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Sample records for partially ionized space

  1. Radiation of partially ionized atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear collisional-radiative model for determination of production of electrons, positive and negative ions, excited atoms, and spectral and continuum line intensities in stationary partially ionized atomic hydrogen is presented. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations for production of the electrons, ions, and excited atoms with the radiation escape factors, which are not constant but depend on plasma conditions. It is found that the contribution of the negative ion emission to the total continuum emission can be important. Comparison of the calculated total continuum emission coefficient, including the negative ion emission, is in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Partially ionized plasmas, including the Third Symposium on Uranium Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Fundamentals of both electrically and fission generated plasmas are discussed. Research in gaseous fuel reactors using uranium hexafluoride is described and other partially ionized plasma applications are discussed.

  3. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  4. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  5. ONSET OF FAST MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN PARTIALLY IONIZED GASES

    SciTech Connect

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Zweibel, Ellen G. E-mail: zweibel@astro.wisc.edu

    2011-10-01

    We consider quasi-stationary two-dimensional magnetic reconnection in a partially ionized incompressible plasma. We find that when the plasma is weakly ionized and the collisions between the ions and the neutral particles are significant, the transition to fast collisionless reconnection due to the Hall effect in the generalized Ohm's law is expected to occur at much lower values of the Lundquist number, as compared to a fully ionized plasma case. We estimate that these conditions for fast reconnection are satisfied in molecular clouds and in protostellar disks.

  6. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, Roberto; Ballester, Jose Luis; Carbonell, Marc E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es

    2013-11-01

    Compressible disturbances propagate in a plasma in the form of magnetoacoustic waves driven by both gas pressure and magnetic forces. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of ionized and neutral species are coupled due to ion-neutral collisions. As a consequence, magnetoacoustic waves propagating through a partially ionized medium are affected by ion-neutral coupling. The degree to which the behavior of the classic waves is modified depends on the physical properties of the various species and on the relative value of the wave frequency compared to the ion-neutral collision frequency. Here, we perform a comprehensive theoretical investigation of magnetoacoustic wave propagation in a partially ionized plasma using the two-fluid formalism. We consider an extensive range of values for the collision frequency, ionization ratio, and plasma β, so that the results are applicable to a wide variety of astrophysical plasmas. We determine the modification of the wave frequencies and study the frictional damping due to ion-neutral collisions. Approximate analytic expressions for the frequencies are given in the limit case of strongly coupled ions and neutrals, while numerically obtained dispersion diagrams are provided for arbitrary collision frequencies. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoffs in the dispersion diagrams that constrain wave propagation for certain combinations of parameters. A specific application to propagation of compressible waves in the solar chromosphere is given.

  7. Shock-wave structure in a partially ionized gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, C. S.; Huang, A. B.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a steady plane shock in a partially ionized gas has been investigated using the Boltzmann equation with a kinetic model as the governing equation and the discrete ordinate method as a tool. The effects of the electric field induced by the charge separation on the shock structure have also been studied. Although the three species of an ionized gas travel with approximately the same macroscopic velocity, the individual distribution functions are found to be very different. In a strong shock the atom distribution function may have double peaks, while the ion distribution function has only one peak. Electrons are heated up much earlier than ions and atoms in a partially ionized gas. Because the interactions of electrons with atoms and with ions are different, the ion temperature can be different from the atom temperature.

  8. Neutral Atom Diffusion in a Partially Ionized Prominence Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The support of solar prominences is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. it is necessary to consider in addition the support of the neutral component of the prominence plasma. This support is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material,

  9. Investigation of Partially Ionized Plasma Chemistry of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Forrest; Lemmer, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    Future space missions require an efficient and versatile method of propulsion. One possibility is the use of dual-mode-propulsion. Dual-mode-propulsion combines the high specific impulse of electric propulsion with the high thrust of chemical propulsion. However, to effectively implement dual-mode-propulsion a propellant that can be used in both electric and chemical propulsion is required. Ionic liquids are one class of propellants currently being investigated for their use in dual-mode-propulsion systems. Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HAN) is the ionic liquid of interest in this study. HAN's chemistry and decomposition have been thoroughly investigated at pressures above atmospheric pressure; however, the chemistry of partially ionized HAN is not well understood. Ab-initio modelling is used to determine the chemistry of key ion-neutral reactions and to develop a reaction network for HAN plasma. Calculations using Density Functional Theory and Coupled Cluster Singles Doubles with approximate Triples corrections are performed. This will allow for accurate modelling of HAN's interaction with thruster components and prevent premature failure.

  10. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion–neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled

  11. The role of partial ionization effects in the chromosphere.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-05-28

    The energy for the coronal heating must be provided from the convection zone. However, the amount and the method by which this energy is transferred into the corona depend on the properties of the lower atmosphere and the corona itself. We review: (i) how the energy could be built in the lower solar atmosphere, (ii) how this energy is transferred through the solar atmosphere, and (iii) how the energy is finally dissipated in the chromosphere and/or corona. Any mechanism of energy transport has to deal with the various physical processes in the lower atmosphere. We will focus on a physical process that seems to be highly important in the chromosphere and not deeply studied until recently: the ion-neutral interaction effects in the chromosphere. We review the relevance and the role of the partial ionization in the chromosphere and show that this process actually impacts considerably the outer solar atmosphere. We include analysis of our 2.5D radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations with the Bifrost code (Gudiksen et al. 2011 Astron. Astrophys. 531, A154 (doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116520)) including the partial ionization effects on the chromosphere and corona and thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The photosphere, chromosphere and transition region are partially ionized and the interaction between ionized particles and neutral particles has important consequences on the magneto-thermodynamics of these layers. The partial ionization effects are treated using generalized Ohm's law, i.e. we consider the Hall term and the ambipolar diffusion (Pedersen dissipation) in the induction equation. The interaction between the different species affects the modelled atmosphere as follows: (i) the ambipolar diffusion dissipates magnetic energy and increases the minimum temperature in the chromosphere and (ii) the upper chromosphere may get heated and expanded over a greater range of heights. These processes reveal appreciable differences between the modelled atmospheres

  12. Equation of state of partially ionized argon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F.; Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Chen, Y. L.; Cai, L. C.

    2011-11-15

    The ionization degree, Hugoniots, and equation of state of partially ionized argon plasma were calculated by using self-consistent fluid variational theory for temperature of 6-50 kK and density of 0.05-4.0 g/cm{sup 3}. The corrections of lowering of ionization energy of fluid argon caused by the interactions among all particles of Ar, Ar{sup +}, Ar{sup 2+}, and e have been taken into consideration in terms of the correlation contributions to the chemical potential which is determined self-consistently by the free energy function. The initial density effects of gas argon under shock compression have been discussed. Comparison is performed with available shock-wave experiments and other theoretical calculations.

  13. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN PARTIALLY IONIZED COMPRESSIBLE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, A. J.; Ballester, J. L. E-mail: roberto.soler@wis.kuleuven.be

    2012-07-20

    We study the modification of the classical criterion for the linear onset and growing rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a partially ionized plasma in the two-fluid description. The plasma is composed of a neutral fluid and an electron-ion fluid, coupled by means of particle collisions. The governing linear equations and appropriate boundary conditions, including gravitational terms, are derived and applied to the case of the RTI in a single interface between two partially ionized plasmas. The limits of collisionless, no gravity, and incompressible fluids are checked before addressing the general case. We find that both compressibility and ion-neutral collisions lower the linear growth rate, but do not affect the critical threshold of the onset of the RTI. The configuration is always unstable when a lighter plasma is below a heavier plasma regardless the value of the magnetic field strength, the ionization degree, and the ion-neutral collision frequency. However, ion-neutral collisions have a strong impact on the RTI growth rate, which can be decreased by an order of magnitude compared to the value in the collisionless case. Ion-neutral collisions are necessary to accurately describe the evolution of the RTI in partially ionized plasmas such as prominences. The timescale for the development of the instability is much longer than in the classical incompressible fully ionized case. This result may explain the existence of prominence fine structures with life times of the order of 30 minutes. The timescales derived from the classical theory are about one order of magnitude shorter and incompatible with the observed life times.

  14. Alfvénic localized structures in partially ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borhanian, Jafar; Rezaei, Arash

    2017-02-01

    The existence and dynamics of Alfvénic localized structures are investigated in partially ionized plasmas. We have employed the Hall magnetohydrodynamics model for partially ionized plasmas and shown that the evolution of a weakly nonlinear and weakly dispersive Alfvén wave is governed by a derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) type equation. In the Hall effect domination limit, this equation reduces to a standard DNLS equation that possesses localized solutions in the form of solitons and rogue waves. The dependence of the profile of these structures on the Hall parameter is addressed. When the ohmic and ambipolar effects are small but finite in comparison to the Hall effect, the evolution equation takes the form of a perturbed DNLS equation. In this limit, the dynamics of envelope soliton solution is examined by means of the soliton perturbation method, the moment method, to be precise.

  15. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED FILAMENT THREAD

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.es

    2009-07-10

    Oscillations and propagating waves are commonly seen in high-resolution observations of filament threads, i.e., the fine-structures of solar filaments/prominences. Since the temperature of prominences is typically of the order of 10{sup 4} K, the prominence plasma is only partially ionized. In this paper, we study the effect of neutrals on the wave propagation in a filament thread modeled as a partially ionized homogeneous magnetic flux tube embedded in an homogeneous and fully ionized coronal plasma. Ohmic and ambipolar magnetic diffusion are considered in the basic resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. We numerically compute the eigenfrequencies of kink, slow, and Alfven linear MHD modes and obtain analytical approximations in some cases. We find that the existence of propagating modes is constrained by the presence of critical values of the longitudinal wavenumber. In particular, the lower and upper frequency cutoffs of kink and Alfven waves owe their existence to magnetic diffusion parallel and perpendicular to magnetic field lines, respectively. The slow mode only has a lower frequency cutoff, which is caused by perpendicular magnetic diffusion and is significantly affected by the ionization degree. In addition, ion-neutral collision is the most efficient damping mechanism for short wavelengths, while ohmic diffusion dominates in the long-wavelength regime.

  16. Equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, F.J.

    1989-09-28

    This paper describes methods for calculating the equation of state of partially-ionized dense plasmas. The term dense plasma is used rather than strongly coupled plasma, since it is possible that at plasma conditions such that only a few levels can be observed spectroscopically the plasma coupling parameters are not large. Due mainly to their importance in theoretical astrophysics, the properties of partially ionized plasmas have been of interest for a long while. More recently, this interest has intensified due to the development of methods for producing partially ionized plasmas in the laboratory. This has opened up large programs of experimental investigation and of practical application. In this paper we consider detailed statistical mechanical methods that explicitly treat the distribution over ionic species and their energy level structure. These detailed approaches are generally characterized as being in the chemical picture'' when a free energy expression is minimized or in the physical picture'' when the starting point is the grand canonical ensemble. 52 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. nMHDust: A 4-Fluid Partially Ionized Dusty Plasma Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2008-11-01

    nMHDust is a next generation 4-fluid partially ionized magnetized dusty plasma code, treating the inertial dynamics of dust, ion and neutral components. Coded in ANSI C, the numerical method is based on the MHDust 3-fluid fully ionized dusty plasma code. This code expands the features of the MHDust code to include ionization/recombination effects and the netCDF data format. Tests of this code include: ionization instabilities, wave mode propagation (electromagnetic and acoustic), shear-flow instabilities, and magnetic reconnection. Relevant parameters for the space environment are considered, allowing a comparison to be made with previous dusty plasma codes (MHDust and DENISIS). The utility of the code is expanded through the possibility of a small dust mass. This allows nMHDust to be used as a 2-ion plasma code. nMHDust completes the array of fluid dusty plasma codes available for numerical investigations into nonlinear phenomena in the field of astrophysical dusty plasmas.

  18. Self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Arkhipov, Yu. V.; Baimbetov, F. B.; Davletov, A. E.

    2011-01-15

    A simple renormalization theory of plasma particle interactions is proposed. It primarily stems from generic properties of equilibrium distribution functions and allows one to obtain the so-called generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation for an effective interaction potential of two chosen particles in the presence of a third one. The same equation is then strictly derived from the Bogolyubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy for equilibrium distribution functions in the pair correlation approximation. This enables one to construct a self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas, correctly accounting for the close interrelation of charged and neutral components thereof. Minimization of the system free energy provides ionization equilibrium and, thus, permits one to study the plasma composition in a wide range of its parameters. Unlike standard chemical models, the proposed one allows one to study the system correlation functions and thereby to obtain an equation of state which agrees well with exact results of quantum-mechanical activity expansions. It is shown that the plasma and neutral components are strongly interrelated, which results in the short-range order formation in the corresponding subsystem. The mathematical form of the results obtained enables one to both firmly establish this fact and to determine a characteristic length of the structure formation. Since the cornerstone of the proposed self-consistent chemical model of partially ionized plasmas is an effective pairwise interaction potential, it immediately provides quite an efficient calculation scheme not only for thermodynamical functions but for transport coefficients as well.

  19. Spectral equation-of-state theory for dense, partially ionized matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, Burke

    2005-07-01

    The Schrödinger equation is solved in time and space to implement a finite-temperature equation-of-state theory for dense, partially ionized matter. The time-dependent calculation generates a spectrum of quantum states. Eigenfunctions are calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and used to calculate the electronic pressure and energy. Results are given for Be and LiD and compared with results from the INFERNO model [D. A. Liberman, Phys. Rev. B 20, 4981 (1979)].

  20. Basic results on the equations of magnetohydrodynamics of partially ionized inviscid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Manuel

    2009-10-15

    The equations of evolution of partially ionized plasmas have been far more studied in one of their many simplifications than in its original form. They present a relation between the velocity of each species, plus the magnetic and electric fields, which yield as an analog of Ohm's law a certain elliptic equation. Therefore, the equations represent a functional evolution system, not a classical one. Nonetheless, a priori estimates and theorems of existence may be obtained in appropriate Sobolev spaces.

  1. Fluid description of multi-component solar partially ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, E. Collados, M.; Vitas, N.; Díaz, A.

    2014-09-15

    We derive self-consistent formalism for the description of multi-component partially ionized solar plasma, by means of the coupled equations for the charged and neutral components for an arbitrary number of chemical species, and the radiation field. All approximations and assumptions are carefully considered. Generalized Ohm's law is derived for the single-fluid and two-fluid formalism. Our approach is analytical with some order-of-magnitude support calculations. After general equations are developed, we particularize to some frequently considered cases as for the interaction of matter and radiation.

  2. Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-06-01

    Transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma in magnetic field taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles are derived. As a starting point of analysis the kinetic equation with a binary collision operator written in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and with a reactive collision integral allowing for arbitrary chemical reactions is used. The linearized variant of Grad's moment method is applied to deduce the systems of moment equations for plasma and also full and reduced transport equations for plasma species nonequilibrium parameters.

  3. Runaway electrons in a fully and partially ionized nonideal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, T.S.; Turekhanova, K.M.

    2005-10-01

    This paper reports on a study of electron runaway for a nonideal plasma in an external electric field. Based on pseudopotential models of nonideal fully and partially ionized plasmas, the friction force was derived as a function of electron velocities. Dependences of the electron free path on plasma density and nonideality parameters were obtained. The impact of the relative number of runaway electrons on their velocity and temperature was considered for classical and semiclassical models of a nonideal plasma. It has been shown that for the defined intervals of the coupled plasma parameter, the difference between the relative numbers of runaway electron values is essential for various plasma models.

  4. KELVIN-HELMHOLTZ INSTABILITY IN PARTIALLY IONIZED COMPRESSIBLE PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Goossens, M.; Diaz, A. J.; Ballester, J. L.

    2012-04-20

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) has been observed in the solar atmosphere. Ion-neutral collisions may play a relevant role for the growth rate and evolution of the KHI in solar partially ionized plasmas such as in, e.g., solar prominences. Here, we investigate the linear phase of the KHI at an interface between two partially ionized magnetized plasmas in the presence of a shear flow. The effects of ion-neutral collisions and compressibility are included in the analysis. We obtain the dispersion relation of the linear modes and perform parametric studies of the unstable solutions. We find that, in the incompressible case, the KHI is present for any velocity shear regardless of the value of the collision frequency. In the compressible case, the domain of instability depends strongly on the plasma parameters, especially the collision frequency and the density contrast. For high collision frequencies and low density contrasts the KHI is present for super-Alfvenic velocity shear only. For high density contrasts the threshold velocity shear can be reduced to sub-Alfvenic values. For the particular case of turbulent plumes in prominences, we conclude that sub-Alfvenic flow velocities can trigger the KHI thanks to the ion-neutral coupling.

  5. The Effects of Partial Ionization on Prominence Mass Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpen, J. T.; Olson, K.; DeVore, C. R.; Martinez Gomez, D.; Sokolov, I.

    2015-12-01

    The origin of the prominence mass has been an open question since this cool plasma suspended in the hot corona was first discovered. We have known for a long time that the mass must come from the chromosphere, but it is unclear whether this mass is lifted bodily through magnetic levitation, injected by reconnection-driven upflows, or driven from the chromosphere by evaporation and then condensed. One evaporation-condensation scenario, the thermal nonequilibrium (TNE) model, is the most fully developed, quantitative model for the prominence plasma to date. In the TNE scenario, localized heating concentrated at the coronal loop footpoints produces chromospheric evaporation, filling the flux tube with hot, dense plasma that subsequently collapses radiatively to form cool condensations. Thus far this model has been successful in explaining the key properties of the long, persistent threads and small, highly dynamic, transient blobs in prominences, the damping of large-amplitude field-aligned prominence oscillations, the appearance of horn-shaped features above the cool prominence in EUV images of coronal cavities, and coronal rain in the ambient corona. To date, all studies of TNE have assumed that the plasma is fully ionized, which is appropriate for the hot coronal gas but unrealistic for the cool plasma below ~30,000 K. The energetics, dynamics, and evolutionary time scales of the TNE process are expected to be altered when the effects of ionization and recombination are considered. We have modified ARGOS, our 1D hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement, to include an equation of state that accounts for the effects of partial ionization of the plasma over a wide range of temperatures and densities. We will discuss the results of these simulations and their comparison with our previous studies of TNE in typical filament-supporting flux tubes. This work was partially supported by NASA's LWS Strategic Capability program.

  6. Equation of state for a partially ionized gas. II.

    PubMed

    Baker, George A

    2003-11-01

    The derivation of equations of state for fluid phases of a partially ionized gas or plasma is addressed from a fundamental point of view. A spherical cellular model is deduced for the hot curve limit (or ideal Fermi gas). Next the Coulomb interactions are added to the spherical cellular model for general ionic charge Z. Then an independent electron model within a Z electron cell plus several many-body effects are employed. Numerical examples of the theory for several elements (H, Li, N, Na, K, Ni, Rb, Pd, Cs, and Er) are reported. These results reduce in various limits of temperature and density to the expected behavior. They display electron, localization-delocalization phase transitions of liquid-gas character. In the higher Z elements, a second possible critical point has been found. The critical pressure, electron density and temperature for the lower-density critical points seem to obey power laws as a function of Z.

  7. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Negative Hydrogen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. Neutral--neutral, ion-neutral, Coulomb collisions and charge-neutralizing collisions are implemented in U3DSMC using the no time counter method, electron-molecule collisions are treated by the constant timestep method. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  8. Effects of viscosity in a partially ionized channel flow with thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2009-01-15

    The flow of the partially ionized gas inside thermionic hollow cathodes spans a diverse range of theoretical disciplines in plasma physics and fluid mechanics. Understanding and predicting the evolution of such flows has many practical implications because hollow cathodes are critical components of electric propulsion systems used onboard scientific and commercial spacecraft presently in space or in the mission planning stages. As space missions become more demanding of the propulsion system in terms of throughput, understanding and predicting failure mechanisms of the system becomes imperative. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the partially ionized gas generated by a thermionic hollow cathode have been performed to quantify the effects of viscosity inside the cylindrical channel of the device. A comparison of the inviscid and fully viscous flow fields shows that viscosity has a significant impact on the atomic species and a lesser effect on the ions. The internal pressure is determined to be more than 40% higher compared to the inviscid solution and the Reynolds number for the flow of atoms is found to be less than 20 inside the channel. Although the Mach number is computed to be <0.1 for approximately 95% of the channel, the solution for the velocity flow field begins to deviate from the Poiseuille (parabolic) solution at about 50% of the channel due mainly to collisional drag with ions.

  9. Transport properties of partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magin, Thierry E.; Degrez, Gerard

    2004-10-01

    This work is a comprehensive and theoretical study of transport phenomena in partially ionized and unmagnetized plasmas by means of kinetic theory. The pros and cons of different models encountered in the literature are presented. A dimensional analysis of the Boltzmann equation deals with the disparity of mass between electrons and heavy particles and yields the epochal relaxation concept. First, electrons and heavy particles exhibit distinct kinetic time scales and may have different translational temperatures. The hydrodynamic velocity is assumed to be identical for both types of species. Second, at the hydrodynamic time scale the energy exchanged between electrons and heavy particles tends to equalize both temperatures. Global and species macroscopic fluid conservation equations are given. New constrained integral equations are derived from a modified Chapman-Enskog perturbative method. Adequate bracket integrals are introduced to treat thermal nonequilibrium. A symmetric mathematical formalism is preferred for physical and numerical standpoints. A Laguerre-Sonine polynomial expansion allows for systems of transport to be derived. Momentum, mass, and energy fluxes are associated to shear viscosity, diffusion coefficients, thermal diffusion coefficients, and thermal conductivities. A Goldstein expansion of the perturbation function provides explicit expressions of the thermal diffusion ratios and measurable thermal conductivities. Thermal diffusion terms already found in the Russian literature ensure the exact mass conservation. A generalized Stefan-Maxwell equation is derived following the method of Kolesnikov and Tirskiy. The bracket integral reduction in terms of transport collision integrals is presented in Appendix for the thermal nonequilibrium case. A simple Eucken correction is proposed to deal with the internal degrees of freedom of atoms and polyatomic molecules, neglecting inelastic collisions. The authors believe that the final expressions are

  10. Partial rectangular metric spaces and fixed point theorems.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Satish

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of partial rectangular metric spaces as a generalization of rectangular metric and partial metric spaces. Some properties of partial rectangular metric spaces and some fixed point results for quasitype contraction in partial rectangular metric spaces are proved. Some examples are given to illustrate the observed results.

  11. Influence of resonant charge exchange on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. M. Stepanenko, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of resonant charge exchange for ion-atom interaction on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma embedded in the magnetic field is investigated. The general system of equations used to derive the viscosity coefficients for an arbitrary plasma component in the 21-moment approximation of Grad’s method is presented. The expressions for the coefficients of total and partial viscosities of a multicomponent partially ionized plasma in the magnetic field are obtained. As an example, the coefficients of the parallel and transverse viscosities for the ionic and neutral components of the partially ionized hydrogen plasma are calculated. It is shown that the account for resonant charge exchange can lead to a substantial change of the parallel and transverse viscosity of the plasma components in the region of low degrees of ionization on the order of 0.1.

  12. Quantum statistical mechanics of dense partially ionized hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Rogers, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of dense hydrogen plasmas beginning with the two component quantum grand partition function is reviewed. It is shown that ionization equilibrium and molecular dissociation equilibrium can be treated in the same manner with proper consideration of all two-body states. A quantum perturbation expansion is used to give an accurate calculation of the equation of state of the gas for any degree of dissociation and ionization. The statistical mechanical calculation of the plasma equation of state is intended for stellar interiors. The general approach is extended to the calculation of the equation of state of the outer layers of large planets.

  13. Kinetic theory of partially ionized complex (dusty) plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tsytovich, V.N.; De Angelis, U.; Ivlev, A.V.; Morfill, G.E.

    2005-08-15

    The general approach to the kinetic theory of complex (dusty) plasmas [Tsytovich and de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1093 (1999)], which was formulated with the assumption of a regular (nonfluctuating) source of plasma particles, is reformulated to include ionization by electron impact on neutrals as the plasma source and the effects of collisions of ions and dust particles with neutrals.

  14. Quantum statistical mechanics of dense partially ionized hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Rogers, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of dense hydrogenic plasmas beginning with the two component quantum grand partition function is reviewed. It is shown that ionization equilibrium and molecular dissociation equilibrium can be treated in the same manner with proper consideration of all two-body states. A quantum perturbation expansion is used to give an accurate calculation of the equation of state of the gas for any degree of dissociation and ionization. In this theory, the effective interaction between any two charges is the dynamic screened potential obtained from the plasma dielectric function. We make the static approximation; and we carry out detailed numerical calculations with the bound and scattering states of the Debye potential, using the Beth-Uhlenbeck form of the quantum second virial coefficient. We compare our results with calculations from the Saha equation.

  15. HEATING OF THE MAGNETIZED SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE BY PARTIAL IONIZATION EFFECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Khomenko, E.; Collados, M.

    2012-03-10

    In this paper, we study the heating of the magnetized solar chromosphere induced by the large fraction of neutral atoms present in this layer. The presence of neutrals, together with the decrease with height of the collisional coupling, leads to deviations from the classical magnetohydrodynamic behavior of the chromospheric plasma. A relative net motion appears between the neutral and ionized components, usually referred to as ambipolar diffusion. The dissipation of currents in the chromosphere is enhanced by orders of magnitude due to the action of ambipolar diffusion, as compared with the standard ohmic diffusion. We propose that a significant amount of magnetic energy can be released to the chromosphere just by existing force-free 10-40 G magnetic fields there. As a consequence, we conclude that ambipolar diffusion is an important process that should be included in chromospheric heating models, as it has the potential to rapidly heat the chromosphere. We perform analytical estimations and numerical simulations to prove this idea.

  16. The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan

    2012-11-20

    The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

  17. Application of the partial-Fourier-transform approach for tunnel ionization of molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingming; Liu, Yunquan

    2016-04-01

    Combining the partial-Fourier-transform approach with Wenzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation, we theoretically study the strong-field tunneling ionization of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. First we obtain the analytical expression of momentum distribution at the tunnel exit of diatomic molecules, and then we calculate the alignment-dependent ionization rate at different laser intensities and internuclear distances. We show that the internuclear distance has a significant effect on the alignment dependence of the ionization rate. Using this approach, we can also separate the contributions of each atomic center and show the interference effect between them. Finally, we extend this method to a polyatomic molecule, benzene, as an example.

  18. Uniformly spaced field-aligned ionization ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Muldrew, D. B.

    1984-01-01

    A number of interesting cases of combination mode ducted echoes for mid- and low-latitude regions are presented that show nearly uniformly spaced multiple combination mode traces on the ionograms in the frequency range above 1 MHz. These traces suggest that a parallel system of field-aligned ducts is present. Ray tracing studies are made to determine the structure that would explain the observations using the electron density profile derivable from the vertical trace and assuming field-aligned ducts. Spacing perpendicular to the ducts is found to be as much as 70 km. Some of these parallel duct structures are found to extend to the conjugate hemisphere, possibly to the F peak.

  19. Strong Field Double Ionization: The Phase Space Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mauger, F.; Chandre, C.; Uzer, T.

    2009-05-01

    We identify the phase-space structures that regulate atomic double ionization in strong ultrashort laser pulses. The emerging dynamical picture complements the recollision scenario by clarifying the distinct roles played by the recolliding and core electrons, and leads to verifiable predictions on the characteristic features of the 'knee', a hallmark of the nonsequential process.

  20. Equation of state for partially ionized carbon and oxygen mixtures at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Massacrier, Gerard; Potekhin, Alexander Y.; Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-11-15

    The equation of state (EOS) for partially ionized carbon, oxygen, and carbon-oxygen mixtures at temperatures 3x10{sup 5} K < or approx. T < or approx. 3x10{sup 6} K is calculated over a wide range of densities, using the method of free energy minimization in the framework of the chemical picture of plasmas. The free energy model is an improved extension of our model previously developed for pure carbon [Potekhin, Massacrier, and Chabrier, Phys. Rev. E 72, 046402 (2005)]. The internal partition functions of bound species are calculated by a self-consistent treatment of each ionization stage in the plasma environment taking into account pressure ionization. The long-range Coulomb interactions between ions and screening of the ions by free electrons are included using our previously published analytical model, recently improved, in particular for the case of mixtures. We also propose a simple but accurate method of calculation of the EOS of partially ionized binary mixtures based on detailed ionization balance calculations for pure substances.

  1. RESONANTLY DAMPED KINK MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED FILAMENT THREAD

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L. E-mail: ramon.oliver@uib.e

    2009-12-10

    Transverse oscillations of solar filament and prominence threads have been frequently reported. These oscillations have the common features of being of short period (2-10 minutes) and being damped after a few periods. The observations are interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave modes, whereas resonant absorption in the Alfven continuum and ion-neutral collisions are candidates to be the damping mechanisms. Here, we study both analytically and numerically the time damping of kink MHD waves in a cylindrical, partially ionized filament thread embedded in a coronal environment. The thread model is composed of a straight and thin, homogeneous filament plasma, with a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer where the plasma physical properties vary continuously from filament to coronal conditions. The magnetic field is homogeneous and parallel to the thread axis. We find that the kink mode is efficiently damped by resonant absorption for typical wavelengths of filament oscillations, the damping times being compatible with the observations. Partial ionization does not affect the process of resonant absorption, and the filament plasma ionization degree is only important for the damping for wavelengths much shorter than those observed. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the phenomenon of resonant absorption is studied in a partially ionized plasma.

  2. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, I: General transport equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we derive the set of general transport equations for multicomponent partially ionized reactive plasma in the presence of electric and magnetic fields taking into account the internal degrees of freedom and electronic excitation of plasma particles. Our starting point is a generalized Boltzmann equation with the collision integral in the Wang-Chang and Uhlenbeck form and a reactive collision integral. We obtain a set of conservation equations for such plasma and employ a linearized variant of Grad's moment method to derive the system of moment (or transport) equations for the plasma species nonequilibrium parameters. Full and reduced transport equations, resulting from the linearized system of moment equations, are presented, which can be used to obtain transport relations and expressions for transport coefficients of electrons and heavy plasma particles (molecules, atoms and ions) in partially ionized reactive plasma.

  3. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  4. The electromagnetic interchange mode in a partially ionized collisional plasma. [spread F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    A collisional electromagnetic dispersion relation is derived from two-fluid theory for the interchange mode coupled to the Alfven, acoustic, drift and entropy modes in a partially ionized plasma. The fundamental electromagnetic nature of the interchange model is noted; coupling to the intermediate Alfven mode is strongly stabilizing for finite k sub z. Both ion viscous and ion-neutral stabilization are included, and it was found that collisions destroy the ion finite Larmor radius cutoff at short perpendicular wavelengths.

  5. Multifluid Modeling of the Partially Ionized Chromosphere with Effects of Impact Ionization, Radiative Recombination and Charge Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Y. G.; Poedts, D. S.; Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.

    2015-12-01

    driver to simulate the propagation of MHD waves in the partially ionized gravitationally stratified system.

  6. Boronated Scintillator Detector for Use in Space with Ionization Calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britvich, G. I.; Chernichenko, S. K.; Demichev, M. A.; Gnezdilov, I. I.; Mukhin, V. I.; Soukhih, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    Boronated Scintillator Detector (BSD) for use in space with ionization calorimeters was suggested. BSD improved e/h showers separation, which are initiated in the ionization calorimeter in interaction it with high energy particles. Improve the rejection is based on the hadron-induced showers tend to be accompanied by significantly more neutron activity than electromagnetic showers. The detector is composed of natural boron-loaded (5%) castable plastic scintillation plates. To collect light using wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibers. The experiment showed that the photoelectron yield is ∼ 40 ph.el./MeV with using PMT EMI 9954KB. Simulation on GEANT4 was obtained neutron detection efficiency. The simulation was conducted in the assumption that neutrons have the spectrum 252Cf and fall plane-parallel on the entry surface of the detector.

  7. Space Weather Nowcasting of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Wilson, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Solomon, Stan C.; Wiltberger, J.; Kunches, Joseph; Kress, Brian T.; Murray, John J.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing concern for the health and safety of commercial aircrew and passengers due to their exposure to ionizing radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET), particularly at high latitudes. The International Commission of Radiobiological Protection (ICRP), the EPA, and the FAA consider the crews of commercial aircraft as radiation workers. During solar energetic particle (SEP) events, radiation exposure can exceed annual limits, and the number of serious health effects is expected to be quite high if precautions are not taken. There is a need for a capability to monitor the real-time, global background radiations levels, from galactic cosmic rays (GCR), at commercial airline altitudes and to provide analytical input for airline operations decisions for altering flight paths and altitudes for the mitigation and reduction of radiation exposure levels during a SEP event. The Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model is new initiative to provide a global, real-time radiation dosimetry package for archiving and assessing the biologically harmful radiation exposure levels at commercial airline altitudes. The NAIRAS model brings to bear the best available suite of Sun-Earth observations and models for simulating the atmospheric ionizing radiation environment. Observations are utilized from ground (neutron monitors), from the atmosphere (the METO analysis), and from space (NASA/ACE and NOAA/GOES). Atmospheric observations provide the overhead shielding information and the ground- and space-based observations provide boundary conditions on the GCR and SEP energy flux distributions for transport and dosimetry simulations. Dose rates are calculated using the parametric AIR (Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation) model and the physics-based HZETRN (High Charge and Energy Transport) code. Empirical models of the near-Earth radiation environment (GCR/SEP energy flux distributions and geomagnetic cut-off rigidity) are benchmarked

  8. Detection of partial-body exposure to ionizing radiation by the automatic detection of dicentrics.

    PubMed

    Vaurijoux, Aurelie; Gregoire, Eric; Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine; Voisin, Pascale; Martin, Cecile; Voisin, Philippe; Roy, Laurence; Gruel, Gaetan

    2012-10-01

    In accidental exposure to ionizing radiation, it is essential to estimate the dose received by the victims. Currently dicentric scoring is the best biological indicator of exposure. The standard biological dosimetry procedure (500 metaphases scored manually) is suitable for a few dose estimations, but the time needed for analysis can be problematic in the case of a large-scale accident. Recently, a new methodology using automatic detection of dicentrics has greatly decreased the time needed for dose estimation and preserves the accuracy of the estimation. However, the capability to detect nonhomogeneous partial-body exposures is an important advantage of dicentric scoring-based biodosimetry, and this remains to be tested with automatic scoring. Thus we analyzed the results obtained with in vitro blood dilutions and in real cases of accidental exposure (partial- or whole-body exposure) using manual scoring and automatic detection of dicentrics. We confirmed that automatic detection allows threefold quicker dicentric scoring than the manual procedure with similar dose estimations and uncertainty intervals. The results concerning partial-body exposures were particularly promising, and homogeneously exposed samples were correctly distinguished from heterogeneously exposed samples containing 5% to 75% of blood irradiated with 2 Gy. In addition, the results obtained for real accident cases were similar whatever the methodology used. This study demonstrates that automatic detection of dicentrics is a credible alternative for recent and acute cases of whole- and partial-body accidental exposures to ionizing radiation.

  9. Partial pressure analysis in space testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilford, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    For vacuum-system or test-article analysis it is often desirable to know the species and partial pressures of the vacuum gases. Residual gas or Partial Pressure Analyzers (PPA's) are commonly used for this purpose. These are mass spectrometer-type instruments, most commonly employing quadrupole filters. These instruments can be extremely useful, but they should be used with caution. Depending on the instrument design, calibration procedures, and conditions of use, measurements made with these instruments can be accurate to within a few percent, or in error by two or more orders of magnitude. Significant sources of error can include relative gas sensitivities that differ from handbook values by an order of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with pressure by as much as two orders of magnitude, changes in sensitivity with time after exposure to chemically active gases, and the dependence of the sensitivity for one gas on the pressures of other gases. However, for most instruments, these errors can be greatly reduced with proper operating procedures and conditions of use. In this paper, data are presented illustrating performance characteristics for different instruments and gases, operating parameters are recommended to minimize some errors, and calibrations procedures are described that can detect and/or correct other errors.

  10. DYNAMICS OF CORONAL RAIN AND DESCENDING PLASMA BLOBS IN SOLAR PROMINENCES. II. PARTIALLY IONIZED CASE

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, R.; Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Zaqarashvili, T. V.

    2016-02-20

    Coronal rain clumps and prominence knots are dense condensations with chromospheric to transition region temperatures that fall down in the much hotter corona. Their typical speeds are in the range 30–150 km s{sup −1} and of the order of 10–30 km s{sup −1}, respectively, i.e., they are considerably smaller than free-fall velocities. These cold blobs contain a mixture of ionized and neutral material that must be dynamically coupled in order to fall together, as observed. We investigate this coupling by means of hydrodynamic simulations in which the coupling arises from the friction between ions and neutrals. The numerical simulations presented here are an extension of those of Oliver et al. to the partially ionized case. We find that, although the relative drift speed between the two species is smaller than 1 m s{sup −1} at the blob center, it is sufficient to produce the forces required to strongly couple charged particles and neutrals. The ionization degree has no discernible effect on the main results of our previous work for a fully ionized plasma: the condensation has an initial acceleration phase followed by a period with roughly constant velocity, and, in addition, the maximum descending speed is clearly correlated with the ratio of initial blob to environment density.

  11. The collisional drift mode in a partially ionized plasma. [in the F region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kennel, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of the drift instability was examined in several density regimes. Let sub e be the total electron mean free path, k sub z the wave-vector component along the magnetic field, and the ratio of perpendicular ion diffusion to parallel electron streaming rates. At low densities (k sub z lambda 1) the drift mode is isothermal and should be treated kineticly. In the finite heat conduction regime square root of m/M k sub z Lambda sub 1) the drift instability threshold is reduced at low densities and increased at high densities as compared to the isothermal threshold. Finally, in the energy transfer limit (k sub z kambda sub e square root of m/M) the drift instability behaves adiabatically in a fully ionized plasma and isothermally in a partially ionized plasma for an ion-neutral to Coulomb collision frequency ratio.

  12. Formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films by partially ionized vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Noriyuki; Takai, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    The partially ionized vapor deposition (PIVD) is proposed as a new method to realize low temperature formation of β-FeSi 2 thin films. In this method, Fe is evaporated by E-gun and a few percents of Fe atoms are ionized. We have investigated influences of the ion content and the accelerating voltage of Fe ions on the structural properties of β-FeSi 2 films deposited on Si substrates. It was confirmed that β-FeSi 2 can be formed on Si(1 0 0) substrate by PIVD even at substrate temperature as low as 350, while FeSi by the conventional vacuum deposition. It was concluded that the influence of Fe ions on preferential orientation of β-FeSi 2 depends strongly on the content and the acceleration energy of ions.

  13. Equation of state of dense neon and krypton plasmas in the partial ionization regime

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. F. Zheng, J.; Gu, Y. J.; Li, Z. G.

    2015-12-15

    The compression behaviors of dense neon and krypton plasmas over a wide pressure-temperature range are investigated by self-consistent fluid variational theory. The ionization degree and equation of state of dense neon and krypton are calculated in the density-temperature range of 0.01–10 g/cm{sup 3} and 4–50 kK. A region of thermodynamic instability is found which is related to the plasma phase transition. The calculated shock adiabat and principal Hugoniot of liquid krypton are in good agreement with available experimental data. The predicted results of shock-compressed liquid neon are presented, which provide a guide for dynamical experiments or numerical first-principle calculations aimed at studying the compression properties of liquid neon in the partial ionization regime.

  14. Modeling Natural Space Ionizing Radiation Effects on External Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alstatt, Richard L.; Edwards, David L.; Parker, Nelson C. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Predicting the effective life of materials for space applications has become increasingly critical with the drive to reduce mission cost. Programs have considered many solutions to reduce launch costs including novel, low mass materials and thin thermal blankets to reduce spacecraft mass. Determining the long-term survivability of these materials before launch is critical for mission success. This presentation will describe an analysis performed on the outer layer of the passive thermal control blanket of the Hubble Space Telescope. This layer had degraded for unknown reasons during the mission, however ionizing radiation (IR) induced embrittlement was suspected. A methodology was developed which allowed direct comparison between the energy deposition of the natural environment and that of the laboratory generated environment. Commercial codes were used to predict the natural space IR environment model energy deposition in the material from both natural and laboratory IR sources, and design the most efficient test. Results were optimized for total and local energy deposition with an iterative spreadsheet. This method has been used successfully for several laboratory tests at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The study showed that the natural space IR environment, by itself, did not cause the premature degradation observed in the thermal blanket.

  15. Controls of crystallinity and surface roughness of Cu film in partially ionized beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, S.K.; Kim, K.H.; Choi, W.K.; Jang, H.G.; Yoon, Y.S.; Han, S.; Jung, H.J.

    1996-12-31

    Changes of crystallinity and surface roughness are discussed in terms of the average energy per deposited atom in the partially ionized beam (PIB) deposition. The average energy per deposited atom can be controlled by adjusting the ionization potential, Vi and acceleration potential Va. The ion beam consists of a Cu ion beam and residual gas ion beam and residual gases as well as Cu particles that were ionized and accelerated to provide the film with energy required for film-growth. The relative contribution of residual gas ions and Cu ions to total average energy per deposited atom was varied with the ionization potential. At fixed ionization potentials of Vi = 400 V and Vi = 450 V, the average energy per deposited atom was varied in the range of 0 to 120 eV with acceleration potential Va, of 0 to 4 kV. The relative intensity ratio, I(111)/I(200), of the Cu films increased from 6 to 37 and the root mean square (R{sub ms}) surface roughness decreased with an increase in acceleration potential at Vi = 400 V. The relative intensity ratio, I(111)/I(200), of Cu films increased up to Va = 2 kV at Vi = 2 kV, above which a decrease occurred, and the surface roughness of Cu films increased as a function of acceleration potential. The degree of preferred orientation was closely related with the average energy per deposited atom. The change of R{sub ms} roughness might be affected by ion flux, particle energy and preferred orientation.

  16. Extended bulk defects induced by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.I.; Wong, J.; Borrego, J.M.; Lu, T.

    1988-08-15

    The study of possible defects generated by low-energy ions during partially ionized beam (PIB) depositions was performed. No defects were observed when acceleration voltage was set lower than 1 kV. Surprisingly, several deep levels were detected up to the depth of 4000 A in the 3-kV sample. However, these levels can be annealed out at a relatively low temperature of 400 /sup 0/C. It is concluded in this study that, by properly choosing the ion energy range, PIB deposition will not cause severe damage to the substrate and can be a viable technique for growing heterostructures.

  17. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  18. Cluster virial expansion for the equation of state of partially ionized hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.; Fortmann, C.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Roepke, G.

    2010-08-15

    We study the contribution of electron-atom interaction to the equation of state for partially ionized hydrogen plasma using the cluster-virial expansion. We use the Beth-Uhlenbeck approach to calculate the second virial coefficient for the electron-atom (bound cluster) pair from the corresponding scattering phase shifts and binding energies. Experimental scattering cross-sections as well as phase shifts calculated on the basis of different pseudopotential models are used as an input for the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula. By including Pauli blocking and screening in the phase shift calculation, we generalize the cluster-virial expansion in order to cover also near solid density plasmas. We present results for the electron-atom contribution to the virial expansion and the corresponding equation of state, i.e. pressure, composition, and chemical potential as a function of density and temperature. These results are compared with semiempirical approaches to the thermodynamics of partially ionized plasmas. Avoiding any ill-founded input quantities, the Beth-Uhlenbeck second virial coefficient for the electron-atom interaction represents a benchmark for other, semiempirical approaches.

  19. Cluster virial expansion for the equation of state of partially ionized hydrogen plasma.

    PubMed

    Omarbakiyeva, Y A; Fortmann, C; Ramazanov, T S; Röpke, G

    2010-08-01

    We study the contribution of electron-atom interaction to the equation of state for partially ionized hydrogen plasma using the cluster-virial expansion. We use the Beth-Uhlenbeck approach to calculate the second virial coefficient for the electron-atom (bound cluster) pair from the corresponding scattering phase shifts and binding energies. Experimental scattering cross-sections as well as phase shifts calculated on the basis of different pseudopotential models are used as an input for the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula. By including Pauli blocking and screening in the phase shift calculation, we generalize the cluster-virial expansion in order to cover also near solid density plasmas. We present results for the electron-atom contribution to the virial expansion and the corresponding equation of state, i.e. pressure, composition, and chemical potential as a function of density and temperature. These results are compared with semiempirical approaches to the thermodynamics of partially ionized plasmas. Avoiding any ill-founded input quantities, the Beth-Uhlenbeck second virial coefficient for the electron-atom interaction represents a benchmark for other, semiempirical approaches.

  20. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-09-01

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. The corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  1. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    DOE PAGES

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; ...

