Science.gov

Sample records for particle clinical radiotherapy

  1. Current status of clinical particle radiotherapy at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Phillips, T.L.; Tobias, C.A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1980-08-15

    Clinical experience with charged particle irradiation of human cancers has been underway at the University of California Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Over 150 patients have been irradiated with heavy charged particle beams including helium, carbon, neon, and argon ions. Pilot studies have included such tumor sites as glioma of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the pancreas, carcinoma of the stomach, ocular melanoma, and carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Prospective studies are planned to investigate the improved dose localization potential (helium) and the enhanced biologic and physical dose potential (carbon, neon) in a controlled trial against the best available megavoltage irradiation techniques.

  2. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  3. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  4. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. . Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Div. California Univ., San Francisco, CA . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  5. High-LET charged particle radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R. |

    1991-07-01

    The Department of Radiation Oncology at UCSF Medical Center and the Radiation Oncology Department at UC Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory have been evaluating the use of high LET charged particle radiotherapy in a Phase 1--2 research trial ongoing since 1979. In this clinical trail, 239 patients have received at least 10 Gy (physical) minimum tumor dose with neon ions, meaning that at least one-half of their total treatment was given with high-LET charged particle therapy. Ninety-one patients received all of their therapy with neon ions. Of the 239 patients irradiated, target sites included lesions in the skin, subcutaneous tissues, head and neck such as paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and salivary glands (major and minor), skull base and juxtaspinal area, GI tract including esophagus, pancreas and biliary tract, prostate, lung, soft tissue and bone. Analysis of these patients has been carried out with a minimum followup period of 2 years.

  6. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  7. Next generation multi-scale biophysical characterization of high precision cancer particle radiotherapy using clinical proton, helium-, carbon- and oxygen ion beams

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Martin; Zimmermann, Ferdinand; Chaudhri, Naved; Krunic, Damir; Tessonnier, Thomas; Ferrari, Alfredo; Parodi, Katia; Jäkel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Haberer, Thomas; Abdollahi, Amir

    2016-01-01

    The growing number of particle therapy facilities worldwide landmarks a novel era of precision oncology. Implementation of robust biophysical readouts is urgently needed to assess the efficacy of different radiation qualities. This is the first report on biophysical evaluation of Monte Carlo simulated predictive models of prescribed dose for four particle qualities i.e., proton, helium-, carbon- or oxygen ions using raster-scanning technology and clinical therapy settings at HIT. A high level of agreement was found between the in silico simulations, the physical dosimetry and the clonogenic tumor cell survival. The cell fluorescence ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) technology was employed to detect particle traverse per cell nucleus. Across a panel of radiobiological surrogates studied such as late ROS accumulation and apoptosis (caspase 3/7 activation), the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) chiefly correlated with the radiation species-specific spatio-temporal pattern of DNA double strand break (DSB) formation and repair kinetic. The size and the number of residual nuclear γ-H2AX foci increased as a function of linear energy transfer (LET) and RBE, reminiscent of enhanced DNA-damage complexity and accumulation of non-repairable DSB. These data confirm the high relevance of complex DSB formation as a central determinant of cell fate and reliable biological surrogates for cell survival/RBE. The multi-scale simulation, physical and radiobiological characterization of novel clinical quality beams presented here constitutes a first step towards development of high precision biologically individualized radiotherapy. PMID:27494855

  8. Particle radiotherapy with carbon ion beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy offers superior dose conformity in the treatment of deep-seated malignant tumours compared with conventional X-ray therapy. In addition, carbon ion beams have a higher relative biological effectiveness compared with protons or X-ray beams. The algorithm of treatment planning and beam delivery system is tailored to the individual parameters of the patient. The present article reviews the available literatures for various disease sites including the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer as well as physical and biological properties. PMID:23497542

  9. Elastic registration based on particle filter in radiotherapy images with brain deformations.

    PubMed

    Mejia-Rodriguez, A R; Arce-Santana, E R; Scalco, E; Tresoldi, D; Mendez, M O; Bianchi, A M; Cattaneo, G M; Rizzo, G

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of the accuracy of an elastic registration algorithm, based on the particle filter and an optical flow process. The algorithm is applied in brain CT and MRI simulated image datasets, and MRI images from a real clinical radiotherapy case. To validate registration accuracy, standard indices for registration accuracy assessment were calculated: the dice similarity coefficient (DICE), the average symmetric distance (ASD) and the maximal distance between pixels (Dmax). The results showed that this registration process has good accuracy, both qualitatively and quantitatively, suggesting that this method may be considered as a good new option for radiotherapy applications like patient's follow up treatment.

  10. Particle Accelerators for Radiotherapy:. Present Status and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciszewski, Wieslaw; Scharf, Waldemar

    2004-07-01

    The paper describes the development of the application of particle accelerators in the treatment of cancer diseases over the past fifty years. Special emphasis is put on the routine application of conventional electron accelerators delivering electron and photon beams. This is the largest group of devices for radiotherapy (over 7500 machines operating worldwide). The number of patients reaches 5 million per year. The medical electron linacs have recently undergone considerable modifications of construction, in particular the systems of radiation field shaping. Contemporary accelerators for radiotherapy are equipped with multi-leaf collimators (MLC) which, in conjunction with IMRT (Intensity Modulation Radiation Therapy) technique and special system of therapy planning, assure considerably higher precision, effectiveness and quality of treatment.

  11. Present Status of Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duehmke, Eckhart

    Aims of radiation oncology are cure from malignant diseases and - at the same time preservation of anatomy (e.g. female breast, uterus, prostate) and organ functions (e.g. brain, eye, voice, sphincter ani). At present, methods and results of clinical radiotherapy (RT) are based on experiences with natural history and radiobiology of malignant tumors in properly defined situations as well as on technical developments since World War II in geometrical and biological treatment planning in teletherapy and brachytherapy. Radiobiological research revealed tolerance limits of healthy tissues to be respected, effective total treatment doses of high cure probability depending on histology and tumor volume, and - more recently - altered fractionation schemes to be adapted to specific growth fractions and intrinsic radiosensitivities of clonogenic tumor cells. In addition, Biological Response Modifiers (BRM), such as cis-platinum, oxygen and hyperthermia may steepen cell survival curves of hypoxic tumor cells, others - such as tetrachiordekaoxid (TCDO) - may enhance repair of normal tissues. Computer assisted techniques in geometrical RT-planning based on individual healthy and pathologic anatomy (CT, MRT) provide high precision RT for well defined brain lesions by using dedicated linear accelerators (Stereotaxy). CT-based individual tissue compensators help with homogenization of distorted dose distributions in magna field irradiation for malignant lymphomas and with total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, e.g. for leukemia. RT with fast neutrons, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), RT with protons and heavy ions need to be tested in randomized trials before implementation into clinical routine.

  12. Biomarkers for DNA DSB inhibitors and radiotherapy clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley K; Olive, Peggy L; Bristow, Robert G

    2008-09-01

    Major technical advances in radiotherapy, including IMRT and image-guided radiotherapy, have allowed for improved physical precision and increased dose delivery to the tumor, with better sparing of surrounding normal tissue. The development of inhibitors of the sensing and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is exciting and could be combined with precise radiotherapy targeting to improve local control following radiotherapy. However, caution must be exercised in order that DSB inhibitors are combined with radiotherapy in such a manner as to preserve the therapeutic ratio by exploiting repair deficiencies in malignant cells over that of normal cells. In this review, we discuss the rationale and current approaches to targeting DSB sensing and repair pathways in combined modality with radiotherapy. We also describe potential biomarkers that could be useful in detecting functional inhibition of DSB repair in a patient's tissues during clinical radiotherapy trials. Finally, we examine a number of issues relating to the use of DSB-inhibiting molecular agents and radiotherapy in the context of the tumor microenvironment, effects on normal tissues and the optimal timing and duration of the agent in relation to fractionated radiotherapy.

  13. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200–500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation. PMID:24885670

  14. Updates on clinical studies of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Puspitasari, Irma M; Abdulah, Rizky; Yamazaki, Chiho; Kameo, Satomi; Nakano, Takashi; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2014-05-29

    To establish guidelines for the selenium supplementation in radiotherapy we assessed the benefits and risks of selenium supplementation in radiotherapy. Clinical studies on the use of selenium in radiotherapy were searched in the PubMed electronic database in January 2013. Sixteen clinical studies were identified among the 167 articles selected in the initial search. Ten articles were observational studies, and the other 6 articles reported studies on the effects of selenium supplementation in patients with cancer who underwent radiotherapy. The studies were conducted worldwide including European, American and Asian countries between 1987 and 2012. Plasma, serum or whole blood selenium levels were common parameters used to assess the effects of radiotherapy and the selenium supplementation status. Selenium supplementation improved the general conditions of the patients, improved their quality of life and reduced the side effects of radiotherapy. At the dose of selenium used in these studies (200-500 μg/day), selenium supplementation did not reduce the effectiveness of radiotherapy, and no toxicities were reported. Selenium supplementation may offer specific benefits for several types of cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy. Because high-dose selenium and long-term supplementation may be unsafe due to selenium toxicity, more evidence-based information and additional research are needed to ensure the therapeutic benefits of selenium supplementation.

  15. Clinical advantages of carbon-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Baba, Masayuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirotoshi; Kato, Shingo; Yamada, Shigeru; Yasuda, Shigeo; Yanagi, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Hara, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Naotaka; Mizoe, Junetsu

    2008-07-01

    Carbon-ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) possesses physical and biological advantages. It was started at NIRS in 1994 using the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC); since then more than 50 protocol studies have been conducted on almost 4000 patients with a variety of tumors. Clinical experiences have demonstrated that C-ion RT is effective in such regions as the head and neck, skull base, lung, liver, prostate, bone and soft tissues, and pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer, as well as for histological types including adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, malignant melanoma and various types of sarcomas, against which photon therapy could be less effective. Furthermore, when compared with photon and proton RT, a significant reduction of overall treatment time and fractions has been accomplished without enhancing toxicities. Currently, the number of irradiation sessions per patient averages 13 fractions spread over approximately three weeks. This means that in a carbon therapy facility a larger number of patients than is possible with other modalities can be treated over the same period of time.

  16. Radiotherapy by particle beams (hadrontherapy) of intracranial tumours: a survey on pathology.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, D

    2005-04-01

    A review of the principal contributions of radio-therapy of brain tumours by beam particles is carried out. Neutrons, protons and light ions are considered along with their pros and cons in relation to types and locations of brain tumours. A particular emphasis is given to the pathologic studies of their effects directly o n tumours and on the normal nervous tissue, considering mainly the relevant action mechanisms of the radiation types and the requirements of the clinical therapeutic strategies. For comparison the main features of the pathologic effects of radiotherapy by photons are described. From the review it emerges that the new modality of radiation by protons and light ions, because of their peculiar physical characteristics, may represent a new way of destroying the tumour and sparing normal nervous tissue, especially when deeply located and irregularly shaped tumours are concerned. More neuropathological studies are needed in order to better understand the potentiality of the new treatment of modalities.

  17. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in Targeted Alpha-Particle Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy. PMID:22202151

  18. Applications of 211At and 223Ra in targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    Targeted radiotherapy using agents tagged with α-emitting radionuclides is gaining traction with several clinical trials already undertaken or ongoing, and others in the advanced planning stage. The most commonly used α-emitting radionuclides are 213Bi, 211At, 223Ra and 225Ac. While each one of these has pros and cons, it can be argued that 211At probably is the most versatile based on its half life, decay scheme and chemistry. On the other hand, for targeting bone metastases, 223Ra is the ideal radionuclide because simple cationic radium can be used for this purpose. In this review, we will discuss the recent developments taken place in the application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and give an overview of the current status of 223Ra for targeted α-particle radiotherapy.

  19. [Clinical to planning target volume margins in prostate cancer radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, F; Duvergé, L; Castelli, J; Nguyen, T D; Servagi-Vernat, S; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-10-01

    The knowledge of inter- and intrafraction motion and deformations of the intrapelvic target volumes (prostate, seminal vesicles, prostatectomy bed and lymph nodes) as well as the main organs at risk (bladder and rectum) allow to define rational clinical to planning target volume margins, depending on the different radiotherapy techniques and their uncertainties. In case of image-guided radiotherapy, prostate margins and seminal vesicles margins can be between 5 and 10mm. The margins around the prostatectomy bed vary from 10 to 15mm and those around the lymph node clinical target volume between 7 and 10mm. Stereotactic body radiotherapy allows lower margins, which are 3 to 5mm around the prostate. Image-guided and stereotactic body radiotherapy with adequate margins allow finally moderate or extreme hypofractionation.

  20. A technology platform for translational research on laser driven particle accelerators for radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enghardt, W.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T.; Fiedler, F.; Kaluza, M.; Pawelke, J.; Schramm, U.; Sauerbrey, R.; Tünnermann, A.; Baumann, M.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely accepted that proton or light ion beams may have a high potential for improving cancer cure by means of radiation therapy. However, at present the large dimensions of electromagnetic accelerators prevent particle therapy from being clinically introduced on a broad scale. Therefore, several technological approaches among them laser driven particle acceleration are under investigation. Parallel to the development of suitable high intensity lasers, research is necessary to transfer laser accelerated particle beams to radiotherapy, since the relevant parameters of laser driven particle beams dramatically differ from those of beams delivered by conventional accelerators: The duty cycle is low, whereas the number of particles and thus the dose rate per pulse are high. Laser accelerated particle beams show a broad energy spectrum and substantial intensity fluctuations from pulse to pulse. These properties may influence the biological efficiency and they require completely new techniques of beam delivery and quality assurance. For this translational research a new facility is currently constructed on the campus of the university hospital Dresden. It will be connected to the department of radiooncology and host a petawatt laser system delivering an experimental proton beam and a conventional therapeutic proton cyclotron. The cyclotron beam will be delivered on the one hand to an isocentric gantry for patient treatments and on the other hand to an experimental irradiation site. This way the conventional accelerator will deliver a reference beam for all steps of developing the laser based technology towards clinical applicability.

  1. [Heavy charged particles radiotherapy--mainly carbon ion beams].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2003-12-01

    Carbon ion beams have superior dose distribution allowing selective irradiation to the tumor while minimizing irradiation to the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions produce an increased density of local energy deposition with high-energy transfer (LET) components, resulting in radiobiological advantages. Stimulated by the favorable results in fast neutrons, helium ions, and neon ions, a clinical trial of carbon ion therapy was begun at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in 1994. Carbon ions were generated by a medically dedicated accelerator (HIMAC, Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan), which was the world's first heavy ion accelerator complex dedicated to medical use in a hospital environment. In general, patients were selected for treatment when their tumors could not be expected to respond favorably to conventional forms of therapy. A total of 1601 patients were registered in this clinical trial so far. The normal tissue reactions were acceptable, and there were no carbon related deaths. Carbon ion radiotherapy seemed to be a clinically feasible curative treatment modality, and appears to offer improved results not only over conventional X-rays but also even over surgery in some selected carcinomas.

  2. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  3. Astatine-211-labeled radiotherapeutics: an emerging approach to targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Vaidyanathan, G

    2000-09-01

    Targeted radiotherapy or endoradiotherapy is an appealing approach to cancer treatment because of the potential for delivering curative doses of radiation to tumor while sparing normal tissues. Radionuclides that decay by the emission of alpha-particles such as the heavy halogen astatine-211 (211At) offer the exciting prospect of combining cell-specific molecular targets with radiation having a range in tissue of only a few cell diameters. Herein, the radiobiological advantages of alpha-particle targeted radiotherapy will be reviewed, and the rationale for using 211At for this purpose will be described. The chemistry of astatine is similar to that of iodine; however, there are important differences which make the synthesis and evaluation of 211At-labeled compounds more challenging. Perhaps the most successful approach that has been developed involves the astatodemetallation of tin, silicon or mercury precursors. Astatine-211 labeled agents that have been investigated for targeted radiotherapy include [211At]astatide, 211At- labeled particulates, 211At-labeled naphthoquinone derivatives, 211At-labeled methylene blue, 211At-labeled DNA precursors, meta-[211At]astatobenzylguanidine, 211At-labeled biotin conjugates, 211At-labeled bisphosphonates, and 211At-labeled antibodies and antibody fragments. The status of these 211At-labeled compounds will be discussed in terms of their labeling chemistry, cytotoxicity in cell culture, as well as their tissue distribution and therapeutic efficacy in animal models of human cancers. Finally, an update on the status of the first clinical trial with an 211At-labeled targeted therapeutic, 211At-labeled chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6, will be provided.

  4. A review of update clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-08-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions.

  5. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  6. Clinical analysis of cholangiocarcinoma patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nantajit, Danupon; Trirussapanich, Pornwaree; Rojwatkarnjana, Sunanta; Soonklang, Kamonwan; Pattaranutraporn, Poompis; Laebua, Kanyanee; Chamchod, Sasikarn

    2016-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) or bile duct cancer is a rare cancer type in developed countries, while its prevalence is increased in southeast Asia, affecting ~33.4 men and ~12.3 women per 100,000 individuals. CCA is one of the most lethal types of cancer. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant therapies have been shown to have limited efficacy in improving the overall prognosis of patients. Radiotherapy has been reported to prolong the survival times of patients with certain characteristics. The present study retrospectively evaluated the medical records and follow-up data from 27 CCA patients who received radiotherapy at Chulabhorn Hospital (Bangkok, Thailand) between 2008 and 2014. A total of 14 patients underwent surgery followed by adjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Of the 27 CCA patients, 14 had intrahepatic CCA, 2 had extrahepatic CCA and 11 had hilar CCA. The 2-year survival rate was 40.7%. Tumor resectability, clinical symptoms and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score were found to be indicative of patient prognosis. In addition, the planning target volume and biologically effective radiotherapy dose were of prognostic value; however, initial treatment response was ambiguous in predicting survival time. The findings of the present study suggested that the currently used radiotherapy protocols for CCA may require modification to improve their efficacy. PMID:28105359

  7. Clinical exuberance of classic Kaposi's sarcoma and response to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Jeniffer Muñoz; Alves, Natália Ribeiro de Magalhães; Medeiros, Paula Mota; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna; Alves, Maria de Fátima Guimarães Scotelaro; Gripp, Alexandre Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a multicentric vascular neoplasm, with cutaneous and extracutaneous involvement. Different clinical and epidemiological variants have been identified. The classic form is manifested mainly in elderly men with indolent and long-term evolution, with lesions localized primarily in the lower extremities. We present two cases of classic Kaposi's sarcoma (CKS) in two female patients with extensive, exuberant skin involvement and rapid evolution, with good response to radiotherapy.

