyspnea and severe weakness. He was diagnosed with congestive heart failure, systolic dysfunction, presumptive myocardial infarction and a left atrial thrombus based on thoracic radiographs, electrocardiogram and echocardiographic findings. Clinical signs also suggested right foreleg embolism. The dog was euthanized due to the grave prognosis and a postmortem evaluation was performed. The postmortem examination confirmed myocardial infarction and was thought to be due to embolic showering from the thrombus attached to a partial thickness left atrial endocardial tear. PMID:26263842

  18. Treatment of partial thickness burns with Zn-hyaluronan: lessons of a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, I.; Zoltán, P.; Erdei, I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A clinical investigation to determine the effectiveness of Zn-hyaluronan gel for the treatment of partial thickness burns was carried out. 60 patients were enrolled in the study with an average of 3% TBSA burn. Exudation lasted 3 days, no infectious complications were observed. By day 14 the wounds of 52 patients have healed, average complete healing time was 10,5 days. An overall 93,3% healing rate was achieved within the planned observation period. Reduction of spontaneous and movementrelated pain was reduced to less than half of the initial values by day 5,5 and 6,3 respectively. Development of a thin, elastic, well tolerable and protective membrane-like layer was noted. This kept the wounds moist while clean during wound-healing, and was spontaneously shed as epithelisation proceeded. Zn-hyaluronan gel is a novel topical wound care product that has proven to be suitable for the treatment of partial thickness burns. PMID:23233826

  19. Optimal treatment of partial thickness burns in children: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vloemans, A F P M; Hermans, M H E; van der Wal, M B A; Liebregts, J; Middelkoop, E

    2014-03-01

    A large part of the patient population of a burn centre consists of children, most of whom are younger than four years. The majority of these young children suffer from superficial and deep partial thickness scald burns that may easily deepen to full thickness burns. A proper wound therapy, that prevents infection and ensures a moist wound condition, might prevent the deterioration of the wound. Therefore, we performed a systematic review of wound management and dressing materials to select the best treatment option for children with burns. A search in Medline and Embase revealed 51 articles for a critical appraisal. The articles were divided into randomized controlled trials, cohort studies and a group of case-reports. Total appraisal did not differ much amongst the groups; the level of evidence was highest in the randomized controlled trials and lowest in the case-reports. In 16 out of 34 comparative studies, silver sulfadiazine or a silver sulfadiazine/chlorhexidine-gluconate combination was the standard of wound care treatment. The competitor dressing was Biobrane(®) in six studies and amnion membrane in three. Tulle gauze, or tulle gauze impregnated with an antibacterial addition were the standard of care treatment in seven studies. In general, membranous dressings like Biobrane(®) and amnion membrane performed better than the standard of care on epithelialization rate, length of hospital stay and pain for treatment of partial thickness burns in children. However, hardly any of the studies investigated long-term results like scar formation.

  20. Estimating the time and temperature relationship for causation of deep-partial thickness skin burns.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John P; Plourde, Brian; Vallez, Lauren; Stark, John; Diller, Kenneth R

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop and present a simple procedure for evaluating the temperature and exposure-time conditions that lead to causation of a deep-partial thickness burn and the effect that the immediate post-burn thermal environment can have on the process. A computational model has been designed and applied to predict the time required for skin burns to reach a deep-partial thickness level of injury. The model includes multiple tissue layers including the epidermis, dermis, hypodermis, and subcutaneous tissue. Simulated exposure temperatures ranged from 62.8 to 87.8°C (145-190°F). Two scenarios were investigated. The first and worst case scenario was a direct exposure to water (characterized by a large convection coefficient) with the clothing left on the skin following the exposure. A second case consisted of a scald insult followed immediately by the skin being washed with cool water (20°C). For both cases, an Arrhenius injury model was applied whereby the extent and depth of injury were calculated and compared for the different post-burn treatments. In addition, injury values were compared with experiment data from the literature to assess verification of the numerical methodology. It was found that the clinical observations of injury extent agreed with the calculated values. Furthermore, inundation with cool water decreased skin temperatures more quickly than the clothing insulating case and led to a modest decrease in the burn extent.

  1. Tendon Innervation.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W; Salo, Paul; Hart, David A

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of tendon metabolism including the responses to loading is far from being well understood. During the last decade, however, accumulating data show that tendon innervation in addition to afferent functions, via efferent pathways has a regulatory role in tendon homeostasis via a wide range of neuromediators, which coordinate metabolic and neuro-inflammatory pathways.Innervation of intact healthy tendons is localized in the surrounding structures, i.e paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the tendon proper is practically devoid of neuronal supply. This anatomical finding reflects that the tendon metabolism is regulated from the tendon envelope, i.e. interfascicular matrix (see Chap. 1 ).Tendon innervation after injury and during repair, however, is found as extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of different neuronal mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammatory and metabolic pathways in tendon regeneration. After healing nerve fibers retract to the tendon envelope.In tendinopathy innervation has been identified to consist of excessive and protracted nerve ingrowth in the tendon proper, suggesting pro-inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses.In metabolic disorders such as eg. diabetes impaired tendon healing has been established to be related to dysregulation of neuronal growth factors.Targeted approaches to the peripheral nervous system including neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:27535247

  2. ERK2 dependent signaling contributes to wound healing after a partial-thickness burn

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Yasushi Saitoh, Daizoh; Takeuchi, Atsuya; Ojima, Kenichiro; Kouzu, Keita; Kawakami, Saki; Ito, Masataka; Ishihara, Masayuki; Sato, Shunichi; Takishima, Kunio

    2009-03-27

    Burn healing is a complex physiological process involving multiple cell activities, such as cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Although extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) have a pivotal role in regulating a variety of cellular responses, little is known about the individual functions of ERK isoform for healing in vivo. This study investigated the role of ERK2 in burn healing. To assess this, Erk2{sup +/-} mice generated by gene targeting were used. The resultant mice exhibited significant delay in re-epithelization of partial-thickness burns in the skin in comparison to wild-type. An in vitro proliferation assay revealed that keratinocytes from Erk2{sup +/-} mice grew significantly slower than those prepared from wild-type. These results highlight the importance of ERK2 in the process of burn healing.

  3. Inflammation activation and resolution in human tendon disease

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie G; Martinez, Fernando O; Yapp, Clarence; Wells, Graham; Oppermann, Udo; Dean, Benjamin JF; Smith, Richard DJ; Wheway, Kim; Watkins, Bridget; Roche, Lucy; Carr, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the role of inflammation in tendon disease is required to facilitate therapeutic target discovery. We studied supraspinatus tendons from patients experiencing pain before and after surgical subacromial decompression treatment. Tendons were classified as having early, intermediate or advanced disease and inflammation was characterized through activation of pathways mediated by Interferon, NF-κB, glucocorticoid receptor and STAT-6. Inflammation signatures revealed expression of genes and proteins induced by Interferon and NF-κB in early stage disease and genes and proteins induced by STAT-6 and glucocorticoid receptor activation in advanced stage disease. The pro-resolving proteins FPR2/ALX and ChemR23 were increased in early stage disease compared to intermediate-advanced stage disease. Patients who were pain-free post-treatment had tendons with increased expression of CD206 and ALOX15 mRNA compared to tendons from patients who continued to experience pain post-treatment, suggesting that these genes and their pathways may moderate tendon pain. Stromal cells from diseased tendons cultured in vitro showed increased expression of NF-κB and Interferon target genes after treatment with lipopolysaccharide or IFNγ compared to stromal cells derived from healthy tendons. We identified 15-epi Lipoxin A4, a stable lipoxin metabolite derived from aspirin treatment, as potentially beneficial in the resolution of tendon inflammation. PMID:26511510

  4. Adhesive bacterial colonization of exposed traumatized tendon.

    PubMed

    Webb, L X; Hobgood, C D; Meredith, J W; Gristina, A G

    1987-05-01

    Recent studies of compromised or damaged tissues, as well as biomaterials, have shown that they provide a particularly fertile substratum for bacterial colonization. Colonization in these environments is mediated by a process of microbial adhesion to surfaces of the substrata. In this report, we present electron microscopic studies of a portion of damaged and infected tendon. These studies demonstrate colonies of bacteria surrounded by a ruthenium red-staining exopolysaccharide biofilm and adhesion to the surface of the tendon by means of an exopolysaccharide polymer. We suggest that this adhesive form of bacterial colonization may partially explain the resistance of exposed tendon to effective debridement by simple mechanical measures and to coverage with granulation tissue, partial-thickness skin grafts, and vascularized tissue grafts.

  5. Arthroscopic Repair of Articular Surface Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Transtendon Technique versus Repair after Completion of the Tear—A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Woodmass, Jarret M.; Bois, Aaron J.; Boorman, Richard S.; Thornton, Gail M.

    2016-01-01

    Articular surface partial-thickness rotator cuff tears (PTRCTs) are commonly repaired using two different surgical techniques: transtendon repair or repair after completion of the tear. Although a number of studies have demonstrated excellent clinical outcomes, it is unclear which technique may provide superior clinical outcomes and tendon healing. The purpose was to evaluate and compare the clinical outcomes following arthroscopic repair of articular surface PTRCT using a transtendon technique or completion of the tear. A systematic review of the literature was performed following PRISMA guidelines and checklist. The objective outcome measures evaluated in this study were the Constant Score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, Visual Analogue Scale, physical examination, and complications. Three studies met our criteria. All were prospective randomized comparative studies with level II evidence and published from 2012 to 2013. A total of 182 shoulders (mean age 53.7 years; mean follow-up 40.5 months) were analyzed as part of this study. Both procedures provided excellent clinical outcomes with no significant difference in Constant Score and other measures between the procedures. Both procedures demonstrated improved clinical outcomes. However, there were no significant differences between each technique. Further studies are required to determine the long-term outcome of each technique. PMID:27462471

  6. Effect of Topical Platelet-Rich Plasma on Burn Healing After Partial-Thickness Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ozcelik, Umit; Ekici, Yahya; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Aydogan, Cem; Turkoglu, Suna; Ozen, Ozlem; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma on tissue maturation and burn healing in an experimental partial-thickness burn injury model. Material/Methods Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 (platelet-rich plasma group) was exposed to burn injury and topical platelet-rich plasma was applied. Group 2 (control group) was exposed to burn injury only. Group 3 (blood donor group) was used as blood donors for platelet-rich plasma. The rats were killed on the seventh day after burn injury. Tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured and histopathologic changes were examined. Results Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the control group (P=.03). Histopathologically, there was significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration (P=.005) and there were no statistically significant differences between groups in fibroblast development, collagen production, vessel proliferations, or epithelization. Conclusions Platelet-rich plasma seems to partially improve burn healing in this experimental burn injury model. As an initial conclusion, it appears that platelet-rich plasma can be used in humans, although further studies should be performed with this type of treatment. PMID:27262706

  7. Effect of Topical Platelet-Rich Plasma on Burn Healing After Partial-Thickness Burn Injury.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Umit; Ekici, Yahya; Bircan, Huseyin Yuce; Aydogan, Cem; Turkoglu, Suna; Ozen, Ozlem; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-06-05

    BACKGROUND To investigate the effects of platelet-rich plasma on tissue maturation and burn healing in an experimental partial-thickness burn injury model. MATERIAL AND METHODS Thirty Wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups of 10 rats each. Group 1 (platelet-rich plasma group) was exposed to burn injury and topical platelet-rich plasma was applied. Group 2 (control group) was exposed to burn injury only. Group 3 (blood donor group) was used as blood donors for platelet-rich plasma. The rats were killed on the seventh day after burn injury. Tissue hydroxyproline levels were measured and histopathologic changes were examined. RESULTS Hydroxyproline levels were significantly higher in the platelet-rich plasma group than in the control group (P=.03). Histopathologically, there was significantly less inflammatory cell infiltration (P=.005) and there were no statistically significant differences between groups in fibroblast development, collagen production, vessel proliferations, or epithelization. CONCLUSIONS Platelet-rich plasma seems to partially improve burn healing in this experimental burn injury model. As an initial conclusion, it appears that platelet-rich plasma can be used in humans, although further studies should be performed with this type of treatment.

  8. A serum amyloid P-binding hydrogel speeds healing of partial thickness wounds in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Gomer, Richard H.; Pilling, Darrell; Kauvar, Lawrence M.; Ellsworth, Stote; Ronkainen, Sanna D.; Roife, David; Davis, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    During wound healing, some circulating monocytes enter the wound, differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and appear to then further differentiate into myofibroblasts, cells that play a key role in collagen deposition, cytokine release, and wound contraction. The differentiation of monocytes into fibrocytes is inhibited by the serum protein serum amyloid P (SAP). Depleting SAP at a wound site thus might speed wound healing. SAP binds to some types of agarose in the presence of Ca2+. We found that human SAP binds to an agarose with a KD of 7×10−8M and a Bmax of 2.1 μg SAP/mg wet weight agarose. Mixing this agarose 1: 5 w/v with 30 μg/mL human SAP (the average SAP concentration in normal serum) in a buffer containing 2mM Ca2+ reduced the free SAP concentration to ~0.02 μg/mL, well below the concentration that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Compared with a hydrogel dressing and a foam dressing, dressings containing this agarose and Ca2+ significantly increased the speed of wound healing in partial thickness wounds in pigs. This suggests that agarose/Ca2+ dressings may be beneficial for wound healing in humans. PMID:19660048

  9. A serum amyloid P-binding hydrogel speeds healing of partial thickness wounds in pigs.

    PubMed

    Gomer, Richard H; Pilling, Darrell; Kauvar, Lawrence M; Ellsworth, Stote; Ronkainen, Sanna D; Roife, David; Davis, Stephen C

    2009-01-01

    During wound healing, some circulating monocytes enter the wound, differentiate into fibroblast-like cells called fibrocytes, and appear to then further differentiate into myofibroblasts, cells that play a key role in collagen deposition, cytokine release, and wound contraction. The differentiation of monocytes into fibrocytes is inhibited by the serum protein serum amyloid P (SAP). Depleting SAP at a wound site thus might speed wound healing. SAP binds to some types of agarose in the presence of Ca(2+). We found that human SAP binds to an agarose with a K(D) of 7 x 10(-8) M and a B(max) of 2.1 microg SAP/mg wet weight agarose. Mixing this agarose 1 : 5 w/v with 30 microg/mL human SAP (the average SAP concentration in normal serum) in a buffer containing 2 mM Ca(2+) reduced the free SAP concentration to approximately 0.02 microg/mL, well below the concentration that inhibits fibrocyte differentiation. Compared with a hydrogel dressing and a foam dressing, dressings containing this agarose and Ca(2+) significantly increased the speed of wound healing in partial thickness wounds in pigs. This suggests that agarose/Ca(2+) dressings may be beneficial for wound healing in humans. PMID:19660048

  10. Current concepts in the management of tendon disorders.

    PubMed

    Rees, J D; Wilson, A M; Wolman, R L

    2006-05-01

    Primary disorders of tendons are common and constitute a high proportion of referrals to rheumatologists. Certain tendons are particularly vulnerable to degenerative pathology; these include the Achilles, patella, elements of the rotator cuff, forearm extensors, biceps brachi and tibialis posterior tendons. Disorders of these tendons are often chronic and can be difficult to manage successfully in the long term. Significant advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of these conditions. Histopathological evidence, together with advances in imaging techniques, has made us more appreciative of the degenerative (rather that inflammatory) nature of these conditions. Additionally the presence of neovascularization is now well-recognized in long-standing tendinopathy. We review the mechanical, vascular and developing neural theories that attempt to explain the aetiology of degenerative tendinopathy. We also explore theories of why specific tendons (such as the Achilles and supraspinatus tendons) are particularly prone to degenerative pathology. Traditionally, treatments have placed a heavy emphasis on anti-inflammatory strategies, which are often inappropriate. Recently, however, significant advances in the practical management of tendon disorders have been made. In particular the advent of 'eccentric loading' training programmes has revolutionized the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy in some patients. This concept is currently being extended to include other commonly injured tendons. Other current treatments are reviewed, as are potential future treatments.

  11. Comparison of the results of operative and conservative treatment of deep dermal partial-thickness scalds in children.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierski, M; Mańkowski, P; Jankowski, A; Harasymczuk, J

    2007-10-01

    Deep dermal partial-thickness scalds remain one of the most common types of injuries in childhood. Local treatment of those wounds, alternatively described as IIb degree, is still very controversial. Some authors advise conservative treatment of such wounds, pointing to their ability to self-reepithelialise, which is possible but significantly prolonged. Other investigators postulate operative treatment, i.e., tangential necrectomy and split-thickness autologous skin grafting, which may shorten the time of wound healing. Arguments call for contra-arguments, and the problem still seems to be unresolved. There is indeed a lack of acceptable standardisation of the local treatment for deep dermal partial-thickness scalds in the paediatric population. The results of both conservative and operative treatment of 114 children aged between 3 months and 17 years, treated for deep dermal partial-thickness scalds from 1997 to 2004 are presented. The treatment of five groups of patients, divided into groups based on the extent of their burn wounds, is evaluated. The patients were treated by tangential necrectomy and skin grafting, mechanical dermabrasion, Granuflex(R) (Convatec) hydrocolloid dressings, Iruxol Mono(R) (Knoll) enzymatic dressings, or Aquacel Ag(R) (Convatec) hydrofibre dressings with silver ions. A number of parameters of wound healing were analysed. The results of this paper encouraged us to present and discuss a proposition for the standardisation of local treatment of deep dermal partial-thickness burn wounds in the paediatric population, according to the extent of injury.

  12. Transforming growth factor-beta and its effect on reepithelialization of partial-thickness ear wounds in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Tredget, Eric B; Demare, Jack; Chandran, Geethan; Tredget, Edward E; Yang, Liju; Ghahary, Aziz

    2005-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is known to affect nearly every aspect of wound repair. Many of the effects have been extensively investigated; however, the primary effect of endogenously derived TGF-beta on wound reepithelialization is still not completely understood. To examine this, two types of wounds were made on a transgenic mouse over-expressing TGF-beta1. Full-thickness back wounds were made to compare the wound healing process in the presence of compensatory healing mechanisms. Superficial partial-thickness ear wounds involving only the epidermis were made to determine the effect of TGF-beta on reepithelialization. In the partial-thickness ear wounds, at later time points, the transgenic group had smaller epithelial gaps than the wild-type mice. A greater number of actively proliferating cells, as determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, was also found in the transgenic mice at post-injury day 8. These results show that TGF-beta1 stimulates the rate of reepithelialization at later time points in partial-thickness wounds. However, in the full-thickness back wounds, the transgenic animals exhibited a slower reepithelialization rate at all time points and the number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells was fewer. Our findings would suggest that the overexpression of TGF-beta1 speeds the rate of wound closure in partial-thickness wounds by promoting keratinocyte migration. In full-thickness wounds, however, the overexpression of TGF-beta1 slows the rate of wound reepithelialization.

  13. Intratendinous supraspinatus cyst as a cause of shoulder impingement

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Akshay; Karuppaiah, Karthik; Elias, David; Tavakkolizadeh, Adel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 29-year-old gentleman with shoulder impingement. An articular-sided intratendinous supraspinatus cyst was identified as the cause of his symptoms. Arthroscopic cyst debridement resulted in a good outcome at 1-year follow-up. Cysts around the shoulder are a well described pathological entity. They consist of different categories, including intraosseus cysts of the humeral head and glenoid, paralabral cysts and cysts associated with the acromioclavicular joint. Although paralabral cysts that lie intramuscularly or between the muscle bellies have frequently been reported, this is the first report of an intratendinous supraspinatus cyst with an intact rotator cuff. We describe the case, its management and the postsurgical outcome. PMID:27582975

  14. Comparison between cryopreserved and glycerol-preserved allografts in a partial-thickness porcine wound model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Cheonjae; Lim, Kihwan; Lee, Sungjun; Choi, Yanghwan; Choi, Youngwhan; Lee, Jungsuk

    2016-03-01

    Human skin allografts are one of the best temporary biological coverings for severely burned patients. Cryopreserved (CPA) and glycerol-preserved (GPA) allografts are the most widely used types. This study compared the allograft efficiency of both preservation methods under the same conditions. To simulate actual clinical conditions, we used a porcine wound model. In addition, we evaluated the macroscopic and microscopic scoring of graft performance for each method. Porcine cadaver skin 1 mm thick was obtained from one pig. Cryopreserved skin cell viability was 20.8 %, glycerol-preserved skin was 9.08 %, and fresh skin was 58.6 %. We made ten partial-thickness wounds each in two pigs. The take rates on day 2 were 96.23 and 82.65 % in the GPA and CPA group (both n = 9), respectively. After 1 week, the take rates of both groups were nearly equal. The removal rate at week 5 was 98.87 and 94.41 % in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. On microscopic findings at week 2, inflammation was greater in the CPA group. Other findings such as fibroblast hyperplasia and neovascularization were not significantly different between both groups. At week 5, the score of collagen fiber synthesis was 2.67 ± 0.47 and 2.33 ± 0.47 in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. The epidermal-dermal junction was 2.22 ± 0.79 and 2.00 ± 0.47 in the GPA and CPA group, respectively. These findings suggest that wound healing takes longer in the CPA group. The preservation method of allografts is not a absolute factor in the wound healing process in this wound model.

  15. Effects of isotretinoin treatment on cartilage and tendon thicknesses: an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Karataş Toğral, Arzu; Baki, Ali Erdem; Ekiz, Timur

    2015-07-01

    Effects of retinoic acid on collagen synthesis and cartilage have previously been shown. However, its effects on cartilage and tendons in humans have not been studied yet. Therefore, in order to provide a morphologic insight, the aim of this study was to measure femoral cartilage, Achilles and supraspinatus tendon thicknesses in patients under systemic isotretinoin treatment by using ultrasound. Fifteen patients (nine F, six M) who used isotretinoin for their acnes were included. All patients were treated with isotretinoin 0.5 mg/kg/day for the first month, and the dosage was escalated up to 1 mg/kg/day thereafter. Distal femoral cartilage, supraspinatus, and Achilles tendons thicknesses have been evaluated both before the treatment and at the end of the third month. Femoral cartilage thicknesses were assessed from three midpoints bilaterally; medial condyle, lateral condyle, and intercondylar area. Short/long-axis diameters and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendons and axial tendon thicknesses of supraspinatus tendon were evaluated from the nondominant side. The mean age of the patients was 20.1 ± 4.9 years, and body mass index was 21.7 ± 2.5 kg/m(2). Although posttreatment cartilage measurements of 30 knees were lower for the three midpoints, it reached significance only for lateral condyle (p = 0.05). In addition, posttreatment tendon measurements were not statistically significant compared with pretreatment values (all p > 0.05). Systemic isotretinoin treatment seems to make cartilage thinner. Further studies considering histological and molecular evaluations with more sample sizes are awaited. PMID:24985041

  16. Effects of isotretinoin treatment on cartilage and tendon thicknesses: an ultrasonographic study.

    PubMed

    Yıldızgören, Mustafa Turgut; Karataş Toğral, Arzu; Baki, Ali Erdem; Ekiz, Timur

    2015-07-01

    Effects of retinoic acid on collagen synthesis and cartilage have previously been shown. However, its effects on cartilage and tendons in humans have not been studied yet. Therefore, in order to provide a morphologic insight, the aim of this study was to measure femoral cartilage, Achilles and supraspinatus tendon thicknesses in patients under systemic isotretinoin treatment by using ultrasound. Fifteen patients (nine F, six M) who used isotretinoin for their acnes were included. All patients were treated with isotretinoin 0.5 mg/kg/day for the first month, and the dosage was escalated up to 1 mg/kg/day thereafter. Distal femoral cartilage, supraspinatus, and Achilles tendons thicknesses have been evaluated both before the treatment and at the end of the third month. Femoral cartilage thicknesses were assessed from three midpoints bilaterally; medial condyle, lateral condyle, and intercondylar area. Short/long-axis diameters and cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendons and axial tendon thicknesses of supraspinatus tendon were evaluated from the nondominant side. The mean age of the patients was 20.1 ± 4.9 years, and body mass index was 21.7 ± 2.5 kg/m(2). Although posttreatment cartilage measurements of 30 knees were lower for the three midpoints, it reached significance only for lateral condyle (p = 0.05). In addition, posttreatment tendon measurements were not statistically significant compared with pretreatment values (all p > 0.05). Systemic isotretinoin treatment seems to make cartilage thinner. Further studies considering histological and molecular evaluations with more sample sizes are awaited.

  17. Interobserver Agreement in the Classification of Partial-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears Using the Snyder Classification System

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.; Davis, Shane M.; Doremus, Brittany; Kouk, Shalen; Stetson, William B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: At present, there is no widely accepted classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears, and as a result, optimal treatment remains controversial. Purpose: To examine the interobserver reliability and accuracy of classifying partial rotator cuff tears using the Snyder classification system. We hypothesized that the Snyder classification would be reproducible with high reliability and accuracy. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Twenty-seven orthopaedic surgeons reviewed 10 video-recorded shoulder arthroscopies. Each surgeon was provided with a description of the Snyder classification system for partial-thickness rotator cuff tears and was then instructed to use this system to describe each tear. Interrater kappa statistics and percentage agreement between observers were calculated to measure the level of agreement. Surgeon experience as well as fellowship training was evaluated to determine possible correlations. Results: A kappa coefficient of 0.512 indicated moderate reliability between surgeons using the Snyder classification to describe partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. The mean correct score was 80%, which indicated “very good” agreement. There was no correlation between the number of shoulder arthroscopies performed per year and fellowship training and the number of correct scores. Conclusion: The Snyder classification system is reproducible and can be used in future research studies in analyzing the treatment options of partial rotator cuff tears. PMID:27738643

  18. Aqueous humor outflow effects of partial thickness channel created by a femtosecond laser in ex-vivo human eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Dongyul; Chaudhary, Gautam; Kurtz, Ron; Juhasz, Tibor

    2007-02-01

    The reduced outflow rate caused by the increased resistance through trabecular meshwork (TM) has been thought to be the main reason for elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). It has been demonstrated that femtosecond laser pulses tuned to 1.7 μm wavelength can create the partial thickness channel in the sclera in ex vivo human eyes [1] and aqueous outflow can be increased by these channels in porcine eyes [2]. It was also shown that the outflow rate is reduced over time in ex vivo human eyes [3]. Therefore, the control experiment without laser treatment at the same condition was conducted and showed that outflow was reduced by 1.5 +/- 0.8 μl/min at 15mmHg and 1.8 +/- 1.0 μl/min at 25mmHg. However, the outflow rate increased by 0.26 μl/min at 15mmHg and 0.15 μl/min at 25mmHg after the partial thickness channel was created, meaning the amount of increased outflow rate might be more than measured considering the outflow reduction in control experiment. We suggest that the femtosecond laser created partial thickness channel can increase the outflow rate and delay the progression of glaucoma.

  19. Ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels reduce infection and support healing in a porcine partial-thickness thermal burn.

    PubMed

    Roy, Daniel C; Tomblyn, Seth; Isaac, Kameel M; Kowalczewski, Christine J; Burmeister, David M; Burnett, Luke R; Christy, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in burn patients. Current therapies include silver-based creams and dressings, which display limited antimicrobial effectiveness and impair healing. The need exists for a topical, point-of-injury antibiotic treatment that provides sustained antimicrobial activity without impeding wound repair. Fitting this description are keratin-based hydrogels, which are fully biocompatible and support the slow-release of antibiotics. Here we develop a porcine model of an infected partial-thickness burn to test the effects of ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels on infection and wound healing. Partial-thickness burns were inoculated with either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in infections that persisted for >2 weeks that exceeded 10(5) and 10(6) cfu per gram of tissue, respectively. Compared to silver sulfadiazine, ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogel treatment significantly reduced the amount of P. aeruginosa and S. aureus in the burn by >99% on days 4, 7, 11, and 15 postinjury. Further, burns treated with ciprofloxacin-loaded keratin hydrogels exhibited similar healing patterns as uninfected burns with regards to reepithelialization, macrophage recruitment, and collagen deposition and remodeling. The ability of keratin hydrogels to deliver antibiotics to fight infection and support healing of partial-thickness burns make them a strong candidate as a first-line burn therapy. PMID:27238250

  20. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    PubMed

    Kietrys, David M; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steve N; Barbe, Mary F

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF) handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC) as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  1. ggstThe role of tendon microcirculation in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    Tendinopathy is of distinct interest as it describes a painful tendon disease with local tenderness, swelling and pain associated with sonographic features such as hypoechogenic texture and diameter enlargement. Recent research elucidated microcirculatory changes in tendinopathy using laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry such as at the Achilles tendon, the patellar tendon as well as at the elbow and the wrist level. Tendon capillary blood flow is increased at the point of pain. Tendon oxygen saturation as well as tendon postcapillary venous filling pressures, determined non-invasively using combined Laser Doppler flowmetry and spectrophotometry, can quantify, in real-time, how tendon microcirculation changes over with pathology or in response to a given therapy. Tendon oxygen saturation can be increased by repetitive, intermittent short-term ice applications in Achilles tendons; this corresponds to 'ischemic preconditioning', a method used to train tissue to sustain ischemic damage. On the other hand, decreasing tendon oxygenation may reflect local acidosis and deteriorating tendon metabolism. Painful eccentric training, a common therapy for Achilles, patellar, supraspinatus and wrist tendinopathy decreases abnormal capillary tendon flow without compromising local tendon oxygenation. Combining an Achilles pneumatic wrap with eccentric training changes tendon microcirculation in a different way than does eccentric training alone; both approaches reduce pain in Achilles tendinopathy. The microcirculatory effects of measures such as extracorporeal shock wave therapy as well as topical nitroglycerine application are to be studied in tendinopathy as well as the critical question of dosage and maintenance. Interestingly it seems that injection therapy using color Doppler for targeting the area of neovascularisation yields to good clinical results with polidocanol sclerosing therapy, but also with a combination of epinephrine and lidocaine. PMID:18447938

  2. Diabetes alters mechanical properties and collagen fiber re-alignment in multiple mouse tendons.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Bhatt, Pankti R; Liechty, Kenneth W; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Tendons function to transfer load from muscle to bone through their complex composition and hierarchical structure, consisting mainly of type I collagen. Recent evidence suggests that type II diabetes may cause alterations in collagen structure, such as irregular fibril morphology and density, which could play a role in the mechanical function of tendons. Using the db/db mouse model of type II diabetes, the diabetic skin was found to have impaired biomechanical properties when compared to the non-diabetic group. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of diabetes on biomechanics, collagen fiber re-alignment, and biochemistry in three functionally different tendons (Achilles, supraspinatus, patellar) using the db/db mouse model. Results showed that cross-sectional area and stiffness, but not modulus, were significantly reduced in all three tendons. However, the tendon response to load (transition strain, collagen fiber re-alignment) occurred earlier in the mechanical test, contrary to expectations. In addition, the patellar tendon had an altered response to diabetes when compared to the other two tendons, with no changes in fiber re-alignment and decreased collagen content at the midsubstance of the tendon. Overall, type II diabetes alters tendon mechanical properties and the dynamic response to load.

  3. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  4. Histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis of the tendon-bone interface after rotator cuff repair in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Gotoh, Masafumi; Ohta, Keisuke; Honda, Hirokazu; Ohzono, Hiroki; Shimokobe, Hisao; Shiba, Naoto; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Successful rotator cuff repair requires biological anchoring of the repaired tendon to the bone. However, the histological structure of the repaired tendon-bone interface differs from that of a normal tendon insertion. We analysed differences between the normal tendon insertion and the repaired tendon-bone interface after surgery in the mechanical properties, histomorphometric analysis, and 3-dimensional ultrastructure of the cells using a rat rotator cuff repair model. Twenty-four adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats underwent complete cuff tear and subsequent repair of the supraspinatus tendon. The repaired tendon-bone interface was evaluated at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. At each time point, shoulders underwent micro-computed tomography scanning and biomechanical testing (N = 6), conventional histology and histomorphometric analysis (N = 6), and ultrastructural analysis with focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) tomography (N = 4). We demonstrated that the cellular distribution between the repaired tendon and bone at 12 weeks after surgery bore similarities to the normal tendon insertion. However, the ultrastructure of the cells at any time point had a different morphology than those of the normal tendon insertion. These morphological differences affect the healing process, partly contributing to re-tearing at the repair site. These results may facilitate future studies of the regeneration of a normal tendon insertion. PMID:27647121

  5. Abnormal origins of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to rotator cuff pathology: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alan L; Gates, Cameron H; Link, Thomas M; Ma, C Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Previous case reports have highlighted various anomalous origins of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHBT) that do not originate from the superior glenoid labrum or supraglenoid tubercle. Yet, these cases were all reported as incidental findings and were not thought to cause any significant shoulder pathology. We present the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinical treatment of two cases where aberrant intra-articular origins of the long head of the biceps tendon from the anterior edge of the supraspinatus tendon may have contributed to symptomatic rotator cuff pathology. Arthroscopy confirmed MR findings of partial articular-sided supraspinatus lesions in close proximity to the anomalous origins and treatment with tenodesis of the LHBT successfully relieved symptoms. Although rare occurrences with subtle and potentially misleading imaging findings, it is important to be aware of aberrant origins of the LHBT that may contribute to concomitant rotator cuff pathology.

  6. Treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with ultrasound guided dry needling

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to describe the treatment of a patient with tendinopathy using sonographically guided dry needling. Tendinopathies are a highly prevalent problem in musculoskeletal medicine, and no one form of treatment has gained universal acceptance as being superior to another. Clinical Features A 30-year-old woman with a 4-month history of anterolateral right shoulder pain was diagnosed with supraspinatus tendinopathy upon physical examination, which was confirmed with diagnostic sonography. Intervention and Outcome Sonography was used to guide an acupuncture needle into the pathologic tissue to induce a humoral healing response. Therapeutic exercise was also prescribed. At 10-day follow-up, increased echogenicity was found in the previously heterogenous hypoechoic areas. The patient also experienced a subjective resolution of her shoulder pain, which did not return with increased physical activity. Conclusions Sonographically guided dry needling was shown to be beneficial for this patient as evident by sonographic changes pre- and postprocedure. PMID:23997721

  7. Posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation with supraspinatus tear. A case report.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, K; Hamada, K; Gotoh, M; Miyazaki, S; Fukuda, H

    1998-08-01

    A 20-year-old man was treated for posteroinferior acromioclavicular dislocation. The diagnosis was based on standard radiographs and intraoperative findings. The distal end of the clavicle had impaled the supraspinatus muscle. Open reduction was performed 2 weeks after injury, followed by wire fixation of the acromioclavicular joint and repair of the torn superior acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligaments. Two years after the procedure, standard radiographs revealed normal anatomic alignment of the acromioclavicular joint, with pain free range of motion. Active elevation in the scapular plane was 180 degrees, active external rotation was 80 degrees in the anatomic position, and passive internal rotation was to the T5 vertebra. The patient returned to playing baseball and tennis and was satisfied with the postoperative result.

  8. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... when the posterior tibial tendon becomes inflamed or torn. As a result, the tendon may not be ... repetitive use. Once the tendon becomes inflamed or torn, the arch will slowly fall (collapse) over time. ...

  9. Achilles tendon repair

    MedlinePlus

    Achilles tendon rupture-surgery; Percutaneous Achilles tendon rupture repair ... To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut ...

  10. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Heel cord tear; Calcaneal tendon rupture ... MRI scan to see what type of Achilles tendon tear you have. An MRI is a type ... partial tear means at least some of the tendon is still OK. A full tear means your ...

  11. Tendon latch

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    A latch connects tendons run from a floating platform to a socket in a foundation on the sea floor. The latch includes a latch body having a plurality of dogs disposed within and urgible outward from the latch body. A piston is releasably disposed within the latch body above the dogs and moves downwardly when released to urge the dogs outwardly from the body into latching engagement with the socket. A trigger mechanism in the latch releases the piston when the latch body lands in the socket and contacts a trigger pin projecting upwardly from the bottom of the socket. A series of wedges are disposed exteriorally on the body and inhibit lateral movement of the body relative to the socket when the tendon is subjected to a cycle bending loads.

  12. Administration of prednisolone phosphate-liposomes reduces wound contraction in a rat partial-thickness wound model.

    PubMed

    Richters, Cornelia D; Paauw, Nanne J; Mayen, Ilvy; van Bloois, Louis; Metselaer, Josbert M; Storm, Gert; du Pont, John S; Hoekstra, Matthias J; Kreis, Robert W; Kamperdijk, Eduard W A

    2006-01-01

    Macrophages play an important role in the inflammatory phase of wound healing and their activity regulates fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Modulation of macrophage function may result in improvement of the wound healing process. Prednisolone phosphate (PLP) encapsulated into liposomes was administered to partial-thickness wounds in rats. A single dose of 75 microg/kg, applied directly after wounding, resulted in up to a 30% reduction of wound contraction at 28 days after wounding. This effect could not be achieved in the group that was administered free PLP or liposomes containing phosphate-buffered saline to the wound. The number of myofibroblasts was up to 50% lower in wounds treated with the liposomal PLP at 4 days after wounding. The number of macrophages present in the wounds was not statistically different between groups. Most probably, the production of cytokines and growth factors by macrophages is altered after phagocytosing the liposomes, resulting in reduced wound contraction. PMID:17014673

  13. Partial Flexor Tendon Laceration Assessment: Interobserver and Intraobserver Reliability.

    PubMed

    Barker, B Justin; Kolovich, Gregory P; Klinefelter, Ryan D

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in the hand is difficult owing to the subjectivity of evaluation. In this study, we created 12 partial-thickness flexor tendon lacerations in a cadaveric hand, evaluated the accuracy of 6 orthopedic residents and 4 fellowship-trained hand surgeons in estimating the percentage thickness of each laceration, and assessed the groups' interobserver and intraobserver agreement. The 10 participants estimated each laceration independently and on 2 separate occasions and indicated whether they would repair it. The actual thickness of each laceration was calculated from measurements made with a pair of digital microcalipers. Overall estimates differed significantly from calibrated measurements. Estimates grouped by residents and fellowship-trained hand surgeons also differed significantly. Third-year residents were the most accurate residents, and fellowship-trained hand surgeons were more accurate than residents. Overall interobserver agreement was poor for both readings. There was moderate overall intraobserver agreement. Fellowship-trained hand surgeons and first-year residents had the highest intraobserver agreement. These results highlight the difficulty in accurately assessing flexor tendon lacerations. Accuracy appears not to improve with surgeon experience. PMID:26991579

  14. MRI-Arthroscopic Correlation in Rotator Cuff Tendon Pathologies; A Comparison between Various Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sefidbakht, Sepideh; Momenzadeh, Omid Reza; Dehghani, Sakineh; Gerami, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has long been considered a perfect imaging study for evaluation of shoulder pathologies despite occasional discrepancies between MR reports and arthroscopic findings. In this study we aim to evaluate impact of imaging center as an indicator of image quality on accuracy of MRI reports in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon pathologies. Methods: We reviewed MR reports of 64 patients who underwent arthroscopy in university center hospital. MRIs were done in various centers including both university-affiliated and out-centers. All studies were reported by two radiologists in consensus unaware of the arthroscopic results or previous reports. An inter-observer agreement analysis using the kappa statistics was performed to determine consistency among imaging and surgical reports. Results: Kappa values for out-centers were as follows: 0.785 for biceps, 0.469 for suscapularis, 0.846 for supraspinatus and 0.785 for infraspinatus tendons. In university centers values were 0.799 for biceps, 0.802 for suscapularis, 0.789 for supraspinatus and 0.770 for infraspinatus tendons. Conclusion: Image reporting in university centers with proficient sequences increased accuracy of diagnosis in 3/4 of evaluated features and showed subtle decreased inter-observer agreement in 1/4 of features. Uniformity of the scanners and protocols as well as evaluation on a workstation rather than hard copies cumulatively resulted in a meaningful increase in the accuracy of the same radiologists in diagnosis of rotator cuff tendon tear. PMID:27200392

  15. Endoscopic Management of Gluteus Medius Tendon Tears.

    PubMed

    Thaunat, Mathieu; Noël, Eric; Nové-Josserand, Laurent; Murphy, Colin G; Sbiyaa, Mouhcine; Sonnery-Cottet, Bertrand

    2016-03-01

    Tears in the gluteus medius and minimus tendons have been recognized as an important cause of recalcitrant greater trochanteric pain syndrome. Because of the frequency of partial-thickness undersurface tears, this relatively unknown pathology is often misdiagnosed and left untreated. Surgery is indicated in case of 4 associated conditions: (i) Failure of conservative treatment with duration of symptoms >6 months; (ii) magnetic resonance imaging showing a tendon tear; (iii) positive ultrasound-guided infiltration test; and (iv) the absence of an evolved fatty degeneration or atrophy of the gluteus medius and minimus muscle. Endoscopic repair of partial or full-thickness tears, with systematic resection of the bony structures implicated in the impingement, and a complete bursectomy appear to give satisfactory results, although these results remain to be confirmed by clinical studies with longer follow-up. The degree of tendon degeneration may compromise the tissue left for reattachment, raising concerns over its healing capacity, durability, and ultimate strength of the repair. PMID:26752773

  16. ARTHROSCOPY FOR TREATMENT OF REFRACTORY CALCIFIC TENDONITIS OF THE SHOULDER

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Marcos Rassi; Fernandes, Rui José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from arthroscopic treatment in patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder. Methods: Between September 2001 and June 2006, 55 patients with calcific tendonitis of the shoulder that was resistant to conservative treatment were evaluated, with follow-up of 12 to 70 months. The mean age was 42 years, ranging from 30 to 64 years; 44 patients were female (80%). There were 37 right shoulders, and 63.63% of the cases were on the dominant side. Pain was the main symptom, and the mean time between onset of symptoms and arthroscopy was 38 months (range: five to 120 months). The tendon affected was the supraspinatus in 42 cases, the infraspinatus in 11 cases and an association between these in two cases. Acromioplasty was carried out in 12 patients (21.82%) and subacromial bursectomy was performed in all cases. Results: According to the UCLA criteria, 46 cases were excellent and six were good, making a total of 52 satisfactory results (94.54%). Conclusion: Arthroscopic treatment of calcific tendonitis of the shoulder appears to be an effective method, with high rates of satisfactory results. Associated acromioplasty is not necessary. PMID:27019839

  17. Latissimus Dorsi Tendon Transfer for Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: A Modified Technique Using Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Villacis, Diego; Merriman, Jarrad; Wong, Karlton; Rick Hatch, George F.

    2013-01-01

    Latissimus dorsi transfer is a well-established method for the treatment of posterosuperior massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. We propose using an arthroscopically assisted technique that avoids insult to the deltoid. With the patient in the lateral decubitus position, an L-shaped incision is made along the anterior belly of the latissimus muscle and then along the posterior axillary line. The latissimus and teres major are identified and separated. The tendon insertion of the latissimus is isolated, and a FiberWire traction suture (Arthrex, Naples, FL) is placed, facilitating dissection of the muscle to the thoracodorsal neurovascular pedicle and subsequent mobilization. The interval deep to the deltoid and superficial to the teres minor is developed into a subdeltoid tunnel for arthroscopic tendon transfer. The latissimus tendon is then transferred and stabilized arthroscopically to the lateral aspect of the infraspinatus and supraspinatus footprints by multiple suture anchors. PMID:23767006

  18. A liposome hydrogel with polyvinyl-pyrrolidone iodine in the local treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Homann, Heinz-Herbert; Rosbach, Oliver; Moll, Wiebke; Vogt, Peter Maria; Germann, Guenter; Hopp, Michael; Langer-Brauburger, Birgit; Reimer, Karen; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-10-01

    Local treatment of burn injuries with conventional anti-infective preparations does not provide the moist environment that promotes fast wound healing. In a randomized controlled trial the effects of liposome polyvinyl-pyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) hydrogel, a novel formulation of PVP-I in a liposome hydrogel with high water-binding capacity, were investigated in 43 patients with partial-thickness burn wounds in an intraindividual comparison with a conventional silver-sulfadiazine cream. Treatment with liposome PVP-I hydrogel resulted in significantly faster complete healing of the burn wounds compared with silver-sulfadiazine cream (9.9 +/- 4.5 days versus 11.3 +/- 4.9; P < 0.015). The cosmetic result (smoothness, elasticity, appearance) was rated as excellent for 37.0% of study wounds with liposome PVP-I hydrogel compared with 13.0% of wounds treated with silver-sulfadiazine cream. Local tolerability was good; handling and change of dressing were rated as easy. Local treatment with liposome PVP-I hydrogel thus provides fast wound healing with a favorable cosmetic result.

  19. A liposome hydrogel with polyvinyl-pyrrolidone iodine in the local treatment of partial-thickness burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Homann, Heinz-Herbert; Rosbach, Oliver; Moll, Wiebke; Vogt, Peter Maria; Germann, Guenter; Hopp, Michael; Langer-Brauburger, Birgit; Reimer, Karen; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-10-01

    Local treatment of burn injuries with conventional anti-infective preparations does not provide the moist environment that promotes fast wound healing. In a randomized controlled trial the effects of liposome polyvinyl-pyrrolidone-iodine (PVP-I) hydrogel, a novel formulation of PVP-I in a liposome hydrogel with high water-binding capacity, were investigated in 43 patients with partial-thickness burn wounds in an intraindividual comparison with a conventional silver-sulfadiazine cream. Treatment with liposome PVP-I hydrogel resulted in significantly faster complete healing of the burn wounds compared with silver-sulfadiazine cream (9.9 +/- 4.5 days versus 11.3 +/- 4.9; P < 0.015). The cosmetic result (smoothness, elasticity, appearance) was rated as excellent for 37.0% of study wounds with liposome PVP-I hydrogel compared with 13.0% of wounds treated with silver-sulfadiazine cream. Local tolerability was good; handling and change of dressing were rated as easy. Local treatment with liposome PVP-I hydrogel thus provides fast wound healing with a favorable cosmetic result. PMID:17901735

  20. Influence of tendon tears on ultrasound echo intensity in response to loading

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Kayt E.; Marcu, David; Baer, Geoffrey S.; Thelen, Darryl G.; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Acoustoelastic (AE) ultrasound image analysis is a promising non-invasive approach that uses load-dependent echo intensity changes to characterize stiffness of tendinous tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AE can detect localized changes in tendon stiffness due to partial and full-thickness tendon tears. Ovine infraspinatus tendons with different levels of damage (Intact, 33%, 66% and full thickness cuts initiated on the articular and bursal sides) were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while cine ultrasound images were recorded. The load-induced changes in echo intensity on the bursal and articular side of the tendon were determined. Consistent with AE theory, the undamaged tendons exhibited an increase in echo intensity with tendon loading, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. In the intact condition, the articular region demonstrated a significantly greater increase in echo intensity during loading than the bursal region. Cuts initiated on the bursal side resulted in a progressive decrease in echo intensity of the adjacent tissue, likely reflecting the reduced load transmission through that region. However, image intensity information was less sensitive for identifying load transmission changes that result from partial thickness cuts initiated on the articular side. We conclude that AE approaches may be useful to quantitatively assess load-dependent changes in tendon stiffness, and that disruption of AE behavior may be indicative of substantial tendon damage. PMID:25468301

  1. Influence of tendon tears on ultrasound echo intensity in response to loading.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Kayt E; Marcu, David; Baer, Geoffrey S; Thelen, Darryl G; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-12-18

    Acoustoelastic (AE) ultrasound image analysis is a promising non-invasive approach that uses load-dependent echo intensity changes to characterize stiffness of tendinous tissue. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether AE can detect localized changes in tendon stiffness due to partial and full-thickness tendon tears. Ovine infraspinatus tendons with different levels of damage (Intact, 33%, 66% and full thickness cuts initiated on the articular and bursal sides) were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while cine ultrasound images were recorded. The load-induced changes in echo intensity on the bursal and articular side of the tendon were determined. Consistent with AE theory, the undamaged tendons exhibited an increase in echo intensity with tendon loading, reflecting the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. In the intact condition, the articular region demonstrated a significantly greater increase in echo intensity during loading than the bursal region. Cuts initiated on the bursal side resulted in a progressive decrease in echo intensity of the adjacent tissue, likely reflecting the reduced load transmission through that region. However, image intensity information was less sensitive for identifying load transmission changes that result from partial thickness cuts initiated on the articular side. We conclude that AE approaches may be useful to quantitatively assess load-dependent changes in tendon stiffness, and that disruption of AE behavior may be indicative of substantial tendon damage.

  2. The effects of exercise using PNF in patients with a supraspinatus muscle tear

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jwa-jun; Lee, Sang-yeol; Ha, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise on subjective pain reduction and blood flow velocity in supraspinatus tear patients and to evaluate muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] The 20 subjects of this study were diagnosed with supraspinatus tears by MRI. The subjects have performed PNF techniques and Simple exercise for 12 weeks. [Results] After 12 weeks of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise, the blood flow velocity, Visual Analogue Scale, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand score showed statistically significant difference. Also, the difference between the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise was statistically significant. [Conclusion] In conclusion, 12 weeks of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation treatment and simple exercise therapy had no effect on pain reduction in patients with supraspinatus tear, but in terms of functionality, the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation treatment was effective. PMID:26356542

  3. Efficacy of a bio-electric dressing in healing deep, partial-thickness wounds using a porcine model .

    PubMed

    Harding, Andrew C; Gil, Joel; Valdes, Jose; Solis, Michael; Davis, Stephen C

    2012-09-01

    Numerous physical modalities have been used in attempts to augment the healing process, including ultrasound, low- energy light therapy, and electrical stimulation (ES). ES has been shown to benefit tissue repair in a variety of wound types, but variations in study designs, administration, and parameters render its application in clinical practice somewhat unconventional. A dressing was designed to generate an electric potential of 0.6 V to 0.7 V in the presence of moisture, thereby delivering a sustained micro-current without the need for an external power source. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of this bio-electric dressing (BED) on deep, partial-thickness wounds using six female specific pathogen-free animals and a well established porcine model for wound healing. Wounds (10 mm x 7 mm x 0.5 mm) were created in paravertebral and thoracic areas of these animals using a specialized electrokeratome and covered with the active polyester BED and a polyurethane film dressing (n = 30) (treatment) or an inactive polyester and film dressing (n = 30). Using an epidermal migration assay, wounds were assessed daily from day 4 through day 8 post-wounding. Differences in the proportion of wounds healed were statistically significant (P <0.001) on days 5 and 6 post-wounding. These results show BED is more effective than a control dressing treatment with moisture-retentive dressings in this animal model. Controlled clinical studies are warranted to elucidate the potential clinical implications of this treatment modality.

  4. Clinical evaluation comparing the efficacy of aquacel ag hydrofiber dressing versus petrolatum gauze with antibiotic ointment in partial-thickness burns in a pediatric burn center.