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using themore » method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.« less

  2. An equation of state for partially ionized plasmas: The Coulomb contribution to the free energy

    SciTech Connect

    Kilcrease, D. P.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Fontes, C. J.; Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-06-20

    We have previously developed an equation of state (EOS) model called ChemEOS (Hakel and Kilcrease, Atomic Processes in Plasmas, Eds., J. Cohen et al., AIP, 2004) for a plasma of interacting ions, atoms and electrons. It is based on a chemical picture of the plasma and is derived from an expression for the Helmholtz free energy of the interacting species. All other equilibrium thermodynamic quantities are then obtained by minimizing this free energy subject to constraints, thus leading to a thermodynamically consistent EOS. The contribution to this free energy from the Coulomb interactions among the particles is treated using the method of Chabrier and Potekhin (Phys. Rev. E 58, 4941 (1998)) which we have adapted for partially ionized plasmas. This treatment is further examined and is found to give rise to unphysical behavior for various elements at certain values of the density and temperature where the Coulomb coupling begins to become significant and the atoms are partially ionized. We examine the source of this unphysical behavior and suggest corrections that produce acceptable results. The sensitivity of the thermodynamic properties and frequency-dependent opacity of iron is examined with and without these corrections. Lastly, the corrected EOS is used to determine the fractional ion populations and level populations for a new generation of OPLIB low-Z opacity tables currently being prepared at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the ATOMIC code.

  3. State-specific transport properties of partially ionized flows of electronically excited atomic gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Istomin, V. A.; Kustova, E. V.

    2017-03-01

    State-to-state approach for theoretical study of transport properties in atomic gases with excited electronic degrees of freedom of both neutral and ionized species is developed. The dependence of atomic radius on the electronic configuration of excited atoms is taken into account in the transport algorithm. Different cutoff criteria for increasing atomic radius are discussed and the limits of applicability for these criteria are evaluated. The validity of a Slater-like model for the calculation of state-resolved transport coefficients in neutral and ionized atomic gases is shown. For ionized flows, a method of evaluation for effective cross-sections of resonant charge-transfer collisions is suggested. Accurate kinetic theory algorithms for modelling the state-specific transport properties are applied for the prediction of transport coefficients in shock heated flows. Based on the numerical observations, different distributions over electronic states behind the shock front are considered. For the Boltzmann-like distributions at temperatures greater than 14,000 K, an important effect of electronic excitation on the partial thermal conductivity and viscosity coefficients is found for both neutral and ionized atomic gases: increasing radius of excited atoms causes a strong decrease in these transport coefficients. Similarly, the presence of electronically excited states with increased atomic radii leads to reduced diffusion coefficients. Nevertheless the overall impact of increasing effective cross-sections on the transport properties just behind the shock front under hypersonic reentry conditions is found to be minor since the populations of high-lying electronic energy levels behind the shock waves are low.

  4. Turbulent Dynamo in a Conducting Fluid and a Partially Ionized Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Siyao; Lazarian, A.

    2016-12-01

    By following the Kazantsev theory and taking into account both microscopic and turbulent diffusion of magnetic fields, we develop a unified treatment of the kinematic and nonlinear stages of a turbulent dynamo process, and we study the dynamo process for a full range of magnetic Prandtl number P m and ionization fractions. We find a striking similarity between the dependence of dynamo behavior on P m in a conducting fluid and { R } (a function of ionization fraction) in a partially ionized gas. In a weakly ionized medium, the kinematic stage is largely extended, including not only exponential growth but a new regime of dynamo characterized by a linear-in-time growth of magnetic field strength, and the resulting magnetic energy is much higher than the kinetic energy carried by viscous-scale eddies. Unlike the kinematic stage, the subsequent nonlinear stage is unaffected by microscopic diffusion processes and has a universal linear-in-time growth of magnetic energy with the growth rate as a constant fraction 3/38 of the turbulent energy transfer rate, showing good agreement with earlier numerical results. Applying the analysis to the first stars and galaxies, we find that the kinematic stage is able to generate a field strength only an order of magnitude smaller than the final saturation value. But the generation of large-scale magnetic fields can only be accounted for by the relatively inefficient nonlinear stage and requires longer time than the free-fall time. It suggests that magnetic fields may not have played a dynamically important role during the formation of the first stars.

  5. Ionization steps and phase-space metamorphoses in the pulsed microwave ionization of highly excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bayfield, J.E.; Luie, S.Y.; Perotti, L.C.; Skrzypkowski, M.P.

    1996-01-01

    As the peak electric field of the microwave pulse is increased, steps in the classical microwave ionization probability of the highly excited hydrogen atom are produced by phase-space metamorphosis. They arise from new layers of Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser (KAM) islands being exposed as KAM surfaces are destroyed. Both quantum numerical calculations and laboratory experiments exhibit the ionization steps, showing that such metamorphoses influence pulsed semiclassical systems. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Measurements of absolute total and partial cross sections for the electron ionization of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basner, R.; Schmidt, M.; Becker, K.

    2004-04-01

    We measured absolute partial cross sections for the formation of positive ions followed by electron impact on tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) from threshold to 900 eV using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). Dissociative ionization processes resulting in seven different singly charged ions (F+, W+, WFx+, x=1-5) and five doubly charged ions (W2+, WFx2+, x=1-4) were found to be the dominant ionization channels. The ion spectrum at all impact energies is dominated by WF5+ fragment ions. At 120 eV impact energy, the partial WF5+ ionization cross section has a maximum value of 3.92×10-16 cm2 that corresponds to 43% of the total ion yield. The cross section values of all the other singly charged fragment ions at 120 eV range between 0.39×10-16 and 0.73×10-16 cm2. The ionization cross sections of the doubly charged ions are more than one order of magnitude lower than the cross section of WF5+. Double ionization processes account for 21% of the total ion yield at 120 eV. The absolute total ionization cross section of WF6 was obtained as the sum of all measured partial ionization cross sections and is compared with available calculated cross sections.

  7. HEATING OF THE PARTIALLY IONIZED SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE BY WAVES IN MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Shelyag, S.; Przybylski, D.; Khomenko, E.; Vicente, A. de

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  8. Shear flow instability in a partially-ionized plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Sotnikov, V. I.; Mudaliar, S.; Genoni, T. C.; Rose, D. V.; Oliver, B. V.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2011-06-15

    The stability of ion acoustic waves in a sheared-flow, partially-ionized compressible plasma sheath around a fast-moving vehicle in the upper atmosphere, is described and evaluated for different flow profiles. In a compressible plasma with shear flow, instability occurs for any velocity profile, not just for profiles with an inflection point. A second-order differential equation for the electrostatic potential of excited ion acoustic waves in the presence of electron and ion collisions with neutrals is derived and solved numerically using a shooting method with boundary conditions appropriate for a finite thickness sheath in contact with the vehicle. We consider three different velocity flow profiles and find that in all cases that neutral collisions can completely suppress the instability.

  9. Heating of the Partially Ionized Solar Chromosphere by Waves in Magnetic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelyag, S.; Khomenko, E.; de Vicente, A.; Przybylski, D.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we show a “proof of concept” of the heating mechanism of the solar chromosphere due to wave dissipation caused by the effects of partial ionization. Numerical modeling of non-linear wave propagation in a magnetic flux tube, embedded in the solar atmosphere, is performed by solving a system of single-fluid quasi-MHD equations, which take into account the ambipolar term from the generalized Ohm’s law. It is shown that perturbations caused by magnetic waves can be effectively dissipated due to ambipolar diffusion. The energy input by this mechanism is continuous and shown to be more efficient than dissipation of static currents, ultimately leading to chromospheric temperature increase in magnetic structures.

  10. Jeans instability of self gravitating partially ionized Hall plasma with radiative heat loss functions and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Chhajlani, R. K.

    2013-06-01

    The Jeans instability of partially ionized self gravitating plasma is discussed to investigate the effect of the Hall current, radiative heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, collision frequency of neutrals, porosity, finite electrical resistivity and viscosity for the formation of stars in HI and HII regions. The standard Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) set of equations is used for the present configuration with radiative heat-loss function and thermal conductivity. A general dispersion relation is obtained from perturbation equations using the normal mode analysis method. We find that the Jeans condition of self-gravitational instability is modified due to the presence of neutral particle, radiative heat-loss functions and thermal conductivity. Presence of Hall current, porosity and collision frequency have no effect on Jeans criterion.

  11. Quantum diffraction effects on the atomic polarization collision in partially ionized dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Young-Dae

    2014-04-15

    The influence of quantum diffraction on the electron-atom polarization collision process is investigated in partially ionized dense plasmas. The pseudopotential model and eikonal method are employed to obtain the eikonal phase shift and eikonal cross section as functions of the impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length, electron de Broglie wavelength, and atomic polarizability. The results show that the eikonal phase shift for the electron-hydrogen atom polarization collision decreases with an increase of the electron de Broglie wavelength. It is important to note that the influence of quantum diffraction produces the repulsive part in the electron-atom polarization interaction. It is also found that the quantum diffraction effect enhances the differential eikonal cross section. Additionally, the total eikonal cross section decreases with increasing electron de Broglie wavelength. The variations of the eikonal cross section due to the influence of finite size of the de Broglie wavelength and Debye radius are also discussed.

  12. Ionizing feedback from massive stars in massive clusters - III. Disruption of partially unbound clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, J. E.; Ercolano, B.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2013-03-01

    We extend our previous smoothed particle hydrodynamics parameter study of the effects of photoionization from O-stars on star-forming clouds to include initially unbound clouds. We generate a set of model clouds in the mass range 104-106 M⊙ with initial virial ratios Ekin/Epot = 2.3, allow them to form stars and study the impact of the photoionizing radiation produced by the massive stars. We find that, on the 3 Myr time-scale before supernovae are expected to begin detonating, the fraction of mass expelled by ionizing feedback is a very strong function of the cloud escape velocities. High-mass clouds are largely unaffected dynamically, while low-mass clouds have large fractions of their gas reserves expelled on this time-scale. However, the fractions of stellar mass unbound are modest and significant portions of the unbound stars are so only because the clouds themselves are initially partially unbound. We find that ionization is much more able to create well-cleared bubbles in the unbound clouds, owing to their intrinsic expansion, but that the presence of such bubbles does not necessarily indicate that a given cloud has been strongly influenced by feedback. We also find, in common with the bound clouds from our earlier work, that many of the systems simulated here are highly porous to photons and supernova ejecta, and that most of them will likely survive their first supernova explosions.

  13. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: comparisons among average-atom density functional models.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Michael S; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B; Dharma-wardana, M W C

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  14. Injection to Rapid Diffusive Shock Acceleration at Perpendicular Shocks in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid simulation of a collisionless perpendicular shock in a partially ionized plasma for the first time. In this simulation, the shock velocity and upstream ionization fraction are v sh ≈ 1333 km s-1 and f i ˜ 0.5, which are typical values for isolated young supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium. We confirm previous two-dimensional simulation results showing that downstream hydrogen atoms leak into the upstream region and are accelerated by the pickup process in the upstream region, and large magnetic field fluctuations are generated both in the upstream and downstream regions. In addition, we find that the magnetic field fluctuations have three-dimensional structures and the leaking hydrogen atoms are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) at the perpendicular shock after the pickup process. The observed DSA can be interpreted as shock drift acceleration with scattering. In this simulation, particles are accelerated to v ˜ 100 v sh ˜ 0.3 c within ˜100 gyroperiods. The acceleration timescale is faster than that of DSA in parallel shocks. Our simulation results suggest that SNRs can accelerate cosmic rays to 1015.5 eV (the knee) during the Sedov phase.

  15. Partial ionization in dense plasmas: Comparisons among average-atom density functional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Michael S.; Weisheit, Jon; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Dharma-wardana, M. W. C.

    2013-06-01

    Nuclei interacting with electrons in dense plasmas acquire electronic bound states, modify continuum states, generate resonances and hopping electron states, and generate short-range ionic order. The mean ionization state (MIS), i.e, the mean charge Z of an average ion in such plasmas, is a valuable concept: Pseudopotentials, pair-distribution functions, equations of state, transport properties, energy-relaxation rates, opacity, radiative processes, etc., can all be formulated using the MIS of the plasma more concisely than with an all-electron description. However, the MIS does not have a unique definition and is used and defined differently in different statistical models of plasmas. Here, using the MIS formulations of several average-atom models based on density functional theory, we compare numerical results for Be, Al, and Cu plasmas for conditions inclusive of incomplete atomic ionization and partial electron degeneracy. By contrasting modern orbital-based models with orbital-free Thomas-Fermi models, we quantify the effects of shell structure, continuum resonances, the role of exchange and correlation, and the effects of different choices of the fundamental cell and boundary conditions. Finally, the role of the MIS in plasma applications is illustrated in the context of x-ray Thomson scattering in warm dense matter.

  16. Space- and time-resolved observation of extreme laser frequency upshifting during ultrafast-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Giulietti, A.; Koester, P.; Levato, T.; Pathak, N. C.; André, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy, S.; Monot, P.; Giulietti, D.; Hosokai, T.; Kotaki, H.; Labate, L.; Gizzi, L. A.; Nuter, R.

    2013-08-15

    A 65-fs, 800-nm, 2-TW laser pulse propagating through a nitrogen gas jet has been experimentally studied by 90° Thomson scattering. Time-integrated spectra of scattered light show unprecedented broadening towards the blue which exceeds 300 nm. Images of the scattering region provide for the first time a space- and time-resolved description of the process leading quite regularly to such a large upshift. The mean shifting rate was as high as δλ/δt ≈ 3 Å/fs, never observed before. Interferometry shows that it occurs after partial laser defocusing. Numerical simulations prove that such an upshift is consistent with a laser-gas late interaction, when laser intensity has decreased well below relativistic values (a{sub 0}≪ 1) and ionization process involves most of the laser pulse. This kind of interaction makes spectral tuning of ultrashort intense laser pulses possible in a large spectral range.

  17. Partially Ionized Plasma Three-Fluid Modeling of Magnetic Reconnection in the Sun Chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez Laguna, A.; Lani, A.; Mansour, N. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Poedts, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is present in most of the unsteady and eruptive phenomena in the Sun atmosphere, including Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) and solar flares. Also, it occurs in the chromosphere, bringing about chromospheric jets and spicules and being considered a likely mechanism to play an important role in heating up the corona. In this work, we present a computational model that simulates magnetic reconnection in the Sun chromosphere using a three-fluid model (electrons + ions + neutrals). The model treats separately ions, electrons and neutrals, considering mass, momentum and energy conservation for each fluid. The fluids interact among each other by means of collisions and chemical reactions. The charged particles heat fluxes are anisotropic with the magnetic field, following Braginskii's description. This model also considers non-equilibrium partial ionization effects including electron impact ionization, radiative recombination reactions and charge exchange. The electromagnetic field evolution is represented by the full Maxwell's equations, allowing for high frequency waves disregarded by the MHD approximation. Previous two-fluid simulations showed that the dynamics of ions and neutrals are decoupled during the reconnection process when the width of the current sheet becomes comparable to the ion scales. Also, the effect of the chemical non-equilibrium in the reconnection region plays a crucial role, yielding faster reconnection rates. We extended these simulations with a three-fluid model that considers separately the dynamics of electrons. This new model provides a better description of the complex dynamics taking place during the reconnection, both in Sweet-Parker reconnections and during the tearing instability. The results are compared with the two-fluid simulations.

  18. Two-fluid modeling of magnetosonic wave propagation in the partially ionized solar chromosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maneva, Yana; Alvarez Laguna, Alejandro; Lani, Andrea; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-04-01

    We perform 2D two-fluid simulations to study the effects of ion-neutral interactions on the propagation of magnetosonic waves in the partially ionized solar chromosphere, where the number density of neutrals significantly exceeds the number density of protons at low heights. Thus modeling the neutral-ion interactions and studying the effect of neutrals on the ambient plasma properties becomes important for better understanding the observed emission lines and the propagation of disturbances from the photosphere to the transition region and the corona. The role of charged particles (electrons and ions) is combined within resistive MHD approach with Coulomb collisions and anisotropic heat flux determined by Braginskii's transport coefficients. The electromagnetic fields are evolved according to the full Maxwell equations, allowing for propagation of higher frequency waves neglected by the standard MHD approximation. Separate mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are considered for the neutrals and the interaction between the different fluids is determined by the chemical reactions, such as impact ionization, radiative recombination and charge exchange, provided as additional source terms. To initialize the system we consider an ideal gas equation of state with equal initial temperatures for the electrons, ions and the neutrals and different density profiles. The initial temperature and density profiles are height-dependent and follow VAL C atmospheric model for the solar chromosphere. We have searched for a chemical and collisional equilibrium between the ions and the neutrals to minimize any unphysical outflows and artificial heating induced by initial pressure imbalances. Including different magnetic field profiles brings new source of plasma heating through Ohmic dissipation. The excitation and propagation of the magnetosonic waves depends on the type of the external velocity driver. As the waves propagate through the gravitationally stratified media

  19. TWO-DIMENSIONAL RADIATIVE MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF THE IMPORTANCE OF PARTIAL IONIZATION IN THE CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo

    2012-07-10

    The bulk of the solar chromosphere is weakly ionized and interactions between ionized particles and neutral particles likely have significant consequences for the thermodynamics of the chromospheric plasma. We investigate the importance of introducing neutral particles into the MHD equations using numerical 2.5D radiative MHD simulations obtained with the Bifrost code. The models span the solar atmosphere from the upper layers of the convection zone to the low corona, and solve the full MHD equations with non-gray and non-LTE radiative transfer, and thermal conduction along the magnetic field. The effects of partial ionization are implemented using the generalized Ohm's law, i.e., we consider the effects of the Hall term and ambipolar diffusion in the induction equation. The approximations required in going from three fluids to the generalized Ohm's law are tested in our simulations. The Ohmic diffusion, Hall term, and ambipolar diffusion show strong variations in the chromosphere. These strong variations of the various magnetic diffusivities are absent or significantly underestimated when, as has been common for these types of studies, using the semi-empirical VAL-C model as a basis for estimates. In addition, we find that differences in estimating the magnitude of ambipolar diffusion arise depending on which method is used to calculate the ion-neutral collision frequency. These differences cause uncertainties in the different magnetic diffusivity terms. In the chromosphere, we find that the ambipolar diffusion is of the same order of magnitude or even larger than the numerical diffusion used to stabilize our code. As a consequence, ambipolar diffusion produces a strong impact on the modeled atmosphere. Perhaps more importantly, it suggests that at least in the chromospheric domain, self-consistent simulations of the solar atmosphere driven by magnetoconvection can accurately describe the impact of the dominant form of resistivity, i.e., ambipolar diffusion. This

  20. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Reacting Plasma Flow in a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Averkin, Sergey; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. The rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom in U3DSMC are implemented using the Larsen-Borgnakke model. Chemical reactions are implemented in U3DSMC using the Quantum-Kinetic model. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  1. Self-consistent Simulations of Plasma-Neutral in a Partially Ionized Astrophysical Turbulent Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    A local turbulence model is developed to study energy cascades in the heliosheath and outer heliosphere (OH) based on self-consistent two-dimensional fluid simulations. The model describes a partially ionized magnetofluid OH that couples a neutral hydrogen fluid with a plasma primarily through charge-exchange interactions. Charge-exchange interactions are ubiquitous in warm heliospheric plasma, and the strength of the interaction depends largely on the relative speed between the plasma and the neutral fluid. Unlike small-length scale linear collisional dissipation in a single fluid, charge-exchange processes introduce channels that can be effective on a variety of length scales that depend on the neutral and plasma densities, temperature, relative velocities, charge-exchange cross section, and the characteristic length scales. We find, from scaling arguments and nonlinear coupled fluid simulations, that charge-exchange interactions modify spectral transfer associated with large-scale energy-containing eddies. Consequently, the turbulent cascade rate prolongs spectral transfer among inertial range turbulent modes. Turbulent spectra associated with the neutral and plasma fluids are therefore steeper than those predicted by Kolmogorov's phenomenology. Our work is important in the context of the global heliospheric interaction, the energization and transport of cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts, interstellar density spectra, etc. Furthermore, the plasma-neutral coupling is crucial in understanding the energy dissipation mechanism in molecular clouds and star formation processes.

  2. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported.

  3. Suppression of diamagnetism by neutrals pressure in partially ionized, high-beta plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Shunjiro; Kuwahara, Daisuke; Yano, Kazuki; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2016-12-01

    Suppression of diamagnetism in a partially ionized plasma with high beta was experimentally investigated by the use of Langmuir and Hall sensor probes, focusing on a neutrals pressure effect. The plasma beta, which is the ratio of plasma to vacuum magnetic pressures, varied from ˜1% to >100% while the magnetic field varied from ˜120 G to ˜1 G. Here, a uniform magnetized argon plasma was operated mostly in an inductive mode, using a helicon plasma source of the Large Helicon Plasma Device [S. Shinohara et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 057104 (2009)] with a diameter of 738 mm and an axial length of 4860 mm. Electron density varied from 5 × 1015 m-3 to <3 × 1018 m-3, while an argon fill pressure was varied from ˜0.02 Pa to 0.75 Pa as well as the magnetic field mentioned above, with the fixed radio frequency (rf) and power of 7 MHz and ˜3.5 kW, respectively. The observed magnetic field reduction rate, a decrease of the magnetic field divided by the vacuum one, was up to 18%. However, in a certain parameter regime, where the product of ion and electron Hall terms is a key parameter, the measured diamagnetic effect was smaller than that expected by the plasma beta. This suppressed diamagnetism is explained by the neutrals pressure replacing magnetic pressure in balancing plasma pressure. Diamagnetism is weakened if neutrals pressure is comparable to the plasma pressure and if the coupling of plasma and neutrals pressures by ion-neutral collisions is strong enough.

  4. Chromospheric anemone jets and magnetic reconnection in partially ionized solar atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, K. A. P.; Shibata, K.; Nishizuka, N.; Isobe, H.

    2011-11-15

    The solar optical telescope onboard Hinode with temporal resolution of less than 5 s and spatial resolution of 150 km has observed the lower solar atmosphere with an unprecedented detail. This has led to many important findings, one of them is the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets in the solar chromosphere. The chromospheric anemone jets are ubiquitous in solar chromosphere and statistical studies show that the typical length, life time and energy of the chromospheric anemone jets are much smaller than the coronal events (e.g., jets/flares/CMEs). Among various observational parameters, the apparent length and maximum velocity shows good correlation. The velocity of chromospheric anemone jets is comparable to the local Alfven speed in the lower solar chromosphere. Since the discovery of chromospheric anemone jets by Hinode, several evidences of magnetic reconnection in chromospheric anemone jets have been found and these observations are summarized in this paper. These observations clearly suggest that reconnection occurs quite rapidly as well as intermittently in the solar chromosphere. In the solar corona ({lambda}{sub i} > {delta}{sub SP}), anomalous resistivity arises due to various collisionless processes. Previous MHD simulations show that reconnection becomes fast as well as strongly time-dependent due to anomalous resistivity. Such processes would not arise in the solar chromosphere which is fully collisional and partially-ionized. So, it is unclear how the rapid and strongly time-dependent reconnection would occur in the solar chromosphere. It is quite likely that the Hall and ambipolar diffusion are present in the solar chromosphere and they could play an important role in driving such rapid, strongly time-dependent reconnection in the solar chromosphere.

  5. Light scattering study of partially ionized poly(acrylic acid) systems : comparison between gels and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaid, A.; Munch, J. P.; Schosseler, F.; Candau, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Static and quasielastic light scattering experiments have been performed on the reaction bath of partially neutralized poly(acrylic acid) solutions and gels. The intensity scattered from gels is independent on the scattering wavevector, giving thus evidence that the gels are homogeneous at the scale of the wavelength of the light, contrary to what is generally observed in neutral gels. The comparison of the time and ensemble averages of the autocorrelation function of scattered light intensity shows that the gels behave with respect to that experiment as ergodic media. The variations of the intensity scattered from gels and solutions, with the ionization degree and the polymer concentration were found to be in good agreement with those predicted from simple theoretical arguments. The variations of the cooperative diffusion with these same parameters were found similar for gels and solutions. Des mesures de diffusion statique et quasiélastique de la lumière ont été effectuées sur des solutions et des gels d'acide poly(acrylique) partiellement ionisés. L'intensité diffusée par les gels est indépendante du vecteur d'onde de transfert, ce qui montre leur homogénéité, contrairement au cas des gels neutres. La comparaison des moyennes temporelle et spatiale de la fonction d'autocorrélation de l'intensité de la lumière diffusée montre que ces gels se comportent comme des milieux ergodiques. Les variations de l'intensité diffusée par les gels et les solutions en fonction de la concentration en polymère et du degré d'ionisation sont en bon accord avec les prédictions théoriques. Les variations du coefficient de diffusion avec ces mêmes paramètres sont identiques pour les gels et les solutions.

  6. Multi-fluid Approach to High-frequency Waves in Plasmas. II. Small-amplitude Regime in Partially Ionized Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Soler, Roberto; Terradas, Jaume

    2017-03-01

    The presence of neutral species in a plasma has been shown to greatly affect the properties of magnetohydrodynamic waves. For instance, the interaction between ions and neutrals through momentum transfer collisions causes the damping of Alfvén waves and alters their oscillation frequency and phase speed. When the collision frequencies are larger than the frequency of the waves, single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic approximations can accurately describe the effects of partial ionization, since there is a strong coupling between the various species. However, at higher frequencies, the single-fluid models are not applicable and more complex approaches are required. Here, we use a five-fluid model with three ionized and two neutral components, which takes into consideration Hall’s current and Ohm’s diffusion in addition to the friction due to collisions between different species. We apply our model to plasmas composed of hydrogen and helium, and allow the ionization degree to be arbitrary. By analyzing the corresponding dispersion relation and numerical simulations, we study the properties of small-amplitude perturbations. We discuss the effect of momentum transfer collisions on the ion-cyclotron resonances and compare the importance of magnetic resistivity, and ion–neutral and ion–ion collisions on the wave damping at various frequency ranges. Applications to partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere are performed.

  7. Photo Double Ionization of Fixed in Space Deuterium Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thorsten; Dörner, Reinhard; Czasch, Achim; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Böcking, Horst Schmidt; Müller, Alkis; Mergel, Volker; Prior, Mike; Osipov, Timur; Daveau, Sebastian; Rotenberg, Eli; Meigs, George; Cocke, Lew; Landers, Allen; Kheifets, Anatoli; Feagin, Jim; Muino, Ricardo Diez

    2006-11-01

    In the following we present the kinematically complete study of the four-body fragmentation of the D2 molecule following absorption of a single photon. For equal energy sharing of the two electrons and a photon energy of 75.5 eV, we observed the relaxation of one of the selection rules valid for He photo double ionization and a strong dependence of the electron angular distribution on the orientation of the molecular axis in the coplanar geometry. This effect is reproduced by a model in which a pair of photo ionization amplitudes is introduced for the light polarization parallel and perpendicular to the molecular axis. The results in a non-coplanar geometry reveal that the correlated motion of the electrons is strongly dependent on the inter-nuclear separation in the molecular ground state at the instant of photon absorption.

  8. Partially Ionized Beam-Deposited Aluminum on Silicon: Interface Reactions and Epitaxy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Radhika

    Aluminum, although a popular choice for metallization for Si based ICs, possesses a number of inherent problems when used as contact metal directly on Si, or as inter -connects. Two of the more critical ones are junction spiking and electromigration, both of which are diffusion related phenomena. The predominant mode of diffusion in thin films has long been established to be that due to grain boundaries. The polycrystalline nature of the deposited aluminum films is hence chiefly responsible for the above mentioned problems. If it were possible to reduce the number of grain boundaries and obtain epitaxial single crystal Al films on Si, the situation could be improved considerably. Epitaxial aluminum films on both Si(111) and (100) single crystal substrates can be deposited, using an ion assisted deposition method, referred to as the Partially Ionized Beam technique, where beam energy, current and direction can be controlled to optimize single crystallinity. This is inspite of the fact that the mismatch between Al and Si lattices is about 26%. In this research this technique is used to study the epitaxy of Al on Si. Electrical properties of such deposits were examined and defects present in these epitaxial deposits have been studied. Various x-ray and electron diffraction studies have been performed, including HRTEM to confirm the integrity of the interface and the 4 Al to 3 Si atom relationship. The orientation of the overlayers were found to be a strong function of beam energy and current. Use of high beam energies and currents while depositing ultra thin aluminum films were found to create donor like defects near the substrate surface, altering the electrical characteristics, especially of films on high resistivity p-silicon, where 'inverted' current-voltage characteristics were observed. These characteristics were also found to vary with thickness of deposited films. A MIS tunnel diode (with aluminum oxide as the insulator) model and an ion damage related defect

  9. Operating Deflection Shapes for the Space Shuttle Partial Stack Rollout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Kappus, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    In November of 2003 a rollout test was performed to gain a better understanding of the dynamic environment for the Space Shuttle during transportation from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the launch pad. This was part of a study evaluating the methodology for including the rollout dynamic loads in the Space Shuttle fatigue life predictions. The rollout test was conducted with a partial stack consisting of the Crawler Transporter, Mobile Launch Platform, and the Solid Rocket Boosters with an interconnecting crossbeam. Instrumentation included over 100 accelerometers. Data was recorded for steady state speeds, start-ups and stops, and ambient wind excitations with the vehicle at idle. This paper will describe the operating deflection shape analysis performed using the measured acceleration response data. The response data for the steady state speed runs were dominated by harmonics of the forcing frequencies, which were proportional to the vehicle speed. Assuming a broadband excitation for the wind, analyses of the data sets with the vehicle at idle were used to estimate the natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes. Comparisons of the measured modal properties with numerical predictions are presented.

  10. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  11. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelov, Nikolai; Zhang, Ming; Borovikov, Sergey; Heerikhuisen, Jacob; Zank, Gary; Gamayunov, Konstantin; Colella, Phillip

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  12. Phase-space dynamics of ionization injection in plasma-based accelerators.

    PubMed

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Li, F; Zhang, C J; Yan, L X; Du, Y C; Huang, W H; Chen, H B; Tang, C X; Lu, W; Yu, P; An, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2014-01-24

    The evolution of beam phase space in ionization injection into plasma wakefields is studied using theory and particle-in-cell simulations. The injection process involves both longitudinal and transverse phase mixing, leading initially to a rapid emittance growth followed by oscillation, decay, and a slow growth to saturation. An analytic theory for this evolution is presented and verified through particle-in-cell simulations. This theory includes the effects of injection distance (time), acceleration distance, wakefield structure, and nonlinear space charge forces, and it also shows how ultralow emittance beams can be produced using ionization injection methods.

  13. Gas ionization induced by a high speed plasma injection in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sasaki, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Yanagisawa, M.; Obayashi, T.; Roberts, W. T.; Reasoner, D. L.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Gas ionization induced by a fast plasma injection has been observed with the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) Experiment on Spacelab-1. When an impulsive high-density plasma was injected from the orbiter, waves near the lower-hybrid frequency were enhanced, and the surrounding gas drifting with the orbiter was ionized for several tens of milliseconds after the plasma injection. The long-duration gas ionization was observed only when the plasma flux incoming to the orbiter cargo bay and the orbital velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field were relatively large. This effect has been explained by the concept of critical velocity ionization (CVI) for the gas drifting with the orbiter, although the gas velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field was less than the Alfven critical velocity.

  14. Preliminary analysis of accelerated space flight ionizing radiation testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Stock, L. V.; Carter, D. J.; Chang, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary analysis shows that radiation dose equivalent to 30 years in the geosynchronous environment can be accumulated in a typical composite material exposed to space for 2 years or less onboard a spacecraft orbiting from perigee of 300 km out to the peak of the inner electron belt (approximately 2750 km). Future work to determine spacecraft orbits better tailored to materials accelerated testing is indicated. It is predicted that a range of 10 to the 9th power to 10 to the 10th power rads would be accumulated in 3-6 mil thick epoxy/graphite exposed by a test spacecraft orbiting in the inner electron belt. This dose is equivalent to the accumulated dose that this material would be expected to have after 30 years in a geosynchronous orbit. It is anticipated that material specimens would be brought back to Earth after 2 years in the radiation environment so that space radiation effects on materials could be analyzed by laboratory methods.

  15. Artists drawing of partial cutaway view of Apollo/Saturn IB space vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Artists drawing of a partial cutaway view of an Apollo/Saturn IB space vehicle in a launch configuration. Arrow point to various features and components of the vehicle. This drawing is representative of the Apollo 7 space vehicle.

  16. The use of ionization electron columns for space-charge compensation in high intensity proton accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  17. The Use of Ionization Electron Columns for Space-Charge Compensation in High Intensity Proton Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Y.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Kapin, V.; Kuznetsov, G.

    2009-01-22

    We discuss a recent proposal to use strongly magnetized electron columns created by beam ionization of the residual gas for compensation of space charge forces of high intensity proton beams in synchrotrons and linacs. The electron columns formed by trapped ionization electrons in a longitudinal magnetic field that assures transverse distribution of electron space charge in the column is the same as in the proton beam. Electrostatic electrodes are used to control the accumulation and release of the electrons. Ions are not magnetized and drift away without affecting the compensation. Possible technical solution for the electron columns is presented. We also discuss the first numerical simulation results for space-charge compensation in the FNAL Booster and results of relevant beam studies in the Tevatron.

  18. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  19. Absolute partial and total electron-impact-ionization cross sections for CF4 from threshold up to 500 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ce; Bruce, M. R.; Bonham, R. A.

    1991-09-01

    Electron-impact dissociative ionization of tetrafluoromethane (CF4) was studied with the use of a pulsed electron beam time-of-flight apparatus. The absolute partial ionization cross sections of CF+3, CF+2, CF2+3, CF+, CF2+2, F+, and C+ were measured from threshold up to 500 eV. The total ionization cross section was obtained by charge weighted summing of all the observed partial ionization cross sections. A total cross section for dissociation into neutral fragments was inferred from our total ionization cross section and the total dissociation cross section of Winters and Inokuti [Phys. Rev. A 25, 1420 (1982)]. The present results for the partial ionization cross sections are as much as 9% (CF+3) to 81% (F+) higher than the previously published absolute measurements of Stephan, Deutsch, and Märk [J. Chem. Phys. 83, 5712 (1985)] at 80 eV, but are in agreement with their recently revised estimates for the singly charged ions. We also found that dissociative ionization was a dominant process for electron-impact energies above 30 eV, accounting for 85% of the total dissociation cross section at 80 eV.

  20. Electron impact ionization of liquid and gaseous water: a single-center partial-wave approach.

    PubMed

    Champion, C

    2010-01-07

    In this work, we report a unified methodology to express the molecular wavefunctions of water in both vapor and liquid phases by means of a single-center approach. These latter are then used as input data in a theoretical treatment--previously published and successfully tested--for describing the water ionization process in the first Born approximation (Champion et al 2006 Phys. Rev. A 73 012717). The multi-differential and total cross sections also obtained are reported for the two thermodynamical phases investigated and compared to the rare existing experimental and theoretical data.

  1. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  2. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  3. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  4. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  5. 46 CFR 116.600 - Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed spaces... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.600 Ventilation of enclosed and partially enclosed... manner suitable for the purpose of the space. (b) A power ventilation system must be capable of...

  6. Partial Solar Eclipse From Space - Feb. 21, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    On February 21, 2012, the Moon moved in between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite and the Sun (seen here in extreme ultraviolet light) and produced a partial solar eclipse from sp...

  7. Thermosolutal instability of a radiating partially-ionized plasma in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opara, F. E.

    1994-03-01

    The thermosolutal instability of a radiating two-component plasma, in a porous medium in the presence of a uniform vertical magnetic field, is examined with respect to the effects of collision frequency and radiative transfer. A combination of the Bestman and Chandrasekar methods is used to solve the eigenvalue problem with two-dimensional disturbances for the case of stationary convection. Radiation present on the onset of instability is found to have a destabilizing effect for even a very small radiation parameter, of the order alpha (0.1); concentration gradient on the other hand has a stabilizing effect on the system. The effect of collision on the onset of stationary cells diminished for the optical thin non-grey plasma-near equilibrium. This is of paramount importance in cosmic ray physics, as the interaction between the ionized and neutral gas components represents a state which often exists in the universe.

  8. Phase space density as a measure of cooling performance for the international muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, J. S.

    2015-05-03

    The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an experiment to demonstrate ionization cooling of a muon beam in a beamline that shares characteristics with one that might be used for a muon collider or neutrino factory. I describe a way to quantify cooling performance by examining the phase space density of muons, and determining how much that density increases. This contrasts with the more common methods that rely on the covariance matrix and compute emittances from that. I discuss why a direct measure of phase space density might be preferable to a covariance matrix method. I apply this technique to an early proposal for the MICE final step beamline. I discuss how matching impacts the measured performance.

  9. Cut-off wavenumber of Alfvén waves in partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaqarashvili, T. V.; Carbonell, M.; Ballester, J. L.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    Context. Alfvén wave dynamics in partially ionized plasmas of the solar atmosphere shows that there is indeed a cut-off wavenumber, i.e. the Alfvén waves with wavenumbers higher than the cut-off value are evanescent. The cut-off wavenumber appears in single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) approximation but it is absent in a multi-fluid approach. Up to now, an explanation for the existence of the cut-off wavenumber is still missing. Aims: The aim of this paper is to point out the reason for the appearance of a cut-off wavenumber in single-fluid MHD. Methods: Beginning with three-fluid equations (with electrons, protons and neutral hydrogen atoms), we performed consecutive approximations until we obtained the usual single-fluid description. We solved the dispersion relation of linear Alfvén waves at each step and sought the approximation responsible of the cut-off wavenumber appearance. Results: We have found that neglecting inertial terms significantly reduces the real part of the Alfvén frequency although it never becomes zero. Therefore, the cut-off wavenumber does not exist at this stage. However, when the inertial terms together with the Hall term in the induction equation are neglected, the real part of the Alfvén frequency becomes zero. Conclusions: The appearance of a cut-off wavenumber, when Alfvén waves in partially ionized regions of the solar atmosphere are studied, is the result of neglecting inertial and Hall terms, therefore it has no physical origin.

  10. Electron impact fragmentation of adenine: partial ionization cross sections for positive fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Burgt, Peter J. M.; Finnegan, Sinead; Eden, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Using computer-controlled data acquisition we have measured mass spectra of positive ions for electron impact on adenine, with electron energies up to 100 eV. Ion yield curves for 50 ions have been obtained and normalized by comparing their sum to the average of calculated total ionization cross sections. Appearance energies have been determined for 37 ions; for 20 ions for the first time. All appearance energies are consistent with the fragmentation pathways identified in the literature. Second onset energies have been determined for 12 fragment ions (for 11 ions for the first time), indicating the occurrence of more than one fragmentation process e.g. for 39 u (C2HN+) and 70 u (C2H4N3+). Matching ion yield shapes (118-120 u, 107-108 u, 91-92 u, and 54-56 u) provide new evidence supporting closely related fragmentation pathways and are attributed to hydrogen rearrangement immediately preceding the fragmentation. We present the first measurement of the ion yield curve of the doubly charged parent ion (67.5 u), with an appearance energy of 23.5 ± 1.0 eV. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene Surdutovich.

  11. A DRIFT ORDERED SHORT MEAN-FREE DESCRIPTION FOR PARTIALLY IONIZED MAGNETIZED PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    SIMAKOV, ANDERI N.

    2007-02-08

    Effects of neutral particles, most prominently the associated heat flux and viscosity, can be very important or even dominant at the edge of a tokamak and so must be self-consistently accounted for in a description of magnetized tokamak edge plasma. To the best of our knowledge, this has only been done so far for short mean-free path plasma under MHD-like Braginskii's orderings i.e. assuming that species velocities are on the order of the ion thermal speed. Since plasma flows in modern tokamaks are usually slow compared with the ion thermal speed (at least in the absence of strong external momentum sources) it is more appropriate to use drift orderings in which the plasma flow velocity is instead comparable with the diamagnetic heat flow divided by pressure. Employing drift orderings and evaluating species distribution functions through second order in the small gyroradius and mean-free path expansion parameters allows accounting for the important effects of heat fluxes on species momentum transport (viscosities), which are missing from the large flow ordered treatments. In this work we consider short mean-free path plasma consisting of electrons and single species of singly-charged ions and neutrals. We neglect neutral-neutral and elastic electron-neutral collisions and approximate the neutral-ion charge-exchange cross-section with a constant. We employ drift orderings to evaluate ion, neutral, and electron heat fluxes, viscosity tensors, and momentum and energy exchange terms and formulate a self-consistent system of electron, ion, and neutral fluid equations, thereby generalizing the drift-ordered treatment of fully ionized plasma.

  12. Impact ionization engineered avalanche photodiode arrays for free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Mike S.; Rabinovich, William S.; Clark, William R.; Waters, William D.; Campbell, Joe C.; Mahon, Rita; Vaccaro, Kenneth; Krejca, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    High sensitivity photodetectors serve two purposes in free space optical communication: data reception and position sensing for pointing, tracking, and stabilization. Because of conflicting performance criteria, two separate detectors are traditionally utilized to perform these tasks but recent advances in the fabrication and development of large area, low noise avalanche photodiode (APD) arrays have enabled these devices to be used both as position sensitive detectors (PSD) and as communications receivers. Combining these functionalities allows for more flexibility and simplicity in optical assembly design without sacrificing the sensitivity and bandwidth performance of smaller, single element data receivers. Beyond eliminating the need to separate the return beam into two separate paths, these devices enable implementation of adaptive approaches to compensate for focal plane beam wander and breakup often seen in highly scintillated terrestrial and maritime optical links. While the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Optogration Inc, have recently demonstrated the performance of single period, InAlAs/InGaAs APD arrays as combined data reception and tracking sensors, an impact ionization engineered (I2E) epilayer design achieves even lower carrier ionization ratios by incorporating multiple multiplication periods engineered to suppress lower ionization rate carriers while enhancing the higher ionization rate carriers of interest. This work presents a three period I2E concentric, five element avalanche photodiode array rated for bandwidths beyond 1GHz with measured carrier ionization ratios of 0.05-0.1 at moderate APD gains. The epilayer design of the device will be discussed along with initial device characterization and high speed performance measurements.

  13. Mars Radiation Risk Assessment and Shielding Design for Long-term Exposure to Ionizing Space Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Nealy, John E.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is now focused on the agency's vision for space exploration encompassing a broad range of human and robotic missions including missions to Moon, Mars and beyond. As a result, there is a focus on long duration space missions. NASA is committed to the safety of the missions and the crew, and there is an overwhelming emphasis on the reliability issues for space missions and the habitat. The cost-effective design of the spacecraft demands a very stringent requirement on the optimization process. Exposure from the hazards of severe space radiation in deep space and/or long duration missions is a critical design constraint and a potential 'show stopper'. Thus, protection from the hazards of severe space radiation is of paramount importance to the agency's vision. It is envisioned to have long duration human presence on the Moon for deep space exploration. The exposures from ionizing radiation - galactic cosmic radiation and solar particle events - and optimized shield design for a swing-by and a long duration Mars mission have been investigated. It is found that the technology of today is inadequate for safe human missions to Mars, and revolutionary technologies need to be developed for long duration and/or deep space missions. The study will provide a guideline for radiation exposure and protection for long duration missions and career astronauts and their safety.

  14. Calculation of total electron excitation cross-sections and partial electron ionization cross-sections for the elements. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    Computer programs were used to calculate the total electron excitation cross-section for atoms and the partial ionization cross-section. The approximations to the scattering amplitude used are as follows: (1) Born, Bethe, and Modified Bethe for non-exchange excitation; (2) Ochkur for exchange excitation; and (3) Coulomb-Born of non-exchange ionization. The amplitudes are related to the differential cross-sections which are integrated to give the total excitation (or partial ionization) cross-section for the collision. The atomic wave functions used are Hartree-Fock-Slater functions for bound states and the coulomb wave function for the continuum. The programs are presented and the results are examined.

  15. Performance deficit produced by partial body exposures to space radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On exploratory class missions to other planets, astronauts will be exposed to types of radiation (particles of high energy and charge [HZE particles]) that are not experienced in low earth orbit, where the space shuttle operates. Previous research has shown that exposure to HZE particles can affect...

  16. Phase-space analysis for ionization processes in the laser-atom interaction using Gabor transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, X. F.; Liu, S. B.; Song, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the ionization processes during laser-atom interaction are investigated in phase-space using Gabor transformation. Based on the time-dependent Schrödinger equation (TDSE), the depletion of the whole system caused by the mask function is taken into consideration in calculating the plasma density. We obtain the momentum distribution via the Gabor transformation of the escaping portions of the time-dependent wave packet at the detector-like points on the interior boundaries from which the kinetic energies carried by the escaping portions are calculated.