  8. Adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Freedland, Stephen J; Rumble, R Bryan; Finelli, Antonio; Chen, Ronald C; Slovin, Susan; Stein, Mark N; Mendelson, David S; Wackett, Colin; Sandler, Howard M

    2014-12-01

    To endorse the American Urological Association (AUA)/American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The panel determined that the guideline recommendations on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, published in August 2013, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the guideline on adjuvant and salvage radiotherapy after prostatectomy, adding one qualifying statement that not all candidates for adjuvant or salvage radiotherapy have the same risk of recurrence or disease progression, and thus, risk-benefit ratios are not the same for all men. Those at the highest risk for recurrence after radical prostatectomy include men with seminal vesicle invasion, Gleason score 8 to 10, extensive positive margins, and detectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Physicians should discuss adjuvant radiotherapy with patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiotherapy with patients with PSA or local recurrence after prostatectomy. The discussion of radiotherapy should include possible short- and long-term adverse effects and potential benefits. The decision to administer radiotherapy should be made by the patient and multidisciplinary treatment team, keeping in mind that not all men are at equal risk of recurrence or clinically meaningful disease progression. Thus, the risk-benefit ratio will differ for each patient. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical

  9. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Stephanie K.; Kozak, Kevin R.; Friedmann, Alison M.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  10. Reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using charged particle or photon radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Demizu, Yusuke; Okimoto, Tomoaki; Ogita, Mikio; Himei, Kengo; Nakamura, Satoaki; Suzuki, Gen; Yoshida, Ken; Kotsuma, Tadayuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Oh, Ryoongjin

    2017-07-01

    To examine the outcomes of reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancers using different modalities. This retrospective study included 26 patients who received charged particle radiotherapy (CP) and 150 who received photon radiotherapy (117 CyberKnife radiotherapy [CK] and 36 intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) involving propensity scores was used to reduce background selection bias. Higher prescribed doses were used in CP than photon radiotherapy. The 1‑year overall survival (OS) rates were 67.9% for CP and 54.1% for photon radiotherapy (p = 0.15; 55% for CK and 51% for IMRT). In multivariate Cox regression, the significant prognostic factors for better survival were nasopharyngeal cancer, higher prescribed dose, and lower tumor volume. IPTW showed a statistically significant difference between CP and photon radiotherapy (p = 0.04). The local control rates for patients treated with CP and photon radiotherapy at 1 year were 66.9% (range 46.3-87.5%) and 67.1% (range 58.3-75.9%), respectively. A total of 48 patients (27%) experienced toxicity grade ≥3 (24% in the photon radiotherapy group and 46% in the CP group), including 17 patients with grade 5 toxicity. Multivariate analysis revealed that younger age and a larger planning target volume (PTV) were significant risk factors for grade 3 or worse toxicity. CP provided superior survival outcome compared to photon radiotherapy. Tumor volume, primary site (nasopharyngeal), and prescribed dose were identified as survival factors. Younger patients with a larger PTV experienced toxicity grade ≥3.

  11. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Ewing's Sarcoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Rombi, Barbara; DeLaney, Thomas F.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Huang, Mary S.; Ebb, David H.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Marcus, Karen J.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: Proton radiotherapy (PT) has been prescribed similarly to photon radiotherapy to achieve comparable disease control rates at comparable doses. The chief advantage of protons in this setting is to reduce acute and late toxicities by decreasing the amount of normal tissue irradiated. We report the preliminary clinical outcomes including late effects on our pediatric Ewing's sarcoma patients treated with PT at the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, MA). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective review of the medical records of 30 children with Ewing's sarcoma who were treated with PT between April 2003 and April 2009. Results: A total of 14 male and 16 female patients with tumors in several anatomic sites were treated with PT at a median age of 10 years. The median dose was 54 Gy (relative biological effectiveness) with a median follow-up of 38.4 months. The 3-year actuarial rates of event-free survival, local control, and overall survival were 60%, 86%, and 89%, respectively. PT was acutely well tolerated, with mostly mild-to-moderate skin reactions. At the time of writing, the only serious late effects have been four hematologic malignancies, which are known risks of topoisomerase and anthracyline exposure. Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy was well tolerated, with few adverse events. Longer follow-up is needed to more fully assess tumor control and late effects, but the preliminary results are encouraging.

  12. Clinical commissioning of online seed matching protocol for prostate radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Duffton, A; McNee, S; Muirhead, R; Alhasso, A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to clinically commission an online seed matching image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) protocol using modern hardware/software for patients undergoing prostate radiotherapy. An essential constraint was to achieve this within a busy centre without reducing patient throughput, which had been reported with other techniques. Methods 45 patients had 3 fiducial markers inserted into the prostate and were imaged daily using kilovoltage orthogonal images with online correction applied before treatment. A total of 1612 image pairs were acquired and analysed to identify interfractional motion, seed migration and interobserver variability, and assess ease of use. Results This method of IGRT was implemented successfully in our centre with no impact on treatment times and patient throughput. Systematic (Σ) interfractional set-up errors were 2.2, 2.7 and 3.9 mm in right–left (RL), superoinferior (SI) and anteroposterior (AP) directions, respectively. Random (σ) interfractional set-up errors were 3.2 (RL), 3.7 (SI) and 5.7 mm (AP). There were significant differences between patients. Seed migration and interobserver variability were not significant issues. Conclusions The described technique is facilitated by the advanced imaging system, allowing a fast and effective method of correcting set-up errors before treatment. Extended implementation of this technique has improved treatment delivery to the majority of our prostate radiotherapy patients. The measurement of interfractional motion in this study is potentially valuable for margin reduction in intensity-modulated radiotherapy/volumetric arc therapy. Advances in knowledge This technique can be used within treatment time constraints, benefiting large numbers of patients by helping to avoid geographical miss and potentially reducing toxicity to organs at risk. PMID:23175493

  13. [Radiotherapy for cervix carcinomas: clinical target volume delineation].

    PubMed

    Gnep, K; Mazeron, R

    2013-10-01

    Concurrent chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy is currently the standard treatment for locally advanced cervix carcinomas. Modern radiation techniques require planning based on 3D images, and therefore an accurate delineation of target volumes. The clinical target volume (CTV) used for the different phases of treatment are now well defined, but are not always easy to delineate on a CT scan which is currently the standard examination for simulation in radiotherapy. MRI and PET-CT are routinely performed at diagnosis, and can be used to improve the accuracy of the delineation. The objective of this review is to describe the definitions and recommendations of CTV in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  14. Combining radiotherapy and angiogenesis inhibitors: Clinical trial design

    SciTech Connect

    Citrin, Deborah . E-mail: citrind@mail.nih.gov; Menard, Cynthia; Camphausen, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a vital role in the multimodality treatment of cancer. Recent advances in RT have primarily involved improvements in dose delivery. Future improvements in tumor control and disease outcomes will likely involve the combination of RT with targeted therapies. Preclinical evaluations of angiogenesis inhibitors in combination with RT have yielded promising results with increased tumor 'cure.' It remains to be seen whether these improvements in tumor control in the laboratory will translate into improved outcomes in the clinic. Multiple differences between these agents and cytotoxic chemotherapy must be taken into account when designing clinical trials evaluating their effectiveness in combination with RT. We discuss important considerations for designing clinical trials of angiogenesis inhibitors with RT.

  15. The intersection of radiotherapy and immunotherapy: mechanisms and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Spiotto, Michael; Fu, Yang-Xin; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2016-01-01

    By inducing DNA damage, radiotherapy both reduces tumor burden and enhances anti-tumor immunity. Here, we will review the mechanisms by which radiation induces anti-tumor immune responses that can be augmented using immunotherapies to facilitate tumor regression. Radiotherapy increases inflammation in tumors by activating the NF-κB and the Type I interferon response pathways to induce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This inflammation coupled with antigen release from irradiated cells facilitates dendritic cell maturation and cross-presentation of tumor antigens to prime tumor-specific T cell responses. Radiation also sensitizes tumors to these T cell responses by enhancing T cell infiltration into tumors and the recognition of both malignant cancer cells and non-malignant stroma that present cognate antigen. Yet, these anti-tumor immune responses may be blunted by several mechanisms including regulatory T cells and checkpoint molecules that promote T cell tolerance and exhaustion. Consequently, the combination of immunotherapy using vaccines and/or checkpoint inhibitors with radiation is demonstrating early clinical potential. Overall, this review will provide a global view for how radiation and the immune system converge to target cancers and the early attempts to exploit this synergy in clinical practice. PMID:28018989

  16. Clinical investigations of a CVD diamond detector for radiotherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Betzel, G T; Lansley, S P; Baluti, F; Reinisch, L; Meyer, J

    2012-04-01

    X-ray detectors based on single crystal diamond film made via chemical vapor deposition were investigated to evaluate their performance under clinically relevant conditions for radiotherapy dosimetry. Studies focused on repeatability, dose rate dependence, tissue phantom ratios, output factors and beam profiling. Repeatability experiments revealed a temporary loss in sensitivity due to charge detrapping effects following irradiation, which was modeled to make corrections that improved short-term precision. Dose rate dependence was observed (Fowler fitting parameter Δ = 0.96 ± 0.2) using dose rates up to ~2 Gy min(-1). The detector statistically distinguished (n = 5, P < 0.05) between dose values separated by 7.7 × 10(-3) Gy (1 MU). Depth dose measurements from 1 to 15 cm and output factors using 3 × 3 to 10 × 10 cm2 field sizes compared well with a Farmer ion chamber (<1.3% difference). Output factor measurements indicate encouraging results for fields sizes <4 × 4 cm2. Off-axis measurements showed that perturbation of the beam could be reduced when the detector is used in the edge-on orientation due to its thin-film sandwich configuration and ~200 nm thick Ag contacts. This relatively inexpensive detector has potential to be used for routine dosimetry using conventional radiotherapy instrumentation. Copyright © 2011 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical application of multimodality imaging in radiotherapy treatment planning for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Yang; Zhe, Hong

    2013-12-11

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of rectal cancer. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy are mainstay techniques of radiotherapy for rectal cancer. However, the success of these techniques is heavily reliant on accurate target delineation and treatment planning. Computed tomography simulation is a cornerstone of rectal cancer radiotherapy, but there are limitations, such as poor soft-tissue contrast between pelvic structures and partial volume effects. Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) can overcome these limitations and provide additional information for rectal cancer treatment planning. PET can also reduce the interobserver variation in the definition of rectal tumor volume. However, there is a long way to go before these image modalities are routinely used in the clinical setting. This review summarizes the most promising studies on clinical applications of multimodality imaging in target delineation and treatment planning for rectal cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Evaluation of novel radiotherapy technologies: what evidence is needed to assess their clinical and cost effectiveness, and how should we get it?

    PubMed

    van Loon, Judith; Grutters, Janneke; Macbeth, Fergus

    2012-04-01

    Technical innovations in radiation oncology--eg, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and particle therapy--can be developed rapidly and introduced into the clinic even when costs associated with their use are much higher than those for conventional radiotherapy. Although clinical benefit is expected on the basis of superior biological and physical characteristics, data for clinical effectiveness of new radiotherapy techniques are scarce. Evidence from randomised clinical trials would be ideal but such studies focus mostly on new drugs. High investment costs and modifications over time make evaluation of novel radiotherapy technologies in clinical trials more complex. Here, we propose an algorithm for evaluation of the clinical and cost effectiveness of novel radiotherapy technologies. We suggest situations when randomised trials might be feasible and the type of trial that should be undertaken when they are not. Furthermore, we discuss the usefulness of dose-distribution models for estimation of expected clinical benefit and for selection of the patients' population with the highest expected benefit. Economic modelling, including the approach of real options analysis, can inform whether implementation of a technology should begin (based on available evidence) or be delayed (until further data are available), and it can indicate the best trial design and required sample size.

  19. Clinical results of a pilot study on stereovision-guided stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L

    2010-12-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks.

  20. Clinical Results of a Pilot Study on Stereovision-Guided Stereotactic Radiotherapy and Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Kleinberg, Lawrence R.; Rigamonti, Daniele; Wharam, Moody D.; Rashid, Abdul; Jackson, Juan; Djajaputra, David; He, Shenjen; Creasey, Tunisia; DeWeese, Theodore L.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time stereovision-guidance has been introduced for efficient and convenient fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) and image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). This first pilot study is to clinically evaluate its accuracy and precision as well as impact on treatment doses. Sixty-one FSR patients wearing stereotactic masks (SMs) and nine IMRT patients wearing flexible masks (FMs), were accrued. Daily target reposition was initially based-on biplane-radiographs and then adjusted in six degrees of freedom under real-time stereovision guidance. Mean and standard deviation of the head displacements measured the accuracy and precision. Head positions during beam-on times were measured with real-time stereovisions and used for determination of delivered doses. Accuracy ± precision in direction with the largest errors shows improvement from 0.4 ± 2.3 mm to 0.0 ± 1.0 mm in the inferior-to-superior direction for patients wearing SM or from 0.8 ± 4.3 mm to 0.4 ± 1.7 mm in the posterior-to-anterior direction for patients wearing FM. The image-guidance increases target volume coverage by >30% for small lesions. Over half of head position errors could be removed from the stereovision-guidance. Importantly, the technique allows us to check head position during beam-on time and makes it possible for having frameless head refixation without tight masks. PMID:21070083

  1. Complement is a central mediator of radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and clinical response.

    PubMed

    Surace, Laura; Lysenko, Veronika; Fontana, Andrea Orlando; Cecconi, Virginia; Janssen, Hans; Bicvic, Antonela; Okoniewski, Michal; Pruschy, Martin; Dummer, Reinhard; Neefjes, Jacques; Knuth, Alexander; Gupta, Anurag; van den Broek, Maries

    2015-04-21

    Radiotherapy induces DNA damage and cell death, but recent data suggest that concomitant immune stimulation is an integral part of the therapeutic action of ionizing radiation. It is poorly understood how radiotherapy supports tumor-specific immunity. Here we report that radiotherapy induced tumor cell death and transiently activated complement both in murine and human tumors. The local production of pro-inflammatory anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a was crucial to the tumor response to radiotherapy and concomitant stimulation of tumor-specific immunity. Dexamethasone, a drug frequently given during radiotherapy, limited complement activation and the anti-tumor effects of the immune system. Overall, our findings indicate that anaphylatoxins are key players in radiotherapy-induced tumor-specific immunity and the ensuing clinical responses.

  2. Introduction to the EC's Marie Curie Initial Training Network (MC-ITN) project: Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy (PARTNER).

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Magrin, Giulio

    2013-07-01

    PARTNER (Particle Training Network for European Radiotherapy) is a project funded by the European Commission's Marie Curie-ITN funding scheme through the ENLIGHT Platform for 5.6 million Euro. PARTNER has brought together academic institutes, research centres and leading European companies, focusing in particular on a specialized radiotherapy (RT) called hadron therapy (HT), interchangeably referred to as particle therapy (PT). The ultimate goal of HT is to deliver more effective treatment to cancer patients leading to major improvement in the health of citizens. In Europe, several hundred million Euro have been invested, since the beginning of this century, in PT. In this decade, the use of HT is rapidly growing across Europe, and there is an urgent need for qualified researchers from a range of disciplines to work on its translational research. In response to this need, the European community of HT, and in particular 10 leading academic institutes, research centres, companies and small and medium-sized enterprises, joined together to form the PARTNER consortium. All partners have international reputations in the diverse but complementary fields associated with PT: clinical, radiobiological and technological. Thus the network incorporates a unique set of competencies, expertise, infrastructures and training possibilities. This paper describes the status and needs of PT research in Europe, the importance of and challenges associated with the creation of a training network, the objectives, the initial results, and the expected long-term benefits of the PARTNER initiative.

  3. Combinations of Radiotherapy and Immunotherapy for Melanoma: A Review of Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Christopher A.; Postow, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has long played a role in the management of melanoma. Recent advances have also demonstrated the efficacy of immunotherapy in the treatment of melanoma. Preclinical data suggest a biologic interaction between radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Several clinical studies corroborate these findings. This review will summarize the outcomes of studies reporting on patients with melanoma treated with a combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Vaccine therapies often use irradiated melanoma cells, and may be enhanced by radiotherapy. The cytokines interferon-alpha and interleukin-2 have been combined with radiotherapy in several small studies, with some evidence suggesting increased toxicity and/or efficacy. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, has been combined with radiotherapy in several notable case studies and series. Finally, pilot studies of adoptive cell transfer have suggested radiotherapy may improve the efficacy of treatment. The review will demonstrate that the combination of radiotherapy and immunotherapy has been reported in several notable case studies, series and clinical trials. These clinical results suggest interaction and the need for further study. PMID:24661650

  4. The radiotherapy clinical trials projects at the ESRF: technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Renier, M; Brochard, Th; Nemoz, C; Requardt, H; Bräuer, E; Esteve, F; Balosso, J; Suortti, P; Baruchel, J; Elleaume, H; Berruyer, G; Berkvens, P; Bravin, A

    2008-12-01

    The radiotherapy clinical trials projects, both aiming at treating aggressive brain tumors, require several major modifications and new constructions at the ESRF ID17 Biomedical beamline. The application of the Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiation Therapy (SSRT) technique mainly necessitates an upgrade of the existing patient positioning system, which was formerly used for the angiography program. It will allow for accurate positioning, translation and rotation of the patient during the treatment. For the Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) clinical trials project, a new white beam hutch will be constructed to accommodate a dedicated patient positioning system. Consequently, the existing control hutches and the related installations will also be completely refurbished. Furthermore, the foreseen installation of a second X-ray source, which will allow doubling the currently available photon flux at high energies, requires a redesign of most optical components to handle the increased power and power densities. Starting from the current ID17 Biomedical beamline layout, the paper will present an update of the different modification/construction projects, including the general organization and planning.

  5. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  6. Clinical outcomes and toxicities of proton radiotherapy for gastrointestinal neoplasms: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Vivek; Lin, Steven H.; Simone, Charles B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) is frequently shown to be dosimetrically superior to photon radiotherapy (RT), though supporting data for clinical benefit are severely limited. Because of the potential for toxicity reduction in gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, we systematically reviewed the literature on clinical outcomes (survival/toxicity) of PBT. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group, and American Society of Clinical Oncology was conducted for publications from 2000–2015. Thirty-eight original investigations were analyzed. Results Although results of PBT are not directly comparable to historical data, outcomes roughly mirror previous data, generally with reduced toxicities for PBT in some neoplasms. For esophageal cancer, PBT is associated with reduced toxicities, postoperative complications, and hospital stay as compared to photon radiation, while achieving comparable local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). In pancreatic cancer, numerical survival for resected/unresected cases is also similar to existing photon data, whereas grade ≥3 nausea/emesis and post-operative complications are numerically lower than those reported with photon RT. The strongest data in support of PBT for HCC comes from phase II trials demonstrating very low toxicities, and a phase III trial of PBT versus transarterial chemoembolization demonstrating trends towards improved LC and progression-free survival (PFS) with PBT, along with fewer post-treatment hospitalizations. Survival and toxicity data for cholangiocarcinoma, liver metastases, and retroperitoneal sarcoma are also roughly equivalent to historical photon controls. There are two small reports for gastric cancer and three for anorectal cancer; these are not addressed further. Conclusions Limited quality (and quantity) of data hamper direct comparisons and conclusions. However, the available

  7. Clinical outcomes and toxicities of proton radiotherapy for gastrointestinal neoplasms: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Lin, Steven H; Simone, Charles B; Mehta, Minesh P

    2016-08-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy (PBT) is frequently shown to be dosimetrically superior to photon radiotherapy (RT), though supporting data for clinical benefit are severely limited. Because of the potential for toxicity reduction in gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies, we systematically reviewed the literature on clinical outcomes (survival/toxicity) of PBT. A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, abstracts from meetings of the American Society for Radiation Oncology, Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group, and American Society of Clinical Oncology was conducted for publications from 2000-2015. Thirty-eight original investigations were analyzed. Although results of PBT are not directly comparable to historical data, outcomes roughly mirror previous data, generally with reduced toxicities for PBT in some neoplasms. For esophageal cancer, PBT is associated with reduced toxicities, postoperative complications, and hospital stay as compared to photon radiation, while achieving comparable local control (LC) and overall survival (OS). In pancreatic cancer, numerical survival for resected/unresected cases is also similar to existing photon data, whereas grade ≥3 nausea/emesis and post-operative complications are numerically lower than those reported with photon RT. The strongest data in support of PBT for HCC comes from phase II trials demonstrating very low toxicities, and a phase III trial of PBT versus transarterial chemoembolization demonstrating trends towards improved LC and progression-free survival (PFS) with PBT, along with fewer post-treatment hospitalizations. Survival and toxicity data for cholangiocarcinoma, liver metastases, and retroperitoneal sarcoma are also roughly equivalent to historical photon controls. There are two small reports for gastric cancer and three for anorectal cancer; these are not addressed further. Limited quality (and quantity) of data hamper direct comparisons and conclusions. However, the available data, despite the inherent caveats and

  8. Cytogenetic, clinical, and cytologic characteristics of radiotherapy-related leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Philip, P.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, J.