    PubMed

    Saba, Salim Charles; Tsai, Roger; Glat, Paul

    2009-01-01

    We conducted this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study to compare Aquacel Ag Hydrofiber dressing (Aquacel Ag) to a standard dressing for the treatment of partial thickness burns in children. We used the St. Christopher's Hospital burn center registry to identify 20 pediatric patients who had sustained partial thickness burns over a 10-month period. Ten of these patients had been treated with Aquacel Ag Hydrofiber dressing and 10 were treated with conventional Xeroflo gauze with Bacitracin Zinc ointment, the institutional standard of care for nonoperative partial-thickness burn wounds. Inclusion criteria included anyone with partial-thickness burns below the age of 18 years and in excellent baseline health. Exclusion criteria included inhalation injury, presence of full-thickness burns necessitating surgical debridement, cellulitic, or infected wounds, and percentage total body surface area involvement greater than 40%. Outcomes measured for the Aquacel Ag versus the Xeroflo gauze with Bacitracin Zinc ointment group included hospital length of stay (2.4 vs. 9.6 days), total number of in-house dressing changes (2.7 vs. 17.1), pain on a 10-point scale associated with dressing changes (6.4 vs. 8.2), total number of intravenous narcotic administrations (2.3 vs. 14.4), nursing time adjusted for percentage total body surface area (1.9 vs. 3.5 min), time to wound reepithelialization (10.3 vs. 16.3 days), and patient primary caregiver satisfaction score using a 4-point scale--with four delineating maximum satisfaction (3.8 vs. 1.8). Aquacel Ag proved to be a safe and effective means of treating partial thickness burns with a significant reduction in nursing time and patient pain involved with dressing changes.

  5. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon. PMID:26833218

  6. Transverse Compression of Tendons.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, S T Samuel; Buckley, C Paul; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-04-01

    A study was made of the deformation of tendons when compressed transverse to the fiber-aligned axis. Bovine digital extensor tendons were compression tested between flat rigid plates. The methods included: in situ image-based measurement of tendon cross-sectional shapes, after preconditioning but immediately prior to testing; multiple constant-load creep/recovery tests applied to each tendon at increasing loads; and measurements of the resulting tendon displacements in both transverse directions. In these tests, friction resisted axial stretch of the tendon during compression, giving approximately plane-strain conditions. This, together with the assumption of a form of anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model proposed previously for tendon, justified modeling the isochronal response of tendon as that of an isotropic, slightly compressible, neo-Hookean solid. Inverse analysis, using finite-element (FE) simulations of the experiments and 10 s isochronal creep displacement data, gave values for Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio of this solid of 0.31 MPa and 0.49, respectively, for an idealized tendon shape and averaged data for all the tendons and E = 0.14 and 0.10 MPa for two specific tendons using their actual measured geometry. The compression load versus displacement curves, as measured and as simulated, showed varying degrees of stiffening with increasing load. This can be attributed mostly to geometrical changes in tendon cross section under load, varying according to the initial 3D shape of the tendon.

  7. Sclerosing polidocanol injections of small vessels to treat the chronic painful tendon.

    PubMed

    Alfredson, H; Lorentzon, R

    2007-04-01

    The chronic painful tendon (tendinopathy, tendinosis) is generally considered difficult to treat, not seldom causing long-term disability and sometimes ending the sports or work carreér. Most common sites for tendinopathy are the Achilles-, patellar-, extensor carpi radialis brevis (ERCB)-, and supraspinatus tendons. The origin of pain has for many years been unknown, but recently, by using ultrasound (US) + colour Doppler (CD), immunohistochemical analyses of tendon biopsies, and diagnostic injections of local anaestesia, we found a close relationship between areas with vasculo-neural ingrowth and tendon pain. Sensory nerves (Substance-P-SP and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide-CGRP) were found inside and outside the vascular wall. In following clinical studies we have demonstrated good short-and mid-term clinical results using treatment with US+CD-guided sclerosing polidocanol injections, targeting the area with neovessels outside the tendon. Two-year follow ups have showed remaining good clinical results, and sonographically signs of remodelling with a significantly thinner tendon with a more normal structure. Whether the effects of polidocanol are mediated through destruction of neovessels, activity on nerves or a combination, is under evaluation. PMID:17430133

  8. Achilles tendon: US examination

    SciTech Connect

    Fornage, B.D.

    1986-06-01

    Real-time ultrasonography (US) using linear-array probes and a stand-off pad as a ''waterpath'' was performed to evaluate the Achilles tendon in 67 patients (including 24 athletes) believed to have acute or chronic traumatic or inflammatory pathologic conditions. Tendons in 23 patients appeared normal on US scans. The 44 abnormal tendons comprised five complete and four partial ruptures, seven instances of postoperative change, and 28 cases of tendonitis. US depiction of the inner structure of the tendon resulted in the diagnosis of focal abnormalities, including partial ruptures, nodules, and calcifications. Tendonitis was characterized by enlargement and decreased echogenicity of the tendon. The normal US appearance of the Achilles tendon is described.

  9. Biomechanics of Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Livermore, Andrew; Tueting, Jonathan L

    2016-08-01

    The transfer of tendons in the upper extremity is a powerful technique to restore function to a partially paralyzed hand. The biomechanical principles of muscle tension and tendon excursion dictate motor function both in the native as well as transferred states. Appropriately tensioning transferred tendons to maximize the function of the associated muscle remains an area of focused research. Newer methods of tendon coaptation have proven similar in strength to the standard Pulvertaft weave, affording more options to the surgeon. PMID:27387073

  10. Musculoskeletal diseases—tendon

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Tomoya; Sakai, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tendons establish specific connections between muscles and the skeleton by transferring contraction forces from skeletal muscle to bone thereby allowing body movement. Tendon physiology and pathology are heavily dependent on mechanical stimuli. Tendon injuries clinically represent a serious and still unresolved problem since damaged tendon tissues heal very slowly and no surgical treatment can restore a damaged tendon to its normal structural integrity and mechanical strength. Understanding how mechanical stimuli regulate tendon tissue homeostasis and regeneration will improve the treatment of adult tendon injuries that still pose a great challenge in today's medicine. Source of data This review summarizes the current status of tendon treatment and discusses new directions from the point of view of cell-based therapy and regenerative medicine approach. We searched the available literature using PubMed for relevant original articles and reviews. Growing points Identification of tendon cell markers has enabled us to study precisely tendon healing and homeostasis. Clinically, tissue engineering for tendon injuries is an emerging technology comprising elements from the fields of cellular source, scaffold materials, growth factors/cytokines and gene delivering systems. Areas timely for developing research The clinical settings to establish appropriate microenvironment for injured tendons with the combination of these novel cellular- and molecular-based scaffolds will be critical for the treatment. PMID:21729872

  11. Tendon development and diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaut, Ludovic; Duprez, Delphine

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a uniaxial connective tissue component of the musculoskeletal system. Tendon is involved in force transmission between muscle and bone. Tendon injury is very common and debilitating but tendon repair remains a clinical challenge for orthopedic medicine. In vertebrates, tendon is mainly composed of type I collagen fibrils, displaying a parallel organization along the tendon axis. The tendon-specific spatial organization of type I collagen provides the mechanical properties for tendon function. In contrast to other components of the musculoskeletal system, tendon biology is poorly understood. An important goal in tendon biology is to understand the mechanisms involved in the production and assembly of type I collagen fibrils during development, postnatal formation, and healing processes in order to design new therapies for tendon repair. In this review we highlight the current understanding of the molecular and mechanical signals known to be involved in tenogenesis during development, and how development provides insights into tendon healing processes. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:5-23. doi: 10.1002/wdev.201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  12. Pressurized gas filled tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Silcox, W. H.

    1985-06-04

    Pressurized gas filled tubular tendons provide a means for detecting leaks therein. Filling the tendon with a gaseous fluid provides increased buoyancy and reduces the weight supported by the buoyant structure. The use of a corrosion inhibiting gaseous fluid reduces the corrosion of the interior tendon wall.

  13. Biologics for tendon repair☆

    PubMed Central

    Docheva, Denitsa; Müller, Sebastian A.; Majewski, Martin; Evans, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and present a clinical challenge to orthopedic surgery mainly because these injuries often respond poorly to treatment and require prolonged rehabilitation. Therapeutic options used to repair ruptured tendons have consisted of suture, autografts, allografts, and synthetic prostheses. To date, none of these alternatives has provided a successful long-term solution, and often the restored tendons do not recover their complete strength and functionality. Unfortunately, our understanding of tendon biology lags far behind that of other musculoskeletal tissues, thus impeding the development of new treatment options for tendon conditions. Hence, in this review, after introducing the clinical significance of tendon diseases and the present understanding of tendon biology, we describe and critically assess the current strategies for enhancing tendon repair by biological means. These consist mainly of applying growth factors, stem cells, natural biomaterials and genes, alone or in combination, to the site of tendon damage. A deeper understanding of how tendon tissue and cells operate, combined with practical applications of modern molecular and cellular tools could provide the long awaited breakthrough in designing effective tendon-specific therapeutics and overall improvement of tendon disease management. PMID:25446135

  14. Overload and neovascularization of shoulder tendons in volleyball players

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In overhead sports like volleyball, the onset of a rotator cuff tendinopathy due to functional overload is a common observation. An angiofibroblastic etiopathogenesis has been hypothesized, whereby a greater anaerobic metabolism occurs in critical zones of the tendon with a lower degree of vascularization; this would induce collagen and extracellular matrix degradation, that could then trigger a compensatory neovascularization response. We performed a clinical observational study of 80 elite volleyball players, monitoring the perfusion values of the supraspinatus tendons by oximetry. Results No statistically significant differences were found between the oximetry data and age, sex or years of sports activity, nor when comparing the right and left arm or the dominant and non-dominant arm. A statistically significant difference was found for the dominant arm values in relation to the competitive role, higher values being obtained in outside hitters (62.7%) than middle hitters (53.7%) (p = 0.01), opposite hitters (55.5%) (p = 0.02) and libero players (54.4%) (p = 0.008), whereas there were no differences in setters (56.2%) (p > 0.05). Conclusions The different tendon vascularization values found in players with different roles in the team may be attributed to a response to the specific biomechanical demands posed by the different overhead throwing roles. PMID:22853746

  15. Visual MRI Grading System to Evaluate Atrophy of the Supraspinatus Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyun Kyong; Yoo, Hye Jin; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the interobserver reproducibility and diagnostic feasibility of a visual grading system for assessing atrophy of the supraspinatus muscle on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods Three independent radiologists retrospectively evaluated the occupying ratio of the supraspinatus muscle in the supraspinatus fossa on 192 shoulder MRI examinations in 188 patients using a 3-point visual grading system (1, ≥ 60%; 2, 30-59%; 3, < 30%) on oblique sagittal T1-weighted images. The inter-reader agreement and the agreement with the reference standard (3-point grades according to absolute occupying ratio values quantitatively measured by directly contouring the muscles on MRI) were analyzed using weighted kappa. The visual grading was applied by a single reader to a group of 100 consecutive patients who had undergone rotator cuff repair to retrospectively determine the association between the visual grades at preoperative state and postsurgical occurrences of retear. Results The inter-reader weighted kappa value for the visual grading was 0.74 when averaged across three reader pairs (0.70-0.77 for individual reader pairs). The weighted kappa value between the visual grading and the reference standard ranged from 0.75 to 0.83. There was a significant difference in retear rates of the rotator cuff between the 3 visual grades of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI in univariable analysis (p < 0.001), but not in multivariable analysis (p = 0.026). Conclusion The 3-point visual grading system may be a feasible method to assess the severity of supraspinatus muscle atrophy on MRI and assist in the clinical management of patients with rotator cuff tear. PMID:25053911

  16. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  17. Sustainable antimicrobial effect of silver sulfadiazine-loaded nanosheets on infection in a mouse model of partial-thickness burn injury.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keisuke; Saito, Akihiro; Fujie, Toshinori; Nishiwaki, Keisuke; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Kinoshita, Manabu; Saitoh, Daizoh; Ohtsubo, Shinya; Takeoka, Shinji

    2015-09-01

    Partial-thickness burn injury has the potential for reepithelialization and heals within 3weeks. If the wound is infected by bacteria before reepithelization, however, the depth of disruption increases and the lesion easily progresses to the full-thickness dermal layers. In the treatment of partial-thickness burn injury, it is important to prevent the wound area from bacterial infection with an antimicrobial dressing. Here, we have tested the antimicrobial properties of polymeric ultra-thin films composed of poly(lactic acid) (termed "PLA nanosheets"), which have high flexibility, adhesive strength and transparency, and silver sulfadiazine (AgSD), which exhibits antimicrobial efficacy. The AgSD-loaded nanosheet released Ag(+) for more than 3days, and exerted antimicrobial efficacy against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an in vitro Kirby-Bauer test. By contrast, a cell viability assay indicated that the dose of AgSD used in the PLA nanosheets did not show significant cytotoxicity toward fibroblasts. In vivo evaluation using a mouse model of infection in a partial-thickness burn wound demonstrated that the nanosheet significantly reduced the number of MRSA bacteria on the lesion (more than 10(5)-fold) and suppressed the inflammatory reaction, thereby preventing a protracted wound healing process.

  18. Fibrillins in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Betti; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2016-01-01

    Tendons among connective tissue, mainly collagen, contain also elastic fibers (EF) made of fibrillin 1, fibrillin 2 and elastin that are broadly distributed in tendons and represent 1–2% of the dried mass of the tendon. Only in the last years, studies on structure and function of EF in tendons have been performed. Aim of this review is to revise data on the organization of EF in tendons, in particular fibrillin structure and function, and on the clinical manifestations associated to alterations of EF in tendons. Indeed, microfibrils may contribute to tendon mechanics; therefore, their alterations may cause joint hypermobility and contractures which have been found to be clinical features in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS) and Beals syndrome. The two diseases are caused by mutations in genes FBN1 and FBN2 encoding fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2, respectively. PMID:27812333

  19. Tendon Structure and Composition.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-01-01

    Tendons are soft, fibrous tissues that connect muscle to bone. Their main function is to transfer muscle generated force to the bony skeleton, facilitating movement around a joint, and as such they are relatively passive, inelastic structures, able to resist high forces. Tendons are predominantly composed of collagen, which is arranged in a hierarchical manner parallel to the long axis of the tendon, resulting in high tensile strength. Tendon also contains a range of non-collagenous proteins, present in low amounts, which nevertheless have important functional roles. In this chapter, we describe general tendon composition and structure, and discuss how variations in composition and structure at different levels of the tendon hierarchy confer specific mechanical properties, which are related to tendon function. PMID:27535244

  20. Novel fiber-based pure chitosan scaffold for tendon augmentation: biomechanical and cell biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, J; Aibibu, D; Farack, J; Nimtschke, U; Hild, M; Gelinsky, M; Kasten, P; Cherif, Ch

    2016-07-01

    One possibility to improve the mechanical properties after tendon ruptures is augmentation with a scaffold. Based on wet spinning technology, chitosan fibres were processed to a novel pure high-grade multifilament yarn with reproducible quality. The fibres were braided to obtain a 3D tendon scaffold. The CS fibres and scaffolds were evaluated biomechanically and compared to human supraspinatus (SSP) tendons. For the cytobiological characterization, in vitro cell culture experiments with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were performed. Three types of 3D circular braided scaffolds were fabricated. Significantly, higher ultimate stress values were measured for scaffold with larger filament yarn, compared to scaffold with smaller filament yarn. During cultivation over 28 days, the cells showed in dependence of isolation method and/or donor a doubling or tripling of the cell number or even a six-fold increase on the CS scaffold, which was comparable to the control (polystyrene) or in the case of cells obtained from human biceps tendon even higher proliferation rates. After 14 days, the scaffold surface was covered homogeneously with a cell layer. In summary, the present work demonstrates that braided chitosan scaffolds constitute a straightforward approach for designing tendon analogues, maintaining important flexibility in scaffold design and providing favourable mechanical properties of the resulting construct.

  1. Active tendon implants in flexor tendon reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J M; Singer, D I; Jaeger, S H; Mackin, E J

    1988-11-01

    Forty-five active flexor tendon implants were evaluated after placement in scarred tendon beds of digits II through V. The implant is constructed of silicone rubber with a Dacron core, terminating in a loop proximally and a metal plate distally. Modification of the implant during the period of study has improved its reliability and longevity. The improvement in total active motion (TAM) averaged 72 degrees during implant functioning (stage I) in a group of digits that before operation were classified as 78% Boyes grade 5 (salvage). Complication rate during stage I was 11% (5 out of 45). Of the 27 digits evaluated after implant replacement by tendon autograft (stage II), there was an overall improvement in 62 degrees total active motion with 70% of digits being Boyes grade 5. Many of the complications were believed to be avoidable with experience. This study demonstrates the feasibility of an active tendon implant and the possibility of a permanent prosthesis. PMID:2976074

  2. Atraumatic quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Abram, Simon G F; Sharma, Akash D; Arvind, Chinnakonda

    2012-11-27

    Calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon condition. We present the first case of a quadriceps tendon tear associated with calcific tendonitis. In this case, the patient presented with symptoms mimicking a rupture of the quadriceps tendon. This case illustrates that although calcific tendonitis of the quadriceps is a rare condition it is not benign and should be considered when investigating acute symptoms associated with the extensor mechanism of the knee.

  3. Principles of Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, Danielle; Hammert, Warren C

    2016-08-01

    Tendon transfers provide a substitute, either temporary or permanent, when function is lost due to neurologic injury in stroke, cerebral palsy or central nervous system lesions, peripheral nerve injuries, or injuries to the musculotendinous unit itself. This article reviews the basic principles of tendon transfer, which are important when planning surgery and essential for an optimal outcome. In addition, concepts for coapting the tendons during surgery and general principles to be followed during the rehabilitation process are discussed. PMID:27387072

  4. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    PubMed

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were

  5. Riser and tendon management system

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, P.V.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes a riser and tendon management system. It comprises means to set nominal conditions for the risers and tendons; means to measure actual riser and tendon conditions; means to compare the actual and nominal conditions of the risers and tendons; and means responsive to a differential between the actual and nominal riser and tendon conditions, which difference exceeds specified limits, and recommending corrective action to bring the risers and tendons back to within nominal conditions.

  6. Tendon and ligament imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, R J; O'Connor, P J; Grainger, A J

    2012-01-01

    MRI and ultrasound are now widely used for the assessment of tendon and ligament abnormalities. Healthy tendons and ligaments contain high levels of collagen with a structured orientation, which gives rise to their characteristic normal imaging appearances as well as causing particular imaging artefacts. Changes to ligaments and tendons as a result of disease and injury can be demonstrated using both ultrasound and MRI. These have been validated against surgical and histological findings. Novel imaging techniques are being developed that may improve the ability of MRI and ultrasound to assess tendon and ligament disease. PMID:22553301

  7. Tendon Homeostasis in Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Soslowsky, Louis J; Fryhofer, George W

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a serious health problem that is associated not only with heart disease, but also tendon pathology. In high cholesterol environments (e.g. familial hyperlipidemia), lipids accumulate within the tendon extracellular matrix and form deposits called xanthomas. Lipid-related changes are known to affect several tendon mechanical properties, including stiffness and modulus, in uninjured and injured tendons, alike. Mechanisms to explain these cholesterol-related changes are multiple, including alterations in tenocyte gene and protein expression, matrix turnover, tissue vascularity, and cytokine production. Clinically, rotator cuff tear and Achilles tendon rupture are clearly associated with metabolic derangements, and elevated total cholesterol is often among the specific metabolic parameters implicated. Treatment of hypercholesterolemia using statin medications has also been shown to affect tendon properties, resulting in normalization of tendon thickness and improved tendon healing. Despite current work, the pathophysiology of lipid-related tendon pathology remains incompletely understood, and additional hypothesis-generating studies, including those incorporating whole-genome and whole-transcriptome technologies, will help to point the field in new directions. PMID:27535257

  8. Inflammation in Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Speed, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    The role of inflammation in tendon disorders has long been a subject of considerable debate. Developments in our understanding of the basic science of inflammation have provided further insight into its potential role in specific forms of tendon disease, and the circumstances that may potentiate this. Such circumstances include excessive mechanical stresses on tendon and the presence of systemic inflammation associated with chronic diseases. In this chapter a brief review of the basic science of inflammation is provided and the influence that it may play on tendons is discussed. PMID:27535263

  9. Influence of Hyperlipidemia on the Treatment of Supraspinatus Tendinopathy With or Without Tear

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of hyperlipidemia on the treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy, with or without tear. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the data of patients with shoulder pain and patients with supraspinatus tendinopathy, with or without tear, were included in the study. Exclusion criteria were prior shoulder surgery, prior steroid injection, neurological diseases that could lead to shoulder pain, and use of lipid-lowering medication. According to the serum lipid profiles, patients were assigned to either the hyperlipidemia or non-hyperlipidemia group. By analyzing the numeric rating scale (NRS) before treatment, and at 2 weeks and 8 weeks after treatment, we compared the difference in treatment effect between the two groups. Results No significant baseline difference was found among the two groups for age, gender, body mass index, duration of pain, side of pain, range of motion of affected shoulder, or physical examination. On the repeated-measures analysis of variance, NRS scores significantly decreased with time for both groups (p<0.001). When analyzing the effect of time between the subjects factor, there was significant difference in the treatment effect between the two groups (p<0.001), namely NRS was less decreased in the hyperlipidemia group. Conclusion We found that hyperlipidemia may be an adversely affecting factor in the treatment of supraspinatus tendinopathy with or without tear. PMID:27446783

  10. The efficacy of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) vs antithrombin III (at III) vs heparin, in the healing process of partial-thickness burns: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Kritikos, O.; Tsagarakis, M.; Tsoutsos, D.; Kittas, C.; Gorgoulis, V.; Papalois, A.; Giannopoulos, A.; Kakiopoulos, G.; Papadopoulos, O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This is an experimental study regarding the positive effect of recombinant human activated protein C (rhAPC) in the healing process of partial-thickness burns, in comparison to antithrombin III and heparin. On a porcine model we induced superficial partial-thickness and deep partial-thickness burns and performed intravenous administration of the elements of study during the first 48 h. The progress of the condition of the injured tissues was evaluated by histopathological examination at specific time intervals. The results showed an improved healing response of the specimens treated with rhAPC compared to those treated with antithrombin III, heparin, and placebo. PMID:23233823

  11. Fatigue loading of tendon

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer H; Screen, Hazel R C

    2013-01-01

    Tendon injuries, often called tendinopathies, are debilitating and painful conditions, generally considered to develop as a result of tendon overuse. The aetiology of tendinopathy remains poorly understood, and whilst tendon biopsies have provided some information concerning tendon appearance in late-stage disease, there is still little information concerning the mechanical and cellular events associated with disease initiation and progression. Investigating this in situ is challenging, and numerous models have been developed to investigate how overuse may generate tendon fatigue damage and how this may relate to tendinopathy conditions. This article aims to review these models and our current understanding of tendon fatigue damage. We review the strengths and limitations of different methodologies for characterizing tendon fatigue, considering in vitro methods that adopt both viable and non-viable samples, as well as the range of different in vivo approaches. By comparing data across model systems, we review the current understanding of fatigue damage development. Additionally, we compare these findings with data from tendinopathic tissue biopsies to provide some insights into how these models may relate to the aetiology of tendinopathy. Fatigue-induced damage consistently highlights the same microstructural, biological and mechanical changes to the tendon across all model systems and also correlates well with the findings from tendinopathic biopsy tissue. The multiple testing routes support matrix damage as an important contributor to tendinopathic conditions, but cellular responses to fatigue appear complex and often contradictory. PMID:23837793

  12. Tendon Transfers for Tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that 65% to 75% of patients with cervical spinal cord injuries could benefit from upper extremity tendon transfer surgery. The goals of surgery are to restore elbow extension, as well as hand pinch, grasp, and release. Patients who have defined goals, actively participate in therapy, and understand expected outcomes, appear to have the highest satisfaction following tendon transfer procedures. PMID:27387082

  13. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI. PMID:27374984

  14. A new technique for MR elastography of the supraspinatus muscle: A gradient-echo type multi-echo sequence.

    PubMed

    Ito, Daiki; Numano, Tomokazu; Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Takamoto, Koichi; Onishi, Takaaki; Nishijo, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can measure tissue stiffness quantitatively and noninvasively. Supraspinatus muscle injury is a significant problem among throwing athletes. The purpose of this study was to develop an MRE technique for application to the supraspinatus muscle by using a conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRE acquisitions were performed with a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence at 100Hz pneumatic vibration. A custom-designed vibration pad was used as a pneumatic transducer in order to adapt to individual shoulder shapes. In a gradient-echo type multi-echo MR sequence, without motion encoding gradient (MEG) that synchronizes with vibrations, bipolar readout gradient lobes achieved a similar function to MEG (MEG-like effect). In other words, a dedicated MRE sequence (built-in MEG) is not always necessary for MRE. In this study, 7 healthy volunteers underwent MRE. We investigated the effects of direction of the MEG-like effect and selected imaging planes on the patterns of wave propagation (wave image). The results indicated that wave images showed clear wave propagation on a condition that the direction of the MEG-like effect was nearly perpendicular to the long axis of the supraspinatus muscle, and that the imaging plane was superior to the proximal supraspinatus muscle. This limited condition might be ascribed to specific features of fibers in the supraspinatus muscle and wave reflection from the boundaries of the supraspinous fossa. The mean stiffness of the supraspinatus muscle was 10.6±3.17kPa. Our results demonstrated that using MRE, our method can be applied to the supraspinatus muscle by using conventional MRI.

  15. The tibialis posterior tendon.

    PubMed

    Lhoste-Trouilloud, A

    2012-02-01

    The tibialis posterior tendon is the largest and anteriormost tendon in the medial ankle. It produces plantar flexion and supination of the ankle and stabilizes the plantar vault. Sonographic assessment of this tendon is done with high-frequency, linear-array transducers; an optimal examination requires transverse retromalleolar, longitudinal retromalleolar, and distal longitudinal scans, as well as dynamic studies. Disorders of the posterior tibial tendon include chronic tendinopathy with progressive rupture, tenosynovitis, acute rupture, dislocation and instability, enthesopathies. The most common lesion is a progressive "chewing gum" lesion that develops in a setting of chronic tendinopathy; it is usually seen in overweight women over 50 years of age with valgus flat feet. Medial ankle pain must also be carefully investigated, and the presence of instability assessed with dynamic maneuvers (forced inversion, or dorsiflexion) of the foot. Sonography plays an important role in the investigation of disorders involving the posterior tibial tendon.

  16. A prospective randomized trial comparing silver sulfadiazine cream with a water-soluble polyantimicrobial gel in partial-thickness burn wounds.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan S; Drake, David B

    2015-01-01

    The lipid base of silver sulfadiazine (SSD) makes removal of the product painful for the patient and difficult for the physician to accurately assess particularly in partial-thickness burn injuries. As an alternative, a water-soluble antimicrobial gel is used at the University of Virginia. We present a prospective, randomized comparison of these two therapies using pain with dressing changes and time to perform dressing changes as our primary endpoints. Adult inpatients with partial-thickness burn wounds were randomized to begin therapy with either SSD cream or the water-soluble burn wound gel (BWG), and then therapies were alternated daily. Pain assessments, time to complete dressing care, total narcotic medication administered, and the number of personnel required for dressing changes were recorded. Eight patients were enrolled resulting in 13 pairs (26 points) of data comparison between the two therapies. Four of the eight enrolled patients (50%) refused to continue receiving SSD because of pain associated with dressing changes and voluntarily withdrew from the study. The amount of time to perform dressing changes was an average of 79 nurse-minutes longer for SSD. A 6.08 greater morphine equivalent was delivered to those having BWG removed.A water-soluble polyantimicrobial gel was superior to SSD in the parameters measured as exhibited by our patient dropout rate and differential time to perform dressing care. Limiting the time to perform dressing care will reduce the cumulative pain experience, improve patient satisfaction, and reduce the resources to deliver care.

  17. In vitro effects of glutamate and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism on human tendon derived cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Javaid, Muhammad Kassim; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    It is known that extracellular glutamate concentrations are increased in tendinopathy but the effects of glutamate upon human tendon derived cells are unknown. The primary purpose was to investigate the effect of glutamate exposure on human tendon-derived cells in terms of viability, protein, and gene expression. The second purpose was to assess whether NMDAR antagonism would affect the response of tendon-derived cells to glutamate exposure. Human tendon-derived cells were obtained from supraspinatus tendon tissue obtained during rotator cuff repair (tendon tear derived cells) and from healthy hamstring tendon tissue (control cells). The in vitro impact of glutamate exposure and NMDAR antagonism (MK-801) was measured using the Alamar blue cell viability assay, immunocytochemistry, and quantitative real-time PCR. Glutamate reduced cell viability at 24 h in tendon tear derived cells but not in control cells at concentrations of 7.5 mM and above. Cell viability was significantly reduced after 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate in both cell groups; this deleterious effect was attenuated by NMDAR antagonism with 10 µM MK-801. Both 24 and 72 h of 1.875 mM glutamate exposure reduced Type 1 alpha 1 collagen (COL1A1) and Type 3 alpha 1 collagen (COL3A1) gene expression, but increased Aggrecan gene expression. We propose that these effects of glutamate on tendon derived cells including reduced cell viability and altered matrix gene expression contribute to the pathogenesis of tendinopathy. PMID:26041147

  18. Drug-Induced Tendon Disorders.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced tendon disorders are an often underestimated risk factor. The range from detrimental effects on the tendon include tendinopathy as well as potentially tendon rupture. As for today, four main drug classes have been reported to be associated with potentially deteriorated tendon properties: 1. Corticosteroids, 2. Chinolon antibiotics, 3. Aromatase inhbitors, 4. Statins as HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors. Most often, the Achilles tendon is affected in terms of tendinopathy and/or subsequent tendon rupture. However, nearly every tendon of the entire body might be affected in a detrimental way by one or a combination of the aformentioned agents. PMID:27535265

  19. Tendon Gradient Mineralization for Tendon to Bone Interface Integration

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a “bone-to-bone” interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into 5 groups: 1) normal FDP tendon, 2) CaP (Non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), 3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), 4) CaPFetuin (Non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and 5) CaPEXTFetuin (Extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 μm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction. PMID:23939935

  20. Tendon gradient mineralization for tendon to bone interface integration.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jin; Thoreson, Andrew R; Chen, Qingshan; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2013-11-01

    Tendon-to-bone integration is a great challenge for tendon or ligament reconstruction regardless of use of autograft or allograft tendons. We mineralized the tendon, thus transforming the tendon-to-bone into a "bone-to-bone" interface for healing. Sixty dog flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons were divided randomly into five groups: (1) normal FDP tendon, (2) CaP (non-extraction and mineralization without fetuin), (3) CaPEXT (Extraction by Na2 HPO4 and mineralization without fetuin), (4) CaPFetuin (non-extraction and mineralization with fetuin), and (5) CaPEXTFetuin (extraction and mineralization with fetuin). The calcium and phosphate content significantly increased in tendons treated with combination of extraction and fetuin compared to the other treatments. Histology also revealed a dense mineral deposition throughout the tendon outer layers and penetrated into the tendon to a depth of 200 µm in a graded manner. Compressive moduli were significantly lower in the four mineralized groups compared with normal control group. No significant differences in maximum failure strength or stiffness were found in the suture pull-out test among all groups. Mineralization of tendon alters the interface from tendon to bone into mineralized tendon to bone, which may facilitate tendon-to-bone junction healing following tendon or ligament reconstruction.

  1. Regulatory role of collagen V in establishing mechanical properties of tendons and ligaments is tissue dependent.

    PubMed

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Freedman, Benjamin R; Fried, Joanna H; Sun, Mei; Birk, David E; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with classic (type I) Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), characterized by heterozygous mutations in the Col5a1 and Col5a2 genes, exhibit connective tissue hyperelasticity and recurrent joint dislocations, indicating a potential regulatory role for collagen V in joint stabilizing soft tissues. This study asked whether the contribution of collagen V to the establishment of mechanical properties is tissue dependent. We mechanically tested four different tissues from wild type and targeted collagen V-null mice: the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon, Achilles tendon (ACH), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), and the supraspinatus tendon (SST). Area was significantly reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group in the FDL, ACH, and SST. Maximum load and stiffness were reduced in the Col5a1(ΔTen/ΔTen) group for all tissues. However, insertion site and midsubstance modulus were reduced only for the ACL and SST. This study provides evidence that the regulatory role of collagen V in extracellular matrix assembly is tissue dependent and that joint instability in classic EDS may be caused in part by insufficient mechanical properties of the tendons and ligaments surrounding each joint. PMID:25876927

  2. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology.

  3. How Obesity Affects Tendons?

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Several epidemiological and clinical observations have definitely demonstrated that obesity has harmful effects on tendons. The pathogenesis of tendon damage is multi-factorial. In addition to overload, attributable to the increased body weight, which significantly affects load-bearing tendons, systemic factors play a relevant role. Several bioactive peptides (chemerin, leptin, adiponectin and others) are released by adipocytes, and influence tendon structure by means of negative activities on mesenchymal cells. The ensuing systemic state of chronic, sub-clinic, low-grade inflammation can damage tendon structure. Metabolic disorders (diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and dislipidemia), frequently associated with visceral adiposity, are concurrent pathogenetic factors. Indeed, high glucose levels increase the formation of Advanced Glycation End-products, which in turn form stable covalent cross-links within collagen fibers, modifying their structure and functionality.Sport activities, so useful for preventing important cardiovascular complications, may be detrimental for tendons if they are submitted to intense acute or chronic overload. Therefore, two caution rules are mandatory: first, to engage in personalized soft training program, and secondly to follow regular check-up for tendon pathology. PMID:27535258

  4. Sex Hormones and Tendon.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood. The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet, in active young female athletes, physiological high concentration of estrogen may enhance the risk of injuries due to reduced fibrillar crosslinking and enhanced joint laxity. In men, testosterone can enhance tendon stiffness due to an enhanced tendon collagen turnover and collagen content, but testosterone has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens. PMID:27535256

  5. The Effect of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution on the Epithelialization of Partial-Thickness Donor Site Wounds in Normal and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Swine

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Juri; Hackl, Florian; Koyama, Taro; Aflaki, Pejman; Smith, Charlotte A.; Robson, Martin C.; Eriksson, Elof

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether amnion-derived cellular cytokine solution (ACCS) could improve the quality of epithelialization and accelerate closure of dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic pigs. Methods: Dermatome-created partial-thickness wounds were sealed with wound chambers in healthy and diabetic pigs and were injected with ACCS. Wound fluid was exchanged daily for total protein concentration, and biopsies were taken on days 6, 8, 10, and 12. Epithelialization, thickness of epidermis, number of epidermal cell layers, and rete ridges were evaluated. Results: The macroscopic appearance of the wounds and speed of healing was similar in all groups at each time point. All wounds were healed by day 6. The epidermis was thicker in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds than in the controls (140.6 μm vs 82.7 μm on day 12 in diabetic pigs). There were more cell layers (13 vs 7.7) in ACCS-treated diabetic pigs on day 12. The number of rete ridges per 2.5 mm was greater on day 12 in the ACCS-treated diabetic wounds (13 vs 8). There was also a significant increase in the number of rete ridges in ACCS-treated nondiabetic pigs but no difference in epidermal thickness or number of cell layers. Conclusion: In diabetic pigs, we found a significantly thicker epidermis and more cell layers and rete ridges in the ACCS-treated wounds. Healthy pigs showed more rete ridges but no difference in thickness of epidermis or number of cell layers on day 12. PMID:19936023

  6. Histomorphometric analysis of early epithelialization and dermal changes in mid-partial-thickness burn wounds in humans treated with porcine small intestinal submucosa and silver-containing hydrofiber.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Rosa M; Bravo, Leonardo; García, Mario; Melchor, Juan M; Krötzsch, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the healing rates of mid-partial-thickness burns treated with a porcine intestinal submucosa (SIS) vs. silver-containing cellulose hydrofiber (AgH) dressings. This was done by comparing healing response of burn wounds treated with SIS vs that of burns treated with AgH dressings. Five patients with mid-partial-thickness burns ≤10% of body surface were treated simultaneously, but in different areas, with SIS and AgH dressings; full-thickness biopsies were taken at days 0 and 7. Tissues treated with SIS presented higher epithelial maturation index (6.2 ± 0.84 vs. 3.2 ± 3.28; [mean ± standard deviation], P = .029), better orientation and differentiation of epithelial cells, as well as an appropriate basal lamina structure, collagen deposition, and higher transforming growth factor-β3 expression (7.4 ± 8.1 vs. 2.1 ± 2.6; P = .055) than tissues treated with AgH dressings. Importantly, after the treatment SIS was not integrated in healed tissues. After 3 months of treatment, SIS produced a lower score according to Vancouver Scar Scale (3.6 ± 2.6 vs. 7.2 ± 2.5, P = .025).The submucosa dressing does not simply act as scaffolding for the wound, it provides stimulation in the healing area, probably via growth factors initially present in SIS or matrikines derived from its digestion in the wound site. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that biological matrices favor the wound-healing process.

  7. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff - An uncommon anatomical variation: case report.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it.

  8. Tendon of the long head of the biceps originating from the rotator cuff – An uncommon anatomical variation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Esteves, Leonardo Roure; Figueiredo, Eduardo; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    Anatomical variations at the origin of the biceps tendon have been described by several authors, but occurrences of an origin in the supraspinatus are rare. It is unclear whether this variation might contribute toward pathological conditions of the shoulder. Our objective here was to describe a case of an anatomical variation in the origin of the tendon of the long head of the biceps. The clinical information, preoperative images and arthroscopic images relating to a patient with an aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps, which was observed during shoulder arthroscopy, were reviewed. In this case study, the origin of the biceps was found in the rotator cuff, without any origin from the supraglenoid tubercle or upper labrum. This variant did not seem to contribute toward the pathological condition of the shoulder, and standard treatment for the concomitant condition was sufficient for treating it. PMID:26962493

  9. One-incision endoscopic technique for posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Hwa; Chen, Wen-Jer; Shih, Chun-Hsiung

    2001-03-01

    Quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft is an alternative graft choice for posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction. A 2-incision technique with outside-in fixation at the femoral condyle is generally used. In this article, we describe a 1-incision endoscopic technique for PCL reconstruction with quadriceps tendon-patellar bone autograft. The graft consists of a proximal patellar bone plug and central quadriceps tendon. The bone plug is trapezoidal, 20 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 8 mm thick. The tendon portion is 80 mm long, 10 mm wide, and 6 mm thick, including the full-thickness of the rectus femoris and partial thickness of the vastus intermedius. Three arthroscopic portals, including anteromedial, anterolateral, and posteromedial, are used. All procedures are performed in an endoscopic manner with only 1 incision at the proximal tibia. At the femoral side, the bone plug is fixed by an interference screw. At the tibial side, the tendon portion is fixed by a suture to a screw on the anterior cortex and an interference bioscrew in the posterior tibial tunnel opening. Quadriceps tendon autograft has the advantages of being self-available, allowing for easier arthroscopic technique, and providing comparable graft size. The 1-incision technique provides a simple reconstruction method for PCL insufficiency without a second incision at the medial femoral condyle.

  10. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space

    PubMed Central

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-01-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  11. Arthroscopic Marginal Resection of a Lipoma of the Supraspinatus Muscle in the Subacromial Space.

    PubMed

    Pagán Conesa, Alejandro; Aznar, Carlos Verdú; Herrera, Manuel Ruiz; Lopez-Prats, Fernando Anacleto

    2015-08-01

    Subacromial impingement syndrome is a common cause of shoulder pain in young adults and seniors at present. The etiology of this syndrome is associated with several shoulder disorders, most related to aging, overhead activities, and overuse. The subacromial space is well circumscribed and limited in size, and soft-tissue growing lesions, such as tumors, can endanger the normal function of the shoulder girdle. We present a case of shoulder impingement syndrome caused by an intramuscular lipoma of the supraspinatus muscle in the subacromial space in a 50-year-old male bank manager. Radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and a computed tomography scan showed a well-circumscribed soft-tissue tumor at the supraspinatus-musculotendinous junction. It was arthroscopically inspected and dissected and complete marginal excision was performed through a conventional augmented anterolateral portal, avoiding the need to open the trapezius fascia or perform an acromial osteotomy. Microscopic study showed a benign lipoma, and the shoulder function of the patient was fully recovered after a rehabilitation period of 4 months. This less invasive technique shows similar results to conventional open surgery. PMID:26759779

  12. [Simultaneous rupture of a patellar tendon and contralateral quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Horas, U; Ernst, S; Meyer, C; Halbsguth, A; Herbst, U

    2006-09-01

    The simultaneous bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a rare injury; only occasional reports exist about the bilateral simultaneous rupture of the patellar tendon. Degenerative changes of the tendon due to drugs or diseases lead to the rupture. We describe two cases of simultaneous rupture of the patellar and contralateral quadriceps tendons; only one patient had special risks. We report the management of therapy and the functional results using the Lysholm score and Knee Rating Scale.

  13. Autologous hamstring tendon used for revision of quadiceps tendon tears.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Frank; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; Kim, Jaehon; Martin, Scott D

    2013-04-01

    A paucity of literature exists on quadriceps tendon reruptures. Failed quadriceps tendon repair can cause significant morbidity and disability. Surgical management of quadriceps tendon rerupture can be challenging due to tissue degeneration, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, and poor bone fixation. A lack of guidance in the literature exists on the appropriate surgical techniques for managing quadriceps tendon reruptures.This article describes the case of a male recreational athlete with a failed primary quadriceps tendon repair who presented 10 months after rerupture. Examination was significant for morbid obesity, assisted ambulation, and a significant defect at the superior pole of the patella on the affected side. Intraoperative findings were consistent with a 2.0- to 4.5-cm tendon defect across the extensor mechanism with complete retinaculi tears. The authors performed a novel surgical approach for revision of quadriceps tears using a bilateral hamstring autograft through a quadriceps tendon weave and a transosseous patellar repair. Tendon length was restored, and extensor mechanism tension was reapproximated. Postoperatively, the patient achieved a good outcome and had returned to full, painless, sport participation at 2-year follow-up.This surgical technique is suitable for revision quadriceps tendon repairs of large tendon gap defects, repairs desiring tendon-to-bone in-growth, and repairs requiring large-force transmission across the repair.

  14. [Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures].

    PubMed

    Grim, C; Lorbach, O; Engelhardt, M

    2010-12-01

    Ruptures of the quadriceps or patellar tendon are uncommon but extremely relevant injuries. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment with a stable suture construction are mandatory for a good postoperative clinical outcome. The standard methods of repair for quadriceps and patellar tendon injuries include the placement of suture loops through transpatellar tunnels. Reinforcement with either a wire cerclage or a PDS cord is used in patellar tendon repair. The PDS cord can also be applied as augmentation in quadriceps tendon repair. In secondary patellar tendon repair an autologous semitendinosus graft can be used. For chronic quadriceps tendon defects a V-shaped tendon flap with a distal footing is recommended. The different methods of repair should lead to early functional postoperative treatment. The clinical outcome after surgical treatment of patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures is mainly good.

  15. Hyperuricemia in Tendons.

    PubMed

    Andia, Isabel; Abate, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, particularly gout, and the immune inflammatory response are highly integrated. Both, long standing hyperuricemia and monosodium urate (MSU) crystal deposition can challenge tendon homeostasis because of their potential to cause inflammation to the host. Knowledge is emerging from clinical imaging research depicting where MSU crystals deposit, including patellar tendon, triceps and quadriceps tendons. Remarkably, subclinical tendon inflammation and damage are also present in asymptomatic hyperuricemia. Monosodium urate crystals act as danger activating molecular patterns (DAMPs), activating the inflammasome and inducing the secretion of IL-1beta, a key mediator of the inflammatory response. The crucial role of IL-1beta in driving the inflammatory events during gout attacks is supported by the clinical efficacy of IL-1beta blockade. Some data implicating IL-1beta as an initiator of tendinopathy exist, but the link between hyperuricemia and the development of tendinopathy remains to be validated. Further knowledge about the interactions of uric acid with both innate immune and tendon cells, and their consequences may help to determine if there is a subclass of hyperuricemic-tendinopathy. PMID:27535254

  16. Tendon Driven Finger Actuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reich, David M. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Linn, Douglas Martin (Inventor); Askew, Scott R. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Hargrave, Brian (Inventor); Valvo, Michael C. (Inventor); Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Permenter, Frank Noble (Inventor); Mehling, Joshua S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A humanoid robot includes a robotic hand having at least one finger. An actuation system for the robotic finger includes an actuator assembly which is supported by the robot and is spaced apart from the finger. A tendon extends from the actuator assembly to the at least one finger and ends in a tendon terminator. The actuator assembly is operable to actuate the tendon to move the tendon terminator and, thus, the finger.

  17. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders.

  18. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  19. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection.

  20. Open Achilles tendon lacerations.

    PubMed

    Said, M Nader; Al Ateeq Al Dosari, Mohamed; Al Subaii, Nasser; Kawas, Alaa; Al Mas, Ali; Al Ser, Yaser; Abuodeh, Yousef; Shakil, Malik; Habash, Ali; Mukhter, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    In contrast to closed Achilles tendon ruptures, open injuries are rarely reported in the literature. This paper provides information about open Achilles tendon wounds that are eventually seen in the Middle East. The reporting unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, is one of the biggest trauma centers in the Gulf area and the major health provider in Qatar. This is a retrospective study including patients admitted and operated for open Achilles tendon injuries between January 2011 and December 2013. Two hundred and five cases of open Achilles tendon lacerations were operated in Hamad General Hospital in this period. Forty-eight cases showed partial injuries, and the remaining are complete tendons cut. In the same period, fifty-one closed ruptured Achilles tendons were operated in the same trauma unit. In the majority of cases, the open injury resulted from a slip in the floor-leveled traditional toilette seats. Local damage to the toilette seats resulted in sharp edges causing the laceration of the heel if the patient was slipping over the wet floor. This occurrence is the cause in the vast majority of the cases. Wounds were located 1-5 cm proximal to tendon insertion. Standard treatment principles were applied. This included thorough irrigation in the emergency room, intravenous antibiotics, surgical debridement and primary repair within 24 h. Patients were kept in the hospital 1-7 days for intravenous antibiotics and possible dressing changes. Postoperatively below knee slabs were applied in the majority of patients and were kept for about 4 weeks followed by gradual weight bearing and range of motion exercises. Outpatients follow up in 1-2 weeks. Further follow-up visits at around 2-, 4-, 8- and 12-week intervals until complete wound healing and satisfactory rehabilitation outcome. Sixteen cases needed a second procedure. A high incidence of Achilles tendon open injuries is reported. This seems to be related to partially damaged floor-level toilettes in the

  1. Posterior Tibial Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Shane, Amber M; Reeves, Christopher L; Cameron, Jordan D; Vazales, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    When performed correctly with the right patient population, a tibialis posterior muscle/tendon transfer is an effective procedure. Many different methods have been established for fixating the tendon, each of which has its' own indications. Passing through the interosseous membrane is the preferred and recommended method and should be used unless this is not possible. Good surgical planning based on patient needs and expectations, along with excellent postoperative care including early range of motion and physical therapy minimizes risk of complications and allows for the optimal outcome to be achieved. PMID:26590722

  2. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A A; Larson, R V

    1999-04-01

    Infrapatellar tendonitis is a chronic overload lesion in the patellar ligament at the attachment to the lower pole of the patella. This lesion is found primarily in athletes who participate in jumping sports. Magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound can show the extent of tendon pathology. Patellar tendonitis is treated with modification of activities, medications, and therapy. When conservative measures fail, operative debridement has been recommended. Previous reports have described a technique of open debridement of the patellar tendon, followed by an extended period of rehabilitation before returning to sports. Two athletes with persistent infrapatellar tendonitis were treated with an arthroscopic debridement. Both athletes returned to full activities without restrictions within 8 weeks of surgery. Arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis has not been previously described. This technical note describes the technique and two case reports of the arthroscopic treatment of infrapatellar tendonitis.

  3. Evaluation of global load sharing and shear-lag models to describe mechanical behavior in partially lacerated tendons.

    PubMed

    Pensalfini, Marco; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical effect of a partial thickness tear or laceration of a tendon is analytically modeled under various assumptions and results are compared with previous experimental data from porcine flexor tendons. Among several fibril-level models considered, a shear-lag model that incorporates fibril-matrix interaction and a fibril-fibril interaction defined by the contact area of the interposed matrix best matched published data for tendons with shallow cuts (less than 50% of the cross-sectional area). Application of this model to the case of many disrupted fibrils is based on linear superposition and is most successful when more fibrils are incorporated into the model. An equally distributed load sharing model for the fraction of remaining intact fibrils was inadequate in that it overestimates the strength for a cut less than half of the tendon's cross-sectional area. In a broader sense, results imply that shear-lag contributes significantly to the general mechanical behavior of tendons when axial loads are nonuniformly distributed over a cross section, although the predominant hierarchical level and microstructural mediators for this behavior require further inquiry. PMID:24845861

  4. Evaluation of global load sharing and shear-lag models to describe mechanical behavior in partially lacerated tendons.

    PubMed

    Pensalfini, Marco; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah; Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2014-09-01

    The mechanical effect of a partial thickness tear or laceration of a tendon is analytically modeled under various assumptions and results are compared with previous experimental data from porcine flexor tendons. Among several fibril-level models considered, a shear-lag model that incorporates fibril-matrix interaction and a fibril-fibril interaction defined by the contact area of the interposed matrix best matched published data for tendons with shallow cuts (less than 50% of the cross-sectional area). Application of this model to the case of many disrupted fibrils is based on linear superposition and is most successful when more fibrils are incorporated into the model. An equally distributed load sharing model for the fraction of remaining intact fibrils was inadequate in that it overestimates the strength for a cut less than half of the tendon's cross-sectional area. In a broader sense, results imply that shear-lag contributes significantly to the general mechanical behavior of tendons when axial loads are nonuniformly distributed over a cross section, although the predominant hierarchical level and microstructural mediators for this behavior require further inquiry.

  5. Effect of red and near-infrared wavelengths on low-level laser (light) therapy-induced healing of partial-thickness dermal abrasion in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) promotes wound healing, reduces pain and inflammation, and prevents tissue death. Studies have explored the effects of various radiant exposures on the effect of LLLT; however, studies of wavelength dependency in in vivo models are less common. In the present study, the healing effects of LLLT mediated by different wavelengths of light in the red and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength regions (635, 730, 810, and 980 nm) delivered at constant fluence (4 J/cm(2)) and fluence rate (10 mW/cm(2)) were evaluated in a mouse model of partial-thickness dermal abrasion. Wavelengths of 635 and 810 nm were found to be effective in promoting the healing of dermal abrasions. However, treatment using 730- and 980-nm wavelengths showed no sign of stimulated healing. Healing was maximally augmented in mice treated with an 810-nm wavelength, as evidenced by significant wound area reduction (p < 0.05), enhanced collagen accumulation, and complete re-epithelialization as compared to other wavelengths and non-illuminated controls. Significant acceleration of re-epithelialization and cellular proliferation revealed by immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin-14 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (p < 0.05) was evident in the 810-nm wavelength compared with other groups. Photobiomodulation mediated by red (635 nm) and NIR (810 nm) light suggests that the biological response of the wound tissue depends on the wavelength employed. The effectiveness of 810-nm wavelength agrees with previous publications and, together with the partial effectiveness of 635 nm and the ineffectiveness of 730 and 980 nm wavelengths, can be explained by the absorption spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase, the candidate mitochondrial chromophore in LLLT.