  17. Joint space narrowing after partial medial meniscectomy in the anterior cruciate ligament-intact knee.

    PubMed

    Shelbourne, K Donald; Dickens, Jonathan F

    2007-09-01

    Osteoarthritis of the knee is common after total medial meniscectomy. In anterior cruciate ligament-intact knees, the reported outcomes of partial medial meniscectomy are variable. Radiographic assessment using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view is a reliable tool for detecting minor medial joint space narrowing, which may be an early sign of osteoarthritis. Studies that assessed the effect of partial medial meniscectomy found a low percentage of patients with >50% joint narrowing at 10 to 15 years after surgery. Digital radiography, using a posteroanterior weight-bearing view, is a highly sensitive method for observing minor joint space narrowing in the involved knee. A recent study showed that 88% of patients who underwent partial medial meniscectomy had joint space narrowing of <2 mm, and none had narrowing >or=2 mm, at a mean follow-up of 12 years. Subjective results after partial medial meniscectomy are favorable, with 88% to 95% of patients reporting good to excellent results.

  18. Complex space source theory of partially coherent light wave.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, S R

    2010-07-01

    The complex space source theory is used to derive a general integral expression for the vector potential that generates the extended full Gaussian wave in terms of the input value of the vector potential of the corresponding paraxial beam. The vector potential and the fields are assumed to fluctuate on a time scale that is large compared to the wave period. The Poynting vector in the propagation direction averaged over a wave period is expressed in terms of the cross-spectral density of the fluctuating vector potential across the input plane. The Schell model is assumed for the cross-spectral density. The radiation intensity distribution and the power radiated are determined. The effect of spatial coherence on the radiation intensity distribution and the radiated power are investigated for different values of the physical parameters. Illustrative numerical results are provided to bring out the effect of spatial coherence on the propagation characteristics of the fluctuating light wave.

  19. Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported. Detailed consideration of the effects of both the natural and induced ionizing radiation environment during ISS design, development, and flight operations has produced a safe, efficient manned space platform that is largely immune to deleterious effects of the LEO ionizing radiation environment. The assumption of a small shielding mass for purposes of design and verification has been shown to be a valid worst-case approximation approach to design for reliability, though predicted dependences of single event effect (SEE) effects on latitude, longitude, SEP events, and spacecraft structural shielding mass are not observed. The Figure of Merit (FOM) method over predicts the rate for median shielding masses of about 10g/cm(exp 2) by only a factor of 3, while the Scott Effective Flux Approach (SEFA) method overestimated by about one order of magnitude as expected. The Integral Rectangular Parallelepiped (IRPP), SEFA, and FOM methods for estimating on-orbit (Single Event Upsets) SEU rates all utilize some version of the CREME-96 treatment of energetic particle interaction with structural shielding, which has been shown to underestimate the production of secondary particles in heavily shielded manned spacecraft. The need for more work directed to development of a practical understanding of secondary particle production in massive structural shielding for SEE design and verification is indicated. In contrast, total dose estimates using CAD based shielding mass distributions functions and the Shieldose Code provided a reasonable accurate estimate of accumulated dose in Grays internal to the ISS pressurized elements, albeit as a result of using worst-on-worst case assumptions (500 km altitude x 2) that compensate for ignoring both GCR and secondary particle

  20. Phase space path-integral formulation of the above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milošević, D. B.

    2013-04-01

    Atoms and molecules submitted to a strong laser field can emit electrons of high energies in the above-threshold ionization (ATI) process. This process finds a highly intuitive and also quantitative explanation in terms of Feynman's path integral and the concept of quantum orbits [P. Salières et al., Science 292, 902 (2001)], 10.1126/science.108836. However, the connection with the Feynman path-integral formalism is explained only by intuition and analogy and within the so-called strong-field approximation (SFA). Using the phase space path-integral formalism we have obtained an exact result for the momentum-space matrix element of the total time-evolution operator. Applying this result to the ATI we show that the SFA and the so-called improved SFA are, respectively, the zeroth- and the first-order terms of the expansion in powers of the laser-free effective interaction of the electron with the rest of the atom (molecule). We have also presented the second-order term of this expansion which is responsible for the ATI with double scattering of the ionized electron.

  1. New Solutions of Three Nonlinear Space- and Time-Fractional Partial Differential Equations in Mathematical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Ruo-Xia; Wang, Wei; Chen, Ting-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Motivated by the widely used ansätz method and starting from the modified Riemann—Liouville derivative together with a fractional complex transformation that can be utilized to transform nonlinear fractional partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations, new types of exact traveling wave solutions to three important nonlinear space- and time-fractional partial differential equations are obtained simultaneously in terms of solutions of a Riccati equation. The results are new and first reported in this paper.

  2. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  3. Space-time description of strong-field ionization and high-order-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, C.; Plaja, L.

    2014-02-01

    We develop the spatiotemporal description of matter-field interaction within the strong-field approximation. We show that the space-time form of the ionized wave function has analogies with the diffraction phenomenon, allowing for the definition of two different regimes: Fresnel and Fraunhofer. We demonstrate that the standard saddle-point analysis corresponds to the paraxial approximation of the Fraunhofer case. The Fresnel number therefore appears as a useful parameter to characterize the validity of the saddle-point approach. We give a closed formula for the ionized wave function beyond the standard saddle-point analysis that takes the form of a chirped Volkov wave. We apply our results to the study of high-order-harmonic generation, demonstrating that the saddle-point approximation breaks down for extended systems, i.e., when the Fresnel number approaches or is above the unity. As a simple example, we analyze the harmonic generation of dissociating H2+ and demonstrate the Fresnel number as a useful parameter to determine the accuracy of the semiclassical saddle-point approach.

  4. Evaluation of Partial k-space strategies to speed up Time-domain EPR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Chandramouli, Gadisetti VR; McMillan, Alan; Gullapalli, Rao P; Devasahayam, Nallathamby; Mitchell, James B.; Matsumoto, Shingo; Krishna, Murali C

    2012-01-01

    Narrow-line spin probes derived from the trityl radical have led to the development of fast in vivo time-domain EPR imaging. Pure phase-encoding imaging modalities based on the Single Point Imaging scheme (SPI) have demonstrated the feasibility of 3D oximetric images with functional information in minutes. In this paper, we explore techniques to improve the temporal resolution and circumvent the relatively short biological half-lives of trityl probes using partial k-space strategies. There are two main approaches: one involves the use of the Hermitian character of the k-space by which only part of the k-space is measured and the unmeasured part is generated using the Hermitian symmetry. This approach is limited in success by the accuracy of numerical estimate of the phase roll in the k-space that corrupts the Hermiticy. The other approach is to measure only a judicially chosen reduced region of k-space (a centrosymmetric ellipsoid region) that more or less accounts for >70% of the k-space energy. Both of these aspects were explored in FT-EPR imaging with a doubling of scan speed demonstrated by considering ellipsoid geometry of the k-space. Partial k-space strategies help improve the temporal resolution in studying fast dynamics of functional aspects in vivo with infused spin probes. PMID:23045171

  5. Ionizing Radiation and Bone Loss: Space Exploration and Clinical Therapy Applications.

    PubMed

    Willey, Jeffrey S; Lloyd, Shane A J; Nelson, Gregory A; Bateman, Ted A

    2011-03-01

    Damage to normal, nontumor bone tissue following therapeutic irradiation increases the risk of fracture among cancer patients. For example, women treated for various pelvic tumors have been shown to have a greater than 65% increased incidence of hip fracture by 5 years postradiotherapy. Another practical situation in which exposure to ionizing radiation may negatively impact skeletal integrity is during extended spaceflight missions. There is a limited understanding of how spaceflight-relevant doses and types of radiation can influence astronaut bone health, particularly when combined with the significant effects of mechanical unloading experienced in microgravity. Historically, negative effects on osteoblasts have been studied. Radiation exposure has been shown to damage osteoblast precursors. Damage to local vasculature has been observed, ranging from decreased lumen diameter to complete ablation within the irradiated volume, causing a state of hypoxia. These effects result in suppression of bone formation and a general state of low bone turnover. More recently, however, we have demonstrated in pre-clinical mouse models, a very rapid but transient increase in osteoclast activity after exposure to spaceflight and clinically relevant radiation doses. Combined with long-term suppression of bone formation, this skeletal damage may cause long-term deficits. This review will present a broad set of literature outlining our current set knowledge of both clinical therapy and space exploration exposure to ionizing radiation. Additionally, we will discuss prevention of the initial osteoclast-mediated bone loss, the need to promote normal bone turnover and long-term quality of bone tissue, and our hypothesized molecular mechanisms.

  6. Partial-ionization cross sections of a CO{sub 2} molecule due to impact of 10-26-keV electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, Pragya; Singh, Raj; Yadav, Namita; Shanker, R.

    2010-10-15

    Experimental data on total- and partial-ionization cross sections of ionic fragments of CO{sub 2} molecule produced by impact of 10-26-keV electrons are obtained on a crossed-beam apparatus in our laboratory. An ejected electron-produced ion-coincidence technique is employed together with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for analysis of the ions. The six ionic fragments, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CO{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, O{sup +}, C{sup +}, and C{sup 2+}, resulting from dissociative ionization of the CO{sub 2} molecule are observed and identified; their relative ionization cross sections and branching ratios are determined as a function of impact energy. The binary-encounter Bethe model is found to overestimate the experimental data for total-ionization cross sections of the observed ions. No other experimental or theoretical data exist in the investigated energy range to make a direct comparison with the present results.

  7. Analysis of Design Alternatives on Using Dynamic and Partial Reconfiguration in a Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veljkovic, Filip; Riesgo, Teresa; Berrojo, Luis; Regada, Raul; Alvaro, Angel; de la Torre, Eduardo

    2014-08-01

    Some of the biggest concerns in space systems are power consumption and reliability due to the limited power generated by the system's energy harvesters and the fact that once deployed, it is almost impossible to perform maintenance or repairs. Another consideration is that during deployment, the high exposure to electromagnetic radiation can cause single event damage effects including SEUs, SEFIs, SETs and others. In order to mitigate these problems inherent to the space environment, a system with dynamic and partial reconfiguration capabilities is proposed. This approach provide s the flexibility to reconfigure parts of the FPGA while still in operation, thus making the system more flexible, fault tolerant and less power-consuming. In this paper, several partial reconfiguration approaches are proposed and compared in terms of device occupation, power consumption, reconfiguration speed and size of memory footprints.

  8. PIG (partially ionized globule) anatomy - Density and temperature structure of the bright-rimmed globule IC 1396E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabyn, E.; Guesten, R.; Mundy, L.

    1993-01-01

    The density and temperature structure of the bright-rimmed cometary globule IC 1396E is estimated, and the possibility that recent internal star formation was triggered by the ionization front in its southern surface is assessed. On the basis of NH3 data, gas temperatures in the globule are found to increase outward from the center, from a minimum of 17 K in its tail to a maximum of 26 K on the surface most directly facing the stars ionizing IC 1396. On the basis of a microturbulent radiative transfer code to model the radial dependence of the CS line intensities, and also the intensities of the optically thin 2-1 and 5-4 lines toward the cloud center, a radial density dependence of r exp -1.55 to r exp -1.75 is found.

  9. Combining phase information in reciprocal space for molecular replacement with partial models.

    PubMed

    Millán, Claudia; Sammito, Massimo; Garcia-Ferrer, Irene; Goulas, Theodoros; Sheldrick, George M; Usón, Isabel

    2015-09-01

    ARCIMBOLDO allows ab initio phasing of macromolecular structures below atomic resolution by exploiting the location of small model fragments combined with density modification in a multisolution frame. The model fragments can be either secondary-structure elements predicted from the sequence or tertiary-structure fragments. The latter can be derived from libraries of typical local folds or from related structures, such as a low-homology model that is unsuccessful in molecular replacement. In all ARCIMBOLDO applications, fragments are searched for sequentially. Correct partial solutions obtained after each fragment-search stage but lacking the necessary phasing power can, if combined, succeed. Here, an analysis is presented of the clustering of partial solutions in reciprocal space and of its application to a set of different cases. In practice, the task of combining model fragments from an ARCIMBOLDO run requires their referral to a common origin and is complicated by the presence of correct and incorrect solutions as well as by their not being independent. The F-weighted mean phase difference has been used as a figure of merit. Clustering perfect, non-overlapping fragments dismembered from test structures in polar and nonpolar space groups shows that density modification before determining the relative origin shift enhances its discrimination. In the case of nonpolar space groups, clustering of ARCIMBOLDO solutions from secondary-structure models is feasible. The use of partially overlapping search fragments provides a more favourable circumstance and was assessed on a test case. Applying the devised strategy, a previously unknown structure was solved from clustered correct partial solutions.

  10. Analytic Shielding Optimization to Reduce Crew Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Inside Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Razvan; Cooper, Tim P.; Hanzo, Arthur; Hussein, Hesham; Jarvis, Kandy S.; Kimble, Ryan; Lee, Kerry T.; Patel, Chirag; Reddell, Brandon D.; Stoffle, Nicholas; Zapp, E. Neal; Shelfer, Tad D.

    2009-01-01

    A sustainable lunar architecture provides capabilities for leveraging out-of-service components for alternate uses. Discarded architecture elements may be used to provide ionizing radiation shielding to the crew habitat in case of a Solar Particle Event. The specific location relative to the vehicle where the additional shielding mass is placed, as corroborated with particularities of the vehicle design, has a large influence on protection gain. This effect is caused by the exponential- like decrease of radiation exposure with shielding mass thickness, which in turn determines that the most benefit from a given amount of shielding mass is obtained by placing it so that it preferentially augments protection in under-shielded areas of the vehicle exposed to the radiation environment. A novel analytic technique to derive an optimal shielding configuration was developed by Lockheed Martin during Design Analysis Cycle 3 (DAC-3) of the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). [1] Based on a detailed Computer Aided Design (CAD) model of the vehicle including a specific crew positioning scenario, a set of under-shielded vehicle regions can be identified as candidates for placement of additional shielding. Analytic tools are available to allow capturing an idealized supplemental shielding distribution in the CAD environment, which in turn is used as a reference for deriving a realistic shielding configuration from available vehicle components. While the analysis referenced in this communication applies particularly to the Orion vehicle, the general method can be applied to a large range of space exploration vehicles, including but not limited to lunar and Mars architecture components. In addition, the method can be immediately applied for optimization of radiation shielding provided to sensitive electronic components.

  11. Space-time analogy for partially coherent plane-wave-type pulses.

    PubMed

    Lancis, Jesús; Torres-Company, Víctor; Silvestre, Enrique; Andrés, Pedro

    2005-11-15

    In this Letter we extend the well-known space-time duality to partially coherent wave fields and, as a limit case, to incoherent sources. We show that there is a general analogy between the paraxial diffraction of quasi-monochromatic beams of limited spatial coherence and the temporal distortion of partially coherent plane-wave pulses in parabolic dispersive media. Next, coherence-dependent effects in the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulses are retrieved from that of their spatial counterpart, the Gaussian Schell-model beam. Finally, the last result allows us to present a source linewidth analysis in an optical fiber communication system operating around the 1.55 microm wavelength window.

  12. Solvability of some partial functional integrodifferential equations with finite delay and optimal controls in Banach spaces.

    PubMed

    Ezzinbi, Khalil; Ndambomve, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the control system governed by some partial functional integrodifferential equations with finite delay in Banach spaces. We assume that the undelayed part admits a resolvent operator in the sense of Grimmer. Firstly, some suitable conditions are established to guarantee the existence and uniqueness of mild solutions for a broad class of partial functional integrodifferential infinite dimensional control systems. Secondly, it is proved that, under generally mild conditions of cost functional, the associated Lagrange problem has an optimal solution, and that for each optimal solution there is a minimizing sequence of the problem that converges to the optimal solution with respect to the trajectory, the control, and the functional in appropriate topologies. Our results extend and complement many other important results in the literature. Finally, a concrete example of application is given to illustrate the effectiveness of our main results.

  13. Flight performance of bumble bee as a possible pollinator in space agriculture under partial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Mitsuhata, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masami; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    Space agriculture is an advanced life support concept for habitation on extraterrestrial bodies based on biological and ecological function. Flowering plant species are core member of space agriculture to produce food and revitalize air and water. Selection of crop plant species is made on the basis of nutritional requirements to maintain healthy life of space crew. Species selected for space agriculture have several mode of reproduction. For some of plant species, insect pollination is effective to increase yield and quality of food. In terrestrial agriculture, bee is widely introduced to pollinate flower. For pollinator insect on Mars, working environment is different from Earth. Magnitude of gravity is 0.38G on Mars surface. In order to confirm feasibility of insect pollination for space agriculture, capability of flying pollinator insect under such exotic condition should be examined. Even bee does not possess evident gravity sensory system, gravity dominates flying performance and behavior. During flight or hovering, lifting force produced by wing beat sustains body weight, which is the product of body mass and gravitational acceleration. Flying behavior of bumble bee, Bombus ignitus, was documented under partial or micro-gravity produced by parabolic flight of jet plane. Flying behavior at absence of gravity differed from that under normal gravity. Ability of bee to fly under partial gravity was examined at the level of Mars, Moon and the less, to determine the threshold level of gravity for bee flying maneuver. Adaptation process of bee flying under different gravity level was evaluated as well by successive documentation of parabolic flight experiment.

  14. Fixed Point Results of Locally Contractive Mappings in Ordered Quasi-Partial Metric Spaces

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Jamshaid

    2013-01-01

    Fixed point results for a self-map satisfying locally contractive conditions on a closed ball in an ordered 0-complete quasi-partial metric space have been established. Instead of monotone mapping, the notion of dominated mappings is applied. We have used weaker metric, weaker contractive conditions, and weaker restrictions to obtain unique fixed points. An example is given which shows that how this result can be used when the corresponding results cannot. Our results generalize, extend, and improve several well-known conventional results. PMID:24062629

  15. Simulated Space Radiation: Impact of Four Different Types of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Lichen Xanthoria elegans.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Annette; Meeßen, Joachim; Jänicke, Reiner U; Raguse, Marina; Ott, Sieglinde

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the viability of the lichen Xanthoria elegans after high-dose ionizing irradiation in the frame of the STARLIFE campaign. The first set of experiments was intended to resemble several types of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) as present beyond the magnetic shield of Earth. In the second set of experiments, γ radiation up to 113 kGy was applied to test the limit of lichen resistance to ionizing radiation. Entire thalli of Xanthoria elegans were irradiated in the anhydrobiotic state. After STARLIFE 1, the metabolic activity of both symbionts was quantified by live/dead staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The photosynthetic activity was measured after the respective irradiation to assess the ability of the symbiotic green algae to restore photosynthesis after irradiation. The STARLIFE campaign complements the results of the LIFE experiments at the EXPOSE-E facility on the International Space Station by testing the model organism Xanthoria elegans on its resistance to hazardous radiation that might be accumulated during long-term space exposure. In addition, the photosynthetic activity of metabolically active lichen was investigated after X-ray irradiation up to 100 Gy (3.3 Gy/min). Since previous astrobiological experiments were mostly performed with anhydrobiotic lichen, these experiments will broaden our knowledge on the correlation of physiological state and astrobiological stressors. Key Words: Astrobiology-Extremotolerance-Gamma rays-Ionizing radiation-Lichens-Viability. Astrobiology 17, 136-144.

  16. Microplasma Ionization of Volatile Organics for Improving Air/Water Monitoring Systems On-Board the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Matthew C; Alberici, Rosana M; Keelor, Joel D; Dwivedi, Prabha; Zambrzycki, Stephen C; Wallace, William T; Gazda, Daniel B; Limero, Thomas F; Symonds, Josh M; Orlando, Thomas M; Macatangay, Ariel; Fernández, Facundo M

    2016-07-01

    Low molecular weight polar organics are commonly observed in spacecraft environments. Increasing concentrations of one or more of these contaminants can negatively impact Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems and/or the health of crew members, posing potential risks to the success of manned space missions. Ambient plasma ionization mass spectrometry (MS) is finding effective use as part of the analytical methodologies being tested for next-generation space module environmental analysis. However, ambient ionization methods employing atmospheric plasmas typically require relatively high operation voltages and power, thus limiting their applicability in combination with fieldable mass spectrometers. In this work, we investigate the use of a low power microplasma device in the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) configuration for the analysis of polar organics encountered in space missions. A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure with molybdenum foil disc electrodes and a mica insulator was used to form a 300 μm diameter plasma discharge cavity. We demonstrate the application of these MIM microplasmas as part of a versatile miniature ion source for the analysis of typical volatile contaminants found in the International Space Station (ISS) environment, highlighting their advantages as low cost and simple analytical devices. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Microplasma Ionization of Volatile Organics for Improving Air/Water Monitoring Systems On-Board the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Matthew C.; Alberici, Rosana M.; Keelor, Joel D.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Zambrzycki, Stephen C.; Wallace, William T.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Limero, Thomas F.; Symonds, Josh M.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Macatangay, Ariel; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-07-01

    Low molecular weight polar organics are commonly observed in spacecraft environments. Increasing concentrations of one or more of these contaminants can negatively impact Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) systems and/or the health of crew members, posing potential risks to the success of manned space missions. Ambient plasma ionization mass spectrometry (MS) is finding effective use as part of the analytical methodologies being tested for next-generation space module environmental analysis. However, ambient ionization methods employing atmospheric plasmas typically require relatively high operation voltages and power, thus limiting their applicability in combination with fieldable mass spectrometers. In this work, we investigate the use of a low power microplasma device in the microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) configuration for the analysis of polar organics encountered in space missions. A metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure with molybdenum foil disc electrodes and a mica insulator was used to form a 300 μm diameter plasma discharge cavity. We demonstrate the application of these MIM microplasmas as part of a versatile miniature ion source for the analysis of typical volatile contaminants found in the International Space Station (ISS) environment, highlighting their advantages as low cost and simple analytical devices.

  18. Bruhat Order in the Full Symmetric sl(n) Toda Lattice on Partial Flag Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyakov, Yury B.; Sharygin, Georgy I.; Sorin, Alexander S.

    2016-08-01

    In our previous paper [Comm. Math. Phys. 330 (2014), 367-399] we described the asymptotic behaviour of trajectories of the full symmetric sl_n Toda lattice in the case of distinct eigenvalues of the Lax matrix. It turned out that it is completely determined by the Bruhat order on the permutation group. In the present paper we extend this result to the case when some eigenvalues of the Lax matrix coincide. In that case the trajectories are described in terms of the projection to a partial flag space where the induced dynamical system verifies the same properties as before: we show that when tto±∞ the trajectories of the induced dynamical system converge to a finite set of points in the partial flag space indexed by the Schubert cells so that any two points of this set are connected by a trajectory if and only if the corresponding cells are adjacent. This relation can be explained in terms of the Bruhat order on multiset permutations.

  19. Additive hazards regression and partial likelihood estimation for ecological monitoring data across space.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng-Chang; Zhu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    We develop continuous-time models for the analysis of environmental or ecological monitoring data such that subjects are observed at multiple monitoring time points across space. Of particular interest are additive hazards regression models where the baseline hazard function can take on flexible forms. We consider time-varying covariates and take into account spatial dependence via autoregression in space and time. We develop statistical inference for the regression coefficients via partial likelihood. Asymptotic properties, including consistency and asymptotic normality, are established for parameter estimates under suitable regularity conditions. Feasible algorithms utilizing existing statistical software packages are developed for computation. We also consider a simpler additive hazards model with homogeneous baseline hazard and develop hypothesis testing for homogeneity. A simulation study demonstrates that the statistical inference using partial likelihood has sound finite-sample properties and offers a viable alternative to maximum likelihood estimation. For illustration, we analyze data from an ecological study that monitors bark beetle colonization of red pines in a plantation of Wisconsin.

  20. Effects of dose and of partial body ionizing radiation on taste aversion learning in rats with lesions of the area postrema

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J. )

    1984-01-01

    The effect of area postrema lesions on the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following partial body exposure to ionizing radiation was investigated in rats exposed to head-only irradiation at 100, 200 and 300 rad or to body-only irradiation at 100 and 200 rad. Following head-only irradiation area postrema lesions produced a significant attenuation of the radiation-induced taste aversion at all dose levels, although the rats still showed a significant reduction in sucrose preference. Following body-only exposure, area postrema lesions completely disrupted the acquisition of the conditioned taste aversion. The results are interpreted as indicating that: (a) the acquisition of a conditioned taste aversion following body-only exposure is mediated by the area postrema; and (b) taste aversion learning following radiation exposure to the head-only is mediated by both the area postrema and a mechanism which is independent of the area postrema.

  1. Negative Differential Resistance of CaF 2/CdF 2 Triple-Barrier Resonant-Tunneling Diode on Si(111) Grown by Partially Ionized Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Aoki, Yuichi; Saito, Wataru; Tsuganezawa, Mika

    1999-02-01

    Room-temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) of triple-barrier cadmium di-fluoride (CdF2)/calcium di-fluoride (CaF2) heterostructure resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) on a Si(111) substrate has been demonstrated. CdF2/CaF2 multilayered heterostructures were grown on a Si(111) substrate using partially ionized beam epitaxy to obtain atomically flat interfaces. The RTD structures, which consist of triple CaF2 energy barriers and double CdF2 quantum wells, were fabricated by electron beam (EB) lithography and dry etching to avoid thermal and chemical damage to the CdF2 layers. In the current-voltage characteristics of the RTD, NDR was clearly observed even at room temperature and the maximum peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio was about 6.

  2. Partially ionized gas flow and heat transfer in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions downstream of an abrupt circular channel expansion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Massier, P. F.; Roschke, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure measurements obtained in the separation, reattachment, and redevelopment regions along a tube and nozzle located downstream of an abrupt channel expansion are presented for a very high enthalpy flow of argon. The ionization energy fraction extended up to 0.6 at the tube inlet just downstream of the arc heater. Reattachment resulted from the growth of an instability in the vortex sheet-like shear layer between the central jet that discharged into the tube and the reverse flow along the wall at the lower Reynolds numbers, as indicated by water flow visualization studies which were found to dynamically model the high-temperature gas flow. A reasonably good prediction of the heat transfer in the reattachment region where the highest heat transfer occurred and in the redevelopment region downstream can be made by using existing laminar boundary layer theory for a partially ionized gas. In the experiments as much as 90 per cent of the inlet energy was lost by heat transfer to the tube and the nozzle wall.

  3. Momentum space analysis of multiphoton double ionization of helium by intense attosecond xuv pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng; Peng, Liang-You; Gong, Qihuang; Morishita, Toru

    2010-04-26

    We investigate the momentum and energy distributions of the two electrons in multiphoton double ionization of He by intense attosecond xuv pulses, based on a two-dimensional model. Two different patterns of the momentum distributions are identified, corresponding to the uncorrelated and correlated channels, respectively. Our analysis of the electron correlations focuses on two-photon and three-photon double ionization processes for different pulse durations and for different time delays after the pulses. For both two-photon and three-photon cases, a clear correlation valley in energy distributions is found when both electrons are ejected in opposite directions. This is mostly attributed to the electron correlations during the ionization of the first electron. We also find that when two electrons are ejected in the same direction, their Coulomb repulsion has an significant influence on the electron energy distributions during the postionization stage. Finally, in the case of three photon double ionization, we observe that the effects of the Coulomb repulsion become much more complicated, and a new catch-up collision phenomena is observed in the energy distributions.

  4. Exploring the parameter space for ionization and dissociation of H2^+ in an intense laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudnev, Vladimir

    2005-05-01

    We explore the dissociation and ionization of H2^+ ions aligned with a 790 nm laser field of peak intensity in the range 1.0x10^13 to 7.0x10^14 W/cm ^2 . Calculated dissociation and ionization probabilities are reported for different initial vibrational states and for the initial state averaged over the Franck-Condon distribution. The dependence on the carrier-envelope phase difference for different initial states and for pulse durations from 5 to 30 fs FWHM is presented. These results --- from direct solution of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation --- are compared with solutions in the Born-Oppenheimer representation with two-channels for low peak laser intensities.

  5. A partial regularity result for an anisotropic smoothing functional for image restoration in BV space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunderli, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Here we examine the partial regularity of minimizers of a functional used for image restoration in BV space. This functional is a combination of a regularized p-Laplacian for the part of the image with small gradient and a total variation functional for the part with large gradient. This model was originally introduced in Chambolle and Lions using the Laplacian. Due to the singular nature of the p-Laplacian we study a regularized p-Laplacian. We show that where the gradient is small, the regularized p-Laplacian smooths the image u, in the sense that u[set membership, variant]C1,[alpha] for some 0<[alpha]<1. This functional thus anisotropically smooths the image where the gradient is small and preserves edges via total variation where the gradient is large.

  6. Exploring a partially enclosed space by lead-exposed female rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lasky, R E; Laughlin, N K

    2001-01-01

    Beginning on Day 8 postpartum, lead acetate was administered to female rhesus monkeys (n=48). Their blood lead levels rose to 35-40 microg/dl (the level maintained for the duration of the study period) by 12 weeks of age. Weekly, these lead-exposed monkeys and their controls (n=23) were placed in a partially enclosed space from the second postnatal week until they escaped three times or were 26 weeks old. The lead-exposed monkeys exhibited more fear, were more likely to be agitated, and climbed more frequently during the first testing session. In subsequent sessions, they more frequently explored the periphery of the test area than the controls. The lead-exposed monkeys also tended to escape sooner although that trend did not consistently reach the.05 level of significance. The increased activity and agitation of the lead-exposed monkeys is suggestive of deficits reported in human children with high blood lead levels.

  7. Feasibility of measuring dissolved carbon dioxide based on head space partial pressures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watten, B.J.; Boyd, C.E.; Schwartz, M.F.; Summerfelt, S.T.; Brazil, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an instrument prototype that measures dissolved carbon dioxide (DC) without need for standard wetted probe membranes or titration. DC is calculated using Henry's Law, water temperature, and the steady-state partial pressure of carbon dioxide that develops within the instrument's vertical gas-liquid contacting chamber. Gas-phase partial pressures were determined with either an infrared detector (ID) or by measuring voltage developed by a pH electrode immersed in an isolated sodium carbonate solution (SC) sparged with recirculated head space gas. Calculated DC concentrations were compared with those obtained by titration over a range of DC (2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, and 28mg/l), total alkalinity (35, 120, and 250mg/l as CaCO3), total dissolved gas pressure (-178 to 120 mmHg), and dissolved oxygen concentrations (7, 14, and 18 mg/l). Statistically significant (P < 0.001) correlations were established between head space (ID) and titrimetrically determined DC concentrations (R2 = 0.987-0.999, N = 96). Millivolt and titrimetric values from the SC solution tests were also correlated (P < 0.001, R 2 = 0.997, N = 16). The absolute and relative error associated with the use of the ID and SC solution averaged 0.9mg/l DC and 7.0% and 0.6 mg/l DC and 9.6%, respectively. The precision of DC estimates established in a second test series was good; coefficients of variation (100(SD/mean)) for the head space (ID) and titration analyses were 0.99% and 1.7%. Precision of the SC solution method was 1.3%. In a third test series, a single ID was coupled with four replicate head space units so as to permit sequential monitoring (15 min intervals) of a common water source. Here, appropriate gas samples were secured using a series of solenoid valves (1.6 mm bore) activated by a time-based controller. This system configuration reduced the capital cost per sample site from US$ 2695 to 876. Absolute error averaged 2.9, 3.1, 3.7, and 2.7 mg/ l for replicates 1-4 (N = 36) during a 21

  8. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space.

    PubMed

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-28

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  9. Simulated Space Radiation: Impact of Four Different Types of High-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Lichen Xanthoria elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, Annette; Meeßen, Joachim; Jänicke, Reiner U.; Raguse, Marina; Ott, Sieglinde

    2017-02-01

    This study addresses the viability of the lichen Xanthoria elegans after high-dose ionizing irradiation in the frame of the STARLIFE campaign. The first set of experiments was intended to resemble several types of galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) as present beyond the magnetic shield of Earth. In the second set of experiments, γ radiation up to 113 kGy was applied to test the limit of lichen resistance to ionizing radiation. Entire thalli of Xanthoria elegans were irradiated in the anhydrobiotic state. After STARLIFE 1, the metabolic activity of both symbionts was quantified by live/dead staining with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The photosynthetic activity was measured after the respective irradiation to assess the ability of the symbiotic green algae to restore photosynthesis after irradiation. The STARLIFE campaign complements the results of the LIFE experiments at the EXPOSE-E facility on the International Space Station by testing the model organism Xanthoria elegans on its resistance to hazardous radiation that might be accumulated during long-term space exposure. In addition, the photosynthetic activity of metabolically active lichen was investigated after X-ray irradiation up to 100 Gy (3.3 Gy/min). Since previous astrobiological experiments were mostly performed with anhydrobiotic lichen, these experiments will broaden our knowledge on the correlation of physiological state and astrobiological stressors.

  10. Influence of partial k-space filling on the quality of magnetic resonance images*

    PubMed Central

    Jornada, Tiago da Silva; Murata, Camila Hitomi; Medeiros, Regina Bitelli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the influence that the scan percentage tool used in partial k-space acquisition has on the quality of images obtained with magnetic resonance imaging equipment. Materials and Methods A Philips 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging scanner was used in order to obtain phantom images for quality control tests and images of the knee of an adult male. Results There were no significant variations in the uniformity and signal-to-noise ratios with the phantom images. However, analysis of the high-contrast spatial resolution revealed significant degradation when scan percentages of 70% and 85% were used in the acquisition of T1- and T2-weighted images, respectively. There was significant degradation when a scan percentage of 25% was used in T1- and T2-weighted in vivo images (p ≤ 0.01 for both). Conclusion The use of tools that limit the k-space is not recommended without knowledge of their effect on image quality. PMID:27403015

  11. Ionizing Radiation in Earth’s Atmosphere and in Space Near Earth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    1.3 Total 2.38 a Described in the section entitled Ionizing Radiation Terminology. b Sources include uranium-238, radium -226, thorium-232, potassium...40, and cesium-137. c Potassium-40 and carbon-14. d Radon-222 is a decay product of radium -226, which is a decay product of uranium-238. Some... Radium -226 2 0.6 Strontium-90 30 20 ---- 4 Tritium (hydrogen-3) 80000 80000 Uranium-233 10 1 0.7 0.04 Uranium-234 10 1 0.7 0.04 Uranium-235

  12. Numeric estimation of the possibilities of ionizing detectors for monitoring SR beam space parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemiev, A. N.; Artemiev, N. A.; Ioudin, L. I.; Mikhailov, V. G.; Moryakov, V. P.; Odintsov, D. G.; Rezvov, V. A.; Cerenius, Y.; Svensson, A.

    2000-06-01

    An ionizing detector for on-line registration and representation of the geometric SR beam parameters was developed in RRC KI. The detector analyses the products of the residual gas ionization, which was done by the investigated beam. Special electrostatic optics and open image converter tube (ICT) form optical image of the real beam on the screen of ICT. The detector was checked on SR beams of the next storage rings: DCI (LURE, Orsey, France), KSRS (RRC KI, Moscow, Russia) and MAX-2 (MAX-lab, Lund, Sweden). The codes for TV image processing give a possibility for numeric estimation of the beam size, the width of its horizontal and vertical profiles and position of the beam gravity. Statistic processing of the beam gravity center using big amount of TV frames gives uncertainty in the beam position of about 2 μm while the width of the beam is about 2 mm. Summation of big amount of TV frames was used. This method significantly increases signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Communication: Electron ionization of DNA bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. A.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2016-04-01

    No reliable experimental data exist for the partial and total electron ionization cross sections for DNA bases, which are very crucial for modeling radiation damage in genetic material of living cell. We have measured a complete set of absolute partial electron ionization cross sections up to 500 eV for DNA bases for the first time by using the relative flow technique. These partial cross sections are summed to obtain total ion cross sections for all the four bases and are compared with the existing theoretical calculations and the only set of measured absolute cross sections. Our measurements clearly resolve the existing discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results, thereby providing for the first time reliable numbers for partial and total ion cross sections for these molecules. The results on fragmentation analysis of adenine supports the theory of its formation in space.

  14. Wave optics simulation of spatially partially coherent beams: Applications to free space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng

    One of the main drawbacks that prevent the extensive application of free space laser communications is the atmospheric turbulence through which the beam must propagate. For the past four decades, much attention has been devoted to finding different methods to overcome this difficulty. A partially coherent beam (PCB) has been recognized as an effective approach to improve the performance of an atmospheric link. It has been examined carefully with most analyses considering the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. However, practical PCBs may not follow GSM theory and are better examined through some numerical simulation approach such as a wave optics simulation. Consequently, an approach for modeling the spatially PCB in wave optics simulation is presented here. The approach involves the application of a sequence of random phase screens to an initial beam field and the summation of the intensity results after propagation. The relationship between the screen parameters and the spatial coherence function for the beam is developed and the approach is verified by comparing results with analytic formulations for a Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam. A variety of simulation studies were performed for this dissertation. The propagation through turbulence of a coherent beam and a particular version of a PCB, a pseudo-partially coherent beam (PPCB), is analyzed. The beam is created with a sequence of several Gaussian random phase screens for each atmospheric realization. The average intensity profiles, the scintillation index and aperture averaging factor for a horizontal propagation scenario are examined. Comparisons between these results and their corresponding analytic results for the well-known GSM beam are also made. Cumulative probability density functions for the received irradiance are initially investigated. Following the general simulation investigations, a performance metric is proposed as a general measure for optimizing the transverse coherence length of a partial

  15. Utilizing a shallow trench isolation parasitic transistor to characterize the total ionizing dose effect of partially-depleted silicon-on-insulator input/output n-MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Ning, Bing-Xu; Huang, Hui-Xiang; Fan, Shuang; Zhang, Zheng-Xuan; Bi, Da-Wei; En, Yun-Fei

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the effects of 60Co γ-ray irradiation on the 130 nm partially-depleted silicon-on-isolator (PDSOI) input/output (I/O) n-MOSFETs. A shallow trench isolation (STI) parasitic transistor is responsible for the observed hump in the back-gate transfer characteristic curve. The STI parasitic transistor, in which the trench oxide acts as the gate oxide, is sensitive to the radiation, and it introduces a new way to characterize the total ionizing dose (TID) responses in the STI oxide. A radiation enhanced drain induced barrier lower (DIBL) effect is observed in the STI parasitic transistor. It is manifested as the drain bias dependence of the radiation-induced off-state leakage and the increase of the DIBL parameter in the STI parasitic transistor after irradiation. Increasing the doping concentration in the whole body region or just near the STI sidewall can increase the threshold voltage of the STI parasitic transistor, and further reduce the radiation-induced off-state leakage. Moreover, we find that the radiation-induced trapped charge in the buried oxide leads to an obvious front-gate threshold voltage shift through the coupling effect. The high doping concentration in the body can effectively suppress the radiation-induced coupling effect.

  16. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaothekar, Sachin; Soni, Ghanshyam D.; Chhajlani, Rajendra K.

    2012-12-15

    The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  17. Directional Degradation of Spectralon Diffuser Under Ionizing Radiation for Calibration of Space-Based Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiev, G. T.; Butler, J. J.; Kowalewski, M. G.; Ding, L.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) irradiation on the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of Spectralon is presented in this paper. The sample was a 99% white Spectralon calibration standard irradiated with VUV source positioned at 60o off the irradiation direction for a total of 20 hours. The BRDF before and after VUV irradiation was measured and compared at number of wavelengths in the UV, VIS and IR. Non-isotropic directional degradation of Spectralon diffuser under ionizing radiation was detected at different BRDF measurement geometries primarily at UV spectral range. The 8o directional/hemispherical reflectance of the same sample was also measured and compared from 200nm to 2500nm. Index Terms BRDF, Reflectance, Multiangular, Spectralon, Remote Sensing

  18. Results from a Pre-Ionization Study of a 30 kW RMF-FRC Experiment for Space Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Carrie; Uchizono, Nolan; Holmes, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Field-Reversed-Configuration (FRC) plasma thrusters are an attractive concept for in-space propulsion. These thrusters operate in a quasi-steady manner by expelling successive bursts of FRC plasmoids on the order of the neutral-gas refill rate. Pre-ionization (PI) of the seed gas is a challenge for these repetitive systems as the starting mix is a combination of the hot remnants from the recently-departed FRC and the cold refill gas. Pre-ionization of this mixture is critical to the RMF current drive and energy coupling of the system and therefore must be optimized to maximize performance. An empirical PI study was conducted on a 30-kW RMF-FRC benchtop experiment to examine how coil geometry and initial plasma distribution affects the plasmoid formation and acceleration processes. Three different inductively-coupled PI coil geometries were investigated. Their effectiveness was monitored by recording the downstream plasma velocity distribution, density, and energy coupling to the RMF antennas. The initial seed plasma created by these sources was also mapped in limited regions to compare the starting conditions for the FRC plasmoid in each case.

  19. Space charge in MNOS elements under the effect of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtov, V. A.; Nazarov, A. I.; Stepanov, V. E.

    1987-07-01

    Experimental results are presented on the formation of radiation-induced space charge in MNOS elements under applied voltage. The separation of electron-hole pairs in silicon nitride and the injection of carriers from the semiconductor electrode are investigated by varying the thickness of the SiO2 sublayer. It is shown that the radiation-induced space charge is due to nonequilibrium electrons and holes captured at deep centers in the subbarrier dielectric.

  20. The Analysis on Space Radiation Environment and Effect of the KOMPSAT-2 Spacecraft(I): Total Ionizing Dose Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Myung-Jin; Kim, Hak-Jung

    2001-11-01

    In this paper, space radiation environment and total ionizing dose(TID) effect have been analyzed for the KOMPSAT-2 operational orbit. It has been revealed that the trapped protons are concentrated in the SAA(South Atlantic Anomaly) area and that the trapped protons and electrons, and solar protons are main factors affecting TID. It turned out that low energy particles can be effectively blocked by aluminum shielding thickness, but high energy particles can not be effectively blocked by increasing aluminum shielding thickness. KOMPSAT-2 total radiation dose which is accumulated continuously to spacecraft electronics has been expressed as the function of aluminum thickness. These values can be used as the criteria for the selection of electronic parts and shielding thinkness of the KOMPSAT-2 structure or electronic box.

  1. Pulsed discharge helium ionization detector : a new sensitive space detector for gas chromatography ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szopa, C.; Cabane, M.; Coscia, D.; Coll, P.; Eugenie, J.; Brun, J. F.; Israel, G.

    2003-04-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) is a powerful analytical technique which has been widely used in the exploration of other planetary atmospheres and surfaces. It was part of the scientific payloads devoted to in situ chemical analysis of the soil of Mars, the atmosphere of Venus, and it is currently present in the Huygens probe en route to explore Titan’s atmosphere as well as in the Rosetta lander probe to investigate a cometary nucleus. Obviously, since it was first used in a Viking probe (1976), space GC was improved to fulfil the more and more constraining scientific and space instrumental requirements. More particularly, the separation part, composed of chromatographic columns, was the subject of transformations which contributed to significantly improve the efficiency and the sensitivity of the technique. But on the other hand, space GC detectors remained relatively rudimentary systems, if one except the introduction of mass spectrometry coupled to GC, and they became the limiting factor to a better sensitivity of the whole instrument. In other words, much more sensitive space GC is now required to investigate the composition in organics of hostile environments, as can be the soil of Mars where concentration in organics could be limited to trace levels. That is the reason why, in order to overcome this limitation, we are currently leading a research and development program funded by the space French agency to develop a new type of space chromatographic detector which could meet the objectives of the future space GC : the pulsed discharge helium ionisation detector (PDHID). The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the compatibility of the analytical performances of PDHID with space exploration requirements, by presenting the results of a series of experiments led with a commercial version of PDHID. These results made us starting a program of miniaturisation of this type of detector to build a version compatible with space instrumentation requirements in terms of mass

  2. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the first of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations (PDEs) in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE). In CFT, these are null-state equations and conformal Ward identities. They govern partition functions for the continuum limit of a statistical cluster or loop-gas model, such as percolation, or more generally the Potts models and O( n) models, at the statistical mechanical critical point. (SLE partition functions also satisfy these equations.) For such a lattice model in a polygon with its 2 N sides exhibiting a free/fixed side-alternating boundary condition , this partition function is proportional to the CFT correlation function where the w i are the vertices of and where is a one-leg corner operator. (Partition functions for "crossing events" in which clusters join the fixed sides of in some specified connectivity are linear combinations of such correlation functions.) When conformally mapped onto the upper half-plane, methods of CFT show that this correlation function satisfies the system of PDEs that we consider. In this first article, we use methods of analysis to prove that the dimension of this solution space is no more than C N , the Nth Catalan number. While our motivations are based in CFT, our proofs are completely rigorous. This proof is contained entirely within this article, except for the proof of Lemma 14, which constitutes the second article (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1404.0035, 2014). In the third article (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1303.7182, 2013), we use the results of this article to prove that the solution space of this system of PDEs has dimension C N and is spanned by solutions constructed with the CFT Coulomb gas (contour integral) formalism. In the fourth article (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1405

  3. The influence of the ionized medium on synchrotron emission in interstellar space.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramaty, R.