    1988-04-01

    From 1978 to 1985, we observed eight cases of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia or preleukemia, three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and three cases of chronic myeloid leukemia in patients previously treated exclusively with radiotherapy for other tumor types. The latent period from administration of radiotherapy to development of leukemia varied between 12 and 243 months. Clonal chromosome aberrations reported previously as characteristic of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia following therapy with alkylating agents were observed in three of the eight patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (5q- and -7) and in two of the three patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (-7 and 12p-). All three patients with radiotherapy-related chronic myeloid leukemia presented a t(9;22)(q34;q11). The results suggest that cytogenetic characteristics may reflect the etiology in radiation-induced acute leukemias, whereas radiation-related chronic myeloid leukemia does not seem to differ chromosomally from de novo cases of the disease.

  9. Influence of fragment reaction of relativistic heavy charged particles on heavy-ion radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fukumura, Akifumi; Komori, Masataka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2003-06-01

    The production of projectile fragments is one of the most important, but not yet perfectly understood, problems to be considered when planning for the utilization of high-energy heavy charged particles for radiotherapy. This paper reports our investigation of the fragments' fluence and linear energy transfer (LET) spectra produced from various incident ions using an experimental approach to reveal these physical qualities of the beams. Polymethyl methacrylate, as a substitute for the human body, was used as a target. A ΔE-E counter telescope with a plastic scintillator and a BGO scintillator made it possible to identify the species of fragments based on differences of various elements. By combining a gas-flow proportional counter with a counter telescope system, LET spectra as well as fluence spectra of the fragments were derived for each element down from the primary particles to hydrogen. Among them, the information on hydrogen and helium fragments was derived for the first time. The result revealed that the number of light fragments, such as hydrogen and helium, became larger than the number of primaries in the vicinity of the range end. However, the greater part of the dose delivered to a cell was still governed by the primaries. The calculated result of a simulation used for heavy-ion radiotherapy indicated room for improving the reaction model.

  10. Perspectives in Medical Applications of Monte Carlo Simulation Software for Clinical Practice in Radiotherapy Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschini, Matteo; Giani, Simone; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Rancoita, Pier-Giorgio

    2006-04-01

    We discuss the physics requirements to accurately model radiation dosimetry in the human body as performed for oncological radiotherapy treatment. Recent advancements in computing hardware and software simulation technology allow precise dose calculation in real-life imaging output, with speed suitable for clinical needs. An experimental programme, based on physics published literature, is proposed to demonstrate the actual possibility to improve the precision of radiotherapy treatment planning.

  11. Proposed definitions for isodose flatness and symmetry in clinical radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Galiano, Eduardo; Joly, Tara; Wiebe, Federico

    2004-12-01

    In clinical radiotherapy it is important that beam intensity be as homogeneous as possible to reduce the probability of treatment failure. As an extension of the well established concepts of beam flatness and symmetry for characterizing radiotherapy beams, the concepts of isodose flatness and symmetry are introduced. The definitions are tested with actual data obtained from a Co-60 unit and a linear accelerator and results are presented. The concepts as defined appear to provide a useful quantitative indication of beam homogeneity.

  12. Evolving Clinical Cancer Radiotherapy: Concerns Regarding Normal Tissue Protection and Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy, which is one of three major cancer treatment methods in modern medicine, has continued to develop for a long period, more than a century. The development of radiotherapy means allowing the administration of higher doses to tumors to improve tumor control rates while minimizing the radiation doses absorbed by surrounding normal tissues through which radiation passes for administration to tumors, thereby reducing or removing the incidence of side effects. Such development of radiotherapy was accomplished by the development of clinical radiation oncology, the development of computers and machine engineering, the introduction of cutting-edge imaging technology, a deepened understanding of biological studies on the effects of radiation on human bodies, and the development of quality assurance (QA) programs in medical physics. The development of radiotherapy over the last two decades has been quite dazzling. Due to continuous improvements in cancer treatment, the average five-year survival rate of cancer patients has been close to 70%. The increases in cancer patients’ complete cure rates and survival periods are making patients’ quality of life during or after treatment a vitally important issue. Radiotherapy is implemented in approximately 1/3 to 2/3s of all cancer patients; and has improved the quality of life of cancer patients in the present age. Over the last century, as a noninvasive treatment, radiotherapy has unceasingly enhanced complete tumor cure rates and the side effects of radiotherapy have been gradually decreasing, resulting in a tremendous improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients. PMID:26908993

  13. Evolving Clinical Cancer Radiotherapy: Concerns Regarding Normal Tissue Protection and Quality Assurance.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Jaeho

    2016-02-01

    Radiotherapy, which is one of three major cancer treatment methods in modern medicine, has continued to develop for a long period, more than a century. The development of radiotherapy means allowing the administration of higher doses to tumors to improve tumor control rates while minimizing the radiation doses absorbed by surrounding normal tissues through which radiation passes for administration to tumors, thereby reducing or removing the incidence of side effects. Such development of radiotherapy was accomplished by the development of clinical radiation oncology, the development of computers and machine engineering, the introduction of cutting-edge imaging technology, a deepened understanding of biological studies on the effects of radiation on human bodies, and the development of quality assurance (QA) programs in medical physics. The development of radiotherapy over the last two decades has been quite dazzling. Due to continuous improvements in cancer treatment, the average five-year survival rate of cancer patients has been close to 70%. The increases in cancer patients' complete cure rates and survival periods are making patients' quality of life during or after treatment a vitally important issue. Radiotherapy is implemented in approximately 1/3 to 2/3s of all cancer patients; and has improved the quality of life of cancer patients in the present age. Over the last century, as a noninvasive treatment, radiotherapy has unceasingly enhanced complete tumor cure rates and the side effects of radiotherapy have been gradually decreasing, resulting in a tremendous improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients.

  14. Clinical trial of thalidomide combined with radiotherapy in patients with esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing-Ping; Sun, Su-Ping; Sun, Zhi-Qiang; Ni, Xin-Chu; Wang, Jian; Li, Yi; Hu, Li-Jun; Li, Dong-Qing

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term efficacy and tolerability of radiotherapy plus thalidomide in patients with esophageal cancer (EC). METHODS: Serum samples from 86 EC patients were collected before, during, and after radiotherapy, and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level was examined by ELISA. According to the change in serum VEGF level during radiotherapy, the patients were divided into two groups: in the drug group, VEGF level was increased or remained unchanged, and thalidomide was administered up to the end of radiotherapy; in the non-drug group, VEGF level was decreased and radiotherapy was given alone. Thirty healthy volunteers served as controls. The efficacy and safety of radiotherapy plus thalidomide therapy were investigated. RESULTS: The 86 EC patients had a significantly higher level of VEGF compared with the 30 healthy controls before radiotherapy (P < 0.01), and the VEGF level was significantly correlated with primary tumor size, lymph node metastasis, histopathologic type, and clinical stage (P < 0.01). Of 83 evaluable cases, VEGF level was significantly decreased after radiotherapy in 32 patients in the drug group (P < 0.05), with an effective rate of 71.88%. The incidence of dizziness and/or burnout in the drug group and non-drug group was 62.50% and 15.69%, respectively (P = 0.000), and the incidence of somnolence was 12.50% and 0%, respectively (P = 0.019). No significant differences were observed. CONCLUSION: Thalidomide can down-regulate serum VEGF level in EC patients, and combined with radiotherapy may improve treatment outcome. Thalidomide was well tolerated by EC patients. PMID:24803825

  15. Development of online quality assurance automation tool "SmartQC" for radiotherapy clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaks, Daniel

    Radiotherapy has existed as a clinical medical procedure since as early as 1900, and has become an essential component of modern hospitals. It is predicted that, sometime between the years 2010 and 2020, the number of patients receiving radiation therapy during their initial treatment is expected to rise by 22% from 470,000 per year to 575,000 per year Due to the potential for harm in radiotherapy, quality assurance is an essential element at every stage of modern clinical workflow. The quality and use of time in QA procedures and checks is an important issue that has significant impact on both practice and research in the field of radiotherapy. This thesis documents the results of development and results of tools addressing that question. While the motivation for radiotherapy QA is principally about improving quality of patient care, and developing radiotherapy research tools, we also discuss the relevance of QA to radiotherapy malpractice lawsuits and related financial costs. We show that in the treatment plan check performed by the medical physicist---also known as the second check or physics check---a substantial fraction (~33%) of the average time is spent on non-physics related analysis. We also demonstrate the development and implementation of a web-based system, referred to as PlanTracker within this thesis, to track the status of the plan. This thesis concludes with further developments being considered as an outgrowth of this system.

  16. [Clinical analysis of postoperative radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Shen, W; Wang, J

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the role and complications of adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer after surgery. From May, 1986 to December, 1995, 20 patients with stage I endometrial cancer received total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy(TAH/BSO), and additional pelvic lymph node dissection in 5 cases. Most of the patients received radio therapy in 2-4 weeks after surgery. The radiation fields included pelvic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40-50 Gy. All the patients had survived for 10 years. Only one patient developed distant metastases. Acute radiation reaction was observed in all patients. Late radiation-induced damage occured in six patients and was severe in two. Postoperative radiotherapy in the management of stage I endometrial cancer is beneficial for the controal of local recurrence but has relatively high frequency of late radiation injury.

  17. Clinical study and numerical simulation of brain cancer dynamics under radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, S.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a clinical and numerical study of the progression of brain cancer tumor growth dynamics coupled with the effects of radiotherapy. We obtained clinical data from a sample of brain cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and compare it to our numerical simulations to a mathematical model of brain tumor cell population growth influenced by radiation treatment. We model how the body biologically receives a physically delivered dose of radiation to the affected tumorous area in the form of a generalized LQ model, modified to account for the conversion process of sublethal lesions into lethal lesions at high radiation doses. We obtain good agreement between our clinical data and our numerical simulations of brain cancer progression given by the mathematical model, which couples tumor growth dynamics and the effect of irradiation. The correlation, spanning a wide dataset, demonstrates the potential of the mathematical model to describe the dynamics of brain tumor growth influenced by radiotherapy.

  18. Amino acid transport system - A substrate predicts the therapeutic effects of particle radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Mariko; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Arano, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    L-[methyl-11C]Methionine (11C-Met) is useful for estimating the therapeutic efficacy of particle radiotherapy at early stages of the treatment. Given the short half-life of 11C, the development of longer-lived 18F- and 123I-labeled probes that afford diagnostic information similar to 11C-Met, are being sought. Tumor uptake of 11C-Met is involved in many cellular functions such as amino acid transport System-L, protein synthesis, and transmethylation. Among these processes, since the energy-dependent intracellular functions involved with 11C-Met are more reflective of the radiotherapeutic effects, we evaluated the activity of the amino acid transport System-A as an another energy-dependent cellular function in order to estimate radiotherapeutic effects. In this study, using a carbon-ion beam as the radiation source, the activity of System-A was evaluated by a specific System-A substrate, alpha-[1-14C]-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (14C-MeAIB). Cellular growth and the accumulation of 14C-MeAIB or 14C-Met were evaluated over time in vitro in cultured human salivary gland (HSG) tumor cells (3-Gy) or in vivo in murine xenografts of HSG tumors (6- or 25-Gy) before and after irradiation with the carbon-ion beam. Post 3-Gy irradiation, in vitro accumulation of 14C-Met and 14C-MeAIB decreased over a 5-day period. In xenografts of HSG tumors in mice, tumor re-growth was observed in vivo on day-10 after a 6-Gy irradiation dose, but no re-growth was detected after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. Consistent with the growth results, the in vivo tumor accumulation of 14C-MeAIB did not decrease after the 6-Gy irradiation dose, whereas a significant decrease was observed after the 25-Gy irradiation dose. These results indicate that the activity of energy dependent System-A transporter may reflect the therapeutic efficacy of carbon-ion radiotherapy and suggests that longer half-life radionuclide-labeled probes for System-A may also provide widely available probes to evaluate the effects

  19. Cyclophilin B expression is associated with in vitro radioresistance and clinical outcome after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul D; Owens, Charles R; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Read, Paul W; Larner, James M; Story, Michael D; Brock, William A; Amundson, Sally A; Lee, Jae K; Theodorescu, Dan

    2011-12-01

    The tools for predicting clinical outcome after radiotherapy are not yet optimal. To improve on this, we applied the COXEN informatics approach to in vitro radiation sensitivity data of transcriptionally profiled human cells and gene expression data from untreated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and bladder tumors to generate a multigene predictive model that is independent of histologic findings and reports on tumor radiosensitivity. The predictive ability of this 41-gene model was evaluated in patients with HNSCC and was found to stratify clinical outcome after radiotherapy. In contrast, this model was not useful in stratifying similar patients not treated with radiation. This led us to hypothesize that expression of some of the 41 genes contributes to tumor radioresistance and clinical recurrence. Hence, we evaluated the expression the 41 genes as a function of in vitro radioresistance in the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel and found cyclophilin B (PPIB), a peptidylprolyl isomerase and target of cyclosporine A (CsA), had the strongest direct correlation. Functional inhibition of PPIB by small interfering RNA depletion or CsA treatment leads to radiosensitization in cancer cells and reduced cellular DNA repair. Immunohistochemical evaluation of PPIB expression in patients with HNSCC was found to be associated with outcome after radiotherapy. This work demonstrates that a novel 41-gene expression model of radiation sensitivity developed in bladder cancer cell lines and human skin fibroblasts predicts clinical outcome after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients and identifies PPIB as a potential target for clinical radiosensitization.

  20. Pre-clinical research in small animals using radiotherapy technology--a bidirectional translational approach.

    PubMed

    Tillner, Falk; Thute, Prasad; Bütof, Rebecca; Krause, Mechthild; Enghardt, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    For translational cancer research, pre-clinical in-vivo studies using small animals have become indispensable in bridging the gap between in-vitro cell experiments and clinical implementation. When setting up such small animal experiments, various biological, technical and methodical aspects have to be considered. In this work we present a comprehensive topical review based on relevant publications on irradiation techniques used for pre-clinical cancer research in mice and rats. Clinical radiotherapy treatment devices for the application of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy as well as dedicated research irradiation devices are feasible for small animal irradiation depending on the animal model and the experimental goals. In this work, appropriate solutions for the technological transfer of human radiation oncology to small animal radiation research are summarised. Additionally, important information concerning the experimental design is provided such that reliable and clinically relevant results can be attained.

  1. Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Combined X-Ray Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, and Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoe, Jun-Etsu Tsujii, Hirohiko; Hasegawa, Azusa D.D.S.; Yanagi, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Ryo D.D.S.; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Takakura, Kintomo

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a Phase I/II clinical trial for patients with malignant gliomas, treated with combined X-ray radiotherapy (XRT), chemotherapy, and carbon ion radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Between October 1994 and February 2002, 48 patients with histologically confirmed malignant gliomas (16 anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) and 32 glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) were enrolled in a Phase I/II clinical study. The treatment involved the application of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks of XRT, followed by CRT at 8 fractions/2 weeks. Nimustine hydrochloride (ACNU) were administered at a dose of 100 mg/m{sup 2} concurrently in weeks 1, 4, or 5 of XRT. The carbon ion dose was increased from 16.8 to 24.8 Gray equivalent (GyE) in 10% incremental steps (16.8, 18.4, 20.0, 22.4, and 24.8 GyE, respectively). Results: There was no Grade 3 or higher acute reaction in the brain. The late reactions included four cases of Grade 2 brain morbidity and four cases of Grade 2 brain reaction among 48 cases. The median survival time (MST) of AA patients was 35 months and that of GBM patients 17 months (p = 0.0035). The median progression-free survival and MST of GBM showed 4 and 7 months for the low-dose group, 7 and 19 months for the middle-dose group, and 14 and 26 months for the high-dose group. Conclusion: The results of combined therapy using XRT, ACNU chemotherapy, and CRT showed the potential efficacy of CRT for malignant gliomas in terms of the improved survival rate in those patients who received higher carbon doses.

  2. The role of technology in clinical trials using stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Marianne; Méndez Romero, Alejandra; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2017-03-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is a highly technology-driven treatment modality. The wider availability of in-room imaging and advanced radiotherapy delivery techniques has led to more institutions offering stereotactic ablative therapy (SABR). While some technological challenges remain, the crucial point for the next generation of SABR clinical trials is that today's technology is used correctly and close to its optimal potential for accuracy. The credentialing procedure of SABR needs to be extensive, but this investment will benefit the trial itself, the patients and the professionals involved.

  3. Clinical evidence of particle beam therapy (carbon).

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-04-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) is unique as it possesses well-localized and superior-depth dose distribution in addition to less repairable radiobiological effects. The use of CIRT for various diseases has been explored as clinical trials at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. Since 1994, when the first clinical study of cancer therapy with carbon ion beams was started, about 50 clinical studies have been completed safely and effectively. These studies revealed that intractable cancers such as inoperable bone and soft-tissue sarcomas can be cured safely in a shorter overall treatment time, as can cancers in the head, neck, lung, liver, prostate, and postoperative pelvic recurrence of rectal cancer. The number of patients receiving CIRT has reached 6,000, and the therapy was approved as a highly advanced medical technology in 2003. Based on these experiences, we embarked on the research and development of new-generation beam delivery facilities such as a 3D scanning method with a pencil beam and a compact rotating gantry. Clinical research using pencil-beam scanning has been in operation since May 2011.