  6. Effect of red and near-infrared wavelengths on low-level laser (light) therapy-induced healing of partial-thickness dermal abrasion in mice.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Asheesh; Dai, Tianhong; Hamblin, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) promotes wound healing, reduces pain and inflammation, and prevents tissue death. Studies have explored the effects of various radiant exposures on the effect of LLLT; however, studies of wavelength dependency in in vivo models are less common. In the present study, the healing effects of LLLT mediated by different wavelengths of light in the red and near-infrared (NIR) wavelength regions (635, 730, 810, and 980 nm) delivered at constant fluence (4 J/cm(2)) and fluence rate (10 mW/cm(2)) were evaluated in a mouse model of partial-thickness dermal abrasion. Wavelengths of 635 and 810 nm were found to be effective in promoting the healing of dermal abrasions. However, treatment using 730- and 980-nm wavelengths showed no sign of stimulated healing. Healing was maximally augmented in mice treated with an 810-nm wavelength, as evidenced by significant wound area reduction (p < 0.05), enhanced collagen accumulation, and complete re-epithelialization as compared to other wavelengths and non-illuminated controls. Significant acceleration of re-epithelialization and cellular proliferation revealed by immunofluorescence staining for cytokeratin-14 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (p < 0.05) was evident in the 810-nm wavelength compared with other groups. Photobiomodulation mediated by red (635 nm) and NIR (810 nm) light suggests that the biological response of the wound tissue depends on the wavelength employed. The effectiveness of 810-nm wavelength agrees with previous publications and, together with the partial effectiveness of 635 nm and the ineffectiveness of 730 and 980 nm wavelengths, can be explained by the absorption spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase, the candidate mitochondrial chromophore in LLLT. PMID:23619627

  7. [Damage to large tendons: Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendons].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2006-07-01

    The etiology and mechanisms of Achilles, patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures are very similar. Age dependent changes in tendon structure and disorders such gout, diabetes, rheumatic diseases and chronic renal failure are associated causes. The main mechanism of rupture is indirect trauma. Although clinical diagnosis is easy, ruptures are still frequently missed. Sonography is the main standard diagnostic tool. MRI is indicated only in special cases. Open operative repair is the most common treatment for quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures. Treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is moving towards an individualized choice of therapy. Percutaneous and other "minimally invasive" techniques will play an increasingly important role.

  8. Scaffolds in Tendon Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Lamberti, Alfredo; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering techniques using novel scaffold materials offer potential alternatives for managing tendon disorders. Tissue engineering strategies to improve tendon repair healing include the use of scaffolds, growth factors, cell seeding, or a combination of these approaches. Scaffolds have been the most common strategy investigated to date. Available scaffolds for tendon repair include both biological scaffolds, obtained from mammalian tissues, and synthetic scaffolds, manufactured from chemical compounds. Preliminary studies support the idea that scaffolds can provide an alternative for tendon augmentation with an enormous therapeutic potential. However, available data are lacking to allow definitive conclusion on the use of scaffolds for tendon augmentation. We review the current basic science and clinical understanding in the field of scaffolds and tissue engineering for tendon repair. PMID:22190961

  9. Peroneal tendons subluxation.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Del Frate, Dario; Ferran, Nicholas Antonio; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    Subluxation of the peroneal tendons is uncommon. It occurs especially in skiing, soccer, basketball, rugby, ice skating, judo, sprint, water-skiing, mountaineering, and gymnastics. We present an overview of the injury, with the classification commonly used. Many surgical techniques have been described to manage recurrent subluxation of the peroneal tendons, but only Level IV/Grade C evidence has been produced. Thus, randomized controlled trials are necessary to determinate the best surgical management method. It appears that high-demand individuals should be primarily managed surgically, and retinaculoplasty seems to be, when indicated, the best surgical option: it affords less complications and a high rate of return to sports without reducing their activity levels.

  10. Isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion.

    PubMed

    Frank, Jonathan M; Riedel, Matthew D; McCormick, Frank M; Nho, Shane J

    2013-10-01

    Isolated avulsion of the vastus lateralis tendon is a very rare injury. To our knowledge, only 1 case has been reported in the literature. This tendon is crucial to knee stability and proper patellofemoral tracking. As isolated avulsion of the tendon tends to occur in young, active males, early surgical repair is recommended to allow them to maintain a high level of functional ability. We present the case of a 49-year-old man who sustained an isolated vastus lateralis tendon avulsion injury. The injury was successfully treated with suture anchor repair.

  11. Tribological characteristics of healthy tendon.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Dowson, Duncan; Khan, Ilyas M; Jones, Michael D

    2012-07-26

    Tendons transfer muscular forces efficiently and painlessly, facilitating joint motion. Whilst the tribology of articular cartilage is constantly explored, a poorer understanding remains of tendon lubrication and friction. This study reports experimental data describing the tribological characteristics of tendon and its surrounding tissue, before presenting an arithmetic solution to facilitate numerical modelling. The experimental characteristics of the tensile (i.e. mid-substance) and compressive (i.e. fibrocartilaginous) regions of bovine flexor tendon were investigated using a pin-on-plate tribometer, with immunofluroscence analysis describing the relative intensity and distribution of surface-bound lubricin. Arithmetic analysis considering the digital extensor tendon determined that, in physiological conditions, the tensile tendon region was able to generate elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The equivalent region of compressive tendon exhibited a higher intensity of surface-bound lubricin which, it is hypothesised, serves to minimise the increased frictional resistance due to generating only mixed or boundary lubrication regimes. Arithmetic analysis indicates that, given a more favourable biomechanical environment, this region can also generate EHL. Whilst acknowledging the limitations of transferring data from an animal model to a clinical environment, by providing the first data and equations detailing the film thicknesses and lubrication regime for these two tendon regions it is hoped that clinicians, engineers and scientists can consider improved clinical strategies to tackle both tendinopathy and tendon rupture.

  12. Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Endoscopic Repair of Partial Articular Gluteus Tendon Avulsion.

    PubMed

    Nho, Shane J; Grzybowski, Jeffrey S; Bogunovic, Ljiljana; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Mather, Richard C; Salata, Michael J; Bush-Joseph, Charles A

    2016-06-01

    In addition to trochanteric bursitis, gluteus medius and minimus tears (GMMTs) can be a common source of insidious lateral hip pain and dysfunction. Partial-thickness GMMTs are much more common than full-thickness GMMTs but are frequently overlooked by both radiologists and orthopaedic surgeons. GMMTs are commonly identified on magnetic resonance imaging ordered for lateral hip pain unresponsive to conservative management. Imaging can show that high-grade partial articular gluteus tendon avulsion (PAGTA) can occur as either an isolated gluteus medius tear, an isolated gluteus minimus tear, or a combined GMMT. We describe how to identify PAGTA injuries with intraoperative assessment and identification of the interval between the gluteus medius and minimus tendons to allow access to the PAGTA without violating the bursal side of the tendon. PAGTAs can be repaired arthroscopically by single- or double-row suture anchor fixation depending on the size of the tear. The purpose of this article is to guide orthopaedic surgeons in the recognition of PAGTA with magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic examination to allow for accurate repair of GMMTs. PMID:27656357

  13. Biomechanical Effect of Margin Convergence Techniques: Quantitative Assessment of Supraspinatus Muscle Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W.; Steinmann, Scott P.; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Although the margin convergence (MC) technique has been recognized as an option for rotator cuff repair, little is known about the biomechanical effect on repaired rotator cuff muscle, especially after supplemented footprint repair. The purpose of this study was to assess the passive stiffness changes of the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle after MC techniques using shear wave elastography (SWE). A 30 × 40-mm U-shaped rotator cuff tear was created in 8 cadaveric shoulders. Each specimen was repaired with 6 types of MC technique (1-, 2-, 3-suture MC with/without footprint repair, in a random order) at 30° glenohumeral abduction. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the SSP muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Data were obtained from the SSP muscle at 0° abduction under 8 different conditions: intact (before making a tear), torn, and postoperative conditions with 6 techniques. MC techniques using 1-, or 2-suture combined with footprint repair showed significantly higher stiffness values than the intact condition. Passive stiffness of the SSP muscle was highest after a 1-suture MC with footprint repair for all regions when compared among all repair procedures. There was no significant difference between the intact condition and a 3-suture MC with footprint repair. MC techniques with single stitch and subsequent footprint repair may have adverse effects on muscle properties and tensile loading on repair, increasing the risk of retear of repairs. Adding more MC stitches could reverse these adverse effects. PMID:27583402

  14. Biomechanical Effect of Margin Convergence Techniques: Quantitative Assessment of Supraspinatus Muscle Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Taku; Giambini, Hugo; Zhao, Chunfeng; Sperling, John W; Steinmann, Scott P; Itoi, Eiji; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Although the margin convergence (MC) technique has been recognized as an option for rotator cuff repair, little is known about the biomechanical effect on repaired rotator cuff muscle, especially after supplemented footprint repair. The purpose of this study was to assess the passive stiffness changes of the supraspinatus (SSP) muscle after MC techniques using shear wave elastography (SWE). A 30 × 40-mm U-shaped rotator cuff tear was created in 8 cadaveric shoulders. Each specimen was repaired with 6 types of MC technique (1-, 2-, 3-suture MC with/without footprint repair, in a random order) at 30° glenohumeral abduction. Passive stiffness of four anatomical regions in the SSP muscle was measured based on an established SWE method. Data were obtained from the SSP muscle at 0° abduction under 8 different conditions: intact (before making a tear), torn, and postoperative conditions with 6 techniques. MC techniques using 1-, or 2-suture combined with footprint repair showed significantly higher stiffness values than the intact condition. Passive stiffness of the SSP muscle was highest after a 1-suture MC with footprint repair for all regions when compared among all repair procedures. There was no significant difference between the intact condition and a 3-suture MC with footprint repair. MC techniques with single stitch and subsequent footprint repair may have adverse effects on muscle properties and tensile loading on repair, increasing the risk of retear of repairs. Adding more MC stitches could reverse these adverse effects. PMID:27583402

  15. Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Vigneswaran, N; Lee, K; Yegappan, M

    2007-11-01

    Spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 30-year-old man with end-stage renal failure, who sustained this injury, and subsequently had surgical repair of both tendons on separate occasions. He has since regained full range of movement of both knees.

  16. Principles of tendon transfers.

    PubMed

    Coulet, B

    2016-04-01

    Tendon transfers are carried out to restore functional deficits by rerouting the remaining intact muscles. Transfers are highly attractive in the context of hand surgery because of the possibility of restoring the patient's ability to grip. In palsy cases, tendon transfers are only used when a neurological procedure is contraindicated or has failed. The strategy used to restore function follows a common set of principles, no matter the nature of the deficit. The first step is to clearly distinguish between deficient muscles and muscles that could be transferred. Next, the type of palsy will dictate the scope of the program and the complexity of the gripping movements that can be restored. Based on this reasoning, a surgical strategy that matches the means (transferable muscles) with the objectives (functions to restore) will be established and clearly explained to the patient. Every paralyzed hand can be described using three parameters. 1) Deficient segments: wrist, thumb and long fingers; 2) mechanical performance of muscles groups being revived: high energy-wrist extension and finger flexion that require strong transfers with long excursion; low energy-wrist flexion and finger extension movements that are less demanding mechanically, because they can be accomplished through gravity alone in some cases; 3) condition of the two primary motors in the hand: extrinsics (flexors and extensors) and intrinsics (facilitator). No matter the type of palsy, the transfer surgery follows the same technical principles: exposure, release, fixation, tensioning and rehabilitation. By performing an in-depth analysis of each case and by following strict technical principles, tendon transfer surgery leads to reproducible results; this allows the surgeon to establish clear objectives for the patient preoperatively. PMID:27117119

  17. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery. PMID:26135547

  18. Effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage and rotator cuff tendon healing: An in vivo rabbit study.

    PubMed

    Friel, Nicole A; McNickle, Allison G; DeFranco, Michael J; Wang, FanChia; Shewman, Elizabeth F; Verma, Nikhil N; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Chubinskaya, Susan; Kramer, Susan M; Wang, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    Highly purified capsaicin has emerged as a promising injectable compound capable of providing sustained pain relief following a single localized treatment during orthopedic surgical procedures. To further assess its reliability for clinical use, the potential effect of highly purified capsaicin on articular cartilage metabolism as well as tendon structure and function warrants clarification. In the current study, rabbits received unilateral supraspinatus transection and repair with a single 1 ml injection of capsaicin (R+C), PEG-only placebo (R+P), or saline (R+S) into the glenohumeral joint (GHJ). An additional group received 1 ml capsaicin onto an intact rotator cuff (I+C). At 18 weeks post-op, cartilage proteoglycan (PG) synthesis and content as well as cell viability were similar (p>0.05) across treatment groups. Biomechanical testing revealed no differences (p>0.05) among tendon repair treatment groups. Similarly, histologic features of both cartilage and repaired tendons showed minimal differences across groups. Hence, in this rabbit model, a single injection of highly purified capsaicin into the GHJ does not induce a deleterious response with regard to cartilage matrix metabolism and cell viability, or rotator cuff healing. These data provide further evidence supporting the use of injectable, highly purified capsaicin as a safe alternative for management of postoperative pain following GHJ surgery.

  19. Two cases of peroneus brevis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Minoyama, O; Uchiyama, E; Iwaso, H; Hiranuma, K; Takeda, Y

    2002-02-01

    A longitudinal tear of the peroneal tendon is thought to be the result of repetitive peroneal subluxation. However, this report documents two cases of longitudinal split of the peroneus brevis tendon that had no peroneal tendon subluxation. Primary suture was performed. Subluxation of the peroneal tendons was not identified surgically in either case.

  20. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Wertz, Jess; Galli, Melissa; Borchers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Achilles tendon (AT) rupture in athletes is increasing in incidence and accounts for one of the most devastating sports injuries because of the threat to alter or end a career. Despite the magnitude of this injury, reliable risk assessment has not been clearly defined, and prevention strategies have been limited. The purpose of this review is to identify potential intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes stated in the current literature. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search was conducted on AT rupture, or “injury” and “risk factors” and “athletes” from 1980 to 2011. Emphasis was placed on epidemiology, etiology, and review articles focusing on the risk for lower extremity injury in runners and gymnasts. Thirty articles were reviewed, and 22 were included in this assessment. Results: Aerial and ground athletes share many intrinsic risk factors for AT rupture, including overuse and degeneration of the tendon as well as anatomical variations that mechanically put an athlete at risk. Older athletes, athletes atypical in size for their sport, high tensile loads, leg dominance, and fatigue also may increase risk. Aerial athletes tend to have more extrinsic factors that play a role in this injury due to the varying landing surfaces from heights and technical maneuvers performed at various skill levels. Conclusion: Risk assessment for AT rupture in aerial and ground athletes is multivariable and difficult in terms of developing prevention strategies. Quantitative measures of individual risk factors may help identify major contributors to injury. PMID:24427410

  1. The Changes of Electromyography in the Upper Trapezius and Supraspinatus of Women College Students According to the Method of Bag-carrying and Weight

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Hyoun; Lee, Jung-Ho; Kim, Cheol-Yong

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in upper extremity muscle activities of women college students' due to method of bag-carrying and weight. [Subjects] Thirty healthy adult females participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were orthopedic or neurologic disease, or a dominant left side. [Methods] Electromyographic activities of the supraspinatus and upper trapezius were recorded bilaterally under two conditions: crossbody bag, ipsilateral bag. [Results] There were no significant differences in the supraspinatus and upper trapezius muscles according to the weight carried; however, there was significant difference in the right supraspinatus and both upper trapezius muscles according to the method of carrying. [Conclusion] An effective backpack safety program for female college students is necessary to educate them how to prevent possible musculoskeletal pain related to the weight carried and the method of carrying from the perspective of an ergonomical approach. PMID:24259929

  2. Hyaluronic acid and tendon lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kaux, Jean-François; Samson, Antoine; Crielaard, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Introduction recently, the viscoelastic properties of hyaluronic acid (HA) on liquid connective tissue have been proposed for the treatment of tendinopathies. Some fundamental studies show encouraging results on hyaluronic acid’s ability to promote tendon gliding and reduce adhesion as well as to improve tendon architectural organisation. Some observations also support its use in a clinical setting to improve pain and function. This literature review analyses studies relating to the use of hyaluronic acid in the treatment of tendinopathies. Methods this review was constructed using the Medline database via Pubmed, Scopus and Google Scholar. The key words hyaluronic acid, tendon and tendinopathy were used for the research. Results in total, 28 articles (in English and French) on the application of hyaluronic acid to tendons were selected for their relevance and scientific quality, including 13 for the in vitro part, 7 for the in vivo animal part and 8 for the human section. Conclusions preclinical studies demonstrate encouraging results: HA permits tendon gliding, reduces adhesions, creates better tendon architectural organisation and limits inflammation. These laboratory observations appear to be supported by limited but encouraging short-term clinical results on pain and function. However, controlled randomised studies are still needed. PMID:26958533

  3. Tendon Transfers for Combined Peripheral Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Makarewich, Christopher A; Hutchinson, Douglas T

    2016-08-01

    Combined peripheral nerve injuries present a unique set of challenges to the hand surgeon when considering tendon transfers. They are often associated with severe soft tissue trauma, including lacerations to remaining innervated muscles and tendons, significant scar formation, and substantial sensory loss. In the case of combined nerve injuries, there are typically fewer options for tendon transfers due to fewer tendons of shared function that are expendable as well as associated injuries to tendon or muscle bellies. As such, careful preoperative planning must be performed to make the most of remaining muscle tendon units. PMID:27387081

  4. Extensive Loss of Tibialis Anterior Tendon: Surgical Repair With Split Tendon Transfer of Tibialis Posterior Tendon: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Uchida, Kenzo; Kokubo, Yasuo; Inukai, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Takumi; Yamagishi, Atsushi; Kitade, Makoto; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive damage of the tibialis anterior tendon is rare and mainly caused by trauma. Surgical treatment of these injuries can become challenging owing to the limited availability of autogenous graft resources for reconstruction of the defect. In the present case report, we describe a large defect in the midfoot soft tissue after a traffic injury, which included complete loss of the tibialis anterior tendon. The tendon was reconstructed by split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon without sacrificing function, which was confirmed by the follow-up examination at 6 years after injury. We believe split tendon transfer of the tibialis posterior tendon can be one of the treatment options for patients with extensive disruption of the tibialis anterior tendon. PMID:26213163

  5. Treatment of partial thickness burns of the hand with the preshaped, semipermeable Procel Burn Cover: results of a multicentre study in the burn centres of Berlin, Duisburg and Munich.

    PubMed

    Jostkleigrewe, F; Brandt, K A; Flechsig, G; Bruck, J C; Henckel von Donnersmarck, G; Mühlbauer, W

    1995-06-01

    The results of a prospective clinical study conducted in three German burn centres are reported. The subject of the evaluation was to show the effectiveness of a new, preshaped, semipermeable burn dressing that is resistant to fluids and bacteria but highly permeable to vapour. The dressing was used in conjunction with 1 per cent silver sulphadiazine cream in treating partial thickness burns of the hand. In 49 patients, 72 partial thickness burned hands were treated. The application proved to be very easy. The time for a dressing change was short (5-10 min). The duration of treatment was 13 days on average. Complications due to infections did not occur. Because of the semipermeable properties of the dressing material, skin macerations occurred in only a few instances (13 per cent) as a result of inappropriate cream application or extremely high exudation rates, and these did not adversely affect the healing process. Patients achieved the ability to perform activities of daily living early with positive results for the patients, the physician and the nursing team.

  6. Achilles tendon rupture rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kearney, R. S.; Parsons, N.; Underwood, M.; Costa, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The evidence base to inform the management of Achilles tendon rupture is sparse. The objectives of this research were to establish what current practice is in the United Kingdom and explore clinicians’ views on proposed further research in this area. This study was registered with the ISRCTN (ISRCTN68273773) as part of a larger programme of research. Methods We report an online survey of current practice in the United Kingdom, approved by the British Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society and completed by 181 of its members. A total of ten of these respondents were invited for a subsequent one-to-one interview to explore clinician views on proposed further research in this area. Results The survey showed wide variations in practice, with patients being managed in plaster cast alone (13%), plaster cast followed by orthoses management (68%), and orthoses alone (19%). Within these categories, further variation existed regarding the individual rehabilitation facets, such as the length of time worn, the foot position within them and weight-bearing status. The subsequent interviews reflected this clinical uncertainty and the pressing need for definitive research. Conclusions The gap in evidence in this area has resulted in practice in the United Kingdom becoming varied and based on individual opinion. Future high-quality randomised trials on this subject are supported by the clinical community. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:65–9 PMID:25868938

  7. Adaptation of the tendon to mechanical usage.

    PubMed

    Reeves, N D

    2006-01-01

    Tendons primarily function as contractile force transmitters, but their mechanical properties may change dependent upon their level of mechanical usage. Using an ultrasound-based technique we have assessed tendon mechanical properties in vivo in a number of conditions representing different levels of mechanical usage. Ageing alters tendon mechanical properties; stiffness and modulus were lower in older adults by 10 and 14%, respectively, compared to young adults. Increased levels of exercise loading in old age can however partly reverse this process, as tendon stiffness and modulus were found to increase by 65 and 69%, respectively. Complete unloading due to bed rest or spinal cord injury both reduce tendon stiffness and modulus, however, only chronic unloading due to spinal cord injury seems to cause tendon atrophy. Alterations in tendon mechanical properties due to changes in the levels loading have implications for the speed of force transmission, the muscle's operating range and the likelihood of tendon strain injury.

  8. Quadriceps and patellar tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, L E; Werner, C M L; Heinzelmann, M

    2006-06-01

    Ruptures of the patellar and/or quadriceps tendon are rare injuries that require immediate repair to re-establish knee extensor continuity and to allow early motion. We evaluated 36 consecutive patients with quadriceps or patellar tendon rupture between 1993 and 2000. There were 37 primary ruptures, 3 reruptures, 21 quadriceps and 19 patellar tendon ruptures. Follow up examination (>24 months postoperatively) included the patient's history, assessment of risk factors, clinical examination of both knees, isometric muscle strength measurements and three specific knee scores, Hospital for Special Surgery Score, Knee Society Score and Turba Score, and a short form SF-36. We evaluated 29 patients (26 men) with 33 ruptures (16 patellar tendon, 17 quadriceps tendon). Seven patients were lost to follow up. We found no difference between the range of motion and muscle strength when the injured leg was compared to the non-injured leg. Risk factors did not influence the four scores, patient satisfaction, pain, muscle strength or range of motion. Multiple injured patients had a significant reduction in muscle strength and circumference, however patient satisfaction did not differ to the non-multiple injured patient group.

  9. Triceps tendon rupture in weight lifters.

    PubMed

    Sollender, J L; Rayan, G M; Barden, G A

    1998-01-01

    Triceps tendon avulsion injuries are rare. We report four weight lifters with triceps tendon raptures, two of whom had received local steroid injections for pain in the triceps. All four patients had taken oral anabolic steroids before injury. All patients had closed avulsion of the triceps tendon from its insertion into the olecranon. Three patients were injured while bench pressing heavy weights, and one patient was injured while swinging a baseball bat. Satisfactory results were achieved after surgical reinsertion of the tendon.

  10. Staged tendon grafts and soft tissue coverage

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the two-staged flexor tendon method is to improve the predictability of final results in difficult problems dealing with tendon reconstruction. This article reviews the evolution and benefits of this procedure. It also considers the use of the technique to help deal with problems requiring pulley and skin reconstruction simultaneously with re-constituting the flexor tendon system. PMID:22022043

  11. Achilles tendon reflex measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szebeszczyk, Janina; Straszecka, Joanna

    1995-06-01

    The examination of Achilles tendon reflex is widely used as a simple, noninvasive clinical test in diagnosis and pharmacological therapy monitoring in such diseases as: hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, diabetic neuropathy, the lower limbs obstructive angiopathies and intermittent claudication. Presented Achilles tendon reflect measuring system is based on the piezoresistive sensor connected with the cylinder-piston system. To determinate the moment of Achilles tendon stimulation a detecting circuit was used. The outputs of the measuring system are connected to the PC-based data acquisition board. Experimental results showed that the measurement accuracy and repeatability is good enough for diagnostics and therapy monitoring purposes. A user friendly, easy-to-operate measurement system fulfills all the requirements related to recording, presentation and storing of the patients' reflexograms.

  12. The clinical effect of tendon repair for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection in hands

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui; Ye, Ganmin; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Corticosteroid injections for hand tendinitis can lead to a rare significant complication of tendon spontaneous rupture. However, only sporadic cases were reported in the literature before. This study was designed to gauge the clinical effect of tendon repair in patients of tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection and analyze our experience. This was a retrospective observational study of 13 patients (8 women and 5 men) operated between July 2011 and December 2015 for tendon spontaneous rupture after corticosteroid injection. Demographic data, clinical features, imaging data, and surgical treatments were carefully reviewed. The average age was 52.308 ± 15.381 years (range 29–71). The average injection times were 2.538 ± 1.664 times (range 1–6). The average rupture time (after last injection) was 10.923 ± 9.500 weeks (range 3–32). Nine patients were treated by tendon suture (69% of cases), and 4 patients were treated by tendon grafting (31% of cases). All patients received follow-up in our outpatient clinic. The sites of the tendon rupture (15 tendons of 13 patients had involved) include extensor pollicis longus (6 tendons, 40% of cases), extensor digiti quinti and extensor digiti minimi (4 tendons, 27% of cases), ring finger of extensor digitorum communis (3 tendons, 20% of cases), and middle finger of extensor digitorum communis (2 tendons, 13% of cases). Two patients who had tendon adhesion (15% of cases) were treated by tendon release. One patient who had tendon rerupture (8% of cases) was treated by tendon grafting. No patient had complications of infections, vascular, or nerve injury. Tendon spontaneous rupture is a serious complication after corticosteroid injection for tendinitis. Rigid standard of corticosteroid injection is very important. Magnetic resonance imaging was contributory to preoperative assess tendon defect and can be used to monitor healing quality of tendons during the follow-up. PMID:27741145

  13. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer for Posterior Tibial Tendon Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ramanujam, Crystal L; Stapleton, John J; Zgonis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Cobb procedure is useful for addressing stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction and is often accompanied by a medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy and/or lateral column lengthening. The Cobb procedure can also be combined with selected medial column arthrodesis and realignment osteotomies along with equinus correction when indicated. PMID:26590721

  14. Metastatic pleomorphic adenoma to the supraspinatus muscle: a case report and review of a rare aggressive clinical entity

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, James G; Redmond, Maeve; Tuffy, John B; Wilson, Lorraine; Looby, Seamus

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 65-year-old female with a recurrent right parotid pleomorphic adenoma (PA) 24 years after initial surgical excision. Positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) demonstrated an unusual suspicious FDG-avid erosive rim enhancing mass centered in the right supraspinatus muscle. Cytology from CT-guided aspiration of the mass was consistent with a histologically benign PA, and the patient was diagnosed with metastatic pleomorphic adenoma (MPA). The patient later developed diffuse pulmonary metastases and died within 3 months. MPA, although rare, is recognised as a potentially lethal malignant complication of recurrent or longstanding benign PA. As no biochemical or genetic parameters are predictive of malignant change, patients presenting with recurrent PA should be considered for screening for metastatic disease. PMID:26629288

  15. Hamstring tendon harvesting--Effect of harvester on tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption; cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, C P; Alvi, F; Phaltankar, P; Gagey, O

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the type of hamstring tendon harvester used can influence harvested tendon characteristics and soft tissue disruption. We compared two different types of tendon harvesters with regard to the length of tendon obtained and soft tissue disruption during hamstring tendon harvesting. Thirty six semitendinosus and gracilis tendons were harvested using either a closed stripper or a blade harvester in 18 paired knees from nine human fresh cadavers. Use of the blade harvester gave longer lengths of usable tendon whilst minimising the stripping of muscle and of any non-usable tendon. Our results suggest that the type of harvester per se can influence the length of tendon harvested as well as soft tissue disruption. Requesting such data from the industry prior to deciding which harvester to use seems desirable.

  16. Multiple Fibromas of Tendon Sheath: Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Se Young; Jin, Seon Pil; Yeom, Bora; Kim, Shin Woo; Cho, So Yun

    2011-01-01

    Fibroma of the tendon sheath is an uncommon soft tissue tumor presenting as a solitary, slow-growing, firm, painless, small nodule, which shows strong attachment to the tendon or tendon sheath. It is usually localized on fingers and hand tendons in adults between the age of 20 and 40 years old. This case concerns a 61-year-old man presenting with a 5-year history of multiple cutaneous nodules on both palms and soles. Skin biopsy confirmed fibroma of the tendon sheath. Blood tests showed a high titer of rheumatoid factor and positivity to anti-nuclear antibody. No case of fibroma of the tendon sheath occurring multifocally on both palms and soles has been previously reported. Herein, we report on a very rare case of multiple fibromas of the tendon sheath arising from palms and soles, which supports the pathogenetic hypothesis that this tumor may be a reactive process rather than a true neoplasm. PMID:22028571

  17. Histologic analysis of ruptured quadriceps tendons.

    PubMed

    Trobisch, Per David; Bauman, Matthias; Weise, Kuno; Stuby, Fabian; Hak, David J

    2010-01-01

    Quadriceps tendon ruptures are uncommon injuries. Degenerative changes in the tendon are felt to be an important precondition for rupture. We retrospectively reviewed 45 quadriceps tendon ruptures in 42 patients. Quadriceps tendon ruptures occurred most often in the sixth and seventh decade of life. Men were affected six times as often as women. A tissue sample from the rupture-zone was obtained in 22 cases and histologic analysis was performed. Degenerative changes were present in only 14 (64%) of the 22 samples. We observed an increasing ratio of degenerative to nondegenerative tendons with increasing patient age. Our data suggests that quadriceps tendon rupture, especially in younger patients, can occur in the absence of pathologic tendon degeneration.

  18. Bioreactor Design for Tendon/Ligament Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Gardiner, Bruce S.; Lin, Zhen; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B.; Wang, Allan; Xu, Jiake

    2013-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injury is a worldwide health problem, but the treatment options remain limited. Tendon and ligament engineering might provide an alternative tissue source for the surgical replacement of injured tendon. A bioreactor provides a controllable environment enabling the systematic study of specific biological, biochemical, and biomechanical requirements to design and manufacture engineered tendon/ligament tissue. Furthermore, the tendon/ligament bioreactor system can provide a suitable culture environment, which mimics the dynamics of the in vivo environment for tendon/ligament maturation. For clinical settings, bioreactors also have the advantages of less-contamination risk, high reproducibility of cell propagation by minimizing manual operation, and a consistent end product. In this review, we identify the key components, design preferences, and criteria that are required for the development of an ideal bioreactor for engineering tendons and ligaments. PMID:23072472

  19. Growth factors in porcine full and partial thickness burn repair. Differing targets and effects of keratinocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, epidermal growth factor, and neu differentiation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Danilenko, D. M.; Ring, B. D.; Tarpley, J. E.; Morris, B.; Van, G. Y.; Morawiecki, A.; Callahan, W.; Goldenberg, M.; Hershenson, S.; Pierce, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    The topical application of recombinant growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB homodimer (rPDGF-BB), keratinocyte growth factor (rKGF), and neu differentiation factor has resulted in significant acceleration of healing in several animal models of wound repair. In this study, we established highly reproducible and quantifiable full and deep partial thickness porcine burn models in which burns were escharectomized 4 or 5 days postburn and covered with an occlusive dressing to replicate the standard treatment in human burn patients. We then applied these growth factors to assess their efficacy on several parameters of wound repair: extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production, percent reepithelialization, and new epithelial area. In full thickness burns, only rPDGF-BB and the combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF induced significant changes in burn repair. rPDGF-BB induced marked extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production (P = 0.013) such that the burn defect was filled within several days of escharectomy, but had no effect on new epithelial area or reepithelialization. The combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF in full thickness burns resulted in a highly significant increase in extracellular matrix and granulation tissue area (P = 0.0009) and a significant increase in new epithelial area (P = 0.007), but had no effect on reepithelialization. In deep partial thickness burns, rKGF induced the most consistent changes. Daily application of rKGF induced a highly significant increase in new epithelial area (P < 0.0001) but induced only a modest increase in reepithelialization (83.7% rKGF-treated versus 70.2% control; P = 0.016) 12 days postburn. rKGF also doubled the number of fully reepithelialized burns (P = 0.02) at 13 days postburn, at least partially because of marked stimulation of both epidermal and follicular proliferation as assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. In situ hybridization for

  20. Pectoralis Major Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Frank A.; Degen, Ryan; Mahony, Gregory Thomas; Tsouris, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Systematic reviews of the literature have identified 365 reported cases of Pectoralis Major Tendon (PMT) injuries. While surgical treatment has demonstrated improved outcomes compared to non-operative treatment, there is still relatively limited data on the functional outcome, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in athletes following PMT repair. This study comprises the largest series of athletes following PMT repair reported to date. The Objective is to report on the functional outcomes, return to sport and need for 2nd surgery in a consecutive series of PMT tears. Methods: From 2009, 81 patients with PMT tears were enrolled in this prospective series. Baseline evaluation included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, physical examination and PMT specific MRI for confirmation of the diagnosis and analysis of the extent of injury. Each patient underwent surgical repair by the senior author utilizing a previously published surgical technique. Patients were then followed at 2 weeks, 6 weeks, 3 months and 6 months and further follow-up was conducted annually thereafter with functional outcome scores and adduction strength testing. The return to sport and incidence of 2nd surgery data were recorded. This study includes the first 40 athletes to reach the 2-year post-operative period. Results: All athletes were male, with an average age of 34.4 years (range 23-59). The patient cohort consisted of 4 professional NFL players and 36 recreational athletes. Average follow-up duration was 2.5 years (range 2 - 6.0 years). The most common mechanisms of injury occurred during the bench press (n=26) and contact sport participation (n=14). Sixteen injuries were complete avulsions involving both the clavicular and sternocostal heads, while 24 were isolated sternocostal head avulsions. Average pre-injury bench press of 396 lbs (range 170-500 lbs) was restored to 241 lbs post-operatively (range 140-550 lbs). Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE) scores

  1. The Effects of Glucocorticoid on Tendon and Tendon Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Dean, Benjamin John Floyd; Carr, Andrew Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are generally used to relieve pain and/or inflammation in a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders including osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, tendinopathy and degenerative spine disease. Glucocorticoids reduce tendon derived cell proliferation in vitro and reduce extracellular matrix synthesis both in vitro and in vivo, in particular type I collagen synthesis. Glucocorticoids also appear to result in acute deleterious changes in healthy in vivo tendon including collagen necrosis, collagen disorganisation and inflammatory cell infiltration; while the overall effect of glucocorticoid administration on the mechanical properties of healthy in vivo tendon are generally negative. Overall the existing in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that glucocorticoids should be used with caution in treating painful tendinopathy. Certainly a real need exists to follow up the long term clinical effects of glucocorticoid in treating tendinopathy, as there is currently a paucity of evidence in this area. However in this context while the short term benefits are clear, glucocorticoids remain a useful treatment option provided they are used in the right patients in sensible moderation. PMID:27535266

  2. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    PubMed Central

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  3. On the mechanical function of tendon.

    PubMed

    Kafka, V; Jírová, J; Smetana, V

    1995-01-01

    A mesoscopic approach is followed for mathematical modelling of the specific deformation properties of tendon. The approach starts from our general concept of modelling mechanical behaviour of heterogeneous media and assumes that the structure of tendon is optimized in such a way that it enables its adjacent muscle to work with a constant performance in the course of increasing loading (acting like a gearbox in a car). The model based on this assumption gives results that are in a very good accordance with observed properties of tendons. Clinical experience reveals that if this function of tendon is violated pathological changes appear in the respective muscle. RELEVANCE: Clarification and mathematical modelling of the mechanical function of tendon is of intellectual interest in its own right, but it is important also for cautioning surgeons against unnecessary violation of this function, and for tissue engineering aspects if tendon must be replaced.

  4. Common conditions of the achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Michael F; McCue, Timothy

    2002-05-01

    The Achilles tendon, the largest tendon in the body, is vulnerable to injury because of its limited blood supply and the combination of forces to which it is subjected. Aging and increased activity (particularly velocity sports) increase the chance of injury to the Achilles tendon. Although conditions of the Achilles tendon are occurring with increasing frequency because the aging U.S. population is remaining active, the diagnosis is missed in about one fourth of cases. Injury onset can be gradual or sudden, and the course of healing is often lengthy. A thorough history and specific physical examination are essential to make the appropriate diagnosis and facilitate a specific treatment plan. The mainstay of treatment for tendonitis, peritendonitis, tendinosis, and retrocalcaneobursitis is ice, rest, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but physical therapy, orthoties, and surgery may be necessary in recalcitrant cases. In patients with tendon rupture, casting or surgery is required. Appropriate treatment often leads to full recovery.

  5. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types. PMID:25940499

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell applications to tendon healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhury, Salma

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tendons are often subject to age related degenerative changes that coincide with a diminished regenerative capacity. Torn tendons often heal by forming scar tissue that is structurally weaker than healthy native tendon tissue, predisposing to mechanical failure. There is increasing interest in providing biological stimuli to increase the tendon reparative response. Stem cells in particular are an exciting and promising prospect as they have the potential to provide appropriate cellular signals to encourage neotendon formation during repair rather than scar tissue. Currently, a number of issues need to be investigated further before it can be determined whether stem cells are an effective and safe therapeutic option for encouraging tendon repair. This review explores the in-vitro and invivo evidence assessing the effect of stem cells on tendon healing, as well as the potential clinical applications. PMID:23738300

  7. Tensile mechanical properties of human forearm tendons.

    PubMed

    Weber, J F; Agur, A M R; Fattah, A Y; Gordon, K D; Oliver, M L

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies of the mechanical properties of tendons in the upper limb have used embalmed specimens or sub-optimal methods of measurement. The aim of this study was to determine the biomechanical properties of all tendons from five fresh frozen cadaveric forearms using updated methodology. The cross-sectional area of tendons was accurately measured using a laser reflectance system. Tensile testing was done in a precision servo-hydraulic device with cryo-clamp fixation. We determined that the cross-sectional area of some tendons is variable and directly influences the calculated material properties; visual estimation of this is unreliable. Data trends illustrate that digital extensor tendons possess the greatest tensile strength and a higher Young's modulus than other tendon types.

  8. Nutrient pathways of flexor tendons in primates

    SciTech Connect

    Manske, P.R.; Lesker, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    The perfusion and diffusion pathways to the flexor profundus tendons of 40 monkeys were investigated by measuring the uptake of tritiated proline by various tendon segments. In the absence of all vascular connections, the process of diffusion provides nutrients to all areas of flexor tendon and in this study the process of diffusion was greater. The distal segment of tendon was observed to be profused most rapidly. The proximal tendon segment is perfused from both the muscular-tendinous junction and the vinculum longus; vincular segment perfusion is via the vinculum longus vessels alone; central segment perfusion is shared by the vinculum longus and vinculum brevis vasculature. The distal segment uptake is by both the process of diffusion or vinculum brevis perfusion. The osseous attachment at the distal phalanx contributes little to tendon nutrition.

  9. Dynamic behavior of tendons in random seas

    SciTech Connect

    Niedzwecki, J.M.; Rijken, O.R.; Soemantri, D.S.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of large scale (1:55) undistorted models of TLP tendons were investigated. The tendons modeled were for a TLP designed to be deployed in a water depth of 914 m. The tendon motions were studied without the presence of the hull, In the study reported, the tendon models were subjected to three quite different design seas and the single and paired tendon configurations were compared under identical wave conditions. The main objective of this study was to examine the dynamic response of TLP tendons under controlled environmental conditions in order to better quantify the observed dynamic behavior. Underwater video tracking techniques were utilized in the experiments to obtain direct measurement of the inline and transverse displacements. Envelopes characterizing the extreme displacement behavior, spatial variations in response and collision behavior are presented and discussed.

  10. Extensor tendon injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Aakash; Jacobs, Bruce; Andoga, Alexandra; Baratz, Mark E

    2014-03-01

    Extensor tendon injuries of the hand and wrist in high-level athletes can cause a delay in return to play and permanently affect their performance. Given the inherent demand for a speedy and complete recovery, orthopedic surgeons must have an understanding of how to best direct an athlete's treatment for these injuries. The extensor anatomy is very intricate and a thorough understanding of the anatomy can help with both diagnosis and treatment. However, untreated or poorly managed injuries are at risk of leading to chronic deformities. We will discuss the diagnosis and management of the most common extensor tendon injuries and tendinopathies of the hand found in athletes: mallet fingers, swan-neck deformities, boutonniere deformities, central slip ruptures, sagittal band ruptures, intersection syndrome, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinitis, and extensor carpi ulnaris subluxation. PMID:24651290

  11. Ulnar Nerve Injury after Flexor Tendon Grafting.

    PubMed

    McCleave, Michael John

    2016-10-01

    A 43-year-old female is presented who underwent a two-stage tendon reconstruction and developed a low ulnar nerve palsy postoperatively. Exploration found that the tendon graft was passing through Guyon's canal and that the ulnar nerve was divided. This is a previously unreported complication. The reconstruction is discussed, the literature reviewed and a guide is given on how to identify the correct tissue plane when passing a tendon rod. PMID:27595967

  12. Tendon transfers for the drop foot.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Karl M; Jones, Carroll P

    2014-03-01

    The paralytic drop foot represents a challenging problem for even the most experienced orthopedic surgeon. Careful patient selection, thorough preoperative examination and planning, and application of tendon transfer biomechanical and physiologic principles outlined in this article can lead to successful results, either through a posterior tibialis tendon transfer, Bridle transfer, or variations on these procedures. Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession may also be needed at the time of tendon transfer. PMID:24548510

  13. Management of complications of extensor tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Kristina; Pipicelli, Joey; Grewal, Ruby

    2015-05-01

    Treatment goals for the management of extensor tendon injuries include restoration of function, minimizing disability, and decreasing the risk of complications. These goals can be achieved with an accurate understanding of the zone-specific concerns for extensor tendon injuries, early referral to hand therapy, and active communication between hand surgeons and therapists. This article reviews extensor tendon injuries by zone, outlines optimal management strategies that help prevent complications, and describes the treatment of these complications. PMID:25934204

  14. Lubricin Surface Modification Improves Tendon Gliding After Tendon Repair in a Canine Model in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Manabu; Sun, Yu-Long; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E.; Cha, Chung-Ja; Jay, Gregory D.; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of lubricin on the gliding of repaired flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons in vitro. Canine FDP tendons were completely lacerated, repaired with a modified Pennington technique, and treated with one of the following solutions: saline, carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/hyaluronic acid (cd-HA-gelatin), carbodiimide derivatized gelatin to which lubricin was added in a second step (cd-gelatin + lubricin), or carbodiimide derivatized gelatin/HA + lubricin (cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin). After treatment, gliding resistance was measured up to 1,000 cycles of simulated flexion/extension motion. The increase in average and peak gliding resistance in cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin tendons was less than the control tendons after 1,000 cycles (p < 0.05). The increase in average gliding resistance of cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons was also less than that of the cd-HA-gelatin treated tendons (p < 0.05). The surfaces of the repaired tendons and associated pulleys were assessed qualitatively with scanning electron microscopy and appeared smooth after 1,000 cycles of tendon motion for the cd-HA-gelatin, cd-gelatin + lubricin, and cd-HA-gelatin + lubricin treated tendons, while that of the saline control appeared roughened. These results suggest that tendon surface modification can improve tendon gliding ability, with a trend suggesting that lubricin fixed on the repaired tendon may provide additional improvement over that provided by HA and gelatin alone. PMID:18683890

  15. Outcome of quadriceps tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Puranik, Gururaj S; Faraj, Adnan

    2006-04-01

    Complete rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a well-described injury. There is a scarcity of literature relating to the outcome of patients with this injury after surgery. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patients who had surgical repair of their quadriceps tendon at our institution over a 13-year period, totalling 21 patients. Males were more commonly affected, with a male/female ratio of 4:1. The peak incidence was in the sixth decade of life. Assessment consisted of the completion of a functional knee questionnaire and a clinical examination. Symptomatic outcome following surgical repair was good with a mean symptom score generated of 19.16 out of a maximum of 25 using the Rougraff et al scoring system. Most of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of activity. Five degrees deficit and extension lag was present in three patients; these patients had the quadriceps repaired using transosseous sutures. Patients who had direct repair of the tendon using the Bunnell technique had lower Rougraff scores than the rest.

  16. Quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dennis; Stinner, Daniel; Mir, Hassan

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of quadriceps and patellar tendon ruptures requires a high index of suspicion and thorough history-taking to assess for medical comorbidities that may predispose patients to tendon degeneration. Radiographic assessment with plain films supplemented by ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging when the work-up is equivocal further aids diagnosis; however, advanced imaging is often unnecessary in patients with functional extensor mechanism deficits. Acute repair is preferred, and transpatellar bone tunnels serve as the primary form of fixation when the tendon rupture occurs at the patellar insertion, with or without augmentation depending on surgeon preference. Chronic tears and disruptions following total knee arthroplasty are special cases requiring reconstructions with allograft, synthetic mesh, or autograft. Rehabilitation protocols generally allow immediate weight-bearing with the knee locked in extension and crutch support. Limited arc motion is started early with active flexion and passive extension and then advanced progressively, followed by full active range of motion and strengthening. Complications are few but include quadriceps atrophy, knee stiffness, and rerupture. Outcomes are excellent if repair is done acutely, with poorer outcomes associated with delayed repair.

  17. High axial load termination for TLP tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, M.M.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a hollow high axial load termination for a composite tubular tendon. It comprises: a curved hollow termination body open at one end wit a circular opening and connected at the opposite curved end with an elongated hollow member of lesser diameter than the diameter of the circular opening of the termination body, a composite tubular tendon containing axial fibers and helical fibers laid on an inner hollow liner; fibers of the composite tubular tendon extending over and covering the termination body from the abutment with the composite tubular tendon to the elongated member of lesser diameter than the termination body.

  18. Tendon Transfers in the Rheumatoid Hand for Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Michael Brody; Singh, Hardeep; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2016-08-01

    Long-standing rheumatoid arthritis can result in spontaneous tendon rupture caused by attrition of the tendons. Ruptures of the ulnar-sided extensor tendons, flexor pollicis longus, and the flexor digitorum profundus can be seen. Primary repair of these tendon ruptures is frequently not possible because of delayed presentation and tendon damage by the disease process. Tendon transfers are the preferred method of treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. At surgery, it is critical to address the underlying cause of rupture to prevent future tendon ruptures. Rates of tendon rupture may decrease due to improved medications for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27387084

  19. Supraspinatus and infraspinatus weakness in overhead athletes with scapular dyskinesis: strength assessment before and after restoration of scapular musculature balance.

    PubMed

    Merolla, Giovanni; De Santis, Elisa; Campi, Fabrizio; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2010-12-01

    A disturbance in scapulohumeral rhythm may cause negative biomechanic effects on rotator cuff (RC). Alteration in scapular motion and shoulder pain can influence RC strength. Purpose of this study was to assess supraspinatus and infraspinatus strength in 29 overhead athletes with scapular dyskinesis, before and after 3 and 6 months of rehabilitation aimed to restore scapular musculature balance. A passive posterior soft tissues stretching was prescribed to balance shoulder mobility. Scapular dyskinesis patterns were evaluated according to Kibler et al. Clinical assessment was performed with the empty can (EC) test and infraspinatus strength test (IST). Strength values were recorded by a dynamometer; scores for pain were assessed with VAS scale. Changes of shoulder IR were measured. The force values increased at 3 months (P < 0.01) and at 6 months (P < 0.01). Changes of glenohumeral IR and decrease in pain scores were found at both follow-up. Outcomes registered on pain and strength confirm the role of a proper scapular position for an optimal length-tension relationship of the RC muscles. These data should encourage those caring for athletes to consider restoring of scapular musculature balance as essential part of the athletic training. PMID:21069487

  20. Calcific tendonitis of the tibialis posterior tendon at the navicular attachment

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Luke; Kempson, Susan; Watura, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Calcific tendinosis (tendonosis/tendonitis) is a condition which results from the deposition of calcium hydroxyapatite crystals in any tendon of the body. Calcific tendonitis usually presents with pain, which can be exacerbated by prolonged use of the affected tendon. We report a case of calcific tendinosis in the posterior tibialis tendon at the navicular insertion. The pathology is rare in the foot, and extremely rare in the tibialis posterior tendon, indeed there are only 2 reported in the published literature. This case report highlights the need to consider calcific tendinosis in the foot despite its rarity. If this diagnosis is considered early, appropriate investigations can then be requested and unnecessary biopsies, use of antibiotics and surgery can be avoided. We also discuss possible causes of calcific tendinosis in the tibialis posterior tendon, the role of imaging modalities and review treatment methods. PMID:22470798

  1. Distribution of proteins within different compartments of tendon varies according to tendon type.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Karunaseelan, Kabelan J; Ng Chieng Hin, Jade; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2016-09-01

    Although the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the energetic cost of locomotion. To maximise energy storage and return, energy-storing tendons need to be more extensible and elastic than tendons with a purely positional function. These properties are conferred in part by a specialisation of a specific compartment of the tendon, the interfascicular matrix, which enables sliding and recoil between adjacent fascicles. However, the composition of the interfascicular matrix is poorly characterised and we therefore tested the hypothesis that the distribution of elastin and proteoglycans differs between energy-storing and positional tendons, and that protein distribution varies between the fascicular matrix and the interfascicular matrix, with localisation of elastin and lubricin to the interfascicular matrix. Protein distribution in the energy-storing equine superficial digital flexor tendon and positional common digital extensor tendon was assessed using histology and immunohistochemistry. The results support the hypothesis, demonstrating enrichment of lubricin in the interfascicular matrix in both tendon types, where it is likely to facilitate interfascicular sliding. Elastin was also localised to the interfascicular matrix, specifically in the energy-storing superficial digital flexor tendon, which may account for the greater elasticity of the interfascicular matrix in this tendon. A differential distribution of proteoglycans was identified between tendon types and regions, which may indicate a distinct role for each of these proteins in tendon. These data provide important advances into fully characterising structure-function relationships within tendon. PMID:27113131

  2. Augmentation of tendon-to-bone healing.

    PubMed

    Atesok, Kivanc; Fu, Freddie H; Wolf, Megan R; Ochi, Mitsuo; Jazrawi, Laith M; Doral, M Nedim; Lubowitz, James H; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-03-19

    Tendon-to-bone healing is vital to the ultimate success of the various surgical procedures performed to repair injured tendons. Achieving tendon-to-bone healing that is functionally and biologically similar to native anatomy can be challenging because of the limited regeneration capacity of the tendon-bone interface. Orthopaedic basic-science research strategies aiming to augment tendon-to-bone healing include the use of osteoinductive growth factors, platelet-rich plasma, gene therapy, enveloping the grafts with periosteum, osteoconductive materials, cell-based therapies, biodegradable scaffolds, and biomimetic patches. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and extracorporeal shockwave treatment may affect tendon-to-bone healing by means of mechanical forces that stimulate biological cascades at the insertion site. Application of various loading methods and immobilization times influence the stress forces acting on the recently repaired tendon-to-bone attachment, which eventually may change the biological dynamics of the interface. Other approaches, such as the use of coated sutures and interference screws, aim to deliver biological factors while achieving mechanical stability by means of various fixators. Controlled Level-I human trials are required to confirm the promising results from in vitro or animal research studies elucidating the mechanisms underlying tendon-to-bone healing and to translate these results into clinical practice.