    1972-01-01

    The effect of the ionized gas on synchrotron emission in the interstellar medium is investigated. A detailed calculation of the synchrotron emissivity of cosmic electrons, assumed to have an isotropic pitch-angle distribution in a uniform magnetic field, is made as a function of frequency and observation angle with respect to the field. The results are presented both as a local emissivity and as an intensity, the latter obtained by neglecting free-free absorption in the interstellar medium and by assuming that the emissivity is constant along the line of sight. The comparison of these results with previous studies on the nature of the low-frequency turnover of the galactic nonthermal radio background reveals that, except if the component perpendicular to the line of sight of the interstellar magnetic field is small (less than 1 microgauss), or if the cosmic-ray electron spectrum is cut off at energies below a few hundred MeV, the suppression of synchrotron emission by the ambient electrons has in general a lesser effect than free-free absorption by these electrons, and that in some cases this suppression effect is almost entirely negligible.

  4. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the last of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities that govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first two articles (Flores and Kleban in Commun Math Phys, 2012; Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, 2014), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. Using these results in the third article (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, 2013), we prove that dim and is spanned by (real-valued) solutions constructed with the Coulomb gas (contour integral) formalism of CFT. In this article, we use these results to prove some facts concerning the solution space . First, we show that each of its elements equals a sum of at most two distinct Frobenius series in powers of the difference between two adjacent points (unless is odd, in which case a logarithmic term may appear). This establishes an important element in the operator product expansion for one-leg boundary operators, assumed in CFT. We also identify particular elements of , which we call connectivity weights, and exploit their special properties to conjecture a formula for the probability that the curves of a multiple-SLE process join in a particular connectivity. This leads to new formulas for crossing probabilities of critical lattice models inside polygons with a free/fixed side-alternating boundary condition, which we derive in Flores et al. (Partition functions and crossing probabilities for critical systems inside polygons, in preparation). Finally, we propose a reason for why the exceptional speeds [certain values that appeared in the analysis of the Coulomb gas solutions in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, 2013)] and

  5. Dissecting the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets using the partial triadic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967-2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967-2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets.

  6. Dissecting the Space-Time Structure of Tree-Ring Datasets Using the Partial Triadic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Nardin, Maxime; Godefroid, Martin; Ruiz-Diaz, Manuela; Sergent, Anne-Sophie; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Pâques, Luc; Rozenberg, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Tree-ring datasets are used in a variety of circumstances, including archeology, climatology, forest ecology, and wood technology. These data are based on microdensity profiles and consist of a set of tree-ring descriptors, such as ring width or early/latewood density, measured for a set of individual trees. Because successive rings correspond to successive years, the resulting dataset is a ring variables × trees × time datacube. Multivariate statistical analyses, such as principal component analysis, have been widely used for extracting worthwhile information from ring datasets, but they typically address two-way matrices, such as ring variables × trees or ring variables × time. Here, we explore the potential of the partial triadic analysis (PTA), a multivariate method dedicated to the analysis of three-way datasets, to apprehend the space-time structure of tree-ring datasets. We analyzed a set of 11 tree-ring descriptors measured in 149 georeferenced individuals of European larch (Larix decidua Miller) during the period of 1967–2007. The processing of densitometry profiles led to a set of ring descriptors for each tree and for each year from 1967–2007. The resulting three-way data table was subjected to two distinct analyses in order to explore i) the temporal evolution of spatial structures and ii) the spatial structure of temporal dynamics. We report the presence of a spatial structure common to the different years, highlighting the inter-individual variability of the ring descriptors at the stand scale. We found a temporal trajectory common to the trees that could be separated into a high and low frequency signal, corresponding to inter-annual variations possibly related to defoliation events and a long-term trend possibly related to climate change. We conclude that PTA is a powerful tool to unravel and hierarchize the different sources of variation within tree-ring datasets. PMID:25247299

  7. Partial least squares analysis of rocket propulsion fuel data using diaphragm valve-based comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Freye, Chris E; Fitz, Brian D; Billingsley, Matthew C; Synovec, Robert E

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition and several physical properties of RP-1 fuels were studied using comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC×GC) coupled with flame ionization detection (FID). A "reversed column" GC×GC configuration was implemented with a RTX-wax column on the first dimension ((1)D), and a RTX-1 as the second dimension ((2)D). Modulation was achieved using a high temperature diaphragm valve mounted directly in the oven. Using leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV), the summed GC×GC-FID signal of three compound-class selective 2D regions (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics) was regressed against previously measured ASTM derived values for these compound classes, yielding root mean square errors of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.855, 0.734, and 0.530mass%, respectively. For comparison, using partial least squares (PLS) analysis with LOOCV, the GC×GC-FID signal of the entire 2D separations was regressed against the same ASTM values, yielding a linear trend for the three compound classes (alkanes, cycloalkanes, and aromatics), yielding RMSECV values of 1.52, 2.76, and 0.945 mass%, respectively. Additionally, a more detailed PLS analysis was undertaken of the compounds classes (n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, mono-, di-, and tri-cycloalkanes, and aromatics), and of physical properties previously determined by ASTM methods (such as net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, density, kinematic viscosity, sustained boiling temperature and vapor rise temperature). Results from these PLS studies using the relatively simple to use and inexpensive GC×GC-FID instrumental platform are compared to previously reported results using the GC×GC-TOFMS instrumental platform.

  8. Ionizing radiation risks to Satellite Power Systems (SPS) workers in space

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    A reference Satellite Power System (SPS) has been designed by NASA and its contractors for the purposes of evaluating the concept and carrying out assessments of the various consequences of development, including those on the health of the space workers. The Department of Energy has responsibility for directing various assessments. Present planning calls for the SPS workers to move from Earth to a low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 500 kilometers; to travel by a transfer ellipse (TE) trajectory to a geosynchronous orbit (GEO) at an altitude of 36,000 kilometers; and to remain in GEO orbit for about 90 percent of the total time aloft. The radiation risks to the health of workers who will construct and maintain solar power satellites in the space environment are studied. The charge to the committee was: (a) to evaluate the radiation environment estimated for the Reference System which could represent a hazard; (b) to assess the possible somatic and genetic radiation hazards; and (c) to estimate the risks to the health of SPS workers due to space radiation exposure, and to make recommendations based on these conclusions. Details are presented. (WHK)

  9. Hubble Space Telescope/WFPC2 and VLA Observations of the Ionized Gas in the Dwarf Starburst Galaxy NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John W.; Maíz-Apellániz, Jesús; Pickens, Christopher E.; Norman, Colin A.; Walborn, Nolan R.

    2000-12-01

    We present new Hα and [O III] λ5007 narrowband images of the starbursting dwarf galaxy NGC 4214, obtained with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC2) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), together with VLA observations of the same galaxy. The HST images resolve features down to physical scales of 2-5 pc, revealing several young (<10 Myr) star-forming complexes of various ionized gas morphologies (compact knots, complete or fragmentary shells) and sizes (~10-200 pc). Our results are consistent with a uniform set of evolutionary trends: The youngest, smaller, filled regions that presumably are those just emerging from dense star-forming clouds tend to be of high excitation and are highly obscured. Evolved, larger shell-like regions have lower excitation and are less extincted owing to the action of stellar winds and supernovae. In at least one case we find evidence for induced star formation, which has led to a two-stage starburst. Age estimates based on W(Hα) measurements do not agree with those inferred from wind-driven shell models of expanding H II regions. The most likely explanation for this effect is the existence of an ~2 Myr delay in the formation of superbubbles caused by the pressure exerted by the high-density medium in which massive stars are born. We report the detection of a supernova remnant embedded in one of the two large H II complexes of NGC 4214. The dust in NGC 4214 is not located in a foreground screen but is physically associated with the warm ionized gas. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the NRAO Very Large Array. The HST observations were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under NASA contract NAS5-26555. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  10. Solving the Poisson partial differential equation using vector space projection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marendic, Boris

    This research presents a new approach at solving the Poisson partial differential equation using Vector Space Projection (VSP) methods. The work attacks the Poisson equation as encountered in two-dimensional phase unwrapping problems, and in two-dimensional electrostatic problems. Algorithms are developed by first considering simple one-dimensional cases, and then extending them to two-dimensional problems. In the context of phase unwrapping of two-dimensional phase functions, we explore an approach to the unwrapping using a robust extrapolation-projection algorithm. The unwrapping is done iteratively by modification of the Gerchberg-Papoulis (GP) extrapolation algorithm, and the solution is refined by projecting onto the available global data. An important contribution to the extrapolation algorithm is the formulation of the algorithm with the relaxed bandwidth constraint, and the proof that such modified GP extrapolation algorithm still converges. It is also shown that the unwrapping problem is ill-posed in the VSP setting, and that the modified GP algorithm is the missing link to pushing the iterative algorithm out of the trap solution under certain conditions. Robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated through its performance in a noisy environment. Performance is demonstrated by applying it to phantom phase functions, as well as to the real phase functions. Results are compared to well known algorithms in literature. Unlike many existing unwrapping methods which perform unwrapping locally, this work approaches the unwrapping problem from a globally, and eliminates the need for guiding instruments, like quality maps. VSP algorithm also very effectively battles problems of shadowing and holes, where data is not available or is heavily corrupted. In solving the classical Poisson problems in electrostatics, we demonstrate the effectiveness and ease of implementation of the VSP methodology to solving the equation, as well as imposing of the boundary conditions

  11. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the third of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations (PDEs) in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE κ ). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities that govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first two articles (Flores and Kleban, in Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012; Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1404.0035, 2014), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. Extending these results, we prove in this article that dim and entirely consists of (real-valued) solutions constructed with the CFT Coulomb gas (contour integral) formalism. In order to prove this claim, we show that a certain set of C N such solutions is linearly independent. Because the formulas for these solutions are complicated, we prove linear independence indirectly. We use the linear injective map of Lemma 15 in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012) to send each solution of the mentioned set to a vector in , whose components we find as inner products of elements in a Temperley-Lieb algebra. We gather these vectors together as columns of a symmetric matrix, with the form of a meander matrix. If the determinant of this matrix does not vanish, then the set of C N Coulomb gas solutions is linearly independent. And if this determinant does vanish, then we construct an alternative set of C N Coulomb gas solutions and follow a similar procedure to show that this set is linearly independent. The latter situation is closely related to CFT minimal models. We emphasize that, although the system of PDEs arises in CFT in away that is typically non-rigorous, our treatment of this system here and in Flores and Kleban (Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012; Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1404

  12. A Solution Space for a System of Null-State Partial Differential Equations: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Steven M.; Kleban, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This article is the second of four that completely and rigorously characterize a solution space for a homogeneous system of 2 N + 3 linear partial differential equations in 2 N variables that arises in conformal field theory (CFT) and multiple Schramm-Löwner evolution (SLE). The system comprises 2 N null-state equations and three conformal Ward identities which govern CFT correlation functions of 2 N one-leg boundary operators. In the first article (Flores and Kleban, Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012), we use methods of analysis and linear algebra to prove that dim , with C N the Nth Catalan number. The analysis of that article is complete except for the proof of a lemma that it invokes. The purpose of this article is to provide that proof. The lemma states that if every interval among ( x 2, x 3), ( x 3, x 4),…,( x 2 N-1, x 2 N ) is a two-leg interval of (defined in Flores and Kleban, Commun Math Phys, arXiv:1212.2301, 2012), then F vanishes. Proving this lemma by contradiction, we show that the existence of such a nonzero function implies the existence of a non-vanishing CFT two-point function involving primary operators with different conformal weights, an impossibility. This proof (which is rigorous in spite of our occasional reference to CFT) involves two different types of estimates, those that give the asymptotic behavior of F as the length of one interval vanishes, and those that give this behavior as the lengths of two intervals vanish simultaneously. We derive these estimates by using Green functions to rewrite certain null-state PDEs as integral equations, combining other null-state PDEs to obtain Schauder interior estimates, and then repeatedly integrating the integral equations with these estimates until we obtain optimal bounds. Estimates in which two interval lengths vanish simultaneously divide into two cases: two adjacent intervals and two non-adjacent intervals. The analysis of the latter case is similar to that for one vanishing

  13. Relationships between coronary heart disease risk factors and serum ionized calcium in Kennedy Space Center Cohort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Lisa Ann; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett; Merz, Marion P.; Alford, William R.

    1987-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) employees are reported to be at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Risk factors for CHD include high serum total cholesterol levels, low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), elevated triglyceride, smoking, inactivity, high blood pressure, being male, and being older. Higher dietary and/or serum calcium Ca(++) may be related to a lower risk for CHD. Fifty men and 37 women participated. Subjects were tested in the morning after fasting 12 hours. Information relative to smoking and exercise habits was obtained; seated blood pressures were measured; and blood drawn. KCS men had higher risk values than KCS women as related to HDLC, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure. Smoking and nonsmoking groups did not differ for other risk factors or for serum Ca(++) levels. Exercise and sedentary groups differed in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Serum Ca(++) levels were related to age, increasing with age in the sedentary group and decreasing in the exercisers, equally for men and women. It is concluded that these relationships may be significant to the risk of CHD and/or the risk of bone demineralization in an aging population.

  14. The eye (and brain) as ionizing particle detector? First results from the ALTEA - space experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narici, Livio

    The first part of ALTEA-Space experiments have been performed on the ISS (USLab) between August 2006 and July 2007. The ALTEA hardware features 6 particle telescopes each with 6 striped 8 x 16 cm2 silicon planes arranged alternately in the x and y direction. These detectors are hold by helmet shaped holder. ALTEA features also a light tight visual stimulation unit, a 32 channel EEG cap and electronics, a 3-buttons pushbutton. Two different experiment modalities were run: DOSI and CNSM. The former is the study of the radiation environment of the USLab, and results from these measurements are mostly covered by other papers in this conference; the latter is the study of the electrophysiological activity in coincidence with particle traveling through the eye/brain of the astronaut, with specific reference to the observed light flashes. In this paper we will present first results from these measurements and discuss, within this panorama, the amount of the measured radiation in the brain/eye. Seven CNSM sessions have been performed (on three astronauts), with a total of 20 light flashes perceived. Comparisons with previous measurements in Low Earth Orbit and during the flights to the Moon will be also shown

  15. ISU in an era of partial reconvergence. M.S. Thesis; [International Space University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messier, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    The International Space University (ISU) was founded in 1987 to provide young space professionals with an international, multi-disciplinary approach to space education. The organization has held six 10-week summer sessions at which students from throughout the world have studied space. In 1995, ISU plans to begin a one-year Ph.D.-level program in space studies. This paper examines the educational goals of ISU in the context of current education trends. It discusses how trends toward internationalism and interdisciplinary studies are reshaping both education and the aerospace field. The tensions that exist between ISU's conflicting goals are discussed in the context of these prevailing currents.

  16. The effects of ionizing radiation, temperature, and space contamination effects on self-cleaning and anti-contamination coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirich, Ronald; Weir, John; Leyble, Dennis

    2008-08-01

    A revolutionary family of cost-effective, lightweight, self-cleaning and anti-contamination coatings is being investigated to mitigate lunar dust on critical power and optical systems, including solar photovoltaic power systems, radiators, and other components needed for lunar exploration as well as optical instruments and sensors. Dust contamination is a serious problem for equipment and vehicles since Lunar "weathering" has left the lunar soil has fine texture compared to terrestrial dust particle size distributions. The electrostatic charging of the lunar surface is caused by its interaction with the local plasma environment and solar UV and X-rays induced photoemission of electrons. The lunar thermal environment poses unique challenges to coatings since it is characterized by large temperature variations, long hot and cold soak times, and reduced heat rejection capability due to the presence of the lunar regolith. We are attempting to design an integrated approach to solving the dust problems associated with its many elements This presentation will discuss the properties, as a function of ionizing radiation, temperature and space contamination effects, for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic coating self-cleaning approaches as well as a new approach which incorporates various catalytic mechanisms (stoichiometric, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic) for decontamination in the lunar environment.

  17. Recognition of Partially Occluded Objects Based on the Three Different Color Spaces (RGB, YCbCr, HSV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Rehman, Amjad

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to propose an algorithm that can recognize partially occluded objects under different variations by computing three histograms of colour spaces (RGB, HSV, YCbCr). The dataset used in this research are from kitchen apparatuses. It is created by the researcher and include two parts: referenced objects (18 single objects) and tested objects (occluded objects) made from two single objects to represent the occluded object under different variations (scale, rotation, transformation) with varying percentage of occlusion (30-90 %). Three different colour spaces histogram (RGB, HIS, YCbCr) are used for extracting the features. Histogram intersection distance works for matching objects. Computation histograms and matching process are used to each block of image that given by image division process and finally compared the performance of each colour space by evaluating the accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is robust for identifying occluded objects and it could work at high occlusion.

  18. A State Space Filter for Reinforcement Learning in Partially Observable Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayoshi, Masato; Murao, Hajime; Tamaki, Hisashi

    This paper presents a technique for reinforcement learning to deal with both discrete and continuous state space systems in POMDPs while keeping the state space of an agent compact. First, in our computational model for MDP environments, a concept of “ state space filtering ” has been introduced and constructed to make the state space of an agent smaller properly by referring to “ entropy ” calculated based on the state-action mapping. The model is extended to be applicable in POMDP environments by introducing the mechanism of utilizing effectively of history information. The extended model is capable of being dealt with a continuous state space as well as a discrete state space by the extended model. Here, the mechanism of adjusting the amount of history information is also introduced so that the state space of an agent should be compact. Moreover, some computational experiments with a robot navigation problem with a continuous state space have been carried out. The potential and the effectiveness of the extended approach have been confirmed through these experiments.

  19. Markov processes and partial differential equations on a group: the space-homogeneous case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendikov, A. D.

    1987-10-01

    CONTENTS Introduction Terminology and notation Chapter I. Potential theory of conjugate processes § 1.1. Markov processes and harmonic spaces § 1.2. Processes of class \\mathscr{A} and Brelot spaces § 1.3. Processes of class \\mathscr{B} and Bauer spaces Chapter II. Space-homogeneous processes on a group § 2.1. Space-homogeneous processes and harmonic structures § 2.2. Quasidiagonal processes § 2.3. An example of a non-quasidiagonal process Chapter III. Elliptic equations on a group § 3.1. Admissible distributions and multipliers § 3.2. Weak solutions of elliptic equations ( L_p-theory) § 3.3. Weyl's lemma and the hypoelliptic property References

  20. Toward optimizing partial spatially coherent beams for free space laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xifeng; Voelz, David

    2007-09-01

    A performance metric is proposed as a general measure for optimizing the transverse coherence length l c of a partial spatially coherent beam for a given communication scenario. The expression is essentially the mean intensity minus the standard deviation of the intensity and we seek to maximize this quantity. It is preliminarily verified by the probability of fade with log-normal distribution model under the weak turbulence condition. We also examine it as a function of l c using wave optics simulations and compared these results with the relationships predicted by analytic theory under weak to medium-strong turbulence conditions. Our results verify there exists a unique coherence length that can optimize the receiver beam quality. After calculating the probability of fades of the optimal partially coherent beam and the fully coherent beam and comparing them with the wave optics simulation results, good agreement was observed.

  1. Space Shuttle Partial Stack Rollout Test Analytical Correlation In Support Of Fatigue Load Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DelBasso, Steve; Dolenz, Jim; Wilson, Lee

    2005-01-01

    A rollout test with only the Solid Rocket Boosters was conducted in November 2003 to gather structural dynamic response data of the transportation environment from the Vehicle Assembly Building to the Launch Pad. The data was acquired to develop and validate analytical methods used to predict rollout Orbiter fatigue load spectra. Earlier predictions computed by a base drive approach with only 5 input drive degrees-of-freedom raised questions that commissioned the partial stack test. Not only was there a concern because of the input degree-of-freedom omission due to measurement limitations, but there was also a concern with the implementation of the "large mass" itself. Three methods were evaluated with the partial stack test data. The analytical correlations to measured strain derived SRB base loads and acceleration5 showed the earlier 5 degree-of-freedom base drive approach to yield the most conservative results for all quantities monitored except the SRB base moment about the axis in which the input drive was missing. This non-conservative shortcoming led to a recommendation to use either the 6 degree-of-freedom base drive or the 12 degree-of-freedom Craig-Bampton boundary drive methods whose results did not substantially differ.

  2. Countermeasures to Neurobehavioral Deficits from Cumulative Partial Sleep Deprivation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinges, David F.

    1999-01-01

    This project is concerned with identifying ways to prevent neurobehavioral and physical deterioration due to inadequate sleep in astronauts during long-duration manned space flight. The performance capability of astronauts during extended-duration space flight depends heavily on achieving recovery through adequate sleep. Even with appropriate circadian alignment, sleep loss can erode fundamental elements of human performance capability including vigilance, cognitive speed and accuracy, working memory, reaction time, and physiological alertness. Adequate sleep is essential during manned space flight not only to ensure high levels of safe and effective human performance, but also as a basic regulatory biology critical to healthy human functioning. There is now extensive objective evidence that astronaut sleep is frequently restricted in space flight to averages between 4 hr and 6.5 hr/day. Chronic sleep restriction during manned space flight can occur in response to endogenous disturbances of sleep (motion sickness, stress, circadian rhythms), environmental disruptions of sleep (noise, temperature, light), and curtailment of sleep due to the work demands and other activities that accompany extended space flight operations. The mechanism through which this risk emerges is the development of cumulative homeostatic pressure for sleep across consecutive days of inadequate sleep. Research has shown that the physiological sleepiness and performance deficits engendered by sleep debt can progressively worsen (i.e., accumulate) over consecutive days of sleep restriction, and that sleep limited to levels commonly experienced by astronauts (i.e., 4 - 6 hr per night) for as little as 1 week, can result in increased lapses of attention, degradation of response times, deficits in complex problem solving, reduced learning, mood disturbance, disruption of essential neuroendocrine, metabolic, and neuroimmune responses, and in some vulnerable persons, the emergence of uncontrolled

  3. Direct numerical solution of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in coordinate space without partial-wave decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuruoǧlu, Zeki C.

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical solution of the coordinate-space integral-equation version of the two-particle Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation is considered without invoking the traditional partial-wave decomposition. The singular kernel of the three-dimensional LS equation in coordinate space is regularized by a subtraction technique. The resulting nonsingular integral equation is then solved via the Nystrom method employing a direct-product quadrature rule for three variables. To reduce the computational burden of discretizing three variables, advantage is taken of the fact that, for central potentials, the azimuthal angle can be integrated out, leaving a two-variable reduced integral equation. A regularization method for the kernel of the two-variable integral equation is derived from the treatment of the singularity in the three-dimensional equation. A quadrature rule constructed as the direct product of single-variable quadrature rules for radial distance and polar angle is used to discretize the two-variable integral equation. These two- and three-variable methods are tested on the Hartree potential. The results show that the Nystrom method for the coordinate-space LS equation compares favorably in terms of its ease of implementation and effectiveness with the Nystrom method for the momentum-space version of the LS equation.

  4. Electron ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    King, Simon J; Price, Stephen D

    2007-11-07

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H+2, C2+, C+/C2+ 2, CH+/C2H+2, CH+2, C+2, and C2H+ relative to the formation of C2H+2, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200 eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50 eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100 eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H2+2 dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (3Sigma*g) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (1Delta g). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H2+2 have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  5. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT THEORY IN PARTIALLY TURBULENT SPACE PLASMAS WITH COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, a new transport theory of cosmic rays in magnetized space plasmas extending the quasilinear approximation to the particle orbit has been developed for the case of an axisymmetric incompressible magnetic turbulence. Here, we generalize the approach to the important physical case of a compressible plasma. As previously obtained in the case of an incompressible plasma, we allow arbitrary gyrophase deviations from the unperturbed spiral orbits in the uniform magnetic field. For the case of quasi-stationary and spatially homogeneous magnetic turbulence we derive, in the small Larmor radius approximation, gyrophase-averaged cosmic-ray Fokker-Planck coefficients. Upper limits for the perpendicular and pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficients and for the perpendicular and parallel spatial diffusion coefficients are presented.

  6. Hand gesture recognition in confined spaces with partial observability and occultation constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirkhodaie, Amir; Chan, Alex; Hu, Shuowen

    2016-05-01

    Human activity detection and recognition capabilities have broad applications for military and homeland security. These tasks are very complicated, however, especially when multiple persons are performing concurrent activities in confined spaces that impose significant obstruction, occultation, and observability uncertainty. In this paper, our primary contribution is to present a dedicated taxonomy and kinematic ontology that are developed for in-vehicle group human activities (IVGA). Secondly, we describe a set of hand-observable patterns that represents certain IVGA examples. Thirdly, we propose two classifiers for hand gesture recognition and compare their performance individually and jointly. Finally, we present a variant of Hidden Markov Model for Bayesian tracking, recognition, and annotation of hand motions, which enables spatiotemporal inference to human group activity perception and understanding. To validate our approach, synthetic (graphical data from virtual environment) and real physical environment video imagery are employed to verify the performance of these hand gesture classifiers, while measuring their efficiency and effectiveness based on the proposed Hidden Markov Model for tracking and interpreting dynamic spatiotemporal IVGA scenarios.

  7. Ionization Structure in the 30 Doradus Nebula as seen with Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, P. A.; Hester, J. J.; Sankrit, R.; Gallagher, J. S.; Ballester, G. E.; Burrows, C. J.; Clarke, J. T.; Crisp, D.; Evans, R. W.; Griffiths, R. E.; Hoessel, J. G.; Holtzman, J. A.; Krist, J.; Mould, J. R.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Trauger, J. T.; Watson, A. M.; Westphal, J. A.

    1998-07-01

    Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, we have imaged the central 20 pc of the giant H ii region 30 Doradus Nebula in three different emission lines. The images allow us to study the nebula with a physical resolution that is within a factor of 2 of that of typical ground-based observations of Galactic H ii regions. We present a gallery of interesting objects within the region studied. These include a tube blown by the wind of a high-velocity star and a discrete H ii region around an isolated B star. This small isolated H ii region appears to be in the midst of the champagne flow phase of its evolution. Most of the emission within 30 Dor is confined to a thin zone located between the hot interior of the nebula and surrounding dense molecular material. This zone appears to be directly analogous to the photoionized photoevaporative flows that dominate emission from small, nearby H ii regions. For example, a column of material protruding from the cavity wall to the south of the main cluster is found to be a direct analog to elephant trunks in M16. Surface brightness profiles across this structure are very similar to surface brightness profiles taken at ground-based resolution across the head of the largest column in M16. The dynamical effects of the photoevaporative flow can be seen as well. An arcuate feature located above this column and a similar feature surrounding a second nearby column are interpreted as shocks in which the photoevaporative flow stagnates against the high-temperature gas that fills the majority of the nebula. The ram pressure in the photoevaporative flow, derived from thermal pressure at the surface of the column, is found to balance with the pressure in the interior of the nebula derived from previous X-ray observations. By analogy with the comparison of ground-based and HST images of M16, we infer that the same sharply stratified structure seen in HST images of M16 almost certainly underlies the observed

  8. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  9. Partial Ambiguity Resolution for Ground and Space-Based Applications in a GPS+Galileo scenario: A simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardo, A.; Li, B.; Teunissen, P. J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR) is the key to fast and precise GNSS positioning. The proper diagnostic metric for successful IAR is provided by the ambiguity success rate being the probability of correct integer estimation. In this contribution we analyse the performance of different GPS+Galileo models in terms of number of epochs needed to reach a pre-determined success rate, for various ground and space-based applications. The simulation-based controlled model environment enables us to gain insight into the factors contributing to the ambiguity resolution strength of the different GPS+Galileo models. Different scenarios of modernized GPS+Galileo are studied, encompassing the long baseline ground case as well as the medium dynamics case (airplane) and the space-based Low Earth Orbiter (LEO) case. In our analyses of these models the capabilities of partial ambiguity resolution (PAR) are demonstrated and compared to the limitations of full ambiguity resolution (FAR). The results show that PAR is generally a more efficient way than FAR to reduce the time needed to achieve centimetre-level positioning precision. For long single baselines, PAR can achieve time reductions of fifty percent to achieve such precision levels, while for multiple baselines it even becomes more effective, reaching reductions up to eighty percent for four station networks. For a LEO, the rapidly changing observation geometry does not even allow FAR, while PAR is then still possible for both dual- and triple-frequency scenarios. With the triple-frequency GPS+Galileo model the availability of precise positioning improves by fifteen percent with respect to the dual-frequency scenario.

  10. Scatter broadening of compact radio sources by the ionized intergalactic medium: prospects for detection with Space VLBI and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koay, J. Y.; Macquart, J.-P.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of detecting and probing various components of the ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) and their turbulent properties at radio frequencies through observations of scatter broadening of compact sources. There is a strong case for conducting targeted observations to resolve scatter broadening (where the angular size scales as ˜ν-2) of compact background sources intersected by foreground galaxy haloes and rich clusters of galaxies to probe the turbulence of the ionized gas in these objects, particularly using Space very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) with baselines of 350 000 km at frequencies below 800 MHz. The sensitivity of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) allows multifrequency surveys of interstellar scintillation (ISS) of ˜ 100 μJy sources to detect or place very strong constraints on IGM scatter broadening down to ˜ 1 μas scales at 5 GHz. Scatter broadening in the warm-hot component of the IGM with typical overdensities of ˜30 cannot be detected, even with Space VLBI or ISS, and even if the outer scales of turbulence have an unlikely low value of ˜1 kpc. None the less, intergalactic scatter broadening can be of the order of ˜ 100 μas at 1 GHz and ˜ 3 μas at 5 GHz for outer scales ˜1 kpc, assuming a sufficiently high-source redshift that most sight-lines intersect within a virial radius of at least one galaxy halo (z ≳ 0.5 and 1.4 for 1010 and 1011 M⊙ systems, following McQuinn 2014). Both Space VLBI and multiwavelength ISS observations with the SKA can easily test such a scenario, or place strong constraints on the outer scale of the turbulence in such regions.

  11. Development of a large area InGaAs APD receiver based on an impact ionization engineered detector for free-space lasercomm applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, H. R.; Ferraro, M. S.; Freeman, W. T.; Moore, C. I.; Murphy, J. L.; Rabinovich, W. S.; Smith, W. R.; Summers, L. L.; Thomas, L. M.; Vilcheck, M. J.; Clark, W. R.; Waters, W. D.

    2012-06-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is developing a small size, weight and power (SWaP) free space lasercomm terminal for small unmanned airborne platforms. The terminal is based on a small gimbal developed by CloudCap Technology. A receiver with a large field of view and with sensitivity sufficient to meet the program range goals is required for this terminal. An InGaAs Avalanche Photodiode (APD) with internal structures engineered to reduce excess noise and keff in high gain applications was selected as the detector. The detector is a 350 micron diameter impact ionization engineered (I2E) APD developed by Optogration, Inc. Results of development and characterization of the receiver will be presented.

  12. Quantitative measurement of the chemical composition of geological standards with a miniature laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer designed for in situ application in space research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuland, M. B.; Grimaudo, V.; Mezger, K.; Moreno-García, P.; Riedo, A.; Tulej, M.; Wurz, P.

    2016-03-01

    A key interest of planetary space missions is the quantitative determination of the chemical composition of the planetary surface material. The chemical composition of surface material (minerals, rocks, soils) yields fundamental information that can be used to answer key scientific questions about the formation and evolution of the planetary body in particular and the Solar System in general. We present a miniature time-of-flight type laser ablation/ionization mass spectrometer (LMS) and demonstrate its capability in measuring the elemental and mineralogical composition of planetary surface samples quantitatively by using a femtosecond laser for ablation/ionization. The small size and weight of the LMS make it a remarkable tool for in situ chemical composition measurements in space research, convenient for operation on a lander or rover exploring a planetary surface. In the laboratory, we measured the chemical composition of four geological standard reference samples USGS AGV-2 Andesite, USGS SCo-l Cody Shale, NIST 97b Flint Clay and USGS QLO-1 Quartz Latite with LMS. These standard samples are used to determine the sensitivity factors of the instrument. One important result is that all sensitivity factors are close to 1. Additionally, it is observed that the sensitivity factor of an element depends on its electron configuration, hence on the electron work function and the elemental group in agreement with existing theory. Furthermore, the conformity of the sensitivity factors is supported by mineralogical analyses of the USGS SCo-l and the NIST 97b samples. With the four different reference samples, the consistency of the calibration factors can be demonstrated, which constitutes the fundamental basis for a standard-less measurement-technique for in situ quantitative chemical composition measurements on planetary surface.

  13. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  14. [ESTIMATION OF IONIZING RADIATION EFFECTIVE DOSES IN THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION CREWS BY THE METHOD OF CALCULATION MODELING].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of the radiation loading on cosmonauts requires calculation of absorbed dose dynamics with regard to the stay of cosmonauts in specific compartments of the space vehicle that differ in shielding properties and lack means of radiation measurement. The paper discusses different aspects of calculation modeling of radiation effects on human body organs and tissues and reviews the effective dose estimates for cosmonauts working in one or another compartment over the previous period of the International space station operation. It was demonstrated that doses measured by a real or personal dosimeters can be used to calculate effective dose values. Correct estimation of accumulated effective dose can be ensured by consideration for time course of the space radiation quality factor.

  15. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  16. Clinical outcomes, toxicity, and cosmesis in breast cancer patients with close skin spacing treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using multi-lumen/catheter applicators

    PubMed Central

    Akhtari, Mani; Abboud, Mirna; Szeja, Sean; Pino, Ramiro; Lewis, Gary D.; Bass, Barbara L.; Miltenburg, Darlene M.; Butler, E. Brian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using a single-lumen device is associated with better cosmetic outcomes if the spacing between the applicator and skin is > 7 mm. However, there are no reports addressing the late toxicity and clinical outcomes in patients treated with single-entry multi-lumen/catheter applicators who had close skin spacing (7 mm or less). We undertook this study to report clinical outcome, acute and late toxicity as well as cosmesis of early stage breast cancer patients with close skin spacing treated with APBI using multi-lumen or multi-catheter devices. Material and methods This is a retrospective study of all breast cancer patients who had undergone APBI using single-entry multi-lumen/catheter devices in a single institution between 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to those with ≤ 7 mm spacing between the device and skin. Results We identified 37 patients and 38 lesions with skin spacing of ≤ 7 mm. Seven lesions (18%) had spacing of ≤ 3 mm. Median follow-up was 47.5 months. There was one case of ipsilateral breast recurrence and one ipsilateral axillary recurrence. Based on RTOG criteria, 22 treated lesions experienced grade 1 and 9 lesions experienced grade 2 toxicity. Twenty-one lesions experienced late grade 1 toxicity. One patient had to undergo mastectomy due to mastitis. Twenty-four treated breasts showed excellent and 11 had good cosmetic outcome. Overall cosmesis trended towards a significant correlation with skin spacing. However, all patients with ≤ 3 mm skin spacing experienced acute and late toxicities. Conclusions Accelerated partial breast irradiation can be safely performed in patients with skin spacing of ≤ 7 mm using single-entry multi-lumen/catheter applicators with excellent cosmetic outcomes and an acceptable toxicity profile. However, skin spacing of ≤ 3 mm is associated with acute and late toxicity and should be avoided if possible. PMID:28115955

  17. Space-time simulations of photon, lepton, ionization and nucleon trails of TGF ignition in thunderstorm electric field geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The origin of high energy electrons which contribute to the Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche of a TGF are not precisely known, or yet observed, though the most obvious source would seem to be the products of cosmic ray showers, or electron avalanches generated in the high electric field near the tips of lightning leaders. With our new TGF simulation software package LEPTRACK we can now easily create any electric field geometry to be expected in stormclouds, any kind of electron source, and are investigating scenarios of TGF ignition, which may or may not be runaway, and in any direction - not just vertical. Vidoes, lightcurves and spectra, presenting the detailed density structure and time evolution of TGF photon, electron, neucleon and ionization trails were presented for the first time at the AGU Fall Meeting in 2014 - showing the complicated effects of changing electric field strength and air density - and the as yet unrecognized importance of the earth magnetic field in trapping electrons and positrons in the upper atmosphere at the magnetic equator - possibly giving rise to the hard tail seen in some TGF spectra observed by AGILE. We will present here an extension of this work to show the dynamics of TGF ignition scenarios of current interest - upward, downward and randomly directed - both from free electrons and from combinations of lightning leader micro-fields producing electron avalanches, which are then input to the macro-fields expected at or above thunderstorm cloudtops. We will show the spatial shape and time evolution of TGF particle structures, along with their optical and gamma ray spectra emitted, and bring to life their essential physics.

  18. Microscale Solubility Measurements of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization (MALDI) Matrices Using Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) Coupled with Partial Least Squares (PLS) Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorre, Elsa; Owens, Kevin G

    2016-11-01

    In this work an attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption based method is used to measure the solubility of two matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) matrices in a few pure solvents and mixtures of acetonitrile and water using low microliter amounts of solution. Results from a method that averages the values obtained from multiple calibration curves created by manual peak picking are compared to those predicted using a partial least squares (PLS) chemometrics approach. The PLS method provided solubility values that were in good agreement with the manual method with significantly greater ease of analysis. As a test, the solubility of adipic acid in acetone was measured using the two methods of analysis, and the values are in good agreement with solubility values reported in literature. The solubilities of the MALDI matrices α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHCA) and sinapinic acid (SA) were measured in a series of mixtures made from acetonitrile (ACN) and water; surprisingly, the results show a highly nonlinear trend. While both CHCA and SA show solubility values of less than 10 mg/mL in the pure solvents, the solubility value for SA increases to 56.3 mg/mL in a 75:25 v/v ACN:water mixture. This can have a significant effect on the matrix-to-analyte ratios in the MALDI experiment when sample protocols call for preparation of a saturated solution of the matrix in the chosen solvent system.

  19. Design of the Experimental Exposure Conditions to Simulate Ionizing Radiation Effects on Candidate Replacement Materials for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. Montgomery

    1998-01-01

    In this effort, experimental exposure times for monoenergetic electrons and protons were determined to simulate the space radiation environment effects on Teflon components of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although the energy range of the available laboratory particle accelerators was limited, optimal exposure times for 50 keV, 220 keV, 350 keV, and 500 KeV electrons were calculated that produced a dose-versus-depth profile that approximated the full spectrum profile, and were realizable with existing equipment. For the case of proton exposure, the limited energy range of the laboratory accelerator restricted simulation of the dose to a depth of .5 mil. Also, while optimal exposure times were found for 200 keV, 500 keV and 700 keV protons that simulated the full spectrum dose-versus-depth profile to this depth, they were of such short duration that the existing laboratory could not be controlled to within the required accuracy. In addition to the obvious experimental issues, other areas exist in which the analytical work could be advanced. Improved computer codes for the dose prediction- along with improved methodology for data input and output- would accelerate and make more accurate the calculational aspects. This is particularly true in the case of proton fluxes where a paucity of available predictive software appears to exist. The dated nature of many of the existing Monte Carlo particle/radiation transport codes raises the issue as to whether existing codes are sufficient for this type of analysis. Other areas that would result in greater fidelity of laboratory exposure effects to the space environment is the use of a larger number of monoenergetic particle fluxes and improved optimization algorithms to determine the weighting values.

  20. UNEXPECTED IONIZATION STRUCTURE IN ETA CARINAE'S ''WEIGELT KNOTS''

    SciTech Connect

    Remmen, Grant N.; Davidson, Kris; Mehner, Andrea

    2013-08-10

    The Weigelt knots, dense slow-moving ejecta near {eta} Carinae, are mysterious in structure as well as in origin. Using spatially dithered spectrograms obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), we have partially resolved the ionization zones of one knot. Contrary to simple models, higher ionization levels occur on the outer side, i.e., farther from the star. They cannot represent a bow shock, and no satisfying explanation is yet available-though we sketch one qualitative possibility. STIS spectrograms provide far more reliable spatial measurements of the Weigelt knots than HST images do, and this technique can also be applied to the knots' proper motion problem. Our spatial measurement accuracy is about 10 mas, corresponding to a projected linear scale of the order of 30 AU, which is appreciably smaller than the size of each Weigelt knot.

  1. Fundamental Processes in Partially Ionized Plasmas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-01

    moi* Natural broadening is due to the Heisenberg uncertainty principle applied to the energies of the initial and the final state of the transition...by ab initio calculations ( Werner et al, 1984, Rizzo et al, 1988, Langhoff et al, 1988a, 1988b, 1991, Bauschlicher and Langhoff, 1988). Since these...moments N2 First positive system B 3 rlg- A 3 yu+ The ETMF from Werner et al (1984) was preferred over the one from Rizzo et al (1988) since it yields

  2. Determination of biogenic amines in canned fish samples using head-space solid phase microextraction based on nanostructured polypyrrole fiber coupled to modified ionization region ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parchami, Razieh; Kamalabadi, Mahdie; Alizadeh, Naader

    2017-01-20

    The head-space solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied to extraction and determination of histamine (HIS), putrescine (PUT), cadaverine (CAD), tyramine (TYR) in canned fish samples by ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) without any derivatization process. HIS and CAD have the same mobilities in nitrogen as buffer gas and their corresponding peaks are severely overlapped in ion mobility spectrum. Peak separation was acquired in the presence of 18-crown-6 vapor as complexation reagent into carrier gas and modified ionization region of IMS (MIR-IMS) at optimum flow rate. The interaction between 18-crown-6 and the mentioned amines forms nanocluster product ions with different cross section areas and ion mobilities. The effects of main extraction parameters on the efficiency of HS-SPME-MIR-IMS were investigated and optimized. Relative standard deviations (RSD%) of the biogenic amines determination at 50μgL(-1) concentration level were obtained in range 5.7%-6.3%. Limits of detection for analytes were in the range of 0.6-1ngg(-1). HS-SPME-MIR-IMS results indicate that the proposed method can be successfully used in biogenic amines analysis in water and food samples. Method validation was conducted by comparing our results with those obtained through GC-MS method.

  3. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  4. Unicompartmental knee arthroplasties implanted for osteoarthritis with partial loss of joint space have high re-operation rates.

    PubMed

    Niinimäki, Tuukka T; Murray, David W; Partanen, Juha; Pajala, Ari; Leppilahti, Juhana I

    2011-12-01

    The indications and contraindications for unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) are controversial. The aim of the study was to determine the risk factors for re-operation in our practice. A series of 113 medial UKAs with mean follow-up of 63 months were reviewed retrospectively. Pre-operatively all knees had radiographic or arthroscopic evidence of severe cartilage damage. The re-operation rate was not related to age, gender, arthroscopic finding or body mass index. It was related to the joint space on pre-operative standing weight bearing radiographs taken in extension. The re-operation rate was 6 (95% CI 2.1-17, P<0.001) times higher when the thickness of the pre-operative medial joint space was >2 mm rather than ≤2 mm. It was 8 (95% CI 2.8-22.5, P<0.001) times higher when the thickness of the pre-operative medial space was >40% of the thickness of the lateral space. The ratio of pre-operative joint spaces has a greater influence on revision rate than the absolute measurement and is independent of radiographic magnification or the patient's normal cartilage thickness. We therefore recommend that, in medial knee osteoarthritis, UKA should only be used if the pre-operative medial joint space on standing radiographs is ≤40% of the lateral joint space, even if severe cartilage damage is seen arthroscopically.

  5. Electron ionization of H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Simon J.; Price, Stephen D.

    2008-11-01

    Relative partial ionization cross-sections and precursor-specific relative partial ionization cross-sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of H2O have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H2+, O2+, O+ and OH+ relative to the formation of H2O+, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30 to 200 eV. This data includes, for the first time, measurements on the formation all positive ion pairs and ion triples by dissociative multiple electron ionization of H2O. Through determinations of the kinetic energy release involved in ion pair formation we provide further evidence that indirect processes contribute significantly to the yield of H+ + OH+ ion pairs below the vertical double ionization threshold.

  6. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  7. L{sup p} Theory for Super-Parabolic Backward Stochastic Partial Differential Equations in the Whole Space

    SciTech Connect

    Du Kai Qiu, Jinniao Tang Shanjian

    2012-04-15

    This paper is concerned with semi-linear backward stochastic partial differential equations (BSPDEs for short) of super-parabolic type. An L{sup p}-theory is given for the Cauchy problem of BSPDEs, separately for the case of p Element-Of (1,2] and for the case of p Element-Of (2,{infinity}). A comparison theorem is also addressed.