  4. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T. J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Timothy E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman; Purdy, James

    2012-01-01

    Background In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a two day workshop to examine the challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. Lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities like proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results Four recommendations were made: 1) Develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor intensity of QA to clinical trial objectives. Tiers include (i) general credentialing, (ii) trial specific credentialing, and (iii) individual case review; 2) Establish a case QA repository; 3) Develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and 4) Explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion Radiotherapy QA may impact clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based. PMID:22425219

  5. Clinical tolerance in large field radiotherapy--the knowledge gained over the last ten years.

    PubMed

    Gocheva, Lilia B

    2010-01-01

    Malignant disorders are still far from being successfully managed in spite of the apparent progress achieved by surgical treatment, high energy radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CHT). They keep being the second most frequent cause of lethal outcomes both in Bulgaria and in most countries of the world. One of the promising approaches to increasing the efficaciousness of treatment is development and use of methods that are in full accord with the modern requirements of a complex therapy. Over the last fifty years, large field radiation techniques, applied as systemic therapy in oncology, have been investigated and established. These techniques show the transition in oncology to using actively various variants of large field radiotherapy (LFR), the "heavy artillery" of oncoradiologic practice, as an alternative or adjunct therapy to chemotherapy (CHT). In the present paper we review the current knowledge in the field and present the clinical experience accumulated over the last ten years with respect to clinical tolerance in the major large-field radiotherapy techniques--total body irradiation, half body irradiation, whole abdominal irradiation, total and partial lymphoid irradiation. Described in detail are the contemporary knowledge about clinical and hematologic tolerance in total body irradiation as part of the myelo- and nonmyeloablative conditioning regimens as well as in half body irradiation as a systemic therapy in oncology. We also present the amassed experience in clinical tolerance in partial body irradiation in the form of whole abdominal and total or partial lymphoid irradiation. Another point worth noting based again on the experience gained over the last ten years is that for LFR we need to develop a radiotherapy technique that is designed carefully to achieve an optimal therapeutic effect that should include the disease control, good clinical tolerance and reduction of post-radiotherapy sequelae.

  6. Laser-driven particle acceleration for radiobiology and radiotherapy: where we are and where we are going

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giulietti, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Radiation therapy of tumors progresses continuously and so do devices, sharing a global market of about $ 4 billions, growing at an annual rate exceeding 5%. Most of the progress involves tumor targeting, multi-beam irradiation, reduction of damage on healthy tissues and critical organs, dose fractioning. This fast-evolving scenario is the moving benchmark for the progress of the laser-based accelerators towards clinical uses. As for electrons, both energy and dose requested by radiotherapy are available with plasma accelerators driven by lasers in the power range of tens of TW but several issues have still to be faced before getting a prototype device for clinical tests. They include capability of varying electron energy, stability of the process, reliability for medical users. On the other side hadron therapy, presently applied to a small fraction of cases but within an exponential growth, is a primary option for the future. With such a strong motivation, research on laser-based proton/ion acceleration has been supported in the last decade in order to get performances suitable to clinical standards. None of these performances has been achieved so far with laser techniques. In the meantime a rich crop of data have been obtained in radiobiological experiments performed with beams of particles produced with laser techniques. It is quite significant however that most of the experiments have been performed moving bio samples to laser labs, rather moving laser equipment to bio labs or clinical contexts. This give us the measure that laser community cannot so far provide practical devices usable by non-laser people.

  7. In Silico Simulation of a Clinical Trial Concerning Tumour Response to Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Athanaileas, Theodoras E.; Merrychtas, Andreas; Kaklamani, Dimitra; Varvarigou, Theodora; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2008-11-06

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how multilevel tumour growth and response to therapeutic treatment models can be used in order to simulate clinical trials, with the long-term intention of both better designing clinical studies and understanding their outcome based on basic biological science. For this purpose, an already developed computer simulation model of glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been used and a clinical study concerning glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been simulated. In order to facilitate the simulation of such virtual trials, a toolkit enabling the user-friendly execution of the simulations on grid infrastructures has been designed and developed. The results of the conducted virtual trial are in agreement with the outcome of the real clinical study.

  8. In Silico Simulation of a Clinical Trial Concerning Tumour Response to Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionysiou, Dimitra D.; Stamatakos, Georgios S.; Athanaileas, Theodoras E.; Merrychtas, Andreas; Kaklamani, Dimitra; Varvarigou, Theodora; Uzunoglu, Nikolaos

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how multilevel tumour growth and response to therapeutic treatment models can be used in order to simulate clinical trials, with the long-term intention of both better designing clinical studies and understanding their outcome based on basic biological science. For this purpose, an already developed computer simulation model of glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been used and a clinical study concerning glioblastoma multiforme response to radiotherapy has been simulated. In order to facilitate the simulation of such virtual trials, a toolkit enabling the user-friendly execution of the simulations on grid infrastructures has been designed and developed. The results of the conducted virtual trial are in agreement with the outcome of the real clinical study.

  9. International data-sharing for radiotherapy research: an open-source based infrastructure for multicentric clinical data mining.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Erik; Dekker, André; Meldolesi, Elisa; van Stiphout, Ruud G P M; Valentini, Vincenzo; Lambin, Philippe

    2014-02-01

    Extensive, multifactorial data sharing is a crucial prerequisite for current and future (radiotherapy) research. However, the cost, time and effort to achieve this are often a roadblock. We present an open-source based data-sharing infrastructure between two radiotherapy departments, allowing seamless exchange of de-identified, automatically translated clinical and biomedical treatment data.

  10. International data-sharing for radiotherapy research: An open-source based infrastructure for multicentric clinical data mining

    PubMed Central

    Meldolesi, Elisa; van Stiphout, Ruud G.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive, multifactorial data sharing is a crucial prerequisite for current and future (radiotherapy) research. However, the cost, time and effort to achieve this are often a roadblock. We present an open-source based data-sharing infrastructure between two radiotherapy departments, allowing seamless exchange of de-identified, automatically translated clinical and biomedical treatment data. PMID:24309199

  11. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zheng; Liang, Rui; Wang, Cheng-qiong; Xu, Shaofeng; Li, Nana; He, Yuejuan; Tang, Fushan; Chen, Ling; Ma, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background/Introduction: Aidi injection plus radiotherapy is widely used for lung cancer in China. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer? Has Aidi injection the attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy? There is lack of strong evidence to prove it. Objectives: To reveal its real attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy and provide sufficient evidence for adjuvant chemotherapy strategies to lung cancer, we systematically evaluated all related studies. Data Sources: We collected all studies about Aidi injection plus radiotherapy for lung cancer in Medline, Embase, Web of Science, China national knowledge infrastructure database (CNKI), Chinese scientific journals full-text database (VIP), Wanfang database, China biological medicine database (CBM) (established to June 2015), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (June 2015), evaluated their quality according to the Cochrane evaluation handbook of randomized controlled trials (5.1.0), extracted data following the PICO principles and synthesized the data by Meta analysis. Results: Sixteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 1192 lung cancer patients were included, with general methodological quality in most trials. The merged relative risk (RR) values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and quality of life (QOL) were as follows: 1.54, (1.39,1.70), 1.10 (1.02, 1.19), and 2.13 (1.68, 2.68). The merged RR values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for myelosuppression and neutropenia, radiation pneumonitis, and radiation esophagitis were as follows: 0.51 (0.38, 0.69), 0.53 (0.42, 0.65), 0.52 (0.41, 0.67), and 0.52 (0.40, 0.68). All were statistically significant. The possibility of publication bias was small which objectively reported the results. Conclusions: The evidence available indicates that Aidi injection plus radiotherapy can significantly

  12. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.

  13. [Clinical analysis of sudden deafness after radiotherapy and chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients].

    PubMed

    Yao, Liangzhong; Liu, Junjie; Pan, Zhiling; Yang, Xiangning; Zhu, Yanli

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the clinical features and therapeutic effects of sudden deafness after radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Clinical data of 42 nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients suffered from sudden deafness after radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy were analyzed retrospectively. Among the 42 patients, 2 showed moderate deafness, 4 presented excessive deafness, 30 suffered from severe deafness, and 6 exhibited profound deafness. The audiogram pattern of 33 patients met with the type of high tone frequencies hearing loss, and that of the rest 9 cases showed hearing loss at all frequencies. All patients received medical therapy combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Of all the cases with hearing loss, 2 were cured, 2 showed excellent recovery, 9 came out partial recovery, and 29 showed no response to the treatment. The total effective rate was 30.95%. For the accompanied symptoms, none of the 30 cases of tinnitus were relieved, 3 out of 10 cases of aural fullness were cured, and the 5 cases of dizziness or vertigo were all improved. The sudden deafness after radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma is closely related to radiotherapy. The hearing loss is serious, and the therapeutic effects are not satisfactory.

  14. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update].

    PubMed

    Girard, N; Mornex, F

    2011-10-01

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation microbeams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. Copyright © 2011 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimating Cardiac Exposure From Breast Cancer Radiotherapy in Clinical Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.W. McGale, P.; Povall, J.M.; Thomas, E.; Kumar, S.; Dodwell, D.; Darby, S.C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of maximum heart distance (MHD) in predicting the dose and biologically effective dose (BED) to the heart and the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery for left-tangential breast or chest wall irradiation. Methods and Materials: A total of 50 consecutive breast cancer patients given adjuvant left-tangential irradiation at a large U.K. radiotherapy center during 2006 were selected. For each patient, the following were derived using three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) planning: (1) mean dose and BED to the heart, (2) mean dose and BED to the LAD coronary artery, (3) MHD, (4) position of the CT slice showing the maximum area of the irradiated heart relative to the mid-plane slice, and (5) sternal and contralateral breast thickness (measures of body fat). Results: A strong linear correlation was found between the MHD and the mean heart dose. For every 1-cm increase in MHD, the mean heart dose increased by 2.9% on average (95% confidence interval 2.5-3.3). A strong linear-quadratic relationship was seen between the MHD and the mean heart BED. The mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED were also correlated with the MHD but the associations were weaker. These relationships were not affected by body fat. The mid-plane CT slice did not give a reliable assessment of cardiac irradiation. Conclusion: The MHD is a reliable predictor of the mean heart dose and BED and gives an approximate estimate of the mean LAD coronary artery dose and BED. Doses predicted by the MHD could help assess the risk of radiation-induced cardiac toxicity where individual CT-based cardiac dosimetry is not possible.

  16. Fractionation effects in particle radiotherapy: implications for hypo-fractionation regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabe-Fernandez, A.; Dale, R. G.; Hopewell, J. W.; Jones, B.; Paganetti, H.

    2010-10-01

    The aim is to demonstrate the potential impact of changes in the value of the β parameter in the linear quadratic (LQ) model on the calculation of clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values used for high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy. The parameter RBEmin is introduced into the LQ formulation to account for possible changes in the β radiosensitivity coefficient with changing LET. The model is used to fit fractionated data under two conditions, where RBEmin = 1 and RBEmin ≠ 1. Nonlinear regression and analysis of variance are used to test the hypothesis that the inclusion of a non-unity value of RBEmin better predicts the total iso-effective dose required at low number of fractions for fast neutrons, carbon ions, π-meson and proton fractionation data obtained for various tissues from previous publications. For neutrons the assumption of RBEmin ≠ 1 provided a better fit in 89% of the cases, whereas for carbon ions RBEmin ≠ 1 provided a better fit only for normal tissue at the spread-out Bragg peak. The results provide evidence of the impact that variations in the β parameter may have when calculating clinically relevant RBE values, especially when using high doses per fraction (i.e. hypofractionation) of high-LET radiations.

  17. Fractionation effects in particle radiotherapy: implications for hypo-fractionation regimes.

    PubMed

    Carabe-Fernandez, A; Dale, R G; Hopewell, J W; Jones, B; Paganetti, H

    2010-10-07

    The aim is to demonstrate the potential impact of changes in the value of the β parameter in the linear quadratic (LQ) model on the calculation of clinical relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values used for high linear energy transfer (LET) radiotherapy. The parameter RBE(min) is introduced into the LQ formulation to account for possible changes in the β radiosensitivity coefficient with changing LET. The model is used to fit fractionated data under two conditions, where RBE(min) = 1 and RBE(min) ≠ 1. Nonlinear regression and analysis of variance are used to test the hypothesis that the inclusion of a non-unity value of RBE(min) better predicts the total iso-effective dose required at low number of fractions for fast neutrons, carbon ions, π-meson and proton fractionation data obtained for various tissues from previous publications. For neutrons the assumption of RBE(min) ≠ 1 provided a better fit in 89% of the cases, whereas for carbon ions RBE(min) ≠ 1 provided a better fit only for normal tissue at the spread-out Bragg peak. The results provide evidence of the impact that variations in the β parameter may have when calculating clinically relevant RBE values, especially when using high doses per fraction (i.e. hypofractionation) of high-LET radiations.

  18. Targeted α-Particle Radiotherapy with 211At-labeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Reardon, David A.; Pozzi, Oscar R.; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D.

    2007-01-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed on tumor cells to selectively deliver the α-particle emitting radiohalogen 211At to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels, and the lack of data concerning toxicity of α-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies and others are planned for the near future. PMID:17921029

  19. Targeted alpha-particle radiotherapy with 211At-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, Michael R; Reardon, David A; Pozzi, Oscar R; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Bigner, Darell D

    2007-10-01

    An attractive feature of targeted radionuclide therapy is the ability to select radionuclides and targeting vehicles with characteristics that are best suited for a particular clinical application. One combination that has been receiving increasing attention is the use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specifically reactive to receptors and antigens that are expressed in tumor cells to selectively deliver the alpha-particle-emitting radiohalogen astatine-211 (211At) to malignant cell populations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical models with multiple 211At-labeled mAbs; however, translation of the concept to the clinic has been slow. Impediments to this process include limited radionuclide availability, the need for suitable radiochemistry methods operant at high activity levels and lack of data concerning the toxicity of alpha-particle emitters in humans. Nonetheless, two clinical trials have been initiated to date with 211At-labeled mAbs, and others are planned for the near future.

  20. Cyclophilin B Expression Is Associated with In Vitro Radioresistance and Clinical Outcome after Radiotherapy12

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Paul D; Owens, Charles R; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Read, Paul W; Larner, James M; Story, Michael D; Brock, William A; Amundson, Sally A; Lee, Jae K; Theodorescu, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The tools for predicting clinical outcome after radiotherapy are not yet optimal. To improve on this, we applied the COXEN informatics approach to in vitro radiation sensitivity data of transcriptionally profiled human cells and gene expression data from untreated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and bladder tumors to generate a multigene predictive model that is independent of histologic findings and reports on tumor radiosensitivity. The predictive ability of this 41-gene model was evaluated in patients with HNSCC and was found to stratify clinical outcome after radiotherapy. In contrast, this model was not useful in stratifying similar patients not treated with radiation. This led us to hypothesize that expression of some of the 41 genes contributes to tumor radioresistance and clinical recurrence. Hence, we evaluated the expression the 41 genes as a function of in vitro radioresistance in the NCI-60 cancer cell line panel and found cyclophilin B (PPIB), a peptidylprolyl isomerase and target of cyclosporine A (CsA), had the strongest direct correlation. Functional inhibition of PPIB by small interfering RNA depletion or CsA treatment leads to radiosensitization in cancer cells and reduced cellular DNA repair. Immunohistochemical evaluation of PPIB expression in patients with HNSCC was found to be associated with outcome after radiotherapy. This work demonstrates that a novel 41-gene expression model of radiation sensitivity developed in bladder cancer cell lines and human skin fibroblasts predicts clinical outcome after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients and identifies PPIB as a potential target for clinical radiosensitization. PMID:22241958

  1. Preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy versus surgery alone for retroperitoneal sarcoma: a case-control, propensity score-matched analysis of a nationwide clinical oncology database.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, Daniel P; Rushing, Christel N; Lane, Whitney O; Cardona, Diana M; Kirsch, David G; Peterson, Bercedis L; Blazer, Dan G

    2016-07-01

    Recruitment into clinical trials for retroperitoneal sarcoma has been challenging, resulting in termination of the only randomised multicentre trial in the USA investigating perioperative radiotherapy. Nonetheless, use of radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma has increased over the past decade, substantiated primarily by its established role in extremity sarcoma. In this study, we used a nationwide clinical oncology database to separately compare overall survival for patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma who had surgery and preoperative radiotherapy or surgery and postoperative radiotherapy versus surgery alone. We did two case-control, propensity score-matched analyses of the National Cancer Data Base, which included adult patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma who were diagnosed from 2003 to 2011. Patients were included if they had localised, primary retroperitoneal sarcoma. Patients were classified into three groups based on use of radiotherapy: preoperative radiotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy, and no radiotherapy (surgery alone). Patients were excluded if they received both preoperative radiotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy, or if they received intraoperative radiotherapy. Parallel propensity score-matched datasets were created for patients who received preoperative radiotherapy versus those who received no radiotherapy and for patients who received postoperative therapy versus those who received no radiotherapy. Propensity scores were calculated with logistic regression, with multiple imputation and backwards elimination, with a significance level to stay of 0·05. Matching was done with a nearest-neighbour algorithm and matched 1:2 for the preoperative radiotherapy dataset and 1:1 for the postoperative radiotherapy dataset. The primary objective of interest was overall survival for patients who received preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy compared with those who received no radiotherapy within the propensity score

  2. Clinical toxicity of peripheral nerve to intraoperative radiotherapy in a canine model

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, P.A.S.; DeLuca, A.M.; Terrill, R.E.

    1995-07-15

    The clinical late effects of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) on peripheral nerve were investigated in a foxhound model. Between 1982 and 1987, 40 animals underwent laparotomy with intraoperative radiotherapy of doses from 0-75 Gy administered to the right lumbosacral plexus. Subsequently, all animals were monitored closely and sacrificed to assess clinical effects to peripheral nerve. This analysis reports final clinical results of all animals, with follow-up to 5 years. All animals treated with {>=} 25 Gy developed ipsilateral neuropathy. An inverse relationship was noted between intraoperative radiotherapy dose and time to neuropathy, with an effective dose for 50% paralysis (ED{sub 50}) of 17.2 Gy. One of the animals treated with 15 Gy IORT developed paralysis, after a much longer latency than the other animals. Doses of 15 Gy delivered intraoperatively may be accompanied by peripheral neuropathy with long-term follow-up. This threshold is less than that reported with shorter follow-up. The value of ED{sub 50} determined here is in keeping with data from other animal trials, and from clinical trials in humans. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  4. Particle beam therapy (hadrontherapy): basis for interest and clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Orecchia, R; Zurlo, A; Loasses, A; Krengli, M; Tosi, G; Zurrida, S; Zucali, P; Veronesi, U

    1998-03-01

    The particle or hadron beams deployed in radiotherapy (protons, neutrons and helium, carbon, oxygen and neon ions) have physical and radiobiological characteristics which differ from those of conventional radiotherapy beams (photons) and which offer a number of theoretical advantages over conventional radiotherapy. After briefly describing the properties of hadron beams in comparison to photons, this review discusses the indications for hadrontherapy and analyses accumulated experience on the use of this modality to treat mainly neoplastic lesions, as published by the relatively few hadrontherapy centres operating around the world. The analysis indicates that for selected patients and tumours (particularly uveal melanomas and base of skull/spinal chordomas and chondrosarcomas), hadrontherapy produces greater disease-free survival. The advantages of hadrontherapy are most promisingly realised when used in conjunction with modern patient positioning, radiation delivery and focusing techniques (e.g. on-line imaging, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy) developed to improve the efficacy of photon therapy. Although the construction and running costs of hadrontherapy units are considerably greater than those of conventional facilities, a comprehensive analysis that considers all the costs, particularly those resulting from the failure of less effective conventional radiotherapy, might indicate that hadrontherapy could be cost effective. In conclusion, the growing interest in this form of treatment seems to be fully justified by the results obtained to date, although more efficacy and dosing studies are required.