  3. Tendons Involvement in Congenital Metabolic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Abate, Michele; Salini, Vincenzo; Andia, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Congenital metabolic disorders are consequence of defects involving single genes that code for enzymes. Blocking metabolic pathways, the defect leads to the shortage of essential compounds, and/or to the accumulation of huge quantities of precursors, which interfere with normal functions. Only few of these diseases are characterized by a clinically significant tendon involvement.Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia results from the inheritance of a mutant low-density lipoprotein receptor gene; patients show high cholesterol levels, precocious coronary artery disease, and may develop tendon xanthomata (mainly in Achilles tendon). The detection of xanthomata is important, because it allows an early diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Cerebrotendinous Xanthomatosis is a rare genetic metabolic disorder of cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, characterized by accumulation of cholestanol in brain and tendons. Tendon abnormalities are similar to those reported in Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolaemia. Alkaptonuria is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme homogentisic acid oxidase. Due to the accumulation of the homogentisic acid, tendons and ligaments are characterized by a typical ochre/yellow pigmentation (ochronosis), with ensuing inflammation, calcification and rupture. In Congenital Hypergalactosemia an increased tendon collagen cross-linking by non-enzymatic galactosylation can be observed. Finally, Congenital Hypophosphatasia may be associated to deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in rotator cuff, elbow, and Achilles tendons. PMID:27535253

  4. Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendons rupture.

    PubMed

    Celik, Evrim Coşkun; Ozbaydar, Mehmet; Ofluoglu, Demet; Demircay, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury that is usually seen in association with multiple medical conditions and some medications. We report a case of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that may be related to the long-term use of a statin.

  5. Measuring Regional Changes in Damaged Tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Catherine Kayt Vincent

    Mechanical properties of tendon predict tendon health and function, but measuring these properties in vivo is difficult. An ultrasound-based (US) analysis technique called acoustoelastography (AE) uses load-dependent changes in the reflected US signal to estimate tissue stiffness non-invasively. This thesis explores whether AE can provide information about stiffness alteration resulting from tendon tears both ex vivo and in vivo. An ex vivo ovine infraspinatus tendon model suggests that the relative load transmitted by the different tendon layers transmit different fractions of the load and that ultrasound echo intensity change during cyclic loading decreases, becoming less consistent once the tendon is torn. An in vivo human tibialis anterior tendon model using electrically stimulated twitch contractions investigated the feasibility of measuring the effect in vivo. Four of the five subjects showed the expected change and that the muscle contraction times calculated using the average grayscale echo intensity change compared favorably with the times calculated based on the force data. Finally an AE pilot study with patients who had rotator cuff tendon tears found that controlling the applied load and the US view of the system will be crucial to a successful in vivo study.

  6. [Multiple calcifications and ossifications of tendons].

    PubMed

    Gaucher, A; Péré, P; Gillet, P

    1991-06-21

    Multiple calcifications and ossifications of tendons are, as a rule, associated with similar lesions of other articular and/or periarticular structures. The nature and multiplicity of these lesions gives them an unquestionable diagnostic and nosological value. Multiple calcifications are part of the apatite arthritis or of diffuse articular chondrocalcinosis. Multiple ossifications of tendons often suggest Forestier's disease and ankylosing spondylitis.

  7. Structure-mechanics relationships in mineralized tendons.

    PubMed

    Spiesz, Ewa M; Zysset, Philippe K

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we review the hierarchical structure and the resulting elastic properties of mineralized tendons as obtained by various multiscale experimental and computational methods spanning from nano- to macroscale. The mechanical properties of mineralized collagen fibres are important to understand the mechanics of hard tissues constituted by complex arrangements of these fibres, like in human lamellar bone. The uniaxial mineralized collagen fibre array naturally occurring in avian tendons is a well studied model tissue for investigating various stages of tissue mineralization and the corresponding elastic properties. Some avian tendons mineralize with maturation, which results in a graded structure containing two zones of distinct morphology, circumferential and interstitial. These zones exhibit different amounts of mineral, collagen, pores and a different mineral distribution between collagen fibrillar and extrafibrillar space that lead to distinct elastic properties. Mineralized tendon cells have two phenotypes: elongated tenocytes placed between fibres in the circumferential zone and cuboidal cells with lower aspect ratios in the interstitial zone. Interestingly some regions of avian tendons seem to be predestined to mineralization, which is exhibited as specific collagen cross-linking patterns as well as distribution of minor tendon constituents (like proteoglycans) and loss of collagen crimp. Results of investigations in naturally mineralizing avian tendons may be useful in understanding the pathological mineralization occurring in some human tendons.

  8. Tendon Vasculature in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Tendons represent a bradytrophic tissue which is poorly vascularized and, compared to bone or skin, heal poorly. Usually, a vascularized connective scar tissue with inferior functional properties forms at the injury site. Whether the increased vascularization is the root cause of tissue impairments such as loss of collagen fiber orientation, ectopic formation of bone, fat or cartilage, or is a consequence of these pathological changes remains unclear. This review provides an overview of the role of tendon vasculature in healthy and chronically diseased tendon tissue as well as its relevance for tendon repair. Further, the nature and the role of perivascular tendon stem/progenitor cells residing in the vascular niche will be discussed and compared to multipotent stromal cells in other tissues. PMID:26635616

  9. Ultrasonic evaluation of flood gate tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Brown, A.

    1997-10-01

    Our water resources infrastructure is susceptible to aging degradation just like the rest of this country`s infrastructure. A critical component of the water supply system is the flood gate that controls the outflow from dams.Long steel rods called tendons attach these radial gates to the concrete in the dam. The tendons are typically forty feet long and over one inch in diameter. Moisture may seep into the grout around the tendons and cause corrosion. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is working with the California Department of Water Resources to develop advanced ultrasonic techniques for nondestructively inspecting their tendons. A unique transducer was designed and fabricated to interrogate the entire tendon. A robust,portable unit was assembled that included a computer controlled data acquisition system and specialized data processing software to analyze the ultrasonic signals. This system was tested on laboratory specimens and is presently being fielded at two dam sites.

  10. The Role of Detraining in Tendon Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Salamanna, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Vittadini, Filippo; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Nicoli Aldini, Nicolò; Masiero, Stefano; Fini, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several conditions such as training, aging, estrogen deficiency and drugs could affect the biological and anatomo-physiological characteristics of the tendon. Additionally, recent preclinical and clinical studies examined the effect of detraining on tendon, showing alterations in its structure and morphology and in tenocyte mechanobiology. However, few data evaluated the importance that cessation of training might have on tendon. Basically, we do not fully understand how tendons react to a phase of training followed by sudden detraining. Therefore, within this review, we summarize the studies where tendon detraining was examined. Materials and Methods: A descriptive systematic literature review was carried out by searching three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Knowledge) on tendon detraining. Original articles in English from 2000 to 2015 were included. In addition, the search was extended to the reference lists of the selected articles. A public reference manager (www.mendeley.com) was adopted to remove duplicate articles. Results: An initial literature search yielded 134 references (www.pubmed.org: 53; www.scopus.com: 11; www.webofknowledge.com: 70). Fifteen publications were extracted based on the title for further analysis by two independent reviewers. Abstracts and complete articles were after that reviewed to evaluate if they met inclusion criteria. Conclusions: The revised literature comprised four clinical studies and an in vitro and three in vivo reports. Overall, the results showed that tendon structure and properties after detraining are compromised, with an alteration in the tissue structural organization and mechanical properties. Clinical studies usually showed a lesser extent of tendon alterations, probably because preclinical studies permit an in-depth evaluation of tendon modifications, which is hard to perform in human subjects. In conclusion, after a period of sudden detraining (e.g., after an injury), physical activity should

  11. Engineered scaffold-free tendon tissue produced by tendon-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ni, Ming; Rui, Yun Feng; Tan, Qi; Liu, Yang; Xu, Liang Liang; Chan, Kai Ming; Wang, Yan; Li, Gang

    2013-03-01

    Most of the exogenous biomaterials for tendon repair have limitations including lower capacity for inducing cell proliferation and differentiation, poorer biocompatibility and remodeling potentials. To avoid these shortcomings, we intend to construct an engineered tendon by stem cells and growth factors without exogenous scaffolds. In this study, we produced an engineered scaffold-free tendon tissue (ESFTT) in vitro and investigated its potentials for neo-tendon formation and promoting tendon healing in vivo. The ESFTT, produced via tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) by treatment of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and ascorbic acid in vitro, was characterized by histology, qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry methods. After ESFTT implanted into the nude mouse, the in vivo fluorescence imaging, histology and immunohistochemistry examinations showed neo-tendon formation. In a rat patellar tendon window injury model, the histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical testing data indicated ESFTT could significantly promote tendon healing. In conclusion, this is a proof-of-concept study demonstrating that ESFTT could be a potentially new approach for tendon repair and regeneration.

  12. Preparation and characterization of decellularized tendon slices for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Ning, Liang-Ju; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Xiao-He; Luo, Jing-Cong; Li, Xiu-Qun; Yang, Zhi-Ming; Qin, Ting-Wu

    2012-06-01

    To develop a naturally derived tendon tissue engineering scaffold with the preservation of the native ultrastructure, tensile strength, and biochemical composition of the tendon extracellular matrix (ECM), decellularized tendon slices (DTSs) were prepared using repetitive freeze/thaw of the intact Achilles tendons, frozen section, and nuclease treatment. The DTSs were characterized in the native ultrastructure, mechanical properties, biochemical composition, and cytocompatibility. Histological examination and DNA quantification analysis confirmed that cells were completely removed from tendon tissue by repetitive freeze/thaw in combination with nuclease treatment 12 h. The intrinsic ultrastructure of tendon tissue was well preserved based on scanning electron microscopy examination. The tensile strength of the DTSs was retained 85.62% of native tendon slice. More than 93% of proteoglycans (fibromodulin, biglycan) and growth factors (TGF-β1, IGF-1, VEGF, and CTGF) inherent in tendon ECM were preserved in the DTSs according to ELISA analysis. Furthermore, the DTSs facilitated attachment and repopulation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts in vitro. Overall, the DTSs are sheet scaffolds with a combination of elemental mechanical strength and tendon ECM bioactive factors that may have many potential applications in tendon tissue engineering.

  13. Is higher serum cholesterol associated with altered tendon structure or tendon pain? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Tilley, Benjamin J; Cook, Jill L; Docking, Sean I; Gaida, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background Tendon pain occurs in individuals with extreme cholesterol levels (familial hypercholesterolaemia). It is unclear whether the association with tendon pain is strong with less extreme elevations of cholesterol. Objective To determine whether lipid levels are associated with abnormal tendon structure or the presence of tendon pain. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant articles were found through an electronic search of 6 medical databases—MEDLINE, Cochrane, AMED, EMBASE, Web of Science and Scopus. We included all case–control or cross-sectional studies with data describing (1) lipid levels or use of lipid-lowering drugs and (2) tendon structure or tendon pain. Results 17 studies (2612 participants) were eligible for inclusion in the review. People with altered tendon structure or tendon pain had significantly higher total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol; with mean difference values of 0.66, 1.00, 0.33, and −0.19 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions The results of this review indicate that a relationship exists between an individual’s lipid profile and tendon health. However, further longitudinal studies are required to determine whether a cause and effect relationship exists between tendon structure and lipid levels. This could lead to advancement in the understanding of the pathoaetiology and thus treatment of tendinopathy. PMID:26474596

  14. Repair of quadriceps tendon ruptures using suture anchors.

    PubMed

    Richards, David P; Barber, F Alan

    2002-01-01

    The repair of ruptured quadriceps tendon is commonly performed by weaving sutures through the ruptured tendon and then attaching the tendon to the bone by passing these sutures through tunnels in the superior patella. This technical note is the first report we are aware of in the English language literature of a technique that uses suture anchors to attach the tendon to bone.

  15. Tendon Stem Cells: Mechanobiology and Development of Tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, James H-C; Komatsu, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Millions of people suffer from tendon injuries in both occupational and athletic settings. However, the restoration of normal structure and function to injured tendons still remains as one of the greatest challenges in orthopaedics and sports medicine. In recent years, a remarkable advancement in tendon research field has been the discovery of tendon stem/progenitor cells (TSCs). Unlike tenocytes, the predominant resident cell in tendons, TSCs have the ability to self-renew and multi-differentiate. Because of these distinct properties, TSCs may play a critical role in tendon physiology as well as pathology such as tendinopathy, which is a prevalent chronic tendon injury. Additionally, because TSCs are tendon-specific stem cells, they could potentially be used in tendon tissue engineering in vitro, and serve as a promising cell source for cell-based therapy to effectively repair or even regenerate injured tendons in clinical settings. PMID:27535248

  16. Viscoelasticity of Tendons Under Transverse Compression.

    PubMed

    Paul Buckley, C; Samuel Salisbury, S T; Zavatsky, Amy B

    2016-10-01

    Tendons are highly anisotropic and also viscoelastic. For understanding and modeling their 3D deformation, information is needed on their viscoelastic response under off-axis loading. A study was made, therefore, of creep and recovery of bovine digital extensor tendons when subjected to transverse compressive stress of up to ca. 100 kPa. Preconditioned tendons were compression tested between glass plates at increasing creep loads. The creep response was anomalous: the relative rate of creep reduced with the increasing stress. Over each ca. 100 s creep period, the transverse creep deformation of each tendon obeyed a power law dependence on time, with the power law exponent falling from ca. 0.18 to an asymptote of ca. 0.058 with the increasing stress. A possible explanation is stress-driven dehydration, as suggested previously for the similar anomalous behavior of ligaments. Recovery after removal of each creep load was also anomalous. Relative residual strain reduced with the increasing creep stress, but this is explicable in terms of the reducing relative rate of creep. When allowance was made for some adhesion occurring naturally between tendon and the glass plates, the results for a given load were consistent with creep and recovery being related through the Boltzmann superposition principle (BSP). The tendon tissue acted as a pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) in contact with the glass plates: explicable in terms of the low transverse shear modulus of the tendons. PMID:27496279

  17. Biological Augmentation of Rotator Cuff Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kovacevic, David

    2008-01-01

    A histologically normal insertion site does not regenerate following rotator cuff tendon-to-bone repair, which is likely due to abnormal or insufficient gene expression and/or cell differentiation at the repair site. Techniques to manipulate the biologic events following tendon repair may improve healing. We used a sheep infraspinatus repair model to evaluate the effect of osteoinductive growth factors and BMP-12 on tendon-to-bone healing. Magnetic resonance imaging and histology showed increased formation of new bone and fibrocartilage at the healing tendon attachment site in the treated animals, and biomechanical testing showed improved load-to-failure. Other techniques with potential to augment repair site biology include use of platelets isolated from autologous blood to deliver growth factors to a tendon repair site. Modalities that improve local vascularity, such as pulsed ultrasound, have the potential to augment rotator cuff healing. Important information about the biology of tendon healing can also be gained from studies of substances that inhibit healing, such as nicotine and antiinflammatory medications. Future approaches may include the use of stem cells and transcription factors to induce formation of the native tendon-bone insertion site after rotator cuff repair surgery. PMID:18264850

  18. THE ROLE OF MECHANOBIOLOGY IN TENDON HEALING

    PubMed Central

    Killian, Megan L.; Cavinatto, Leonardo; Galatz, Leesa M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical cues affect tendon healing, homeostasis, and development in a variety of settings. Alterations in the mechanical environment are known to result in changes in the expression of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors, transcription factors, and cytokines that can alter tendon structure and cell viability. Loss of muscle force in utero or in the immediate postnatal period delays tendon and enthesis development. The response of healing tendons to mechanical load varies depending on anatomic location. Flexor tendons require motion to prevent adhesion formation, yet excessive force results in gap formation and subsequent weakening of the repair. Excessive motion in the setting of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction causes accumulation of macrophages, which are detrimental to tendon graft healing. Complete removal of load is detrimental to rotator cuff healing, yet large forces are also harmful. Controlled loading can enhance healing in most settings; however, a fine balance must be reached between loads that are too low (leading to a catabolic state) and too high (leading to micro-damage). This review will summarize existing knowledge of the mechanobiology of tendon development, homeostasis, and healing. PMID:22244066

  19. Updates in biological therapies for knee injuries: tendons.

    PubMed

    Demange, Marco Kawamura; de Almeida, Adriano Marques; Rodeo, Scott A

    2014-09-01

    Tendons are subjected to tendinopathies caused by inflammation, degeneration, and weakening of the tendon, due to overuse and trauma, which may eventually lead to tendon rupture. Recently, there has been increasing interest in biological approaches to augment tissue healing. Tendon healing occurs through a dynamic process with inflammation, cellular proliferation, and tissue remodeling. In this review article, we discuss the more frequently proposed biological therapies for tendon injuries as platelet-rich plasma, mesenchymal stem cells, extracorporeal shockwave, and scaffolds.

  20. Percutaneous techniques for tendon transfers in the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Panchbhavi, Vinod Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are useful for replacing a dysfunctional or diseased tendon or for restoring muscle imbalance. The tendon to be transferred is harvested as distal as is necessary to provide adequate length for rerouting and attachment at the different site. The harvesting of tendon itself can be attained using an open surgical approach or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques that limit surgical exposure. This article describes percutaneous techniques for tendon transfer procedures used to address foot and ankle disorders. PMID:24548514

  1. Patellar tendon rupture: an ultrasound case report.

    PubMed

    Berg, Kenneth; Peck, Jeff; Boulger, Creagh; Bahner, David P

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a case in which ultrasound was the primary modality for diagnosis of traumatic patellar tendon rupture. Traditionally, this diagnosis has been made using MRI. This case highlights the growing need for emergency medicine physicians to become facile with bedside ultrasound and its indications as a supplement to traditional musculoskeletal examination. Normal and pathological patellar tendon examinations with ultrasound are discussed in detail. Furthermore, the advantages of ultrasound over the more traditional imaging modalities of x-ray and MRI in cases where tendon rupture is suspected are discussed.

  2. Informing Stem Cell-Based Tendon Tissue Engineering Approaches with Embryonic Tendon Development.

    PubMed

    Okech, William; Kuo, Catherine K

    2016-01-01

    Adult tendons fail to regenerate normal tissue after injury, and instead form dysfunctional scar tissue with abnormal mechanical properties. Surgical repair with grafts is the current standard to treat injuries, but faces significant limitations including pain and high rates of re-injury. To address this, we aim to regenerate new, normal tendons to replace dysfunctional tendons. A common approach to tendon tissue engineering is to design scaffolds and bioreactors based on adult tendon properties that can direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. Despite significant progress, advances have been limited due, in part, to a need for markers and potent induction cues. Our goal is to develop novel tendon tissue engineering approaches informed by embryonic tendon development. We are characterizing structure-property relationships of embryonic tendon to identify design parameters for three-dimensional scaffolds and bioreactor mechanical loading systems to direct adult stem cell tenogenesis. We will review studies in which we quantified changes in the mechanical and biochemical properties of tendon during embryonic development and elucidated specific mechanisms of functional property elaboration. We then examined the effects of these mechanical and biochemical factors on embryonic tendon cell behavior. Using custom-designed bioreactors, we also examined the effects of dynamic mechanical loading and growth factor treatment on embryonic tendon cells. Our findings have established cues to induce tenogenesis as well as metrics to evaluate differentiation. We finish by discussing how we have evaluated the tenogenic differentiation potential of adult stem cells by comparing their responses to that of embryonic tendon cells in these culture systems.

  3. Les plaies du tendon patellaire

    PubMed Central

    Mechchat, Atif; Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mardy, Abdelhak; Elayoubi, Abdelghni; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2014-01-01

    Les plaies du tendon patellaire sont peu fréquentes et sont peu rapportés dans la littérature, contrairement aux ruptures sous cutanées. Les sections du tendon patellaire nécessitent une réparation immédiate afin de rétablir l'appareil extenseur et de permettre une récupération fonctionnelle précoce. A travers ce travail rétrospectif sur 13 cas, nous analysons les aspects épidémiologiques, thérapeutiques et pronostiques de ce type de pathologie en comparant différents scores. L’âge moyen est de 25 ans avec une prédominance masculine. Les étiologies sont dominées par les accidents de la voie publique (68%) et les agressions par agent tranchant (26%) et contendant (6 %). Tous nos patients ont bénéficié d'un parage chirurgical avec suture tendineuse direct protégée par un laçage au fils d'aciers en légère flexion. La rééducation est débutée après sédation des phénomènes inflammatoires. Au dernier recul les résultats sont excellents et bon à 92%. Nous n'avons pas noté de différence de force musculaire et d'amplitude articulaire entre le genou sain et le genou lésé. Les lésions ouvertes du tendon patellaire est relativement rare. La prise en charge chirurgicale rapide donne des résultats assez satisfaisants. La réparation est généralement renforcée par un semi-tendineux, synthétique ou métallique en forme de cadre de renfort pour faciliter la réadaptation et réduire le risque de récidive après la fin de l'immobilisation. PMID:25170379

  4. Multi-Layer Electrospun Membrane Mimicking Tendon Sheath for Prevention of Tendon Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shichao; Yan, Hede; Fan, Dapeng; Song, Jialin; Fan, Cunyi

    2015-01-01

    Defect of the tendon sheath after tendon injury is a main reason for tendon adhesions, but it is a daunting challenge for the biomimetic substitute of the tendon sheath after injury due to its multi-layer membrane-like structure and complex biologic functions. In this study, a multi-layer membrane with celecoxib-loaded poly(l-lactic acid)-polyethylene glycol (PELA) electrospun fibrous membrane as the outer layer, hyaluronic acid (HA) gel as middle layer, and PELA electrospun fibrous membrane as the inner layer was designed. The anti-adhesion efficacy of this multi-layer membrane was compared with a single-layer use in rabbit flexor digitorum profundus tendon model. The surface morphology showed that both PELA fibers and celecoxib-loaded PELA fibers in multi-layer membrane were uniform in size, randomly arrayed, very porous, and smooth without beads. Multi-layer membrane group had fewer peritendinous adhesions and better gliding than the PELA membrane group and control group in gross and histological observation. The similar mechanical characteristic and collagen expression of tendon repair site in the three groups indicated that the multi-layer membrane did not impair tendon healing. Taken together, our results demonstrated that such a biomimetic multi-layer sheath could be used as a potential strategy in clinics for promoting tendon gliding and preventing adhesion without poor tendon healing. PMID:25822877

  5. Canine tendon studies. II. Biomechanical evaluation of normal and regrown canine tendons.

    PubMed

    Walker, P; Amstutz, H C; Rubinfeld, M

    1976-01-01

    Some of the mechanical properties of regrown canine tendons are compared to those of normal tendons of young and mature animals. Patellar and Achilles tendons from 12 beagle dogs were removed and studied with their bone origin and insertions. Mechanical tests were performed within 24 hr and test conditions simulated the physiological function of the tendon in vivo at room temperature. Specimens were soaked in Ringers solution and mounted in an Instron testing machine with load deflection curves plotted automatically. The parameters used for analysis were load extension, stress relaxation, elastic limit, and strain rate dependence. The regrown tendons in young animals appeared to quickly adjust in dimension and structure so that their properties were not significantly different from those of normal tendons on a load extension basis. The normal tendons were stiffer than regrown ones but the modulus of elasticity increased with age. The Achilles were stiffer than patellar tendons. Cyclic loading with 25 kg did not affect reconstructed tendon models, although some increase in stiffness was noted. The elastic modulus decreased with an increase in ambient temperature and increasing strain rate.

  6. Famotidine suppresses osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro and pathological calcification of tendon in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kenichi; Hojo, Hironori; Koshima, Isao; Chung, Ung-il; Ohba, Shinsuke

    2012-12-01

    Heterotopic ossification or calcification follows any type of musculoskeletal trauma and is known to occur after arthroplasties of hip, knee, shoulder, or elbow; fractures; joint dislocations; or tendon ruptures. Histamine receptor H2 (Hrh2) has been shown to be effective for reducing pain and decreasing calcification in patients with calcifying tendinitis, which suggested that H2 blockers were effective for the treatment of tendon ossification or calcification. However, the detailed mechanisms of its action on tendon remain to be clarified. We investigated the mechanisms underlying H2 blocker-mediated suppression of tendon calcification, with a focus on the direct action of the drug on tendon cells. Famotidine treatment suppressed the mRNA expressions of Col10a1 and osteocalcin, ossification markers, in a tendon-derived cell line TT-D6, as well as a preosteoblastic one MC3T3-E1. Both of the cell lines expressed Hrh2; histamine treatment induced osteocalcin expression in these cells. Famotidine administration suppressed calcification in the Achilles tendon of ttw mice, a mouse model of ectopic ossification. These data suggest that famotidine inhibits osteogenic differentiation of tendon cells in vitro, and this inhibition may underlie the anti-calcification effects of the drug in vivo. This study points to the use of H2 blockers as a promising strategy for treating heterotopic ossification or calcification in tendon, and provides evidence in support of the clinical use of famotidine.

  7. IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee report 2014: from the IFSSH Flexor Tendon Committee (Chairman: Jin Bo Tang).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jin Bo; Chang, James; Elliot, David; Lalonde, Donald H; Sandow, Michael; Vögelin, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Hand surgeons continue to search for the best surgical flexor tendon repair and treatment of the tendon sheaths and pulleys, and they are attempting to establish postoperative regimens that fit diverse clinical needs. It is the purpose of this report to present the current views, methods, and suggestions of six senior hand surgeons from six different countries - all experienced in tendon repair and reconstruction. Although certainly there is common ground, the report presents provocative views and approaches. The report reflects an update in the views of the committee. We hope that it is helpful to surgeons and therapists in treating flexor tendon injuries. PMID:23962872

  8. Delayed reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon.

    PubMed

    Pocock, C A J; Trikha, S P; Bell, J S P

    2008-01-01

    Rupture of the quadriceps tendon is an uncommon injury and rapid diagnosis is important because delay in surgical repair generally is believed to adversely affect outcome. One study of 20 patients suggests repair should be done during the first 48 to 72 hours postinjury to achieve a successful outcome and late repair led to unsatisfactory recovery. Cases of delayed tendon repair have been reported, the longest to our knowledge being 11 months before surgical intervention. We present a case of successful outcome of a quadriceps tendon rupture reconstructed at least 8 years after occurrence and a review of the literature of delayed reconstructions. We show that successful restoration of extensor mechanism function can be achieved several years after tendon rupture.

  9. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  10. Glycosaminoglycans in Tendon Physiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Sorushanova, Anna; Lomas, Alex J; Mullen, Anne Maria; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-07-15

    Although glycosaminoglycans constitute a minor portion of native tissues, they play a crucial role in various physiological processes, while their abnormal expression is associated with numerous pathophysiologies. Glycosaminoglycans have become increasingly prevalent in biomaterial design for tendon repair, given their low immunogenicity and their inherent capacity to stimulate the regenerative processes, while maintaining resident cell phenotype and function. Further, their incorporation into three-dimensional scaffold conformations significantly improves their mechanical properties, while reducing the formation of peritendinous adhesions. Herein, we discuss the role of glycosaminoglycans in tendon physiology and pathophysiology and the advancements achieved to date using glycosaminoglycan-functionalized scaffolds for tendon repair and regeneration. It is evidenced that glycosaminoglycan functionalization has led to many improvements in tendon tissue engineering and it is anticipated to play a pivotal role in future reparative therapies.

  11. Position Control of Tendon-Driven Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E.; Platt, Robert, Jr.; Hargrave, B.; Pementer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, tendon-driven manipulators implement some force control scheme based on tension feedback. This feedback allows the system to ensure that the tendons are maintained taut with proper levels of tensioning at all times. Occasionally, whether it is due to the lack of tension feedback or the inability to implement sufficiently high stiffnesses, a position control scheme is needed. This work compares three position controllers for tendon-driven manipulators. A new controller is introduced that achieves the best overall performance with regards to speed, accuracy, and transient behavior. To compensate for the lack of tension feedback, the controller nominally maintains the internal tension on the tendons by implementing a two-tier architecture with a range-space constraint. These control laws are validated experimentally on the Robonaut-2 humanoid hand. I

  12. Regional adaptations in three rat tendons.

    PubMed

    Covizi, D Z; Felisbino, S L; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R; Carvalho, H F

    2001-10-01

    Although detailed histological and immunocytochemical studies have been published for the rat calcanear tendon (CT), little is known of the structure, composition and biomechanics of the deep (DFT) and superficial (SFT) flexor tendons. In this study, we examined the structural specialization of these three tendons in 90-day-old rats by applying histochemical and biochemical assays to different tendon regions (proximal, intermediate and distal regions of the DFT and SFT, and proximal and distal regions of the CT). There were regional differences in tissue structure, glycosaminoglycan type and content, swelling properties and in the amount and distribution of elastic fibers. Dermatan sulfate occurred in all regions, but chondroitin sulfate predominated in the intermediate region of the DFT and in the distal region of the CT. These two chondroitin sulfate-bearing regions showed swelling in water, while all other regions lost fluid in water. Fibrocartilaginous sites were observed on the CT, one at the insertion to the bone and another distally at the innermost area of the tendon. The intermediate region of the DFT showed round cells disposed in lacunae, while the proximal and distal regions were typically fibrous. The intermediate region of the SFT showed a wavy array of collagen bundles but neither toluidine blue staining in the matrix nor round cells. Elastic fibers were present in each region of the three tendons, but were more prominent in the intermediate zone of the SFT. These results demonstrate regional variation in the three tendons. Tendon differentiation may occur by an increase in the number of elastic fibers and by variations in the arrangement of collagen fibers, without fibrocartilage formation.

  13. [Tendinosis and ruptures of the Achilles tendon].

    PubMed

    Amlang, M H; Zwipp, H

    2012-02-01

    Tendinosis of the Achilles tendon is a degenerative-reparative structural change of the tendon with microdefects, increases in cross-section due to cicatricial tendon regeneration, neoangiogenesis and reduction of elasticity. The previously used term tendinitis is only rarely used for the chronic form since signs of inflammation such as redness and hyperthermia or elevated levels of inflammatory parameters on laboratory testing are generally absent. Duplex sonography with visualization of the neovascularization has become a valuable supplement not only for diagnostics but also for therapy planning. The classic, conservative therapy for painful tendinosis consists of oral anti-inflammatory drugs, pain-adapted load reduction, raising the heel, stretching the calf musculature, and various physiotherapeutic interventions. When conservative treatment over a period of 4 - 6 months fails to produce any or non-adequate pain relief, an indication for surgical treatment should be considered. In the therapy for fresh ruptures of the Achilles tendon further developments in minimally invasive techniques have led to a worldwide paradigm change over the past 10 years. The decisive advantage of minimally invasive surgical techniques is the lower risk of wound infection as compared to the sutures of the open technique. When compared with conservative functional therapy the minimally invasive repair has the advantage of being less dependent on the compliance of the patient since, in the early phase of tendon healing the suture prevents a separation of the tendon ends upon controlled movements. However, not every patient with a ruptured Achilles tendon should be treated with a minimally invasive repair. Open tendon reconstruction and functional conservative therapy are still justified when the correct indication is given. PMID:22344862

  14. [Bilateral rupture of the quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Modrego, Francisco J; Molina, Juan

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneous, bilateral, and spontaneous rupture of the quadriceps tendon is a very rare injury. Individuals with this injury are usually predisposed by chronic renal disease with secondary hyperparathyroidism, gout, diabetes, and lupus erythematosus. Often, primary diagnostic confusion can lead to a delay in treatment. Two cases of a bilateral lesion of the quadriceps tendon, that were treated surgically using the technique of Scuderi, followed by an intense rehabilitation programme, are presented. Surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  15. A biomechanical assessment of tendon repair after radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Lisa M; Leek, Bryan T; Chase, Derek C; Healey, Robert M; Linn, Michael S; Tasto, James P; Amiel, David

    2012-09-01

    After acute tendon injury, rapid mobilization prevents adhesions and improves the ultimate strength of the repair. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation is proposed to enhance angiogenesis in the early stages of healing. The mechanism and effect of RF have not yet been described in an animal model of tendon injury. To investigate the biomechanical effect of bipolar RF on acute injury in a rabbit model of partial Achilles tendon transection and suture repair, RF-treated tendon repairs were compared to untreated tendons. Cross-sectional area, Young's modulus, and ultimate tensile strength were determined. At 6 and 12 weeks after repair, RF-treated tendons had significant increases in cross-sectional area (P<.001; P< .0001) and ultimate tensile strength (P<.0001; P<.01). Young modulus of RF-treated tendons was increased at 6 weeks but not at 12 weeks (P<.01) Compared with untreated tendons, RF-treated tendons showed faster return to mechanical integrity. This may allow earlier rehabilitation.

  16. Tension Distribution in a Tendon-Driven Robotic Finger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Wampler, II, Charles W. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method is provided for distributing tension among tendons of a tendon-driven finger in a robotic system, wherein the finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons. The method includes determining a maximum functional tension and a minimum functional tension of each tendon of the finger, and then using a controller to distribute tension among the tendons, such that each tendon is assigned a tension value less than the maximum functional tension and greater than or equal to the minimum functional tension. The method satisfies the minimum functional tension while minimizing the internal tension in the robotic system, and satisfies the maximum functional tension without introducing a coupled disturbance to the joint torques. A robotic system includes a robot having at least one tendon-driven finger characterized by n degrees of freedom and n+1 tendons, and a controller having an algorithm for controlling the tendons as set forth above.

  17. Grasp Assist Device with Shared Tendon Actuator Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Bergelin, Bryan J. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A grasp assist device includes a glove with first and second tendon-driven fingers, a tendon, and a sleeve with a shared tendon actuator assembly. Tendon ends are connected to the respective first and second fingers. The actuator assembly includes a drive assembly having a drive axis and a tendon hook. The tendon hook, which defines an arcuate surface slot, is linearly translatable along the drive axis via the drive assembly, e.g., a servo motor thereof. The flexible tendon is routed through the surface slot such that the surface slot divides the flexible tendon into two portions each terminating in a respective one of the first and second ends. The drive assembly may include a ball screw and nut. An end cap of the actuator assembly may define two channels through which the respective tendon portions pass. The servo motor may be positioned off-axis with respect to the drive axis.

  18. In vivo identity of tendon stem cells and the roles of stem cells in tendon healing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qi; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the spatial distribution of stem cells in tendons and the roles of stem cells in early tendon repair. The relationship between tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) isolated in vitro and tendon stem cells in vivo was also explored. Iododeoxyuridine (IdU) label-retaining method was used for labeling stem cells in rat patellar tendons with and without injury. Co-localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs) with different markers was done by immunofluorescent staining. TDSCs were isolated from patellar tendon mid-substance after IdU pulsing, and the expression of different markers in fresh and expanded cells was done by immunofluorescent staining. More LRCs were found at the peritenon and tendon-bone junction compared with the mid-substance. Some LRCs at the peritenon were located at the perivascular niche. The LRC number and the expression of proliferative, tendon-related, pluripotency, and pericyte-related markers in LRCs in the window wound increased. Most of the freshly isolated TDSCs expressed IdU, and some TDSCs expressed pericyte-related markers, which were lost during expansion. Both freshly isolated and subcultured TDSCs expressed pluripotency markers, which were absent in LRCs in intact tendons. In conclusion, we identified LRCs at the peritenon, mid-substance, and tendon-bone junction. There were both vascular and non-vascular sources of LRCs at the peritenon, while the source of LRCs at the mid-substance was non-vascular. LRCs participated in tendon repair via migration, proliferation, activation for tenogenesis, and increased pluripotency. Some LRCs in the window wound were pericyte like. Most of the mid-substance TDSCs were LRCs. The pluripotency markers and pericyte-related marker in LRCs might be important for function after injury.

  19. Microstructural stress relaxation mechanics in functionally different tendons.

    PubMed

    Screen, H R C; Toorani, S; Shelton, J C

    2013-01-01

    Tendons experience widely varying loading conditions in vivo. They may be categorised by their function as either positional tendons, which are used for intricate movements and experience lower stress, or as energy storage tendons which act as highly stressed springs during locomotion. Structural and compositional differences between tendons are thought to enable an optimisation of their properties to suit their functional environment. However, little is known about structure-function relationships in tendon. This study adopts porcine flexor and extensor tendon fascicles as examples of high stress and low stress tendons, comparing their mechanical behaviour at the micro-level in order to understand their stress relaxation response. Stress-relaxation was shown to occur predominantly through sliding between collagen fibres. However, in the more highly stressed flexor tendon fascicles, more fibre reorganisation was evident when the tissue was exposed to low strains. By contrast, the low load extensor tendon fascicles appears to have less capacity for fibre reorganisation or shearing than the energy storage tendon, relying more heavily on fibril level relaxation. The extensor fascicles were also unable to sustain loads without rapid and complete stress relaxation. These findings highlight the need to optimise tendon repair solutions for specific tendons, and match tendon properties when using grafts in tendon repairs.

  20. Arthroscopic quadriceps tendon repair: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury.

  1. Laminar Tendon Composites with Enhanced Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Kyle A.; Sun, Jeong-Yun; Illeperuma, Widusha R.; Suo, Zhigang; Xu, Qiaobing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A strong isotropic material that is both biocompatible and biodegradable is desired for many biomedical applications, including rotator cuff repair, tendon and ligament repair, vascular grafting, among others. Recently, we developed a technique, called “bioskiving” to create novel 2D and 3D constructs from decellularized tendon, using a combination of mechanical sectioning, and layered stacking and rolling. The unidirectionally aligned collagen nanofibers (derived from sections of decellularized tendon) offer good mechanical properties to the constructs compared with those fabricated from reconstituted collagen. Methods In this paper, we studied the effect that several variables have on the mechanical properties of structures fabricated from tendon slices, including crosslinking density and the orientation in which the fibers are stacked. Results We observed that following stacking and crosslinking, the strength of the constructs is significantly improved, with crosslinked sections having an ultimate tens ile strength over 20 times greater than non-crosslinked samples, and a modulus nearly 50 times higher. The mechanism of the mechanical failure mode of the tendon constructs with or without crosslinking was also investigated. Conclusions The strength and fiber organization, combined with the ability to introduce transversely isotropic mechanical properties makes the laminar tendon composites a biocompatiable material that may find future use in a number of biomedical and tissue engineering applications. PMID:25691802

  2. The cell biology of suturing tendons.

    PubMed

    Wong, J K F; Alyouha, S; Kadler, K E; Ferguson, M W J; McGrouther, D A

    2010-07-01

    Trauma by suturing tendon form areas devoid of cells termed "acellular zones" in the matrix. This study aimed to characterise the cellular insult of suturing and acellular zone formation in mouse tendon. Acellular zone formation was evaluated using single grasping sutures placed using flexor tendons with time lapse cell viability imaging for a period of 12h. Both tension and injury were required to induce cell death and cell movement in the formation of the acellular zone. DNA fragmentation studies and transmission electron microscopy indicated that cells necrosed. Parallel in vivo studies showed that cell-to-cell contacts were disrupted following grasping by the suture in tensioned tendon. Without tension, cell death was lessened and cell-to-cell contacts remained intact. Quantitative immunohistochemistry and 3D cellular profile mapping of wound healing markers over a one year time course showed that acellular zones arise rapidly and showed no evidence of healing whilst the wound healing response occurred in the surrounding tissues. The acellular zones were also evident in a standard modified "Kessler" clinical repair. In conclusion, the suture repair of injured tendons produces acellular zones, which may potentially cause early tendon failure. PMID:20600895

  3. Arthroscopic Quadriceps Tendon Repair: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidetomo; Shimada, Yoichi; Yamamura, Toshiaki; Yamada, Shin; Sato, Takahiro; Nozaka, Koji; Kijima, Hiroaki; Saito, Kimio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, although some studies of open repair of the tendon of the quadriceps femoris have been published, there have been no reports in the literature on primary arthroscopic repair. In our present study, we present two cases of quadriceps tendon injury arthroscopically repaired with excellent results. Case 1 involved a 68-year-old man who was injured while shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed complete rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using both suture anchor and pull-out suture fixation methods via bone tunnels (hereafter, pull-out fixation). Two years after surgery, retearing was not observed on MRI and both Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) Knee and Lysholm scores had recovered to 100. Case 2 involved a 50-year-old man who was also injured when shifting his weight to prevent a fall. MRI showed incomplete superficial rupture at the insertion of the patella of the quadriceps tendon. The rupture was arthroscopically repaired using pull-out fixation of six strand sutures. One year after surgery, MRI revealed a healed tendon and his JOA and Lysholm scores were 95 and 100, respectively. Thus, arthroscopic repair may be a useful surgical method for repairing quadriceps tendon injury. PMID:25815224

  4. Biochemical and anisotropical properties of tendons.

    PubMed

    Aparecida de Aro, Andrea; Vidal, Benedicto de Campos; Pimentel, Edson Rosa

    2012-02-01

    Tendons are formed by dense connective tissue composed of an abundant extracellular matrix (ECM) that is constituted mainly of collagen molecules, which are organized into fibrils, fibers, fiber bundles and fascicles helicoidally arranged along the largest axis of the tendon. The biomechanical properties of tendons are directly related to the organization of the collagen molecules that aggregate to become a super-twisted cord. In addition to collagen, the ECM of tendons is composed of non-fibrillar components, such as proteoglycans and non-collagenous glycoproteins. The capacity of tendons to resist mechanical stress is directly related to the structural organization of the ECM. Collagen is a biopolymer and presents optical anisotropies, such as birefringence and linear dichroism, that are important optical properties in the characterization of the supramolecular organization of the fibers. The objective of this study was to present a review of the composition and organization of the ECM of tendons and to highlight the importance of the anisotropic optical properties in the study of alterations in the ECM.

  5. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon Transfer and Modified Kidner Technique in Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Maskill, James T; Pomeroy, Gregory C

    2016-01-01

    The modified Kidner procedure and flexor digitorum longus tendon transfer are common procedures used today when addressing posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. These techniques are often used in conjunction with a combination of osteotomies to correct flatfoot deformity, and have been proved to be reliable and predictable. PMID:26590720

  6. The effect of decellularized matrices on human tendon stem/progenitor cell differentiation and tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zi; Chen, Xiao; Zhu, Ting; Hu, Jia-jie; Song, Hai-xin; Shen, Wei-liang; Jiang, Liu-yun; Heng, Boon Chin; Ji, Jun-feng; Ouyang, Hong-Wei

    2013-12-01

    It is reported that decellularized collagen matrices derived from dermal skin and bone have been clinically used for tendon repair. However, the varying biological and physical properties of matrices originating from different tissues may influence the differentiation of tendon stem cells, which has not been systematically evaluated. In this study, the effects of collagenous matrices derived from different tissues (tendon, bone and dermis) on the cell differentiation of human tendon stem/progenitor cells (hTSPCs) were investigated, in the context of tendon repair. It was found that all three matrices supported the adhesion and proliferation of hTSPCs despite differences in topography. Interestingly, tendon-derived decellularized matrix promoted the tendinous phenotype in hTSPCs and inhibited their osteogenesis, even under osteogenic induction conditions, through modulation of the teno- and osteolineage-specific transcription factors Scleraxis and Runx2. Bone-derived decellularized matrix robustly induced osteogenic differentiation of hTSPCs, whereas dermal skin-derived collagen matrix had no apparent effect on hTSPC differentiation. Based on the specific biological function of the tendon-derived decellularized matrix, a tissue-engineered tendon comprising TSPCs and tendon-derived matrix was successfully fabricated for Achilles tendon reconstruction. Implantation of this cell-scaffold construct led to a more mature structure (histology score: 4.08 ± 0.61 vs. 8.51 ± 1.66), larger collagen fibrils (52.2 ± 1.6 nm vs. 47.5 ± 2.8 nm) and stronger mechanical properties (stiffness: 21.68 ± 7.1 Nm m(-1) vs.13.2 ± 5.9 Nm m(-1)) of repaired tendons compared to the control group. The results suggest that stem cells promote the rate of repair of Achilles tendon in the presence of a tendinous matrix. This study thus highlights the potential of decellularized matrix for future tissue engineering applications, as well as developing a practical strategy for functional tendon

  7. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    PubMed

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P < 0.01) however, the suspensory branches were not (P = 0.67). Findings supported future clinical application of elastography as a noninvasive "stall-side" imaging modality for evaluation of the tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses.

  8. The effect of tendon surface treatment on cell attachment for potential enhancement of tendon graft healing: an ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takahiro; Sun, Yu-Long; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-12-01

    For both tendon allografts and autografts, the surface, initially optimized for gliding, may not be ideal to facilitate tissue integration for graft healing to host tendon or bone. As a prelude to studying tendon-bone integration, we investigated the effect of surface treatments with trypsin or mechanical abrasion on cell attachment to the tendon surface in a canine ex vivo intrasynovial tendon tissue culture model. Intrasynovial tendon allograft surfaces were seeded with cells after the following treatments: (1) no treatment, (2) mechanical abrasion, (3) trypsin, and (4) abrasion and trypsin. The area covered by cells was determined using confocal laser microscopy at one and two weeks. Results were compared to untreated extrasynovial tendon. Additional tendons were characterized with scanning electron microscopy. Tendons with trypsin treatment had significantly more surface coverage with cells than the other groups, after both one and two weeks of culture. In terms of the cellular shape and size, cells on tendons with trypsin treatment spread more and were more polygonal in shape, whereas tendons with mechanical abrasion with/without trypsin treatment contained smaller, more spindle-like cells. Surface roughening can affect cell behavior with topographical stimulation. Trypsin surface digestion exposes a mesh-like structure on the tendon surface, which could enhance cell adherence and, possibly, tendon/bone healing.

  9. Nutritional research may be useful in treating tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Luke

    2016-06-01

    Tendon injures cause a great deal of disability and pain, and increase medical costs. However, relatively little is known about tendon biology and healing. Many tendon-related surgical procedures are not very successful and leave the patient with essentially a chronic injury. New therapeutic approaches for tendon injury are needed. Preliminary evidence suggests that various nutrients such as proteins, amino acids (leucine, arginine, glutamine), vitamins C and D, manganese, copper, zinc, and phytochemicals may be useful in improving tendon growth and healing. More research on nutrition and tendon health is needed. Because many nutrients are required for tendon health, nutritional interventions involving multiple nutrients may be more effective than single-nutrient strategies. In the future, ideal treatment regimens for tendon injuries may include a multifaceted "bundle" of nutrition, drugs, biologic products, extracellular matrix therapies, exercise/physical therapy, and possibly surgery. PMID:26921066

  10. A histological study of macroscopically normal equine digital flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Webbon, P M

    1978-10-01

    The normal appearance of the superficial (SFT) and deep (DFT) digital flexor tendons was described and the difference between their histological structures was emphasised. Further differences were recognised between different sites from the same tendon and between tendons in the fore and hind limbs of the same animal. Both of the tendons underwent changes with age but although a number of alterations in the histological appearance were described, a particular change, involving a patchy loss of stainable nuclei, was found at the common site of SFT injuries. While this appearance has been seen in injured tendons and described as tendon necrosis, the author warns that no cause and effect relationship has been established between the acellularity and the clinical lesions. Neither is it certain that the loss of tendon cells results in mechanical weakness of the tendon.

  11. Nutritional research may be useful in treating tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Luke

    2016-06-01

    Tendon injures cause a great deal of disability and pain, and increase medical costs. However, relatively little is known about tendon biology and healing. Many tendon-related surgical procedures are not very successful and leave the patient with essentially a chronic injury. New therapeutic approaches for tendon injury are needed. Preliminary evidence suggests that various nutrients such as proteins, amino acids (leucine, arginine, glutamine), vitamins C and D, manganese, copper, zinc, and phytochemicals may be useful in improving tendon growth and healing. More research on nutrition and tendon health is needed. Because many nutrients are required for tendon health, nutritional interventions involving multiple nutrients may be more effective than single-nutrient strategies. In the future, ideal treatment regimens for tendon injuries may include a multifaceted "bundle" of nutrition, drugs, biologic products, extracellular matrix therapies, exercise/physical therapy, and possibly surgery.

  12. Robot Arm with Tendon Connector Plate and Linear Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor); Nguyen, Vienny (Inventor); Millerman, Alexander (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A robotic system includes a tendon-driven end effector, a linear actuator, a flexible tendon, and a plate assembly. The linear actuator assembly has a servo motor and a drive mechanism, the latter of which translates linearly with respect to a drive axis of the servo motor in response to output torque from the servo motor. The tendon connects to the end effector and drive mechanism. The plate assembly is disposed between the linear actuator assembly and the tendon-driven end effector and includes first and second plates. The first plate has a first side that defines a boss with a center opening. The second plate defines an accurate through-slot having tendon guide channels. The first plate defines a through passage for the tendon between the center opening and a second side of the first plate. A looped end of the flexible tendon is received within the tendon guide channels.

  13. Bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture in a patient with jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J M; Whitaker, J H

    1991-01-01

    This is the fourth case report of bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture as a result of indirect trauma in a patient without systemic disease. This is the only report we have found of jumper's knee leading to simultaneous infrapatellar tendon ruptures.

  14. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B.; Stanton, Tasha R.; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G. Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one’s own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both ‘upward-downward’ and ‘towards-away from the elbow’ planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a ‘telescoping’ effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  15. No Telescoping Effect with Dual Tendon Vibration.