  8. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  9. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wiresa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-01

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from ≳0.1g/cm3 and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm3 and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 μm aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by ˜150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and ˜2μm X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 μm spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s → 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s → 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within ±25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  10. CHANDRA X-RAY AND HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE IMAGING OF OPTICALLY SELECTED KILOPARSEC-SCALE BINARY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. I. NATURE OF THE NUCLEAR IONIZING SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Civano, Francesca; Shen, Yue; Green, Paul; Greene, Jenny E.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2013-01-10

    Kiloparsec-scale binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) signal active supermassive black hole (SMBH) pairs in merging galaxies. Despite their significance, unambiguously confirmed cases remain scarce and most have been discovered serendipitously. In a previous systematic search, we optically identified four kpc-scale binary AGNs from candidates selected with double-peaked narrow emission lines at z = 0.1-0.2. Here, we present Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging of these four systems. We critically examine and confirm the binary-AGN scenario for two of the four targets, by combining high angular resolution X-ray imaging spectroscopy with Chandra ACIS-S, better nuclear position constraints from WFC3 F105W imaging, and direct starburst estimates from WFC3 F336W imaging; for the other two targets, the existing data are still consistent with the binary-AGN scenario, but we cannot rule out the possibility of only one AGN ionizing gas in both merging galaxies. We find tentative evidence for a systematically smaller X-ray-to-[O III] luminosity ratio and/or higher Compton-thick fraction in optically selected kpc-scale binary AGNs than in single AGNs, possibly caused by a higher nuclear gas column due to mergers and/or a viewing angle bias related to the double-peak narrow-line selection. While our result lends some further support to the general approach of optically identifying kpc-scale binary AGNs, it also highlights the challenge and ambiguity of X-ray confirmation.

  11. Identification and quantification of seven volatile n-nitrosamines in cosmetics using gas chromatography/chemical ionization-mass spectrometry coupled with head space-solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Choi, Na Rae; Kim, Yong Pyo; Ji, Won Hyun; Hwang, Geum-Sook; Ahn, Yun Gyong

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the identification and quantification of seven volatile n-nitrosamines (n-nitrosodimethylamine [NDMA], n-nitrosoethylmethylamine [NMEA], n-nitrosodiethylamine [NDEA], n-nitrosodipropylamine [NDPA], n-nitrosodibutylamine [NDBA], n-nitrosopiperidine [NPIP], and n-nitrosopyrrolidine [NPYR]) in water insoluble cream type cosmetics. It was found that the head space-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was suitable for extraction, clean up, and pre-concentration of n-nitrosamines in the cream type samples so its optimal conditions were investigated. Identification and quantification of n-nitrosamines using single quadrupole gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in chemical ionization (CI) mode were carried out with accurate mass measurements. Their accurate masses of protonated molecular ions were obtained within 10 mDa of the theoretical masses when sufficiently high signal was acquired from the unique calibration method using mass and isotope accuracy. For the method validation of quantification, spiking experiments were carried out to determine the linearity, recovery, and method detection limit (MDL) using three deuterated internal standards. The average recovery was 79% within 20% relative standard deviation (RSD) at the concentration of 50 ng/g. MDLs ranged from 0.46 ng/g to 36.54 ng/g, which was satisfactory for the directive limit of 50 ng/g proposed by the European Commission (EC). As a result, it was concluded that the method could be provided for the accurate mass screening, confirmation, and quantification of n-nitrosamines when applied to cosmetic inspection.

  12. The determination of area and time comparison of the partial solar eclipse at space science center, LAPAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filawati, S.; Gammamerdianti; Hidayat, E. E.; Suryana, Y.; Kesumaningrum, R.

    2016-11-01

    The observation of the partial solar eclipse in Bandung on March, 9th 2016 was done to measure the surface coverage area and to compare to NASA calculation. We have calculated solar disk coverage area based on image data at the maximum contact until final contact of the eclipse. We obtained that maximum eclipse was at 7:21 a.m. (UT+7) with 84.81% area of solar disk covered by Moon and the end of eclipse was at 8:31 a.m. (UT+7).

  13. Partial-Discharge Tests of Multiwinding High-Voltage Transformers for Space TWTAs (Traveling-Wave Tube Amplifiers).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-23

    6420 5697 26898 0 0 10:18:30 1.06 4420 18019 11092 0 0 10:20:07 1.06 3420 14879 1115 0 0 10:21:4 1.06 2700 5674 0 0 0 10:23:21 1.08 2300 5739 1264 0 0...for Detection and Measurement of Discharge (Corona) Pulses in Evaluation of Insulation Systems," ASTM D1868-73. 5. R. J. Densley, "Partial Discharge...under Direct-Voltage Conditions," Ch. 11 in Engineering Dielectrics, Vol. 1: Corona Measurement and Interpretation, ASTM 669, eds. R. Bartnikas and E. J

  14. [The cascade scheme as a methodical platform for analysis of health risks in space flight and partially and fully analog conditions].

    PubMed

    Ushakov, I B; Poliakov, A V; Usov, V M

    2011-01-01

    Space anthropoecology, a subsection of human ecology, studies various aspects of physiological, psychological, social and professional adaptation to the extreme environment of space flight and human life and work in partially- and fully analogous conditions on Earth. Both SF and simulated extreme conditions are known for high human safety standards and a substantial analytic base that secures on-line analysis of torrent of information. Management evaluation and response to germing undesired developments aimed to curb their impact on the functioning of the crew-vehicle-environment system and human health involve the complete wealth of knowledge about risks to human health and performance. Spacecrew safety issues are tackled by experts of many specialties which emphasizes the importance of integral methodical approaches to risk estimation and mitigation, setting up barriers to adverse trends in human physiology and psychology in challenging conditions, and minimization of delayed effects on professional longevity and disorders in behavioral reactions.

  15. A Bayesian approach for inferring the dynamics of partially observed endemic infectious diseases from space-time-genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Mollentze, Nardus; Nel, Louis H.; Townsend, Sunny; le Roux, Kevin; Hampson, Katie; Haydon, Daniel T.; Soubeyrand, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a statistical framework for reconstructing the sequence of transmission events between observed cases of an endemic infectious disease using genetic, temporal and spatial information. Previous approaches to reconstructing transmission trees have assumed all infections in the study area originated from a single introduction and that a large fraction of cases were observed. There are as yet no approaches appropriate for endemic situations in which a disease is already well established in a host population and in which there may be multiple origins of infection, or that can enumerate unobserved infections missing from the sample. Our proposed framework addresses these shortcomings, enabling reconstruction of partially observed transmission trees and estimating the number of cases missing from the sample. Analyses of simulated datasets show the method to be accurate in identifying direct transmissions, while introductions and transmissions via one or more unsampled intermediate cases could be identified at high to moderate levels of case detection. When applied to partial genome sequences of rabies virus sampled from an endemic region of South Africa, our method reveals several distinct transmission cycles with little contact between them, and direct transmission over long distances suggesting significant anthropogenic influence in the movement of infected dogs. PMID:24619442

  16. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Kolomiets, M. D.; Mesyats, G. A.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-14

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  17. Magnetically insulated coaxial vacuum diode with partial space-charge-limited explosive emission from edge-type cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belomyttsev, S. Ya.; Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Shunailov, S. A.; Kolomiets, M. D.; Mesyats, G. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-01-01

    The vacuum current associated with any type of electron emission for arbitrary configuration of the diode depends on the combination of the applied electric field and vacuum space charge (VSC) field created by the current. Such fundamental statement should give very close links between the diode current and the normalized cathode field θ which has been introduced by Forbes in 2008 for planar diodes as a reduction in the cathode surface field: θ = field-with/field-without VSC. This article reports the universal approximation of the type of cos(πθ/2) that is the ratio of the actual current and the fully space-charge-limited current. Also, the theoretical treatment and the experimental method of determination of the dynamic emissive characteristics of the macroscopic explosive emission from edge-type cathodes in the coaxial diode are developed. The experimental results obtained with a picosecond time reference between the cathode voltage and the onset of the high-current electron beam exhibit a good coincidence with the theoretical predictions. The presented methods enable the analysis of a real-time-resolved dynamics associated with the dense, magnetized electron beam formation, acceleration and drift motion, including kinematic effects and the phase-stable excitation of high-power microwave oscillators.

  18. Time and space resolved measurement of the electron temperature, mass density and ionization state in the ablation plasma between two exploding Al wires

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Hansen, S. B.

    2012-05-15

    We have determined the properties of plasma around and between two exploding wires using high-resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plasma densities and temperatures ranging from Greater-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 0.1g/cm{sup 3} and a few eV to less than 0.01 g/cm{sup 3} and 30 eV have been measured in experiments at Cornell University with two 40 {mu}m aluminum (Al) wires spaced 1 mm apart driven by {approx}150 kA peak current pulses with 100 ns rise time. The wire plasma was backlit by the 1.4-1.6 keV continuum radiation produced by a Mo wire X-pinch. The spectrometer employed two spherically bent quartz crystals to record the absorption and backlighter spectra simultaneously. The transition between the dense Al wire core and the coronal plasma is seen as a transition from cold K-edge absorption to Mg-, Na-, and finally Ne-like absorption at the boundary. In the plasma that accumulates between the wires, ionization states up to C-Like Al are observed. The spectrometer geometry and {approx}2{mu}m X-pinch source size provide 0.3 eV spectral resolution and 20 {mu}m spatial resolution enabling us to see 1s{yields} 2p satellite transitions as separate lines as well as O-, F-, and Ne-like 1s{yields} 3p transitions that have not been seen before. A step wedge was used to calibrate the transmission, enabling density to be measured within a factor of two and temperature to be measured within {+-}25%. A genetic algorithm was developed to fit synthetic spectra calculated using the collisional-radiative code SCRAM to the experimental spectra. In order to obtain agreement it was necessary to assume multiple plasma regions with variable thicknesses, thereby allowing the inferred plasma conditions to vary along the absorption path.

  19. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  20. The partial space qualification of a vertically aligned carbon nanotube coating on aluminium substrates for EO applications.

    PubMed

    Theocharous, Evangelos; Chunnilall, Christopher J; Mole, Ryan; Gibbs, David; Fox, Nigel; Shang, Naigui; Howlett, Guy; Jensen, Ben; Taylor, Rosie; Reveles, Juan R; Harris, Oliver B; Ahmed, Naseer

    2014-03-24

    The fabrication of NanoTube Black, a Vertically Aligned carbon NanoTube Array (VANTA) on aluminium substrates is reported for the first time. The coating on aluminium was realised using a process that employs top down thermal radiation to assist growth, enabling deposition at temperatures below the substrate's melting point. The NanoTube Black coatings were shown to exhibit directional hemispherical reflectance values of typically less than 1% across wavelengths in the 2.5 µm to 15 µm range. VANTA-coated aluminium substrates were subjected to space qualification testing (mass loss, outgassing, shock, vibration and temperature cycling) before their optical properties were re-assessed. Within measurement uncertainty, no changes to hemispherical reflectance were detected, confirming that NanoTube Black coatings on aluminium are good candidates for Earth Observation (EO) applications.

  1. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  2. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  3. Effects of source spatial partial coherence on temporal fade statistics of irradiance flux in free-space optical links through atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunyi; Yang, Huamin; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Weizhi; Kavehrad, Mohsen; Tong, Shoufeng; Wang, Tianshu

    2013-12-02

    The temporal covariance function of irradiance-flux fluctua-tions for Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence is theoretically formulated by making use of the method of effective beam parameters. Based on this formulation, new expressions for the root-mean-square (RMS) bandwidth of the irradiance-flux temporal spectrum due to GSM beams passing through atmospheric turbulence are derived. With the help of these expressions, the temporal fade statistics of the irradiance flux in free-space optical (FSO) communication systems, using spatially partially coherent sources, impaired by atmospheric turbulence are further calculated. Results show that with a given receiver aperture size, the use of a spatially partially coherent source can reduce both the fractional fade time and average fade duration of the received light signal; however, when atmospheric turbulence grows strong, the reduction in the fractional fade time becomes insignificant for both large and small receiver apertures and in the average fade duration turns inconsiderable for small receiver apertures. It is also illustrated that if the receiver aperture size is fixed, changing the transverse correlation length of the source from a larger value to a smaller one can reduce the average fade frequency of the received light signal only when a threshold parameter in decibels greater than the critical threshold level is specified.

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging using radial k-space sampling and self-calibrated partial parallel reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingsi; Lai, Peng; Huang, Feng; Li, Yu; Li, Debiao

    2010-05-01

    Radial sampling has been demonstrated to be potentially useful in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging because it is less susceptible to motion than Cartesian sampling. Nevertheless, its capability of imaging acceleration remains limited by undersampling-induced streaking artifacts. In this study, a self-calibrated reconstruction method was developed to suppress streaking artifacts for highly accelerated parallel radial acquisitions in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) radial k-space data were collected from a phantom and healthy volunteers. Images reconstructed using the proposed method and the conventional regridding method were compared based on statistical analysis on a four-point scale imaging scoring. It was demonstrated that the proposed method can effectively remove undersampling streaking artifacts and significantly improve image quality (P<.05). With the use of the proposed method, image score (1-4, 1=poor, 2=good, 3=very good, 4=excellent) was improved from 2.14 to 3.34 with the use of an undersampling factor of 4 and from 1.09 to 2.5 with the use of an undersampling factor of 8. Our study demonstrates that the proposed reconstruction method is effective for highly accelerated cardiac imaging applications using parallel radial acquisitions without calibration data.

  5. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  6. Partially coherent nonparaxial beams.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kailiang; Lü, Baida

    2004-04-15

    The concept of a partially coherent nonparaxial beam is proposed. A closed-form expression for the propagation of nonparaxial Gaussian Schell model (GSM) beams in free space is derived and applied to study the propagation properties of nonparaxial GSM beams. It is shown that for partially coherent nonparaxial beams a new parameter f(sigma) has to be introduced, which together with the parameter f, determines the beam nonparaxiality.

  7. Low-Pressure, Field-Ionizing Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank; Smith, Steven

    2009-01-01

    A small mass spectrometer utilizing a miniature field ionization source is now undergoing development. It is designed for use in a variety of applications in which there are requirements for a lightweight, low-power-consumption instrument that can analyze the masses of a wide variety of molecules and ions. The device can operate without need for a high-vacuum, carrier-gas feed radioactive ionizing source, or thermal ionizer. This mass spectrometer can operate either in the natural vacuum of outer space or on Earth at any ambient pressure below 50 torr (below about 6.7 kPa) - a partial vacuum that can easily be reached by use of a small sampling pump. This mass spectrometer also has a large dynamic range - from singly charged small gas ions to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragments larger than 104 atomic mass units - with sensitivity adequate for detecting some molecules and ions at relative abundances of less than one part per billion. This instrument (see figure) includes a field ionizer integrated with a rotating-field mass spectrometer (RFMS). The field ionizer effects ionization of a type characterized as "soft" in the art because it does not fragment molecules or initiate avalanche arcing. What makes the "soft" ionization mode possible is that the distance between the ionizing electrodes is less than mean free path for ions at the maximum anticipated operating pressure, so that the ionizer always operates on the non-breakdown side of the applicable Paschen curve (a standard plot of breakdown potential on the ordinate and pressure electrode separation on the abscissa). The field ionizer in this instrument is fabricated by micromachining a submicron-thick membrane out of an electrically nonconductive substrate, coating the membrane on both sides to form electrodes, then micromachining small holes through the electrodes and membrane. Because of the submicron electrode separation, even a potential of only 1 V applied between the electrodes gives rise to an electric

  8. Search of truncation of (N-1) electron basis containing full connected triple excitations in computing main and satellite ionization potentials via Fock-space coupled cluster approach.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Kalipada; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; De, Barin Kumar; Sharma, Amitava; Nath, Ranendu Kumar; Sinha, Dhiman

    2013-06-05

    A valence-universal multireference coupled cluster (VUMRCC) theory, realized via the eigenvalue independent partitioning (EIP) route, has been implemented with full inclusion of triples excitations for computing and analyzing the entire main and several satellite peaks in the ionization potential spectra of several molecules. The EIP-VUMRCC method, unlike the traditional VUMRCC theory, allows divergence-free homing-in to satellite roots which would otherwise have been plagued by intruders, and is thus numerically more robust to obtain more efficient and dependable computational schemes allowing more extensive use of the approach. The computed ionization potentials (IPs) as a result of truncation of the (N-1) electron basis manifold involving virtual functions such as 2h-p and 3h-2p by different energy thresholds varying from 5 to 15 a.u. with 1 a.u. intervals as well as thresholds such as 20, 25, and 30 a.u. have been carefully looked into. Cutoff at around 25 a.u. turns out to be an optimal threshold. Molecules such as C2H4 and C2H2 (X = D,T), and N2 and CO (X = D,T,Q) with Dunning's cc-pVXZ bases have been investigated to determine all main and 2h-p shake-up and 3h-2p double shake-up satellite IPs. We believe that the present work will pave the way to a wider application of the method by providing main and satellite IPs for some problematic N-electron closed shell systems.

  9. Space colonization - Some physiological perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, L. H.

    1978-01-01

    Physiological criteria determining the design of the habitat for a space colony with 10,000 people are discussed. Centrifugally generated earth-normal gravity, maximum ionizing radiation dose standards less than or equal to 0.5 rem/year (obtained with passive shielding), and an atmosphere with reduced nitrogen partial pressures were established as design requirements for the habitat. However, further research is needed to determine whether humans experience complete adaptation to weightlessness and whether there are long-term effects of breathing various atmospheric mixtures and pressures.

  10. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    PubMed

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated.

  11. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  12. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  13. Sub-cycle dynamics of multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    Sub-cycle oscillatory structures are revealed in calculated time-dependent multiphoton ionization rates. Both atomic and molecular targets manifest multiple ionization bursts per one optical cycle of the laser field. Using the accurate and efficient time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have performed calculations on H, He+, H2+,and HHe2+, for the laser fields with several intensities and wavelengths in the near-infrared range (750 nm to 1064 nm). The sub-cycle structures appear a universal feature of multiphoton ionization and become well pronounced for sufficiently strong laser fields depending on the target atom or molecule. Analysis of the electron density distributions on the sub-femtosecond time scale shows several time moments per optical cycle (not necessarily corresponding to the peak values of the laser field) when significant portions of the electron density move away from the nucleus giving rise to the bursts in the ionization rate. The nature of the phenomenon can be related to ionization through different pathways, including direct ionization as well as population of the excited states by the laser field with subsequent ionization at later times. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  14. Partial Return Yoke for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Witte H.; Plate, S

    2013-05-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a large scale experiment which is presently assembled at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in Didcot, UK. The purpose of MICE is to demonstrate the concept of ionization cooling experimentally. Ionization cooling is an important accelerator concept which will be essential for future HEP experiments such as a potential Muon Collider or a Neutrino Factory. The MICE experiment will house up to 18 superconducting solenoids, all of which produce a substantial amount of magnetic flux. Recently it was realized that this magnetic flux leads to a considerable stray magnetic field in the MICE hall. This is a concern as technical equipment in the MICE hall may may be compromised by this. In July 2012 a concept called partial return yoke was presented to the MICE community, which reduces the stray field in the MICE hall to a safe level. This report summarizes the general concept, engineering considerations and the expected shielding performance.

  15. Exit point in the strong field ionization process

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, I. A.; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the process of strong field ionization using the Bohmian approach. This allows retention of the concept of electron trajectories. We consider the tunnelling regime of ionization. We show that, in this regime, the coordinate distribution for the ionized electron has peaks near the points in space that can be interpreted as exit points. The interval of time during which ionization occurs is marked by a quick broadening of the coordinate distribution. The concept of the exit point in the tunneling regime, which has long been assumed for the description of strong field ionization, is justified by our analysis. PMID:28057938

  16. Exit point in the strong field ionization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, I. A.; Nam, Chang Hee; Kim, Kyung Taec

    2017-01-01

    We analyze the process of strong field ionization using the Bohmian approach. This allows retention of the concept of electron trajectories. We consider the tunnelling regime of ionization. We show that, in this regime, the coordinate distribution for the ionized electron has peaks near the points in space that can be interpreted as exit points. The interval of time during which ionization occurs is marked by a quick broadening of the coordinate distribution. The concept of the exit point in the tunneling regime, which has long been assumed for the description of strong field ionization, is justified by our analysis.

  17. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  18. [Influence of chronic exposure to low doses of space ionizing radiation on the character of formation of microbial assemblage in the habitat of orbital station].

    PubMed

    Tsetlin, V V; Deshevaia, E A

    2003-01-01

    Statistically valid relations between radiation conditions in compartments of MIR station and the micromicete population (CFU number) on the surface of the equipment and the interior have been established. It was found that in conditions of a chronic exposure to space radiation the number of CFU increased in one thousand and more times with increasing of absorbed dose rate from 200 up to 1000 microGy/day. The results of land-based model experiments confirmed morphological changes in the "flight" strains of funguses under exposure to low doses of gamma (100-800 microGy/day) and neutron (0.2-2 neutron/cm2.s) radiation. It was found that the morphological changes in the control (museum) cultures of funguses of the same species, which were expressed in the weak increase of vegetative mycelium, were detected only after repeated gamma- and gamma + neutron irradiation.

  19. Electron-impact ionization of ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newson, Karl A.; Luc, Stephanie M.; Price, Stephen D.; Mason, Nigel J.

    1995-10-01

    Partial electron ionization cross-sections of ozone for incident electron energies from 40 to 500 eV have been determined using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The cross-sections are derived by identifying the contribution of ozone to the ion signals recorded following ionization of a mixture of O2 and O3. Only one previous determination of these cross-sections, for energies up to 100 eV, is available in the literature. The cross-sections derived in the present study at these lower electron energies are in good agreement with the previous determination.

  20. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  3. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  4. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  5. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  6. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  7. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  8. MUON COLLIDERS - IONIZATION COOLING AND SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    1999-03-29

    For a muon collider, to obtain the needed luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. Alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed for muon colliders, where the emittance are huge. We present an overview, discuss formalism, transfer maps for solenoid magnets and beam dynamics.

  9. Quantification of selected volatile organic compounds in human urine by gas chromatography selective reagent ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-SRI-TOF-MS) coupled with head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME).

    PubMed

    Mochalski, Paweł; Unterkofler, Karl

    2016-08-07

    Selective reagent ionization time of flight mass spectrometry with NO(+) as the reagent ion (SRI-TOF-MS(NO(+))) in conjunction with gas chromatography (GC) and head-space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used to determine selected volatile organic compounds in human urine. A total of 16 volatiles exhibiting high incidence rates were quantified in the urine of 19 healthy volunteers. Amongst them there were ten ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 3-methyl-2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 2-heptanone, and 4-heptanone), three volatile sulphur compounds (dimethyl sulfide, allyl methyl sulfide, and methyl propyl sulfide), and three heterocyclic compounds (furan, 2-methylfuran, 3-methylfuran). The concentrations of the species under study varied between 0.55 nmol L(-1) (0.05 nmol mmol(-1)creatinine) for allyl methyl sulfide and 11.6 μmol L(-1) (1.54 μmol mmol(-1)creatinine) for acetone considering medians. Limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.08 nmol L(-1) for allyl methyl sulfide to 1.0 nmol L(-1) for acetone and furan (with RSDs ranging from 5 to 9%). The presented experimental setup assists both real-time and GC analyses of volatile organic compounds, which can be performed consecutively using the same analytical system. Such an approach supports the novel concept of hybrid volatolomics, an approach which combines VOC profiles obtained from two or more body fluids to improve and complement the chemical information on the physiological status of an individual.

  10. Antioxidant Approaches to Management of Ionizing Irradiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Greenberger, Joel; Kagan, Valerian; Bayir, Hulya; Wipf, Peter; Epperly, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing irradiation induces acute and chronic injury to tissues and organs. Applications of antioxidant therapies for the management of ionizing irradiation injury fall into three categories: (1) radiation counter measures against total or partial body irradiation; (2) normal tissue protection against acute organ specific ionizing irradiation injury; and (3) prevention of chronic/late radiation tissue and organ injury. The development of antioxidant therapies to ameliorate ionizing irradiation injury began with initial studies on gene therapy using Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (MnSOD) transgene approaches and evolved into applications of small molecule radiation protectors and mitigators. The understanding of the multiple steps in ionizing radiation-induced cellular, tissue, and organ injury, as well as total body effects is required to optimize the use of antioxidant therapies, and to sequence such approaches with targeted therapies for the multiple steps in the irradiation damage response. PMID:26785339

  11. Concerning the equation of state for partially ionized system

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Jr, George A

    2008-01-01

    I will discuss the expansion of various thermodynamic quantities about the ideal gas in powers of the electric charge, and I will discuss some cellular models. The first type of cellular model is appropriate for hydrogen. The second type is for Z > 1. It has the independent electron approximation within the atoms. These models are cross compared and minimal regions of validity are determined. The actual region of validity is expected to be larger. In the cellular models, the phase boundaries for liquid-gas transitions are found. For the second type of cellular model, in the part of the low-temperature, low-density region where there is not much expectation of validity of these methods, a non-thermodynamic region is found. I have devised a construction, similar in spirit to the Maxwell construction, to bridge this region so as to leave a thermodynamically valid equation of state. The non-thermodynamic region does not occur in hydrogen and it seems to be due to the inadequacy of the aforementioned approximation in that region.

  12. Mechanism of branching in negative ionization fronts.

    PubMed

    Arrayás, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, José L

    2005-10-14

    When a strong electric field is applied to nonconducting matter, narrow channels of plasma called streamers may form. Branchlike patterns of streamers have been observed in anode directed discharges. We explain a mechanism for branching as the result of a balance between the destabilizing effect of impact ionization and the stabilizing effect of electron diffusion on ionization fronts. The dispersion relation for transversal perturbation of a planar negative front is obtained analytically when the ratio D between the electron diffusion coefficient and the intensity of the externally imposed electric field is small. We estimate the spacing lambda between streamers and deduce a scaling law lambda approximately D(1/3).

  13. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  14. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  15. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  16. Ionization of water molecules by fast charged projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Carniato, S.; Fainstein, P. D.; Hansen, J. P.

    2011-07-15

    Single-ionization cross sections of water molecules colliding with fast protons are calculated from lowest-order perturbation theory by taking all electrons and molecular orientations consistently into account. Explicit analytical formulas based on the peaking approximation are obtained for differential ionization cross sections with the partial contribution from the various electron orbitals accounted for. The results, which are in very good agreement with total and partial cross sections at high electron and projectile energies, display a strong variation on molecular orientation and molecular orbitals.

  17. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  18. Partial Return Yoke for MICE Step IV and Final Step

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, Holger; Plate, Stephen; Berg, J.Scott; Tarrant, Jason; Bross, Alan

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  19. Guided ionization waves: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Naidis, G. V.; Laroussi, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2014-07-01

    This review focuses on one of the fundamental phenomena that occur upon application of sufficiently strong electric fields to gases, namely the formation and propagation of ionization waves-streamers. The dynamics of streamers is controlled by strongly nonlinear coupling, in localized streamer tip regions, between enhanced (due to charge separation) electric field and ionization and transport of charged species in the enhanced field. Streamers appear in nature (as initial stages of sparks and lightning, as huge structures-sprites above thunderclouds), and are also found in numerous technological applications of electrical discharges. Here we discuss the fundamental physics of the guided streamer-like structures-plasma bullets which are produced in cold atmospheric-pressure plasma jets. Plasma bullets are guided ionization waves moving in a thin column of a jet of plasma forming gases (e.g., He or Ar) expanding into ambient air. In contrast to streamers in a free (unbounded) space that propagate in a stochastic manner and often branch, guided ionization waves are repetitive and highly-reproducible and propagate along the same path-the jet axis. This property of guided streamers, in comparison with streamers in a free space, enables many advanced time-resolved experimental studies of ionization waves with nanosecond precision. In particular, experimental studies on manipulation of streamers by external electric fields and streamer interactions are critically examined. This review also introduces the basic theories and recent advances on the experimental and computational studies of guided streamers, in particular related to the propagation dynamics of ionization waves and the various parameters of relevance to plasma streamers. This knowledge is very useful to optimize the efficacy of applications of plasma streamer discharges in various fields ranging from health care and medicine to materials science and nanotechnology.

  20. Fossil Ionized Bubbles around Dead Quasars during Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Steven R.; Haiman, Zoltán; Oh, S. Peng

    2008-10-01

    One of the most dramatic signatures of the reionization era may be the enormous ionized bubbles around luminous quasars (with radii reaching ~40 comoving Mpc), which may survive as "fossil" ionized regions long after their source shuts off. Here we study how the inhomogeneous intergalactic medium (IGM) evolves inside such fossils. The average recombination rate declines rapidly with time, and the brief quasar episode significantly increases the mean free path inside the fossil bubbles. As a result, even a weak ionizing background generated by galaxies inside the fossil can maintain it in a relatively highly and uniformly ionized state. For example, galaxies that would ionize 20%-30% of hydrogen in a random patch of the IGM can maintain 80%-90% ionization inside the fossil for a duration much longer than the average recombination time in the IGM. Quasar fossils at zlesssim 10 thus retain their identity for nearly a Hubble time and appear "gray," distinct from both the average IGM (which has a "Swiss cheese" ionization topology and a lower mean ionized fraction) and the fully ionized bubbles around active quasars. More distant fossils, at zgtrsim 10, have a weaker galaxy-generated ionizing background and a higher gas density, so they can attain a Swiss cheese topology similar to the rest of the IGM, but with a smaller contrast between the ionized bubbles and the partially neutral regions separating them. Analogous He III fossils should exist around the epoch of He II/He III reionization at z ~ 3, although rapid recombination inside the He III fossils is more common. Our model of inhomogeneous recombination also applies to "double-reionization" models and shows that a nonmonotonic reionization history is even more unlikely than previously thought.

  1. Dissociative Ionization of Benzene by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred; Dateo, Christopher; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We report a theoretical study of the dissociative ionization (DI) of benzene from the low-lying ionization channels. Our approach makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and DI is treated as a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in an ion with the same nuclear geometry as the neutral molecule. In the second step the nuclei relax from the initial geometry and undergo unimolecular dissociation. For the ionization process we use the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. For the unimolecular dissociation step, we study the steepest descent reaction path to the minimum of the ion potential energy surface. The path is used to analyze the probability of unimolecular dissociation and to determine the product distributions. Our analysis of the dissociation products and the thresholds of the productions are compared with the result dissociative photoionization measurements of Feng et al. The partial oscillator strengths from Feng et al. are then used in the iBED cross section calculations.

  2. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  3. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  4. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology.

  5. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  6. Ionizing radiation from tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, J.B.

    1987-04-24

    Accidents at nuclear power facilities seem inevitably to bring in their wake a great deal of concern on the part of both the lay and medical communities. Relatively little attention, however, is given to what may be the largest single worldwide source of effectively carcinogenic ionizing radiation: tobacco. The risk of cancer deaths from the Chernobyl disaster are tobacco smoke is discussed.

  7. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  8. Ion Compensation for Space Charge in the Helical Electron Beams of Gyrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuilov, V. N.; Semenov, V. E.

    2016-06-01

    We solve analytically the problem about ion compensation for the space charge of a helical electron beam in a gyrotron operated in the long-pulse regime. Elementary processes, which take place during ionization of residual gas in the tube under typical pressures of 10-6-10-7 mm Hg, are considered. It is shown that distribution of the space charge is affected mainly by the electrons of the initial beam and slow-moving ions produced by ionization of the residual gas. Steady-state density of ions in the operating space of the gyrotron after the end of the transitional processes is found, as well as the electron density profile in the channel of electron beam transportation. The results obtained allow us to evaluate the pitch-factor variations caused by partial compensations for the potential "sagging" in the gyrotron cavity, thus being useful for analysis of starting currents, efficiency, and mode competition in high-power gyrotrons.

  9. Electron Impact Ionization Cross Sections and Rate Coefficients for Single Carbon Freon Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Satyendra; Kumar, Neeraj

    2015-09-01

    Single carbon Freon molecules or chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) are important industrial material with wide-ranging applications as refrigerant, aerosol propellant and semiconductor etchant, etc. The large-scale industrial consumption is of particular environmental concern because of its potential for ozone destruction in the stratosphere. In the present work, we have extended and generalized the modified Jain-Khare (JK) semi-empirical formalism for the evaluation of the total ionization cross sections corresponding to the formation of the cations in the electron impact ionization of molecules to the electron impact ionization of single carbon freon molecules, viz. CFCl3, CF2Cl2 and CF3Cl. The integral partial and the total ionization cross sections as function of incident electron energy are evaluated in the energy range varying from ionization threshold to 1000 eV. In absence of available differential cross sections, the corresponding derived partial and total ionization cross sections revealed a reasonably good agreement with the experimental and theoretical data, wherever available. In addition to the differential and integral ionization cross sections, we have also calculated the ionization rate coefficients using the evaluated partial ionization cross sections and the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution as a function of electron temperature/energy. The work is supported by DST, New Delhi, India.

  10. Partial Synchronization of Interconnected Boolean Networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongwei; Liang, Jinling; Lu, Jianquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the partial synchronization problem for the interconnected Boolean networks (BNs) via the semi-tensor product (STP) of matrices. First, based on an algebraic state space representation of BNs, a necessary and sufficient criterion is presented to ensure the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs. Second, by defining an induced digraph of the partial synchronized states set, an equivalent graphical description for the partial synchronization of the interconnected BNs is established. Consequently, the second partial synchronization criterion is derived in terms of adjacency matrix of the induced digraph. Finally, two examples (including an epigenetic model) are provided to illustrate the efficiency of the obtained results.

  11. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  12. Rydberg atom spectroscopy enabled by blackbody radiation ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Xiaoxu; Sun Yuan; Metcalf, Harold

    2011-09-15

    We have excited helium atoms from their metastable 2 {sup 3} S state to Rydberg states in the range 13partially overlapping laser beams of the appropriate frequencies in the counterintuitive order to exploit the high efficiency of stimulated rapid adiabatic passage. The interaction region is between two plates that can be used for Stark tuning in a few V/cm field or for field ionization. At fields much too low for field ionization, we observe signals attributed to ionization by blackbody radiation. Multiple tests confirm this attribution as the cause of ionization. For example, by heating the plates we observe the expected signal increases. Our experiments reinforce previous work where the interaction between Rydberg atoms and room temperature blackbody radiation is important for experiments.

  13. The MICE Demonstration of Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, J.; Blackmore, V.; Hunt, C.; Lagrange, J-B.; Long, K.; Collomb, N.; Snopok, P.

    2015-05-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions at energies of up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling, the technique by which it is proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization cooling channel, the muon beam passes through a material (the absorber) in which it loses energy. The energy lost is then replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect of energy loss and re-acceleration is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). A major revision of the scope of the project was carried out over the summer of 2014. The revised project plan, which has received the formal endorsement of the international MICE Project Board and the international MICE Funding Agency Committee, will deliver a demonstration of ionization cooling by September 2017. In the revised configuration a central lithium-hydride absorber provides the cooling effect. The magnetic lattice is provided by the two superconducting focus coils and acceleration is provided by two 201 MHz single-cavity modules. The phase space of the muons entering and leaving the cooling cell will be measured by two solenoidal spectrometers. All the superconducting magnets for the ionization cooling demonstration are available at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the first single-cavity prototype is under test in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The design of the cooling demonstration experiment will be described together with a summary of the performance of each of its components. The cooling performance of the revised configuration will also be presented.

  14. Integrated atom detector based on field ionization near carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruener, B.; Jag, M.; Stibor, A.; Visanescu, G.; Haeffner, M.; Kern, D.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate an atom detector based on field ionization and subsequent ion counting. We make use of field enhancement near tips of carbon nanotubes to reach extreme electrostatic field values of up to 9x10{sup 9} V/m, which ionize ground-state rubidium atoms. The detector is based on a carpet of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a substrate and used for field ionization, and a channel electron multiplier used for ion counting. We measure the field enhancement at the tips of carbon nanotubes by field emission of electrons. We demonstrate the operation of the field ionization detector by counting atoms from a thermal beam of a rubidium dispenser source. By measuring the ionization rate of rubidium as a function of the applied detector voltage we identify the field ionization distance, which is below a few tens of nanometers in front of nanotube tips. We deduce from the experimental data that field ionization of rubidium near nanotube tips takes place on a time scale faster than 10{sup -10} s. This property is particularly interesting for the development of fast atom detectors suitable for measuring correlations in ultracold quantum gases. We also describe an application of the detector as partial pressure gauge.

  15. Partial synchronization and partial amplitude death in mesoscale network motifs.

    PubMed

    Poel, Winnie; Zakharova, Anna; Schöll, Eckehard

    2015-02-01

    We study the interplay between network topology and complex space-time patterns and introduce a concept to analytically predict complex patterns in networks of Stuart-Landau oscillators with linear symmetric and instantaneous coupling based solely on the network topology. These patterns consist of partial amplitude death and partial synchronization and are found to exist in large variety for all undirected networks of up to 5 nodes. The underlying concept is proved to be robust with respect to frequency mismatch and can also be extended to larger networks. In addition it directly links the stability of complete in-phase synchronization to only a small subset of topological eigenvalues of a network.

  16. The MICE Demonstration of Muon Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste; Hunt, Christopher; Palladino, Vittorio; Pasternak, Jaroslaw

    2016-06-01

    Muon beams of low emittance provide the basis for the intense, well-characterised neutrino beams necessary to elucidate the physics of flavour at the Neutrino Factory and to provide lepton-antilepton collisions up to several TeV at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate muon ionization cooling, the technique proposed to reduce the phase-space volume occupied by the muon beam at such facilities. In an ionization-cooling channel, the muon beam traverses a material (the absorber) loosing energy, which is replaced using RF cavities. The combined effect is to reduce the transverse emittance of the beam (transverse cooling). The configuration of MICE required to deliver the demonstration of ionization cooling is being prepared in parallel to the execution of a programme designed to measure the cooling properties of liquid-hydrogen and lithium hydride. The design of the cooling-demonstration experiment will be presented together with a summary of the performance of each of its components and the cooling performance of the experiment.

  17. Is Titan Partially Differentiated?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitri, G.; Pappalardo, R. T.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The recent measurement of the gravity coefficients from the Radio Doppler data of the Cassini spacecraft has improved our knowledge of the interior structure of Titan (Rappaport et al. 2008 AGU, P21A-1343). The measured gravity field of Titan is dominated by near hydrostatic quadrupole components. We have used the measured gravitational coefficients, thermal models and the hydrostatic equilibrium theory to derive Titan's interior structure. The axial moment of inertia gives us an indication of the degree of the interior differentiation. The inferred axial moment of inertia, calculated using the quadrupole gravitational coefficients and the Radau-Darwin approximation, indicates that Titan is partially differentiated. If Titan is partially differentiated then the interior must avoid melting of the ice during its evolution. This suggests a relatively late formation of Titan to avoid the presence of short-lived radioisotopes (Al-26). This also suggests the onset of convection after accretion to efficiently remove the heat from the interior. The outer layer is likely composed mainly of water in solid phase. Thermal modeling indicates that water could be present also in liquid phase forming a subsurface ocean between an outer ice I shell and a high pressure ice layer. Acknowledgments: This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  19. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  20. On the Magnetic Flux Conservation in the Partially Ionzied Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsap, Yu.; Kopylova, Yu.

    2014-12-01

    The Ohm, Hall, and ambipolar diffusions in the partially ionized plasma are considered. It has been shown that the statement of Pandey and Wardle that only the Ohm diffusion is capable to decrease the magnetic flux is not sufficiently correct due to the formal dependence of the magnetic diffusion on a selected frame of reference. Thes ignificance of understanding of the physical nature for the dissipation and diffusion of the magnetic field in the partially ionized plasma as well as consequences of obtained results are discussed.

  1. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q F; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-02-08

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas.

  2. First-Principles Investigation to Ionization of Argon Under Conditions Close to Typical Sonoluminescence Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wei; Zhao, Shijun; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Q. F.; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    Mott effect, featured by a sharp increase of ionization, is one of the unique properties of partially ionized plasmas, and thus of great interest to astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion. Recent experiments of single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) revealed that strong ionization took place at a density two orders lower than usual theoretical expectation. We show from the perspective of electronic structures that the strong ionization is unlikely the result of Mott effect in a pure argon plasma. Instead, first-principles calculations suggest that other ion species from aqueous environments can energetically fit in the gap between the continuum and the top of occupied states of argon, making the Mott effect possible. These results would help to clarify the relationship between SBSL and Mott effect, and further to gain an better understanding of partially ionized plasmas. PMID:26853107

  3. Electron Impact Ionization of C_2F_6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iga, Ione; Pereira Sanches, Ivana; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2001-10-01

    Besides CF_4, perfluoroethane, C_2F_6, is also one of the fluorocarbon compounds most frequently used in plasma processing applications. Consequently, the knowledge of the ionization properties of C_2F6 is clearly of interest in order to model the plasma-chemical reactions. Nevertheless, only few partial ionization-cross-section measurements [1,2] for this molecule were reported in the literature. Also, the energy range covered in these studies was very limited (below 120 eV). Recently, we have studied these properties. More specifically, partial ionization cross sections (PICS) for the fragments: C^+, F^+, CF^+, CF_2^+, CF_3^+ and C_2F_5^+, produced by electron impact on C_2F_6, were measured in a single-collision condition from near ionization threshold to 1000 eV. In addition, total ionization cross sections (TICS) are also obtained by summing up the PICS's. The comparison of our measured PICS and derived TICS with available data [1-4] will be presented during the Conference. [1] H. U. Poll, J. Meischner, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 27 (1987) 359. [2] C. Q. Jiao, A Garscadden, P. D. Haaland, Chem. Phys. Lett. 310 (1999) 52. [3] H. Nishimura, W. M. Huo, M. A Ali and Y -K. Kim, J. Chem. Phys. 110 (1999) 3811. [4] L. G. Christophorou and J. K. Olthoff, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 27 (1998) 1 and references therein.

  4. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  5. Progress report on the Heavy Ions in Space (HIIS) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Beahm, Lorraine P.; Boberg, Paul R.; Tylka, Allan J.

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of the Heavy Ions In Space (HIIS) experiment is to investigate heavy ions which appear at Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) below the geomagnetic cutoff for fully-ionized galactic cosmic rays. Possible sources of such 'below-cutoff' particles are partially-ionized solar energetic particles, the anomalous component of cosmic rays, and magnetospherically-trapped particles. In recent years, there have also been reports of below-cutoff ions which do not appear to be from any known source. Although most of these observations are based on only a handful of ions, they have led to speculation about 'partially-ionized galactic cosmic rays' and 'near-by cosmic ray sources'. The collecting power of HIIS is order of magnitude larger than that of the instruments which reported these results, so HIIS should be able to confirm these observations and perhaps discover the source of these particles. Preliminary results on below-cutoff heavy-ions are reported. Observations to possible known sources of such ions are compared. A second objective of the HIIS experiment is to measure the elemental composition of ultraheavy galactic cosmic rays, beginning in the tin-barium region of the periodic table. A report on the status of this analysis is presented.

  6. Calcium: total or ionized?

    PubMed

    Schenck, Patricia A; Chew, Dennis J

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of serum total calcium (tCa) has been relied on for assessment of calcium status, despite the fact that it is the ionized calcium (iCa) fraction that has biologic activity. Serum tCa does not accurately predict iCa status in many clinical conditions. For accurate assessment of iCa status, iCa should be directly measured. Anaerobic measurement of serum iCa under controlled conditions provides the most reliable assessment of calcium status; aerobic measurement of iCa with species-specific pH correction is highly correlated with anaerobic measurements.

  7. Interference oscillations in the angular distribution of laser-ionized electrons near ionization threshold.

    PubMed

    Arbó, D G; Yoshida, S; Persson, E; Dimitriou, K I; Burgdörfer, J

    2006-04-14

    We analyze the two-dimensional momentum distribution of electrons ionized by few-cycle laser pulses in the transition regime from multiphoton absorption to tunneling by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and by a classical-trajectory Monte-Carlo simulation with tunneling (CTMC-T). We find a complex two-dimensional interference pattern that resembles above threshold ionization (ATI) rings at higher energies and displays Ramsauer-Townsend-type diffraction oscillations in the angular distribution near threshold. CTMC-T calculations provide a semiclassical explanation for the dominance of selected partial waves. While the present calculation pertains to hydrogen, we find surprising qualitative agreement with recent experimental data for rare gases [A. Rudenko, J. Phys. B 37, L407 (2004)].

  8. Electron-Impact Dissociative Ionization Of Ethylene (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    seen in Fig. 5 , where the discrepancy between em- pirical calculation and the experiment is more profound, FIG. 2 . Partial ionization cross section...not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YY) 2 . REPORT TYPE 3...ANSI Std. Z39-18 Electron-impact dissociative ionization of ethylene S. Popović,1,* S. Williams, 2 ,† and L. Vušković1,‡ 1Department of Physics, Old

  9. Ionization processes in combined high-voltage nanosecond - laser discharges in inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey; Shneider, Mikhail; PU Team

    2016-09-01

    Remote control of plasmas induced by laser radiation in the atmosphere is one of the challenging issues of free space communication, long-distance energy transmission, remote sensing of the atmosphere, and standoff detection of trace gases and bio-threat species. Sequences of laser pulses, as demonstrated by an extensive earlier work, offer an advantageous tool providing access to the control of air-plasma dynamics and optical interactions. The avalanche ionization induced in a pre-ionized region by infrared laser pulses where investigated. Pre-ionization was created by an ionization wave, initiated by high-voltage nanosecond pulse. Then, behind the front of ionization wave extra avalanche ionization was initiated by the focused infrared laser pulse. The experiment was carried out in argon. It is shown that the gas pre-ionization inhibits the laser spark generation under low pressure conditions.