  5. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    PubMed

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Impact of Particle Irradiation on the Immune System: From the Clinic to Mars

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Baatout, Sarah; Moreels, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the generalized use of photon-based radiation (i.e., gamma rays and X-rays) to treat different cancer types, particle radiotherapy (i.e., protons and carbon ions) is becoming a popular, and more effective tool to treat specific tumors due to the improved physical properties and biological effectiveness. Current scientific evidence indicates that conventional radiation therapy affects the tumor immunological profile in a particular manner, which in turn, might induce beneficial effects both at local and systemic (i.e., abscopal effects) levels. The interaction between radiotherapy and the immune system is being explored to combine immune and radiation (including particles) treatments, which in many cases have a greater clinical effect than any of the therapies alone. Contrary to localized, clinical irradiation, astronauts are exposed to whole body, chronic cosmic radiation, where protons and heavy ions are an important component. The effects of this extreme environment during long periods of time, e.g., a potential mission to Mars, will have an impact on the immune system that could jeopardize the health of the astronauts, hence the success of the mission. To this background, the purpose of this mini review is to briefly present the current knowledge in local and systemic immune alterations triggered by particle irradiation and to propose new lines of future research. Immune effects induced by particle radiation relevant to clinical applications will be covered, together with examples of combined radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Then, the focus will move to outer space, where the immune system alterations induced by cosmic radiation during spaceflight will be discussed. PMID:28275377

  7. Impact of Particle Irradiation on the Immune System: From the Clinic to Mars.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Baatout, Sarah; Moreels, Marjan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the generalized use of photon-based radiation (i.e., gamma rays and X-rays) to treat different cancer types, particle radiotherapy (i.e., protons and carbon ions) is becoming a popular, and more effective tool to treat specific tumors due to the improved physical properties and biological effectiveness. Current scientific evidence indicates that conventional radiation therapy affects the tumor immunological profile in a particular manner, which in turn, might induce beneficial effects both at local and systemic (i.e., abscopal effects) levels. The interaction between radiotherapy and the immune system is being explored to combine immune and radiation (including particles) treatments, which in many cases have a greater clinical effect than any of the therapies alone. Contrary to localized, clinical irradiation, astronauts are exposed to whole body, chronic cosmic radiation, where protons and heavy ions are an important component. The effects of this extreme environment during long periods of time, e.g., a potential mission to Mars, will have an impact on the immune system that could jeopardize the health of the astronauts, hence the success of the mission. To this background, the purpose of this mini review is to briefly present the current knowledge in local and systemic immune alterations triggered by particle irradiation and to propose new lines of future research. Immune effects induced by particle radiation relevant to clinical applications will be covered, together with examples of combined radiotherapy and immunotherapy. Then, the focus will move to outer space, where the immune system alterations induced by cosmic radiation during spaceflight will be discussed.

  8. Clinical problems in radiotherapy of carcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Saunders, W.M.; Quivey, J.M.; Chen, G.T.; Collier, J.M.; Woodruff, K.H.; Lyman, J.T.; Twomey, P.; Frey, C.; Phillips, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Since 1975, 94 patients with localized unresectable carcinoma of the pancreas have been irradiated using helium and heavier particles at the University of California Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Despite surgical exploration and an extensive diagnostic workup including radiological, nuclear medicine, and computer-assisted tomographic studies, many patients proved to have occult liver metastases manifested within 9 months post treatment. In addition, local and regional control of the primary neoplasm (approx.20%) has been difficult to obtain even with doses of 6000 equivalent rad in 7 1/2 weeks. Gastric and biliary obstruction have required surgical bypass procedures since irradiation has not been successful in relieving obstructive symptoms. Evidence of gastrointestinal injury has been present in postradiation therapy in approximately 10% of patients, a figure which might be higher if more patients had a longer survival (average 10 months). Some patients require pancreatic enzyme supplementation because of pancreatic deficiency either secondary to tumor or treatment.

  9. The clinical implementation of respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Keall, Paul . E-mail: pjkeall@vcu.edu; Vedam, Sastry; George, Rohini; Bartee, Chris; Siebers, Jeffrey; Lerma, Fritz; Weiss, Elisabeth; Chung, Theodore

    2006-07-01

    The clinical use of respiratory-gated radiotherapy and the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are 2 relatively new innovations to the treatment of lung cancer. Respiratory gating can reduce the deleterious effects of intrafraction motion, and IMRT can concurrently increase tumor dose homogeneity and reduce dose to critical structures including the lungs, spinal cord, esophagus, and heart. The aim of this work is to describe the clinical implementation of respiratory-gated IMRT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. Documented clinical procedures were developed to include a tumor motion study, gated CT imaging, IMRT treatment planning, and gated IMRT delivery. Treatment planning procedures for respiratory-gated IMRT including beam arrangements and dose-volume constraints were developed. Quality assurance procedures were designed to quantify both the dosimetric and positional accuracy of respiratory-gated IMRT, including film dosimetry dose measurements and Monte Carlo dose calculations for verification and validation of individual patient treatments. Respiratory-gated IMRT is accepted by both treatment staff and patients. The dosimetric and positional quality assurance test results indicate that respiratory-gated IMRT can be delivered accurately. If carefully implemented, respiratory-gated IMRT is a practical alternative to conventional thoracic radiotherapy. For mobile tumors, respiratory-gated radiotherapy is used as the standard of care at our institution. Due to the increased workload, the choice of IMRT is taken on a case-by-case basis, with approximately half of the non-small cell lung cancer patients receiving respiratory-gated IMRT. We are currently evaluating whether superior tumor coverage and limited normal tissue dosing will lead to improvements in local control and survival in non-small cell lung cancer.

  10. Development and clinical introduction of automated radiotherapy treatment planning for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, D.; Bol, G. H.; van Asselen, B.; Hes, J.; Scholten, V.; Kerkmeijer, L. G. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2016-12-01

    To develop an automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow to efficiently create patient specifically optimized clinical grade treatment plans for prostate cancer and to implement it in clinical practice. A two-phased planning and optimization workflow was developed to automatically generate 77Gy 5-field simultaneously integrated boost intensity modulated radiation therapy (SIB-IMRT) plans for prostate cancer treatment. A retrospective planning study (n  =  100) was performed in which automatically and manually generated treatment plans were compared. A clinical pilot (n  =  21) was performed to investigate the usability of our method. Operator time for the planning process was reduced to  <5 min. The retrospective planning study showed that 98 plans met all clinical constraints. Significant improvements were made in the volume receiving 72Gy (V72Gy) for the bladder and rectum and the mean dose of the bladder and the body. A reduced plan variance was observed. During the clinical pilot 20 automatically generated plans met all constraints and 17 plans were selected for treatment. The automated radiotherapy treatment planning and optimization workflow is capable of efficiently generating patient specifically optimized and improved clinical grade plans. It has now been adopted as the current standard workflow in our clinic to generate treatment plans for prostate cancer.

  11. Effective particle energies for stopping power calculation in radiotherapy treatment planning with protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, T.; Kanematsu, N.

    2016-10-01

    The stopping power ratio (SPR) of body tissues relative to water depends on the particle energy. For simplicity, however, most analytical dose planning systems do not account for SPR variation with particle energy along the beam’s path, but rather assume a constant energy for SPR estimation. The range error due to this simplification could be indispensable depending on the particle species and the assumed energy. This error can be minimized by assuming a suitable energy referred to as an ‘effective energy’ in SPR estimation. To date, however, the effective energy has never been investigated for realistic patient geometries. We investigated the effective energies for proton, helium-, carbon-, and oxygen-ion radiotherapy using volumetric models of the reference male and female phantoms provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The range errors were estimated by comparing the particle ranges calculated when particle energy variations were and were not considered. The effective energies per nucleon for protons and helium, carbon, and oxygen ions were 70 MeV, 70 MeV, 131 MeV, and 156 MeV, respectively. Using the determined effective energies, the range errors were reduced to  ⩽0.3 mm for respective particle species. For SPR estimation of multiple particle species, an effective energy of 100 MeV is recommended, with which the range error is  ⩽0.5 mm for all particle species.

  12. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; King, Christopher R.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  13. External beam radiotherapy in thyroid carcinoma: clinical review and recommendations of the AIRO "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group.

    PubMed

    Mangoni, Monica; Gobitti, Carlo; Autorino, Rosa; Cerizza, Lorenzo; Furlan, Carlo; Mazzarotto, Renzo; Monari, Fabio; Simontacchi, Gabriele; Vianello, Federica; Basso, Michela; Zanirato Rambaldi, Giuseppe; Russi, Elvio; Tagliaferri, Luca

    2017-03-24

    The therapeutic approach to thyroid carcinoma usually involves surgery as initial treatment. The use of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is limited to high-risk patients and depends on clinical stage and histologic type. Different behavior patterns and degrees of aggressiveness of thyroid carcinomas require different management for differentiated, medullary, and anaplastic carcinoma. However, the role of EBRT is an issue of debate. Most clinical studies are retrospective and based on single-institution experiences. In this article, we review the main literature and give recommendations for the use of EBRT in thyroid carcinoma on behalf of the "Radioterapia Metabolica" Group of the Italian Radiation Oncology Association.

  14. Nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer: preliminary study of a Phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jun; E, Mingyan; Wu, Gang; Zhao, Lujun; Li, Xia; Xiu, Xia; Li, Ning; Chen, Bo; Hui, Zhouguang; Lv, Jima; Fang, Hui; Tang, Yu; Bi, Nan; Wang, Wenqing; Zhai, Yirui; Li, Tao; Chen, Dongfu; Zou, Shuangmei; Lu, Ning; Perez-Rodríguez, Rolando; Zheng, Junqi; Wang, Luhua

    2013-01-01

    To determine the safety and therapeutic effects of nimotuzumab (h-R3) combined with radiotherapy in esophageal cancer. This Phase II clinical trial involved 42 patients with stage II (inoperable or refused surgery) to stage IV (supraclavicular lymph node metastasis only) esophageal cancers treated between November 2008 and July 2010. All patients had squamous cell carcinomas, and all received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 200 mg nimotuzumab per week during radiotherapy. There were 9, 25, and 8 patients with stage II, III and IV disease, respectively. All except two patients received 50-70 Gy radiation; 37 patients (88.1%) received more than five nimotuzumab doses. Grade III toxicities (21.4% of all adverse events) included esophagitis and gastrointestinal, dermatological and hematological toxicities. Complete response, partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease were observed in 0, 22 (52.4%), 17 (40.5%) and 3 (7.1%) patients at 1 month after the treatment. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression rate was 95.2%. After a median follow-up of 37 months, the median survival time (MST) was 14 months. The 2 year and 3 year overall survival (OS) rates were 33.3% and 26.2%, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 10 months. The 2 year and 3 year PFS rates were 24.5% and 22.1%, respectively. The MST in the 13 patients with (+++) EGFR expression (group A) and 7 patients with (++) EGFR expression (group B) was 15 and 11 months, respectively. The 2 year and 3 year OS rates were 46.2% and 38.5% in group A and 28.6% and 28.6% in group B, respectively (P = 0.405). Although concurrent chemoradiotherapy was the standard care for locally advanced esophageal cancer, radiotherapy was the choice for those who were refused or could not tolerate chemoradiotherapy. Our study shows that nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy was well tolerated in patients with esophageal cancer. EGFR overexpression was more common

  15. Clinical Results for Bladder Cancer Treated by Radiotherapy Without Concurrent Standard Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Saito, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) alone in patients with bladder cancer who were unfit for concurrent standard chemotherapy. Between January 2007 and May 2016, 34 patients (20 men, 14 women) aged 65-97 years (median=83) with bladder cancer cT1-4bN0-1M1 were treated with conformal whole-bladder radiotherapy with fractions of 1.8-3 Gy up to a total dose of 40-50 Gy. Median survival was 10 months (range=1-99); 1-year and 3-year survival was 51.4% and 34.3%, respectively. Radiation dose >50 Gy was associated with improved survival. Three-year local control (LC) rate was 58.8%. On multivariate analysis, only radiation dose showed a significant association with LC. Our results demonstrated the safety and feasibility of radiotherapy in patients with bladder cancer unfit for concurrent standard chemotherapy. A higher radiation dose may confer superior LC and overall survival (OS) without complications. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. [The cost of respiration-gated radiotherapy in the framework of a clinical research programme "STIC"].

    PubMed

    Remonnay, R; Morelle, M; Giraud, P; Carrère, M-O

    2009-07-01

    Our study aims to evaluate the impact of the implementation of respiratory gating (RG) on the production cost of radiotherapy, as compared to conformational radiotherapy without RG (comparator) in patients with lung or breast cancers. Issues surrounding reimbursement were also explored. A prospective, multicenter, non-randomised study was conducted in the framework of a project entitled "Support Program for Costly Diagnostic and Therapeutic Innovations". Of the 20 hospitals involved in the clinical study, eight reference centers participated to the medico-economic study evaluating the costs of staff and equipment, as well as the costs of maintenance and consumables. Three hundred and sixty-five patients were enrolled over two years in the economic study, corresponding to 197 radiotherapy treatments without RG and 168 with RG. Patients treated during the learning phase (n=27) were excluded from the comparison with the control group. The use of RG in routine practice induced a cost increase of respectively euro1256 and euro996 per treatment for lung and breast cancer patients treated with breath-hold techniques, versus euro1807 and euro1510 for lung and breast cancer patients treated with synchronized gating techniques. Overcosts were mainly due to extra working time of medical staff and medical technicians and to extra use of equipment during treatment sessions. The results of the full cost estimation suggested that medical reimbursements largely underestimate the costs related to innovation.

  17. Clinical and dosimetric implications of intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage glottic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Matthew Christopher Pham, Yvonne D.; Kotecha, Rupesh; Zakem, Sara J.; Murray, Eric; Greskovich, John F.

    2016-04-01

    Conventional parallel-opposed radiotherapy (PORT) is the established standard technique for early-stage glottic carcinoma. However, case reports have reported the utility of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with or without image guidance (image-guided radiotherapy, IGRT) in select patients. The proposed advantages of IMRT/VMAT include sparing of the carotid artery, thyroid gland, and the remaining functional larynx, although these benefits remain unclear. The following case study presents a patient with multiple vascular comorbidities treated with VMAT for early-stage glottic carcinoma. A detailed explanation of the corresponding treatment details, dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis, and a review of the relevant literature are provided. Conventional PORT remains the standard of care for early-stage glottic carcinoma. IMRT or VMAT may be beneficial for select patients, although great care is necessary to avoid a geographical miss. Clinical data supporting the benefit of CRT are lacking. Therefore, these techniques should be used with caution and only in selected patients.

  18. Predictors for Clinical Outcomes After Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, Reed; Carter, Dennis L. Howell, Kathryn; Henkenberns, Phyllis; Tallhamer, Michael; Johnson, Tim; Kercher, Jane; Widner, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Leonard, Charles E.

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To correlate the treatment planning parameters with the clinical outcomes in patients treated with accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 105 patients with Stage I breast cancer were treated between February 2004 and March 2007 in a Phase II prospective trial and had detailed information available on the planning target volume (PTV), ipsilateral breast volume (IBV), PTV/IBV ratio, lung volume, chest wall volume, surgery to radiotherapy interval, follow-up interval, breast pain, and cosmesis. The first 7 of these patients were treated to 34 Gy, and the remaining 98 were treated to 38.5 Gy. All patients were treated twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months. No recurrences or deaths were observed. Of the 105 patients, 30 reported mild or moderate breast pain in their most recently recorded follow-up visit. The irradiated lung volume (p < 0.05) and chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy (p < 0.01) were associated with pain. The PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, also correlated with pain (p < 0.01 and p = 0.42, respectively). A total of 72 patients reported excellent, 32 reported good, and 1 reported poor cosmesis. Physician-rated cosmesis reported 90 excellent and 15 good. None of the tested variables correlated with the cosmetic outcomes. Conclusion: Radiotherapy to the chest wall (chest wall volume receiving >35 Gy) and to lung correlated with reports of mild pain after accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Also, the PTV, but not the PTV/IBV ratio, was predictive of post-treatment reports of pain.

  19. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, Ashwatha . E-mail: narayana@mskcc.org; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy.

  20. Redesigning radiotherapy quality assurance: opportunities to develop an efficient, evidence-based system to support clinical trials--report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance.

    PubMed

    Bekelman, Justin E; Deye, James A; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A; FitzGerald, T J; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lee, J Jack; Merchant, Thomas E; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C Norman; Purdy, James

    2012-07-01

    In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Redesigning Radiotherapy Quality Assurance: Opportunities to Develop an Efficient, Evidence-Based System to Support Clinical Trials-Report of the National Cancer Institute Work Group on Radiotherapy Quality Assurance

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E.; Deye, James A.; Vikram, Bhadrasain; Bentzen, Soren M.; Bruner, Deborah; Curran, Walter J.; Dignam, James; Efstathiou, Jason A.; FitzGerald, T.J.; Hurkmans, Coen; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Lee, J. Jack; Merchant, Thomas E.; Michalski, Jeff; Palta, Jatinder R.; Simon, Richard; Ten Haken, Randal K.; Timmerman, Robert; Tunis, Sean; Coleman, C. Norman; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: In the context of national calls for reorganizing cancer clinical trials, the National Cancer Institute sponsored a 2-day workshop to examine challenges and opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy quality assurance (QA) in clinical trial design. Methods and Materials: Participants reviewed the current processes of clinical trial QA and noted the QA challenges presented by advanced technologies. The lessons learned from the radiotherapy QA programs of recent trials were discussed in detail. Four potential opportunities for optimizing radiotherapy QA were explored, including the use of normal tissue toxicity and tumor control metrics, biomarkers of radiation toxicity, new radiotherapy modalities such as proton beam therapy, and the international harmonization of clinical trial QA. Results: Four recommendations were made: (1) to develop a tiered (and more efficient) system for radiotherapy QA and tailor the intensity of QA to the clinical trial objectives (tiers include general credentialing, trial-specific credentialing, and individual case review); (2) to establish a case QA repository; (3) to develop an evidence base for clinical trial QA and introduce innovative prospective trial designs to evaluate radiotherapy QA in clinical trials; and (4) to explore the feasibility of consolidating clinical trial QA in the United States. Conclusion: Radiotherapy QA can affect clinical trial accrual, cost, outcomes, and generalizability. To achieve maximum benefit, QA programs must become more efficient and evidence-based.