    PubMed

    Bellan, Valeria; Wallwork, Sarah B; Stanton, Tasha R; Reverberi, Carlo; Gallace, Alberto; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2016-01-01

    The tendon vibration illusion has been extensively used to manipulate the perceived position of one's own body part. However, findings from previous research do not seem conclusive sregarding the perceptual effect of the concurrent stimulation of both agonist and antagonist tendons over one joint. On the basis of recent data, it has been suggested that this paired stimulation generates an inconsistent signal about the limb position, which leads to a perceived shrinkage of the limb. However, this interesting effect has never been replicated. The aim of the present study was to clarify the effect of a simultaneous and equal vibration of the biceps and triceps tendons on the perceived location of the hand. Experiment 1 replicated and extended the previous findings. We compared a dual tendon stimulation condition with single tendon stimulation conditions and with a control condition (no vibration) on both 'upward-downward' and 'towards-away from the elbow' planes. Our results show a mislocalisation towards the elbow of the position of the vibrated arm during dual vibration, in line with previous results; however, this did not clarify whether the effect was due to arm representation contraction (i.e., a 'telescoping' effect). Therefore, in Experiment 2 we investigated explicitly and implicitly the perceived arm length during the same conditions. Our results clearly suggest that in all the vibration conditions there was a mislocalisation of the entire arm (including the elbow), but no evidence of a contraction of the perceived arm length. PMID:27305112

  16. Modelling approaches for evaluating multiscale tendon mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Lake, Spencer P

    2016-02-01

    Tendon exhibits anisotropic, inhomogeneous and viscoelastic mechanical properties that are determined by its complicated hierarchical structure and varying amounts/organization of different tissue constituents. Although extensive research has been conducted to use modelling approaches to interpret tendon structure-function relationships in combination with experimental data, many issues remain unclear (i.e. the role of minor components such as decorin, aggrecan and elastin), and the integration of mechanical analysis across different length scales has not been well applied to explore stress or strain transfer from macro- to microscale. This review outlines mathematical and computational models that have been used to understand tendon mechanics at different scales of the hierarchical organization. Model representations at the molecular, fibril and tissue levels are discussed, including formulations that follow phenomenological and microstructural approaches (which include evaluations of crimp, helical structure and the interaction between collagen fibrils and proteoglycans). Multiscale modelling approaches incorporating tendon features are suggested to be an advantageous methodology to understand further the physiological mechanical response of tendon and corresponding adaptation of properties owing to unique in vivo loading environments.

  17. Complications of the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Molloy, Andy; Wood, Edward V

    2009-12-01

    Since the first reports in the medical literature of treatment of the Achilles tendon, complications have been recognized from both non-operative and operative techniques. These include tendon rerupture, sural nerve morbidity, wound healing problems, changes in tendon morphology, venous thromboembolism, elongation of the tendon, complex regional pain syndrome, and compartment syndrome. This article delineates the incidence for each of these complications, with differing techniques, methods of avoiding these complications and treatment methods if they occur. PMID:19857846

  18. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  19. Partial tear of the quadriceps tendon in a child.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, George

    2008-06-01

    We present a case of partial rupture of the quadriceps tendon in an 8-year-old girl. This is one of the youngest patients reported with a quadriceps tendon rupture, an entity seen predominantly in middle-aged people. The strength of the muscle tendon unit in a child makes tendon injuries extremely unusual as compared to apophyseal avulsions. The MR imaging findings of this unusual pediatric injury are illustrated.

  20. Structure-function relationships in tendons: a review

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, M; Kaiser, E; Milz, S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the current review is to highlight the structure-function relationship of tendons and related structures to provide an overview for readers whose interest in tendons needs to be underpinned by anatomy. Because of the availability of several recent reviews on tendon development and entheses, the focus of the current work is primarily directed towards what can best be described as the ‘tendon proper’ or the ‘mid-substance’ of tendons. The review covers all levels of tendon structure from the molecular to the gross and deals both with the extracellular matrix and with tendon cells. The latter are often called ‘tenocytes’ and are increasingly recognized as a defined cell population that is functionally and phenotypically distinct from other fibroblast-like cells. This is illustrated by their response to different types of mechanical stress. However, it is not only tendon cells, but tendons as a whole that exhibit distinct structure-function relationships geared to the changing mechanical stresses to which they are subject. This aspect of tendon biology is considered in some detail. Attention is briefly directed to the blood and nerve supply of tendons, for this is an important issue that relates to the intrinsic healing capacity of tendons. Structures closely related to tendons (joint capsules, tendon sheaths, pulleys, retinacula, fat pads and bursae) are also covered and the concept of a ‘supertendon’ is introduced to describe a collection of tendons in which the function of the whole complex exceeds that of its individual members. Finally, attention is drawn to the important relationship between tendons and fascia, highlighted by Wood Jones in his concept of an ‘ectoskeleton’ over half a century ago – work that is often forgotten today. PMID:18304204

  1. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  5. 21 CFR 888.3025 - Passive tendon prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Passive tendon prosthesis. 888.3025 Section 888...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3025 Passive tendon prosthesis. (a) Identification. A passive tendon prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted made of silicon elastomer or...

  6. Effect of pulley excision on flexor tendon biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, W W; Manske, P R; Bollinger, B A; Lesker, P A; McCarthy, J A

    1986-01-01

    Flexor tendon function following excision of various portions of the fibro-osseous pulley system was measured biomechanically using a tensile testing machine. The biomechanical parameters measured were tendon excursion (the excursion of the tendon required to fully flex the digit) and work of flexion (the area under the force-excursion curve, representing all the forces that resist tendon flexion). In this experiment, work of flexion included the forces necessary to accomplish full digital flexion against a 15-g counter-weight, as well as the frictional forces that resist tendon gliding. The results indicate that the work of flexion was affected to a greater degree by pulley loss than was tendon excursion, suggesting that it is a more sensitive measurement of tendon function. A2 was found to be the single most important pulley for flexor tendon function, followed by A4. However, both A2 and A4 had to be present if near-normal hand function was to be achieved; sacrificing the A1 pulley was not associated with a significant loss of flexion. The "pulley effect" of the skin and soft tissue as a supplement to the fibro-osseous pulleys in reducing tendon bow-stringing was also noted. Although the parameters of tendon excursion and work of flexion were used in this study to determine the effect of pulley loss on tendon function, they can also be used to evaluate other flexor tendon studies, such as pulley reconstruction.

  7. Can Shockwave Therapy Improve Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Zwerver, Johannes; Waugh, Charlotte; van der Worp, Henk; Scott, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Shockwave treatments are commonly used in the management of tendon injuries and there is increasing evidence for its clinical effectiveness. There is a paucity of fundamental (in vivo) studies investigating the biological action of shockwave therapy. Destruction of calcifications, pain relief and mechanotransduction-initiated tissue regeneration and remodeling of the tendon are considered to be the most important working mechanisms. The heterogeneity of systems (focussed shockwave therapy vs. radial pressurewave therapy), treatment protocols and study populations, and the fact that there seem to be responders and non-responders, continue to make it difficult to give firm recommendations with regard to the most optimal shockwave therapy approach. Specific knowledge with regard to the effects of shockwave therapy in patients with metabolic tendon disorders is not available. Further fundamental and clinical research is required to determine the value of shockwave therapy in the management of tendinopathy.

  8. Can Shockwave Therapy Improve Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Zwerver, Johannes; Waugh, Charlotte; van der Worp, Henk; Scott, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Shockwave treatments are commonly used in the management of tendon injuries and there is increasing evidence for its clinical effectiveness. There is a paucity of fundamental (in vivo) studies investigating the biological action of shockwave therapy. Destruction of calcifications, pain relief and mechanotransduction-initiated tissue regeneration and remodeling of the tendon are considered to be the most important working mechanisms. The heterogeneity of systems (focussed shockwave therapy vs. radial pressurewave therapy), treatment protocols and study populations, and the fact that there seem to be responders and non-responders, continue to make it difficult to give firm recommendations with regard to the most optimal shockwave therapy approach. Specific knowledge with regard to the effects of shockwave therapy in patients with metabolic tendon disorders is not available. Further fundamental and clinical research is required to determine the value of shockwave therapy in the management of tendinopathy. PMID:27535269

  9. Influence of Thyroid Hormones on Tendon Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Francesco; Piccirilli, Eleonora; Berardi, Anna C; Tarantino, Umberto; Maffulli, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Tendinopathies have a multifactorial etiology driven by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Recent studies have elucidated the importance of thyroid hormones in the alteration of tendons homeostasis and in the failure of tendon healing after injury. The effects of thyroid hormones are mediated by receptors (TR)-α and -β that seem to be ubiquitous. In particular, T3 and T4 play an antiapoptotic role on tenocytes, causing an increase in vital tenocytes isolated from tendons in vitro and a reduction of apoptotic ones; they are also able to influence extra cellular matrix proteins secretion in vitro from tenocytes, enhancing collagen production. From a clinical point of view, disorders of thyroid function have been investigated only for rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy and tears. In this complex scenario, further research is needed to clarify the role of thyroid hormones on the onset of tendinopathies. PMID:27535255

  10. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  11. An unusual cause of Achilles tendon xanthoma.

    PubMed

    Parente, Fabienne; Vesnaver, Matthew; Massie, Rami; Baass, Alexis

    2016-01-01

    Tendinous xanthomas are often thought to be pathognomonic for familial hypercholesterolemia. In this report, we present the case of a young man with a normal lipid profile and Achilles tendon xanthoma. Biochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis in this patient. Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with xanthoma in tendons and the brain as well as progressive neurologic deficits. Unfortunately, this rare form of reversible dementia is thought to be underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disease with chenodeoxycholic acid is essential and has been shown to greatly improve the patient's symptoms and prognosis. PMID:27578138

  12. Structure-strength relations in mammalian tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Lanir, Y

    1978-01-01

    The stress-strain relations in mammalian tendon are analyzed in terms of the structure and mechanics of its constituents. The model considers the tensile and bending strength of the collagen fibers, the tensile strength of the elastin fibers, and the interaction between the matrix and the collagen fibers. The stress-strain relations are solved through variational considerations by assuming that the fibermaxtrix interactions can be modeled as beam on elastic foundation. The tissue thus modeled is a hyperelastic material. It is further shown that on the basis of the model, the dominant parameters to the tendon's behavior can be evaluated from simple tensile tests. PMID:728528

  13. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Alajoulin, Omar A.; Alsbou, Mohammed S.; Ja’afreh, Somayya O.; Kalbouneh, Heba M.

    2015-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare inborn metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA). Excretion of HGA in urine causes darkening of urine and its deposition in connective tissues causes dark pigmentation (ochronosis), early degeneration of articular cartilage, weakening of the tendons, and subsequent rupture. In this case report, we present a rare case of a patient presented with unilateral spontaneous rupture of Achilles tendon due to AKU. The patient developed most of the orthopedic manifestations of the disease earlier than typical presentations. Alkaptonuria patients should avoid strenuous exercises and foot straining especially in patients developing early orthopedic manifestations. PMID:26620992

  14. [Isolated injury of the subscapular muscle tendon].

    PubMed

    Thielemann, F W; Kley, U; Holz, U

    1992-03-01

    Avulsion of the subscapularis tendon is caused by a combined abduction and external rotation trauma of the upper limb. Weakness of internal rotation and a positive apprehension test are clinical signs of the injury. A fracture of the lesser tuberosity in the x-ray film or a disruption of the subscapularis tendon documented in dynamic sonography of the shoulder clarify the diagnosis. Operative treatment is indicated of prevent weakness of internal rotation as well as anterior instability. This recommendation is supported by four cases with full range of motion and good anterior stability after surgery. PMID:1585252

  15. Tendon ruptures: mallet, flexor digitorum profundus.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Peter C; Shin, Steven S

    2012-08-01

    Mallet injuries are the most common closed tendon injury in the athlete. Flexor digitorum profundus ruptures are rare in baseball, but are common injuries in contact sports. The diagnosis for each condition is based on clinical examination, although radiographs should be evaluated for a possible bony component. Treatment for mallet injury depends on the athlete's goals of competition and understanding of the consequences of any treatment chosen. Gripping, throwing, and catching would be restricted or impossible with the injured finger immobilized. Treatment of FDP ruptures is almost always surgical and requires reattachment of the torn tendon to the distal phalanx.

  16. Lubricin in human achilles tendon: The evidence of intratendinous sliding motion and shear force in achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-Long; Wei, Zhuang; Zhao, Chunfeng; Jay, Gregory D; Schmid, Thomas M; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2015-06-01

    Achilles tendon is one of the most commonly injured tendons. Mechanical force is regarded as a major causative factor. However, the biomechanics of Achilles tendon and mechanical mechanism of the injuries are unclear. Lubricin expresses at regions exposed to sliding motion and shear force in a number of tissues. This study investigated the distribution and concentration of lubricin in human Achilles tendons for better understanding the biomechanics of Achilles tendon. Achilles tendons were harvested from nine cadavers. Lubricin was extracted from various locations proximal to the calcaneal insertion and quantified with ELISA. The distribution of lubricin was investigated with immunohistochemistry. Lubricin was mainly identified at the interfaces of tendon fascicles, especially in the mid-portion of the tendon. The concentration of lubricin in Achilles tendons varied by individual and the distance from its calcaneal insertion. The distal portion of the tendon had a higher concentration of lubricin than the proximal regions of the tendon. This study suggests the presence of intratendinous sliding motion of fascicles and shear force at interfaces of fascicles in human Achilles tendon. Shear force could be an important mechanical factor for the development of Achilles tendinopathy and rupture.

  17. The role of animal models in tendon research

    PubMed Central

    Hast, M. W.; Zuskov, A.; Soslowsky, L. J.

    2014-01-01

    Tendinopathy is a debilitating musculoskeletal condition which can cause significant pain and lead to complete rupture of the tendon, which often requires surgical repair. Due in part to the large spectrum of tendon pathologies, these disorders continue to be a clinical challenge. Animal models are often used in this field of research as they offer an attractive framework to examine the cascade of processes that occur throughout both tendon pathology and repair. This review discusses the structural, mechanical, and biological changes that occur throughout tendon pathology in animal models, as well as strategies for the improvement of tendon healing. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:193–202. PMID:24958818

  18. Is tendon stiffness correlated to the dissipation coefficient?

    PubMed

    Fouré, A; Cornu, C; Nordez, A

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of Achilles tendon mechanical properties in vivo has received much attention in the literature. Many studies investigated mechanical properties by assessing tendon stiffness. Despite tendon dissipative properties being representative of a storage-recoil process, its determination has received minimal attention in the literature. The aim of this study was to determine if Achilles tendon stiffness is associated with dissipative properties. The cross-sectional area, stiffness and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured in 35 subjects. No significant correlation was found between stiffness and the dissipation coefficient, irrespective of stiffness normalization with cross-sectional area (P > 0.05). Thus, it appears that both stiffness and dissipative properties must be assessed to determine the storage-recoil process capacities of the Achilles tendon in order to precisely characterize changes in the tendon mechanical properties after chronic interventions or rehabilitation programs.

  19. Transosseous-Equivalent Repair for Distal Patellar Tendon Avulsion.

    PubMed

    Galos, David K; Konda, Sanjit R; Kaplan, Daniel J; Ryan, William E; Alaia, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Extensor mechanism disruptions are relatively uncommon injuries involving injury to the quadriceps tendon, patella, or patellar tendon. Patellar tendon avulsions from the tibial tubercle in adults are rare; as such, little technical information has been written regarding surgical management of this injury in the adult. Transosseous-equivalent repairs have been described in the management of several types of tendon ruptures, including rotator cuff and distal triceps tendon ruptures, but not previously in patellar injuries. We present a technique for repairing an avulsion injury of the patellar tendon from the tibial tubercle using suture anchors in a transosseous-equivalent manner. This technique for treating distal patellar tendon avulsion injuries likely increases contact area at the repair site while potentially improving fixation strength. PMID:27462538

  20. Plyometric training effects on Achilles tendon stiffness and dissipative properties.

    PubMed

    Fouré, Alexandre; Nordez, Antoine; Cornu, Christophe

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 14 wk of plyometric training on mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon. Nineteen subjects were randomly assigned to trained or control group. Cross-sectional area (CSA), stiffness, and dissipation coefficient of the Achilles tendon were measured before and after the training period. In the trained group, a decrease in dissipation coefficient (-35.0%; P<0.05) and an upward trend in stiffness (+24.1%) of the Achilles tendon was found, without any changes in Achilles tendon CSA (P>0.05). Plyometric training enhances the muscular tension transmission mainly through a reduction in energy dissipated by the tendon. The lack of changes in the Achilles tendon CSA indicates that changes in mechanical properties would mainly result from a qualitative change in tendinous tissues rather than from changes in the geometry of the Achilles tendon.

  1. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  2. Abductor pollicis longus tendon division with swan neck thumb deformity.

    PubMed

    Zacharia, Balaji; Puthezhath, Kishore

    2012-08-01

    Swan neck thumb deformity can be caused by osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, tendon transfers and paralytic diseases. Abductor pollicis longus is one of the major stabilizing tendon of the carpometacarpal joint of thumb. To the best of our knowledge, swan neck thumb deformity owing to division of abductor pollicis longus tendon is rare. In this article, we describe a case of isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon presenting with swan-neck deformity of thumb and discuss the mechanism, management and outcome. The patient was treated by repair of the divided tendon using palmaris longus tendon graft. At approximately 107 weeks following treatment, the patient was having full range of thumb movement and the deformity completely disappeared. We also describe the unusual mechanism whereby an isolated division of abductor pollicis longus tendon results in swan neck thumb deformity. Level of clinical evidence IV. PMID:22825877

  3. Flexor digitorum profundus tendon tension during finger manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tatsuro; Amadio, Peter C; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; An, Kai-Nan

    2005-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to measure the tension in the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendon in zone II and the digit angle during joint manipulations that replicate rehabilitation protocols. Eight FDP tendons from eight human cadavers were used in this study. The dynamic tension in zone II of the tendon and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint angle were measured in various wrist and digit positions. Tension in the FDP tendon increased with MCP joint extension. There was no tension with the finger fully flexed and wrist extended (synergistic motion), but the tendon force reached 1.77 +/- 0.43 N with the MCP joint hyperextended 45 degrees with the distal interphalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints flexed. The combination of wrist extension and MCP joint hyperextension with the distal interphalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints fully flexed, what the authors term "modified synergistic motion," produced a modest tendon tension and may be a useful alternative configuration to normal synergistic motion in tendon rehabilitation.

  4. Anatomical heterogeneity of tendon: Fascicular and interfascicular tendon compartments have distinct proteomic composition

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Peffers, Mandy J.; Simpson, Deborah; Halliwell, Elizabeth; Screen, Hazel R. C.; Clegg, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is a simple aligned fibre composite, consisting of collagen-rich fascicles surrounded by a softer interfascicular matrix (IFM). The composition and interactions between these material phases are fundamental in ensuring tissue mechanics meet functional requirements. However the IFM is poorly defined, therefore tendon structure-function relationships are incompletely understood. We hypothesised that the IFM has a more complex proteome, with faster turnover than the fascicular matrix (FM). Using laser-capture microdissection and mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that the IFM contains more proteins, and that many proteins show differential abundance between matrix phases. The IFM contained more protein fragments (neopeptides), indicating greater matrix degradation in this compartment, which may act to maintain healthy tendon structure. Protein abundance did not alter with ageing, but neopeptide numbers decreased in the aged IFM, indicating decreased turnover which may contribute to age-related tendon injury. These data provide important insights into how differences in tendon composition and turnover contribute to tendon structure-function relationships and the effects of ageing. PMID:26842662

  5. Simultaneous reconstruction of quadriceps tendon rupture after TKA and neglected Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Min, Byoung-Hyun; Han, Kyeong-Jin; Cho, Jae Ho; Han, Seung Hwan; Lee, Doo-Hyung; Oh, Kyung Soo

    2010-05-12

    We report a case of simultaneous reconstruction of a quadriceps tendon rupture after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and neglected Achilles tendon rupture, which occurred before TKA with an ipsilateral hamstring autograft. A 64-year-old woman presented with persistent right knee pain. She also had right heel pain and had received multiple steroid injections at the knee joint and heel. On examination, she showed osteoarthritis in the medial and lateral compartments of the knee joint and an Achilles tendon rupture in the ipsilateral limb. There was skin dimpling and the proximal portion of tendon was migrated. We performed TKA, and the postoperative course was satisfactory. She returned 3 months postoperatively, however, with skin dimpling around the suprapatellar area and weakness of knee extension. Her ankle symptoms were also aggravated because she could not use the knee joint freely. We performed simultaneous reconstruction of the quadriceps tendon and the Achilles tendon using an ipsilateral hamstring autograft.Hamstring autograft offers a good alternative treatment option for rupture repair, particularly with concommitant ruptures of multiple sites when primary repair is not possible or the viability of repaired tissue is poor.

  6. Cadaveric limb analysis of tendon length discrepancy of posterior tibial tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Alexander J; Haffner, Kyle E; Mendicino, Samuel S

    2013-01-01

    The posterior tibial tendon transfer through the interosseous membrane, as popularized by Watkins in 1954, is a procedure for treating reducible eversion and dorsiflexory paresis used by lower extremity foot and ankle surgeons. The posterior tibial tendon has been transferred to various locations on the midfoot for equinus and equinovarus deformities. Dorsiflexory paresis is a common symptom in equinovarus deformity, clubfoot deformity, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, leprosy, mononeuropathy, trauma to the common peroneal nerve, cerebrovascular accident, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The main difficulty with this procedure, often discussed by surgeons, is inadequate tendon length, making anchoring to the cuneiforms or cuboid difficult. The goal of our cadaveric study was threefold. First, we sought to determine whether the tendon length is sufficient when transferring the posterior tibial tendon to the dorsum of the foot through the interosseous membrane for a dynamic or a static transfer. Second, we wished to describe the surgical technique designed to obtain the maximal length. Finally, we sought to discuss the strategies used when the tendon length for transfer is insufficient. PMID:23369302

  7. Minimally Invasive Approach to Achilles Tendon Pathology.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Kenneth W; Doyle, Matthew D; Todd, Nicholas W; Rush, Shannon M

    2016-01-01

    Many surgical procedures have been described for Achilles tendon pathology; however, no overwhelming consensus has been reached for surgical treatment. Open repair using a central or paramedian incision allows excellent visualization for end-to-end anastomosis in the case of a complete rupture and detachment and reattachment for insertional pathologies. Postoperative wound dehiscence and infection in the Achilles tendon have considerable deleterious effects on overall functional recovery and outcome and sometimes require plastic surgery techniques to achieve coverage. With the aim of avoiding such complications, foot and ankle surgeons have studied less invasive techniques for repair. We describe a percutaneous approach to Achilles tendinopathy using a modification of the Bunnell suture weave technique combined with the use of interference screws. No direct end-to-end repair of the tendon is performed, rather, the proximal stump is brought in direct proximity of the distal stump, preventing overlengthening and proximal stump retraction. This technique also reduces the suture creep often seen with end-to-end tendon repair by providing a direct, rigid suture to bone interface. We have used the new technique to minimize dissection and exposure while restoring function and accelerating recovery postoperatively. PMID:26385574

  8. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  9. Tendon fatigue in response to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Andarawis-Puri, N.; Flatow, E. L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are commonly attributable to accumulation of sub-rupture fatigue damage from repetitive use. Data is limited to late stage disease from patients undergoing surgery, motivating development of animal models, such as ones utilizing treadmill running or repetitive reaching, to investigate the progression of tendinopathies. We developed an in vivo model using the rat patellar tendon that allows control of the loading directly applied to the tendon. This manuscript discusses the response of tendons to fatigue loading and applications of our model. Briefly, the fatigue life of the tendon was used to define low, moderate and high levels of fatigue loading. Morphological assessment showed a progression from mild kinks to fiber disruption, for low to high level fatigue loading. Collagen expression, 1 and 3 days post loading, showed more modest changes for low and moderate than high level fatigue loading. Protein and mRNA expression of Ineterleukin-1β and MMP-13 were upregulated for moderate but not low level fatigue loading. Moderate level (7200 cycles) and 100 cycles of fatigue loading resulted in a catabolic and anabolic molecular profile respectively, at both 1 and 7 days post loading. Results suggest unique mechanisms for different levels of fatigue loading that are distinct from laceration. PMID:21625047

  10. Anatomic variation of the 5th extensor tendon compartment and extensor digiti minimi tendon.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshikazu; Moran, Steven L; Zhao, Chunfeng; Zobitz, Mark E; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2007-08-01

    Anatomic variation within the 5th extensor compartment may contribute to the development of tenosynovitis and limit the usefulness of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) for tendon transfer. The purpose of this study was to assess the anatomic variation of the EDM tendon and its surrounding retinaculum, with particular attention to anatomical variation between specimens. Forty-one fresh cadaver hands were dissected. The length of the 5th compartment retinaculum was noted. The incidence of an intercompartmental septum was noted in each specimen as well as the type of tendinous attachments present between the EDM and extensor digitorum communis (EDC) tendons. The presence and length of any accessory retinacular bands distal to the edge of proper extensor retinaculum was also noted. Only one specimen contained a single EDM tendon, while 71% (n = 29) of specimens contained two slips and 23% (n = 9) had three slips; 24% (n = 10) of EDC tendons had no slip to the small finger, while 61% (n = 25) of specimens had a single slip to the small finger. The EDC's contribution to the small finger was found to be an independent tendon in 42% of cases (n = 17), while 34% (n = 14) of specimens were found to have a common EDC slip, which branched to both the ring and small finger. Three EDM tendons divided distal to the extensor retinaculum, while the remaining EDM tendons divided beneath or proximal to the extensor retinaculum. Seventy-three percent (n = 30) of the specimens had an accessory retinacular band surrounding the EDM tendon identified at the base of the 5th metacarpal. Eighty-eight percent (n = 36) of hands had a septum between the EDM slips. The surgeon should be aware of variability within the 5th dorsal compartment in cases of trauma and in cases of tendon transfer. In our series 30 of 41 specimens were noted to contain an accessory dorsal retinacular band surrounding the EDM and 36 specimens were noted to contain a septum within the 5th compartment. The presence of an

  11. Accessory bands of the hamstring tendons: A clinical anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Yasin, M N; Charalambous, C P; Mills, S P; Phaltankar, P M

    2010-10-01

    Gracilis and semitendinosus tendons are commonly used as grafts in ligamentous reconstruction. Awareness of accessory bands of these tendons is essential in preventing inadvertent diversion of the tendon harvester into the main tendon resulting in premature tendon amputation and inadequate tendon graft. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of these accessory bands. Twenty five patients undergoing arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using hamstring tendons were included. The number of accessory bands and distance of the most proximal band from the distal periosteal insertion point on the tibial crest was recorded for both gracilis and semitendinosus. In most cases gracilis had two accessory bands; the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 5.1 cm. Semitendinosus had three bands in most cases, the average distance of the most proximal band from the tibial crest insertion being 8.1 cm. Five (20%) semitendinosus but no gracilis tendons had an accessory band originating greater than 10 cm from the tibial crest insertion. Semitendinosus had more accessory bands compared to gracilis. A significant proportion (20%) of semitendinosus and none of the gracilis tendons had bands originating greater than 10 cm proximal to the tibial crest insertion. This knowledge about the accessory bands of the hamstrings can guide toward safe harvesting of these tendons.

  12. Decellularized and Engineered Tendons as Biological Substitutes: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Lovati, Arianna B.; Bottagisio, Marta; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are a great burden in clinics. Finding a proper graft material as a substitute for tendon repair is one of the main challenges in orthopaedics, for which the requirement of a biological scaffold would be different for each clinical application. Among biological scaffolds, the use of decellularized tendon-derived matrix increasingly represents an interesting approach to treat tendon ruptures. We analyzed in vitro and in vivo studies focused on the development of efficient protocols for the decellularization and for the cell reseeding of the tendon matrix to obtain medical devices for tendon substitution. Our review considered also the proper tendon source and preclinical animal models with the aim of entering into clinical trials. The results highlight a wide panorama in terms of allogenic or xenogeneic tendon sources, specimen dimensions, physical or chemical decellularization techniques, and the cell type variety for reseeding from terminally differentiated to undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells and their static or dynamic culture employed to generate implantable constructs tested in different animal models. We try to identify the most efficient approach to achieve an optimal biological scaffold for biomechanics and intrinsic properties, resembling the native tendon and being applicable in clinics in the near future, with particular attention to the Achilles tendon substitution. PMID:26880985

  13. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-07-08

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages.

  14. A new strategy for the decellularisation of large equine tendons as biocompatible tendon substitutes.

    PubMed

    Bottagisio, M; Pellegata, A F; Boschetti, F; Ferroni, M; Moretti, M; Lovati, A B

    2016-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and/or large losses remain to be a great clinical challenge and often require full replacement of the damaged tissue. The use of auto- and allografts or engineered scaffolds is an established approach to restore severe tendon injuries. However, these grafts are commonly related to scarce biocompatibility, site morbidity, chronic inflammation and poor biomechanical properties. Recently, the decellularisation techniques of allo- or xenografts using specific detergents have been studied and have been found to generate biocompatible substitutes that resemble the native tissue. This study aims to identify a novel decellularisation protocol for large equine tendons that would produce an extracellular matrix scaffold suitable for the regeneration of injured tendons in humans. Specifically, equine tendons were treated either with tri (n-butyl) phosphate alone, or associated to multiple concentrations of peracetic acid (1, 3 and 5 %), which has never before been tested in vitro.Samples were then analysed by histology and with biochemical, biomechanical, and cytotoxicity tests. The best decellularisation protocol, resulting from these examinations, was selected and the chosen scaffold was re-seeded with murine fibroblasts. Resulting grafts were tested for cell viability, histologic analysis, DNA and collagen content. The results identified 1 % tri (n-butyl) phosphate combined with 3 % peracetic acid as the most suitable decellularised matrix in terms of biochemical and biomechanical properties. Moreover, the non-cytotoxic nature of the decellularised matrix allowed for good fibroblast reseeding, thus demonstrating a biocompatible matrix that will be suitable for tendon tissue engineering and hopefully as substitutes in severe tendon damages. PMID:27386840

  15. Increased unilateral tendon stiffness and its effect on gait 2-6 years after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Agres, A N; Duda, G N; Gehlen, T J; Arampatzis, A; Taylor, W R; Manegold, S

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) alters tissue composition, which may affect long-term tendon mechanics and ankle function during movement. However, a relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) properties and ankle joint function during gait remains unclear. The primary hypotheses were that (a) post-ATR tendon stiffness and length differ from the noninjured contralateral side and that (b) intra-patient asymmetries in AT properties correlate to ankle function asymmetries during gait, determined by ankle angles and moments. Ultrasonography and dynamometry were used to assess AT tendon stiffness, strain, elongation, and rest length in both limbs of 20 ATR patients 2-6 years after repair. Three-dimensional ankle angles and moments were determined using gait analysis. Injured tendons exhibited increased stiffness, rest length, and altered kinematics, with higher dorsiflexion and eversion, and lower plantarflexion and inversion. Intra-patient tendon stiffness and tendon length ratios were negatively correlated to intra-patient ratios of the maximum plantarflexion moment and maximum dorsiflexion angle, respectively. These results suggest that after surgical ATR repair, higher AT stiffness, but not a longer AT, may contribute to deficits in plantarflexion moment generation. These data further support the claim that post-ATR tendon regeneration results in the production of a tissue that is functionally different than noninjured tendon.

  16. A Tendon Cell Specific RNAi Screen Reveals Novel Candidates Essential for Muscle Tendon Interaction.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Prabhat; Kumar, Arun; Das, Rudra Nayan; Malhotra, Vivek; VijayRaghavan, K

    2015-01-01

    Tendons are fibrous connective tissue which connect muscles to the skeletal elements thus acting as passive transmitters of force during locomotion and provide appropriate body posture. Tendon-derived cues, albeit poorly understood, are necessary for proper muscle guidance and attachment during development. In the present study, we used dorsal longitudinal muscles of Drosophila and their tendon attachment sites to unravel the molecular nature of interactions between muscles and tendons. We performed a genetic screen using RNAi-mediated knockdown in tendon cells to find out molecular players involved in the formation and maintenance of myotendinous junction and found 21 candidates out of 2507 RNAi lines screened. Of these, 19 were novel molecules in context of myotendinous system. Integrin-βPS and Talin, picked as candidates in this screen, are known to play important role in the cell-cell interaction and myotendinous junction formation validating our screen. We have found candidates with enzymatic function, transcription activity, cell adhesion, protein folding and intracellular transport function. Tango1, an ER exit protein involved in collagen secretion was identified as a candidate molecule involved in the formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 knockdown was found to affect development of muscle attachment sites and formation of myotendinous junction. Tango1 was also found to be involved in secretion of Viking (Collagen type IV) and BM-40 from hemocytes and fat cells. PMID:26488612

  17. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology. PMID:27062597

  18. Preliminary study of tendon biopsy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Webbon, P M

    1986-09-01

    A series of experimental tendon biopsies is described. Three biopsies were taken from the lateral digital extensor tendon (LDET) and three from the superficial flexor tendon (SFT). The LDET biopsies resulted in little discomfort whereas the SFT biopsies led to temporary lameness. The tendons were examined histologically up to 99 days after the biopsies were removed. In all of the tendons the defect filled with granulation tissue which subsequently became organised as a longitudinally orientated collagenous scar tissue. In this small series of biopsies the histological effects of the biopsy persisted longer in the SFT than in the LDET. It is concluded that tendon biopsy cannot be advocated for safe routine use in the horse.

  19. Influence of autograft removal on rabbit patellar tendon length.

    PubMed

    Monllau, J C; Hinarejos, P; Alvarez, P; Alameda, F; Ballester, J

    2004-02-01

    Twelve adult New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1, 30% of the central mass of the right patellar tendon was removed. In group 2, 60% was removed. The left knees served as controls. The animals were killed 1 year later. The patella-patellar tendon-tibial tuberosity units of all knees were studied using histological and morphometric analysis. In both groups, the tendons had lengthened. Lengthening average was 2.50 mm in group 1 and 8.17 mm in group 2. In both groups, histology revealed poor alignment of the collagen fibres and high cellularity, although the findings in group 1 were nearer the normal histological pattern. The results suggest that removal of significant portions of the patellar tendon leads to lengthening of the resulting tendon. In clinical practice, it seems prudent to pay attention to the dimensions of the patellar tendon when harvesting a graft.

  20. Tendon Differentiation on Decellularized Extracellular Matrix Under Cyclic Loading.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendon bioreactors combine cells, scaffold, and mechanical stimulation to drive tissue neogenesis ex vivo. Faithful recapitulation of the native tendon microenvironment is essential for stimulating graft maturation or modeling tendon biology. As the mediator between cells and mechanical stimulation, the properties of a scaffold constitute perhaps the most essential elements in a bioreactor system. One method of achieving native scaffold properties is to process tendon allograft in a manner that removes cells without modifying structure and function: "decellularization." This chapter describes (1) production of tendon scaffolds derived from native extracellular matrix, (2) preparation of cell-laden scaffolds prior to bioreactor culture, and (3) tissue processing post-harvest for gene expression analysis. These methods may be applied for a variety of applications including graft production, cell priming prior to transplantation and basic investigations of tendon cell biology.

  1. Biceps femoris tendon injuries sustained while playing hockey

    PubMed Central

    Watura, Christopher; Harries, William

    2011-01-01

    A 42-year-old female nurse presented in March 2008 with a left proximal hamstring tendon injury sustained while playing hockey. At surgery, the proximal biceps femoris tendon and semitendonosus were found to be ruptured and were repaired. The patient made a good recovery but sustained a further hockey injury in January 2010 involving a complete tear and rupture of the biceps femoris tendon distally. This was managed conservatively and the patient was able to return to playing hockey 10 months later. Biceps femoris tendon injuries have been reported in sport but this is the first documented case of the injury occurring while playing hockey and is also the first reported case of a biceps tendon rupture proximally (hamstring tendon) followed by distal biceps femoris rupture at the knee in the same leg. PMID:22715185

  2. Subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon: a case report.

    PubMed

    Noda, Daisuke; Yoshimura, Ichiro; Kanazawa, Kazuki; Hagio, Tomonobu; Naito, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon can be associated with open injuries and that closed rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon is rare. Tendon injuries of the foot can occur secondary to direct, indirect, or repetitive injury. Repetitive tendon injuries can cause tendinitis or stenosing tenosynovitis. Tendinitis is associated with internal tendon injury that can present with tendon thickening, mucinoid degeneration, nodule development, or in situ partial tears. Stenosing tenosynovitis is the development of tendon adhesions within the tendon sheath that interfere with tendon gliding, known as trigger toe. The flexor hallucis longus tendon is susceptible to injury along its entire course. A total of 35 cases of complete or partial closed ruptures of the flexor hallucis longus tendon have been reported. We present the case of complete subcutaneous rupture of the flexor hallucis longus tendon associated with trauma at the proximal phalangeal head. PMID:22153296

  3. An efficient robotic tendon for gait assistance.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Kevin W; Ilg, Robert; Sugar, Thomas G; Herring, Donald

    2006-10-01

    A robotic tendon is a spring based, linear actuator in which the stiffness of the spring is crucial for its successful use in a lightweight, energy efficient, powered ankle orthosis. Like its human analog, the robotic tendon uses its inherent elastic nature to reduce both peak power and energy requirements for its motor. In the ideal example, peak power required of the motor for ankle gait is reduced from 250 W to just 77 W. In addition, ideal energy requirements are reduced from nearly 36 J to just 21 J. Using this approach, an initial prototype has provided 100% of the power and energy necessary for ankle gait in a compact 0.95 kg package, seven times less than an equivalent motor/gearbox system.

  4. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used.

  5. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with allograft tendons.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Sabrina M; MacGillivray, John D; Warren, Russell F

    2003-01-01

    Allograft tissue allows reconstruction of the ACL without the donor site morbidity that can be caused by autograft harvesting. Patients who must kneel as a part of their occupation or chosen sport are particularly good candidates for allograft reconstruction. Patients over 45 years of age and those requiring revision ACL surgery can also benefit from the use and availability of allograft tendons. In some cases, patients or surgeons may opt for allograft tendons to maximize the result or morbidity ratio. Despite advances in cadaver screening and graft preparation, there remain risks of disease transmission and joint infection after allograft implantation. Detailed explanation and informed consent is vitally important in cases in which allograft tissue is used. PMID:12735200

  6. Comparison of modified Kessler tendon suture at different levels in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon and porcine flexors and porcine extensors: an experimental biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Järvinen, T L N; Göransson, H

    2011-10-01

    This study compared the biomechanical behaviour of repairs in the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones I, II and III with repairs of different segments of the porcine flexor tendon of the second digit and the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon, in order to assess the validity of porcine tendons as models for human flexor tendon repairs. These porcine tendons were selected after comparing their size with the human flexor digitorum profundus tendon. The tendon repairs were done in three segments of each porcine tendon and repairs in the human tendons were done in zones I,II and III. Ten tendons in each group yielded a total of 90 specimens. A modified Kessler repair was done with 3-0 coated braided polyester suture and subjected to uniaxial tensile testing. In human flexor tendons, the ultimate force was higher in zones I and II than in zone III. The porcine flexor digitorum profundus tendon from the second digit and the proximal segment of the extensor digiti quarti proprius tendon behaved similarly to the human flexor tendon in zone III and can be considered as surrogates for the human flexor tendon. PMID:21816887

  7. A 3-Dimensional Anatomic Study of the Distal Biceps Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Christine; Li, Zhi; Pennings, Amanda; Agur, Anne; Elmaraghy, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Background Complete rupture of the distal biceps tendon from its osseous attachment is most often treated with operative intervention. Knowledge of the overall tendon morphology as well as the orientation of the collagenous fibers throughout the musculotendinous junction are key to intraoperative decision making and surgical technique in both the acute and chronic setting. Unfortunately, there is little information available in the literature. Purpose To comprehensively describe the morphology of the distal biceps tendon. Study Design Descriptive laboratory study. Methods The distal biceps terminal musculature, musculotendinous junction, and tendon were digitized in 10 cadaveric specimens and data reconstructed using 3-dimensional modeling. Results The average length, width, and thickness of the external distal biceps tendon were found to be 63.0, 6.0, and 3.0 mm, respectively. A unique expansion of the tendon fibers within the distal muscle was characterized, creating a thick collagenous network along the central component between the long and short heads. Conclusion This study documents the morphologic parameters of the native distal biceps tendon. Reconstruction may be necessary, especially in chronic distal biceps tendon ruptures, if the remaining tendon morphology is significantly compromised compared with the native distal biceps tendon. Knowledge of normal anatomical distal biceps tendon parameters may also guide the selection of a substitute graft with similar morphological characteristics. Clinical Relevance A thorough description of distal biceps tendon morphology is important to guide intraoperative decision making between primary repair and reconstruction and to better select the most appropriate graft. The detailed description of the tendinous expansion into the muscle may provide insight into better graft-weaving and suture-grasping techniques to maximize proximal graft incorporation. PMID:26665092

  8. Quadriceps Tendon Rupture due to Postepileptic Convulsion

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yilmaz; Sahin, Rifat; Keskin, Davut

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of quadriceps tendon (QT) rupture. QT ruptures can occur in all ages. The cause is mostly traumatic in origin. Spontaneous ruptures that are thought to result from predisposing conditions are rare. Post-convulsion QT ruptures lacking traumas in their history can be overlooked in clinical examinations. This should be born in mind by the attending physician, as early diagnosis and treatment of the condition can lead to satisfactory outcomes. PMID:24944977

  9. Low level laser therapy in healing tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, P. T. C.; Batista, Cheila O. C.; Fabíola, C.

    2005-11-01

    This study aims to verify the effects of AsGa Laser in the scarring of tendon lesion in rats with low nourishment condition and to analyze the ideal light density by means of histopathologic findings highlighted by light microscopy. After the proposed nutritional condition was verified the animals were divided into 3 groups denominated as follows: GI control group, GII laser 1 J/sq.cm. and GIII laser 4 J/sq.cm. The lesions were induced by means of routine surgical process for tendon exposure: There was a crushing process with Allis pincers followed by saturated incision. The data obtained in relation to the amount of macrophage, leukocyte, fibroblast, vessel neoformation, fibrosis and collagen were submitted to parametric statistic procedures of variance analysis and "Tukey" Test and the result obtained was p < 0,05. According to the obtained results it can be concluded that low power laser therapy proved to be efficient in tendon repairing even though the animals suffered from malnutrition as well as the 1 J energy density proved to be more efficient in this case.

  10. Evolutionary transformations of myoseptal tendons in gnathostomes.

    PubMed Central

    Gemballa, Sven; Ebmeyer, Leoni; Hagen, Katja; Hannich, Tobias; Hoja, Kathrin; Rolf, Mara; Treiber, Kerstin; Vogel, Felix; Weitbrecht, Gerd

    2003-01-01

    Axial undulations in fishes are powered by a series of three-dimensionally folded myomeres separated by sheets of connective tissue, the myosepta. Myosepta have been hypothesized to function as transmitters of muscular forces to axial structures during swimming, but the difficulty of studying these delicate complex structures has precluded a more complete understanding of myoseptal mechanics. We have developed a new combination of techniques for visualizing the three-dimensional morphology of myosepta, and here we present their collagen-fibre architecture based on examination of 62 species representing all of the major clades of notochordates. In all gnathostome fishes, each myoseptum bears a set of six specifically arranged tendons. Because these tendons are not present outside the gnathostomes (i.e. they are absent from lampreys, hagfishes and lancelets), they represent evolutionary novelties of the gnathostome ancestor. This arrangement has remained unchanged throughout 400 Myr of gnathostome evolution, changing only on the transition to land. The high uniformity of myoseptal architecture in gnathostome fishes indicates functional significance and may be a key to understanding general principles of fish swimming mechanics. In the design of future experiments or biomechanical models, myosepta have to be regarded as tendons that can distribute forces in specific directions. PMID:12816635

  11. Extensor tendon ruptures after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bonnin, M; Lustig, S; Huten, D

    2016-02-01

    Extensor tendon rupture is a rare but serious complication after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) that impairs active knee extension, thereby severely affecting knee function. Surgery is usually required. Surgical options range from simple suturing to allograft reconstruction of the entire extensor mechanism and include intermediate methods such as reconstruction using neighbouring tendons or muscles, synthetic ligament implantation, and partial allograft repair. Simple suturing carries a high failure rate and should therefore be routinely combined with tissue augmentation using a neighbouring tendon or a synthetic ligament. After allograft reconstruction, outcomes are variable and long-term complications common. Salvage procedures for managing the most severe cases after allograft failure involve reconstruction using gastrocnemius or vastus flaps. Regardless of the technique used, suturing must be performed under tension, with the knee fully extended, and rehabilitation must be conducted with great caution. Weaknesses of available case-series studies include small sample sizes, heterogeneity, and inadequate follow-up duration. All treatment options are associated with substantial failure rates. The patient should be informed of this fact and plans made for a salvage option. Here, the main techniques and their outcomes are discussed, and a therapeutic strategy is suggested.

  12. Long head of the biceps tendon pathology

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez, Maximiliano; Calvo, Ana Belén; Alvarez, Victoria; Lepore, Salvador; Ibañez, Federico; Reybet, Juan; Vedova, Franco Della; Aeschlimann, Mauro; Taborro, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Disorders of the long head of the biceps tendon can exist in conjunction with other shoulder pathologies. It was proposed as a cause of pain in patients with rotator cuff injury. A detailed history, thorough physical examination and radiographical evaluation are necessary for a correct diagnosis. The aim of our study was to describe the surgical technique and analyze the results obtained in patients based on the same. Materials and Methods: Were included in this retrospective study 70 patients who had lesions in the long head of the biceps tendon, diagnosed with MRI treated at our institution with arthroscopic biotenodesis technique of the tendon with interference screw in the lower portion of the bicipital groove since January 2009 to January 2012. Functional clinical evaluation was performed with the appropriate scores for the disease (ASES, Rowe, Simple Shoulder Test, Constant Murley). Pain was evaluated using Visual Analog Scale. Results: The Rowe score was 86 points, 81 points ASES, SST 9 points, Constant and Murley 87 points. The VAS showed poor post surgical pain. At the time, no associated deformity similar to a Popeye sign was observed. Discussion: The decision to perform a surgical management of the long head of the biceps pathology depends on the clinical presentation, thorough physical examination with specific test, the presence of associated pathologies and failure of nonsurgical treatment.

  13. An Artificial Tendon with Durable Muscle Interface

    PubMed Central

    Melvin, Alan; Litsky, Alan; Mayerson, Joel; Witte, David; Melvin, David; Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    A coupling mechanism that can permanently fix a forcefully contracting muscle to a bone anchor or any totally inert prosthesis would meet a serious need in orthopaedics. Our group developed the OrthoCoupler™ device to satisfy these demands. The objective of this study was to test OrthoCoupler’s performance in vitro and in vivo in the goat semitendinosus tendon model. For in vitro evaluation, 40 samples were fatigue-tested, cycling at 10 load levels, n=4 each. For in vivo evaluation, the semitendinosus tendon was removed bilaterally in 8 goats. Left sides were reattached with an OrthoCoupler, and right sides were reattached using the Krackow stitch with #5 braided polyester sutures. Specimens were harvested 60 days post-surgery and assigned for biomechanics and histology. Fatigue strength of the devices in vitro was several times the contractile force of the semitendinosus muscle. The in vivo devices were built equivalent to two of the in vitro devices, providing an additional safety factor. In strength testing at necropsy, suture controls pulled out at 120.5 ± 68.3 N, whereas each OrthoCoupler was still holding after the muscle tore, remotely, at 298±111.3N (mean ± SD)(p<0.0003). Muscle tear strength was reached with the fiber-muscle composite produced in healing still soundly intact. This technology may be of value for orthopaedic challenges in oncology, revision arthroplasty, tendon transfer, and sports-injury reconstruction. PMID:19639642

  14. Evolutionary transformations of myoseptal tendons in gnathostomes.

    PubMed

    Gemballa, Sven; Ebmeyer, Leoni; Hagen, Katja; Hannich, Tobias; Hoja, Kathrin; Rolf, Mara; Treiber, Kerstin; Vogel, Felix; Weitbrecht, Gerd

    2003-06-22

    Axial undulations in fishes are powered by a series of three-dimensionally folded myomeres separated by sheets of connective tissue, the myosepta. Myosepta have been hypothesized to function as transmitters of muscular forces to axial structures during swimming, but the difficulty of studying these delicate complex structures has precluded a more complete understanding of myoseptal mechanics. We have developed a new combination of techniques for visualizing the three-dimensional morphology of myosepta, and here we present their collagen-fibre architecture based on examination of 62 species representing all of the major clades of notochordates. In all gnathostome fishes, each myoseptum bears a set of six specifically arranged tendons. Because these tendons are not present outside the gnathostomes (i.e. they are absent from lampreys, hagfishes and lancelets), they represent evolutionary novelties of the gnathostome ancestor. This arrangement has remained unchanged throughout 400 Myr of gnathostome evolution, changing only on the transition to land. The high uniformity of myoseptal architecture in gnathostome fishes indicates functional significance and may be a key to understanding general principles of fish swimming mechanics. In the design of future experiments or biomechanical models, myosepta have to be regarded as tendons that can distribute forces in specific directions. PMID:12816635

  15. How High Glucose Levels Affect Tendon Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-01-01

    Among the many factors playing a role in tendon disease, unregulated biochemical reactions between glucose and the collagen extracellular matrix are coming increasingly into focus. We have shown that formation of advanced glycation end-products that cross-link the collagen extracellular matrix can drastically affect cellular level mechanical properties of the matrix, and in turn affect cell-level biomechanical stimuli during physiological loading of the tissue. We suggest that these may adversely affect tendon cell response to matrix damage, as well as the quality of the consequent repair. If such mechanical feedback loops are altered, the ability of tendon cells to maintain tissue in a functional, healthy state may be compromised. Although key foundational elements of biochemical, biomechanical, and biological understanding are now in place, the full extent of how these aspects interact, including the precise mechanisms by which advanced glycation end-products pathologically disrupt connective tissue homeostasis and damage repair, are only beginning to be adequately appreciated. PMID:27535261

  16. Patellar tendon rupture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sean D; Kulig, Kornelia

    2009-11-01

    The patient was a 21-year-old male who was referred to physical therapy with a 1-week history of right knee pain and stiffness following an injury of traumatic onset. While attempting to jump off of both legs to dunk a basketball during a game, the patient heard and felt a pop in his right knee that was associated with an immediate onset of pain and swelling. He was unable to bear weight following the injury and, therefore, immediately went to the emergency department, where radiographs were completed and interpreted as negative for a fracture. However, the patella for the right knee was superiorly displaced. The patient was issued crutches and referred to physical therapy. At the time of the initial physical therapy examination, the patient was still not able to bear full weight on the right lower extremity or actively fully extend his right knee. Due to concern over possible meniscal, medial collateral ligament, or patellar tendon involvement, the patient's physician was contacted and magnetic resonance imaging was ordered. Five days later, the patient presented with decreased knee effusion and the special tests for the medial collateral ligament and meniscus were negative. However, the patient was still not able to actively extend his knee, suggesting a possible rupture of the patellar tendon, which was later confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging. Surgical repair of the patellar tendon was performed 2 weeks later.