  10. Ionization dynamics of small water clusters: Proton transfer rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Takada, Tomoya

    2016-08-01

    The surfaces of icy planets and comets are composed of frozen water (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4). These surfaces are irradiated by solar wind and cosmic rays from the interstellar space and they cause ionization of surface molecules. In this report, the effects of ionization of cold water clusters have been investigated using a direct ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) method to elucidate the rate of proton transfer (PT) in cations of small water clusters (H2O)n (n = 2-7). After ionization of the water clusters, PT occurred in all the cluster cations, and dissociation of the OH radical occurred for n = 4-7. The time of PT decreased with increasing the cluster size at n = 2-5 and reached a limiting value at n = 6 and 7. The mechanism of the PT process in ionized water clusters was discussed based on the theoretical results.

  11. Degree of initial hole localization/delocalization in ionized water clusters.

    PubMed

    Pieniazek, Piotr A; Sundstrom, Eric J; Bradforth, Stephen E; Krylov, Anna I

    2009-04-23

    The electronic structure of ionized bulk liquid water presents a number of theoretical challenges. Not the least of these is the realization that the detailed geometry of the hydrogen bonding network is expected to have a strong effect on the electronic couplings between water molecules and thus the degree of delocalization of the initially ionized system. This problem is approached from a cluster perspective where a high-level coupled cluster description of the electronic structure is still possible. Building on the work and methodology developed for the water dimer cation [J. Phys. Chem. A 2008, 112, 6159], the character and spectrum of electronic states of the water hole and their evolution from the dimer into higher clusters is presented. As the time evolution of the initially formed hole can in principle be followed by the system's transient absorption spectrum, the state spacings and transition strengths are computed. An analysis involving Dyson orbitals is applied and shows a partially delocalized nature of states. The issue of conformation disorder in the hydrogen bonding geometry is addressed for the water dimer cation.

  12. Partially supervised speaker clustering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hao; Chu, Stephen Mingyu; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Huang, Thomas S

    2012-05-01

    Content-based multimedia indexing, retrieval, and processing as well as multimedia databases demand the structuring of the media content (image, audio, video, text, etc.), one significant goal being to associate the identity of the content to the individual segments of the signals. In this paper, we specifically address the problem of speaker clustering, the task of assigning every speech utterance in an audio stream to its speaker. We offer a complete treatment to the idea of partially supervised speaker clustering, which refers to the use of our prior knowledge of speakers in general to assist the unsupervised speaker clustering process. By means of an independent training data set, we encode the prior knowledge at the various stages of the speaker clustering pipeline via 1) learning a speaker-discriminative acoustic feature transformation, 2) learning a universal speaker prior model, and 3) learning a discriminative speaker subspace, or equivalently, a speaker-discriminative distance metric. We study the directional scattering property of the Gaussian mixture model (GMM) mean supervector representation of utterances in the high-dimensional space, and advocate exploiting this property by using the cosine distance metric instead of the euclidean distance metric for speaker clustering in the GMM mean supervector space. We propose to perform discriminant analysis based on the cosine distance metric, which leads to a novel distance metric learning algorithm—linear spherical discriminant analysis (LSDA). We show that the proposed LSDA formulation can be systematically solved within the elegant graph embedding general dimensionality reduction framework. Our speaker clustering experiments on the GALE database clearly indicate that 1) our speaker clustering methods based on the GMM mean supervector representation and vector-based distance metrics outperform traditional speaker clustering methods based on the “bag of acoustic features” representation and statistical

  13. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff ... Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101. ...

  14. Partial tooth gear bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A partial gear bearing including an upper half, comprising peak partial teeth, and a lower, or bottom, half, comprising valley partial teeth. The upper half also has an integrated roller section between each of the peak partial teeth with a radius equal to the gear pitch radius of the radially outwardly extending peak partial teeth. Conversely, the lower half has an integrated roller section between each of the valley half teeth with a radius also equal to the gear pitch radius of the peak partial teeth. The valley partial teeth extend radially inwardly from its roller section. The peak and valley partial teeth are exactly out of phase with each other, as are the roller sections of the upper and lower halves. Essentially, the end roller bearing of the typical gear bearing has been integrated into the normal gear tooth pattern.

  15. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  16. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  17. Associative ionization reactions involving excited atoms in nitrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, N. A.

    2009-05-15

    A model of kinetic processes in gas-discharge plasmas of pure nitrogen and its mixtures with nitrogen oxide and oxygen is presented. A distinctive feature of the model is that it includes associative ionization reactions involving N({sup 2}P) electronically excited atoms. Taking into account these processes allows one to explain both the anomalously slow decay of gas-discharge nitrogen plasma and the increase in the electron density in the region of the so-called pink afterglow in nitrogen. The possibility of substantially accelerating secondary ionization by adding NO molecules to a partially dissociated nitrogen is demonstrated. It is shown that such acceleration is caused by the associative ionization reaction N({sup 2}P) + O({sup 3}P) {yields} e + NO{sup +}. The calculated results agree well with available experimental data.

  18. Aging and space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohler, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    The matter of aging and its relation to space vehicle crewmembers undertaking prolonged space missions is addressed. The capabilities of the older space traveler to recover from bone demineralization and muscle atrophy are discussed. Certain advantages of the older person are noted, for example, a greater tolerance of monotony and repetitious activities. Additional parameters are delineated including the cardiovascular system, the reproductive system, ionizing radiation, performance, and group dynamics.

  19. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  20. The lowest ionization potentials of Al2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Barnes, Leslie A.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    Potential curves for the lowest two electronic states (X 2 sigma g + and A 2 pi u) of Al2(+) were computed using complete active space SCF/multireference CI wave functions and large Gaussian basis sets. The lowest observable vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) X 2 sigma g +) of the Al2 X 3 pi u ground state is calculated to occur around 6.1 eV, in excellent agreement with the experimental range of 6.0 to 6.42 eV obtained in recent cluster ionization studies by Cox and co-workers. The second vertical ionization potential (to Al2(+) A 2 pi u) occurs near 6.4 eV, also within the experimental range. The adiabatic IP of 5.90 eV is in good agreement with the value of 5.8 to 6.1 eV deduced by Hanley and co-workers from the difference in thresholds between collision induced dissociation processes of Al3(+). The computed IP values are somewhat larger than those deduced from branching ratios in cluster fragmentation experiments by Jarrold and co-workers. The observation of an ionization threshold below 6.42 eV is shown to be incompatible with an Al2 ground electronic state assignment of 3 sigma g -, but the separation between the two lowest states of Al2 is so small that it is likely that both are populated in the experiments, so that this does not provide unambiguous support for the recent theoretical assignment of the ground state as 3 pi u.

  1. Dissociative Ionization of Aromatic and Heterocyclic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.

    2003-01-01

    Space radiation poses a major health hazard to humans in space flight. The high-energy charged particles in space radiation ranging from protons to high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) particles, and the secondary species they produce, attack DNA, cells, and tissues. Of the potential hazards, long-term health effects such as carcinogenesis are likely linked to the DNA lesions caused by secondary electrons in the 1 - 30 eV range. Dissociative ionization (DI) is one of the electron collision processes that can damage the DNA, either directly by causing a DNA lesion, or indirectly by producing radicals and cations that attack the DNA. To understand this process, we have developed a theoretical model for DI. Our model makes use of the fact that electron motion is much faster than nuclear motion and assumes DI proceeds through a two-step process. The first step is electron-impact ionization resulting in a particular state of the molecular ion in the geometry of the neutral molecule. In the second step the ion undergoes unimolecular dissociation. Thus the DI cross section sigma(sup DI)(sub a) for channel a is given by sigma(sup DI)(sub a) = sigma(sup I)(sub a) P(sub D) with sigma(sup I)(sub a) the ionization cross section of channel a and P(sub D) the dissociation probability. This model has been applied to study the DI of H2O, NH3, and CH4, with results in good agreement with experiment. The ionization cross section sigma(sup I)(sub a) was calculated using the improved binary encounter-dipole model and the unimolecular dissociation probability P(sub D) obtained by following the minimum energy path determined by the gradients and Hessians of the electronic energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates of the ion. This model is used to study the DI from the low-lying channels of benzene and pyridine to understand the different product formation in aromatic and heterocyclic molecules. DI study of the DNA base thymine is underway. Solvent effects will also be discussed.

  2. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  3. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  4. Ionized calcium concentrations in squid axons

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Values for ionized [Ca] in squid axons were obtained by measuring the light emission from a 0.1-mul drop of aequorin confined to a plastic dialysis tube of 140-mum diameter located axially. Ionized Ca had a mean value of 20 x 10(-9) M as judged by the subsequent introduction of CaEGTA/EGTA buffer (ratio ca. 0.1) into the axoplasm, and light measurement on a second aequorin drop. Ionized Ca in axoplasma was also measured by introducing arsenazo dye into an axon by injection and measuring the Ca complex of such a dye by multichannel spectrophotometry. Values so obtained were ca. 50 x 10(-9) M as calibrated against CaEGTA/EGTA buffer mixtures. Wth a freshly isolated axon in 10 mM Ca seawater, the aequorin glow invariably increased with time; a seawater [Ca] of 2-3 mM allowed a steady state with respect to [Ca]. Replacement of Na+ in seawater with choline led to a large increase in light emission from aequorin. Li seawater partially reversed this change and the reintroduction of Na+ brought light levels back to their initial value. Stimulation at 60/s for 2-5 min produced an increase in aequorin glow about 0.1% of that represented by the known Ca influx, suggesting operationally the presence of substantial Ca buffering. Treatment of an axon with CN produced a very large increase in aequorin glow and in Ca arsenazo formation only if the external seawater contained Ca. PMID:818340

  5. Magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Leake, James E.; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.; Linton, Mark G.

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic reconnection in partially ionized plasmas is a ubiquitous phenomenon spanning the range from laboratory to intergalactic scales, yet it remains poorly understood and relatively little studied. Here, we present results from a self-consistent multi-fluid simulation of magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma with a particular focus on the parameter regime of the solar chromosphere. The numerical model includes collisional transport, interaction and reactions between the species, and optically thin radiative losses. This model improves upon our previous work in Leake et al.[“Multi-fluid simulations of chromospheric magnetic reconnection in a weakly ionized reacting plasma,” Astrophys. J. 760, 109 (2012)] by considering realistic chromospheric transport coefficients, and by solving a generalized Ohm's law that accounts for finite ion-inertia and electron-neutral drag. We find that during the two dimensional reconnection of a Harris current sheet with an initial width larger than the neutral-ion collisional coupling scale, the current sheet thins until its width becomes less than this coupling scale, and the neutral and ion fluids decouple upstream from the reconnection site. During this process of decoupling, we observe reconnection faster than the single-fluid Sweet-Parker prediction, with recombination and plasma outflow both playing a role in determining the reconnection rate. As the current sheet thins further and elongates, it becomes unstable to the secondary tearing instability, and plasmoids are seen. The reconnection rate, outflows, and plasmoids observed in this simulation provide evidence that magnetic reconnection in the chromosphere could be responsible for jet-like transient phenomena such as spicules and chromospheric jets.

  6. Detection of sputtered and evaporated carbon aggregates: relative and absolute electron ionization fragmentation yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mair, C.; Deutsch, H.; Becker, K.; Märk, T. D.; Vietzke, E.

    2001-03-01

    The present study is a first attempt to determine electron impact ionization efficiencies for C 2 and C 3. A novel method has been applied to obtain the partial cross-section values for the reactions C 2+e→C +,C 2+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C +,C 3+e→C 2+ and C 3+e→C 3+. The neutral target consisting of C, C 2 and C 3 is produced by thermal evaporation from a heated graphite sample and the neutral precursors in the subsequent ionization process can be distinguished by their different flight-time distributions acquired in the evaporation process. The partial ionization cross-section ratios obtained in this experiment have been calibrated with calculated absolute total ionization cross section curves of C 2 and C 3 using the Deutsch-Märk (DM) formalism.

  7. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  8. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  9. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  10. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  11. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  12. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  13. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  14. Interface control document between the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and Department of Interior EROS Data Center (EDC) for LANDSAT-D. Partially processed multispectral scanner High Density Tape (HDT-AM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The format of the HDT-AM product which contains partially processed LANDSAT D and D Prime multispectral scanner image data is defined. Recorded-data formats, tape format, and major frame types are described.

  15. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report.

  16. Partially coherent flat-topped beam and its propagation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Di; Cai, Yangjian; Lin, Qiang

    2004-08-20

    A partially coherent beam with flat-topped profile is proposed. The cross-spectral density of this beam can be expressed as a finite series of the cross-spectral density of partially coherent Gaussian-Schell-model beams with different parameters. Analytical propagation formulas for partially coherent flat-topped beams are derived through aligned and misaligned optical systems. The propagation property of partially coherent flat-topped beams in free space is illustrated numerically. The fractional Fourier transform of partially coherent fiat-topped beams is also studied. Our method provides a convenient way to describe partially coherent flat-topped beams and treat their propagation and transformation.

  17. Circulant states with positive partial transpose

    SciTech Connect

    Chruscinski, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej

    2007-09-15

    We construct a large class of quantum dxd states which are positive under partial transposition (so called PPT states). The construction is based on certain direct sum decomposition of the total Hilbert space displaying characteristic circular structure - that is why we call them circulant states. It turns out that partial transposition maps any such decomposition into another one and hence both original density matrix and its partially transposed partner share similar cyclic properties. This class contains many well-known examples of PPT states from the literature and gives rise to a huge family of completely new states.

  18. Evidence for unnatural-parity contributions to electron-impact ionization of laser-aligned atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Gregory S. J.; Colgan, James Patrick; Pindzola, M. S.; Amami, S.; Madison, D. H.; Pursehouse, J.; Nixon, K. L.; Murray, A. J.

    2015-09-11

    Recent measurements have examined the electron-impact ionization of excited-state laser-aligned Mg atoms. In this paper we show that the ionization cross section arising from the geometry where the aligned atom is perpendicular to the scattering plane directly probes the unnatural parity contributions to the ionization amplitude. The contributions from natural parity partial waves cancel exactly in this geometry. Our calculations resolve the discrepancy between the nonzero measured cross sections in this plane and the zero cross section predicted by distorted-wave approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that this is a general feature of ionization from p-state targets by additional studies of ionization from excited Ca and Na atoms.

  19. Two-effective-center approximation for proton-impact single ionization of hydrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari-Adivi, Ebrahim

    2015-10-01

    Some closed-form expressions are derived for the partial direct and indirect transition amplitudes for proton-impact single ionization of the hydrogen molecules using a first-order two-effective center continuum-wave approximation. The method satisfies the correct boundary conditions in the entrance channel. The basic assumption in this model is that when the active electron is ionized from one of the atomic centers in the molecule, the other scattering center is completely screened by the passive electron. Consequently, the transition amplitude can be expressed as a superposition of the partial ionization amplitudes from two independent scattering centers located at a constant distance from each other. The superposition of the partial amplitudes leads to different interference patterns for various orientations of the molecular target. The calculated cross sections are compared with the experiments and also with other theories. The comparison shows that the present results are reliable.

  20. Direct Observations of the Evolution of Polar Cap Ionization Patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Zhang, B.; Lockwood, M. M.; Hu, H.; Moen, J. I.; Ruohoniemi, J.; Thomas, E. G.; Zhang, S.; Yang, H.; Liu, R.; McWilliams, K. A.; Baker, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to High Frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a 'tongue' of ionization (TOI).

  1. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions.

  2. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  3. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  4. Zero-Net-Charge Air Ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument monitors air supplied by air ionizer and regulates ionizer to ensure net charge neutral. High-impedance electrometer and nulling control amplifier regulate output of air ionizer. Primarily intended to furnish ionized air having no net charge, instrument adaptable to generating air with positive or negative net charge is so desired. Useful where integrated circuit chips are manufactured, inspected, tested or assembled.

  5. Measurement of partial pressures in vacuum technology and vacuum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, W. K.

    1986-01-01

    It is pointed out that the measurement of gaseous pressures of less than 0.0001 torr is based on the ionization of gas atoms and molecules due to collisions with electrons. The particle density is determined in place of the pressure. The ionization cross sections for molecules of various gases are discussed. It is found that the true pressure in a vacuum system cannot be determined with certainty if it is unknown which gas is present. Effects of partial pressure determination on the condition of the vacuum system are discussed together with ion sources, systems of separation, and ion detection.

  6. Parabolic versus spherical partial cross sections for photoionization excitation of He near threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Bouri, C.; Selles, P.; Malegat, L.; Kwato Njock, M. G.

    2006-09-15

    Spherical and parabolic partial cross sections and asymmetry parameters, defined in the ejected electron frame, are presented for photoionization excitation of the helium atom at 0.1 eV above its double ionization threshold. A quantitative law giving the dominant spherical partial wave l{sub dom} for each excitation level n is obtained. The parabolic partial cross sections are shown to satisfy the same approximate selection rules as the related Rydberg series of doubly excited states (K,T){sub n}{sup A}. The analysis of radial and angular correlations reveals the close relationship between double excitation, ionization excitation, and double ionization. Opposite to a widespread belief, the observed value of the asymmetry parameter is shown to result from the interplay of radial correlations and symmetry constraints, irrespective of angular correlations. Finally, the measurement of parabolic partial cross sections is proposed as a challenge to experimentalists.

  7. Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in optically ionized gases

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A.; Luo, Y.; Suckewer, S.; Gordon, D. F.; Sprangle, P.

    2010-02-15

    Propagation of 800 nm, 120 fs laser pulses with intensities of 4x10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} in supersonic gas jets of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} is studied using a shear-type interferometer. The plasma density distribution resulting from photoionization is resolved in space and time with simultaneously measured initial neutral density distribution. A distinct difference in laser beam propagation distance is observed when comparing propagation in jets of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2}. This is interpreted in terms of ionization induced refraction, which is stronger when electrons are produced from states of higher ionization potential. Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, based on directly solving the Maxwell-Lorentz system of equations, show the roles played by the forward Raman and ionization scattering instabilities, which further affect the propagation distance.

  8. HF Accelerated Electron Fluxes, Spectra, and Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Herbert C.; Jensen, Joseph B.

    2015-10-01

    Wave particle interactions, an essential aspect of laboratory, terrestrial, and astrophysical plasmas, have been studied for decades by transmitting high power HF radio waves into Earth's weakly ionized space plasma, to use it as a laboratory without walls. Application to HF electron acceleration remains an active area of research (Gurevich in Usp Fizicheskikh Nauk 177(11):1145-1177, 2007) today. HF electron acceleration studies began when plasma line observations proved (Carlson et al. in J Atmos Terr Phys 44:1089-1100, 1982) that high power HF radio wave-excited processes accelerated electrons not to ~eV, but instead to -100 times thermal energy (10 s of eV), as a consequence of inelastic collision effects on electron transport. Gurevich et al (J Atmos Terr Phys 47:1057-1070, 1985) quantified the theory of this transport effect. Merging experiment with theory in plasma physics and aeronomy, enabled prediction (Carlson in Adv Space Res 13:1015-1024, 1993) of creating artificial ionospheres once ~GW HF effective radiated power could be achieved. Eventual confirmation of this prediction (Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 36:L18107, 2009; Pedersen et al. in Geophys Res Lett 37:L02106, 2010; Blagoveshchenskaya et al. in Ann Geophys 27:131-145, 2009) sparked renewed interest in optical inversion to estimate electron spectra in terrestrial (Hysell et al. in J Geophys Res Space Phys 119:2038-2045, 2014) and planetary (Simon et al. in Ann Geophys 29:187-195, 2011) atmospheres. Here we present our unpublished optical data, which combined with our modeling, lead to conclusions that should meaningfully improve future estimates of the spectrum of HF accelerated electron fluxes. Photometric imaging data can significantly improve detection of emissions near ionization threshold, and confirm depth of penetration of accelerated electrons many km below the excitation altitude. Comparing observed to modeled emission altitude shows future experiments need electron density profiles

  9. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, J.

    2010-05-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its instability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, the partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches one, the critical index goes to a maximum value that depends on the distribution of the external magnetic field. We demonstrate that the partial torus instability helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux rope CME.

  10. Single ionization of molecular iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dale L.; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James; Gibson, George N.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a study of the single ionization of iodine, I2 over a range of wavelengths. Single ionization of I2 is unexpectedly found to have a contribution from inner molecular orbitals involving the 5 s electrons. The I+I+ dissociation channel was recorded through velocity map imaging, and the kinetic-energy release of each channel was determined with two-dimensional fitting of the images. Most of the measured kinetic-energy data were inconsistent with ionization to the X , A , and B states of I2 + , implying ionization from deeper orbitals. A pump-probe Fourier transform technique was used to look for modulation at the X - and A -state vibrational frequencies to see if they were intermediate states in a two-step process. X - and A -state modulation was seen only for kinetic-energy releases below 0.2 eV, consistent with dissociation through the B state. From these results and intensity-, polarization-, and wavelength-dependent experiments we found no evidence of bond softening, electron rescattering, or photon mediation through the X or A states to higher-energy single-ionization channels.

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability of Ionization Fronts in HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuta, Akira; Kane, Jave; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Takabe, Hideaki

    2003-10-01

    The complex dynamics of an ionization front which is a surface of radiatively driven molecular cloud is a common feature of HII regions. We carried out two-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations with a realistic initial density profile for a neutral gas region, and with perturbations at the ionization front considering detailed physics so far. The energy deposition and release due to the absorption of strong UV radiation from O-stars the recombination effects in the ionized region are included. The radiation loss from shocked molecular gas is also included. We introduce magnetic field's effect into the equation of state to prevent too high density because of radiative collapse in the molecular gas^a. The results are compared with recent detailed observational data of the Eagle Nebula by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Array (BIMA)^b,c. We also discuss the growth of the perturbations at the ionization front and the appropriateness of hydrodynamic instabilities on the ionized front. a. Ryutov, D, & Remington, B., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion (2002) 44, B407, b. Hester, J. J, et al., AJ (1996) 111, 2349, c. Pound, M. W., et al., ApJ (1998) 493, L113

  12. Biochemistry of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, T.L.; Nushin, F.K.

    1990-01-01

    This volume examines the biochemical changes occurring in normal tissue after irradiation. A review of radiation chemistry is followed by an analysis of factors affecting biochemical responses and a timely discussion of radiobiology in space flight. The authors then describe the effects of radiation on lipid peroxidation, amino acids, peptides, proteins, polysaccharides, DNA, thiols, and body fluids. Close attention is given to alterations in biological mediators such as eicosanoids, cyclic nucleotides, angiotensin, histamine, polyamines, catecholamines, and serotonin and in hormones such as adrenocorticotropic hormone, testosterone, estrogens, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, thyroid hormones, insulin and glucagon, gastrin, and melatonin. Other chapters focus on changes in carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and serum proteins. A chapter on biological dosimeters discusses prodromal syndrome, hematological dosimeters, serum composition, urine, chromosomal aberrations, and fluorometric and immunoassays.

  13. Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Gary Wayne (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a Partial Automated Alignment and Integration System (PAAIS) used to automate the alignment and integration of space vehicle components. A PAAIS includes ground support apparatuses, a track assembly with a plurality of energy-emitting components and an energy-receiving component containing a plurality of energy-receiving surfaces. Communication components and processors allow communication and feedback through PAAIS.

  14. Microliter-sized ionization device and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin J. (Inventor); Simac, Robert M. (Inventor); Wernlund, Roger F. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A microliter-sized metastable ionization device with a cavity, a sample gas inlet, a corona gas inlet and a gas outlet. A first electrode has a hollow and disposed in the cavity and is in fluid communication with the sample gas inlet. A second electrode is in fluid communication with the corona gas inlet and is disposed around the first electrode adjacent the hollow end thereof. A gap forming means forms a corona gap between the first and second electrodes. A first power supply is connected to the first electrode and the second power supply is connected to the second electrode for generating a corona discharge across the corona gap. A collector has a hollow end portion disposed in the cavity which is in fluid communications with the gas outlet for the outgassing and detection of ionized gases. The first electrode can be a tubular member aligned concentrically with a cylindrical second electrode. The gap forming means can be in annular disc projecting radially inwardly from the cylindrical second electrode. The collector can have a tubular opening aligned coaxially with the first electrode and has an end face spaced a short distance from an end face of the first electrode forming a small active volume therebetween for the generation and detection of small quantities of trace analytes.

  15. A Prototype Ionization Profile Monitor for RHIC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, R.; Cameron, P.; Ryan, W.; Shea, T.; Sikora, R.; Tsoupas, N.

    1997-05-01

    Transverse beam profiles in the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) will be measured with ionization profile monitors (IPMs). Each IPM will measure the integrated distribution of electrons in one plane resulting from residual gas ionization during bunch passage. The high space-charge electric field of the beam makes it necessary to image with electrons which are guided by a magnetic field. A prototype detector was tested in the injection line during the RHIC Sextant Test. It consists of a collector circuit board mounted on one side of the beam and a parallel electrode on the other to provide an electric sweep field. The collector board has 48 electrodes oriented parallel to the beam with a chevron microchannel plate amplifier mounted in front of the collection traces. The detector vacuum chamber is placed in the gap of a magnet. At each bunch passage the charge pulses are integrated, amplified, and digitized for display as a profile histogram. This paper describes the prototype detector and gives results from the beam tests.

  16. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  17. Gasification and Ionization of Chemically Complex Liquids for FRC Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Michael; Hill, Carrie

    2014-10-01

    Ion thrusters provide reliable and efficient spacecraft propulsion but are limited to noble gas propellants to limit chemical attack of components. However, thrusters based on Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmas are becoming a reality. High beta compact-toroids are generated within an FRC thruster and then expelled to provide thrust. The closed field lines restrict the plasma from attacking thruster components. More convenient propellants such as water are therefore possible. The FRC thruster would generate a series of compact-toroids (plasmoids) to develop continuous spacecraft thrust. Each plasmoid ejection would empty the discharge region. The feed system would then refill the discharge region with partially ionized gas for the next discharge. The ionization part of this feed system is the subject of this paper. The question is how to produce a uniform, chemically complex, ionized gas within the discharge region that optimizes compact-toroid formation? We will be measuring chemical state, ionization state, and uniformity as the propellant enters the discharge region.

  18. PARTIAL TORUS INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang Jie

    2010-07-20

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  19. Partial Torus Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Oscar; Zhang, Jie

    2010-07-01

    Flux ropes are now generally accepted to be the magnetic configuration of coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which may be formed prior to or during solar eruptions. In this study, we model the flux rope as a current-carrying partial torus loop with its two footpoints anchored in the photosphere, and investigate its stability in the context of the torus instability (TI). Previous studies on TI have focused on the configuration of a circular torus and revealed the existence of a critical decay index of the overlying constraining magnetic field. Our study reveals that the critical index is a function of the fractional number of the partial torus, defined by the ratio between the arc length of the partial torus above the photosphere and the circumference of a circular torus of equal radius. We refer to this finding as the partial torus instability (PTI). It is found that a partial torus with a smaller fractional number has a smaller critical index, thus requiring a more gradually decreasing magnetic field to stabilize the flux rope. On the other hand, a partial torus with a larger fractional number has a larger critical index. In the limit of a circular torus when the fractional number approaches 1, the critical index goes to a maximum value. We demonstrate that the PTI helps us to understand the confinement, growth, and eventual eruption of a flux-rope CME.

  20. IONIZATION COOLING SCENARIO FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW, R.C.; GALLARDO, J.C.; PALMER, R.B.; LEBRUN, P.L.

    2001-06-18

    The neutrino factory program aims to produce well-characterized neutrino fluxes, orders of magnitude larger than those available from conventional beams. An important feature of the machine design is a cooling section for reducing the muon transverse emittance to a level that can be accepted by the downstream accelerators and be contained in the storage ring. We describe simulations of a high-performance ionization cooling channel for the front end of a neutrino factory. The design considered here consists of a solenoidal lattice with alternating polarity and 2.75 m and 1.65 m cell lengths. Simulations show that the cooling increases the phase space density into the acceptance of the following linac by a factor of 3.

  1. Space Shuttle Main Engine Flies High

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Main Engine is being lowered onto its handler before its journey to the test complex at Stennis Space Center. This building is where partially assembled Space Shuttle Main Engines are received and prepared for testing.

  2. Ionizing Radiation: The issue of radiation quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prise, Kevin; Schettino, Giuseppe

    Types of Ionising radiations are differentiated from each other by fundamental characteristics of their energy deposition patterns when they interact with biological materials. At the level of the DNA these non-random patterns drive differences in the yields and distributions of DNA damage patterns and specifically the production of clustered damage or complex lesions. The complex radiation fields found in space bring significant challenges for developing a mechanistic understanding of radiation effects from the perspective of radiation quality as these consist of a diverse range of particle and energy types unique to the space environment. Linear energy transfer, energy deposited per unit track length in units of keV per micron, has long been used as a comparator for different types of radiation but has limitations in that it is an average value. Difference in primary core ionizations relative to secondary delta ray ranges vary significantly with particle mass and energy leading to complex interrelationships with damage production at the cellular level. At the cellular level a greater mechanistic understanding is necessary, linking energy deposition patterns to DNA damage patterns and cellular response, to build appropriate biophysical models that are predictive for different radiation qualities and mixed field exposures. Defined studies using monoenergetic beams delivered under controlled conditions are building quantitative data sets of both initial and long term changes in cells as a basis for a great mechanistic understanding of radiation quality effects of relevance to not only space exposures but clinical application of ion-beams.

  3. Dust and Ionized Gas in Elliptical Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudfrooij, Paul

    1995-05-01

    stellar component in the centre (assuming trailing spiral arms). These findings are clear signatures of an acquisition of a companion galaxy. The radial emission-line intensity profile peaks much more strongly towards the centre than the stellar light profile does, suggesting a powerful nuclear ionization source. In Chapter 2 we present deep surface photometry of NGC 1275, the central dominant galaxy of the Perseus cluster. This peculiar galaxy features two distinct filamentary systems, 3000 km s^-1 apart in velocity space. The "host"-galaxy NGC 1275 is associated with the low-velocity system, whereas the nature of the high-velocity system is still controversial. We find that prominent dust absorption features of NGC 1275 have the same distribution on the sky as the high-velocity system of ionized gas. Hence, the dust patches are most probably associated with the high-velocity system. However, our analysis of the extinction properties of the dust patches shows that the dust is well within NGC 1275, implying that the high-velocity system has moved approximately halfway through NGC 1275. We have also found many blue star clusters in our images of NGC 1275, for which we discuss the origin and nature by comparing colour-magnitude diagrams with theoretical population models. We suggest that the blue star clusters have been formed in a cooling flow in the central part of the X-ray-emitting gas of the Perseus cluster of galaxies. Chapter 3 presents the CCD broad-band photometry of the sample ellipticals. Radial profiles of the surface brightness, colours, and characteristics of the detailed isophotal shape are derived. In addition, we show that fitting power-laws to the outer radial intensity profiles of elliptical galaxies is an excellent tool for determining the sky background for CCD photometry. Chapter 4 presents colour-index images and narrow-band images of the H-alpha+[N II]-emitting gas to derive the distribution and amount of dust and ionized gas for the sample

  4. Ionization Collection in Detectors of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Phipps, Arran T.J.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the composition of dark matter is at the forefront of modern scientific research. There is compelling evidence for the existence of vast quantities of dark matter throughout the universe, however it has so-far eluded all direct detection efforts and its identity remains a mystery. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a favored dark matter candidate and have been the primary focus of direct detection for several decades. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) has developed the Z-dependent Ionization and Phonon (ZIP) detector to search for such particles. Typically made from germanium, these detectors are capable of distinguishing between electromagnetic background and a putative WIMP signal through the simultaneous measurement of ionization and phonons produced by scattering events. CDMS has operated several arrays of these detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory (Soudan, MN, USA) resulting in many competitive (often world-leading) WIMP exclusion limits. This dissertation focuses on ionization collection in these detectors under the sub-Kelvin, low electric field, and high crystal purity conditions unique to CDMS. The design and performance of a fully cryogenic HEMT-based amplifier capable of achieving the SuperCDMS SNOLAB ionization energy resolution goal of 100 eVee is presented. The experimental apparatus which has been used to record electron and hole properties under CDMS conditions is described. Measurements of charge transport, trapping, and impact ionization as a function of electric field in two CDMS detectors are shown, and the ionization collection efficiency is determined. The data is used to predict the error in the nuclear recoil energy scale under both CDMSlite and iZIP operating modes. A two species, two state model is developed to describe how ionization collection and space charge generation in CDMS detectors are controlled by the presence of “overcharged” D- donor and A+ acceptor impurity states. The thermal

  5. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  6. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  7. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  8. Sheath ionization model of beam emissions from large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, S. T.; Cohen, H. A.; Bhavnani, K. H.; Tautz, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical model of the charging of a spacecraft emitting electron and ion beams has been applied to the case of large spacecraft. In this model, ionization occurs in the sheath due to the return current. Charge neutralization of spherical space charge flow is examined by solving analytical equations numerically. Parametric studies of potential large spacecraft are performed. As in the case of small spacecraft, the ions created in the sheath by the returning current play a large role in determining spacecraft potential.

  9. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  11. Massive Stars and the Ionization of the Diffuse Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahre, Lauren E.; Walterbos, Rene A. M.

    2015-08-01

    Diffuse ionized Gas (DIG, sometimes called the warm ionized medium or WIM) has been recognized as a major component of the interstellar medium (ISM) in disk galaxies. A general understanding of the characteristics of the DIG is emerging, but several questions remain unanswered. One of these is the ionization mechanism for this gas, believed to be connected to OB stars and HII regions. Using 5-band (NUV (2750 A), U, V, B, and I) photometric imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Legacy Extragalactic Ultraviolet Survey (LEGUS) and ground-based Halpha data from the Local Volume Legacy (LVL) survey and HST Halpha data from LEGUS, we will investigate the photoionization of HII regions and DIG in nearly 50 galaxies. The 5-band photometry will enable us to determine properties of the most massive stars and reddening corrections for specific regions within a galaxy. Luminosities and ages for groups and clusters will be obtained from SED-fitting of photometric data. For individual stars ages will be determined from isochrone-fitting using reddening-corrected color-magnitude diagrams. We can then obtain estimates of the ionizing luminosities by matching these photometric properties for massive stars and clusters to various stellar atmosphere models. We will compare these predictions to the inferred Lyman continuum production rates from reddening-corrected ground- and HST-based Halpha data for HII regions and DIG. This particular presentation will demonstrate the above process for a set of selected regions in galaxies within the LEGUS sample. It will subsequently be expanded to cover the full LEGUS sample, with the overall goals of obtaining a better understanding of the radiative energy feedback from massive stars on the ISM, particularly their ability to ionize the surrounding ISM over a wide range of spatial scales and SFR surface densities, and to connect the ionization of the ISM to HII region morphologies.

  12. Partially strong WW scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung Kingman; Chiang Chengwei; Yuan Tzuchiang

    2008-09-01

    What if only a light Higgs boson is discovered at the CERN LHC? Conventional wisdom tells us that the scattering of longitudinal weak gauge bosons would not grow strong at high energies. However, this is generally not true. In some composite models or general two-Higgs-doublet models, the presence of a light Higgs boson does not guarantee complete unitarization of the WW scattering. After partial unitarization by the light Higgs boson, the WW scattering becomes strongly interacting until it hits one or more heavier Higgs bosons or other strong dynamics. We analyze how LHC experiments can reveal this interesting possibility of partially strong WW scattering.

  13. Evidence for unnatural-parity contributions to electron-impact ionization of laser-aligned atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Gregory S. J.; Colgan, James Patrick; Pindzola, M. S.; ...

    2015-09-11

    Recent measurements have examined the electron-impact ionization of excited-state laser-aligned Mg atoms. In this paper we show that the ionization cross section arising from the geometry where the aligned atom is perpendicular to the scattering plane directly probes the unnatural parity contributions to the ionization amplitude. The contributions from natural parity partial waves cancel exactly in this geometry. Our calculations resolve the discrepancy between the nonzero measured cross sections in this plane and the zero cross section predicted by distorted-wave approaches. Finally, we demonstrate that this is a general feature of ionization from p-state targets by additional studies of ionizationmore » from excited Ca and Na atoms.« less

  14. Integral-equation approach to the weak-field asymptotic theory of tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dnestryan, Andrey I.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2016-03-01

    An integral equation approach to the weak-field asymptotic theory (WFAT) of tunneling ionization is developed. An integral representation for the exact partial amplitudes of ionization into parabolic channels is derived. The WFAT expansion for the ionization rate follows immediately from this relation. Integral representations for the coefficients in the expansion are obtained. The integrals accumulate where the ionizing orbital has large amplitude and are not sensitive to its behavior in the asymptotic region. Hence, these formulas enable one to reliably calculate the WFAT coefficients even if the orbital is represented by an expansion in Gaussian basis, as is usually the case in standard software packages for electronic structure calculations. This development is expected to greatly simplify the implementation of the WFAT for polyatomic molecules, and thus facilitate its growing applications in strong-field physics.

  15. The Contribution of Field OB Stars to the Ionization of the Diffuse Ionized Gas in M33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, Charles G.; Walterbos, René A. M.

    2000-10-01

    We present a study of the ionizing stars associated with the diffuse ionized gas (DIG) and H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxy M33. We compare our Schmidt Hα image to the far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1520 Å) image from the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT). The Hα/FUV ratio is higher in H II regions than in the DIG, suggesting an older population of ionizing stars in the DIG. Assuming ionization equilibrium, we convert the Hα flux to the number of Lyman continuum photons NLyc. When compared to models of evolving stellar populations, the NLyc/FUV ratio in H II regions is consistent with a young burst, while the DIG ratio resembles an older burst population, or a steady state population built up by constant star formation, which is probably a more accurate description of the stellar population in the field. The UIT data is complemented with archival FUV and optical images of a small portion of the disk of M33 obtained with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These images overlap low- and mid-luminosity H II regions as well as DIG, so we can investigate the stellar population in these environments. Using the HST FUV and optical photometry, we assign spectral types to the stars observed in DIG and H II regions. The photometry indicates that ionizing stars are present in the DIG. We compare the predicted ionizing flux with the amount required to produce the observed Hα emission, and we find that field OB stars in the HST images can account for 40%+/-12% of the ionization of the DIG, while the stars in H II regions can provide 107%+/-26% of the Hα luminosity of the H II regions. Due to the limited coverage of the HST data, we cannot determine if stars outside the HST fields ionize some of the DIG located in the HST fields, nor can we determine if photons from stars inside the HST fields leak out of the area covered by the HST fields. We do not find any correlation between leakage of ionizing photons and Hα luminosity for the H II regions in our HST

  16. 12. VIEW OF NORTH FACE OF MST AND PARTIALLY ERECTED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF NORTH FACE OF MST AND PARTIALLY ERECTED UMBILICAL MAST. UMBILICAL MAST TRENCH AND DOORS IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  17. Partial Correlation Estimation by Joint Sparse Regression Models

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Wang, Pei; Zhou, Nengfeng; Zhu, Ji

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computationally efficient approach —space(Sparse PArtial Correlation Estimation)— for selecting non-zero partial correlations under the high-dimension-low-sample-size setting. This method assumes the overall sparsity of the partial correlation matrix and employs sparse regression techniques for model fitting. We illustrate the performance of space by extensive simulation studies. It is shown that space performs well in both non-zero partial correlation selection and the identification of hub variables, and also outperforms two existing methods. We then apply space to a microarray breast cancer data set and identify a set of hub genes which may provide important insights on genetic regulatory networks. Finally, we prove that, under a set of suitable assumptions, the proposed procedure is asymptotically consistent in terms of model selection and parameter estimation. PMID:19881892

  18. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  19. Self-steering partially coherent beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a class of shape-invariant partially coherent beams with a moving guiding center which we term self-steering partially coherent beams. The guiding center of each such beam evolves along a straight line trajectory which can be engineered to make any angle with the x-axis. We show that the straight line trajectory of the guiding center is the only option in free space due to the linear momentum conservation. We experimentally generate a particular subclass of new beams, self-steering Gaussian Schell beams and argue that they can find applications for mobile target tracing and trapped micro- and/or nanoparticle transport.

  20. Self-steering partially coherent beams

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yahong; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.; Cai, Yangjian

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a class of shape-invariant partially coherent beams with a moving guiding center which we term self-steering partially coherent beams. The guiding center of each such beam evolves along a straight line trajectory which can be engineered to make any angle with the x-axis. We show that the straight line trajectory of the guiding center is the only option in free space due to the linear momentum conservation. We experimentally generate a particular subclass of new beams, self-steering Gaussian Schell beams and argue that they can find applications for mobile target tracing and trapped micro- and/or nanoparticle transport. PMID:28051164

  1. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  2. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  6. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  7. Design and Prototyping of an Ionization Profile Monitor for the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bartkoski, Dirk A; Deibele, Craig E; Polsky, Yarom

    2014-12-01

    An ionization profile monitor (IPM) has been designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Utilizing ionized electrons produced by beam-gas ionization, the SNS IPM uses a 120 kV bias potential to overcome beam space charge and accelerate electrons towards a movable particle detector. A 300 G magnetic field is used to confine the transverse electron motion, resulting in profile errors at the estimated 7% level. With a system bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. The SNS IPM is capable of measuring turn-by-turn beam profiles for a fully accumulated beam. This paper presents a description of the system and design.

  8. Miniature triaxial metastable ionization detector for gas chromatographic trace analysis of extraterrestrial volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, F. H.; Kojiro, D. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with a miniature metastable ionization detector featuring an unconventional electrode configuration, whose performance characteristics parallel those of traditional design. The ionization detector is to be incorporated in a flight gas chromatograph (GC) for use in the Space Shuttle. The design of the detector is discussed, taking into account studies which verified the sensitivity of the detector. The triaxial design of the detector is compared with a flat-plate style. The obtained results show that the principal goal of developing a miniature, highly sensitive ionization detector for flight applications was achieved. Improved fabrication techniques will utilize glass-to-metal seals and brazing procedures.

  9. Partial polarizer filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A birefringent filter module comprises, in seriatum. (1) an entrance polarizer, (2) a first birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the entrance polarizer, (3) a partial polarizer responsive to optical energy exiting the first polarizer, (4) a second birefringent crystal responsive to optical energy exiting the partial polarizer, and (5) an exit polarizer. The first and second birefringent crystals have fast axes disposed + or -45 deg from the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer. Preferably, the second crystal has a length 1/2 that of the first crystal and the high transmitivity direction of the partial polarizer is nine times as great as the low transmitivity direction. To provide tuning, the polarizations of the energy entering the first crystal and leaving the second crystal are varied by either rotating the entrance and exit polarizers, or by sandwiching the entrance and exit polarizers between pairs of half wave plates that are rotated relative to the polarizers. A plurality of the filter modules may be cascaded.

  10. Dilemmas of partial cooperation.

    PubMed

    Stark, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-08-01

    Related to the often applied cooperation models of social dilemmas, we deal with scenarios in which defection dominates cooperation, but an intermediate fraction of cooperators, that is, "partial cooperation," would maximize the overall performance of a group of individuals. Of course, such a solution comes at the expense of cooperators that do not profit from the overall maximum. However, because there are mechanisms accounting for mutual benefits after repeated interactions or through evolutionary mechanisms, such situations can constitute "dilemmas" of partial cooperation. Among the 12 ordinally distinct, symmetrical 2 x 2 games, three (barely considered) variants are correspondents of such dilemmas. Whereas some previous studies investigated particular instances of such games, we here provide the unifying framework and concisely relate it to the broad literature on cooperation in social dilemmas. Complementing our argumentation, we study the evolution of partial cooperation by deriving the respective conditions under which coexistence of cooperators and defectors, that is, partial cooperation, can be a stable outcome of evolutionary dynamics in these scenarios. Finally, we discuss the relevance of such models for research on the large biodiversity and variation in cooperative efforts both in biological and social systems.

  11. 77 FR 19739 - Notice of Intent to Grant Partially Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ..., Technology Transfer Office/ZP30, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812, (256) 544-5226... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Notice of Intent to Grant Partially Exclusive License AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of Intent to Grant Partially Exclusive License SUMMARY:...

  12. 76 FR 9820 - Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-22

    ... applications thereof for research and development, space tourism, and other commercial endeavors. The patent... SPACE ADMINISTRATION Notice of Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive License AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. ACTION: Notice of intent to grant a partially exclusive license....

  13. Colloidal plasmas in space - Some aspects of condensation and growth of solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De, B. R.; Arrhenius, G.