  2. A dietitian-led clinic for patients receiving (chemo)radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Nicole K; Krishnasamy, Meinir; Loeliger, Jenelle; Granados, Alba; Dutu, Gaelle; Corry, June

    2012-09-01

    Malnutrition is prevalent in head and neck cancer patients and is associated with poorer outcomes and increased health care costs. This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability, organisational efficiency and clinical outcomes of a dietitian-led head and neck cancer clinic. Two consecutive, independent, patient cohorts were studied with a pre-post-test design of 98 patients prior to the introduction of a dietitian-led clinic (DLC) and the subsequent 100 patients who attended the newly formulated DLC. The two groups were compared for frequency of dietitian intervention, weight loss, enteral feeding, hospital admissions and post-treatment medical follow-up requirements. Nutritional management in a DLC was associated with reduced nutrition-related admissions from 12% to 4.5% (p = 0.0029), unplanned nasogastric tube insertions from 75% to 39% (p = 0.02), improved transition to oral diet post-radiotherapy from 68.3% to 76.7% (p = 0.10) and reduced radiation oncologist review at 2 weeks post-radiotherapy from 32% to 15% patients (p = 0.009) compared to the cohort prior to the DLC. A dietitian-led head and neck cancer clinic is associated with improved efficiency and nutritional management of head and neck cancer patients and offers a feasible model of care.

  3. External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer: Clinical Significance of Nadir Prostate-Specific Antigen Value Within 12 Months

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the results of external beam radiotherapy for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer and investigate the clinical significance of nadir prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value within 12 months (nPSA12) as an early estimate of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-four patients with localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. The total radiation doses ranged from 30 to 76 Gy (median, 66 Gy), and the median follow-up period for all 84 patients was 26.9 months (range, 2.7-77.3 months). Results: The 3-year actuarial overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), and local control rates in all 84 patients after radiotherapy were 67%, 61%, and 93%, respectively. Although distant metastases and/or regional lymph node metastases developed in 34 patients (40%) after radiotherapy, local progression was observed in only 5 patients (6%). Of all 84 patients, the median nPSA12 in patients with clinical failure and in patients without clinical failure was 3.1 ng/mL and 0.5 ng/mL, respectively. When dividing patients according to low (<0.5 ng/mL) and high ({>=}0.5 ng/mL) nPSA12 levels, the 3-year PFS rate in patients with low nPSA12 and in those with high nPSA12 was 96% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.0001). In univariate analysis, nPSA12 and pretreatment PSA value had a significant impact on PFS, and in multivariate analysis nPSA12 alone was an independent prognostic factor for PFS after radiotherapy. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy had an excellent local control rate for clinically localized hormone-refractory prostate cancer, and nPSA12 was predictive of clinical outcomes after radiotherapy.

  4. A particle swarm optimization algorithm for beam angle selection in intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjie; Yao, Dezhong; Yao, Jonathan; Chen, Wufan

    2005-08-07

    Automatic beam angle selection is an important but challenging problem for intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning. Though many efforts have been made, it is still not very satisfactory in clinical IMRT practice because of overextensive computation of the inverse problem. In this paper, a new technique named BASPSO (Beam Angle Selection with a Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm) is presented to improve the efficiency of the beam angle optimization problem. Originally developed as a tool for simulating social behaviour, the particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm is a relatively new population-based evolutionary optimization technique first introduced by Kennedy and Eberhart in 1995. In the proposed BASPSO, the beam angles are optimized using PSO by treating each beam configuration as a particle (individual), and the beam intensity maps for each beam configuration are optimized using the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. These two optimization processes are implemented iteratively. The performance of each individual is evaluated by a fitness value calculated with a physical objective function. A population of these individuals is evolved by cooperation and competition among the individuals themselves through generations. The optimization results of a simulated case with known optimal beam angles and two clinical cases (a prostate case and a head-and-neck case) show that PSO is valid and efficient and can speed up the beam angle optimization process. Furthermore, the performance comparisons based on the preliminary results indicate that, as a whole, the PSO-based algorithm seems to outperform, or at least compete with, the GA-based algorithm in computation time and robustness. In conclusion, the reported work suggested that the introduced PSO algorithm could act as a new promising solution to the beam angle optimization problem and potentially other optimization problems in IMRT, though further studies need to be investigated.

  5. Does a too risk-averse approach to the implementation of new radiotherapy technologies delay their clinical use?

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, H; Fiorino, C; Thwaites, D

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a generally safe treatment modality in practice; nevertheless, recent well-reported accidents also confirm its potential risks. However, this may obstruct or delay the introduction of new technologies and treatment strategies/techniques into clinical practice. Risks must be addressed and judged in a realistic context: risks must be assessed realistically. Introducing new technology may introduce new possibilities of errors. However, delaying the introduction of such new technology therefore means that patients are denied the potentially better treatment opportunities. Despite the difficulty in quantitatively assessing the risks on both sides of the possible choice of actions, including the “lost opportunity”, the best estimates should be included in the overall risk–benefit and cost–benefit analysis. Radiotherapy requires a sufficiently high level of support for the safety, precision and accuracy required: radiotherapy development and implementation is exciting. However, it has been anxious with a constant awareness of the consequences of mistakes or misunderstandings. Recent history can be used to show that for introduction of advanced radiotherapy, the risk-averse medical physicist can act as an electrical fuse in a complex circuit. The lack of sufficient medical physics resource or expertise can short out this fuse and leave systems unsafe. Future technological developments will continue to present further safety and risk challenges. The important evolution of radiotherapy brings different management opinions and strategies. Advanced radiotherapy technologies can and should be safely implemented in as timely a manner as possible for the patient groups where clinical benefit is indicated. PMID:25993488

  6. Clinical and biochemical evaluation of the saliva of patients with xerostomia induced by radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Barros Pontes, Cássio; Polizello, Ana Cristina Morseli; Spadaro, Augusto César Cropanese

    2004-01-01

    Clinical aspects and biochemical properties in the saliva of 21 patients prior to and following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer were evaluated (experimental group) and compared with the same properties in a control group of 21 subjects free of cancer. Salivary flow was evaluated by measuring the time necessary, in seconds, for the output of 2 ml of stimulated saliva; and the buffering capacity changes were determined using a simple colorimetric method. Total salivary protein concentration was determined by the Bradford 4 method. Amylase activity was measured by reducing sugars released from a soluble starch substrate, quantified by the dinitrosalicylic method. The electrophoretic profile was evaluated in polyacrylamide gel (12% SDS-PAGE) using samples of 5 mg of salivary protein. A statistically significant reduction (p < 0.01) of the salivary flow was observed, (162.47 s +/- 28.30 before and 568.71 s +/- 79.75 after irradiation), as well as a reduction in the salivary buffering capacity (pH 5.45 +/- 0.14 before and pH 4.40 +/- 0.15 after irradiation). No statistically significant alteration was observed in total salivary protein concentration. A statistically significant reduction (p < 0.01) of salivary alpha-amylase activity (856.6 ng/mg +/- 88.0 before and 567.0 ng/mg +/- 120.6 after irradiation) was observed. Electrophoretic profile differences in salivary protein bands were also observed after radiotherapy, mainly in the range of molecular weight of 72000 to 55000 Daltons. Clinically, patients presenting xerostomia induced by radiotherapy presented an increase in oral tissue injury.

  7. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays.

    PubMed

    Zygmanski, Piotr; Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics.

  8. Nanoscale radiation transport and clinical beam modeling for gold nanoparticle dose enhanced radiotherapy (GNPT) using X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Sajo, Erno

    2016-01-01

    We review radiation transport and clinical beam modelling for gold nanoparticle dose-enhanced radiotherapy using X-rays. We focus on the nanoscale radiation transport and its relation to macroscopic dosimetry for monoenergetic and clinical beams. Among other aspects, we discuss Monte Carlo and deterministic methods and their applications to predicting dose enhancement using various metrics. PMID:26642305

  9. Dosimetric robustness against setup errors in charged particle radiotherapy of skull base tumors.

    PubMed

    Ammazzalorso, Filippo; Jelen, Urszula; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2014-12-05

    It is expected that physical dose deposition properties render charged particle dose distributions sensitive to targeting uncertainties. Purpose of this work was to investigate the robustness of scanned-beam particle therapy plans against setup errors for different optimization modalities, beam setups and ion species. For 15 patients with skull base tumors, localized in regions of severe tissue density heterogeneity, scanned lateral-opposed-beam treatment plans were prepared with the treatment planning system TRiP98, employing different optimization settings (single- and multiple-field modulation) and ion species (carbon ions and protons). For 10 of the patients, additional plans were prepared with individually selected beam setups, aiming at avoiding severe tissue heterogeneities. Subsequently, multiple rigid positioning errors of magnitude 1-2 mm (i.e. within planning target expansion) were simulated by introducing a shift of the irradiation fields with respect to the computed tomography (CT) data and recomputing the plans. In presence of shifts, in carbon ion plans using a lateral-opposed beam setup and fulfilling clinical healthy tissue dose constraints, the median reduction in CTV V95% was up to 0.7 percentage points (pp) and 3.5 pp, for shifts of magnitude 1 mm and 2 mm respectively, however, in individual cases, the reduction reached 5.1 pp and 9.7 pp. In the corresponding proton plans similar median CTV V95% reductions of up to 0.9 pp (1 mm error) and 3.4 pp (2 mm error) were observed, with respective individual-case reductions of at most 3.2 pp and 11.7 pp. Unconstrained plans offered slightly higher coverage values, while no relevant differences were observed between different field modulation methods. Individually selected beam setups had a visible dosimetric advantage over lateral-opposed beams, for both particle species. While carbons provided more conformal plans and generally more advantageous absolute dose values, in presence of setup errors

  10. Constructing a clinical decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy using a Bayesian Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrave, C.; Moores, M.; Deegan, T.; Gibbs, A.; Poulsen, M.; Harden, F.; Mengersen, K.

    2014-03-01

    A decision-making framework for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) is being developed using a Bayesian Network (BN) to graphically describe, and probabilistically quantify, the many interacting factors that are involved in this complex clinical process. Outputs of the BN will provide decision-support for radiation therapists to assist them to make correct inferences relating to the likelihood of treatment delivery accuracy for a given image-guided set-up correction. The framework is being developed as a dynamic object-oriented BN, allowing for complex modelling with specific subregions, as well as representation of the sequential decision-making and belief updating associated with IGRT. A prototype graphic structure for the BN was developed by analysing IGRT practices at a local radiotherapy department and incorporating results obtained from a literature review. Clinical stakeholders reviewed the BN to validate its structure. The BN consists of a sub-network for evaluating the accuracy of IGRT practices and technology. The directed acyclic graph (DAG) contains nodes and directional arcs representing the causal relationship between the many interacting factors such as tumour site and its associated critical organs, technology and technique, and inter-user variability. The BN was extended to support on-line and off-line decision-making with respect to treatment plan compliance. Following conceptualisation of the framework, the BN will be quantified. It is anticipated that the finalised decision-making framework will provide a foundation to develop better decision-support strategies and automated correction algorithms for IGRT.

  11. Inadequate pain management in cancer patients attending an outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Sherlyn; Pulenzas, Natalie; DeAngelis, Carlo; Torabi, Sarah; Ahrari, Soha; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Barnes, Toni; Chow, Edward

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of undertreated cancer pain in an outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic using the Pain Management Index (PMI). A retrospective analysis of a prospective database to assess pain management was done on patients with cancer pain enrolled from January 2009 to March 2015 using recorded pain intensity (0-10) and baseline pain medications. The pain intensities were categorized into no pain (0), mild pain (1), moderate pain (2), and severe pain (3), and an analgesic score was assigned to the most potent pain medication the patient was taking during the time of data collection. "0" was assigned to no analgesics, "1" to non-opioids, "2" to weak opioids, and "3" for strong opioids based on the WHO guidelines. The PMI was calculated for each patient by subtracting the pain score from the analgesic score. A negative value indicated undertreatment, and a value of 0 or greater corresponded to adequate pain management. Three hundred fifty-four patients were included in the study. The incidence of inadequate pain management was 33.3 %, similar to that reported in our previous studies. Additionally, 106 patients were taking strong opioids and reporting severe pain despite being the PMI reporting adequately treated. The rate of undertreatment is similar to that reported in past studies; however, the rates have shown a slight increase in our palliative radiotherapy clinic since the last assessment. Inadequate management of cancer pain continues to be a problem.

  12. Self-reported Conflicts of Interest and Trial Sponsorship of Clinical Trials in Prostate Cancer Involving Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Leite, Elton Trigo Teixeira; Hamstra, Dan A; Feng, Felix Y; Arruda, Fernando Freire; Gadia, Rafael; Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Marta, Gustavo Nader; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Silva, João Luis Fernandes da; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade; Spratt, Daniel E

    2015-12-22

    To examine the association between trial sponsorship and conflicts of interest (COI) with clinical trial conclusions for prostate cancer trials related to radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched for all prostate cancer clinical trials published between 2004 and 2013 and identified 1396 studies. Two investigators independently identified trials published in the English language of ≥30 patients, and extracted relevant data. Clinical trials were classified according to trial characteristics, sponsorship source and type, COI, and study conclusion, and analyzed by univariable and multivariable logistic regression. Of 240 eligible trials, 160 (67.5%) evaluated drugs without radiotherapy, 60 (25%) involved radiotherapy, and 18 (7.5%) involved procedures without radiotherapy. Of the 60 radiotherapy trials eligible for analysis, positive sponsorship and potential COI were present in 58.3% and 20% of trials, respectively. Study conclusions were positive, negative, or neutral in 78.3%, 5%, and 16.7% of trials, respectively. No association was found between positive conclusions and either industry support of potential COI. Positive conclusions were reported in 86.7% and 83.3% of trials with sponsorship and COI, respectively, as compared with 75.6% and 77.1% of those without sponsorship (P=0.37) and COI (P=0.64). Sponsorship was significantly associated with radiotherapy trials combined with drugs (odds ratio 5.5, P=0.01) and higher-risk disease (odds ratio 4.71, P=0.01). The presence of sponsorship was associated with radiotherapy trials involving drugs or studying higher-risk prostate cancer. However, there were no identified associations between study conclusion and sponsorship type or COI.

  13. The Clinical Outcome of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy With CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery for Perioptic Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Puataweepong, Putipun; Dhanachai, Mantana; Hansasuta, Ake; Dangprasert, Somjai; Swangsilpa, Thiti; Sitathanee, Chomporn; Jiarpinitnun, Chuleeporn; Vitoonpanich, Patamintita; Yongvithisatid, Pornpan

    2016-12-01

    Stereotactic radiation technique including single fraction radiosurgery and conventional fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is widely reported as an effective treatment of pituitary adenomas. Because of the restricted radiation tolerance dose of the optic pathway, single fraction radiosurgery has been accepted for small tumor located far away from the optic apparatus, while fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy may be suitable for larger tumor located close to the optic pathway. More recently, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has become an alternative treatment option that provides high rate of tumor control and visual preservation for the perioptic lesions within 2 to 3 mm of the optic pathway. The objective of the study was to analyze the clinical outcomes of perioptic pituitary adenomas treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. From 2009 to 2012, 40 patients with perioptic pituitary adenoma were treated with CyberKnife robotic radiosurgery. The median tumor volume was 3.35 cm(3) (range, 0.82-25.86 cm(3)). The median prescribed dose was 25 Gy (range, 20-28 Gy) in 5 fractions (range, 3-5). After the median follow-up time of 38.5 months (range, 14-71 months), 1 (2.5%) patient with prolactinoma had tumor enlargement, 31 (77.5%) were stable, and the remaining 8 (20%) tumors were smaller in size. No patient's vision deteriorated after hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. Hormone normalization was observed in 7 (54%) of 13 patients. No newly developed hypopituitarism was detected in our study. These data confirmed that hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy achieved high rates of tumor control and visual preservation. Because of the shorter duration of treatment, it may be preferable to use hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy over fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for selected pituitary adenomas immediately adjacent to the optic apparatus.

  14. Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Low Interobserver Concordance

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ross P.; Truong, Pauline T. Kader, Hosam A.; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Kader, Adam S.; Beckham, Wayne A.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To examine variability in target volume delineation for partial breast radiotherapy planning and evaluate characteristics associated with low interobserver concordance. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who underwent planning CT for adjuvant breast radiotherapy formed the study cohort. Using a standardized scale to score seroma clarity and consensus contouring guidelines, three radiation oncologists independently graded seroma clarity and delineated seroma volumes for each case. Seroma geometric center coordinates, maximum diameters in three axes, and volumes were recorded. Conformity index (CI), the ratio of overlapping volume and encompassing delineated volume, was calculated for each case. Cases with CI {<=}0.50 were analyzed to identify features associated with low concordance. Results: The median time from surgery to CT was 42.5 days. For geometric center coordinates, variations from the mean were 0.5-1.1 mm and standard deviations (SDs) were 0.5-1.8 mm. For maximum seroma dimensions, variations from the mean and SDs were predominantly <5 mm, with the largest SDs observed in the medial-lateral axis. The mean CI was 0.61 (range, 0.27-0.84). Five cases had CI {<=}0.50. Conformity index was significantly associated with seroma clarity (p < 0.001) and seroma volume (p < 0.002). Features associated with reduced concordance included tissue stranding from the surgical cavity, proximity to muscle, dense breast parenchyma, and benign calcifications that may be mistaken for surgical clips. Conclusion: Variability in seroma contouring occurred in three dimensions, with the largest variations in the medial-lateral axis. Awareness of clinical features associated with reduced concordance may be applied toward training staff and refining contouring guidelines for partial breast radiotherapy trials.

  15. A controlled clinical trial of misonidazole in the radiotherapy of patients with carcinoma of the bronchus

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, M.I.; Anderson, P.; Dische, S.; Martin, W.M.C.

    1982-03-01

    In 1977, during the initial development period of misonidazole, it was decided to start a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial in carcinoma of bronchus, using a 6 fraction technique of radiotherapy. The patients included in the study were patients with squamous and large-cell undifferentiated carcinoma of the bronchus who were unsuitable for surgical resection, but where there was no evidence for metastases beyond the thorax. A total of 62 patients were randomized between January 1977 and September 1980. Tomography was performed at 2 monthly intervals and a particular effort was made to obtain post-mortem examinations. Fifty-four of the patients included have now died and post-mortems were obtained in 67%. Assessments of immediate tumor regression, tumor clearance, tumor regrowth and the findings at death were made. Thirty-three of the 62 patients were randomized to receive misonidazole and of these 12 (36%) showed peripheral neuropathy. No significant benefit was obtained with the use of misonidazole, as assessed by the parameters listed above. The full observation of those patients now dead showed that using a 6 fraction technique of radiotherapy, a complete tumor control was obtained in only 2. It was further found that the primary tumor was an important factor causing death in 85% of these patients. No evidence for distance metastases could be obtained in a considerable number of post-mortems. Among the possible reasons for the lack of benefit was the relatively low concentrations of sensitizer in the tumor, the advanced stage of disease and the 6 fraction technique of radiotherapy. The trial did, however, show that in a carefully selected group of patients the control of the primary tumor was important and that further efforts should be made to eradicate tumor.