  17. Single-row, double-row, and transosseous equivalent techniques for isolated supraspinatus tendon tears with minimal atrophy: A retrospective comparative outcome and radiographic analysis at minimum 2-year followup

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Frank; Gupta, Anil; Bruce, Ben; Harris, Josh; Abrams, Geoff; Wilson, Hillary; Hussey, Kristen; Cole, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the subjective, objective, and radiographic healing outcomes of single-row (SR), double-row (DR), and transosseous equivalent (TOE) suture techniques for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Materials and Methods: A retrospective comparative analysis of arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs by one surgeon from 2004 to 2010 at minimum 2-year followup was performed. Cohorts were matched for age, sex, and tear size. Subjective outcome variables included ASES, Constant, SST, UCLA, and SF-12 scores. Objective outcome variables included strength, active range of motion (ROM). Radiographic healing was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Statistical analysis was performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Mann — Whitney and Kruskal — Wallis tests with significance, and the Fisher exact probability test <0.05. Results: Sixty-three patients completed the study requirements (20 SR, 21 DR, 22 TOE). There was a clinically and statistically significant improvement in outcomes with all repair techniques (ASES mean improvement P = <0.0001). The mean final ASES scores were: SR 83; (SD 21.4); DR 87 (SD 18.2); TOE 87 (SD 13.2); (P = 0.73). There was a statistically significant improvement in strength for each repair technique (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between techniques across all secondary outcome assessments: ASES improvement, Constant, SST, UCLA, SF-12, ROM, Strength, and MRI re-tear rates. There was a decrease in re-tear rates from single row (22%) to double-row (18%) to transosseous equivalent (11%); however, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.6). Conclusions: Compared to preoperatively, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, using SR, DR, or TOE techniques, yielded a clinically and statistically significant improvement in subjective and objective outcomes at a minimum 2-year follow-up. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic level 3. PMID:24926159

  18. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  19. ACL reconstruction: patellar tendon versus hamstring grafts--economical aspects.

    PubMed

    Forssblad, Magnus; Valentin, Anders; Engström, Björn; Werner, Suzanne

    2006-06-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to compare the costs for the use of patellar tendon versus hamstring tendons as grafts for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction including the different fixation methods. The background is that during recent years there has been a dramatic shift from patellar tendon to hamstring tendons in ACL reconstructions in Sweden. All our patients with ACL reconstructions performed during 1 year (2004) were included. Knee joints numbering 440 in 439 patients were primary ACL reconstructions. A hamstring graft was used in 345 knee joints (78.4%) and a patellar tendon graft in 95 (21.6%) of the patients (Table 2). On average 34 (SD 12.9; range 14-63) ACL reconstructions per surgeon were performed by a total of 14 surgeons. The average cost for patellar tendon procedure was 197 euros compared to 436 euros for the hamstring procedure. Mean time for surgery in primary reconstructions was 11.5 min shorter (P<0.001) for patellar tendon reconstructions (71.3+/-31 min) compared to hamstring reconstructions (83.2+/-27 min). This means a difference in cost of 90 euros. The total additional cost (fixation and surgery time) for the hamstring method compared to the patellar tendon method was on an average 329 euros. From a strict economic point of view we therefore recommend or at least consider the use of the patellar tendon as a graft in ACL reconstructions. PMID:16570193

  20. Nanoparticles for Tendon Healing and Regeneration: Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Parchi, Paolo D; Vittorio, Orazio; Andreani, Lorenzo; Battistini, Pietro; Piolanti, Nicola; Marchetti, Stefano; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties. Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties) to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration. PMID:27597828

  1. Nanoparticles for Tendon Healing and Regeneration: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Vittorio, Orazio; Andreani, Lorenzo; Battistini, Pietro; Piolanti, Nicola; Marchetti, Stefano; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties. Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties) to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration.

  2. Multiple variations of the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox

    PubMed Central

    Thwin, San San; Zaini, Fazlin; Than, Myo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Multiple tendons of the abductor pollicis longus (APL) in the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist can lead to the development of de Quervain's syndrome, which is caused by stenosing tenosynovitis. A cadaveric study was performed to establish the variations present in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox in a Malaysian population, in the hope that this knowledge would aid clinical investigation and surgical treatment of de Quervain's tenosynovitis. METHODS Routine dissection of ten upper limbs was performed to determine the variations in the tendons of the anatomical snuffbox of the wrist. RESULTS In all the dissected upper limbs, the APL tendon of the first extensor compartment was found to have several (3–14) tendon slips. The insertion of the APL tendon slips in all upper limbs were at the base of the first metacarpal bone, trapezium and fascia of the opponens pollicis muscle; however, in seven specimens, they were also found to be attached to the fleshy belly of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. In two specimens, double tendons of the extensor pollicis longus located in the third extensor compartment were inserted into the capsule of the proximal interphalangeal joints before being joined to the extensor expansion. In two other specimens, the first extensor compartment had two osseofibrous tunnels divided by a septum that separated the APL tendon from the extensor pollicis brevis tendon. CONCLUSION Multiple variations were found in the anatomical snuffbox region of the dissected upper limbs. Knowledge of these variations would be useful in interventional radiology and orthopaedic surgery. PMID:24452976

  3. Reconstruction of neglected patellar tendon ruptures using the quadriceps graft.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Luiz Ellera; de Oliveira Alves, Jairo André; Zimmermann, José Mauro

    2014-08-01

    Several techniques using different grafts have been described for reconstruction of the patellar tendon after a neglected rupture. Retraction of the quadriceps tendon may compromise repair integrity due to progressive stretching of the graft. The authors present a surgical technique using the central one-third of the quadriceps tendon. This is supported by the fact that the resistance to traction of this segment of the quadriceps tendon equals that of a double-looped semitendinosus graft and that the harvesting of this specific graft promotes muscle inhibition, thus protecting the reconstruction during the recovery period.

  4. Nanoparticles for Tendon Healing and Regeneration: Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo D.; Vittorio, Orazio; Andreani, Lorenzo; Battistini, Pietro; Piolanti, Nicola; Marchetti, Stefano; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Tendon injuries are commonly met in the emergency department. Unfortunately, tendon tissue has limited regeneration potential and usually the consequent formation of scar tissue causes inferior mechanical properties. Nanoparticles could be used in different way to improve tendon healing and regeneration, ranging from scaffolds manufacturing (increasing the strength and endurance or anti-adhesions, anti-microbial, and anti-inflammatory properties) to gene therapy. This paper aims to summarize the most relevant studies showing the potential application of nanoparticles for tendon tissue regeneration. PMID:27597828

  5. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Youngstrom, Daniel W.; Barrett, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems. PMID:26839559

  6. Ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendon: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Arora, Abhishek J; Arora, Richa

    2015-09-01

    Ossification of the Achilles tendon is a rare clinical entity comprising of one or more segments of variable sized ossified masses in the fibrocartilaginous substance of the tendon. The etiology of ossification of the Achilles tendon is multifactorial with recurrent trauma and surgery comprising major predisposing factors, with others being metabolic, systemic, and infectious diseases. The possibility of a genetic predisposition towards this entity has also been raised, but has not yet been proven. We present a rare case of ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendons without any history of trauma or surgery in a 48-year-old female patient. PMID:26413314

  7. Engineering Tendon: Scaffolds, Bioreactors, and Models of Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Youngstrom, Daniel W; Barrett, Jennifer G

    2016-01-01

    Tendons bridge muscle and bone, translating forces to the skeleton and increasing the safety and efficiency of locomotion. When tendons fail or degenerate, there are no effective pharmacological interventions. The lack of available options to treat damaged tendons has created a need to better understand and improve the repair process, particularly when suitable autologous donor tissue is unavailable for transplantation. Cells within tendon dynamically react to loading conditions and undergo phenotypic changes in response to mechanobiological stimuli. Tenocytes respond to ultrastructural topography and mechanical deformation via a complex set of behaviors involving force-sensitive membrane receptor activity, changes in cytoskeletal contractility, and transcriptional regulation. Effective ex vivo model systems are needed to emulate the native environment of a tissue and to translate cell-matrix forces with high fidelity. While early bioreactor designs have greatly expanded our knowledge of mechanotransduction, traditional scaffolds do not fully model the topography, composition, and mechanical properties of native tendon. Decellularized tendon is an ideal scaffold for cultivating replacement tissue and modeling tendon regeneration. Decellularized tendon scaffolds (DTS) possess high clinical relevance, faithfully translate forces to the cellular scale, and have bulk material properties that match natural tissue. This review summarizes progress in tendon tissue engineering, with a focus on DTS and bioreactor systems.

  8. Mechanical characteristics of native tendon slices for tissue engineering scaffold.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ting-Wu; Chen, Qingshan; Sun, Yu-Long; Steinmann, Scott P; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the mechanical behavior of tendon slices with different thicknesses. Tendon slices of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 μm thickness were mechanically tested. The 300 μm slices were further tested for strength and modulus after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing under different applied strain levels (0, 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 12%). The tendon slice structure, morphology, and viability of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) seeded onto the slices were also examined with histology, scanning electron microscopy, and vital cell labeling, respectively. Tendon slices 300 μm or more in thickness had similar ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus to the intact tendon bundle. A strain of 5% or less did not cause any structural damage, nor did it change the mechanical properties of a 300 μm-thick tendon slice after 21,000-cycle fatigue testing. BMSCs were viable between and on the tendon slices after 2 weeks in tissue culture. This study demonstrated that, if tendon slices are used as a scaffold for tendon tissue engineering, slices 300 μm or more in thickness would be preferable from a mechanical strength point of view. If mechanical stimulation is performed for seeded-cell preparations, 5% strain or less would be appropriate.

  9. Biology and augmentation of tendon-bone insertion repair

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Surgical reattachment of tendon and bone such as in rotator cuff repair, patellar-patella tendon repair and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction often fails due to the failure of regeneration of the specialized tissue ("enthesis") which connects tendon to bone. Tendon-to-bone healing taking place between inhomogenous tissues is a slow process compared to healing within homogenous tissue, such as tendon to tendon or bone to bone healing. Therefore special attention must be paid to augment tendon to bone insertion (TBI) healing. Apart from surgical fixation, biological and biophysical interventions have been studied aiming at regeneration of TBI healing complex, especially the regeneration of interpositioned fibrocartilage and new bone at the healing junction. This paper described the biology and the factors influencing TBI healing using patella-patellar tendon (PPT) healing and tendon graft to bone tunnel healing in ACL reconstruction as examples. Recent development in the improvement of TBI healing and directions for future studies were also reviewed and discussed. PMID:20727196

  10. Tendon transfer options in managing the adult flexible flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Aronow, Michael S

    2012-06-01

    Patients undergoing surgery for posterior tibial tendon dysfunction may require tendon transfer. The flexor digitorum longus is most commonly transferred, although the flexor hallucis longus and peroneus brevis have also been described in the literature. This article discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the different tendons, the surgical techniques used to perform them, and their results in the literature, concentrating principally on studies in which additional bone procedures were not performed. This article will also discuss the potential role for isolated soft tissue procedures in the treatment of stage 2 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:22541521

  11. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures--jumper's knee.

    PubMed

    Kelly, D W; Carter, V S; Jobe, F W; Kerlan, R K

    1984-01-01

    We reviewed 13 patients with end stage jumper's knee, 10 with patellar tendon ruptures, and 3 with ruptures of the quadriceps tendon to evaluate our long-term results in treating these tendon ruptures in an athletic population. The focus was on the natural history, the time until return, and the level of return, to athletic activity. Jumper's knee affected all patients to a varying degree prior to rupture. Basketball was the most common sport involved. At followup, averaging 4 1/2 years, patients underwent functional and clinical, as well as Cybex and roentgenographic, evaluations. Results indicated patellar tendon ruptures, where the ruptures are complete, have a more favorable prognosis than those of the quadriceps tendon which are incomplete. All of the latter patients continued to have quadriceps tendinitis following repair. In both groups, the poor results were obtained in patients with chondromalacia and/or patella alta. Cybex testing yielded results of greater than 100% strength in three patients with patellar tendon ruptures, but no patient with quadriceps rupture had comparable test results. There was no apparent relationship between ruptures and cortisone injections. Patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures from indirect injury in athletes represent the end stage of jumper's knee and result from repetitive microtrauma. Excellent function usually follows repair of patellar tendon ruptures when surgery is performed early and care is taken to restore normal patellar tendon length. Results of quadriceps ruptures are less satisfactory since these ruptures are usually incomplete and all degenerative tissue may not be involved in the healing response.

  12. Impact of oestrogen deficiency and aging on tendon: concise review

    PubMed Central

    Frizziero, Antonio; Vittadini, Filippo; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Masiero, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The knowledge about tendons and tenocyte biological behaviour during aging and, especially, oestrogen deficiency is limited. Women differ from men with regard to muscle and tendon, most likely due to differences in sex hormones activity and tissue response. To-date the interest in metabolic factors that may induce tendon disorders is growing. The aim of this paper is to elucidate the current findings in the correlation between oestrogen deficiency, aging and tendon pathology and to encourage future researches to ameliorate assessment and management of tendinopathies in postmenopausal women. PMID:25489550

  13. Outcome following addition of peroneus brevis tendon transfer to treatment of acquired posterior tibial tendon insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Song, S J; Deland, J T

    2001-04-01

    The flexor digitorum longus, the tendon most often used for transfer in posterior tibial tendon insufficiency, is one-half to one-third the size of the posterior tibial tendon. Occasionally it may be particularly small or may have been previously used for transfer. In these cases, the senior author has felt that the addition of a transfer of the Peroneus Brevis (PBr) tendon may be helpful in maintaining sufficient tendon and muscle mass to rebalance the foot. Thirteen patients who underwent this procedure were retrospectively identified and matched by age and length of follow-up to patients who underwent a more standard tendon transfer operation minus the addition of the PBr transfer. Pain and functional status were then assessed by the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society's ankle/hindfoot rating scale. Each patient was tested by an independent physical therapist to evaluate inversion and eversion strength. The mean duration of follow-up was 20.6 months (12 to 34 months). The average AOFAS score of the PBr group was 75.8 compared to 71.5 for the standard control group. There was no significant difference between the groups when inversion or eversion strengths were compared. Inversion strength and eversion strength was rated good or excellent (4 or 5) in 12 out of 13 of the PBr transfer group patients. No major complications were encountered in either group. Although it does not increase inversion strength, a PBr transfer can be used to augment a small FDL without causing significant eversion weakness. This can be useful when the FDL is particularly small or in revision surgery. PMID:11354442

  14. The promoting effect of pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on tendon healing involves tendon outgrowth, cell survival, and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chung-Hsun; Tsai, Wen-Chung; Lin, Miao-Sui; Hsu, Ya-Hui; Pang, Jong-Hwei Su

    2011-03-01

    Pentadecapeptide BPC 157, composed of 15 amino acids, is a partial sequence of body protection compound (BPC) that is discovered in and isolated from human gastric juice. Experimentally it has been demonstrated to accelerate the healing of many different wounds, including transected rat Achilles tendon. This study was designed to investigate the potential mechanism of BPC 157 to enhance healing of injured tendon. The outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants cultured with or without BPC 157 was examined. Results showed that BPC 157 significantly accelerated the outgrowth of tendon explants. Cell proliferation of cultured tendon fibroblasts derived from rat Achilles tendon was not directly affected by BPC 157 as evaluated by MTT assay. However, the survival of BPC 157-treated cells was significantly increased under the H(2)O(2) stress. BPC 157 markedly increased the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by transwell filter migration assay. BPC 157 also dose dependently accelerated the spreading of tendon fibroblasts on culture dishes. The F-actin formation as detected by FITC-phalloidin staining was induced in BPC 157-treated fibroblasts. The protein expression and activation of FAK and paxillin were determined by Western blot analysis, and the phosphorylation levels of both FAK and paxillin were dose dependently increased by BPC 157 while the total amounts of protein was unaltered. In conclusion, BPC 157 promotes the ex vivo outgrowth of tendon fibroblasts from tendon explants, cell survival under stress, and the in vitro migration of tendon fibroblasts, which is likely mediated by the activation of the FAK-paxillin pathway. PMID:21030672

  15. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    PubMed

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair.

  16. MR appearance of bilateral, spontaneous patellar tendon rupture in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Gould, E S; Taylor, S; Naidich, J B; Furie, R; Lane, L

    1987-01-01

    Bilateral spontaneous patellar tendon rupture is an unusual complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. The ability of magnetic resonance to detect these tendon abnormalities is demonstrated.

  17. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-11-05

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment.

  18. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p < 0.05). In contrast, cell-free constructs failed to form good

  19. Simultaneous traumatic rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon in a healthy individual

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rachakatla, N; Kerin, C; Kumar, R

    2010-01-01

    A simultaneous traumatic complete rupture of the patellar tendon and the contralateral quadriceps tendon is reported to occur in patients with renal failure and other inflammatory diseases, but is extremely rare in a healthy individual because of the different contributory factors and mechanisms of injury. We present a rare case report of such a combination of injuries in a 48-year-old healthy man. To our knowledge only three such cases have been reported in the English literature. This is an unusual combination and hence there is potential for missed diagnosis leading to suboptimal treatment. PMID:22791858

  20. Multilayered electrospun scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chainani, Abby; Hippensteel, Kirk J; Kishan, Alysha; Garrigues, N William; Ruch, David S; Guilak, Farshid; Little, Dianne

    2013-12-01

    Full-thickness rotator cuff tears are one of the most common causes of shoulder pain in people over the age of 65. High retear rates and poor functional outcomes are common after surgical repair, and currently available extracellular matrix scaffold patches have limited abilities to enhance new tendon formation. In this regard, tissue-engineered scaffolds may provide a means to improve repair of rotator cuff tears. Electrospinning provides a versatile method for creating nanofibrous scaffolds with controlled architectures, but several challenges remain in its application to tissue engineering, such as cell infiltration through the full thickness of the scaffold as well as control of cell growth and differentiation. Previous studies have shown that ligament-derived extracellular matrix may enhance differentiation toward a tendon or ligament phenotype by human adipose stem cells (hASCs). In this study, we investigated the use of tendon-derived extracellular matrix (TDM)-coated electrospun multilayered scaffolds compared to fibronectin (FN) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) coating for use in rotator cuff tendon tissue engineering. Multilayered poly(ɛ-caprolactone) scaffolds were prepared by sequentially collecting electrospun layers onto the surface of a grounded saline solution into a single scaffold. Scaffolds were then coated with TDM, FN, or PBS and seeded with hASCs. Scaffolds were maintained without exogenous growth factors for 28 days in culture and evaluated for protein content (by immunofluorescence and biochemical assay), markers of tendon differentiation, and tensile mechanical properties. The collagen content was greatest by day 28 in TDM-scaffolds. Gene expression of type I collagen, decorin, and tenascin C increased over time, with no effect of scaffold coating. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan and dsDNA contents increased over time in culture, but there was no effect of scaffold coating. The Young's modulus did not change over time, but yield strain

  1. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Godinho, Marta S.C.; Riley, Graham P.; Birch, Helen L.; Clegg, Peter D.; Screen, Hazel R.C.

    2015-01-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury. PMID:25958330

  2. Reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture using graft from contralateral patella graft together with reinforcement from flexor tendons. Case report.

    PubMed

    Frois Temponi, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Lúcio Honório; da Silva Bernardes, Cláudio Otávio; Presses Teixeira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Chronic patellar tendon rupture is a rare disabling injury that is technically difficult to repair. The true prevalence of this injury is unknown. Delayed reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon rupture has yielded suboptimal clinical and functional results. Many different surgical methods for reconstruction of chronic patellar tendon injury have been reported. In this report, we present a case with chronic patellar tendon injury that was addressed using a technique that had not previously been described in the literature, through combining procedures that had been described separately. The reconstruction method presented in this article has the advantages of being easy and reproducible, without a requirement of allografts.

  3. The interfascicular matrix enables fascicle sliding and recovery in tendon, and behaves more elastically in energy storing tendons.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Chavaunne T; Godinho, Marta S C; Riley, Graham P; Birch, Helen L; Clegg, Peter D; Screen, Hazel R C

    2015-12-01

    While the predominant function of all tendons is to transfer force from muscle to bone and position the limbs, some tendons additionally function as energy stores, reducing the cost of locomotion. Energy storing tendons experience extremely high strains and need to be able to recoil efficiently for maximum energy storage and return. In the equine forelimb, the energy storing superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) has much higher failure strains than the positional common digital extensor tendon (CDET). However, we have previously shown that this is not due to differences in the properties of the SDFT and CDET fascicles (the largest tendon subunits). Instead, there is a greater capacity for interfascicular sliding in the SDFT which facilitates the greater extensions in this particular tendon (Thorpe et al., 2012). In the current study, we exposed fascicles and interfascicular matrix (IFM) from the SDFT and CDET to cyclic loading followed by a test to failure. The results show that IFM mechanical behaviour is not a result of irreversible deformation, but the IFM is able to withstand cyclic loading, and is more elastic in the SDFT than in the CDET. We also assessed the effect of ageing on IFM properties, demonstrating that the IFM is less able to resist repetitive loading as it ages, becoming stiffer with increasing age in the SDFT. These results provide further indications that the IFM is important for efficient function in energy storing tendons, and age-related alterations to the IFM may compromise function and predispose older tendons to injury.

  4. Achilles tendon suture deteriorates tendon capillary blood flow with sustained tissue oxygen saturation – an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Robert; Lorenzen, Johan; Rotter, Robert; Vogt, Peter M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Treatment of ruptured Achilles tendons currently constitutes of conservative early functional treatment or surgical treatment either by open or minimal invasive techniques. We hypothesize that an experimental Achilles tendon suture in an animal model significantly deteriorates Achilles tendon microcirculation immediately following suturing. Methods Fifteen Achilles tendons of eight male Wistar rats (275–325 g) were included. After preparation of the Achilles tendon with a medial paratendinous approach, Achilles tendon microcirculation was assessed using combined Laser-Doppler and spectrophotometry (Oxygen-to-see) regarding: - tendinous capillary blood flow [arbitrary units AU] - tendinous tissue oxygen saturation [%] - tendinous venous filling pressure [rAU] The main body of the Achilles tendon was measured in the center of the suture with 50 Hz. 10 minutes after Achilles tendon suture (6-0 Prolene), a second assessment of microcirculatory parameters was performed. Results Achilles tendon capillary blood flow decreased by 57% following the suture (70 ± 30 AU vs. 31 ± 16 AU; p < 0.001). Tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remained at the same level before and after suture (78 ± 17% vs. 77 ± 22%; p = 0.904). Tendinous venous filling pressure increased by 33% (54 ± 16 AU vs. 72 ± 20 AU; p = 0.019) after suture. Conclusion Achilles tendon suture in anaesthetised rats causes an acute loss of capillary perfusion and increases postcapillary venous filling pressures indicating venous stasis. The primary hypothesis of this study was confirmed. In contrast, tendinous tissue oxygen saturation remains unchanged excluding acute intratendinous hypoxia within the first 10 minutes after suture. Further changes of oxygen saturation remain unclear. Furthermore, it remains to be determined to what extent reduced capillary blood flow as well as increased postcapillary stasis might influence tendon healing from a microcirculatory point of view in this animal setting

  5. Achilles tendon biomechanics in response to acute intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Michael F; Lillie, Kurtis R; Bergeron, Daniel J; Cota, Kevin C; Yoon, Joseph S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R

    2014-05-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disorder and is more prevalent in men. Although differences in tendon mechanics between men and women have been reported, understanding of tendon mechanics in young active people is limited. Moreover, there is limited understanding of changes in tendon mechanics in response to acute exercise. Our purpose was to compare Achilles tendon mechanics in active young adult men and women at rest and after light and strenuous activity in the form of repeated jumping with an added load. Participants consisted of 17 men and 14 women (18-30 years) who were classified as being at least moderately physically active as defined by the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Tendon force/elongation measures were obtained during an isometric plantarflexion contraction on an isokinetic dynamometer with simultaneous ultrasound imaging of the Achilles tendon approximate to the soleus myotendinous junction. Data were collected at rest, after a 10-minute treadmill walk, and after a fatigue protocol of 100 toe jumps performed in a Smith machine, with a load equaling 20% of body mass. We found greater tendon elongation, decreased stiffness, and lower Young's modulus only in women after the jumping exercise. Force and stress were not different between groups but decreased subsequent to the jumping exercise bout. In general, women had greater elongation and strain, less stiffness, and a lower Young's modulus during plantarflexor contraction. These data demonstrate differences in tendon mechanics between men and women and suggest a potential protective mechanism explaining the lower incidence of Achilles tendinopathy in women.

  6. Ultrasonic assessment of extracellular matrix content in healing Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Ghorayeb, Sleiman R; Shah, Neil V; Edobor-Osula, Folorunsho; Lane, Lewis B; Razzano, Pasquale; Chahine, Nadeen; Grande, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    Although several imaging modalities have been utilized to observe tendons, assessing injured tendons by tracking the healing response over time with ultrasound is a desirable method which is yet to be realized. This study examines the use of ultrasound for non-invasive monitoring of the healing process of Achilles tendons after surgical transection. The overall extracellular matrix content of the transection site is monitored and quantified as a function of time. B-mode images (built from successive A-scan signatures) of the injury site were obtained and compared to biomechanical properties. A quantitative measure of tendon healing using the extracellular matrix (ECM) content of the injury site was analyzed using linear regression with all biomechanical measures. Contralateral tendons were used as controls. The trend in the degree of ECM regrowth in the 4 weeks following complete transection of excised tendons was found to be most closely paralleled with that of linear stiffness (R(2) = 0.987, p < .05) obtained with post-ultrasound biomechanical tests. Results suggest that ultrasound can be an effective imaging technique in assessing the degree of tendon healing, and can be used to correlate structural properties of Achilles tendons.

  7. The role of carbon fibre as a flexor tendon substitute.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, R

    1983-06-01

    Experiments have been carried out on Rhesus monkeys to determine the effectiveness of carbon fibre as a flexor tendon substitute. Though the strength, flexibility and capacity to induce a neotendon make carbon fibre an ideal flexor tendon substitute, induction of fibrosis and accompanying increase in bulk of the implant resulted in failure.

  8. Quadriceps tendon rupture through a superolateral bipartite patella.

    PubMed

    Woods, G William; O'Connor, Daniel P; Elkousy, Hussein A

    2007-10-01

    We report a case of a quadriceps tendon rupture through a bipartite patella. Although quadriceps tendon ruptures and patella fractures are common, rupture through a bipartite patella fragment is rare. This case was managed similar to a quadriceps rupture with an excellent result.

  9. Single-Stage Flexor Tendon Grafting: Refining the Steps.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Derek R; McClinton, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Single-stage tendon grafting for reconstruction of zone I and II flexor tendon injuries is a challenging procedure in hand surgery. Careful patient selection, strict indications, and adherence to sound surgical principles are mandatory for return of digital motion. PMID:26026357

  10. Muscle power attenuation by tendon during energy dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Konow, Nicolai; Azizi, Emanuel; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    An important function of skeletal muscle is deceleration via active muscle fascicle lengthening, which dissipates movement energy. The mechanical interplay between muscle contraction and tendon elasticity is critical when muscles produce energy. However, the role of tendon elasticity during muscular energy dissipation remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that tendon elasticity functions as a mechanical buffer, preventing high (and probably damaging) velocities and powers during active muscle fascicle lengthening. We directly measured lateral gastrocnemius muscle force and length in wild turkeys during controlled landings requiring rapid energy dissipation. Muscle-tendon unit (MTU) strain was measured via video kinematics, independent of muscle fascicle strain (measured via sonomicrometry). We found that rapid MTU lengthening immediately following impact involved little or no muscle fascicle lengthening. Therefore, joint flexion had to be accommodated by tendon stretch. After the early contact period, muscle fascicles lengthened and absorbed energy. This late lengthening occurred after most of the joint flexion, and was thus mainly driven by tendon recoil. Temporary tendon energy storage led to a significant reduction in muscle fascicle lengthening velocity and the rate of energy absorption. We conclude that tendons function as power attenuators that probably protect muscles against damage from rapid and forceful lengthening during energy dissipation. PMID:21957134

  11. Stem Cell Applications in Tendon Disorders: A Clinical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Tendon injuries are a common cause of morbidity and a significant health burden on society. Tendons are structural tissues connecting muscle to bone and are prone to tearing and tendinopathy, an overuse or degenerative condition that is characterized by failed healing and cellular depletion. Current treatments, for tendon tear are conservative, surgical repair or surgical scaffold reconstruction. Tendinopathy is treated by exercises, injection therapies, shock wave treatments or surgical tendon debridement. However, tendons usually heal with fibrosis and scar tissue, which has suboptimal tensile strength and is prone to reinjury, resulting in lifestyle changes with activity restriction. Preclinical studies show that cell therapies have the potential to regenerate rather than repair tendon tissue, a process termed tenogenesis. A number of different cell lines, with varying degrees of differentiation, have being evaluated including stem cells, tendon derived cells and dermal fibroblasts. Even though cellular therapies offer some potential in treating tendon disorders, there have been few published clinical trials to determine the ideal cell source, the number of cells to administer, or the optimal bioscaffold for clinical use. PMID:22448174

  12. Relationship between tendon stiffness and failure: a metaanalysis

    PubMed Central

    LaCroix, Andrew S.; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E.; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2013-01-01

    Tendon is a highly specialized, hierarchical tissue designed to transfer forces from muscle to bone; complex viscoelastic and anisotropic behaviors have been extensively characterized for specific subsets of tendons. Reported mechanical data consistently show a pseudoelastic, stress-vs.-strain behavior with a linear slope after an initial toe region. Many studies report a linear, elastic modulus, or Young's modulus (hereafter called elastic modulus) and ultimate stress for their tendon specimens. Individually, these studies are unable to provide a broader, interstudy understanding of tendon mechanical behavior. Herein we present a metaanalysis of pooled mechanical data from a representative sample of tendons from different species. These data include healthy tendons and those altered by injury and healing, genetic modification, allograft preparation, mechanical environment, and age. Fifty studies were selected and analyzed. Despite a wide range of mechanical properties between and within species, elastic modulus and ultimate stress are highly correlated (R2 = 0.785), suggesting that tendon failure is highly strain-dependent. Furthermore, this relationship was observed to be predictable over controlled ranges of elastic moduli, as would be typical of any individual species. With the knowledge gained through this metaanalysis, noninvasive tools could measure elastic modulus in vivo and reasonably predict ultimate stress (or structural compromise) for diseased or injured tendon. PMID:23599401

  13. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  14. Tendon Transfers Around the Foot: When and Where.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ken N; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Krzak, Joseph J; Smith, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Tendon transfers are invaluable in the treatment of severe children's foot deformities. They are often preferable to simple releases, lengthening, or fusion in surgical treatment because they provide an active motor function for deformity correction and, when properly selected, the procedures stabilize the foot against progressive deformity. The authors describe 4 commonly used tendon transfer procedures that are useful in children's foot deformity surgeries.

  15. A biomechanical study of pediatric flexor profundus tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thunayan, Turki A.; Al-Zahrani, Mohammed T.; Hakeem, Ahmad A.; Al-Zahrani, Fahad M.; Al-Qattan, Mohammad M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the tensile strength of repaired flexor profundus tendons in young lambs, which would be equivalent to repairs in children older than 2 years of age. Methods: A comparative in-vitro experimental study conducted at King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from October 2014 to December 2015. We utilized 30 flexor profundus tendons of young lambs with a width of 4 mm. All tendons were repaired with a 4-strand repair technique using 4/0 polypropylene core sutures. In group I (n=10 tendons), 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures were applied. In group II (n=10 tendons), simple locking sutures were added to the corners of 2 separate figure-of-eight sutures. In group III (n=10 tendons), the locked cruciate repair was used. All tendon repairs were tested to single-cycle tensile failure. Results: There was no significant difference between groups II and III with regards to gap and breaking forces; and all forces of these 2 groups were significantly higher than the forces in group I. Conclusion: It was concluded that 4 mm-wide pediatric flexor tendons allow a 4-strand repair and the use of 4/0 sutures. The use of locking sutures increases the tensile strength to values that may allow protective mobilization in children. PMID:27570850

  16. Relationship between tendon stiffness and failure: a metaanalysis.

    PubMed

    LaCroix, Andrew S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Lakes, Roderic S; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-07-01

    Tendon is a highly specialized, hierarchical tissue designed to transfer forces from muscle to bone; complex viscoelastic and anisotropic behaviors have been extensively characterized for specific subsets of tendons. Reported mechanical data consistently show a pseudoelastic, stress-vs.-strain behavior with a linear slope after an initial toe region. Many studies report a linear, elastic modulus, or Young's modulus (hereafter called elastic modulus) and ultimate stress for their tendon specimens. Individually, these studies are unable to provide a broader, interstudy understanding of tendon mechanical behavior. Herein we present a metaanalysis of pooled mechanical data from a representative sample of tendons from different species. These data include healthy tendons and those altered by injury and healing, genetic modification, allograft preparation, mechanical environment, and age. Fifty studies were selected and analyzed. Despite a wide range of mechanical properties between and within species, elastic modulus and ultimate stress are highly correlated (R(2) = 0.785), suggesting that tendon failure is highly strain-dependent. Furthermore, this relationship was observed to be predictable over controlled ranges of elastic moduli, as would be typical of any individual species. With the knowledge gained through this metaanalysis, noninvasive tools could measure elastic modulus in vivo and reasonably predict ultimate stress (or structural compromise) for diseased or injured tendon.

  17. Suitability of Thiel embalmed tendons for biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Fessel, Gion; Frey, Kevin; Schweizer, Andreas; Calcagni, Maurizio; Ullrich, Oliver; Snedeker, Jess G

    2011-05-01

    The standard post-mortem storage method for biomechanical testing is freezing. Freezing minimally alters the biomechanical characteristics of tendons but only suspends the process of decay. Chemical fixation arrests decay and overcomes risk of infection, but alters the biomechanical properties of tendons. On the other hand, Thiel preservation has been reported to maintain soft tissue consistency similar to that of living tissue. The current study investigates the effects of Thiel embalming on human digitorum profundus tendons (FDP) from fresh-frozen and Thiel embalmed cadavers. Cross-sectional area was measured at pre-load, samples were preconditioned and then ramped at a constant strain-rate to failure. Thiel preserved tendons had statistically lower failure stress with median of 38MPa compared to fresh frozen samples with median of 60MPa (p-value=0.048) and trended to a decreased tangential modulus. To overcome limited donor number and masking factors of age, gender, and time embalmed, we also performed experiments in rat tail tendon fascicle. Similar quasi-static ramp to failure tests were performed with control and Thiel treated sample pairs. Similar differences were observed to those found as in human FDP, however these trends were statistically significant. In both tendons, Thiel preserved samples demonstrated altered failure characteristics, indicating a different collagen fiber/collagen network failure mechanism most likely due to partial denaturing by boric acid in Thiel solution. In conclusion, Thiel embalmed tendons did not faithfully represent the biomechanical characteristics of fresh frozen tendons.

  18. Physiological loading of tendons induces scleraxis expression in epitenon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Bakhurin, Konstantin I; Lynch, Evan B; Brooks, Susan V

    2012-04-01

    Scleraxis is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays a central role in promoting fibroblast proliferation and matrix synthesis during the embryonic development of tendons. Mice with a targeted inactivation of scleraxis (Scx(-/-)) fail to properly form limb tendons, but the role that scleraxis has in regulating the growth and adaptation of tendons of adult organisms is unknown. To determine if scleraxis expression changes in response to a physiological growth stimulus to tendons, we subjected adult mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the scleraxis promoter (ScxGFP) to a 6-week-treadmill training program designed to induce adaptive growth in Achilles tendons. Age matched sedentary ScxGFP mice were used as controls. Scleraxis expression was sparsely observed in the epitenon region of sedentary mice, but in response to treadmill training, scleraxis was robustly expressed in fibroblasts that appeared to be emerging from the epitenon and migrating into the superficial regions of tendon fascicles. Treadmill training also led to an increase in scleraxis, tenomodulin, and type I collagen gene expression as measured by qPCR. These results suggest that in addition to regulating the embryonic formation of limb tendons, scleraxis also appears to play an important role in the adaptation of adult tendons to physiological loading.

  19. Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture while playing basketball.

    PubMed

    Shah, M; Jooma, N

    2002-04-01

    Simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture is an uncommon injury in healthy people and only a few cases have been reported in athletes. This is the first report of a patient with simultaneous bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture incurred while playing basketball. The injury was surgically repaired and the patient had a good functional outcome.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF A TENDON PHENOTYPE IN GDF6 DEFICIENT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Mikic, Borjana; Rossmeier, Kerri; Bierwert, LouAnn

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the growth/differentiation factors, GDFs 5, 6, and 7 in particular, may play a role in tendon and ligament biology. Mice with genetic mutations in Gdf5 have altered tendon composition and mechanical behavior, while animals with functional null mutations in Gdf7 have a more subtle tendon phenotype. The present study demonstrates for the first time that a null mutation in Gdf6 is associated with substantially lower levels of tail tendon collagen content (−33%) in four-week-old male mice, which has direct functional consequences for the mechanical integrity of the tissue (45-50% reduction in material properties). These data support a role for GDF6 in tendon matrix modeling. PMID:19248159

  1. Continuum model of tendon pathology – where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    McCreesh, Karen; Lewis, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Chronic tendon pathology is a common and often disabling condition, the causes of which remain poorly understood. The continuum model of tendon pathology was proposed to provide a model for the staging of tendon pathology and to assist clinicians in managing this often complex condition (Br. J. Sports Med., 43, 2009, 409). The model presents clinical, histological and imaging evidence for the progression of tendon pathology as a three-stage continuum: reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair and degenerative tendinopathy. It also provides clinical information to assist in identifying the stage of pathology, in addition to proposed treatment approaches for each stage. The usefulness of such a model is determined by its ability to incorporate and inform new and emerging research. This review examines the degree to which recent research supports or refutes the continuum model and proposes future directions for clinical and research application of the model. PMID:23837792

  2. Torque Control of Underactuated Tendon-driven Robotic Fingers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdallah, Muhammad E. (Inventor); Ihrke, Chris A. (Inventor); Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Wampler, Charles W. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor); Platt, Robert (Inventor); Bridgwater, Lyndon (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A robotic system includes a robot having a total number of degrees of freedom (DOF) equal to at least n, an underactuated tendon-driven finger driven by n tendons and n DOF, the finger having at least two joints, being characterized by an asymmetrical joint radius in one embodiment. A controller is in communication with the robot, and controls actuation of the tendon-driven finger using force control. Operating the finger with force control on the tendons, rather than position control, eliminates the unconstrained slack-space that would have otherwise existed. The controller may utilize the asymmetrical joint radii to independently command joint torques. A method of controlling the finger includes commanding either independent or parameterized joint torques to the controller to actuate the fingers via force control on the tendons.

  3. Specialisation of extracellular matrix for function in tendons and ligaments

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Helen L.; Thorpe, Chavaunne T.; Rumian, Adam P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Tendons and ligaments are similar structures in terms of their composition, organisation and mechanical properties. The distinction between them stems from their anatomical location; tendons form a link between muscle and bone while ligaments link bones to bones. A range of overlapping functions can be assigned to tendon and ligaments and each structure has specific mechanical properties which appear to be suited for particular in vivo function. The extracellular matrix in tendon and ligament varies in accordance with function, providing appropriate mechanical properties. The most useful framework in which to consider extracellular matrix differences therefore is that of function rather than anatomical location. In this review we discuss what is known about the relationship between functional requirements, structural properties from molecular to gross level, cellular gene expression and matrix turnover. The relevance of this information is considered by reviewing clinical aspects of tendon and ligament repair and reconstructive procedures. PMID:23885341

  4. System and Method for Tensioning a Robotically Actuated Tendon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiland, Matthew J. (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A tendon tensioning system includes a tendon having a proximal end and a distal end, an actuator, and a motor controller. The actuator may include a drive screw and a motor, and may be coupled with the proximal end of the tendon and configured to apply a tension through the tendon in response to an electrical current. The motor controller may be electrically coupled with the actuator, and configured to provide an electrical current having a first amplitude to the actuator until a stall tension is achieved through the tendon; provide a pulse current to the actuator following the achievement of the stall tension, where the amplitude of the pulse current is greater than the first amplitude, and return the motor to a steady state holding current following the conclusion of the pulse current.

  5. Force Model for Control of Tendon Driven Hands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pena, Edward; Thompson, David E.

    1997-01-01

    Knowing the tendon forces generated for a given task such as grasping via a model, an artificial hand can be controlled. A two-dimensional force model for the index finger was developed. This system is assumed to be in static equilibrium, therefore, the equations of equilibrium were applied at each joint. Constraint equations describing the tendon branch connectivity were used. Gaussian elimination was used to solve for the unknowns of the Linear system. Results from initial work on estimating tendon forces in post-operative hands during active motion therapy were discussed. The results are important for understanding the effects of hand position on tendon tension, elastic effects on tendon tension, and overall functional anatomy of the hand.

  6. Bioreactor optimization of tissue engineered rabbit flexor tendons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Thorfinn, J; Angelidis, I K; Gigliello, L; Pham, H M; Lindsey, D; Chang, J

    2012-02-01

    Tissue-engineered rabbit flexor tendons reseeded with cells are stronger in vitro after culture in a bioreactor. It is not known whether this effect persists in vivo. Tenocytes from New Zealand white rabbits were seeded onto rabbit rear paw flexor tendons that were deprived of cells and exposed to cyclic strain in a bioreactor. Reseeded constructs that were kept unloaded in a medium for 5 days were used as controls. The tendons were implanted to bridge a zone II defect in the rabbit. After explantation 4 weeks later, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elastic modulus (EM) were determined. Tendon constructs that were exposed to cyclic strain had significantly improved UTS and EM. Histology showed that cellularity was increased in the bioreactor tendons.

  7. Do Dietary Factors Influence Tendon Metabolism?

    PubMed

    Scott, Alex; Nordin, Cara

    2016-01-01

    There is very little direct research to conclusively prove the relevance of diet in primary tendinopathies, however it seems prudent to ask whether our current knowledge about the impact of nutrition on collagen metabolism could be useful in assessing, preventing, or treating tendinopathy. The objective of this chapter is to discuss the potential impact (negative or positive) that nutrition may have on the metabolism of tendons by summarizing the related research. The chapter briefly discusses the roles that specific vitamins, amino acids, lipids, and antioxidants have in various processes of the body that may be directly or indirectly related to tenocyte metabolism. PMID:27535270

  8. Tendon Transfers for the Hypoplastic Thumb.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2016-08-01

    Thumb hypoplasia is a component of radial longitudinal deficiency. The severity of hypoplasia can range from a slightly smaller thumb to a complete absence. Types II and IIIA hypoplastic thumbs are candidates for reconstruction to improve function, stability, and strength. There are 2 commonly used tendon transfers that can augment thumb opposition strength: the Huber abductor digiti minimi muscle transfer and the flexor digitorum superficialis opposition transfer. Both transfers use ulnar-sided structures to augment the thenar musculature. The Huber opposition transfer increases thenar bulk, but does not provide additional tissue for metacarpophalangeal stability. PMID:27387085

  9. The anisotropic compressive mechanical properties of the rabbit patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lakiesha N; Elder, Steven H; Bouvard, J L; Horstemeyer, M F

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we examine the transverse and longitudinal compressive mechanical behavior of the rabbit patellar tendon. The anisotropic compressive properties are of interest, because compression occurs where the tendon attaches to bone and where the tendon wraps around bone leading to the development of fibro-cartilaginous matrices. We quantified the time dependent viscoelastic and anisotropic behavior of the tendon under compression. For both orientations, sections of patellar tendon were drawn from mature male white New Zealand rabbits in preparation for testing. The tendons were sequentially compressed to 40% strain at strain rates of 0.1, 1 and 10% strain(s) using a computer-controlled stepper motor driven device under physiological conditions. Following monotonic loading, the tendons were subjected to stress relaxation. The tendon equilibrium compressive modulus was quantified to be 19.49+/-11.46 kPa for the transverse direction and 1.11+/-0.57 kPa for the longitudinal direction. The compressive modulus at applied strain rates of 0.1, 1 and 10% strain(s) in the transverse orientation were 13.48+/-2.31, 18.24+/-4.58 and 20.90+/-8.60 kPa, respectively. The compressive modulus at applied strain rates of 0.1, 1 and 10% strain/s in the longitudinal orientation were 0.19+/-0.11, 1.27+/-1.38 and 3.26+/-3.49 kPa, respectively. The modulus values were almost significantly different for the examination of the effect of orientation on the equilibrium modulus (p=0.054). Monotonic loading of the tendon showed visual differences of the strain rate dependency; however, no significant difference was shown in the statistical analysis of the effect of strain rate on compressive modulus. The statistical analysis of the effect of orientation on compressive modulus showed a significant difference. The difference shown in the orientation analysis validated the anisotropic nature of the tendon. PMID:19065006

  10. Characterization of mechanical and biochemical properties of developing embryonic tendon.

    PubMed

    Marturano, Joseph E; Arena, Jeffrey D; Schiller, Zachary A; Georgakoudi, Irene; Kuo, Catherine K

    2013-04-16

    Tendons have uniquely high tensile strength, critical to their function to transfer force from muscle to bone. When injured, their innate healing response results in aberrant matrix organization and functional properties. Efforts to regenerate tendon are challenged by limited understanding of its normal development. Consequently, there are few known markers to assess tendon formation and parameters to design tissue engineering scaffolds. We profiled mechanical and biological properties of embryonic tendon and demonstrated functional properties of developing tendon are not wholly reflected by protein expression and tissue morphology. Using force volume-atomic force microscopy, we found that nano- and microscale tendon elastic moduli increase nonlinearly and become increasingly spatially heterogeneous during embryonic development. When we analyzed potential biochemical contributors to modulus, we found statistically significant but weak correlation between elastic modulus and collagen content, and no correlation with DNA or glycosaminoglycan content, indicating there are additional contributors to mechanical properties. To investigate collagen cross-linking as a potential contributor, we inhibited lysyl oxidase-mediated collagen cross-linking, which significantly reduced tendon elastic modulus without affecting collagen morphology or DNA, glycosaminoglycan, and collagen content. This suggests that lysyl oxidase-mediated cross-linking plays a significant role in the development of embryonic tendon functional properties and demonstrates that changes in cross-links alter mechanical properties without affecting matrix content and organization. Taken together, these data demonstrate the importance of functional markers to assess tendon development and provide a profile of tenogenic mechanical properties that may be implemented in tissue engineering scaffold design to mechanoregulate new tendon regeneration.

  11. Recurrent patellar tendon rupture in a patient after intramedullary nailing of the tibia: reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft.

    PubMed

    Jagow, Devin M; Garcia, Branden J; Yacoubian, Stephan V; Yacoubian, Shahan V

    2015-05-01

    Various complications after intramedullary (IM) nailing of the tibia have been reported, the most common of which are anterior knee pain and symptoms similar to patella tendonitis. Complete rupture of the patellar tendon after IM nailing of the tibia has been reported on 2 occasions, in conjunction with predisposing patient factors, such as systemic disease or a proud tibial nail. Patellar tendon ruptures are disabling injuries that can be technically difficult to repair because of the poor quality of remaining tendon tissue, quadriceps muscle atrophy and/or contracture, and scar-tissue formation. Many methods have described the surgical reconstruction of the knee extensor mechanism, which is most commonly performed after total knee arthroplasty. We report the successful surgical and clinical outcome of patellar tendon reconstruction using an Achilles tendon allograft in a patient subject to late and recurrent ruptures after IM nailing of the tibia through a mid-patellar tendon-splitting approach. Seven months after tendon reconstruction, the patient exhibited full knee flexion, an extension lag of 10º, 4/5 quadriceps strength, and return to her baseline ambulatory status.

  12. Muscle-tendon glucose uptake in Achilles tendon rupture and tendinopathy before and after eccentric rehabilitation: Comparative case reports.

    PubMed

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens; Finni, Taija

    2016-09-01

    Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is the most common tendon rupture injury. The consequences of ATR on metabolic activity of the Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors are unknown. Furthermore, the effects of eccentric rehabilitation on metabolic activity patterns of Achilles tendon and ankle plantarflexors in ATR patients have not been reported thus far. We present a case study demonstrating glucose uptake (GU) in the Achilles tendon, the triceps surae, and the flexor hallucis longus of a post-surgical ATR patient before and after a 5-month eccentric rehabilitation. At baseline, three months post-surgery, all muscles and Achilles tendon displayed much higher GU in the ATR patient compared to a healthy individual despite lower plantarflexion force. After the rehabilitation, plantarflexion force increased in the operated leg while muscle GU was considerably reduced. The triceps surae muscles showed similar values to the healthy control. When compared to the healthy or a matched patient with Achilles tendon pain after 12 weeks of rehabilitation, Achilles tendon GU levels of ATR patient remained greater after the rehabilitation. Past studies have shown a shift in the metabolic fuel utilization towards glycolysis due to immobilization. Further research, combined with immuno-histological investigation, is needed to fully understand the mechanism behind excessive glucose uptake in ATR cases. PMID:27428528

  13. Calcium phosphate-hybridized tendon graft to enhance tendon-bone healing two years after ACL reconstruction in goats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We developed a novel technique to improve tendon-bone attachment by hybridizing calcium phosphate (CaP) with a tendon graft using an alternate soaking process. However, the long-term result with regard to the interface between the tendon graft and the bone is unclear. Methods We analyzed bone tunnel enlargement by computed tomography and histological observation of the interface and the tendon graft with and without the CaP hybridization 2 years after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in goats using EndoButton and the postscrew technique (CaP, n = 4; control, n = 4). Results The tibial bone tunnel enlargement rates in the CaP group were lower than those in the control group (p < 0.05). In the CaP group, in the femoral and tibial bone tunnels at the anterior and posterior of the joint aperture site, direct insertion-like formation that contained a cartilage layer without tidemarks was more observed at the tendon-bone interface than in the control group (p < 0.05). Moreover, the gap area between the tendon graft and the bone was more observed at the femoral bone tunnel of the joint aperture site in the control group than in the CaP group (p < 0.05). The maturation of the tendon grafts determined using the ligament tissue maturation index was similar in both groups. Conclusions The CaP-hybridized tendon graft enhanced the tendon-bone healing 2 years after ACL reconstruction in goats. The use of CaP-hybridized tendon grafts can reduce the bone tunnel enlargement and gap area associated with the direct insertion-like formation in the interface near the joint. PMID:22166674

  14. Influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on Achilles tendon length change at various ranges of motion

    PubMed Central

    Fukutani, Atsuki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kusumoto, Kazuki; Kurihara, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Achilles tendon length has been measured using a straight‐line model. However, this model is associated with a greater measurement error compared with a curved‐line model. Therefore, we examined the influence of neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon on its length change at various ranges of motion. Ten male subjects participated in this study. First, the location of the Achilles tendon was confirmed by using ultrasonography, and markers were attached on the skin over the Achilles tendon path. Then, the three‐dimensional coordinates of each marker at dorsiflexion (DF) 15°, plantarflexion (PF) 0°, PF15°, and PF30° were obtained. Achilles tendon length in the curved‐line model was calculated as the sum of the distances among each marker. On the other hand, Achilles tendon length in the straight‐line model was calculated as the straight distance between the two most proximal and distal markers projected onto the sagittal plane. The difference of the Achilles tendon length change between curved‐line and straight‐line models was calculated by subtracting the Achilles tendon length change obtained in curved‐line model from that obtained in straight‐line model with three different ranges of motion (i.e., PF0°, PF15°, and PF30° from DF15°, respectively). As a result, the difference in Achilles tendon length change between the two models increased significantly as the range of motion increased. In conclusion, neglecting the curved path of the Achilles tendon induces substantial overestimation of its length change when the extent of ankle joint angle change is large. PMID:25303951

  15. Tissue engineering in flexor tendon surgery: current state and future advances.

    PubMed

    Galvez, M G; Crowe, C; Farnebo, S; Chang, J

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering of flexor tendons addresses a challenge often faced by hand surgeons: the restoration of function and improvement of healing with a limited supply of donor tendons. Creating an engineered tendon construct is dependent upon understanding the normal healing mechanisms of the tendon and tendon sheath. The production of a tendon construct includes: creating a three-dimensional scaffold; seeding cells within the scaffold; encouraging cellular growth within the scaffold while maintaining a gliding surface; and finally ensuring mechanical strength. An effective construct incorporates these factors in its design, with the ultimate goal of creating tendon substitutes that are readily available to the reconstructive hand surgeon.