    1979-01-01

    The abundant occurrence of colloidal plasma clouds in the observable universe is reviewed, and the possible locales of condensation of cosmic solids identified. The physical properties of the condensation environment and the thermal physics of the plasma-cluster medium are outlined. In the light of these discussions, an attempt is made to identify the salient features of the processes of nucleation and growth in space. It is suggested that the conventional nucleation theory is inadequate when applied to the tenuous, partially excited, partially ionized multispecies cosmic vapor phase, and that studies relying on the physics of progressive molecule growth in such environments hold promise of understanding the process of transition of a cluster from the size of a few atomic mass units through the macromolecular range into what may be characterized as the bulk condensed phase.

  14. Ionizing radiation and cancer prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, D G

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation long has been recognized as a cause of cancer. Among environmental cancer risks, radiation is unique in the variety of organs and tissues that it can affect. Numerous epidemiological studies with good dosimetry provide the basis for cancer risk estimation, including quantitative information derived from observed dose-response relationships. The amount of cancer attributable to ionizing radiation is difficult to estimate, but numbers such as 1 to 3% have been suggested. Some radiation-induced cancers attributable to naturally occurring exposures, such as cosmic and terrestrial radiation, are not preventable. The major natural radiation exposure, radon, can often be reduced, especially in the home, but not entirely eliminated. Medical use of radiation constitutes the other main category of exposure; because of the importance of its benefits to one's health, the appropriate prevention strategy is to simply work to minimize exposures. PMID:8741791

  15. Charge segregation in weakly ionized microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyatt, John S.; Douglas, Alison M.; Stanley, Chris; Do, Changwoo; Barker, Thomas H.; Fernández-Nieves, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    We investigate microgels synthesized from N -isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) copolymerized with a large mol% of acrylic acid, finding that when the acid groups are partially ionized at high temperatures, competition between ion-induced swelling and hydrophobic deswelling of poly(NIPAM) chains results in microphase separation. In cross-linked microgels, this manifests as a dramatic decrease in the ratio between the radius of gyration and the hydrodynamic radius to ˜0.2 , indicating that almost all the mass of the microgel is concentrated near the particle center. We also observe a concurrent decrease of the polymer network length scale via small-angle neutron scattering, confirming the presence of a dense, deswollen core surrounded by a diffuse, charged periphery. We compare these results to those obtained for a system of charged ultralow-cross-linked microgels; the form factor shows a distinct peak at high q when the temperature exceeds a threshold value. We successfully fit the form factor to theory developed to describe scattering from weakly charged gels in poor solvents, and we tie this behavior to charge segregation in the case of the cross-linked microgels.

  16. Effect of ionizing radiation on polyaniline solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolszczak, M.; Kroh, J.; Abdel-Hamid, M. M.

    1996-06-01

    This communication presents the optical studies associated with transition doped (metallic)-neutral (semiconductor or insulator) state for conducting polymers. Special attention is focused on the electronic properties of polyaniline. The interconversion of different oxidation states of polyanilines has been studied by chemical and radiolytic methods. The polyaniline system is described by three sets of chromophores of three different oxidation states: fully reduced leucoemeraldine base (LB), partially oxidized emeraldine base (EB), and fully oxidized pernigraniline (PB). Each oxidation state can exist in its protonated form by treatment with an acid. All members of polyaniline family are spectroscopically distinguishable. The radiolytic study presents evidence that the polyaniline can exist in a continuum of oxidation states. The highly conducting form of polymer, i.e. emeraldine salt can be converted by using ionizing radiation into leucoemeraldine salt. The leucoemeraldine base is the final product of radiolysis of emeraldine base solution. The fully oxidized form of polyaniline can also be obtained by the irradiation of EB in the presence of CCl 4 or chlorobenzene.

  17. Radiation hydrodynamical instabilities in cosmological and galactic ionization fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whalen, Daniel J.; Norman, Michael L.

    2011-11-01

    Ionization fronts, the sharp radiation fronts behind which H/He ionizing photons from massive stars and galaxies propagate through space, were ubiquitous in the universe from its earliest times. The cosmic dark ages ended with the formation of the first primeval stars and galaxies a few hundred Myr after the Big Bang. Numerical simulations suggest that stars in this era were very massive, 25-500 solar masses, with H(II) regions of up to 30,000 light-years in diameter. We present three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical calculations that reveal that the I-fronts of the first stars and galaxies were prone to violent instabilities, enhancing the escape of UV photons into the early intergalactic medium (IGM) and forming clumpy media in which supernovae later exploded. The enrichment of such clumps with metals by the first supernovae may have led to the prompt formation of a second generation of low-mass stars, profoundly transforming the nature of the first protogalaxies. Cosmological radiation hydrodynamics is unique because ionizing photons coupled strongly to both gas flows and primordial chemistry at early epochs, introducing a hierarchy of disparate characteristic timescales whose relative magnitudes can vary greatly throughout a given calculation. We describe the adaptive multistep integration scheme we have developed for the self-consistent transport of both cosmological and galactic ionization fronts.

  18. Microwave Triggered Laser Ionization of Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadiee, Ehsan; Prasad, Sarita; Jerald Buchenauer, C.; Schamiloglu, Edl

    2012-10-01

    The goal of this work is to study the evolution and dynamics of plasma expansion when a high power microwave (HPM) pulse is overlapped in time and space on a very small, localized region of plasma formed by a high energy laser pulse. The pulsed Nd:YAG laser (8 ns, 600mJ, repetition rate 10 Hz) is focused to generate plasma filaments in air with electron density of 10^17/cm^3. When irradiated with a high power microwave pulse these electrons would gain enough kinetic energy and further escalate avalanche ionization of air due to elastic electron-neutral collisions thereby causing an increased volumetric discharge region. An X-band relativistic backward wave oscillator(RBWO) at the Pulsed Power,Beams and Microwaves laboratory at UNM is constructed as the microwave source. The RBWO produces a microwave pulse of maximum power 400 MW, frequency of 10.1 GHz, and energy of 6.8 Joules. Special care is being given to synchronize the RBWO and the pulsed laser system in order to achieve a high degree of spatial and temporal overlap. A photodiode and a microwave waveguide detector will be used to ensure the overlap. Also, a new shadowgraph technique with a nanosecond time resolution will be used to detect changes in the shock wave fronts when the HPM signal overlaps the laser pulse in time and space.

  19. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  20. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  1. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Buckner, Mark A.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Bryan, William L.

    2011-05-03

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes insitu polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  2. Space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers

    DOEpatents

    Britton, Jr; Charles, L [Alcoa, TN; Buckner, Mark A [Oak Ridge, TN; Hanson, Gregory R [Clinton, TN; Bryan, William L [Knoxville, TN

    2011-04-26

    Methods and apparatus are described for space charge dosimeters for extremely low power measurements of radiation in shipping containers. A method includes in situ polling a suite of passive integrating ionizing radiation sensors including reading-out dosimetric data from a first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and a second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor, where the first passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor and the second passive integrating ionizing radiation sensor remain situated where the dosimetric data was integrated while reading-out. Another method includes arranging a plurality of ionizing radiation sensors in a spatially dispersed array; determining a relative position of each of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors to define a volume of interest; collecting ionizing radiation data from at least a subset of the plurality of ionizing radiation sensors; and triggering an alarm condition when a dose level of an ionizing radiation source is calculated to exceed a threshold.

  3. Overview of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.; Goldhagen, P.; Tai, H.; Shinn, J. L.

    2003-01-01

    The SuperSonic Transport (SST) development program within the US was based at the Langley Research Center as was the Apollo radiation testing facility (Space Radiation Effects Laboratory) with associated radiation research groups. It was natural for the issues of the SST to be first recognized by this unique combination of research programs. With a re-examination of the technologies for commercial supersonic flight and the possible development of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), the remaining issues of the SST required resolution. It was the progress of SST radiation exposure research program founded by T. Foelsche at the Langley Research Center and the identified remaining issues after that project over twenty-five years ago which became the launch point of the current atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) research project. Added emphasis to the need for reassessment of atmospheric radiation resulted from the major lowering of the recommended occupational exposure limits, the inclusion of aircrew as radiation workers, and the recognition of civil aircrew as a major source of occupational exposures. Furthermore, the work of Ferenc Hajnal of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory brought greater focus to the uncertainties in the neutron flux at high altitudes. A re-examination of the issues involved was committed at the Langley Research Center and by the National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP). As a result of the NCRP review, a new flight package was assembled and flown during solar minimum at which time the galactic cosmic radiation is at a maximum (June 1997). The present workshop is the initial analysis of the new data from that flight. The present paper is an overview of the status of knowledge of atmospheric ionizing radiations. We will re-examine the exposures of the world population and examine the context of aircrew exposures with implications for the results of the present research. A condensed version of this report was given at the 1998

  4. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photo-electron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  5. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  6. Virtual environment application with partial gravity simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, David M.; Vanchau, Michael N.

    1994-01-01

    To support manned missions to the surface of Mars and missions requiring manipulation of payloads and locomotion in space, a training facility is required to simulate the conditions of both partial and microgravity. A partial gravity simulator (Pogo) which uses pneumatic suspension is being studied for use in virtual reality training. Pogo maintains a constant partial gravity simulation with a variation of simulated body force between 2.2 and 10 percent, depending on the type of locomotion inputs. this paper is based on the concept and application of a virtual environment system with Pogo including a head-mounted display and glove. The reality engine consists of a high end SGI workstation and PC's which drive Pogo's sensors and data acquisition hardware used for tracking and control. The tracking system is a hybrid of magnetic and optical trackers integrated for this application.

  7. Transonic control effectiveness for full and partial span elevon configurations on a 0.0165 scale model space shuttle orbiter tested in the LaRC 8-foot transonic wind tunnel (LA48)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A transonic pressure tunnel test is reported on an early version of the space shuttle orbiter (designated 089B-139) 0.0165 scale model to systematically determine both longitudinal and lateral control effectiveness associated with various combinations of inboard, outboard, and full span wing trailing edge controls. The test was conducted over a Mach number range from 0.6 to 1.08 at angles of attack from -2 deg to 23 deg at 0 deg sideslip.

  8. Supersonic control effectiveness for full and partial span elevon configurations on a 0.0165 scale model space shuttle orbiter tested in the LaRC unitary plan wind tunnel (LA49)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A wind tunnel test is reported on an early version of the space shuttle orbiter (designated 089B-139) 0.0165 scale model to systematically determine both longitudinal and lateral control effectiveness associated with various combinations of inboard, outboard, and full span wing trailing edge controls. The test Mach umbers were 2.5 and 4.63 over an angle of attack range from -4 deg to 42 deg at 0 deg sideslip.

  9. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    PubMed Central

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-01-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter. PMID:25744080

  10. Laparoscopic partial splenic resection.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Pfeifer, J; Schauer, C; Kronberger, L; Rabl, H; Ranftl, G; Hauser, H; Bahadori, K

    1995-04-01

    Twenty domestic pigs with an average weight of 30 kg were subjected to laparoscopic partial splenic resection with the aim of determining the feasibility, reliability, and safety of this procedure. Unlike the human spleen, the pig spleen is perpendicular to the body's long axis, and it is long and slender. The parenchyma was severed through the middle third, where the organ is thickest. An 18-mm trocar with a 60-mm Endopath linear cutter was used for the resection. The tissue was removed with a 33-mm trocar. The operation was successfully concluded in all animals. No capsule tears occurred as a result of applying the stapler. Optimal hemostasis was achieved on the resected edges in all animals. Although these findings cannot be extended to human surgery without reservations, we suggest that diagnostic partial resection and minor cyst resections are ideal initial indications for this minimally invasive approach.

  11. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  12. Partially coherent ultrafast spectrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Couprie, M.-E.

    2015-03-01

    Modern ultrafast metrology relies on the postulate that the pulse to be measured is fully coherent, that is, that it can be completely described by its spectrum and spectral phase. However, synthesizing fully coherent pulses is not always possible in practice, especially in the domain of emerging ultrashort X-ray sources where temporal metrology is strongly needed. Here we demonstrate how frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), the first and one of the most widespread techniques for pulse characterization, can be adapted to measure partially coherent pulses even down to the attosecond timescale. No modification of experimental apparatuses is required; only the processing of the measurement changes. To do so, we take our inspiration from other branches of physics where partial coherence is routinely dealt with, such as quantum optics and coherent diffractive imaging. This will have important and immediate applications, such as enabling the measurement of X-ray free-electron laser pulses despite timing jitter.

  13. Activated partial thromboplastin time.

    PubMed

    Ignjatovic, Vera

    2013-01-01

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) is a commonly used coagulation assay that is easy to perform, is affordable, and is therefore performed in most coagulation laboratories, both clinical and research, worldwide. The APTT is based on the principle that in citrated plasma, the addition of a platelet substitute, factor XII activator, and CaCl2 allows for formation of a stable clot. The time required for the formation of a stable clot is recorded in seconds and represents the actual APTT result.

  14. The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the Far-Infrared and Radio Emission in the Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terebey, S.; Fich, M.; Taylor, R.

    1999-01-01

    A summary of research activities carried out in this eighth and final progress report. The final report includes: this summary document, copies of three published research papers, plus a draft manuscript of a fourth research paper entitled "The Contribution of Ionizing Stars to the FarInfrared and Radio Emission in the Milky Way; Evidence for a Swept-up Shell and Diffuse Ionized Halo around the W4 Chimney/Supershell." The main activity during the final quarterly reporting period was research on W4, including analysis of the radio and far-infrared images, generation of shell models, a literature search, and preparation of a research manuscript. There will be additional consultation with co-authors prior to submission of the paper to the Astrophysical Journal. The results will be presented at the 4th Tetons Summer Conference on "Galactic Structure, Stars, and the ISM" in May 2000. In this fourth and last paper we show W4 has a swept-up partially ionized shell of gas and dust which is powered by the OCl 352 star cluster. Analysis shows there is dense interstellar material directly below the shell, evidence that that the lower W4 shell "ran into a brick wall" and stalled, whereas the upper W4 shell achieved "breakout" to form a Galactic chimney. An ionized halo is evidence of Lyman continuum leakage which ionizes the WIM (warm ionized medium). It has long been postulated that the strong winds and abundant ionizing photons from massive stars are responsible for much of the large scale structure in the interstellar medium (ISM), including the ISM in other galaxies. However standard HII region theory predicts few photons will escape the local HII region. The significance of W4 and this work is it provides a direct example of how stellar winds power a galactic chimney, which in turn leads to a low density cavity from which ionizing photons can escape to large distances to ionize the WIM.

  15. Laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Y; Takami, H; Tajima, G; Sasaki, Y; Takayama, J; Kurihara, H; Niimi, M

    2002-01-01

    Since corticosteroids are indispensable hormones, partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomies may be adopted for the surgical treatment of adrenal diseases. In this article, we describe the technique and results of these procedures. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenalectomy has been performed in 10 patients. Seven cases had an aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and three had a pheochromocytoma. Three cases with an APA and a case with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located far from the adrenal central vein, and the vein could be preserved. Four cases with an APA and two with a pheochromocytoma had tumors located close to the adrenal central vein, and it was necessary to section the central vein to resect them. All endoscopic procedures were performed successfully. There were no postoperative complications. At follow-up, adrenal 131I-adosterol scintigrams showed the preservation of remnant adrenal function in all patients. Laparoscopic partial or cortical-sparing adrenal surgery was safely performed, and adrenal function was preserved irrespective of whether the adrenal central vein could be preserved or not. We consider this to be a useful operative technique for selected cases.

  16. ASYMMETRIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN WEAKLY IONIZED CHROMOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Lukin, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-06-01

    Realistic models of magnetic reconnection in the solar chromosphere must take into account that the plasma is partially ionized and that plasma conditions within any two magnetic flux bundles undergoing reconnection may not be the same. Asymmetric reconnection in the chromosphere may occur when newly emerged flux interacts with pre-existing, overlying flux. We present 2.5D simulations of asymmetric reconnection in weakly ionized, reacting plasmas where the magnetic field strengths, ion and neutral densities, and temperatures are different in each upstream region. The plasma and neutral components are evolved separately to allow non-equilibrium ionization. As in previous simulations of chromospheric reconnection, the current sheet thins to the scale of the neutral–ion mean free path and the ion and neutral outflows are strongly coupled. However, the ion and neutral inflows are asymmetrically decoupled. In cases with magnetic asymmetry, a net flow of neutrals through the current sheet from the weak-field (high-density) upstream region into the strong-field upstream region results from a neutral pressure gradient. Consequently, neutrals dragged along with the outflow are more likely to originate from the weak-field region. The Hall effect leads to the development of a characteristic quadrupole magnetic field modified by asymmetry, but the X-point geometry expected during Hall reconnection does not occur. All simulations show the development of plasmoids after an initial laminar phase.

  17. Highly ionized xenon and volumetric weighting in restricted focal geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohaber, J.; Kolomenskii, A. A.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2015-08-01

    The ionization of xenon atoms subjected to 42 fs, 800 nm pulses of radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser was investigated. In our experiments, a maximum laser intensity of ˜ 2 × 10 15 W / cm 2 was used. Xenon ions were measured using a time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer having an entrance slit with dimensions of 12 μ m × 400 μ m . The observed yields Xe n + ( n = 1 - 7 ) were partially free of spatial averaging. The ion yields showed sequential and nonsequential multiple ionization and dip structures following saturation. To investigate the dip structures and to perform a comparison between experimental and simulated data, with the goal of clarifying the effects of residual spatial averaging, we derived a hybrid analytical-numerical solution for the integration kernel in restricted focal geometries. We simulated xenon ionization using Ammosov-Delone-Krainov and Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev theories and obtained agreement with the results of observations. Since a large number of experiments suffer from spatial averaging, the results presented are important to correctly interpret experimental data by taking into account spatial averaging.

  18. The CoRoT target HD 49933: a possible seismic signature of heavy elements ionization in the deep convective zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Ana; Lopes, Ilídio

    2017-04-01

    We use a seismic diagnostic, based on the derivative of the phase shift of the acoustic waves reflected by the surface, to probe the outer layers of the star HD 49933. This diagnostic is particularly sensitive to partial ionization processes occurring above the base of the convective zone. The regions of partial ionization of light elements, hydrogen and helium, have well-known seismological signatures. In this work, we detect a different seismic signature in the acoustic frequencies, which we showed to correspond to the location where the partial ionization of heavy elements occurs. The location of the corresponding acoustic glitch lies between the region of the second ionization of helium and the base of the convective zone, approximately 5 per cent below the surface of the stars.

  19. Towards a Carbon Nanotube Ionization Source for Planetary Atmosphere Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, A. V.; Leblanc, F.; Berthelier, J. J.; Becker, J.; Coulomb, R.; Gilbert, P.; Hong, N. T.; Lee, S.; Vettier, L.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of planetary exospheres today, relies on the development of a highly efficient ionization source, due to the scant neutral molecules (n < 108 cm -3) present in diffuse planetary coronae. These tenuous atmospheres provide insight on to physical processes known to occur such as: space weathering, magneto-atmosphere interactions, as well as atmospheric escape mechanisms, all of which are being heavily investigated via current 3D Monte Carlo simulations (Turc et al. 2014, Leblanc et al. 2016 in prep) at LATMOS. Validation of these studies will rely on in-situ observations in the coming decades. Neutral detection strongly depends on electron-impact ionization which via conventional cathode-sources, such as thermal filaments (heated up to 2000 K), may only produce the target ionization essential for energy-measurements with large power consumption. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) however are ideal low-power, cold cathodes, when subject to moderate electric fields (E ~ 1 MV / m). We present our current device, a small CNT chip, of emission area 15 mm2, emitting electrons that pass through an anode grid and subsequent electrostatic analyzer. The device currently extracts hundreds of µAmperes with applied external voltages ~ -150 Volts, approaching minimum power consumption < 0.1 Watts. The 3D modeling of field effect electrons ionizing a standard influx of neutrals is shown, using the multiphysics suite COMSOL. To better anticipate the species an ideal in-situ spacecraft equipped with such an ionization source would observe, we discuss Europa's exosphere. Europa's environment is largely shaped by the Jovian plasma sputtering the icy regolith with heavy ions and electrons (keV < E < MeV), producing predominately molecular oxygen (Johnson et al. 2002).

  20. Ionizing radiation exposure of LDEF (pre-recovery estimates)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Heinrich, W.; Parnell, T. A.; Armstrong, T. W.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Frank, A. L.; Watts, J. W. Jr; Wiegel, B.

    1992-01-01

    The long duration exposure facility (LDEF), launched into a 258 nautical mile orbit with an inclination of 28.5 degrees, remained in space for nearly 6 yr. The 21,500 lb NASA satellite was one of the largest payloads ever deployed by the Space Shuttle. LDEF completed 32,422 orbits and carried 57 major experiments representing more than 200 investigators from 33 private companies, 21 universities and nine countries. The experiments covered a wide range of disciplines including basic science, electronics, optics, materials, structures and power and propulsion. A number of the experiments were specifically designed to measure the radiation environment. These experiments are of specific interest, since the LDEF orbit is essentially the same as that of the Space Station Freedom. Consequently, the radiation measurements on LDEF will play a significant role in the design of radiation shielding of the space station. The contributions of the various authors presented here attempt to predict the major aspects of the radiation exposure received by the various LDEF experiments and therefore should be helpful to investigators who are in the process of analyzing experiments which may have been affected by exposure to ionizing radiation. The paper discusses the various types and sources of ionizing radiation including cosmic rays, trapped particles (both protons and electrons) and secondary particles (including neutrons, spallation products and high-LET recoils), as well as doses and LET spectra as a function of shielding. Projections of the induced radioactivity of LDEF are also discussed.

  1. Hot electron dominated rapid transverse ionization growth in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael S; Erickson, Thomas; Frische, Kyle; Roquemore, William M

    2011-06-20

    Pump/probe optical-transmission measurements are used to monitor in space and time the ionization of a liquid column of water following impact of an 800-nm, 45-fs pump pulse. The pump pulse strikes the 53-μm-diameter column normal to its axis with intensities up to 2 × 10(15) W/cm2. After the initial photoinization and for probe delay times < 500 fs, the neutral water surrounding the beam is rapidly ionized in the transverse direction, presumably by hot electrons with initial velocities of 0.55 times the speed of light (relativistic kinetic energy of ~100 keV). Such velocities are unusual for condensed-matter excitation at the stated laser intensities.

  2. Direct observations of the evolution of polar cap ionization patches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-He; Zhang, Bei-Chen; Lockwood, Michael; Hu, Hong-Qiao; Moen, Jøran; Ruohoniemi, J Michael; Thomas, Evan G; Zhang, Shun-Rong; Yang, Hui-Gen; Liu, Rui-Yuan; McWilliams, Kathryn A; Baker, Joseph B H

    2013-03-29

    Patches of ionization are common in the polar ionosphere, where their motion and associated density gradients give variable disturbances to high-frequency (HF) radio communications, over-the-horizon radar location errors, and disruption and errors to satellite navigation and communication. Their formation and evolution are poorly understood, particularly under disturbed space weather conditions. We report direct observations of the full evolution of patches during a geomagnetic storm, including formation, polar cap entry, transpolar evolution, polar cap exit, and sunward return flow. Our observations show that modulation of nightside reconnection in the substorm cycle of the magnetosphere helps form the gaps between patches where steady convection would give a "tongue" of ionization (TOI).

  3. Improved Imaging Resolution in Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Imaging resolution of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) was investigated using printed patterns on paper and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plate surfaces. Resolution approaching 40 m was achieved with a typical DESI-MS setup, which is approximately 5 times better than the best resolution reported previously. This improvement was accomplished with careful control of operational parameters (particularly spray tip-to-surface distance, solvent flow rate, and spacing of lane scans). Also, an appropriately strong analyte/surface interaction and uniform surface texture on the size scale no larger that the desired imaging resolution were required to achieve this resolution. Overall, conditions providing the smallest possible effective desorption/ionization area in the DESI impact plume region and minimizing the analyte redistribution on the surface during analysis led to the improved DESI-MS imaging resolution.

  4. Measurements of Beam Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Snopok, Pavel; Rogers, Chris; Neuffer, David; Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Cooled muon beams are essential for production of high-flux neutrino beams at the Neutrino Factory and high luminosity muon beams at the Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment, MICE aims to demonstrate muon beam cooling through ionization energy loss of muons in material. The standard figure of merit for cooling in MICE is the transverse RMS emittance reduction and to measure this, the individual muon positions and momenta are reconstructed using scintillating-fiber tracking detectors, before and after a low-Z absorbing material. In this study, in addition to a preview on the standard measurement technique, an alternative technique is described, which is the measurement of phase-space density using the novel Kernel Density Estimation method. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE - AC05 - 06OR23100.

  5. MAARSY - the new MST radar on Andøya: first results of spaced antenna and Doppler measurements of atmospheric winds in the troposphere and mesosphere using a partial array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Latteck, R.; Rapp, M.; Singer, W.; Zecha, M.

    2012-09-01

    MST radars have been used to study the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere over decades. These radars have proven to be a valuable tool to investigate atmospheric dynamics. MAARSY, the new MST radar at the island of Andøya uses a phased array antenna and is able to perform spaced antenna and Doppler measurements at the same time with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here we present first wind observations using the initial expansion stage during summer 2010. The tropospheric spaced antenna and Doppler beam swinging experiments are compared to radiosonde measurements, which were launched at the nearby Andøya Rocket Range (ARR). The mesospheric wind observations are evaluated versus common volume meteor radar wind measurements. The beam steering capabilities of MAARSY are demonstrated by performing systematic scans of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using 25 and 91 beam directions. These wind observations permit to evaluate the new radar against independent measurements from radiosondes and meteor radar measurements to demonstrate its capabilities to provide reliable wind data from the troposphere up to the mesosphere.

  6. Partial Southwest Elevation Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (Part 3), Partial Southwest Elevation - Mill #5 West (with Section of Courtyard) (Parts 1 & 2) - Boott Cotton Mills, John Street at Merrimack River, Lowell, Middlesex County, MA

  7. Ionizing Radiation and Its Risks

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Marvin

    1982-01-01

    Penetrating ionizing radiation fairly uniformly puts all exposed molecules and cells at approximately equal risk for deleterious consequences. Thus, the original deposition of radiation energy (that is, the dose) is unaltered by metabolic characteristics of cells and tissue, unlike the situation for chemical agents. Intensely ionizing radiations, such as neutrons and alpha particles, are up to ten times more damaging than sparsely ionizing sources such as x-rays or gamma rays for equivalent doses. Furthermore, repair in cells and tissues can ameliorate the consequences of radiation doses delivered at lower rates by up to a factor of ten compared with comparable doses acutely delivered, especially for somatic (carcinogenic) and genetic effects from x- and gamma-irradiation exposure. Studies on irradiated laboratory animals or on people following occupational, medical or accidental exposures point to an average lifetime fatal cancer risk of about 1 × 10-4 per rem of dose (100 per 106 person-rem). Leukemia and lung, breast and thyroid cancer seem more likely than other types of cancer to be produced by radiation. Radiation exposures from natural sources (cosmic rays and terrestrial radioactivity) of about 0.1 rem per year yield a lifetime cancer risk about 0.1 percent of the normally occurring 20 percent risk of cancer death. An increase of about 1 percent per rem in fatal cancer risk, or 200 rem to double the “background” risk rate, is compared with an estimate of about 100 rem to double the genetic risk. Newer data suggest that the risks for low-level radiation are lower than risks estimated from data from high exposures and that the present 5 rem per year limit for workers is adequate. PMID:6761969

  8. The Tevatron Ionization Profile Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bowie, K.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    In designing an ionization profile monitor system for the Tevatron some novel approaches were taken, in particular for the readout electronics. This was motivated by the desire to resolve the individual bunches in both beams simultaneously. For this purpose, custom made electronics originally developed for Particle Physics experiments was used to provide a fast charge integration with very low noise. The various parts of the read-out electronics have been borrowed or adapted from the KTev, CMS, MINOS and BTev experiments. The detector itself also had to be modified to provide clean signals with sufficient bandwidth. The system design will be described along with the initial results.

  9. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  10. Superponderomotive regime of tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, D. F.; Palastro, J. P.; Hafizi, B.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrarelativistic photoelectron spectra exhibit unexpected characteristics in a paraxial laser focus. The photoelectron energy scales superponderomotively, and the usual parabolic momentum distribution is distorted into a variety of intricate patterns, depending on the location of the ion. These patterns include discrete contours, which in some cases can be easily identified with a particular subcycle burst of ionization current. An analytical formula for the maximum photoelectron energy in a paraxial radiation field is given, and high-resolution momentum distributions with narrowly peaked features are presented. These narrowly peaked features suggest application to electron injection into plasma-based accelerators.

  11. Requirements for Simulating Space Radiation With Particle Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M-H Y.

    2004-01-01

    Interplanetary space radiation consists of fully ionized nuclei of atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in the materials of spacecraft and planetary surface enclosures is a major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. Accurate risk prediction depends on a knowledge of basic radiobiological mechanisms and how they are modified in the living tissues of a whole organism. To a large extent, this knowledge is not currently available. It is best developed at ground-based laboratories, using particle accelerator beams to simulate the components of space radiation. Different particles, in different energy regions, are required to study different biological effects, including beams of argon and iron nuclei in the energy range 600 to several thousand MeV/nucleon and carbon beams in the energy range of approximately 100 MeV/nucleon to approximately 1000 MeV/nucleon. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjunction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required. International cooperation in the use of these facilities is essential to the development of a safe international space program.

  12. SR90, strontium shaped-charge critical ionization velocity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wescott, Eugene M.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans; Swift, Daniel W.; Valenzuela, Arnoldo; Rees, David

    1990-01-01

    In May 1986 an experiment was performed to test Alfven's critical ionization velocity (CIV) effect in free space, using the first high explosive shaped charge with a conical liner of strontium metal. The release, made at 540 km altitude at dawn twilight, was aimed at 48 deg to B. The background electron density was 1.5 x 10(exp 4) cu cm. A faint field-aligned Sr(+) ion streak with tip velocity of 2.6 km/s was observed from two optical sites. Using two calibration methods, it was calculated that between 4.5 x 10(exp 20) and 2 x 10(exp 21) ions were visible. An ionization time constant of 1920 s was calculated for Sr from the solar UV spectrum and ionization cross section which combined with a computer simulation of the injection predicts 1.7 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions in the low-velocity part of the ion streak. Thus all the observed ions are from solar UV ionization of the slow (less than critical) velocity portion of the neutral jet. The observed neutral Sr velocity distribution and computer simulations indicate that 2 x 10(exp 21) solar UV ions would have been created from the fast (greater than critical) part of the jet. They would have been more diffuse, and were not observed. Using this fact it was estimated that any CIV ions created were less than 10(exp 21). It was concluded that future Sr CIV free space experiments should be conducted below the UV shadow height and in much larger background plasma density.

  13. Paternalism and partial autonomy.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, O

    1984-01-01

    A contrast is often drawn between standard adult capacities for autonomy, which allow informed consent to be given or withheld, and patients' reduced capacities, which demand paternalistic treatment. But patients may not be radically different from the rest of us, in that all human capacities for autonomous action are limited. An adequate account of paternalism and the role that consent and respect for persons can play in medical and other practice has to be developed within an ethical theory that does not impose an idealised picture of unlimited autonomy but allows for the variable and partial character of actual human autonomy. PMID:6520849

  14. Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl and eta5-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl studied by symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation and collision-energy resolved Penning ionization electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Naoki; Ohno, Koichi

    2010-02-28

    Valence ionized states of iron pentacarbonyl Fe(CO)(5) and eta(5)-cyclopentadienyl cobalt dicarbonyl Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2) have been studied by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, two-dimensional Penning ionization electron spectroscopy (2D-PIES), and symmetry-adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculations. Theory provided reliable assignments for the complex ionization spectra of these molecules, which have metal-carbonyl bonds. Theoretical ionization energies agreed well with experimental observations and the calculated wave functions could explain the relative intensities of PIES spectra. The collision-energy dependence of partial ionization cross sections (CEDPICS) was obtained by 2D-PIES. To interpret these CEDPICS, the interaction potentials between the molecules and a Li atom were examined in several coordinates by calculations. The relation between the slope of the CEDPICS and the electronic structure of the ionized states, such as molecular symmetry and the spatial distribution of ionizing orbitals, was analyzed. In Fe(CO)(5), an attractive interaction was obtained for the equatorial CO, while the interaction for the axial CO direction was repulsive. For Co(eta(5)-C(5)H(5))(CO)(2), the interaction potential in the direction of both Co-C-O and Co-Cp ring was attractive. These anisotropic interactions and ionizing orbital distributions consistently explain the relative slopes of the CEDPICS.

  15. Theory of spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Vahimaa, Pasi; Tervo, Jani

    2005-08-01

    A coherent-mode representation for spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulses is derived both in the space-frequency domain and in the space-time domain. It is shown that both the cross-spectral density and the mutual coherence function of partially coherent pulses can be expressed as a sum of spatially and spectrally and temporally completely coherent modes. The concept of the effective degree of coherence for nonstationary fields is introduced. As an application of the theory, the propagation of Gaussian Schell-model pulsed beams in the space-frequency domain is considered and their coherent-mode representation is presented.

  16. Experts' Understanding of Partial Derivatives Using the Partial Derivative Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-01-01

    Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of…

  17. Electron-impact-ionization dynamics of five C2 to C4 perfluorocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, James N.; Bart, Mark; Vallance, Claire; Harland, Peter W.

    2013-12-01

    Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are man-made compounds whose ion physics exhibit complex interplays between statistical and nonstatistical fragmentation and intramolecular rearrangement processes. One probe of such processes is the energy-dependent electron-impact-ionization cross section. Partial electron-impact-ionization cross sections are reported for the fragments arising from five C2 to C4 PFCs, namely, C2F6, C3F8, C3F6, CF2=CF-CF=CF2, and CF3-C≡C-CF3, over the energy range from threshold to ˜210 eV. Care was taken to maximize ion collection efficiency and to minimize discrimination against ions produced with high kinetic-energy release, and the measured cross sections have been calibrated using independent absolute total (gross) ionization efficiency curves measured previously in the same laboratory with an instrument that was designed to essentially have unit detection efficiency. Total ionization cross sections have also been modeled using the binary-encounter Bethe model, and the shortcomings of the model when applied to perfluorinated compounds are discussed. Analysis of the mass spectral fragmentation patterns in combination with ab initio energetics suggests that nonstatistical dissociative ionization processes play a significant role in the fragmentation dynamics of saturated PFCs. In contrast, unsaturated PFCs exhibit long-lived parent ions, which tend to undergo a higher degree of statistical dissociation following ionization, involving considerable intramolecular rearrangement.

  18. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  19. Radiation protection in space

    SciTech Connect

    Blakely, E.A.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1995-02-01

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space.

  20. Partial cross sections of helium satellites at medium photon energies

    SciTech Connect

    Wehlitz, R.; Sellin, I.A.; Hemmers, O.

    1997-04-01

    Still of current interest is the important role of single ionization with excitation compared to single ionization alone. The coupling between the electrons and the incoming photon is a single-particle operator. Thus, an excitation in addition to an ionization, leading to a so-called satellite line in a photoelectron spectrum, is entirely due to electron-electron interaction and probes the electron correlation in the ground and final state. Therefore the authors have undertaken the study of the intensity of helium satellites He{sup +}nl (n = 2 - 6) relative to the main photoline (n = 1) as a function of photon energy at photon energies well above threshold up to 900 eV. From these results they could calculate the partial cross-sections of the helium satellites. In order to test the consistency of their satellite-to-1s ratios with published double-to-single photoionization ratios, the authors calculated the double-to-single photoionization ratio from their measured ratios using the theoretical energy-distribution curves of Chang and Poe and Le Rouzo and Dal Cappello which proved to be valid for photon energies below 120 eV. These calculated double-to-single ionization ratios agree fairly well with recent ion measurements. In the lower photon energy range the authors ratios agree better with the ratios of Doerner et al. while for higher photon energies the agreement is better with the values of Levin et al.

  1. Furnace brazing under partial vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckown, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Brazing furnace utilizing partial-vacuum technique reduces tooling requirements and produces better bond. Benefit in that partial vacuum helps to dissociate metal oxides that inhibit metal flow and eliminates heavy tooling required to hold parts together during brazing.

  2. Sequential binary collision ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Boeyen, R. W.; Watanabe, N.; Doering, J. P.; Moore, J. H.; Coplan, M. A.; Cooper, J. W.

    2004-03-01

    Fully differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of the magnesium 3s orbital have been measured in a high-momentum-transfer regime wherein the ionization mechanisms can be accurately described by simple binary collision models. Measurements where performed at incident-electron energies from 400 to 3000 eV, ejected-electron energies of 62 eV, scattering angle of 20 °, and momentum transfers of 2 to 5 a.u. In the out-of-plane geometry of the experiment the cross section is observed far off the Bethe ridge. Both first- and second-order processes can be clearly distinguished as previously observed by Murray et al [Ref. 1] and Schulz et al [Ref. 2]. Owing to the relatively large momentum of the ejected electron, the second order processes can be modeled as sequential binary collisions involving a binary elastic collision between the incident electron and ionic core and a binary knock-out collision between the incident electron and target electron. At low incident-electron energies the cross section for both first and second order processes are comparable, while at high incident energies second-order processes dominate. *Supported by NSF under grant PHY-99-87870. [1] A. J. Murray, M. B. J. Woolf, and F. H. Read J. Phys. B 25, 3021 (1992). [2] M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D. H. Madison. S. Jones and J. Ullrich, Nature 422, 48 (2003).

  3. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  4. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  5. New design of high performance ionizing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronggang; Sun, Yurong

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new design of DC-pulse ionizing bar to solve the problem of imbalance offset voltage for the AC ionizing bar, which is easily affected by the environment, as well as indicate the final tests. The new design mainly includes five parts: power supply circuit, main control unit, logic circuit, high frequency transformer unit, and feedback unit. The ionizing bar can automatically adjust the discharge voltage, pulse frequency and pulse width to balance the positive and negative ions. The final test results indicate that the DC ionizing bar owns good effect in electrostatic elimination.

  6. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  7. Space experiments with particle accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kawashima, N.; Kuriki, K.; Nagatomo, M.; Ninomiya, K.; Sasaki, S.; Roberts, W. T.; Chappell, C. R.; Reasoner, D. L.; Garriott, O. K.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1984-01-01

    Electron and plasma beams and neutral gas plumes were injected into the space environment by instruuments on Spacelab 1, and various diagnostic measurements including television camera observations were performed. The results yield information on vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma interactions, and ionization enhancement by neutral beam injection.

  8. Personnel neutron monitoring in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review is presented of available information on the galactic neutron spectrum. An examination is made of the difficulties encountered in the determination of the dose equivalent of neutron recoil protons in the presence of a substantially larger background of trapped and star-produced protons as well as other ionizing particles in space.

  9. Overview of Mercury's ionized exosphere and plasma environment: Results from the first MESSENGER flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Raines, Jim M.; Gloeckler, George; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Slavin, James A.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sprague, Ann L.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction The MESSENGER Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) [1] operated during the 14 January 2008 flyby of Mercury (M1) and provided the first composition measurements of Mercury's ionized exosphere and the ion plasma measurements of Mercury's magnetosphere. Ions in the mass/charge range 1 to ~60 amu/e were detected during the flyby period with a time-resolution of 8 s and within an energy range 0.1-13.5 keV/e. We will focus on three key results from this data set. First on the composition measurements of the ionized exosphere. The exosphere is found to be compositionally rich, with five key components in specific ranges of mass/charge. The identification of the specific elements is not unique because of limits to the FIPS counting statistics as well as the finite mass-resolution of FIPS. Second, we focus on the observations of multiply charged C and O observed in the magnetosphere. These particles are likely the result of impact ionization of hot electrons in the magnetosphere, and hence they provide an important indirect characterization of the magnetosphere. Third, we present an overview of the magnetospheric plasma properties as revealed by FIPS. Plasma moments are computed from what are at times partially obstructed velocity distributions. Our plasma moments are compared with magnetohydrodynamic simulations [2] of the magnetosphere. Exosphere Composition The exospheric composition is dominated by components in five ranges of mass/charge (m/q=23- 24, 32-35, 28, 39-40, and 17-19 amu/e) [3]. Even though the identification of the individual components is at times not unambiguous, FIPS measurements provide a rich set of constraints for the violent interactions of the space environment with Mercury's surface. The ionized exosphere is dominated by Na+ and Mg+, with a relative abundance that remains uncertain at this time due to limited counting statistics. The second mass/charge range most likely includes S+, O2 +, and/or H2S+, providing a first possible

  10. Plasma potential of a moving ionization zone in DC magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Anders, André

    2017-02-01

    Using movable emissive and floating probes, we determined the plasma and floating potentials of an ionization zone (spoke) in a direct current magnetron sputtering discharge. Measurements were recorded in a space and time resolved manner, which allowed us to make a three-dimensional representation of the plasma potential. From this information we could derive the related electric field, space charge, and the related spatial distribution of electron heating. The data reveal the existence of strong electric fields parallel and perpendicular to the target surface. The largest E-fields result from a double layer structure at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We suggest that the double layer plays a crucial role in the energization of electrons since electrons can gain several 10 eV of energy when crossing the double layer. We find sustained coupling between the potential structure, electron heating, and excitation and ionization processes as electrons drift over the magnetron target. The brightest region of an ionization zone is present right after the potential jump, where drifting electrons arrive and where most local electron heating occurs. The ionization zone intensity decays as electrons continue to drift in the Ez × B direction, losing energy by inelastic collisions; electrons become energized again as they cross the potential jump. This results in the elongated, arrowhead-like shape of the ionization zone. The ionization zone moves in the -Ez × B direction from which the to-be-heated electrons arrive and into which the heating region expands; the zone motion is dictated by the force of the local electric field on the ions at the leading edge of the ionization zone. We hypothesize that electron heating caused by the potential jump and physical processes associated with the double layer also apply to magnetrons at higher discharge power, including high power impulse magnetron sputtering.

  11. The calculation of ionization energies by perturbation, configuration interaction and approximate coupled pair techniques and comparisons with green's function methods for Ne, H 2O and N 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacskay, George B.

    1980-05-01

    The vertical valence ionization potentials of Ne, H 2O and N 2 have been calculated by Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation and configuration interaction methods. The calculations were carried out in the space of a single determinant reference state and its single and double excitations, using both the N and N - 1 electron Hartree-Fock orbitals as hole/particle bases. The perturbation series for the ion state were generally found to converge fairly slowly in the N electron Hartree-Fock (frozen) orbital basis, but considerably faster in the appropriate N - 1 electron RHF (relaxed) orbital basis. In certain cases, however, due to near-degeneracy effects, partial, and even complete, breakdown of the (non-degenerate) perturbation treatment was observed. The effects of higher excitations on the ionization potentials were estimated by the approximate coupled pair techniques CPA' and CPA″ as well as by a Davidson type correction formula. The final, fully converged CPA″ results are generally in good agreement with those from PNO-CEPA and Green's function calculations as well as experiment.

  12. Nonlocal diffusion second order partial differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, I.; Loi, N. V.; Malaguti, L.; Taddei, V.

    2017-02-01

    The paper deals with a second order integro-partial differential equation in Rn with a nonlocal, degenerate diffusion term. Nonlocal conditions, such as the Cauchy multipoint and the weighted mean value problem, are investigated. The existence of periodic solutions is also studied. The dynamic is transformed into an abstract setting and the results come from an approximation solvability method. It combines a Schauder degree argument with an Hartman-type inequality and it involves a Scorza-Dragoni type result. The compact embedding of a suitable Sobolev space in the corresponding Lebesgue space is the unique amount of compactness which is needed in this discussion. The solutions are located in bounded sets and they are limits of functions with values in finitely dimensional spaces.

  13. Current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-08-01

    The balances of particles and charges in the volume of parallel-plane ionization chamber are considered. Differential equations describing the distribution of current densities in the chamber volume are obtained. As a result of the differential equations solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization in the volume is obtained.

  14. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Erlan S.; Smith, James R.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Monjes, Julio A.

    1991-01-01

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp.

  15. Partially segmented deformable mirror

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, E.S.; Smith, J.R.; Salmon, J.T.; Monjes, J.A.

    1991-05-21

    A partially segmented deformable mirror is formed with a mirror plate having a smooth and continuous front surface and a plurality of actuators to its back surface. The back surface is divided into triangular areas which are mutually separated by grooves. The grooves are deep enough to make the plate deformable and the actuators for displacing the mirror plate in the direction normal to its surface are inserted in the grooves at the vertices of the triangular areas. Each actuator includes a transducer supported by a receptacle with outer shells having outer surfaces. The vertices have inner walls which are approximately perpendicular to the mirror surface and make planar contacts with the outer surfaces of the outer shells. The adhesive which is used on these contact surfaces tends to contract when it dries but the outer shells can bend and serve to minimize the tendency of the mirror to warp. 5 figures.