  16. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  17. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noel, Camille E; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-08-01

    Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily more) risks than standard IMRT and may be

  18. Process-based quality management for clinical implementation of adaptive radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Camille E.; Santanam, Lakshmi; Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated adaptive radiotherapy (ART) has been the focus of considerable research and developmental work due to its potential therapeutic benefits. However, in light of its unique quality assurance (QA) challenges, no one has described a robust framework for its clinical implementation. In fact, recent position papers by ASTRO and AAPM have firmly endorsed pretreatment patient-specific IMRT QA, which limits the feasibility of online ART. The authors aim to address these obstacles by applying failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) to identify high-priority errors and appropriate risk-mitigation strategies for clinical implementation of intensity-modulated ART. Methods: An experienced team of two clinical medical physicists, one clinical engineer, and one radiation oncologist was assembled to perform a standard FMEA for intensity-modulated ART. A set of 216 potential radiotherapy failures composed by the forthcoming AAPM task group 100 (TG-100) was used as the basis. Of the 216 failures, 127 were identified as most relevant to an ART scheme. Using the associated TG-100 FMEA values as a baseline, the team considered how the likeliness of occurrence (O), outcome severity (S), and likeliness of failure being undetected (D) would change for ART. New risk priority numbers (RPN) were calculated. Failures characterized by RPN ≥ 200 were identified as potentially critical. Results: FMEA revealed that ART RPN increased for 38% (n = 48/127) of potential failures, with 75% (n = 36/48) attributed to failures in the segmentation and treatment planning processes. Forty-three of 127 failures were identified as potentially critical. Risk-mitigation strategies include implementing a suite of quality control and decision support software, specialty QA software/hardware tools, and an increase in specially trained personnel. Conclusions: Results of the FMEA-based risk assessment demonstrate that intensity-modulated ART introduces different (but not necessarily

  19. Xerostomia and quality of life after intensity-modulated radiotherapy vs. conventional radiotherapy for early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Initial report on a randomized controlled clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Pow, Edmond; Kwong, Dora; McMillan, Anne S. . E-mail: annemcmillan@hku.hk; Wong, May; Sham, Jonathan; Leung, Lucullus; Leung, W. Keung

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To compare directly the effect of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) vs. conventional radiotherapy (CRT) on salivary flow and quality of life (QoL) in patients with early-stage nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-one patients with T2, N0/N1, M0 NPC took part in a randomized controlled clinical study and received IMRT or CRT. Stimulated whole (SWS) and parotid (SPS) saliva flow were measured and Medical Outcomes Short Form 36 (SF-36), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core quetionnaire, and EORTC head-and-neck module (QLQ-H and N35) were completed at baseline and 2, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Results: Forty-six patients (88%) were in disease remission 12 months after radiotherapy. At 12 months postradiotherapy, 12 (50.0%) and 20 patients (83.3%) in the IMRT group had recovered at least 25% of preradiotherapy SWS and SPS flow respectively, compared with 1 (4.8%) and 2 patients (9.5%), respectively, in the CRT group. Global health scores showed continuous improvement in QoL after both treatments (p < 0.001). However, after 12 months subscale scores for role-physical, bodily pain, and physical function were significantly higher in the IMRT group, indicating a better condition (p < 0.05). Dry mouth and sticky saliva were problems in both groups 2 months after treatment. In the IMRT group, there was consistent improvement over time with xerostomia-related symptoms significantly less common than in the CRT group at 12 months postradiotherapy. Conclusions: IMRT was significantly better than CRT in terms of parotid sparing and improved QoL for early-stage disease. The findings support the case for assessment of health-related QoL in relation to head-and-neck cancer using a site-specific approach.

  20. Is Radiotherapy an Option for Early Breast Cancers With Complete Clinical Response After Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy?

    SciTech Connect

    Daveau, Caroline; Savignoni, Alexia; Abrous-Anane, Soumya; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Reyal, Fabien; Gautier, Chantal; Kirova, Youlia M.; Dendale, Remi; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain; Bollet, Marc A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the exclusive use of radiotherapy (ERT) could be a treatment option after complete clinical response (cCR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) for early breast cancer (EBC). Methods and Materials: Between 1985 and 1999, 1,477 patients received NCT for EBC considered too large for primary conservative surgery. Of 165 patients with cCR, 65 patients were treated with breast surgery (with radiotherapy) and 100 patients were treated with ERT. Results: The two groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics, except for larger initial tumor sizes in the ERT group. There were no significant differences in overall, disease-free and metastasis-free survival rates. Five-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 91% and 77% in the no-surgery group and 82% and 79% in the surgery group, respectively (p = 0.9). However, a nonsignificant trend toward higher locoregional recurrence rates (LRR) was observed in the no-surgery group (31% vs. 17% at 10 years; p = 0.06). In patients with complete responses on mammography and/or ultrasound, LRR were not significantly different (p = 0.45, 10-year LRR: 21% in surgery vs. 26% in ERT). No significant differences were observed in terms of the rate of cutaneous, cardiac, or pulmonary toxicities. Conclusions: Surgery is a key component of locoregional treatment for breast cancers that achieved cCR to NCT.

  1. [Clinical to target volume margins determination in radiotherapy for anal cancers].

    PubMed

    Libois, V; Mahé, M-A; Rio, E; Maingon, P

    2016-10-01

    There are very few data on the expansion from the clinical target volume (CTV) to the planning target volume (PTV) in the anal cancer treatment. This article aims to collect the different elements needed for the construction of a PTV from scientific data based on a literature analysis. We reviewed the articles published in the medical literature from the last 20years. They concerned setup errors and internal organ mobility of the different volumes of patients treated by conformational radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (anal canal, meso-rectum, common, intern and extern, inguinal and pre-sacral lymph nodes). CTV to PTV margins admitted in the guidelines and atlas of consensus groups (SFRO, RTOG, AGITG) are from 0.7 to 1cm in all directions, based on expert's opinions but not on scientific data. There are no specific studies on the canal anal mobility. Most of the data are from other pelvis cancers (gynecologic, rectum and prostate). Setup errors can be reduced by daily imaging. Patient repositioning and immobilization modalities are mostly local habits rather than scientific consensus. A three-dimensional 1cm margin is generally admitted. Margins reduction must be careful and has to be assessed.

  2. Clinical outcome of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for abdominal lymph node metastases.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, Mario; Navarria, Piera; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Carnaghi, Carlo; Tronconi, Maria Chiara; Santoro, Armando; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-11-01

    We report the medium-term clinical outcome of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a series of patients with either a solitary metastasis or oligometastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Between January 2006 and June 2009, 19 patients with unresectable nodal metastases in the abdominal retroperitoneal region were treated with SBRT. Of the patients, 11 had a solitary nodal metastasis and 8 had a dominant nodal lesion as part of oligometastatic disease, defined as up to five metastases. The dose prescription was 45 Gy to the clinical target volume in six fractions. The prescription had to be downscaled by 10% to 20% in 6 of 19 cases to keep within dose/volume constraints. The first 11 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques and the last 8 by volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy. Median follow-up was 1 year. Of 19 patients, 2 had a local progression at the site of SBRT; both also showed concomitant tumor growth at distant sites. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression was 77.8% ± 13.9% at both 12 and 24 months. Eleven patients showed progressive local and/or distant disease at follow-up. The 12- and 24-month progression-free survival rates were 29.5% ± 13.4% and 19.7% ± 12.0%, respectively. The number of metastases (solitary vs. nonsolitary oligometastases) emerged as the only significant variable affecting progression-free survival (p < 0.0004). Both acute and chronic toxicities were minimal. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastases to abdominal lymph nodes was shown to be feasible with good clinical results in terms of medium-term local control and toxicity rates. Even if most patients eventually show progressive disease at other sites, local control achieved by SBRT may be potentially significant for preserving quality of life and delaying further chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Outcome of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Abdominal Lymph Node Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Bignardi, Mario; Navarria, Piera; Mancosu, Pietro; Cozzi, Luca; Fogliata, Antonella; Tozzi, Angelo; Castiglioni, Simona; Carnaghi, Carlo; Tronconi, Maria Chiara; Santoro, Armando; Scorsetti, Marta

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We report the medium-term clinical outcome of hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in a series of patients with either a solitary metastasis or oligometastases from different tumors to abdominal lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Between January 2006 and June 2009, 19 patients with unresectable nodal metastases in the abdominal retroperitoneal region were treated with SBRT. Of the patients, 11 had a solitary nodal metastasis and 8 had a dominant nodal lesion as part of oligometastatic disease, defined as up to five metastases. The dose prescription was 45 Gy to the clinical target volume in six fractions. The prescription had to be downscaled by 10% to 20% in 6 of 19 cases to keep within dose/volume constraints. The first 11 patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal techniques and the last 8 by volumetric intensity-modulated arc therapy. Median follow-up was 1 year. Results: Of 19 patients, 2 had a local progression at the site of SBRT; both also showed concomitant tumor growth at distant sites. The actuarial rate of freedom from local progression was 77.8% {+-} 13.9% at both 12 and 24 months. Eleven patients showed progressive local and/or distant disease at follow-up. The 12- and 24-month progression-free survival rates were 29.5% {+-} 13.4% and 19.7% {+-} 12.0%, respectively. The number of metastases (solitary vs. nonsolitary oligometastases) emerged as the only significant variable affecting progression-free survival (p < 0.0004). Both acute and chronic toxicities were minimal. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiotherapy for metastases to abdominal lymph nodes was shown to be feasible with good clinical results in terms of medium-term local control and toxicity rates. Even if most patients eventually show progressive disease at other sites, local control achieved by SBRT may be potentially significant for preserving quality of life and delaying further chemotherapy.

  4. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Initial Clinical Outcomes From a Prospective Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L.; Garden, Adam S.; Thomas, Jimmy; Chen Yipei; Zhang Yongbin; Lewin, Jan; Chambers, Mark S.; Dong, Lei

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To present pilot toxicity and survival outcomes for a prospective trial investigating adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 24 patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved clinical trial; data for 22 of these patients were analyzed. Daily CT-guided setup and deformable image registration permitted serial mapping of clinical target volumes and avoidance structures for ART planning. Primary site was base of tongue in 15 patients, tonsil in 6 patient, and glossopharyngeal sulcus in 1 patient. Twenty patients (91%) had American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) Stage IV disease. T stage distribution was 2 T1, 12 T2, 3 T3, 5 T4. N stage distribution was 1 N0, 2 N1, 5 N2a, 12 N2b, and 2 N2c. Of the patients, 21 (95%) received systemic therapy. Results: With a 31-month median follow-up (range, 13-45 months), there has been no primary site failure and 1 nodal relapse, yielding 100% local and 95% regional disease control at 2 years. Baseline tumor size correlated with absolute volumetric treatment response (p = 0.018). Parotid volumetric change correlated with duration of feeding tube placement (p = 0.025). Acute toxicity was comparable to that observed with conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Chronic toxicity and functional outcomes beyond 1 year were tabulated. Conclusion: This is the first prospective evaluation of morbidity and survival outcomes in patients with locally advanced head-and-neck cancer treated with automated adaptive replanning. ART can provide dosimetric benefit with only one or two mid-treatment replanning events. Our preliminary clinical outcomes document functional recovery and preservation of disease control at 1-year follow-up and beyond.

  5. Protracted Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Graves' Ophthalmopathy: A Pilot Study of Clinical and Radiologic Response

    SciTech Connect

    Casimiro de Deus Cardoso, Cejana; Giordani, Adelmo Jose; Borri Wolosker, Angela Maria; Souhami, Luis; Gois Manso, Paulo; Souza Dias, Rodrigo; Comodo Segreto, Helena Regina; Araujo Segreto, Roberto

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiologic response of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy given low-dose orbital radiotherapy (RT) with a protracted fractionation. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients (36 orbits) received orbital RT with a total dose of 10 Gy, fractionated in 1 Gy once a week over 10 weeks. Of these, 9 patients received steroid therapy as well. Patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically at 6 months after treatment. Clinical response assessment was carried out using three criteria: by physical examination, by a modified clinical activity score, and by a verbal questionnaire considering the 10 most common signs and symptoms of the disease. Radiologic response was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Improvement in ocular pain, palpebral edema, visual acuity, and ocular motility was observed in all patients. Significant decrease in symptoms such as tearing (p < 0.001) diplopia (p = 0.008), conjunctival hyperemia (p = 0.002), and ocular grittiness (p = 0.031) also occurred. Magnetic resonance imaging showed decrease in ocular muscle thickness and in the intensity of the T2 sequence signal in the majority of patients. Treatments were well tolerated, and to date no complications from treatment have been observed. There was no statistical difference in clinical and radiologic response between patients receiving RT alone and those receiving RT plus steroid therapy. Conclusion: RT delivered in at a low dose and in a protracted scheme should be considered as a useful therapeutic option for patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  6. Heterotopic ossification: Pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A.; Gobezie, Reuben; Mamon, Harvey J. . E-mail: hmamon@partners.org

    2006-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a benign condition of abnormal formation of bone in soft tissue. HO is frequently asymptomatic, though when it is more severe it typically manifests as decreased range of motion at a nearby joint. HO has been recognized to occur in three distinct contexts-trauma, neurologic injury, and genetic abnormalities. The etiology of HO is incompletely understood. A posited theory is that HO results from the presence of osteoprogenitor cells pathologically induced by an imbalance in local or systemic factors. Individuals at high risk for HO development frequently undergo prophylaxis to prevent HO formation. The two most commonly employed modalities for prophylaxis are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and radiation therapy. This review discusses HO pathophysiology, clinical features, and the role of radiotherapy for prophylaxis.

  7. Reformulation of a clinical-dose system for carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2015-04-01

    At the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), more than 8,000 patients have been treated for various tumors with carbon-ion (C-ion) radiotherapy in the past 20 years based on a radiobiologically defined clinical-dose system. Through clinical experience, including extensive dose escalation studies, optimum dose-fractionation protocols have been established for respective tumors, which may be considered as the standards in C-ion radiotherapy. Although the therapeutic appropriateness of the clinical-dose system has been widely demonstrated by clinical results, the system incorporates several oversimplifications such as dose-independent relative biological effectiveness (RBE), empirical nuclear fragmentation model, and use of dose-averaged linear energy transfer to represent the spectrum of particles. We took the opportunity to update the clinical-dose system at the time we started clinical treatment with pencil beam scanning, a new beam delivery method, in 2011. The requirements for the updated system were to correct the oversimplifications made in the original system, while harmonizing with the original system to maintain the established dose-fractionation protocols. In the updated system, the radiation quality of the therapeutic C-ion beam was derived with Monte Carlo simulations, and its biological effectiveness was predicted with a theoretical model. We selected the most used C-ion beam with αr = 0.764 Gy-1 and β = 0.0615 Gy-2 as reference radiation for RBE. The C-equivalent biological dose distribution is designed to allow the prescribed survival of tumor cells of the human salivary gland (HSG) in entire spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region, with consideration to the dose dependence of the RBE. This C-equivalent biological dose distribution is scaled to a clinical dose distribution to harmonize with our clinical experiences with C-ion radiotherapy. Treatment plans were made with the original and the updated clinical-dose systems, and both

  8. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT).

  9. The value of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy in challenging clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Treece, S J; Mukesh, M; Rimmer, Y L; Tudor, S J; Dean, J C; Benson, R J; Gregory, D L; Horan, G; Jefferies, S J; Russell, S G; Williams, M V; Wilson, C B; Burnet, N G

    2013-01-01

    Objective To illustrate the wider potential scope of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT), outside of the “standard” indications for IMRT. Methods Nine challenging clinical cases were selected. All were treated with radical intent, although it was accepted that in several of the cases the probability of cure was low. IMRT alone was not adequate owing to the close proximity of the target to organs at risk, the risk of geographical miss, or the need to tighten planning margins, making image-guided radiotherapy an essential integral part of the treatment. Discrepancies between the initial planning scan and the daily on-treatment megavoltage CT were recorded for each case. The three-dimensional displacement was compared with the margin used to create the planning target volume (PTV). Results All but one patient achieved local control. Three patients developed metastatic disease but benefited from good local palliation; two have since died. A further patient died of an unrelated condition. Four patients are alive and well. Toxicity was low in all cases. Without daily image guidance, the PTV margin would have been insufficient to ensure complete coverage in 49% of fractions. It was inadequate by >3 mm in 19% of fractions, and by >5 mm in 9%. Conclusion IG-IMRT ensures accurate dose delivery to treat the target and avoid critical structures, acting as daily quality assurance for the delivery of complex IMRT plans. These patients could not have been adequately treated without image guidance. Advances in knowledge IG-IMRT can offer improved outcomes in less common clinical situations, where conventional techniques would provide suboptimal treatment. PMID:23255544

  10. Radiotherapy Planning Using an Improved Search Strategy in Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Modiri, Arezoo; Gu, Xuejun; Hagan, Aaron M.; Sawant, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Objective Evolutionary stochastic global optimization algorithms are widely used in large-scale, non-convex problems. However, enhancing the search efficiency and repeatability of these techniques often requires well-customized approaches. This study investigates one such approach. Methods We use particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to solve a 4-dimensional radiation therapy (RT) inverse planning problem, where the key idea is to use respiratory motion as an additional degree of freedom in lung cancer RT. The primary goal is to administer a lethal dose to the tumor target while sparing surrounding healthy tissue. Our iteratively adjusts radiation fluence-weights for all beam apertures across all respiratory phases. We implement three PSO-based approaches: conventionally-used unconstrained, hard-constrained and our proposed virtual search. As proof of concept, five lung cancer patient cases are optimized over ten runs using each PSO approach. For comparison, a dynamically penalized likelihood (DPL) algorithm- a popular RT optimization technique is also implemented and used. Results The proposed technique significantly improves the robustness to random initialization while requiring fewer iteration cycles to converge across all cases. DPL manages to find the global optimum in 2 out of 5 RT cases over significantly more iterations. Conclusion The proposed virtual search approach boosts the swarm search efficiency and, consequently, improves the optimization convergence rate and robustness for PSO. Significance RT planning is a large-scale, non-convex optimization problem, where finding optimal solutions in a clinically practical time is critical. Our proposed approach can potentially improve the optimization efficiency in similar time-sensitive problems. PMID:27362755

  11. Multivariable modeling of radiotherapy outcomes, including dose-volume and clinical factors

    SciTech Connect

    El Naqa, Issam; Bradley, Jeffrey; Blanco, Angel I.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Vicic, Milos; Hope, Andrew; Deasy, Joseph O. . E-mail: deasy@wustl.edu

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: The probability of a specific radiotherapy outcome is typically a complex, unknown function of dosimetric and clinical factors. Current models are usually oversimplified. We describe alternative methods for building multivariable dose-response models. Methods: Representative data sets of esophagitis and xerostomia are used. We use a logistic regression framework to approximate the treatment-response function. Bootstrap replications are performed to explore variable selection stability. To guard against under/overfitting, we compare several analytical and data-driven methods for model-order estimation. Spearman's coefficient is used to evaluate performance robustness. Novel graphical displays of variable cross correlations and bootstrap selection are demonstrated. Results: Bootstrap variable selection techniques improve model building by reducing sample size effects and unveiling variable cross correlations. Inference by resampling and Bayesian approaches produced generally consistent guidance for model order estimation. The optimal esophagitis model consisted of 5 dosimetric/clinical variables. Although the xerostomia model could be improved by combining clinical and dose-volume factors, the improvement would be small. Conclusions: Prediction of treatment response can be improved by mixing clinical and dose-volume factors. Graphical tools can mitigate the inherent complexity of multivariable modeling. Bootstrap-based variable selection analysis increases the reliability of reported models. Statistical inference methods combined with Spearman's coefficient provide an efficient approach to estimating optimal model order.