  16. Region-specific mechanical properties of the human patella tendon.

    PubMed

    Haraldsson, B T; Aagaard, P; Krogsgaard, M; Alkjaer, T; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2005-03-01

    The present study investigated the mechanical properties of tendon fascicles from the anterior and posterior human patellar tendon. Collagen fascicles from the anterior and posterior human patellar tendon in healthy young men (mean +/- SD, 29.0 +/- 4.6 yr, n = 6) were tested in a mechanical rig. A stereoscopic microscope equipped with a digital camera recorded elongation. The fascicles were preconditioned five cycles before the failure test based on pilot data on rat tendon fascicle. Human fascicle length increased with repeated cycles (P < 0.05); cycle 5 differed from cycle 1 (P < 0.05), but not cycles 2-4. Peak stress and yield stress were greater for anterior (76.0 +/- 9.5 and 56.6 +/- 10.4 MPa, respectively) than posterior fascicles (38.5 +/- 3.9 and 31.6 +/- 2.9 MPa, respectively), P < 0.05, while yield strain was similar (anterior 6.8 +/- 1.0%, posterior 8.7 +/- 1.4%). Tangent modulus was greater for the anterior (1,231 +/- 188 MPa) than the posterior (583 +/- 122 MPa) fascicles, P < 0.05. In conclusion, tendon fascicles from the anterior portion of the human patellar tendon in young men displayed considerably greater peak and yield stress and tangent modulus compared with the posterior portion of the tendon, indicating region-specific material properties.

  17. Patellar tendon properties with fluctuating menstrual cycle hormones.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Katherine E; Pearson, Stephen J; Onambélé, Gladys L

    2010-08-01

    Debate continues over whether skeletal muscle performance and injury risk vary over the course of the menstrual cycle. Alterations in tendon properties may play a role in the potential fluctuations of both of these variables. The aim of the current study was to determine any association between menstrual cycle phase and corresponding levels of female sex hormones and tendon properties. Fifteen normally menstruating (28-32-day cycles) healthy females (age 23 +/- 1 years, mass 63.1 +/- 2.6 kg, height 1.66 +/- 0.02 m) not taking any form of hormonal contraceptive took part in this study. In vivo patellar tendon properties and associated circulating hormonal levels were assessed on 3 occasions including days 3 +/- 0.4, 13 +/- 0.2, and 21 +/- 0.3. Dynamometry, ultrasonography, electromyography, and biochemical assessment of circulating levels of estradiol and progesterone were utilized. No significant differences were seen in tendon mechanical properties among the 3 phases of the menstrual cycle (p > 0.05). Regressions were carried out and revealed that estrogen and maximal voluntary tendon force explained 17.8% (p = 0.043) of the variance in young's modulus. Our findings link estrogen to a chronic, rather than an acute, impact on tendon behavior. These findings are relevant to clinical outcomes, exercise performance, and injury risk. In terms of tendon properties, menstrual cycle phase does not necessarily need to be considered when organizing training and competition schedules.

  18. Temporal healing in rat achilles tendon: ultrasound correlations.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Connie S; Duenwald-Kuehl, Sarah E; Okotie, Gregory; Brounts, Sabrina H; Baer, Geoffrey S; Vanderby, Ray

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether a new ultrasound-based technique correlates with mechanical and biological metrics that describe the tendon healing. Achilles tendons in 32 rats were unilaterally transected and allowed to heal without repair. At 7, 9, 14, or 29 days post-injury, tendons were collected and examined for healing via ultrasound image analysis, mechanical testing, and immunohistochemistry. Consistent with previous studies, we observe that the healing tendons are mechanically inferior (ultimate stress, ultimate load, and normalized stiffness) and biologically altered (cellular and ECM factors) compared to contralateral controls with an incomplete recovery over healing time. Unique to this study, we report: (1) Echo intensity (defined by gray-scale brightness in the ultrasound image) in the healing tissue is related to stress and normalized stiffness. (2) Elongation to failure is relatively constant so that tissue normalized stiffness is linearly correlated with ultimate stress. Together, 1 and 2 suggest a method to quantify mechanical compromise in healing tendons. (3) The amount and type of collagen in healing tendons associates with their strength and normalized stiffness as well as their ultrasound echo intensity. (4) A significant increase of periostin in the healing tissues suggests an important but unexplored role for this ECM protein in tendon healing.

  19. Current Concepts in Examination and Treatment of Elbow Tendon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Nirschl, Robert; Renstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the tendons of the elbow occur frequently in the overhead athlete, creating a significant loss of function and dilemma to sports medicine professionals. A detailed review of the anatomy, etiology, and pathophysiology of tendon injury coupled with comprehensive evaluation and treatment information is needed for clinicians to optimally design treatment programs for rehabilitation and prevention. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in January 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendon injury. Results: Detailed information on tendon pathophysiology was found along with incidence of elbow injury in overhead athletes. Several evidence-based reviews were identified, providing a thorough review of the recommended rehabilitation for elbow tendon injury. Conclusions: Humeral epicondylitis is an extra-articular tendon injury that is common in athletes subjected to repetitive upper extremity loading. Research is limited on the identification of treatment modalities that can reduce pain and restore function to the elbow. Eccentric exercise has been studied in several investigations and, when coupled with a complete upper extremity strengthening program, can produce positive results in patients with elbow tendon injury. Further research is needed in high-level study to delineate optimal treatment methods. PMID:24427389

  20. Absence of the flexor digitorum longus tendon: an MRI study.

    PubMed

    Magra, Merzesh; Taqvi, Syed; Cooper, Robert; Blundell, Chris M; Davies, Mark B

    2012-11-01

    Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) is the primary flexor of the lateral four toes. It is a reliable source of tendon for transfer surgery. We present a case whereby a patient who required a reconstruction for adult acquired flatfoot deformity using FDL as a dynamic structure for transfer was found to have an absent FDL tendon at the time of operation, necessitating the use of flexor hallucis longus (FHL) instead. This unusual finding prompted us to investigate the frequency of absence of the FDL tendon. We reviewed our hospital MRI database of foot and ankle images specifically looking for patients with absence of this tendon. After randomization, 756 images were reviewed independently by two surgeons and a consultant musculoskeletal radiologist. No instances of an absent FDL tendon were identified. In conclusion, the frequency of absence of the FDL tendon is less than 1 in 750. Surgeons who require FDL for tendon transfer surgery need not image the foot preoperatively to anticipate the need for the use of FHL as an alternative. PMID:22334461

  1. Quantification of regional blood flow to canine flexor tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Weidman, K.A.; Simonet, W.T.; Wood, M.B.; Cooney, W.P.; Ilstrup, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Although the blood supply and the microcirculation of flexor tendons have been studied and defined extensively using qualitative methods, the quantitative assessment of blood flow has been lacking because of the limitations of the available experimental techniques. The authors studied the regional blood supply to the flexor tendons of dogs by the technique of radionuclide-labeled microspheres. Seven adult mongrel dogs were used. Microsphere injection and tissue-counting techniques previously used for other tissues were applied. Samples of proximal, isthmus, and distal portions of the profundus and superficialis flexor tendons were harvested from each digital unit of available limbs from each dog. Mean (+/- SE) flows (ml/100 g dry tissue/min) were proximal profundus 1.78 +/- 0.60 and superficialis 7.10 +/- 1.50. The differences were significant. The study suggests that regional variation in blood flow to canine digital flexor tendons exists, so that a single value for blood flow to these tendons is not relevant. Furthermore, the study supports the concept of dual (vascular and synovial) nutrition to the digital flexor tendons in dogs. These observations may have implications regarding tendon repair techniques.

  2. Injury of the Achilles tendon: diagnosis with sonography.

    PubMed

    Kainberger, F M; Engel, A; Barton, P; Huebsch, P; Neuhold, A; Salomonowitz, E

    1990-11-01

    We determined the diagnostic accuracy of sonography for the assessment of injury to the Achilles tendon. After anatomic investigations in three human cadavers, we performed a clinical study in 24 healthy volunteers and 73 symptomatic patients referred for achillodynia or signs of heel thickening or both in whom a clinical diagnosis of acute total rupture was excluded. High-resolution real-time sonography was performed and the results were compared with final clinical diagnoses (55 patients) and surgical findings (18 patients). Fifty-two of the patients had been involved in various sporting activities (long-distance runners, jumpers, and basketball players), three patients had familial hypercholesterolemia, five patients had systemic inflammatory disease, and 13 patients had no known underlying cause. Anatomic investigation demonstrated accurate assessment of tendon structure and thickness. Sonograms were abnormal in 53 patients (sensitivity, 0.72; specificity, 0.83), and the extent of structural disorders of the tendon could be assessed properly. Abnormalities occurred in the form of tendon swelling (45%), abnormal tendon structure (42%), rupture (15%), and peritendinous lesions (47%). No changes were detected in low-grade disease of short duration, which suggests symptoms caused by functional disorders. Sonography is valuable in the diagnosis of various lesions of the Achilles tendon and its surrounding tissue. Furthermore, it can be used to estimate the degree of tendon abnormality and to differentiate between functional and morphologic conditions.

  3. Tenocyte contraction induces crimp formation in tendon-like tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, David F.; Hill, Patrick; Kadler, Karl E.; Margetts, Lee

    2013-01-01

    Tendons are composed of longitudinally aligned collagen fibrils arranged in bundles with an undulating pattern, called crimp. The crimp structure is established during embryonic development and plays a vital role in the mechanical behaviour of tendon, acting as a shock absorber during loading. However, the mechanism of crimp formation is unknown, partly because of the difficulties of studying tendon development in vivo. Here we used a 3D cell culture system in which embryonic tendon fibroblasts synthesize a tendon-like construct comprised of collagen fibrils arranged in parallel bundles. Investigations using polarized light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy showed that tendon-constructs contained a regular pattern of wavy collagen fibrils. Tensile testing indicated that this superstructure was a form of embryonic crimp producing a characteristic toe region in the stress-strain curves. Furthermore, contraction of tendon fibroblasts was the critical factor in the buckling of collagen fibrils during the formation of the crimp structure. Using these biological data, a finite element model was built that mimics the contraction of the tendon fibroblasts and monitors the response of the ECM. The results show that the contraction of the fibroblasts is a sufficient mechanical impulse to build a planar wavy pattern. Furthermore, the value of crimp wavelength was determined by the mechanical properties of the collagen fibrils and inter-fibrillar matrix. Increasing fibril stiffness combined with constant matrix stiffness led to an increase in crimp wavelength. The data suggest a novel mechanism of crimp formation, and the finite element model indicates the minimum requirements to generate a crimp structure in embryonic tendon. PMID:21735243

  4. Spatial variations in Achilles tendon shear wave speed

    PubMed Central

    DeWall, Ryan J.; Slane, Laura C.; Lee, Kenneth S.; Thelen, Darryl G.

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic shear imaging (SSI) is an ultrasound imaging modality that can provide insight into tissue mechanics by measuring shear wave propagation speed, a property that depends on tissue elasticity. SSI has previously been used to characterize the increase in Achilles tendon shear wave speed that occurs with loading, an effect attributable to the strain-stiffening behavior of the tissue. However, little is known about how shear wave speed varies spatially, which is important, given the anatomical variation that occurs between the calcaneus insertion and the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction. The purpose of this study was to investigate spatial variations in shear wave speed along medial and lateral paths of the Achilles tendon for three different ankle postures: resting ankle angle (R, i.e. neutral), plantarflexed (P; R − 15 deg), and dorsiflexed (D; R + 15 deg). We observed significant spatial and posture variations in tendon shear wave speed in ten healthy young adults. Shear wave speeds in the Achilles free tendon averaged 12 ± 1.2 m/s in a resting position, but decreased to 7.2 ± 1.8 m/s with passive plantarflexion. Distal tendon shear wave speeds often reached the maximum tracking limit (16.3 m/s) of the system when the ankle was in the passively dorsiflexed posture (+15 deg from R). At a fixed posture, shear wave speeds decreased significantly from the free tendon to the gastrocnemius musculotendon junction, with slightly higher speeds measured on the medial side than on the lateral side. Shear wave speeds were only weakly correlated with the thickness and depth of the tendon, suggesting that the distal-to-proximal variations may reflect greater compliance in the aponeurosis relative to the free tendon. The results highlight the importance of considering both limb posture and transducer positioning when using SSI for biomechanical and clinical assessments of the Achilles tendon. PMID:24933528

  5. Imaging horse tendons using multimodal 2-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Eichorst, John Paul; Durgam, Sushmitha; Fried, Glenn A; Stewart, Allison A; Stewart, Matthew C

    2014-03-15

    Injuries and damage to tendons plague both human and equine athletes. At the site of injuries, various cells congregate to repair and re-structure the collagen. Treatments for collagen injury range from simple procedures such as icing and pharmaceutical treatments to more complex surgeries and the implantation of stem cells. Regardless of the treatment, the level of mechanical stimulation incurred by the recovering tendon is crucial. However, for a given tendon injury, it is not known precisely how much of a load should be applied for an effective recovery. Both too much and too little loading of the tendon could be detrimental during recovery. A mapping of the complex local environment imparted to any cell present at the site of a tendon injury may however, convey fundamental insights related to their decision making as a function of applied load. Therefore, fundamentally knowing how cells translate mechanical cues from their external environment into signals regulating their functions during repair is crucial to more effectively treat these types of injuries. In this paper, we studied systems of tendons with a variety of 2-photon-based imaging techniques to examine the local mechanical environment of cells in both normal and injured tendons. These tendons were chemically treated to instigate various extents of injury and in some cases, were injected with stem cells. The results related by each imaging technique distinguish with high contrast and resolution multiple morphologies of the cells' nuclei and the alignment of the collagen during injury. The incorporation of 2-photon FLIM into this study probed new features in the local environment of the nuclei that were not apparent with steady-state imaging. Overall, this paper focuses on horse tendon injury pattern and analysis with different 2-photon confocal modalities useful for wide variety of application in damaged tissues.

  6. Tendon transfers in the treatment of the adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Backus, Jonathon D; McCormick, Jeremy J

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfers are critical to successful surgical correction of adult flexible flatfoot deformity and may be beneficial in correcting rigid deformities as well. Patients with refractory stage I and II deformities often require selective osteotomies in addition to tendon transfer. Patients with stage III and IV deformities typically require hindfoot arthrodesis. One of several tendons can be used for transfer based on surgeon's preference. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfers have been shown to have good results. A peroneus brevis transfer is typically used to supplement small FDL or FHL transfer donors or in revision cases.

  7. Recurrent hypertrophic peroneal tubercle associated with peroneus brevis tendon tear.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Leah M; Banerjee, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Stenosing peroneal tenosynovitis resulting from hypertrophy of the peroneal tubercle has been well described. Successful surgical treatment addresses the hypertrophied peroneal tubercle as well as any intrinsic tendon pathology. We report a case of recurrent foot pain caused by stenosing peroneal tenosynovitis in a 16-year-old woman. Four months after excision of a hypertrophic peroneal tubercle, the patient developed a recurrence of symptoms. Imaging studies, repeat operative exploration, and pathologic specimen demonstrated a recurrence of the peroneal tubercle hypertrophy associated with a longitudinal tear of the peroneus brevis tendon. Re-resection of the hypertrophied tubercle and peroneal tendon repair resulted in a resolution of symptoms. PMID:17761327

  8. Arthroscopic Recognition and Repair of the Torn Subscapularis Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Denard, Patrick J.; Burkhart, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the subscapularis has historically received less attention than posterosuperior rotator cuff tears, repair of a torn subscapularis tendon is critically important to restoring anatomy and achieving the best functional outcome possible. Arthroscopic repair begins with proper recognition of the tear. A systematic approach can then be used to arthroscopically repair all types of subscapularis tendon tears, from partial tears to full-thickness tears, as well as those which are retracted and have adhesions medially. Subscapularis footprint restoration can be accomplished with a variety of repair techniques that must be matched to the extent of the tear and mobility of the tendon. PMID:24400185

  9. Tendon transfers in the treatment of the adult flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Backus, Jonathon D; McCormick, Jeremy J

    2014-03-01

    Tendon transfers are critical to successful surgical correction of adult flexible flatfoot deformity and may be beneficial in correcting rigid deformities as well. Patients with refractory stage I and II deformities often require selective osteotomies in addition to tendon transfer. Patients with stage III and IV deformities typically require hindfoot arthrodesis. One of several tendons can be used for transfer based on surgeon's preference. Flexor digitorum longus (FDL) and flexor hallucis longus (FHL) transfers have been shown to have good results. A peroneus brevis transfer is typically used to supplement small FDL or FHL transfer donors or in revision cases. PMID:24548507

  10. Measurement of friction between pulley and flexor tendon.

    PubMed

    An, K N; Berglund, L; Uchiyama, S; Coert, J H

    1993-01-01

    When tendon excursion takes place through the pulley, friction and drag are encountered at the interface. Repetitive exposure to such friction and attrition of the tendon has been considered one of the important factors causing cumulative trauma and leading to disorders such as tendinitis and tenosynovitis. In this study, development of an experimental method to evaluate friction and drag between the pulley and tendon under different loading conditions and joint configurations is considered. Verification of the model under an ideal situation of sutures across a mechanical pulley was performed.

  11. Endoscopic Resection of Lipoma of the Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing; Lee, Man Wai

    2015-01-01

    Synovial lipoma of the patellar tendon is a very rare entity. It can be associated with rupture of the patellar tendon. We present a case of synovial lipoma that was successfully resected endoscopically. The other indications for patellar tendoscopy include chronic patellar tendinitis and tendinosis, recalcitrant bursitis around the tendon, Osgood-Schlatter disease, and jumper's knee. The major potential danger of this endoscopic procedure is iatrogenic damage to the patellar insertion during endoscopic debridement in patients with jumper's knee or the tibial insertion during endoscopic debridement in patients with Osgood-Schlatter disease. PMID:25973368

  12. Tendon bottom connector for a tension leg platform

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, R.M.

    1991-04-02

    This patent describes a floating tension-leg platform having anchoring tendons extending from the platform with the lower ends of the tendons being connected in tension to anchor means fixedly secured to the ocean floor in deep water, the connection being made by underwater-actuatable and remotely-connectable and releasable tendon connector means. It includes first and second connector portions a first inwardly-directed camming surface; a circumferential latching groove; a latching shoulder; a second camming surface; a latching sleeve; collet spring fingers; and outwardly-extending latches.

  13. Repair of severe muscle belly lacerations using a tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Botte, M J; Gelberman, R H; Smith, D G; Silver, M A; Gellman, H

    1987-05-01

    Fourteen patients with 58 severe forearm muscle belly lacerations had muscle repair using tendon grafts. At mean follow-up of 14 months, results of manual muscle testing (N = 58) were: grade 5, 42%, grade 4, 14%, grade 3, 9%, grade 2, 9%, grade 1, 12%, and grade 0, 15%. Mean grip strength of the injured extremity, in pounds per square inch, was 33.5 compared with 83.4 on the noninjured side. Tendon excursion and joint mobility were maintained, and there were no postoperative complications. Tendon grafting of severe muscle lacerations is an effective method to overcome extensive defects.

  14. Compressive properties of cd-HA-gelatin modified intrasynovial tendon allograft in canine model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun; Zhao, Chunfeng; Chen, Qingshan; Thoreson, Andrew R; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2011-06-01

    Although we sometimes use the intrasynovial tendon allograft as a donor, the gliding ability of allograft prepared by lyophilization is significantly decreased. The gliding ability of the grafted tendon after tendon reconstruction is very important because the high gliding resistance causes more adhesion and leads to poor clinical results. We recently revealed that tendon surface treatment with a carbodiimide derivatized HA (cd-HA)-gelatin mixture for intrasynovial tendon allograft significantly improved its gliding ability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether this cd-HA-gelatin treatment affects the tendon mechanical property or not. A total of 40 flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) tendons from canines were evaluated for compressive property by using indentation test. Indentation stiffness was measured for normal tendon, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization, rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo, and cd-HA treated rehydrated tendon after lyophilization that was implanted 6 weeks in vivo. The results for all groups showed no significant difference in the tendon compressive properties. The findings of these results demonstrate that cd-HA treatment for intrasynovial tendon allograft is an excellent method to improve the tendon gliding ability after lyophilization without changing the compressive property of donor tendon. PMID:21549380

  15. Human hamstring tenocytes survive when seeded into a decellularized porcine Achilles tendon extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Anke; Stoll, Christiane; Albrecht, Marit; Denner, Andreas; John, Thilo; Krüger, Kay; Ertel, Wolfgang; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula

    2013-01-01

    Tendon ruptures and defects remain major orthopaedic challenges. Tendon healing is a time-consuming process, which results in scar tissue with an altered biomechanical competence. Using a xenogeneic tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) as a natural scaffold, which can be reseeded with autologous human tenocytes, might be a promising approach to reconstruct damaged tendons. For this purpose, the porcine Achilles (AS) tendons serving as a scaffold were histologically characterized in comparison to human cell donor tendons. AS tendons were decellularized and then reseeded with primary human hamstring tenocytes using cell centrifuging, rotating culture and cell injection techniques. Vitality testing, histology and glycosaminoglycan/DNA quantifications were performed to document the success of tendon reseeding. Porcine AS tendons were characterized by a higher cell and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content than human cell donor tendons. Complete decellularization could be achieved, but led to a wash out of sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Nevertheless, porcine tendon could be recellularized with vital human tenocytes. The recellularization led to a slight increase in cell number compared to the native tendon and some glycosaminoglycan recovery. This study indicates that porcine tendon can be de- and recellularized using adult human tenocytes. Future work should optimize cell distribution within the recellularized tendon ECM and consider tendon- and donor species-dependent differences.

  16. The long head of the biceps tendon is a suitable cell source for tendon tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Matthias F.; Gülecyüz, Mehmet F.; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Jansson, Volkmar; Müller, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tendon tissue engineering (TTE) tries to produce tendinous tissue of high quality to replace dysfunctional tissue. One possible application of TTE might be the replacement of ruptured tissue of the rotator cuff. Autologous tenocytes seem to be most suitable as no differentiation in vitro is necessary. Today it is still uncertain if there is a difference between tendon-derived cells (TDC) of different native tissues. Moreover, the search for suitable scaffolds is another important issue in TTE. Material and methods This study compared TDC of the long head of the biceps tendon (LHB), the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the tendon of the musculus semitendinosus (TMS). The TDC were isolated using the cell migration method. Cell morphology was assessed using light microscopy and gene expression was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterwards, cell seeding efficiency and proliferation were tested on a collagen I scaffold using the WST-1 assay. Results were confirmed using H + E staining. Results The TDC of the LHB showed higher expression levels of collagen type I and decorin (p < 0.01) compared to TDC of other origin. Results showed efficient cell seeding and proliferation within the scaffold. Proliferation within the scaffold was not as high as when cells were cultivated without a scaffold. Conclusions The TDC of the LHB seems to be the most suitable cell source. Further research is necessary to find out if the results can be transferred to an in vivo model. The new collagen I scaffold seems to offer an opportunity to combine good biocompatibility and mechanical strength. PMID:25097592

  17. Human iPSC-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Tendon Repair in a Rat Patellar Tendon Window Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Luo, Ziwei; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Wanqian; Zhong, Li; Lv, Yonggang; Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent that are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal lineages. In this study, we investigated whether iPSC-derived NCSCs (iPSC-NCSCs) have potential for tendon repair. Human iPSC-NCSCs were suspended in fibrin gel and transplanted into a rat patellar tendon window defect. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, macroscopical observation showed that the repair of iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons was superior to that of non-iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons. Histological and mechanical examinations revealed that iPSC-NCSCs treatment significantly enhanced tendon healing as indicated by the improvement in matrix synthesis and mechanical properties. Furthermore, transplanted iPSC-NCSCs produced fetal tendon-related matrix proteins, stem cell recruitment factors, and tenogenic differentiation factors, and accelerated the host endogenous repair process. This study demonstrates a potential strategy of employing iPSC-derived NCSCs for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:23815150

  18. The suture loop holding capacity of flexor digitorum profundus tendon within and outside the digital tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Havulinna, J; Leppänen, O V; Göransson, H

    2013-09-01

    In a previous study we found that the strength of a Kessler core suture in the flexor tendon was greater in flexor zone 2 than in zone 3. To further investigate the material properties of the flexor tendon without the influence of a locking suture configuration, we measured the ultimate strength of a simple loop suture in the flexor digitorum profundus tendon in zones 1, 2, and 3. Eight cadaver flexor digitorum profundus tendons were tested in 10 mm increments with a 3-0 polyester suture loop pull-out test in the mid-substance of the tendon. The mean strength in zones 1 and 2 (26.7 N, SD 5.6) was significantly higher than the mean strength in zone 3 (17.7 N, SD 5.4). We conclude that the difference is owing to variations of the structure of the flexor tendon in different sections of the tendon, as the suture configuration was a simple loop without a locking or grasping component. PMID:23315625

  19. Late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following cruciate ligament reconstruction using central quadriceps tendon graft.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Joseph, Amy; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-10-16

    Central quadriceps tendon (CQT) graft has been successfully used as a viable autograft option in cruciate ligament reconstruction of the knee. The prime emphasis in the majority of the literature is given to surgical details of quadriceps graft harvesting and outcome of cruciate ligament reconstruction. There is less discussion about donor site morbidity in CQT graft, and it is less frequent as compared to that in bone patellar tendon bone graft. We report an extremely unusual case of late quadriceps tendon rupture at the donor site following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using CQT graft.

  20. Technical tips: reconstruction of deep and superficial deltoid ligaments by peroneus longus tendon in stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lui, T H

    2014-12-01

    The deltoid ligament is composed of the superficial and deep layers. Disruption of the deltoid ligament can occur in rotational ankle fracture, chronic ankle instability, or stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Correcting valgus tilt at the time of flatfoot reconstruction in case of stage 4 posterior tibial tendon dysfunction may prevent future collapse and the need for ankle arthrodesis or possibly ankle arthroplasty. We describe a technique of reconstruction of both the superficial and deep deltoid ligaments by peroneus longus tendon. PMID:25457670

  1. Tension Stiffened and Tendon Actuated Manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R. (Inventor); Dorsey, John T. (Inventor); Ganoe, George G. (Inventor); King, Bruce D. (Inventor); Jones, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mercer, Charles D. (Inventor); Corbin, Cole K. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A tension stiffened and tendon actuated manipulator is provided performing robotic-like movements when acquiring a payload. The manipulator design can be adapted for use in-space, lunar or other planetary installations as it is readily configurable for acquiring and precisely manipulating a payload in both a zero-g environment and in an environment with a gravity field. The manipulator includes a plurality of link arms, a hinge connecting adjacent link arms together to allow the adjacent link arms to rotate relative to each other and a cable actuation and tensioning system provided between adjacent link arms. The cable actuation and tensioning system includes a spreader arm and a plurality of driven and non-driven elements attached to the link arms and the spreader arm. At least one cable is routed around the driven and non-driven elements for actuating the hinge.

  2. Augmented repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures.

    PubMed

    Zell, R A; Santoro, V M

    2000-06-01

    Twenty-five patients who had an acute Achilles tendon rupture were managed with an augmented repair using the gastrocnemius-soleus fascia. All patients healed their repair and there were no re-ruptures. There was one infection. Augmented repair allowed early functional recovery as evidenced by full ankle motion by four to eight weeks, full unassisted weight bearing by three weeks, cessation of braces by four weeks, and return to work by one to six weeks post-operatively. Augmentation adds a sufficient amount of collagen to allow early range of motion and weight bearing without re-rupture. Disadvantages included a long incision, soft tissue prominence, one infection, and sural nerve injury.

  3. Right ventricular false tendons, a cadaveric approach.

    PubMed

    Loukas, Marios; Wartmann, Christopher T; Tubbs, R Shane; Apaydin, Nihal; Louis, Robert G; Black, Brandie; Jordan, Robert

    2008-06-01

    Left ventricular false tendons (LFTs) have been extensively described and recognized by gross anatomic studies. However, there is very little information available regarding right ventricular false tendons (RFTs). The aim of our study, therefore, was to explore and delineate the morphology, topography and morphometry of the RFTs, and provide a comprehensive picture of their anatomy across a broad range of specimens. We identified 35/100 heart specimens containing right ventricular RFTs and classified them into five types. In Type I (21, 47.7%) the RFTs, was located between the ventricular septum and the anterior papillary muscle; in Type II (11, 22.9%) between ventricular septum and the posterior papillary muscle; in Type III (7, 14.5%) between the anterior leaflet of the tricuspid valve and the right ventricular free wall; in Type IV (5, 10.4%) between the posterior papillary muscle and the ventricular free wall; and lastly, in Type V (4, 8.3%) between the anterior papillary muscle and ventricular free wall. The mean length of the RFTs was 18 +/- 7 mm with a mean diameter of 1.4 +/- 05 mm. Histologic examination with Masson trichrome and PAS revealed that 20 (41.6%) of the 48 RFTs carried conduction tissue fibers. The presence of conduction tissue fibers within the RFTs was limited to Types I, III, and IV. In Types II and V the RFTs resembled fibrous structures in contrast with Type I, II and IV, which were composed more of muscular fibers, including conduction tissue fibers. RFTs containing conduction tissue fibers were identified, which may implicate them in the appearance of arrhythmias.

  4. Prestressed concrete using KEVLAR reinforced tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    KEVLAR is a high strength, high modulus synthetic fiber manufactured by the E.I. DuPont de Nemours Company. The fiber is resistant to chloride and alkali attack. The resistance is enhanced when the fibers are assembled into a resin matrix and fabricated as rods. These properties suggest that KEVLAR reinforced rods may be a substitute for high strength steel prestress tendons in certain applications such as bridge decks and parking structures. This dissertation presents the background, theoretical development, and experimental investigations of KEVLAR reinforced rod strength, anchorage, fabrication and performance in prestressed concrete structures. The study concludes that KEVLAR has significant potential for these prestressed concrete applications. However, the reliability of the long term anchorage of the KEVLAR reinforced rods must be improved before production applications are undertaken. KEVLAR has a low shear strength compared to its tensile capacity. The anchorage of KEVLAR reinforced rods is sensitive to the shear forces generated in the anchorage assembly. Finite element analyses, using interface elements to simulate the addition of a mold release agent in a conic anchor, predict the behavior of resin socketed anchors. Test results confirm that mold release agents reduce the anchor shear stresses and suggest that moderate strength resins may be used in the anchor. KEVLAR is nearly linearly elastic to failure, yet ductility of a structure is an important design concern. Prestressed concrete beam tests using both bonded and unbonded tendons demonstrated that ductile structural behavior is obtained. Methods of predicting the strength and deflection behavior of the prestressed beams are presented and the theoretical predictions are compared to the experimental results. The overall correlation between predicted and theoretical results is satisfactory.

  5. An ink surgical marker pen is damaging to tendon cells

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, S. L.; Jayadev, C.; Poulsen, R.; Hulley, P.; Price, A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Surgical marking during tendon surgery is often used for technical and teaching purposes. This study investigates the effect of a gentian violet ink marker pen, a common surgical marker, on the viability of the tissue and cells of tendon. Methods In vitro cell and tissue methods were used to test the viability of human hamstring explants and the migrating tenocytes in the presence of the gentian violet ink. Results The outcome of this study was that a constituent of the surgical marker pen causes cell and tissue death in culture, implying the same would occur in vivo. Conclusions This is a cause for concern when marking tendon during surgical procedures, as it may compromise healing and repair and potentially contribute to a poor outcome. The authors suggest that an alternative surgical marking procedure should be found, or that all marker pens should undergo testing on human tendon tissue in vitro prior to use. PMID:23610669

  6. [Neglected ipsilateral simultaneous ruptures of patellar and quadriceps tendon].

    PubMed

    Karahasanoğlu, İlker; Yoloğlu, Osman; Kerimoğlu, Servet; Turhan, Ahmet Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Neglected patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare injury, but ipsilateral simultaneous patellar and quadriceps tendon rupture was not described in the literature to our knowledge. In this article, we report a 40-year-old healthy male patient with neglected ipsilateral patellar and quadriceps tendon ruptures treated by peroneus longus tendon autograft. Patient had received some conservative and surgical treatments for patellar fracture before applying to our clinic. After our treatment using peroneus longus autograft and interference nails, patient was immobilized for six weeks in cylindrical cast. Flexion exercises and full weight bearing were started after cast removal. Patient had no complaint at postoperative second year. Patient was a neglected case. Surgical repair and early rehabilitation enabled us to achieve a satisfactory outcome.

  7. Rupture of adductor longus tendon due to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Mouzopoulos, George; Stamatakos, Mihalis; Vasiliadis, George; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2005-12-01

    We present a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the adductor longus tendon induced by ciprofloxacin. A 35-year-old man was diagnosed with pneumonia and was recommended ciprofloxacin 500 mg iv twice a day for 7 days. Three days after receiving the initial dose, he developed discomfort in his left medial thigh, and pain and swelling in the same area followed ten days later. He consulted us when he noted a palpable mass on the medial side of his left thigh, and MRI study revealed adductor longus tendon rupture. There was no obvious underlying disease or other factor causing fragility of his adductor longus tendon. We review the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to fluoroquinolone-related tendon rupture as well as the risk factors and discuss proper management.

  8. A comprehensive approach for studying muscle-tendon mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, D; Bey, M

    1994-02-01

    A comprehensive approach for studying the mechanics of partially intact muscle-tendon (MT) complexes was developed. This approach utilizes a work station which integrates state-of-the-art equipment and software. The hardware includes a nerve stimulator, ergometer, high speed video camera and recorder, computer, and temperature regulated chamber. When used in conjunction with a small animal muscle model, the work station provides accurate control of muscle stimulation, MT length, and MT shortening or stretching velocity. Simultaneously, muscle force and both muscle and tendon kinematics can be recorded. This approach is unique in that it allows simultaneous testing of both muscle and tendon under physiological conditions. Additionally, both gross and local deformations of the muscle and tendon can be determined. Sample results from a study of a rat tibialis anterior muscle illustrate the utility of this approach.

  9. Full-thickness quadriceps tendon: An easy cruciate reconstruction graft.

    PubMed

    Slullitel, D; Blasco, A; Periotti, G

    2001-09-01

    Full-thickness quadriceps tendon strength has been found to be similar or higher than that of the patellar tendon. Current techniques spare the deep vastus intermedius to avoid piercing the suprapatellar pouch, which might result in loss of visualization. This approach mainly results in loss of graft thickness and surgical problems related to the dissection made through the tendon. We describe a technique where a full-thickness graft can be used, making tendon stripping easier. We also describe how to preserve visualization during surgery. A double anchorage of the tendinous part of the graft on the femoral side is used together with fixation of the bone end on the tibial side, allowing early motion and thereby avoiding suprapatellar pouch adhesions.

  10. Cellular therapy in bone-tendon interface regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-01-01

    The intrasynovial bone-tendon interface is a gradual transition from soft tissue to bone, with two intervening zones of uncalcified and calcified fibrocartilage. Following injury, the native anatomy is not restored, resulting in inferior mechanical properties and an increased risk of re-injury. Recent in vivo studies provide evidence of improved healing when surgical repair of the bone-tendon interface is augmented with cells capable of undergoing chondrogenesis. In particular, cellular therapy in bone-tendon healing can promote fibrocartilage formation and associated improvements in mechanical properties. Despite these promising results in animal models, cellular therapy in human patients remains largely unexplored. This review highlights the development and structure-function relationship of normal bone-tendon insertions. The natural healing response to injury is discussed, with subsequent review of recent research on cellular approaches for improved healing. Finally, opportunities for translating in vivo findings into clinical practice are identified. PMID:24326955

  11. Cyclic tensile strain upregulates collagen synthesis in isolated tendon fascicles

    SciTech Connect

    Screen, Hazel R.C. . E-mail: H.R.C.Screen@qmul.ac.uk; Shelton, Julia C.; Bader, Dan L.; Lee, David A.

    2005-10-21

    Mechanical stimulation has been implicated as an important regulatory factor in tendon homeostasis. In this study, a custom-designed tensile loading system was used to apply controlled mechanical stimulation to isolated tendon fascicles, in order to examine the effects of 5% cyclic tensile strain at 1 Hz on cell proliferation and matrix synthesis. Sample viability and gross structural composition were maintained over a 24 h loading period. Data demonstrated no statistically significant differences in cell proliferation or glycosaminoglycan production, however, collagen synthesis was upregulated with the application of cyclic tensile strain over the 24 h period. Moreover, a greater proportion of the newly synthesised matrix was retained within the sample after loading. These data provide evidence of altered anabolic activity within tendon in response to mechanical stimuli, and suggest the importance of cyclic tensile loading for the maintenance of the collagen hierarchy within tendon.

  12. Cost effective TLP installation methods and tendon top connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wybro, P.G.; Chaison, M.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a novel TLP tendon top connector and motion arrest system. The top connector and motion arrest system is inherently linked to the method used to install the platform, and methods for platform installation are described. This method of installation is most suitable for deepwater and/or large TLP structures, but can also be used in moderate water depth as well. The tendon installation method utilizes the so-called Platform Arrestor Concept (PAC). The installation is procedurally not complex and calls for relatively simple installation equipment, and also enables the use of simple tendon tie-off equipment, such as a single piece nut. The tendons can be pre-installed to the foundation prior to platform arrival, or can be co-installed, i.e., installed while the platform is on location.

  13. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics in rat tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Zhang, X. Z.; Qiu, Y. S.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of skeletal muscle fibers in tail tendons, explore the content of intrinsic components at different depths and ascertain the optimum excitation wavelength, which will help to establish a relationship between diagnosis and therapy and the tendon injury. A multiphoton microscopic imaging system was used to achieve the images and spectra via an imaging mode and a Lambda mode, respectively. This work demonstrates that the skeletal muscle fibers of the tail tendon are in good order. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals originating from certain intrinsic components are varied with depth, and the SHG/TPEF intensity ratios are varied at different excitation wavelengths. Below 800 nm is the optimum for cell TPEF, while above 800 nm is the optimum for SHG. With the development of imaging techniques, a nonlinear optical imaging system will be helpful to represent the functional behaviors of tissue related to tendon injury.

  14. Tendon and ligament adaptation to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization.

    PubMed

    Wren, T A; Beaupré, G S; Carter, D R

    2000-01-01

    This study provides a theoretical and computational basis for understanding and predicting how tendons and ligaments adapt to exercise, immobilization, and remobilization. In a previous study, we introduced a model that described the growth and development of tendons and ligaments. In this study, we use the same model to predict changes in the cross-sectional area, modulus, and strength of tendons and ligaments due to increased or decreased loading. The model predictions are consistent with the results of experimental exercise and immobilization studies performed by other investigators. These results suggest that the same fundamental principles guide both development and adaptation. A basic understanding of these principles can contribute both to prevention of tendon and ligament injuries and to more effective rehabilitation when injury does occur.

  15. Acute Bilateral Traumatic Achilles Tendon Rupture – A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Maulik; Golwala, Paresh; Merh, Aditya; Patel, Amit

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, which is commonly ruptured in male athletes. Bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon is a rare condition with very few reported cases in the literature. It poses a challenge in management, and hence, we report a case with traumatic bilateral Achilles tendon rupture in a young male patient and its management. One side was treated conservatively as the rupture was partial and the other side, which had a complete tear, was operated. At nine months follow-up, the patient has had a satisfactory result and is now bearing full weight without any problems. We suggest this method of treatment to be worthwhile for this unusual entity. PMID:27588227

  16. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in adults and children.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Jones, David A; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2010-04-19

    It is not currently known how the mechanical properties of human tendons change with maturation in the two sexes. To address this, the stiffness and Young's modulus of the patellar tendon were measured in men, women, boys and girls (each group, n=10). Patellar tendon force (F(pt)) was calculated from the measured joint moment during a ramped voluntary isometric knee extension contraction, the antagonist knee extensor muscle co-activation quantified from its electromyographical activity, and the patellar tendon moment arm measured from magnetic resonance images. Tendon elongation was imaged using the sagittal-plane ultrasound scans throughout the contraction. Tendon cross-sectional area was measured at rest from ultrasound scans in the transverse plane. Maximal F(pt) and tendon elongation were (mean+/-SE) 5453+/-307 N and 5+/-0.5 mm for men, 3877+/-307 N and 4.9+/-0.6 mm for women, 2017+/-170 N and 6.2+/-0.5 mm for boys and 2169+/-182 N and 5.9+/-0.7 mm for girls. In all groups, tendon stiffness and Young's modulus were examined at the level that corresponded to the maximal 30% of the weakest participant's F(pt) and stress, respectively; these were 925-1321 N and 11.5-16.5 MPa, respectively. Stiffness was 94% greater in men than boys and 84% greater in women than girls (p<0.01), with no differences between men and women, or boys and girls (men 1076+/-87 N/mm; women 1030+/-139 N/mm; boys 555+/-71 N/mm and girls 561.5+/-57.4 N/mm). Young's modulus was 99% greater in men than boys (p<0.01), and 66% greater in women than girls (p<0.05). There were no differences in modulus between men and women, or boys and girls (men 597+/-49 MPa; women 549+/-70 MPa; boys 255+/-42 MPa and girls 302+/-33 MPa). These findings indicate that the mechanical stiffness of tendon increases with maturation due to an increased Young's modulus and, in females due to a greater increase in tendon cross-sectional area than tendon length. PMID:20045111

  17. Mechanical properties of the patellar tendon in adults and children.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Thomas D; Reeves, Neil D; Baltzopoulos, Vasilios; Jones, David A; Maganaris, Constantinos N

    2010-04-19

    It is not currently known how the mechanical properties of human tendons change with maturation in the two sexes. To address this, the stiffness and Young's modulus of the patellar tendon were measured in men, women, boys and girls (each group, n=10). Patellar tendon force (F(pt)) was calculated from the measured joint moment during a ramped voluntary isometric knee extension contraction, the antagonist knee extensor muscle co-activation quantified from its electromyographical activity, and the patellar tendon moment arm measured from magnetic resonance images. Tendon elongation was imaged using the sagittal-plane ultrasound scans throughout the contraction. Tendon cross-sectional area was measured at rest from ultrasound scans in the transverse plane. Maximal F(pt) and tendon elongation were (mean+/-SE) 5453+/-307 N and 5+/-0.5 mm for men, 3877+/-307 N and 4.9+/-0.6 mm for women, 2017+/-170 N and 6.2+/-0.5 mm for boys and 2169+/-182 N and 5.9+/-0.7 mm for girls. In all groups, tendon stiffness and Young's modulus were examined at the level that corresponded to the maximal 30% of the weakest participant's F(pt) and stress, respectively; these were 925-1321 N and 11.5-16.5 MPa, respectively. Stiffness was 94% greater in men than boys and 84% greater in women than girls (p<0.01), with no differences between men and women, or boys and girls (men 1076+/-87 N/mm; women 1030+/-139 N/mm; boys 555+/-71 N/mm and girls 561.5+/-57.4 N/mm). Young's modulus was 99% greater in men than boys (p<0.01), and 66% greater in women than girls (p<0.05). There were no differences in modulus between men and women, or boys and girls (men 597+/-49 MPa; women 549+/-70 MPa; boys 255+/-42 MPa and girls 302+/-33 MPa). These findings indicate that the mechanical stiffness of tendon increases with maturation due to an increased Young's modulus and, in females due to a greater increase in tendon cross-sectional area than tendon length.

  18. Regional differences in elements of human peroneus longus tendons.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Norikazu; Kumai, Tsukasa; Isomoto, Shinji; Shinohara, Yasushi; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Azuma, Cho; Minami, Takeshi; Tohno, Yoshiyuki

    2013-08-01

    Many studies have been performed on the structure, molecular composition, and biochemical properties of tendons. However, comparatively little research has been conducted on the content of various trace elements within tendons. Six elements were analyzed in four regions of the peroneus longus tendon: the tensional part of the tendon immediately proximal to the lateral malleolus (region A), the compressive region of the tendon in contact with the lateral malleolus (region B), the compressive region of the tendon in contact with the deep surface of the cuboid (region C), and the tensional part of the tendon between the cuboid and first metatarsal, to which the tendon is attached (region D). Regions B and C are wraparound regions. The calcium content was higher in region C (2.10 ± 0.93 mg/g) than in both regions A (1.25 ± 0.51 mg/g) and D (1.43 ± 0.41 mg/g) (p < 0.05), indicating that it is likely related to regional differences in cartilage degeneration. The phosphorus content was also higher in region C, possibly because of low alkaline phosphatase activity in this region. The sulfur content was higher in the wraparound regions (region B: 0.98 ± 0.09 mg/g, region C: 1.24 ± 0.19 mg/g) than in both regions A (0.83 ± 0.11 mg/g) and D (0.83 ± 0.1 mg/g) (p < 0.01); sulfur content is thought to be influenced by tendon-bone compression. Finally, the magnesium content in the wraparound regions was also higher, which is probably related to a higher level of fibrocartilage. No significant relationships were found with regard to zinc or iron. Overall, the findings of the present study indicate that element contents are related to function and anatomical differences in tendons, and that they may even vary within the same tendon.

  19. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon. PMID:26485923

  20. Direct Repair without Augmentation of Patellar Tendon Avulsion following TKA

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishikant; Yadav, Chandrashekhar; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Complications involving the extensor mechanism after TKA are potentially disastrous. We are reporting a case of patellar tendon rupture from tibial tuberosity following total knee arthroplasty. We managed it by direct repair with fiberwire using Krackow suture technique without augmentation. Our long term result has been very encouraging. Our method is a safe and better method of management of patellar tendon avulsion following TKA when it happens without any tissue loss. PMID:25632362

  1. Tendon Transfers Around the Foot: When and Where.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ken N; Wu, Kuan-Wen; Krzak, Joseph J; Smith, Peter A

    2015-12-01

    Tendon transfers are invaluable in the treatment of severe children's foot deformities. They are often preferable to simple releases, lengthening, or fusion in surgical treatment because they provide an active motor function for deformity correction and, when properly selected, the procedures stabilize the foot against progressive deformity. The authors describe 4 commonly used tendon transfer procedures that are useful in children's foot deformity surgeries. PMID:26589081

  2. Tendon Reconstruction with Tissue Engineering Approach--A Review.

    PubMed

    Verdiyeva, Gunay; Koshy, Kiron; Glibbery, Natalia; Mann, Haroon; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-09-01

    Tendon injuries are a common and rising occurrence, associated with significant impairment to quality of life and financial burden to the healthcare system. Clinically, they represent an unresolved problem, due to poor natural tendon healing and the inability of current treatment strategies to restore the tendon to its native state. Tissue engineering offers a promising alternative, with the incorporation of scaffolds, cells and growth factors to support the complete regeneration of the tendon. The materials used in tendon engineering to date have provided significant advances in structural integrity and biological compatibility and in many cases the results obtained are superior to those observed in natural healing. However, grafts fail to reproduce the qualities of the pre-injured tendon and each has weaknesses subject to its constituent parts. Furthermore, many materials and cell types are being investigated concurrently, with seemingly little association or comparison between research results. In this review the properties of the most-investigated and effective components have been appraised in light of the surrounding literature, with research from early in-vitro experiments to clinical trials being discussed. Extensive comparisons have been made between scaffolds, cell types and growth factors used, listing strengths and weaknesses to provide a stable platform for future research. Promising future endeavours are also described in the field of nanocomposite material science, stem cell sources and growth factors, which may bypass weaknesses found in individual elements. The future of tendon engineering looks bright, with growing understanding in material technology, cell and growth factor application and encouraging recent advances bringing us ever closer to regenerating the native tendon.

  3. Temporal response of canine flexor tendon to limb suspension

    PubMed Central

    Thoreson, Andrew R.; Cha, Stephen S.; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Tendon disuse, or stress deprivation, frequently accompanies clinical disorders and treatments, yet the metabolism of tendons subject to stress deprivation has rarely been investigated systematically. The effects of stress deprivation on canine flexor tendon were investigated in this study. One adult canine forepaw was suspended for 21 or 42 days. Control forepaws were collected from dogs that had no intervention on their limbs and paws. The expression of collagen I and III was not significantly altered in the tendons disused for 21 days but was significantly decreased at 42 days (P < 0.03). The expression of collagen II, aggrecan, decorin, and fibronectin was significantly decreased in the tendons in the suspended limbs at 21 days (P < 0.002) and further reduced at 42 days. With stress deprivation, the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) was significantly increased (P < 0.004) at 21 and 42 days. The expression of MMP3 was significantly decreased at 21 and 42 days (P < 0.03). The expression of MMP13 was not altered with stress deprivation at 21 and 42 days. The expression of MMP14 was significantly increased at 21 days (P = 0.0015) and returned to the control level at 42 days. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) expression was decreased after the limbs were suspended for 42 days (P = 0.0043), but not 21 days. However, TIMP2 expression was not significantly different from control at 21 or 42 days. Furthermore, the cross-sectional area of the stress-deprived tendons at 42 days was decreased compared with the control group (P < 0.01). The intervention method in this study did not result in any alteration of stiffness of the tendon. Our study demonstrated that stress deprivation decreases the anabolic process and increases the catabolic process of extracellular matrix in flexor tendon. PMID:20947711

  4. Closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, H; Kato, H; Hata, Y; Nakatsuchi, Y; Tsuchikane, A

    2007-12-01

    We analysed 21 patients with closed rupture of the flexor tendons caused by carpal bone and joint disorders. The tendon that ruptured depended on the location of the bone perforation into the carpal tunnel. Radiocarpal arthrography was performed in 13 patients and capsular perforation was demonstrated by contrast medium leakage into the carpal canal in 11 patients. This proved a useful diagnostic test. The flexor tendon(s) were reconstructed with free tendon graft in 17 patients, cross-over transfer of flexor tendons from adjacent digits in two and buddying to an adjacent flexor tendon in one patient. Postoperative total active range of motion in the fingers after 13 free tendon graft reconstructions averaged 213 degrees (range 170-265 degrees ). The active range of motion of the thumb-interphalangeal joint after free tendon graft reconstruction in three cases improved from 0 degrees to 33 degrees on average (range 10 degrees -40 degrees ).