  16. Partial oxidation catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Krumpelt, Michael; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Doshi, Rajiv

    2000-01-01

    A two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion. The dehydrogenation portion is a group VIII metal and the oxide-ion conducting portion is selected from a ceramic oxide crystallizing in the fluorite or perovskite structure. There is also disclosed a method of forming a hydrogen rich gas from a source of hydrocarbon fuel in which the hydrocarbon fuel contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion at a temperature not less than about 400.degree. C. for a time sufficient to generate the hydrogen rich gas while maintaining CO content less than about 5 volume percent. There is also disclosed a method of forming partially oxidized hydrocarbons from ethanes in which ethane gas contacts a two-part catalyst comprising a dehydrogenation portion and an oxide-ion conducting portion for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form an oxide.

  17. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  18. The Manifest Association Structure of the Single-Factor Model: Insights from Partial Correlations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salgueiro, Maria de Fatima; Smith, Peter W. F.; McDonald, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The association structure between manifest variables arising from the single-factor model is investigated using partial correlations. The additional insights to the practitioner provided by partial correlations for detecting a single-factor model are discussed. The parameter space for the partial correlations is presented, as are the patterns of…

  19. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy: Superiority over laparoscopic partial nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Shiroki, Ryoichi; Fukami, Naohiko; Fukaya, Kosuke; Kusaka, Mamoru; Natsume, Takahiro; Ichihara, Takashi; Toyama, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Nephron-sparing surgery has been proven to positively impact the postoperative quality of life for the treatment of small renal tumors, possibly leading to functional improvements. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy is still one of the most demanding procedures in urological surgery. Laparoscopic partial nephrectomy sometimes results in extended warm ischemic time and severe complications, such as open conversion, postoperative hemorrhage and urine leakage. Robot-assisted partial nephrectomy exploits the advantages offered by the da Vinci Surgical System to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, equipped with 3-D vision and a better degree in the freedom of surgical instruments. The introduction of the da Vinci Surgical System made nephron-sparing surgery, specifically robot-assisted partial nephrectomy, safe with promising results, leading to the shortening of warm ischemic time and a reduction in perioperative complications. Even for complex and challenging tumors, robotic assistance is expected to provide the benefit of minimally-invasive surgery with safe and satisfactory renal function. Warm ischemic time is the modifiable factor during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to affect postoperative kidney function. We analyzed the predictive factors for extended warm ischemic time from our robot-assisted partial nephrectomy series. The surface area of the tumor attached to the kidney parenchyma was shown to significantly affect the extended warm ischemic time during robot-assisted partial nephrectomy. In cases with tumor-attached surface area more than 15 cm(2) , we should consider switching robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to open partial nephrectomy under cold ischemia if it is imperative. In Japan, a nationwide prospective study has been carried out to show the superiority of robot-assisted partial nephrectomy to laparoscopic partial nephrectomy in improving warm ischemic time and complications. By facilitating robotic technology, robot-assisted partial nephrectomy

  20. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  1. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  2. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  3. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  4. Validity boundary of orbital-free molecular dynamics method corresponding to thermal ionization of shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chang; Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Wang, Cong; Zhang, Ping; He, X. T.

    2016-11-01

    With 6LiD as an example, we show that the applicable region of the orbital-free molecular dynamics (OFMD) method in a large temperature range is determined by the thermal ionization process of bound electrons in shell structures. The validity boundary of the OFMD method is defined roughly by the balance point of the average thermal energy of an electron and the ionization energy of the lowest localized electronic state. This theoretical proposition is based on the observation that the deviation of the OFMD method originates from its less accurate description to the charge density in partially ionized shells, as compared with the results of the extended first-principles molecular dynamics method, which well reproduces the charge density of shell structures.

  5. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  6. Space Environment Effects on Materials : An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, Henry B.

    2006-01-01

    A general overview on the space environment and its effects on materials is presented. The topics include: 1) Impact of Space Effects on Spacecraft Costs; 2) Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft by Source; 3) Primary Source of Space Effects: The Sun; 4) The Earth's Environment; 5) Trapped Radiation Belts; 6) Aurora Are Everywhere; 7) Spacecraft Interactions; 8) Atmospheric Effects; 9) Contaminant Effects on Materials; 10) Meteoroid/Debris Effects on Materials; 11) Spacecraft Surface Charging; 12) Surface Discharge Effects; 13) Internal Electrostatic Discharge--Satellite Killer; 14) Plasma Interactions DS-1 Ion Engines; 15) Radiation Effects on Spacecraft Systems and Materials; 16) Total Ionizing Dose Effects Total Ionizing Dose Effects; 17) Man-Made Sources of Space Effects Man-Made Sources of Space Effects; and 18) Space Environments Versus Interactions.

  7. Ionizing Radiation: how fungi cope, adapt, and exploit with the help of melanin

    PubMed Central

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF RECENT ADVANCES Life on Earth has always existed in the flux of ionizing radiation. However, fungi seem to interact with the ionizing radiation differently from other Earth’s inhabitants. Recent data show that melanized fungal species like those from Chernobyl’s reactor respond to ionizing radiation with enhanced growth. Fungi colonize space stations and adapt morphologically to extreme conditions. Radiation exposure causes upregulation of many key genes, and an inducible microhomology-mediated recombination pathway could be a potential mechanism of adaptive evolution in eukaryotes. The discovery of melanized organisms in high radiation environments, the space stations, Antarctic mountains, and in the reactor cooling water combined with phenomenon of ‘radiotropism’ raises the tantalizing possibility that melanins have functions analogous to other energy harvesting pigments such as chlorophylls. PMID:18848901

  8. Semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shvetsov-Shilovski, N. I.; Lein, M.; Madsen, L. B.; Räsänen, E.; Lemell, C.; Burgdörfer, J.; Arbó, D. G.; Tőkési, K.

    2016-07-01

    We present a semiclassical two-step model for strong-field ionization that accounts for path interferences of tunnel-ionized electrons in the ionic potential beyond perturbation theory. Within the framework of a classical trajectory Monte Carlo representation of the phase-space dynamics, the model employs the semiclassical approximation to the phase of the full quantum propagator in the exit channel. By comparison with the exact numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for strong-field ionization of hydrogen, we show that for suitable choices of the momentum distribution after the first tunneling step, the model yields good quantitative agreement with the full quantum simulation. The two-dimensional photoelectron momentum distributions, the energy spectra, and the angular distributions are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding quantum results. Specifically, the model quantitatively reproduces the fanlike interference patterns in the low-energy part of the two-dimensional momentum distributions, as well as the modulations in the photoelectron angular distributions.

  9. Asymmetric particle fluxes from drifting ionization zones in sputtering magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-04-01

    Electron and ion fluxes from direct current and high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS) plasmas were measured in the plane of the target surface. Biased collector probes and a particle energy and mass analyzer showed asymmetric emission of electrons and of singly and doubly charged ions. For both HiPIMS and dcMS discharges, higher fluxes of all types of particles were observed in the direction of the electrons' E × B drift. These results are put in the context with ionization zones that drift over the magnetron's racetrack. The measured currents of time-resolving collector probes suggest that a large fraction of the ion flux originates from drifting ionization zones, while energy-resolving mass spectrometry indicates that a large fraction of the ion energy is due to acceleration by an electric field. This supports the recently proposed hypothesis that each ionization zone is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge structure, thereby producing an electric field that accelerates ions from the location where they were formed.

  10. Simulated Measurements of Cooling in Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohayai, Tanaz; Rogers, Chris; Snopok, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Cooled muon beams set the basis for the exploration of physics of flavour at a Neutrino Factory and for multi-TeV collisions at a Muon Collider. The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) measures beam emittance before and after an ionization cooling cell and aims to demonstrate emittance reduction in muon beams. In the current MICE Step IV configuration, the MICE muon beam passes through low-Z absorber material for reducing its transverse emittance through ionization energy loss. Two scintillating fiber tracking detectors, housed in spectrometer solenoid modules upstream and downstream of the absorber are used for reconstructing position and momentum of individual muons for calculating transverse emittance reduction. However, due to existence of non-linear effects in beam optics, transverse emittance growth can be observed. Therefore, it is crucial to develop algorithms that are insensitive to this apparent emittance growth. We describe a different figure of merit for measuring muon cooling which is the direct measurement of the phase space density.

  11. Future directions for LDEF ionizing radiation modeling and assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.

    1992-01-01

    Data from the ionizing radiation dosimetry aboard LDEF provide a unique opportunity for assessing the accuracy of current space radiation models and in identifying needed improvements for future mission applications. Details are given of the LDEF data available for radiation model evaluations. The status is given of model comparisons with LDEF data, along with future directions of planned modeling efforts and data comparison assessments. The methodology is outlined which is related to modeling being used to help insure that the LDEF ionizing radiation results can be used to address ionizing radiation issues for future missions. In general, the LDEF radiation modeling has emphasized quick-look predictions using simplified methods to make comparisons with absorbed dose measurements and induced radioactivity measurements of emissions. Modeling and LDEF data comparisons related to linear energy transfer spectra are of importance for several reasons which are outlined. The planned modeling and LDEF data comparisons for LET spectra is discussed, including components of the LET spectra due to different environment sources, contribution from different production mechanisms, and spectra in plastic detectors vs silicon.

  12. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing microorganisms. Eradification techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation- based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the non-spore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-spore-forming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/sq m), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  13. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing micro-organisms. Eradi cation techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation-based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the nonspore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-sporeforming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/m2), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  14. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  15. Radiotomographic observations of corpuscular ionization in the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, E. S.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Krysanov, B. Yu.; Nazarenko, M. O.

    2012-04-01

    Along with the antisunward cross-polar convection of the ionospheric plasma and the field-aligned electric currents, the corpuscular fluxes play an important role in the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. Being more tightly coupled with the magnetosphere, the subauroral and auroral ionosphere noticeably differs from the midlatitude ionosphere. It experiences much stronger and faster variations in space and time. The particle fluxes and the electric fields of magnetospheric origin penetrate into the ionosphere and substantially affect the production, loss and transport of charged particles. The rate of ionization in the midlatitude ionosphere is controlled almost solely by the X-ray and UV/EUV solar radiation, whereas in high latitudes the fluxes of particles precipitating from the magnetosphere are significant sources of ionization. Moreover, they are probably the single source during the polar night. Typically, the contribution of the magnetospheric corpuscular fluxes into the ionization is small compared to the contribution of electromagnetic radiation; however, during the geomagnetic storms, it may prove significant, especially if these fluxes are sufficiently strong and act in the nighttime when the solar electromagnetic radiation is absent. The present work is devoted to radio tomographic imaging of the ionospheric effects of particle precipitation using the data from low-orbital navigational satellite systems. The ionospheric radio tomography is actively developed during the past two decades. It provides images of the 2D distribution of electron density in the vertical plane (latitude-altitude cross-sections) (averaged over an interval of 10-15 minutes) for the spatial sector covering several thousand kilometers. The horizontal and vertical resolution of the RT method is 20-30 km and 30-40 km, respectively. In the present work, the particle precipitation events are identified from the particle flux measurements onboard DMSP satellites. We present and discuss

  16. Survival of rock-colonizing organisms after 1.5 years in outer space.

    PubMed

    Onofri, Silvano; de la Torre, Rosa; de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Ott, Sieglinde; Zucconi, Laura; Selbmann, Laura; Scalzi, Giuliano; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J; Rabbow, Elke; Sánchez Iñigo, Francisco J; Horneck, Gerda

    2012-05-01

    Cryptoendolithic microbial communities and epilithic lichens have been considered as appropriate candidates for the scenario of lithopanspermia, which proposes a natural interplanetary exchange of organisms by means of rocks that have been impact ejected from their planet of origin. So far, the hardiness of these terrestrial organisms in the severe and hostile conditions of space has not been tested over extended periods of time. A first long-term (1.5 years) exposure experiment in space was performed with a variety of rock-colonizing eukaryotic organisms at the International Space Station on board the European EXPOSE-E facility. Organisms were selected that are especially adapted to cope with the environmental extremes of their natural habitats. It was found that some-but not all-of those most robust microbial communities from extremely hostile regions on Earth are also partially resistant to the even more hostile environment of outer space, including high vacuum, temperature fluctuation, the full spectrum of extraterrestrial solar electromagnetic radiation, and cosmic ionizing radiation. Although the reported experimental period of 1.5 years in space is not comparable with the time spans of thousands or millions of years believed to be required for lithopanspermia, our data provide first evidence of the differential hardiness of cryptoendolithic communities in space.

  17. Investigation of Ionization and Dissociation Processes Produced by Electron Impact on Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ce.

    1990-01-01

    Absolute electron impact partial ionization cross sections for Ar and CF_4 were measured by use of a newly built pulsed electron beam time-of-flight apparatus for incident electron energies from thresholds to 500 eV. The apparatus employed consisted of a low energy electron gun, 40 mm diameter ion extraction gold screens, time-of-flight drift tubes, micro-channel plate detectors and fast time to digital electronics. A pulsed electron beam was obtained by pulsing the control grid of the electron gun. Both beam - beam experiments and beam - constant gas target pressure experiments were carried out to determine the absolute partial ionization cross sections for Ar ^{+}, Ar^{2+ }, Ar^{3+} from an argon gas target, and for CF_sp {3}{+}, CF_sp {2}{+}, CF_sp {3}{2+}, CF^ {+}, CF_sp{2} {2+}, F^{+}, C^{+} from a CF _4 gas target. By charge weighted summing of the partial ionization cross sections, the total ionization cross sections of Ar and CF_4 were obtained. The total neutral dissociation cross section for CF_4 was inferred from the total ionization cross section and the total dissociation cross section. Also, a new method for determining absolute total electron scattering cross sections with corrections for forward scattering was developed. The electron beam current was measured as function of gas target pressure and the scattering path length. The total electron scattering cross section obtained from the new model is as much as 6% larger than the cross section derived from the traditional Beer's law for Ar at an incident electron energy of 300 eV. This method is capable of yielding reliable total cross section up to 10 keV. Finally, a study of the secondary electron emission as a function of ejection angle and ejection energy for CO, the doubly differential cross section (DDCS), is presented.

  18. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-01-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density. PMID:28186135

  19. Partially orthogonal resonators for magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Malzacher, Matthias; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-02-01

    Resonators for signal reception in magnetic resonance are traditionally planar to restrict coil material and avoid coil losses. Here, we present a novel concept to model resonators partially in a plane with maximum sensitivity to the magnetic resonance signal and partially in an orthogonal plane with reduced signal sensitivity. Thus, properties of individual elements in coil arrays can be modified to optimize physical planar space and increase the sensitivity of the overall array. A particular case of the concept is implemented to decrease H-field destructive interferences in planar concentric in-phase arrays. An increase in signal to noise ratio of approximately 20% was achieved with two resonators placed over approximately the same planar area compared to common approaches at a target depth of 10 cm at 3 Tesla. Improved parallel imaging performance of this configuration is also demonstrated. The concept can be further used to increase coil density.

  20. Partial peritoneal alimentation in an infant.

    PubMed

    Merritt, R J; Atkinson, J B; Whalen, T V; Thomas, D W; Sinatra, F R; Roloson, G J

    1988-01-01

    We provided partial peritoneal alimentation to a 1.69-kg 11-month-old premature infant who had no available central venous access, depleted peripheral venous access, and gastrointestinal dysfunction. A cuffed silastic catheter was surgically inserted into the suprahepatic space. An alimentation solution was continuously infused into the peritoneum for 28 days to supplement peripheral venous and nasogastric alimentation and contributed 42 +/- 15% of total calories daily. Weight gain was achieved, but complications included hypoglycemia, hypophosphatemia, intravascular dehydration, catheter site leakage, ascites, and hydrocele. At autopsy 11 months later, lipid accumulation was present in the upper peritoneum and the hilar regions of the lungs secondary to preexisting lymphatic obstruction. Partial peritoneal alimentation may be feasible when other access routes are inadequate, but lymphatic obstruction is a contraindication to the peritoneal administration of lipid emulsions.

  1. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-28

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters.

  2. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters. PMID:26931697

  3. Propagation characteristics of partially coherent beams with spatially varying correlations.

    PubMed

    Lajunen, Hanna; Saastamoinen, Toni

    2011-10-15

    We introduce a class of partially coherent beams with spatially varying correlation properties. It is shown that mathematically simple modifications in the coherence function of conventional Gaussian Schell-model beams lead to partially coherent fields with extraordinary free-space propagation characteristics, such as locally sharpened and laterally shifted intensity maxima. We study the properties of such fields based on an elementary-mode interpretation and by numerical simulations. The results demonstrate the potential of coherence modulation for beam shaping applications.

  4. Removable partial denture occlusion.

    PubMed

    Ivanhoe, John R; Plummer, Kevin D

    2004-07-01

    No single occlusal morphology, scheme, or material will successfully treat all patients. Many patients have been treated, both successfully and unsuccessfully, using widely varying theories of occlusion, choices of posterior tooth form, and restorative materials. Therefore, experience has demonstrated that there is no one righ r way to restore the occlusion of all patients. Partially edentulous patients have many and varied needs. Clinicians must understand the healthy physiologic gnathostomatic system and properly diagnose what is or may become pathologic. Henderson [3] stated that the occlusion of the successfully treated patient allows the masticating mechanism to carry out its physiologic functions while the temporomandibular joints, the neuromuscular mechanism, the teeth and their supporting structures remain in a good state of health. Skills in diagnosis and treatment planning are of utmost importance in treating these patients, for whom the clinician's goals are not only an esthetic and functional restoration but also a lasting harmonious state. Perhaps this was best state by DeVan [55] more than 60 years ago in his often-quoted objective. "The patient's fundamental need is the continued meticulous restoration of what is missing, since what is lost is in a sense irretrievably lost." Because it is clear that there is no one method, no one occlusal scheme, or one material that guarantees success for all patients, recommendations for consideration when establishing or reestablishing occlusal schemes have been presented. These recommendations must be used in conjunction with other diagnostic and technical skills.

  5. Partially solidified systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The evolution of magmas is a topic of considerable importance in geology and geophysics because it affects volcanology, igneous petrology, geothermal energy sources, mantle convection, and the thermaland chemical evolution of the earth. The dynamics and evolution of magmas are strongly affected by the presence of solid crystals that occur either in suspension in liquid or as a rigid porous matrix through which liquid magma can percolate. Such systems are physically complex and difficult to model mathematically. Similar physical situations are encountered by metallurgists who study the solidification of molten alloys, and applied mathematicians have long been interested in such moving boundary problems. Clearly, it would be of mutual benefit to bring together scientists, engineers, and mathematicians with a common interest in such systems. Such a meeting is being organized as a North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Advanced Research Workshop on the Structure and Dynamics of Partially Solidified Systems, to be held at Stanford University's Fallen Leaf Lodge at Tahoe, Calif., May 12-16, 1986 The invited speakers and their topics are

  6. Partial disassembly of peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Rat liver peroxisomes were subjected to a variety of procedures intended to partially disassemble or damage them; the effects were analyzed by recentrifugation into sucrose gradients, enzyme analyses, electron microscopy, and SDS PAGE. Freezing and thawing or mild sonication released some matrix proteins and produced apparently intact peroxisomal "ghosts" with crystalloid cores and some fuzzy fibrillar content. Vigorous sonication broke open the peroxisomes but the membranes remained associated with cores and fibrillar and amorphous matrix material. The density of both ghosts and more severely damaged peroxisomes was approximately 1.23. Pyrophosphate (pH 9) treatment solubilized the fibrillar content, yielding ghosts that were empty except for cores. Some matrix proteins such as catalase and thiolase readily leak from peroxisomes. Other proteins were identified that remain in mechanically damaged peroxisomes but are neither core nor membrane proteins because they can be released by pyrophosphate treatment. These constitute a class of poorly soluble matrix proteins that appear to correspond to the fibrillar material observed morphologically. All of the peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes are located in the matrix, but they vary greatly in how easily they leak out. Palmitoyl coenzyme A synthetase is in the membrane, based on its co-distribution with the 22-kilodalton integral membrane polypeptide. PMID:2989301

  7. The Highly Ionized Circumgalactic Medium is Kinematically Uniform around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Murphy, Michael T.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2017-01-01

    The circumgalactic medium (CGM) traced by O vi λ λ 1031,1037 doublet absorption has been found to concentrate along the projected major and minor axes of the host galaxies. This suggests that O vi traces accreting and outflowing gas, respectively, which are key components of the baryon cycle of galaxies. We investigate this further by examining the kinematics of 29 O vi absorbers associated with galaxies at 0.13< {z}{gal}< 0.66 as a function of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. Each galaxy was imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the absorption was detected in COS/HST spectra of nearby (D< 200 kpc) background quasars. We use the pixel-velocity two-point correlation function to characterize the velocity spread of the absorbers, which is a method used previously for a sample of Mg ii absorber–galaxy pairs. The absorption velocity spread for O vi is more extended than Mg ii, which suggests that the two ions trace differing components of the CGM. Again, in contrast to Mg ii, the O vi absorption velocity spreads are similar regardless of galaxy color, inclination, and azimuthal angle. This indicates that the kinematics of the high-ionization gas is not strongly influenced by the current star formation activity in the galaxy. The kinematic homogeneity of O vi absorption and its tendency to be observed mainly along the projected galaxy major and minor axes is likely due to varying ionization conditions and gas densities about the galaxy. Gas in intermediate azimuthal angles may be ionized out of the O vi phase, possibly resulting in an azimuthal angle dependence of the distribution of gas in higher ionization states.

  8. Superconformal partial waves in Grassmannian field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doobary, Reza; Heslop, Paul

    2015-12-01

    We derive superconformal partial waves for all scalar four-point functions on a super Grassmannian space Gr( m| n, 2 m|2 n) for all m, n. This family of four-point functions includes those of all (arbitrary weight) half BPS operators in both N=4 SYM ( m = n = 2) and in N = 2 superconformal field theories in four dimensions ( m = 2 , n = 1) on analytic superspace. It also includes four-point functions of all (arbitrary dimension) scalar fields in non-supersymmetric conformal field theories ( m = 2 , n = 0) on Minkowski space, as well as those of a certain class of representations of the compact SU(2 n) coset spaces. As an application we then specialise to N=4 SYM and use these results to perform a detailed superconformal partial wave analysis of the four-point functions of arbitrary weight half BPS operators. We discuss the non-trivial separation of protected and unprotected sectors for the <2222>, <2233> and <3333> cases in an SU( N) gauge theory at finite N. The <2233> correlator predicts a non-trivial protected twist four sector for <3333> which we can completely determine using the knowledge that there is precisely one such protected twist four operator for each spin.

  9. Astronaut Exposures to Ionizing Radiation in a Lightly-Shielded Spacesuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Simonsen, L. C.; Shinn, J. L.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badavi, F. F.; Atwell, W.

    1999-01-01

    The normal working and living areas of the astronauts are designed to provide an acceptable level of protection against the hazards of ionizing radiation of the space environment. Still there are occasions when they must don a spacesuit designed mainly for environmental control and mobility and leave the confines of their better-protected domain. This is especially true for deep space exploration. The impact of spacesuit construction on the exposure of critical astronaut organs will be examined in the ionizing radiation environments of free space, the lunar surface and the Martian surface. The computerized anatomical male model is used to evaluate astronaut self-shielding factors and to determine space radiation exposures to critical radiosensitive human organs.

  10. Impact of Spacecraft Shielding on Direct Ionization Soft Error Rates for sub-130 nm Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Xapsos, Michael A.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Jordan, Michael M.; Sanders, Anthony B.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Oldham, Timothy R.; Marshall, Paul W.; Heidel, David F.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.

    2010-01-01

    We use ray tracing software to model various levels of spacecraft shielding complexity and energy deposition pulse height analysis to study how it affects the direct ionization soft error rate of microelectronic components in space. The analysis incorporates the galactic cosmic ray background, trapped proton, and solar heavy ion environments as well as the October 1989 and July 2000 solar particle events.

  11. Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Bryant, Robert G.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Wadsworth, Heather M.; Craven, Paul D.; Nehls, Mary K.; Vaughn, Jason A.

    2017-01-01

    For long duration missions of solar sails, the sail material needs to survive harsh space environments and the degradation of the sail material controls operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for mission success. In this study, we investigated the effect of simulated space environment effects of ionizing radiation, thermal aging and simulated potential damage on mechanical, thermal and optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar sail membrane to assess the degradation mechanisms on a feasible solar sail. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy electrons (about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm2), and the physical properties were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus, tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by about 20 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance or thermal emittance. The effect on mechanical properties of a pre-cracked sample, simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film will be discussed.

  12. Ghost peaks observed after AP-MALDI experiment may disclose new ionization mechanism of matrix assisted hypersonic velocity impact ionization

    PubMed Central

    Moskovets, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Understanding the mechanisms of MALDI promises improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of many established applications in the field of mass spectrometry. This paper reports a serendipitous observation of a significant ion yield in a post-ionization experiment conducted after the sample has been removed from a standard atmospheric pressure (AP)-MALDI source. This post-ionization is interpreted in terms of collisions of microparticles moving with a hypersonic velocity into a solid surface. Calculations show that the thermal energy released during such collisions is close to that absorbed by the top matrix layer in traditional MALDI. The microparticles, containing both the matrix and analytes, could be detached from a film produced inside the inlet capillary during the sample ablation and accelerated by the flow rushing through the capillary. These observations contribute some new perspective to ion formation in both laser and laserless matrix-assisted ionization. METHODS An AP-MALDI ion source hyphenated with a three-stage high-pressure ion funnel system was utilized for peptide mass analysis. After the laser was turned off and MALDI sample was removed, ions were detected during a gradual reduction of the background pressure in the first funnel. The constant-rate pressure reduction led to the reproducible appearance of different singly- and doubly-charged peptide peaks in mass spectra taken a few seconds after the end of the MALDI analysis of a dried-droplet spot. RESULTS The ion yield as well as the mass range of ions observed with a significant delay after a completion of the primary MALDI analysis depended primarily on the background pressure inside the first funnel. The production of ions in this post-ionization step was exclusively observed during the pressure drop. A lower matrix background and significant increase in relative yield of double-protonated ions are reported. CONCLUSIONS The observations were partially consistent with a model of

  13. Threshold for thermal ionization of an aluminum surface by pulsed megagauss magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Awe, T J; Bauer, B S; Fuelling, S; Siemon, R E

    2010-01-22

    The first measurement of the threshold for thermal ionization of the surface of thick metal by pulsed magnetic field (B) is reported. Thick aluminum-with depth greater than the magnetic skin layer-was pulsed with partial differential B/ partial differential t from 30-80 MG/micros. Novel loads avoided nonthermal plasma (from electron avalanche, or energetic particles or photons from arcs). Thermal plasma forms from 6061-alloy aluminum when the surface magnetic field reaches 2.2 MG, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulation results by Garanin et al. [J. Appl. Mech. Tech. Phys. 46, 153 (2005)].

  14. Autoionization of He atoms by partially stripped ion impact

    SciTech Connect

    Otranto, S.; Olson, R.E.

    2005-08-15

    A study of the autoionization process induced by partially stripped ion impact is performed. Electron spectra in momentum space are predicted within a classical model for partially stripped ions. The results are compared with those obtained for pure Coulomb-like projectiles. A quantum-mechanical extension of the Barrachina-Macek model is proposed for partially stripped projectiles. Structure on the electron angular distribution arising in quantum and classical treatments is identified and compared. The presence of rainbow scattering interference is observed in the binary ring profile of the outgoing autoionized electrons for positive-ion impact.

  15. Optimal moving grids for time-dependent partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wathen, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    Various adaptive moving grid techniques for the numerical solution of time-dependent partial differential equations were proposed. The precise criterion for grid motion varies, but most techniques will attempt to give grids on which the solution of the partial differential equation can be well represented. Moving grids are investigated on which the solutions of the linear heat conduction and viscous Burgers' equation in one space dimension are optimally approximated. Precisely, the results of numerical calculations of optimal moving grids for piecewise linear finite element approximation of partial differential equation solutions in the least squares norm.

  16. Hole dynamics and spin currents after ionization in strong circularly polarized laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ingo; Smirnova, Olga

    2014-10-01

    We apply the time-dependent analytical R-matrix theory to develop a movie of hole motion in a Kr atom upon ionization by strong circularly polarized field. We find rich hole dynamics, ranging from rotation to swinging motion. The motion of the hole depends on the final energy and the spin of the photoelectron and can be controlled by the laser frequency and intensity. Crucially, hole rotation is a purely non-adiabatic effect, completely missing in the framework of quasistatic (adiabatic) tunneling theories. We explore the possibility to use hole rotation as a clock for measuring ionization time. Analyzing the relationship between the relative phases in different ionization channels we show that in the case of short-range electron-core interaction the hole is always initially aligned along the instantaneous direction of the laser field, signifying zero delays in ionization. Finally, we show that strong-field ionization in circular fields creates spin currents (i.e. different flow of spin-up and spin-down density in space) in the ions. This phenomenon is intimately related to the production of spin-polarized electrons in strong laser fields Barth and Smirnova (2013 Phys. Rev. A 88 013401). We demonstrate that rich spin dynamics of electrons and holes produced during strong field ionization can occur in typical experimental conditions and does not require relativistic intensities or strong magnetic fields.

  17. Coincidence studies of capture and ionization in highly charged Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at medium velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, S.; Hippler, R.; Andersen, L. H.; Dittner, P. F.; Knudsen, H.; Krause, H. F.; Miller, P. D.; Pepmiller, P. L.; Rosseel, T.; Schuch, R.; Stolterfoht, N.; Yamazaki, Y.; Vane, C. R.

    1990-04-01

    Electron capture and ionization processes were investigated for Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at incident energies 0.1-1.0 MeV/nucleon and for incident charge states q=5-44. Cross sections for single-electron capture, transfer ionization, single ionization, and double ionization were obtained using a projectile-ion recoil-ion coincidence technique. A pronounced interplay among the different electronic processes was observed. Cross sections for single ionization show a rather weak charge-state dependence, in disagreement with recent calculations of McKenzie and Olson [Phys. Rev. A 35, 2863 (1987)]. In a second experiment, photon recoil-ion coincidences were measured to obtain partial cross sections for capture into certain projectile n states. These measurements provide strong evidence that transfer ionization populates lower projectile n states than does single-electron capture. Zero-degree electron spectroscopy, coincident with charge capture for 0.5 MeV/nucleon U30+ projectiles revealed that the free electron in transfer ionization is released from the projectile to its continuum and from high-lying Rydberg states of the projectile.

  18. Trigonometric Integrals via Partial Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, H.; Fulford, M.

    2005-01-01

    Parametric differentiation is used to derive the partial fractions decompositions of certain rational functions. Those decompositions enable us to integrate some new combinations of trigonometric functions.

  19. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Lassen, J.; Ruczkowski, J.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Bricault, P.

    2017-02-01

    The resonant ionization laser ion source is an element selective, efficient and versatile ion source to generate radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities. For some elements with complex atomic structures and incomplete spectroscopic data, laser spectroscopic investigations are required for ionization scheme development. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy using Ti:Sa lasers has been performed on antimony (Sb) at TRIUMF's off-line laser ion source test stand. Laser light of 230.217 nm (vacuum wavelength) as the first excitation step and light from a frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 laser (532 nm) as the nonresonant ionization step allowed to search for suitable second excitation steps by continuous wavelength scans from 720 nm to 920 nm across the wavelength tuning range of a grating-tuned Ti:Sa laser. Upon the identification of efficient SES, the third excitation steps for resonance ionization were investigated by laser scans across Rydberg states, the ionization potential and autoionizing states. One Rydberg state and six AI states were found to be well suitable for efficient resonance ionization.

  20. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na/sub 2/ molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na/sub 2/ D/sup 1/PI..mu.. Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na/sub 2//sup +/ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na/sub 2//sup +/ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na/sub 2/ molecules.

  1. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Roussel, F.; Carré, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-09-01

    The production of Na2+ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200Å region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na2 D1Πu Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na2+ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al. we estimate that the cross section for producing Na2+ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na2 molecules.

  2. Dynamics of the helium atom close to the full fragmentation threshold: Ionization excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Bouri, C.; Selles, P.; Malegat, L.; Teuler, J.M.; Njock, M. Kwato; Kazansky, A.K.

    2005-10-15

    The hyperspherical R-matrix method with semiclassical outgoing waves, designed to provide accurate double-ionization cross sections, is extended to allow for the computation of ionization-excitation data of comparable quality. Accordingly, it appears now as a complete method for treating the correlated dynamics of two-electron atoms, in particular above their full fragmentation threshold. Cross sections {sigma}{sub n} and asymmetry parameters {beta}{sub n} are obtained for single photoionization of helium with excitation of the residual ion up to as high a level as n=50 at 0.1 eV above the double-ionization threshold. These data are extrapolated to infinite values of n in order to check widespread assumptions regarding this limit. Our data are found consistent with the assumed n{sup -3} dependence of the partial ionization cross sections. However, the {beta}{sub {infinity}}=-0.636 obtained still lies far from the -1 value expected at the double-ionization threshold.

  3. Experts' understanding of partial derivatives using the partial derivative machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, David; Weber, Eric; Dray, Tevian; Bajracharya, Rabindra R.; Dorko, Allison; Smith, Emily M.; Manogue, Corinne A.

    2015-12-01

    [This paper is part of the Focused Collection on Upper Division Physics Courses.] Partial derivatives are used in a variety of different ways within physics. Thermodynamics, in particular, uses partial derivatives in ways that students often find especially confusing. We are at the beginning of a study of the teaching of partial derivatives, with a goal of better aligning the teaching of multivariable calculus with the needs of students in STEM disciplines. In this paper, we report on an initial study of expert understanding of partial derivatives across three disciplines: physics, engineering, and mathematics. We report on the central research question of how disciplinary experts understand partial derivatives, and how their concept images of partial derivatives differ, with a focus on experimentally measured quantities. Using the partial derivative machine (PDM), we probed expert understanding of partial derivatives in an experimental context without a known functional form. In particular, we investigated which representations were cued by the experts' interactions with the PDM. Whereas the physicists and engineers were quick to use measurements to find a numeric approximation for a derivative, the mathematicians repeatedly returned to speculation as to the functional form; although they were comfortable drawing qualitative conclusions about the system from measurements, they were reluctant to approximate the derivative through measurement. On a theoretical front, we found ways in which existing frameworks for the concept of derivative could be expanded to include numerical approximation.

  4. Preventive or potential therapeutic value of nutraceuticals against ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in exposed subjects and frequent fliers.

    PubMed

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-08-20

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure.

  5. Preventive or Potential Therapeutic Value of Nutraceuticals against Ionizing Radiation-Induced Oxidative Stress in Exposed Subjects and Frequent Fliers

    PubMed Central

    Giardi, Maria Teresa; Touloupakis, Eleftherios; Bertolotto, Delfina; Mascetti, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Humans are constantly exposed to ionizing radiation deriving from outer space sources or activities related to medical care. Absorption of ionizing radiation doses over a prolonged period of time can result in oxidative damage and cellular dysfunction inducing several diseases, especially in ageing subjects. In this report, we analyze the effects of ionizing radiation, particularly at low doses, in relation to a variety of human pathologies, including cancer, and cardiovascular and retinal diseases. We discuss scientific data in support of protection strategies by safe antioxidant formulations that can provide preventive or potential therapeutic value in response to long-term diseases that may develop following exposure. PMID:23965979

  6. Computing Partial Transposes and Related Entanglement Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziero, Jonas

    2016-12-01

    The partial transpose (PT) is an important function for entanglement testing and quantification and also for the study of geometrical aspects of the quantum state space. In this article, considering general bipartite and multipartite discrete systems, explicit formulas ready for the numerical implementation of the PT and of related entanglement functions are presented and the Fortran code produced for that purpose is described. What is more, we obtain an analytical expression for the Hilbert-Schmidt entanglement of two-qudit systems and for the associated closest separable state. In contrast to previous works on this matter, we only use the properties of the PT, not applying Lagrange multipliers.

  7. Termination of the solar wind in the hot, partially ionized interstellar medium. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombard, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Theoretical foundations for understanding the problem of the termination of the solar wind are reexamined in the light of most recent findings concerning the states of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. The investigation suggests that a simple extention of Parker's (1961) analytical model provides a useful approximate description of the combined solar wind, interstellar wind plasma flowfield under conditions presently thought to occur. A linear perturbation solution exhibiting both the effects of photoionization and charge exchange is obtained for the supersonic solar wind. A numerical algorithm is described for computing moments of the non-equilibrium hydrogen distribution function and associated source terms for the MHD equations. Computed using the algorithm in conjunction with the extended Parker solution to approximate the plasma flowfield, profiles of hydrogen number density are given in the solar wind along the upstream and downstream axes of flow with respect to the direction of the interstellar wind. Predictions of solar Lyman-alpha backscatter intensities to be observed at 1 a.u. have been computed, in turn, from a set of such hydrogen number density profiles varied over assumed conditions of the interstellar wind.

  8. Investigation of stopping power for deuterons in partially ionized warm Al plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    He, Bin Wang, Jian-Guo

    2014-06-15

    The stopping powers for deuterons in Al plasmas with a fixed density of 0.02 g/cm{sup 3} and the temperatures at 4.5, 13, and 17 eV are studied in detail for a wide projectile energy range with different models. Comparison of these models indicates that our model is totally in best agreement with the experimental data and the main reason for this is that our calculation for the inelastic processes should be the most reliable. It is found that the difference between our model and the local density approximation model (Wang et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2977 (1998)) is mainly due to the quite different physical picture behind them. In Mehlhorn's model (J. Appl. Phys. 52, 6522 (1981)), the Bethe equation is found to overestimate the inelastic stopping in Al plasmas, meanwhile, it is gradually close to our results with temperature decreasing. The model by classical dielectric function with the choice of the maximum of the momentum transfer associated with the temperature is found not suitable to describe the stopping in warm plasmas. With temperature increasing the stopping due to plasma wave rises up which rapidly exceeds the inelastic stopping in warm Al plasmas.

  9. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons in partially ionized dense semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhumagulova, K. N. Shalenov, E. O.; Ramazanov, T. S.

    2015-08-15

    Elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a dense semiclassical hydrogen plasma for low impact energies has been studied. Differential scattering cross sections were calculated within the effective model of electron-atom interaction taking into account the effect of screening as well as the quantum mechanical effect of diffraction. The calculations were carried out on the basis of the phase-function method. The influence of the diffraction effect on the Ramsauer–Townsend effect was studied on the basis of a comparison with results made within the effective polarization model of the Buckingham type.

  10. Elastic scattering of low energy electrons in partially ionized dense semiclassical plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Shalenov, E. O.; Ramazanov, T. S.

    2015-08-01

    Elastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a dense semiclassical hydrogen plasma for low impact energies has been studied. Differential scattering cross sections were calculated within the effective model of electron-atom interaction taking into account the effect of screening as well as the quantum mechanical effect of diffraction. The calculations were carried out on the basis of the phase-function method. The influence of the diffraction effect on the Ramsauer-Townsend effect was studied on the basis of a comparison with results made within the effective polarization model of the Buckingham type.

  11. Voltage feed through apparatus having reduced partial discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, S. R.; Benham, J. W. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A voltage feed-through apparatus, having reduced partial discharge, has an electrical conductor and an electrical terminal connected thereto. A semiconductor sleeve surrounds the conductor for reducing the electric field concentration at the metallic conductor surface and consequently reducing the partial discharge occurrences. An insulator sleeve encircles the semiconductor sleeve. A metallic sleeve surrounds a portion of the terminal. Another insulator is connected to the metallic sleeve and surrounds a portion of the insulator sleeve forming a space therebetween. Another metallic sleeve spaced from the first metallic sleeve surrounds a portion of the other insulator.

  12. F--Ray: A new algorithm for efficient transport of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Zhang, J.; Wandelt, B. D.; Shapiro, P. R.; Iliev, I. T.

    2014-04-01

    We present a new algorithm for the 3D transport of ionizing radiation, called F2-Ray (Fast Fourier Ray-tracing method). The transfer of ionizing radiation with long mean free path in diffuse intergalactic gas poses a special challenge to standard numerical methods which transport the radiation in position space. Standard methods usually trace each individual ray until it is fully absorbed by the intervening gas. If the mean free path is long, the computational cost and memory load are likely to be prohibitive. We have developed an algorithm that overcomes these limitations and is, therefore, significantly more efficient. The method calculates the transfer of radiation collectively, using the Fast Fourier Transform to convert radiation between position and Fourier spaces, so the computational cost will not increase with the number of ionizing sources. The method also automatically combines parallel rays with the same frequency at the same grid cell, thereby minimizing the memory requirement. The method is explicitly photon-conserving, i.e. the depletion of ionizing photons is guaranteed to equal the photoionizations they caused, and explicitly obeys the periodic boundary condition, i.e. the escape of ionizing photons from one side of a simulation volume is guaranteed to be compensated by emitting the same amount of photons into the volume through the opposite side. Together, these features make it possible to numerically simulate the transfer of ionizing photons more efficiently than previous methods. Since ionizing radiation such as the X-ray is responsible for heating the intergalactic gas when first stars and quasars form at high redshifts, our method can be applied to simulate thermal distribution, in addition to cosmic reionization, in three-dimensional inhomogeneous cosmological density field.

  13. Ionizing radiation and hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Marusyk, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    Somatic evolution, which underlies tumor progression, is driven by two essential components: (1) diversification of phenotypes through heritable mutations and epigenetic changes and (2) selection for mutant clones which possess higher fitness. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) is highly associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis. This link is traditionally attributed to causation of oncogenic mutations through the mutagenic effects of irradiation. On the other hand, potential effects of irradiation on altering fitness and increasing selection for mutant clones are frequently ignored. Recent studies bring the effects of irradiation on fitness and selection into focus, demonstrating that IR exposure results in stable reductions in the fitness of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. These reductions of fitness are associated with alteration of the adaptive landscape, increasing the selective advantages conferred by certain oncogenic mutations. Therefore, the link between irradiation and carcinogenesis might be more complex than traditionally appreciated: while mutagenic effects of irradiation should increase the probability of occurrence of oncogenic mutations, IR can also work as a tumor promoter, increasing the selective expansion of clones bearing mutations which become advantageous in the irradiation-altered environment, such as activated mutations in Notch1 or disrupting mutations in p53. PMID:20676038

  14. Ionizing radiation and heart risks.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Souparno; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are the two leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As advancements in radiation therapy (RT) have significantly increased the number of cancer survivors, the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICD) in this group is a growing concern. Recent epidemiological data suggest that accidental or occupational exposure to low dose radiation, in addition to therapeutic ionizing radiation, can result in cardiovascular complications. The progression of radiation-induced cardiotoxicity often takes years to manifest but is also multifaceted, as the heart may be affected by a variety of pathologies. The risk of cardiovascular disease development in RT cancer survivors has been known for 40 years and several risk factors have been identified in the last two decades. However, most of the early work focused on clinical symptoms and manifestations, rather than understanding cellular processes regulating homeostatic processes of the cardiovascular system in response to radiation. Recent studies have suggested that a different approach may be needed to refute the risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure. In this review, we will focus on how different radiation types and doses may induce cardiovascular complications, highlighting clinical manifestations and the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of radiation-induced cardiotoxicity. We will finally discuss how current and future research on heart development and homeostasis can help reduce the incidence of RICD.

  15. Ionization and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.; Burkert, A.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a set of high resolution simulations on the impact of the UV-radiation of massive stars on the turbulent interstellar medium with the tree-SPH code iVINE. This parameter study includes different levels and driving scales of the turbulence, different ionizing flux as well as different temperatures and densities of the cold gas. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures adjacent to the HII region. From the simulations we are able to derive a criterion for the formation of pillar-like structures and thus the formation of cores and stars. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly on the tips of the structures. We also derive column densities and velocity profiles of our simulations and find these to be in very good agreement with the observations of trunks and cores. In addition, we investigate the further evolution of the pillars once the massive star explodes. This leads to a supernova triggered scenario for the formation of our Solar System.

  16. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  17. Non-equilibrium ionized blast wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a cylindrical blast wave with ionization at non-LTE conditions was calculated using equations previously developed by Wu and Fu (1970). The degree of ionization was predicted by a modified Saha equation. Temperature profiles show that the temperature at non-LTE conditions is lower than at LTE near the shock front. This corresponds to a higher degree of ionization for the non-LTE limit, which indicates that the neutral gas absorption is much more efficient at non-LTE than at the LTE limit. The decaying velocity under non-LTE is approximately 15% less than under LTE.

  18. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  19. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  20. Ionization of excited xenon atoms by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Daniel A.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    2004-08-01

    Measured cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited Xe atoms are not presently available. Therefore, we combine in this work the formalisms of the binary encounter approximation and Sommerfeld’s quantization of atomic orbits and derive from first-principles cross sections for ionization of excited atoms by electrons of low and moderate energies (up to a few hundred eV ). The approach of this work can be used to calculate the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited atoms and atomic ions other than xenon.