  5. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  6. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  7. Proximal humerus shaft fracture after pectoralis major tendon rupture repair.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Jeff A; Goldberg, Ben; Wolin, Preston

    2011-06-01

    Surgical repair of a complete pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion has superior results compared to nonoperative treatment. To our knowledge, a proximal humerus shaft fracture occurring at the site of the bone trough and cortical drill holes after a pectoralis major tendon rupture repair has not been reported in the literature.A 45-year-old man sustained an acute left pectoralis major tendon rupture at the humeral insertion while performing a bench press maneuver. He underwent acute surgical repair. Approximately 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient fell from a standing height and sustained a proximal humerus shaft fracture through the repair site at the bone trough. Three days after the fracture, the patient underwent open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus shaft fracture and exploration of the pectoralis major tendon repair. The fracture was found to be at the level of the repair site, and the pectoralis major tendon was completely intact to the distal fragment. The fracture healed uneventfully, and the patient regained full motion and strength of his extremity with no limitations.Any type of surgical fixation that creates a hole in the humerus or decreases the cross-sectional area such as a bone trough creates a stress riser. Patients undergoing pectoralis tendon repair that involves violating the humerus with a bone trough or hole have a slight risk of postoperative humerus fracture, especially if sustaining an early traumatic event such as a fall. PMID:21667914

  8. Factors affecting the ultrasonic properties of equine digital flexor tendons.

    PubMed

    Miles, C A; Fursey, G A; Birch, H L; Young, R D

    1996-01-01

    The velocity, attenuation and apparent backscattering coefficient of 6-11-MHz ultrasound were measured in three orthogonal directions in equine deep digital flexor (DDF) and superficial digital flexor (SDF) tendons at 0 degree C. Ultrasonic measurements were examined for correlation with tendon water, collagen, DNA and glycosaminoglycans contents, determined by chemical analyses and with structure observed by scanning electron microscopy. The SDF tendon contained more water, more DNA (i.e., more cells), less collagen and less glycosaminoglycans and exhibited lower velocities and attenuations than the DDF tendon. Velocities were governed primarily by the adiabatic bulk modulus and density, perturbed by a highly direction-dependent rigidity. Ultrasound propagating across tendon generated frequency-independent backscattering which appeared to derive from the large interfaces between the fascicles, while along the fibres backscattering varied as f3.62 +/- 0.88 and appeared to derive from small structures such as collagen fibres. The mechanisms by which ultrasound is attenuated by tendon remain unknown.

  9. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies. PMID:27485766

  10. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads; Kovanen, Vuokko; Grosset, Jean-Francois; Snorgaard, Ole; Bencke, Jesper; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard; Bandholm, Thomas; Christensen, Tomas Møller; Boesen, Anders; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Aagaard, Per; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, Stig Peter

    2016-01-15

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters, and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age-matched (45-70 yr) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of the outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness) between patients with well-controlled and poorly controlled diabetes. The overall effect of diabetes was explored by collapsing the diabetes groups (DB) compared with the controls. Skin collagen cross-linking lysylpyridinoline, hydroxylysylpyridinoline (136%, 80%, P < 0.01) and pentosidine concentrations (55%, P < 0.05) were markedly greater in DB. Furthermore, Achilles tendon material stiffness was higher in DB (54%, P < 0.01). Notably, DB also demonstrated higher forefoot/rearfoot peak-plantar-pressure ratio (33%, P < 0.01). Overall, Achilles tendon material stiffness and skin connective tissue cross-linking were greater in diabetic patients compared with controls. The higher foot pressure indicates that material stiffness of tendon and other tissue (e.g., skin and joint capsule) may influence foot gait. The difference in foot pressure distribution may contribute to the development of foot ulcers in diabetic patients.

  11. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient’s tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient’s tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient’s tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  12. The anatomical footprint of the Achilles tendon: a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Ballal, M S; Walker, C R; Molloy, A P

    2014-10-01

    We dissected 12 fresh-frozen leg specimens to identify the insertional footprint of each fascicle of the Achilles tendon on the calcaneum in relation to their corresponding muscles. A further ten embalmed specimens were examined to confirm an observation on the retrocalcaneal bursa. The superficial part of the insertion of the Achilles tendon is represented by fascicles from the medial head of the gastrocnemius muscle, which is inserted over the entire width of the inferior facet of the calcaneal tuberosity. In three specimens this insertion was in continuity with the plantar fascia in the form of periosteum. The deep part of the insertion of the Achilles tendon is made of fascicles from the soleus tendon, which insert on the medial aspect of the middle facet of the calcaneal tuberosity, while the fascicles of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius tendon insert on the lateral aspect of the middle facet of the calcaneal tuberosity. A bicameral retrocalcaneal bursa was present in 15 of the 22 examined specimens. This new observation and description of the insertional footprint of the Achilles tendon and the retrocalcaneal bursa may allow a better understanding of the function of each muscular part of the gastrosoleus complex. This may have clinical relevance in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathies.

  13. Tendon Extracellular Matrix Alterations in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sardone, Francesca; Traina, Francesco; Bondi, Alice; Merlini, Luciano; Santi, Spartaco; Maraldi, Nadir Mario; Faldini, Cesare; Sabatelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Collagen VI (COLVI) is a non-fibrillar collagen expressed in skeletal muscle and most connective tissues. Mutations in COLVI genes cause two major clinical forms, Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). In addition to congenital muscle weakness, patients affected by COLVI myopathies show axial and proximal joint contractures and distal joint hypermobility, which suggest the involvement of the tendon function. We examined a peroneal tendon biopsy and tenocyte culture of a 15-year-old patient affected by UCMD with compound heterozygous COL6A2 mutations. In patient's tendon biopsy, we found striking morphological alterations of tendon fibrils, consisting in irregular profiles and reduced mean diameter. The organization of the pericellular matrix of tenocytes, the primary site of collagen fibril assembly, was severely affected, as determined by immunoelectron microscopy, which showed an abnormal accumulation of COLVI and altered distribution of collagen I (COLI) and fibronectin (FBN). In patient's tenocyte culture, COLVI web formation and cell surface association were severely impaired; large aggregates of COLVI, which matched with COLI labeling, were frequently detected in the extracellular matrix. In addition, metalloproteinase MMP-2, an extracellular matrix-regulating enzyme, was increased in the conditioned medium of patient's tenocytes, as determined by gelatin zymography and western blot. Altogether, these data indicate that COLVI deficiency may influence the organization of UCMD tendon matrix, resulting in dysfunctional fibrillogenesis. The alterations of tendon matrix may contribute to the complex pathogenesis of COLVI related myopathies. PMID:27375477

  14. Chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Tadanao; Spector, Myron

    2010-06-01

    Reparative strategies for the treatment of injuries to tendons, including those of the rotator cuff of the shoulder, need to address the formation of the cartilage which serves as the attachment apparatus to bone and which forms at regions undergoing compressive loading. Moreover, recent work indicates that cells employed for rotator cuff repair may need to synthesize a lubricating glycoprotein, lubricin, which has recently been found to play a role in tendon tribology. The objective of the present study was to investigate the chondrogenic differentiation and lubricin expression of caprine infraspinatus tendon cells in monolayer and three-dimensional culture, and to compare the behavior with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The results demonstrated that while tendon cells in various media, including chondrogenic medium, expressed lubricin, virtually none of the MSCs synthesized this important lubricating molecule. Also of interest was that the cartilage formation capacity of the tendon cells grown in pellet culture in chondrogenic medium was comparable with MSCs. These data inform the use of tendon cells for rotator cuff repair, including for fibrocartilaginous zones.

  15. Biomimetic scaffold design for functional and integrative tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinzhi; Bogdanowicz, Danielle; Erisken, Cevat; Lee, Nancy M; Lu, Helen H

    2012-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears represent the most common shoulder injuries in the United States. The debilitating effect of this degenerative condition coupled with the high incidence of failure associated with existing graft choices underscores the clinical need for alternative grafting solutions. The 2 critical design criteria for the ideal tendon graft would require the graft to not only exhibit physiologically relevant mechanical properties but also be able to facilitate functional graft integration by promoting the regeneration of the native tendon-to-bone interface. Centered on these design goals, this review will highlight current approaches to functional and integrative tendon repair. In particular, the application of biomimetic design principles through the use of nanofiber- and nanocomposite-based scaffolds for tendon tissue engineering will be discussed. This review will begin with nanofiber-based approaches to functional tendon repair, followed by a section highlighting the exciting research on tendon-to-bone interface regeneration, with an emphasis on implementation of strategic biomimicry in nanofiber scaffold design and the concomitant formation of graded multi-tissue systems for integrative soft-tissue repair. This review will conclude with a summary and discussion of future directions.

  16. Tendon Tissue Engineering: Progress, Challenges, and Translation to the Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Jason T.; Kinneberg, Kirsten R.C.; Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Marc T.; Kenter, Keith; Wylie, Christopher; Butler, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products. PMID:21625053

  17. Tendon reflex is suppressed during whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Karacan, Ilhan; Cidem, Muharrem; Yilmaz, Gizem; Sebik, Oguz; Cakar, Halil Ibrahim; Türker, Kemal Sıtkı

    2016-10-01

    In this study we have investigated the effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the tendon reflex (T-reflex) amplitude. Fifteen young adult healthy volunteer males were included in this study. Records of surface EMG of the right soleus muscle and accelerometer taped onto the right Achilles tendon were obtained while participant stood upright with the knees in extension, on the vibration platform. Tendon reflex was elicited before and during WBV. Subjects completed a set of WBV. Each WBV set consisted of six vibration sessions using different frequencies (25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50Hz) applied randomly. In each WBV session the Achilles tendon was tapped five times with a custom-made reflex hammer. The mean peak-to-peak (PP) amplitude of T-reflex was 1139.11±498.99µV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). The maximum PP amplitude of T-reflex was 1333±515μV before vibration. It decreased significantly during WBV (p<0.0001). No significant differences were obtained in the mean acceleration values of Achilles tendon with tapping between before and during vibration sessions. This study showed that T-reflex is suppressed during WBV. T-reflex suppression indicates that the spindle primary afferents must have been pre-synaptically inhibited during WBV similar to the findings in high frequency tendon vibration studies.

  18. Tendon tissue engineering: progress, challenges, and translation to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Shearn, J T; Kinneberg, K R; Dyment, N A; Galloway, M T; Kenter, K; Wylie, C; Butler, D L

    2011-06-01

    The tissue engineering field has made great strides in understanding how different aspects of tissue engineered constructs (TECs) and the culture process affect final tendon repair. However, there remain significant challenges in developing strategies that will lead to a clinically effective and commercially successful product. In an effort to increase repair quality, a better understanding of normal development, and how it differs from adult tendon healing, may provide strategies to improve tissue engineering. As tendon tissue engineering continues to improve, the field needs to employ more clinically relevant models of tendon injury such as degenerative tendons. We need to translate successes to larger animal models to begin exploring the clinical implications of our treatments. By advancing the models used to validate our TECs, we can help convince our toughest customer, the surgeon, that our products will be clinically efficacious. As we address these challenges in musculoskeletal tissue engineering, the field still needs to address the commercialization of products developed in the laboratory. TEC commercialization faces numerous challenges because each injury and patient is unique. This review aims to provide tissue engineers with a summary of important issues related to engineering tendon repairs and potential strategies for producing clinically successful products.

  19. Posterior Tibialis Tendon Dysfunction: Overview of Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Yao, Kaihan; Yang, Timothy Xianyi; Yew, Wei Ping

    2015-06-01

    EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES As a result of reading this article, physicians should be able to: 1. Recognize posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction and begin to include it in differential diagnoses. 2. Recall the basic anatomy and pathology of the posterior tibialis tendon. 3. Assess a patient for posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction with the appropriate investigations and stratify the severity of the condition. 4. Develop and formulate a treatment plan for a patient with posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction. The posterior tibialis is a muscle in the deep posterior compartment of the calf that plays several key roles in the ankle and foot. Posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction is a complex but common and debilitating condition. Degenerative, inflammatory, functional, and traumatic etiologies have all been proposed. Despite being the leading cause of acquired flatfoot, it is often not recognized early enough. Knowledge of the anatomical considerations and etiology of posterior tibialis tendon dysfunction, as well as key concepts in its evaluation and management, will allow health care professionals to develop appropriate intervention strategies to prevent further development of flatfoot deformities. PMID:26091214

  20. Tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons.

    PubMed

    Louis-Ugbo, John; Leeson, Benjamin; Hutton, William C

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the tensile properties of fresh human calcaneal (Achilles) tendons. Twenty fresh cadaveric (age range = 57-93 years) bone-Achilles tendon complexes were harvested within 24 hr postmortem. The calcaneus together with 15 cm of the Achilles tendon extending proximally from the insertion on the calcaneus was clamped and biomechanically tested. Each tendon was firmly fixed in clamps in an MTS Systems Corporation MTS testing machine and tension was applied at a displacement rate of 8 cm per minute until the tendon failed. The tensile force and tensile strain (as measured using an extensometer) were recorded and plotted using onboard software. The narrow age range of our donors prevented any meaningful correlation between age and tensile properties; however, the results showed that: 1) the average ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the human Achilles tendon was 1189 N (range = 360-1,965), 2) there was a correlation between left and right legs for UTS, 3) there was a correlation between left and right legs in regard to cross sectional area, and 4) there was no correlation between UTS and cross-sectional area.

  1. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Alice H.; Riordan, Timothy J.; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L.; Watson, Spencer S.; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D.; Stadler, H. Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F.; Keene, Douglas R.; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes. PMID:26062940

  2. Musculoskeletal integration at the wrist underlies the modular development of limb tendons.

    PubMed

    Huang, Alice H; Riordan, Timothy J; Pryce, Brian; Weibel, Jennifer L; Watson, Spencer S; Long, Fanxin; Lefebvre, Veronique; Harfe, Brian D; Stadler, H Scott; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Tufa, Sara F; Keene, Douglas R; Schweitzer, Ronen

    2015-07-15

    The long tendons of the limb extend from muscles that reside in the zeugopod (arm/leg) to their skeletal insertions in the autopod (paw). How these connections are established along the length of the limb remains unknown. Here, we show that mouse limb tendons are formed in modular units that combine to form a functional contiguous structure; in muscle-less limbs, tendons develop in the autopod but do not extend into the zeugopod, and in the absence of limb cartilage the zeugopod segments of tendons develop despite the absence of tendons in the autopod. Analyses of cell lineage and proliferation indicate that distinct mechanisms govern the growth of autopod and zeugopod tendon segments. To elucidate the integration of these autopod and zeugopod developmental programs, we re-examined early tendon development. At E12.5, muscles extend across the full length of a very short zeugopod and connect through short anlagen of tendon progenitors at the presumptive wrist to their respective autopod tendon segment, thereby initiating musculoskeletal integration. Zeugopod tendon segments are subsequently generated by proximal elongation of the wrist tendon anlagen, in parallel with skeletal growth, underscoring the dependence of zeugopod tendon development on muscles for tendon anchoring. Moreover, a subset of extensor tendons initially form as fused structures due to initial attachment of their respective wrist tendon anlage to multiple muscles. Subsequent individuation of these tendons depends on muscle activity. These results establish an integrated model for limb tendon development that provides a framework for future analyses of tendon and musculoskeletal phenotypes.

  3. Tendon entrapments and dislocations in ankle and hindfoot fractures: evaluation with multidetector computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ballard, David H; Campbell, Kevin J; Blanton, Lee E; Williams, Jason T; Sangster, Guillermo; Hollister, Anne M; Simoncini, Alberto A

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations associated with ankle and hindfoot fractures in patients studied by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Additionally, we describe particular tendon injuries associated with specific fractures. This was a retrospective review of all individuals with a trauma-protocol CT for suspected ankle and/or hindfoot fractures during a consecutive 41-month time period at a single Level I Trauma Center. Each patient's images were evaluated by two radiologists and an orthopedic surgeon for tendon entrapment, tendon dislocation, and bone(s) fractured or dislocated. There were 398 patients with ankle and/or hindfoot fractures that showed tendon entrapment or dislocation in 64 (16.1 %) patients. There were 30 (46.9 %) patients with 40 tendon entrapments, 31 (48.4 %) patients with 59 tendon dislocations, and three (4.7 %) patients with both tendon entrapment and dislocation. All patients with tendon entrapments were seen with either pilon fractures and/or a combination of posterior, medial, or lateral malleolar fractures. The most frequently entrapped tendon was the posterior tibialis tendon (PTT) in 27 patients (27/30, 90.0 %). The peroneal tendons were the most frequently dislocated, representing 27 (87.1 %) of patients with tendon dislocation; all resulted from a talar or calcaneal fracture or subluxation. This study demonstrates that tendon entrapments and tendon dislocations are commonly seen in complex fractures of the ankle and hindfoot. Pilon fractures were associated with the majority of tendon entrapments, whereas calcaneus fractures were associated with the majority of tendon dislocations. PMID:27234977

  4. Use of a turndown quadriceps tendon flap for rupture of the patellar tendon after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Chun; Wang, Jun-Wen

    2007-09-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is a devastating complication after total knee arthroplasty. The results of surgical treatment of this complication were discouraging in most of the reports. We describe a case of rupture of patellar tendon 7 weeks after total knee arthroplasty treated with a turndown quadriceps flap and circumferential wiring. Two years and 6 months after operation, the patient had no extension lag of the knee and knee flexion to 110 degrees .

  5. Combined Reconstruction of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament With Quadricipital Tendon and the Medial Patellotibial Ligament With Patellar Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina Bremer; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2016-01-01

    Although the medial patellotibial ligament (MPTL) has been neglected regarding its function in patellar stability, recently, its importance in terminal extension and during flexion has been recognized. Indications for reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament combined with the MPTL are extension subluxation, flexion instability, children with anatomic risk factors for patellar instability, and knee hyperextension associated with generalized laxity. We describe a combined reconstruction of the medial patellofemoral ligament with quadricipital tendon and reconstruction of the MPTL with patellar tendon autografts. PMID:27073782

  6. A Rare Case of Bilateral Patellar Tendon Ruptures: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tarazi, Nadim; O'loughlin, Padhraig; Amin, Amin; Keogh, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon ruptures are rare. The majority of case reports describing bilateral patellar tendon ruptures have occurred in patients with predisposing factors to tendinopathy. We describe a case of bilateral patellar tendon rupture sustained following minimal trauma by a patient with no systemic disease or history of steroid use. Due to the rarity of this injury, clinical suspicion is low. It is reported that 38% of patellar tendon ruptures are misdiagnosed initially. Therefore careful history taking and physical examination is integral in ensuring a diagnosis is achieved for early primary repair. We discuss the aetiology of spontaneous tendon rupture and report a literature review of bilateral patellar tendon ruptures. PMID:27200200

  7. Posterior tibial tendon tears in young competitive athletes: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Porter, D A; Baxter, D E; Clanton, T O; Klootwyk, T E

    1998-09-01

    Unlike the Achilles tendon, the posterior tibial tendon does not typically undergo acute rupture. We report two cases of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in young, athletic individuals (<30 years old) that required operative intervention before the patients could return to competitive sports. We believe that these are the first two reports of posterior tibial tendon tears occurring in this population without the patient having a prior history of steroid injections in the tendon. The tears we observed and described at surgical exploration were chronic and degenerative in nature. We also comment on our approach to treatment of posterior tibial tendon injuries in the athletic population.

  8. The blood-tendon barrier: identification and characterisation of a novel tissue barrier in tendon blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Lehner, C; Gehwolf, R; Ek, J C; Korntner, S; Bauer, H; Bauer, H C; Traweger, A; Tempfer, H

    2016-01-01

    Tissue barriers function as "gate keepers" between different compartments (usually blood and tissue) and are formed by specialised membrane-associated proteins, localising to the apicolateral plasma membrane domain of epithelial and endothelial cells. By sealing the paracellular space, the free diffusion of solutes and molecules across epithelia and endothelia is impeded. Thereby, tissue barriers contribute to the establishment and maintenance of a distinct internal and external environment, which is crucial during organ development and allows maintenance of an organ-specific homeostatic milieu. So far, various epithelial and endothelial tissue barriers have been described, including the blood-brain barrier, the blood-retina barrier, the blood-testis barrier, the blood-placenta barrier, and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)-brain barrier, which are vital for physiological function and any disturbance of these barriers can result in severe organ damage or even death. Here, we describe the identification of a novel barrier, located in the vascular bed of tendons, which we term the blood-tendon barrier (BTB). By using immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and tracer studies we demonstrate the presence of a functional endothelial barrier within tendons restricting the passage of large blood-borne molecules into the surrounding tendon tissue. We further provide in vitro evidence that the BTB potentially contributes to the creation of a distinct internal tissue environment impacting upon the proliferation and differentiation of tendon-resident cells, effects which might be fundamental for the onset of tendon pathologies. PMID:27227787

  9. Evaluating Changes in Tendon Crimp with Fatigue Loading as an ex vivo Structural Assessment of Tendon Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Benjamin R.; Zuskov, Andrey; Sarver, Joseph J.; Buckley, Mark R.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2015-01-01

    The complex structure of tendons relates to their mechanical properties. Previous research has associated the waviness of collagen fibers (crimp) during quasi-static tensile loading to tensile mechanics, but less is known about the role of fatigue loading on crimp properties. In this study (IACUC approved), mouse patellar tendons were fatigue loaded while an integrated plane polariscope simultaneously assessed crimp properties. We demonstrate a novel structural mechanism whereby tendon crimp amplitude and frequency are altered with fatigue loading. In particular, fatigue loading increased the crimp amplitude across the tendon width and length, and these structural alterations were shown to be both region and load dependent. The change in crimp amplitude was strongly correlated to mechanical tissue laxity (defined as the ratio of displacement and gauge length relative to the first cycle of fatigue loading assessed at constant load throughout testing), at all loads and regions evaluated. Together, this study highlights the role of fatigue loading on tendon crimp properties as a function of load applied and region evaluated, and offers an additional structural mechanism for mechanical alterations that may lead to ultimate tendon failure. PMID:25773654

  10. Fatigue and fracture reliability and maintainability of TLP tendons. [Fatigue and fracture analysis of offshore, tension leg platform tendons

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, C.J. ); Wirsching, P.H. . Dept. of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    A tension leg platform (TLP) tendon system experiences oscillatory tensile stresses, and therefore is vulnerable to fatigue and fracture. Because design factors have significant uncertainty, a reliability analysis to quantify structural performance is appropriate. A maintenance program of periodic inspection and repair shows promise for improving system reliability and enhancing structural integrity. The performance of a TLP tendon system was simulated in order to study the relationship of design factors to system reliability. Effects on system reliability and maintenance performance (repair and replacement rates) can be studied as a function of (a) number of joints, J; (b) number of members, M; (c) inspection frequency; (d) inspection sensitivity as defined by the POD (probability of detection) curve; (e) ultimate strength; (f) repair policy; etc. The performance of an initially damaged or flawed tendon system is investigated. The reliability of a system that uses pressurized tendons to detect through-thickness cracks is studied, as is the vulnerability of the tendon system before replacement of broken tendons.

  11. Evaluation of Elastic Stiffness in Healing Achilles Tendon After Surgical Repair of a Tendon Rupture Using In Vivo Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-ning; Wan, Wen-bo; Wang, Yue-xiang; Jiao, Zi-yu; Zhang, Li-hai; Luo, Yu-kun; Tang, Pei-fu

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been no published report assessing the mechanical properties of a repaired Achilles tendon after surgery using shear wave elastography (SWE). The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in mechanical properties of the healing Achilles tendon after surgical repair of a tendon rupture using ultrasound SWE and how these changes correlate with tendon function. Material/Methods Twenty-six patients who underwent surgical repair for Achilles tendon rupture were examined with ultrasound SWE coupled with a linear array transducer (4–15 MHz). The elasticity values of the repaired Achilles tendon in a longitudinal view were measured at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. Functional outcomes were assessed with the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) rating system at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively. General linear regression analysis and correlation coefficients were used to analyze the relationship between elasticity and the AOFAS score. Results There were significant differences with respect to the mean elasticity values and functional scores of the repaired Achilles tendon at 12, 24, and 48 weeks postoperatively (all P<0.05). Tendon function was positively correlated with the elasticity of the repaired Achilles tendon (P=0.0003). Conclusions Our findings suggest that SWE can provide biomechanical information for evaluating the mechanical properties of healing Achilles tendon and predict Achilles tendon function. PMID:27072885

  12. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  13. Age-related fascicle-tendon interaction in repetitive hopping.

    PubMed

    Hoffrén, Merja; Ishikawa, Masaki; Avela, Janne; Komi, Paavo V

    2012-12-01

    Increasing age can influence the interaction of muscle fascicles and tendon during dynamic movements. The object of the present study was to examine occurrence and possible reasons for the age-specific behavior of fascicles and tendons and their interaction during hopping with different intensities. Nine young and 24 elderly subjects performed repetitive hopping with maximal effort as well as with 50, 65, 75 and 90 % intensities. During hopping joint kinematics and ground reaction, forces were measured together with recordings of ultrasound images of both the fascicle and the muscle-tendon junction part of the gastrocnemius medialis (GaM) muscle. The results showed that fascicle behavior during the braking phase of hopping was clearly age specific in nature with more fascicle shortening in the young (p < 0.001). In addition, the fascicle shortening increased in young subjects with increasing intensity (p < 0.05). At the instant of ground contact, the elderly subjects demonstrated decreased fascicle length with increasing hopping intensity (p < 0.01). Thereafter in the braking phase, the elderly showed much smaller changes in fascicle length as compared to the young. In contrast to the fascicles, the GaM outer tendon did not show major age-specific differences in stretching and shortening amplitudes during hopping although the peak tendon forces were clearly lower in the elderly (p < 0.001). These results suggest that GaM outer tendon behavior is not influenced greatly with increasing age. It is further suggested that when aging modifies the fascicle-tendon interaction, it is primarily due to the age-specific difference in the fascicle level. This notion poses a question that as compared to the young, the elderly individuals may have a different fascicle behavior for optimal SSC locomotion such as hopping.

  14. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of tissue properties for Achilles tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yi-Chun; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Pei-Jarn; Lin, Yu-Ching; Chen, Tainsong; Lin, Chii-Jeng

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques have recently been widely applied for the characterization of tissues. For example, they can be used for the quantification of Achilles tendon properties based on the broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and the speed of sound (SOS) when the ultrasound wave passes through the tissues. This study is to develop an integrated system to investigate the properties of Achilles tendons using QUS images from UBIS 5000 (DMS, Montpellier, France) and B-mode ultrasound images from HDI 5000 (ATL, Ultramark, USA). Subjects including young (32 females and 17 males; mean age: 23.7 ± 2.0) and middle-aged groups (8 female and 8 males; mean age: 47.3 ± 8.5 s) were recruited and tested for this study. Only subjects who did not exercise regularly and had no record of tendon injury were studied. The results show that the BUA is significantly higher for the young group (45.2 ± 1.6 dB MHz-1) than the middle-age group (40.5 ± 1.9 dB MHz-1), while the SOS is significantly lower for the young (1601.9 ± 11.2 ms-1) compared to the middle-aged (1624.1 ± 8.7 m s-1). On the other hand, the thicknesses of Achilles tendons for both groups (young: 4.31 ± 0.23 mm; middle age: 4.24 ± 0.23 mm) are very similar. For one patient who had an Achilles tendon lengthening (ATL) surgery, the thickness of the Achilles tendon increased from 4 mm to 4.33 mm after the surgery. In addition, the BUA increased by about 7.2% while the SOS decreased by about 0.6%. In conclusion, noninvasive ultrasonic assessment of Achilles tendons is useful for assisting clinical diagnosis and for the evaluation of a therapeutic regimen.

  15. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment.

  16. Flexor carpi radialis tendon ultrasound pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Luong, Dien Hung; Smith, Jay; Bianchi, Stefano

    2014-06-01

    Disorders of the flexor carpi radialis tendon (FCRt) are often missed even though they are a relatively frequent cause of volar radial wrist pain. They can manifest as tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, synovial sheath cysts with or without scaphoid-trapezoid-trapezium (STT) joint pathology, and partial or complete rupture. Because FCRt disorders often present with non-specific symptoms and a non-diagnostic clinical examination, imaging is often necessary for accurate evaluation and therapeutic planning. Conventional radiography provides good visualization of the neighboring bones and joints, as well as rare intratendinous calcifications. MRI enables evaluation of the FCRt and adjacent anatomical structures with excellent tissue resolution. In comparison, ultrasound (US) evaluation of the FCRt is less commonly described in the radiology literature, despite its affordability, exquisite soft tissue resolution, and the advantages of quick, dynamic diagnostic imaging. This pictorial essay describes and demonstrates the normal anatomy of the FCRt, its US examination technique and normal US appearance, and US findings of clinically relevant FCRt disorders.

  17. Lateral epicondylalgia: midlife crisis of a tendon.

    PubMed

    Luk, James K H; Tsang, Raymond C C; Leung, H B

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis and management of lateral epicondylalgia, or tennis elbow, a common ailment affecting middle-aged subjects of both genders continue to provoke controversy. Currently it is thought to be due to local tendon pathology, pain system changes, and motor system impairment. Its diagnosis is usually clinical, based on a classical history, as well as symptoms and signs. In selected cases, additional imaging (X-rays, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging) can help to confirm the diagnosis. Different treatment modalities have been described, including the use of orthotics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid injections, topical glyceryl trinitrate, exercise therapy, manual therapy, ultrasound therapy, laser therapy, extracorporeal shockwave therapy, acupuncture, taping, platelet-rich plasma injections, hyaluronan gel injections, botulinum toxin injections, and surgery. Nevertheless, evidence to select the best treatment is lacking and the choice of therapy depends on the experience of the management team, availability of the equipment and expertise, and patient response. This article provides a snapshot of current medical practice for lateral epicondylalgia management.

  18. Methods of Assessing Human Tendon Metabolism and Tissue Properties in Response to Changes in Mechanical Loading.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja M; Kjaer, Michael; Magnusson, S Peter

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of methodological developments have improved the opportunities to study human tendon. Microdialysis enables sampling of interstitial fluid in the peritendon tissue, while sampling of human tendon biopsies allows direct analysis of tendon tissue for gene- and protein expression as well as protein synthesis rate. Further the (14)C bomb-pulse method has provided data on long-term tissue turnover in human tendon. Non-invasive techniques allow measurement of tendon metabolism (positron emission tomography (PET)), tendon morphology (magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)), and tendon mechanical properties (ultrasonography combined with force measurement during movement). Finally, 3D cell cultures of human tendon cells provide the opportunity to investigate cell-matrix interactions in response to various interventions. PMID:27535251

  19. Diclofenac Patch for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Tendonitis or Bursitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-08-05

    Rotator Cuff Tendonitis; Bicipital Tendonitis; Subdeltoid Bursitis of the Shoulder; Subacromial Bursitis of the Shoulder; Medial Epicondylitis of the Elbow; Lateral Epicondylitis of the Elbow; DeQuervain's Tenosynovitis of the Wrist

  20. Insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, L M; Aversa, J M; Newman, J H

    1980-01-01

    A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus developed insidious bilateral infrapatellar tendon rupture initially diagnosed as steroid myopathy. Simultaneous loss of extension at the knee due to quadriceps or infrapatellar tendon ruptures is reviewed. Images PMID:7458438

  1. Mechanical properties of tendons: changes with sterilization and preservation.

    PubMed

    Smith, C W; Young, I S; Kearney, J N

    1996-02-01

    Tendon allografts are commonly used to replace damaged anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL). Some of the sterilization and preservation techniques used by tissue banks with tendon allografts are thought to impair the mechanical properties of graft tissues. The tensile mechanical properties of porcine toe extensor tendons were measured using a dynamic testing machine following either freezing, freeze-drying, freezing then irradiation at 25 kGy (2.5 MRad), freeze-drying then irradiation, or freeze-drying then ethylene oxide gas sterilization. There was a small but significant difference in Young's modulus between the frozen group (0.88 GPa + 0.09 SD) and both the fresh group (0.98 GPa 1 0.12 SD) and the frozen irradiated group (0.97 GPa 1 0.08 SD). No values of Young's modulus were obtained for the freeze-dried irradiated tendons. The ultimate tensile stress (UTS) of the freeze-dried irradiated group (4.7 MPa 1 4.8 SD) was significantly different from both the fresh and the frozen irradiated groups, being reduced by approximately 90 percent. There were no significant changes in UTS or Young's modulus between any of the other groups. If irradiation is to be used to sterilize a tendon replacement for an ACL it must take place after freeze-drying to maintain mechanical properties.

  2. Shear Loads Induce Cellular Damage in Tendon Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  3. Cell therapies for tendons: old cell choice for modern innovation.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Ilias G; Grognuz, Anthony; Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Raffoul, Wassim; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2014-01-01

    Although tissue engineering and cell therapies are becoming realistic approaches for medical therapeutics, it is likely that musculoskeletal applications will be among the first to benefit on a large scale. Cell sources for tissue engineering and cell therapies for tendon pathologies are reviewed with an emphasis on small defect tendon injuries as seen in the hand which could adapt well to injectable cell administration. Specifically, cell sources including tenocytes, tendon sheath fibroblasts, bone marrow or adipose-derived stem cells, amniotic cells, placenta cells and platelet-derivatives have been proposed to enhance tendon regeneration. The associated advantages and disadvantages for these different strategies will be discussed and evolving regulatory requirements for cellular therapies will also be addressed. Human progenitor tenocytes, along with their clinical cell banking potential, will be presented as an alternative cell source solution. Similar cell banking techniques have already been described with other progenitor cell types in the 1950's for vaccine production, and these "old" cell types incite potentially interesting therapeutic options that could be improved with modern innovation for tendon regeneration and repair.

  4. Ultrasound Echo is Related to Stress, Strain in Tendon

    PubMed Central

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic, inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively. PMID:21030024

  5. The enigmatic diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R. E.; Pfister, M. E.

    1993-01-01

    Posterior tibialis tendon rupture is a diagnosis that is often missed. This is thought to be secondary to nonspecific clinical findings and the lack of any laboratory or radiographic test to reliably confirm the diagnosis. We report sixteen cases of surgically confirmed posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Based on our review of these patients, the diagnosis of posterior tibialis tendon rupture should be strongly suspected in the adult patient presenting with a history of a twisting ankle injury and generalized medial ankle pain and swelling. A flexible, asymmetric pes planus and forefoot pronation deformity with absence of posterior tibialis tendon function on manual testing is seen on examination. This is associated with loss of ipsilateral heel inversion on bilateral heel rise. The patient is usually unable to perform ipsilateral single leg heel rise and has less severe pes planus of the contralateral foot. This study reviews the presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of posterior tibialis tendon rupture. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7820739

  6. Shear loads induce cellular damage in tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Kondratko-Mittnacht, Jaclyn; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2015-09-18

    Tendon is vital to musculoskeletal function, transferring loads from muscle to bone for joint motion and stability. It is an anisotropic, highly organized, fibrous structure containing primarily type I collagen in addition to tenocytes and other extracellular matrix components contributing to maintenance and function. Tendon is generally loaded via normal stress in a longitudinal direction. However, certain situations, including fiber breakage, enzymatic remodeling, or tendon pathology may introduce various degrees of other loading modalities, such as shear-lag at the fiber level, potentially affecting cellular response and subsequent function. Fascicles from rat tail tendon were dissected and placed in one of three paired groups: intact, single laceration, or double laceration. Each pair had a mechanically tested and control specimen. Single laceration fascicles contained one transverse laceration to mimic a partial tear. Double laceration fascicles had overlapping, longitudinally separated lacerations on opposite sides to cause intra-fascicular shear transfer to be the primary mechanism of loading. Elastic properties of the fascicle, e.g. peak load, steady state load, and stiffness, decreased from intact to single laceration to double laceration groups. Surprisingly, 45% of the intact strength was maintained when shear was the primary internal load transfer mechanism. Cellular viability decreased after mechanical testing in both laceration groups; cell death appeared primarily in a longitudinal plane where high shear load transfer occurred. This cell death extended far from the injury site and may further compromise an already damaged tendon via enzymatic factors and subsequent remodeling associated with cell necrosis. PMID:26162546

  7. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B.

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  8. Snapping Iliopsoas Tendon in a Recreational Athlete: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Lott, Jason; Duncan, Jewell B.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To describe the evaluation, diagnosis, and conservative treatment of a 31-year-old female recreational athlete with a snapping iliopsoas tendon. Background: The iliopsoas tendon has been implicated as an inflamed structure in this unique form of snapping hip. Hip pain, limitation of motion, or both may severely restrict vocational and recreational function and activities of daily living. Differential Diagnosis: Left snapping hip syndrome secondary to the iliopsoas tendon or the iliotibial band. Treatment: The treatment goal was to restore the athlete's pain-free, functional abilities. The primary focus of the treatment program was stretching of the left hip flexors. The patient demonstrated reduced pain and improved function following a 4-week stretching program and was fully functional and symptom free at 6 months. Uniqueness: Snapping hip syndrome is a clinical entity that may be described as hip pain associated with an audible snap of the hip during motion. The most common and well-known cause of this syndrome involves the snapping of the iliotibial band over the greater trochanter. A less common cause is the snapping of the iliopsoas tendon over the iliopectineal eminence. Conclusions: Understanding the anatomy and function of the iliopsoas tendon and related structures provides a basis for evaluation and treatment of this unique problem. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:16558594

  9. Technical and biological modifications for enhanced flexor tendon repair

    PubMed Central

    Kim, H. Mike; Nelson, Gregory; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Silva, Matthew J.; Das, Rosalina; Gelberman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after intra-synovial flexor tendon repair have been substantially improved over the past two decades through advances in tendon suture techniques and postoperative rehabilitation methods. Nevertheless, complications such as repair site elongation (i.e., gap formation) and rupture continue to occur frequently. Experimental studies have shown that repair site strength fails to increase in the first three weeks following tendon suture. After three weeks, the strength and rigidity of the repair site improves significantly, a process that continues for several months. Formation of a repair site gap during the early rehabilitation period has been shown to considerably delay the accrual of repair site strength over time. Thus, it is of prime importance that the method of tendon suture achieves and maintains a stiff and strong repair site during the early healing interval by maintaining close approximation of the tendon stumps and by stimulating, where possible, the intrinsic repair response. In this review we describe recent efforts to enhance the integrity of the immature repair site. We focus on two major areas of advancement: surgical technique modifications and manipulation of the biologic and biochemical environment. PMID:20513584

  10. Synthetic collagen fascicles for the regeneration of tendon tissue.

    PubMed

    Kew, S J; Gwynne, J H; Enea, D; Brookes, R; Rushton, N; Best, S M; Cameron, R E

    2012-10-01

    The structure of an ideal scaffold for tendon regeneration must be designed to provide a mechanical, structural and chemotactic microenvironment for native cellular activity to synthesize functional (i.e. load bearing) tissue. Collagen fibre scaffolds for this application have shown some promise to date, although the microstructural control required to mimic the native tendon environment has yet to be achieved allowing for minimal control of critical in vivo properties such as degradation rate and mass transport. In this report we describe the fabrication of a novel multi-fibre collagen fascicle structure, based on type-I collagen with failure stress of 25-49 MPa, approximating the strength and structure of native tendon tissue. We demonstrate a microscopic fabrication process based on the automated assembly of type-I collagen fibres with the ability to produce a controllable fascicle-like, structural motif allowing variable numbers of fibres per fascicle. We have confirmed that the resulting post-fabrication type-I collagen structure retains the essential phase behaviour, alignment and spectral characteristics of aligned native type-I collagen. We have also shown that both ovine tendon fibroblasts and human white blood cells in whole blood readily infiltrate the matrix on a macroscopic scale and that these cells adhere to the fibre surface after seven days in culture. The study has indicated that the synthetic collagen fascicle system may be a suitable biomaterial scaffold to provide a rationally designed implantable matrix material to mediate tendon repair and regeneration.

  11. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported.

  12. Tendon-to-Bone Attachment: From Development to Maturity

    PubMed Central

    Zelzer, Elazar; Blitz, Einat; Killian, Megan L.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2014-01-01

    The attachment between tendon and bone occurs across a complex transitional tissue that minimizes stress concentrations and allows for load transfer between muscles and skeleton. This unique tissue cannot be reconstructed following injury, leading to high incidence of recurrent failure and stressing the need for new clinical approaches. This review describes the current understanding of the development and function of the attachment site between tendon and bone. The embryonic attachment unit, namely, the tip of the tendon and the bone eminence into which it is inserted, was recently shown to develop modularly from a unique population of Sox9- and Scx-positive cells, which are distinct from tendon fibroblasts and chondrocytes. The fate and differentiation of these cells is regulated by transforming growth factor beta and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, respectively. Muscle loads are then necessary for the tissue to mature and mineralize. Mineralization of the attachment unit, which occurs postnatally at most sites, is largely controlled by an Indian hedgehog/parathyroid hormone-related protein feedback loop. A number of fundamental questions regarding the development of this remarkable attachment system require further study. These relate to the signaling mechanism that facilitates the formation of an interface with a gradient of cellular and extracellular phenotypes, as well as to the interactions between tendon and bone at the point of attachment. PMID:24677726

  13. Tendoscopy in stage I posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khazen, Gabriel; Khazen, Cesar

    2012-09-01

    Stage I PTTD was defined by Johnson and Strom as tenosynovitis or tendinitis whereby tendon length remains normal, there is no hindfoot deformity, and diagnosis is basically clinical, characterized by swelling and tenderness posterior to the medial malleolus. The PTT has a hypovascular zone 40 mm proximal to the insertion of the tendon and 14 mm in length. Pain often is localized to this portion of the tendon. Tendon power might be normal, and the patient can perform single heel rise, sometimes with slight discomfort. This condition is often misdiagnosed as ankle sprain, which delays correct diagnosis and early treatment that may improve symptoms, stop the disease process, and prevent the development of adult acquired flatfoot deformity. Ultrasonography is a valuable adjunctive diagnostic tool for stage I PTTD, but the authors always indicate MRI for accurate diagnosis in such patients. Patients with stage I PTTD are first treated nonoperatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for 5 days, cryotherapy, local ultrasound, and a PTTD airlift brace (Aircast) for 3 to 6 months. If symptoms persist, surgical debridement and synovectomy has been suggested. PTT tendoscopic synovectomy is a minimally invasive and effective surgical procedure to treat patients with stage I PTTD. It has the advantages of less wound pain, and fewer scar and wound problems. If tendon tear is observed during tendoscopy, it must be repaired with nonabsorbable sutures using a 3- or 4-cm incision.

  14. Ultrasound echo is related to stress and strain in tendon.

    PubMed

    Duenwald, Sarah; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Frisch, Kayt; Lakes, Roderic; Vanderby, Ray

    2011-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of tendons has been well studied in vitro. A noninvasive method to acquire mechanical data would be highly beneficial. Elastography has been a promising method of gathering in vivo tissue mechanical behavior, but it has inherent limitations. This study presents acoustoelasticity as an alternative ultrasound-based method of measuring tendon stress and strain by reporting a relationship between ultrasonic echo intensity (B-mode ultrasound image brightness) and mechanical behavior of tendon in vitro. Porcine digital flexor tendons were cyclically loaded in a mechanical testing system while an ultrasonic echo response was recorded. We report that echo intensity closely follows the applied cyclic strain pattern in time with higher strain protocols resulting in larger echo intensity changes. We also report that echo intensity is related nonlinearly to stress and nearly linearly to strain. This indicates that ultrasonic echo intensity is related to the mechanical behavior in a loaded tissue by an acoustoelastic response, as previously described in homogeneous, nearly incompressible materials. Acoustoelasticity is therefore able to relate strain-dependent stiffness and stress to the reflected echo, even in the processed B-mode signals reflected from viscoelastic and inhomogeneous material such as tendon, and is a promising metric to acquire in vivo mechanical data noninvasively.

  15. Intratendinous Tophaceous Gout Imitating Patellar Tendonitis in an Athletic Man

    PubMed Central

    Gililland, Jeremy M.; Webber, Nicholas P.; Jones, Kevin B.; Randall, R. Lor; Aoki, Stephen K.

    2013-01-01

    Patellar tendon-related pain is common in the athletic patient. When it occurs in skeletally mature patients participating in running, jumping, or kicking sports, the diagnosis of jumper’s knee patellar tendonitis is usually made. If patellar tendon pain is associated with a mass, the differential diagnosis should be broadened to include crystalline arthropathy. This article presents a case of a highly athletic 45-year-old man with a history of gout, anterior knee pain, and an enlarging mass in the region of the patellar tendon. Conservative management failed, and an excisional biopsy found it to be an intra-tendinous gouty tophus. To our knowledge, only 1 report exists documenting a patellar tendon mass secondary to gout, and no case report exists documenting this problem in an athlete. The interplay between athletics and gout has not been well described. Despite the long-term protective nature of fitness, transient elevations in uric acid associated with athletic endeavors may contribute acutely to manifestations of gout in some athletes. Resultant intra- or extra-articular pathology may present as, and easily be mistaken for, a sports-related injury. Without appropriate medical management, tophaceous deposition may continue to occur and treatment of the resultant mass may require surgical intervention. PMID:21410111

  16. Parachute technique: a complimentary method in zone II tendon repair.

    PubMed

    Mozafari, Naser; Hosseini, Seyed Nejat; Abdolzadeh, Madjid; Mozafari, Mohammed Ali

    2011-06-01

    Flexor tendon lacerations still represent a challenging problem for the hand and the plastic surgeon, particularly in zone II. Many techniques have been devised accordingly to make the surgery of this zone easier. Hence, we too have devised an added complementary technique (ie, the parachute technique) to the common surgical techniques of the tendon repair to ease the repairing process and improve the outcomes. In this study, 79 patients, from whom 21 patients had 2 injured fingers, with flexor tendon injury in zone II (ie, 100 fingers) underwent this new technique. Finally, the results were hopeful. Thus, this complementary parachute technique combined with an early active mobilization with almost full range of flexion and extension, starting on the first postoperative day, resulted in improved outcomes compared with both passive mobilization and gentle active mobilization with a limited range of motion (ie, "controlled"). The Strickland formula (total active motion) system was used to evaluate the functional results of the flexor tendon repair. Finally, this technique is applicable for tendon repairs, and is shown to produce good results in their hands.

  17. Regenerative biology of tendon: mechanisms for renewal and repair

    PubMed Central

    Dyment, Nathaniel A.; Galloway, Jenna L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying tissue turnover and repair are essential towards addressing pathologies in aging, injury and disease. Each tissue has distinct means of maintaining homeostasis and healing after injury. For some, resident stem cell populations mediate both of these processes. These stem cells, by definition, are self renewing and give rise to all the differentiated cells of that tissue. However, not all organs fit with this traditional stem cell model of regeneration, and some do not appear to harbor somatic stem or progenitor cells capable of multilineage in vivo reconstitution. Despite recent progress in tendon progenitor cell research, our current knowledge of the mechanisms regulating tendon cell homeostasis and injury response is limited. Understanding the role of resident tendon cell populations is of great importance for regenerative medicine based approaches to tendon injuries and disease. The goal of this review is to bring to light our current knowledge regarding tendon progenitor cells and their role in tissue maintenance and repair. We will focus on pressing questions in the field and the new tools, including model systems, available to address them. PMID:26389023

  18. Should we think about wrist extensor after flexor tendon repair?

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline M; Tanaka, Denise M; Barbosa, Rafael I; Marcolino, Alexandre M; Elui, Valeria MC; Mazzer, Nilton

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the activity of wrist extensor muscle, correlating with wrist motion during gripping after flexor tendon repair. Design: Cross-sectional clinical measurement study. Setting: Laboratory for biomechanics and rehabilitation. Subjects: A total of 11 patients submitted to rehabilitation by early passive motion of the fingers with wrist flexion position were evaluated after 8 weeks of fingers flexor tendon repair and 11 healthy volunteers, all ranging from 20 to 37 years of age. Intervention: Volunteers performed an isometric standardized gripping task. Main measures: We used electrogoniometry to analyze wrist range of motion and surface electromyography, considering 100% maximum voluntary contraction to represent the amplitude of electromyographic activity of the extensor carpi radialis and flexor digitorum superficialis. Results: Patients with flexor tendon repair showed co-activation deficit between wrist extensor (extensor carpi radialis) and flexor finger muscles (flexor digitorum superficialis) during gripping in the intermediate phase of rehabilitation, despite some recovering mobility for wrist extension (p ≤ 0.05). A moderate correlation between range of motion and extensor carpi radialis was present only for injured group (r = 0.32). Total active motion score, which represents finger active excursion, was regular or poor in 65% of cases, all with nerve repair associated. Conclusion: Wrist extensors have an important synergist role at handgrip, although some imbalance can be present after flexor tendon repair. These preliminary findings suggest that emphasis could be directed to add synergistic wrist motion in rehabilitation protocols after flexor tendon repair. Future studies with early active rehabilitation are necessary. PMID:26770674

  19. Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears: Restoring Joint Kinematics by Tendon Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Greenspoon, Joshua A.; Millett, Peter J.; Moulton, Samuel G.; Petri, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tendon transfers can be a surgical treatment option in managing younger, active patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the use of tendon transfers to treat massive irreparable rotator cuff tears and to summarize clinical outcomes. Methods: A selective literature search was performed and personal surgical experiences are reported. Results: Latissimus dorsi transfers have been used for many years in the management of posterosuperior rotator cuff tears with good reported clinical outcomes. It can be transferred without or with the teres major (L’Episcopo technique). Many surgical techniques have been described for latissimus dorsi transfer including single incision, double incision, and arthroscopically assisted transfer. Transfer of the pectoralis major tendon is the most common tendon transfer procedure performed for anterosuperior rotator cuff deficiencies. Several surgical techniques have been described, however transfer of the pectoralis major beneath the coracoid process has been found to most closely replicate the force vector that is normally provided by the intact subscapularis. Conclusion: Tendon transfers can be used successfully in the management of younger patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears and minimal glenohumeral arthritis. Improvements in clinical outcomes scores and range of motion have been demonstrated. This can delay arthroplasty, which is of particular importance for younger patients with high functional demands.

  20. Rehabilitation of Tendon Problems in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jonathan; Gaida, Jamie E; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Zwerver, Johannes; Anthony, Joseph S; Scott, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Exercise is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus and its associated complications. However, individuals with diabetes have a heightened risk of musculoskeletal problems, including tendon pathologies. Diabetes has a significant impact on the function of tendons due to the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in the load-bearing collagen. In addition, tendon vascularity and healing may be reduced due to diabetes-induced changes in the peripheral vascular system, and impaired synthesis of collagen and glycosaminoglycan. The current chapter presents an evidence-based discussion of considerations for the rehabilitation of tendon problems in people with diabetes. The following conditions are discussed in detail - calcific tendinopathy, tenosynovitis, tendon rupture, and non-calcifying tendinopathy. Common diabetes-related findings are presented, along with their potential impact on tendinopathy management and suggested modifications to standard tendinopathy treatment protocols. A holistic approach should be used to optimize musculotendinous function, including a comprehensive exercise prescription addressing strength, flexibility, and aerobic fitness. PMID:27535262