  12. Charged-particle therapy in cancer: clinical uses and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Durante, Marco; Orecchia, Roberto; Loeffler, Jay S

    2017-08-01

    Radiotherapy with high-energy charged particles has become an attractive therapeutic option for patients with several tumour types because this approach better spares healthy tissue from radiation than conventional photon therapy. The cost associated with the delivery of charged particles, however, is higher than that of even the most elaborate photon-delivery technologies. Reliable evidence of the relative cost-effectiveness of both modalities can only come from the results of randomized clinical trials. Thus, the hurdles that currently limit direct comparisons of these two approaches in clinical trials, especially those related to insurance coverage, should be removed. Herein, we review several randomized trials of charged-particle therapies that are ongoing, with results that will enable selective delivery to patients who are most likely to benefit from them. We also discuss aspects related to radiobiology, including the immune response and hypoxia, which will need to be taken into consideration in future randomized trials to fully exploit the potential of charged particles.

  13. MO-D-BRB-11: Out-Of-Field Dose Measurements in Radiotherapy Using Photons and Particles.

    PubMed

    Kaderka, R; Durante, M; Berger, T; Reitz, G; Tessa, C La

    2012-06-01

    Within the European project ALLEGRO (grant agreement no. 231965), the out-of-field dose delivered to a patient when treated with different radiotherapy modalities was investigated. The study compared the dose distribution during photon and particle irradiations both in a water and an anthropomorphic phantom to evaluate the risk of inducing secondary malignancies. Two sets of experiments with standardized conditions were used for a systematic comparison. In the former, a water phantom was irradiated with a 2D squared field to characterize the lateral dose fall-off with high spatial resolution. The latter employed an anthropomorphic phantom treated for a target volume placed at the center of its head to simulate a brain tumor. The dose was measured in several planes along the phantom main axis. For both types of experiments the dose was measured with a PTW diamond detector. Additionally, the use of TLDs and bubble detectors provided some information on the secondary neutron field produced both in the accelerator structure and the target itself. In total, experiments were conducted at six facilities using photons, protons and carbon ions; the ion irradiations were performed with passive delivery and the scanning technique. A significant difference among the out-of-field dose profiles is observed for distances larger than 3 cm to the target. The distribution delivered by photons is a factor 10 to 400 higher than the values of charged particles. Scanning ions reduces the out-of-field dose more than passive delivery at distances larger than 10 cm. The study emphasizes the physical advantage of using charged particles for tumor therapy. Together with the favorable depth dose deposition, ions spare the normal tissue surrounding the target more efficiently than photons. These results imply a lower risk of long-term effects, such as the induction of secondary malignancies, following treatments with particles compared to photons. This work was funded by the European ALLEGRO

  14. Alpha-particle radiotherapy: For large solid tumors diffusion trumps targeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Charles; Sempkowski, Michelle; Holleran, Timothy; Linz, Thomas; Bertalan, Thomas; Josefsson, Anders; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Sofou, Stavroula

    2017-06-01

    Diffusion limitations on the penetration of nanocarriers in solid tumors hamper their therapeutic use when labeled with α-particle emitters. This is mostly due to the α-particles' relatively short range (≤100 μm) resulting in partial tumor irradiation and limited killing. To utilize the high therapeutic potential of α-particles against solid tumors, we designed non-targeted, non-internalizing nanometer-sized tunable carriers (pH-tunable liposomes) that are triggered to release, within the slightly acidic tumor interstitium, highly-diffusive forms of the encapsulated α-particle generator Actinium-225 ((225)Ac) resulting in more homogeneous distributions of the α-particle emitters, improving uniformity in tumor irradiation and increasing killing efficacies. On large multicellular spheroids (400 μm-in-diameter), used as surrogates of the avascular areas of solid tumors, interstitially-releasing liposomes resulted in best growth control independent of HER2 expression followed in performance by (a) the HER2-targeting radiolabeled antibody or (b) the non-responsive liposomes. In an orthotopic human HER2-negative mouse model, interstitially-releasing (225)Ac-loaded liposomes resulted in the longest overall and median survival. This study demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a general strategy to bypass the diffusion-limited transport of radionuclide carriers in solid tumors enabling interstitial release from non-internalizing nanocarriers of highly-diffusing and deeper tumor-penetrating molecular forms of α-particle emitters, independent of cell-targeting.

  15. Bacterial brain abscess in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma following radiotherapy: microbiology, clinical features and therapeutic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to analyze the clinical features, causative pathogens, neuro-imaging findings, and therapeutic outcomes of bacterial brain abscess in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) following radiotherapy. Methods NPC patients with bacterial brain abscess were evaluated. Their clinical data were collected over a 22-year period. For comparison, the clinical features, causative pathogens, neuro-imaging findings, and therapeutic outcomes between NPC and non-NPC patients were analyzed. Results NPC accounted for 5.7% (12/210) of the predisposing factors, with Viridans streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus as the two most common causative pathogens. Significant statistical analysis between the two groups (NPC and non-NPC patients) included chronic otitis media (COM) as the underlying disease, post-radiation necrosis by neuro-imaging, and the temporal lobe as the most common site of brain abscesses. The fatality rate in patients with and without NPC was 16.7% and 20.7%, respectively. Conclusions NPC patients with bacterial brain abscess frequently have COM as the underlying disease. Neuro-imaging often reveals both post-radiation necrosis and the temporal lobe as the most common site of brain abscesses, the diagnosis of which is not always a straightforward process. Radiation necrosis can mimic brain abscess on neuro-imaging and pose significant diagnostic challenges. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential for survival. PMID:22943134

  16. Bacterial brain abscess in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma following radiotherapy: microbiology, clinical features and therapeutic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Peng-Hsiang; Lin, Wei-Che; Tsai, Nai-Wen; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chang, Hsueh-Wen; Huang, Tai-Lin; Lin, Hsin-Ching; Lin, Yu-Jun; Cheng, Ben-Chung; Su, Ben Yu-Jih; Kung, Chia-Te; Wang, Hung-Chen; Lu, Cheng-Hsien

    2012-09-03

    This study aimed to analyze the clinical features, causative pathogens, neuro-imaging findings, and therapeutic outcomes of bacterial brain abscess in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) following radiotherapy. NPC patients with bacterial brain abscess were evaluated. Their clinical data were collected over a 22-year period. For comparison, the clinical features, causative pathogens, neuro-imaging findings, and therapeutic outcomes between NPC and non-NPC patients were analyzed. NPC accounted for 5.7% (12/210) of the predisposing factors, with Viridans streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus as the two most common causative pathogens. Significant statistical analysis between the two groups (NPC and non-NPC patients) included chronic otitis media (COM) as the underlying disease, post-radiation necrosis by neuro-imaging, and the temporal lobe as the most common site of brain abscesses. The fatality rate in patients with and without NPC was 16.7% and 20.7%, respectively. NPC patients with bacterial brain abscess frequently have COM as the underlying disease. Neuro-imaging often reveals both post-radiation necrosis and the temporal lobe as the most common site of brain abscesses, the diagnosis of which is not always a straightforward process. Radiation necrosis can mimic brain abscess on neuro-imaging and pose significant diagnostic challenges. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential for survival.

  17. Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Primary Mediastinal Large B-Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Aviles, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Fernandez, Raul; Huerta-Guzman, Judith; Nambo, Maria J.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: We developed a controlled clinical trial to assess the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant-involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma that achieved complete response after the patients were treated with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone, and rituximab (R-CHOP-14). Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and June 2004, 124 consecutive patients who were in complete remission after dose dense chemotherapy and rituximab administration (R-CHOP14) were randomly assigned to received IFRT (30 Gy). Sixty-three patients received IFR, and 61 patients did not (control group). Results: The study aimed to include 182 patients in each arm but was closed prematurely because in a security analysis (June 2004), progression and early relapse were more frequent in patients that did not received IFRT. Patients were followed until March 2009, at which point actuarial curves at 10 years showed that progression free-survival was 72% in patients who received IFR and 20% in the control group (p < 0.001), overall survival was 72% and 31%, respectively (p < 0.001). Acute toxicity was mild and well tolerated. Discussion: Adjuvant radiotherapy to sites of bulky disease was the only difference to have an improvement in outcome in our patients; the use of rituximab during induction did not improve complete response rates and did affect overall survival; patients who received rituximab but not IFRT had a worse prognosis. Conclusions: The use of IFRT in patients with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who achieved complete response remain as the best treatment available, even in patients that received rituximab during induction.

  18. Dose calculation algorithm of fast fine-heterogeneity correction for heavy charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-04-01

    This work addresses computing techniques for dose calculations in treatment planning with proton and ion beams, based on an efficient kernel-convolution method referred to as grid-dose spreading (GDS) and accurate heterogeneity-correction method referred to as Gaussian beam splitting. The original GDS algorithm suffered from distortion of dose distribution for beams tilted with respect to the dose-grid axes. Use of intermediate grids normal to the beam field has solved the beam-tilting distortion. Interplay of arrangement between beams and grids was found as another intrinsic source of artifact. Inclusion of rectangular-kernel convolution in beam transport, to share the beam contribution among the nearest grids in a regulatory manner, has solved the interplay problem. This algorithmic framework was applied to a tilted proton pencil beam and a broad carbon-ion beam. In these cases, while the elementary pencil beams individually split into several tens, the calculation time increased only by several times with the GDS algorithm. The GDS and beam-splitting methods will complementarily enable accurate and efficient dose calculations for radiotherapy with protons and ions. Copyright © 2010 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Alpha particle radioimmunotherapy: Animal models and clinical prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Kaplan, W.D.; Ferrara, J.L.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.; Burakoff, S.J.; Coleman, C.N. )

    1989-06-01

    Short-lived isotopes that emit alpha particles have a number of physical characteristics which make them attractive candidates for radioimmunotherapy. Among these characteristics are high linear energy transfer and correspondingly high cytotoxicity; particle range limited to several cell diameters from the parent atom; low potential for repair of alpha-induced DNA damage; and low dependence on dose rate and oxygen enhancement effects. This report reviews the synthesis, testing and use in animal models of an alpha particle emitting radioimmunoconjugate constructed via the noncovalent chelation of Bismuth-212 to a monoclonal IgM antibody specific for the murine T cells/neuroectodermal surface antigen, Thy 1.2. These {sup 212}Bi-anti-Thy 1.2 immunoconjugates are capable of extraordinary cytotoxicity in vitro, requiring approximately three {sup 212}Bi-labeled conjugates per target cell to suppress {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation to background levels. The antigen specificity afforded by the monoclonal antibody contributes a factor of approximately 40 to the radiotoxicity of the immunoconjugate. Animals inoculated with a Thy 1.2+ malignant ascites were cured of their tumor in an antigen-specific fashion by intraperitoneal doses of approximately 200 microCi per mouse. Alpha particle emitting radioimmunoconjugates show great potential for regional and intracavitary molecular radiotherapy.

  20. Relative clinical effectiveness of carbon ion radiotherapy: theoretical modelling for H&N tumours

    PubMed Central

    Antonovic, Laura; Dasu, Alexandru; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Toma-Dasu, Iuliana

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of the efficiency of photon and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) administered with the same number of fractions might be of limited clinical interest, since a wide range of fractionation patterns are used clinically today. Due to advanced photon treatment techniques, hypofractionation is becoming increasingly accepted for prostate and lung tumours, whereas patients with head and neck tumours still benefit from hyperfractionated treatments. In general, the number of fractions is considerably lower in carbon ion RT. A clinically relevant comparison would be between fractionation schedules that are optimal within each treatment modality category. In this in silico study, the relative clinical effectiveness (RCE) of carbon ions was investigated for human salivary gland tumours, assuming various radiation sensitivities related to their oxygenation. The results indicate that, for hypoxic tumours in the absence of reoxygenation, the RCE (defined as the ratio of D50 for photons to carbon ions) ranges from 3.5 to 5.7, corresponding to carbon ion treatments given in 36 and 3 fractions, respectively, and 30 fractions for photons. Assuming that interfraction local oxygenation changes take place, results for RCE are lower than that for an oxic tumour if only a few fractions of carbon ions are used. If the carbon ion treatment is given in more than 12 fractions, the RCE is larger for the hypoxic than for the well-oxygenated tumour. In conclusion, this study showed that in silico modelling enables the study of a wide range of factors in the clinical considerations and could be an important step towards individualisation of RT treatments. PMID:25858182

  1. Spine radiosurgery for the local treatment of spine metastases: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance, clinical aspects and future directions

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Fabio Ynoe; Taunk, Neil Kanth; Laufer, Ilya; Neves-Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Hanna, Samir Abdallah; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer patients will develop spinal metastases. Local control is important for preventing neurologic compromise and to relieve pain. Stereotactic body radiotherapy or spinal radiosurgery is a new radiation therapy technique for spinal metastasis that can deliver a high dose of radiation to a tumor while minimizing the radiation delivered to healthy, neighboring tissues. This treatment is based on intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image guidance and rigid immobilization. Spinal radiosurgery is an increasingly utilized treatment method that improves local control and pain relief after delivering ablative doses of radiation. Here, we present a review highlighting the use of spinal radiosurgery for the treatment of metastatic tumors of the spine. The data used in the review were collected from both published studies and ongoing trials. We found that spinal radiosurgery is safe and provides excellent tumor control (up to 94% local control) and pain relief (up to 96%), independent of histology. Extensive data regarding clinical outcomes are available; however, this information has primarily been generated from retrospective and nonrandomized prospective series. Currently, two randomized trials are enrolling patients to study clinical applications of fractionation schedules spinal Radiosurgery. Additionally, a phase I clinical trial is being conducted to assess the safety of concurrent stereotactic body radiotherapy and ipilimumab for spinal metastases. Clinical trials to refine clinical indications and dose fractionation are ongoing. The concomitant use of targeted agents may produce better outcomes in the future. PMID:26934240

  2. Clinical target volume delineation including elective nodal irradiation in preoperative and definitive radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy (RT) is widely used in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Currently, recommendation has been given for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in adjuvant RT. Based on recently reviewed pathologic data, the aim of this study is to propose criteria for the CTV definition and delineation including elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in the preoperative and definitive treatment of pancreatic cancer. Methods The anatomical structures of interest, as well as the abdominal vasculature were identified on intravenous contrast-enhanced CT scans of two different patients with pancreatic cancer of the head and the body. To delineate the lymph node area, a margin of 10 mm was added to the arteries. Results We proposed a set of guidelines for elective treatment of high-risk nodal areas and CTV delineation. Reference CT images were provided. Conclusions The proposed guidelines could be used for preoperative or definitive RT for carcinoma of the head and body of the pancreas. Further clinical investigations are needed to validate the defined CTVs. PMID:22691275

  3. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for pituitary adenomas: The preliminary report of Cleveland Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mackley, Heath B. . E-mail: hmackley@alumni.upenn.edu; Reddy, Chandana A. M.S.; Lee, S.-Y.; Harnisch, Gayle A.; Mayberg, Marc R.; Hamrahian, Amir H.; Suh, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is being increasingly used for the treatment of pituitary adenomas. However, there have been few published data on the short- and long-term outcomes of this treatment. This is the initial report of Cleveland Clinic's experience. Methods and Materials: Between February 1998 and December 2003, 34 patients with pituitary adenomas were treated with IMRT. A retrospective chart review was conducted for data analysis. Results: With a median follow-up of 42.5 months, the treatment has proven to be well tolerated, with performance status remaining stable in 90% of patients. Radiographic local control was 89%, and among patients with secretory tumors, 100% had a biochemical response. Only 1 patient required salvage surgery for progressive disease, giving a clinical progression free survival of 97%. The only patient who received more than 46 Gy experienced optic neuropathy 8 months after radiation. Smaller tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective improvements in nonvisual neurologic complaints (p = 0.03), and larger tumor volume significantly correlated with subjective worsening of visual symptoms (p = 0.05). New hormonal supplementation was required for 40% of patients. Younger patients were significantly more likely to require hormonal supplementation (p 0.03). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary adenomas over the short term. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine if IMRT confers any advantage with respect to either tumor control or toxicity over conventional radiation modalities.

  4. A free software for the evaluation and comparison of dose response models in clinical radiotherapy (DORES).

    PubMed

    Tsougos, Ioannis; Grout, Ioannis; Theodorou, Kyriaki; Kappas, Constantin

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a user-friendly and simple tool for fast and accurate estimation of Normal Tissue Complication Probabilities (NTCP) for several radiobiological models, which can be used as a valuable complement to the clinical experience. The software which has been named DORES (Dose Response Evaluation Software) has been developed in Visual Basic, and includes three NTCP models (Lyman-Kuther-Burman (LKB), Relative Seriality and Parallel). Required input information includes the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) for the Organs at Risk (OAR) of each treatment, the number of fractions and the total dose of therapy. NTCP values are computed, and subsequently placed in a spreadsheet file for further analysis. A Dose Response curve for every model is automatically generated. Every patient of the study population can be found on the curve since by definition their corresponding dose-response points fall exactly on the theoretical dose-response curve, when plotted on the same diagram. Distributions of absorbed dose alone do not provide information on the biological response of tissues to irradiation, so the use of this software may aid in the comparison of outcomes for different treatment plans or types of treatment, and also aid the evaluation of the sensitivity of different model predictions to uncertainties in parameter values. This was illustrated in a clinical case of breast cancer radiotherapy.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Results in Significant Decrease in Clinical Toxicities Compared With Conventional Wedge-Based Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harsolia, Asif; Kestin, Larry; Grills, Inga; Wallace, Michelle; Jolly, Shruti; Jones, Cortney; Lala, Moinaktar; Martinez, Alvaro; Schell, Scott; Vicini, Frank A. . E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with a static multileaf collimator process results in a more homogenous dose distribution compared with conventional wedge-based whole breast irradiation (WBI). In the present analysis, we reviewed the acute and chronic toxicity of this IMRT approach compared with conventional wedge-based treatment. Methods and Materials: A total of 172 patients with Stage 0-IIB breast cancer were treated with lumpectomy followed by WBI. All patients underwent treatment planning computed tomography and received WBI (median dose, 45 Gy) followed by a boost to 61 Gy. Of the 172 patients, 93 (54%) were treated with IMRT, and the 79 patients (46%) treated with wedge-based RT in a consecutive fashion immediately before this cohort served as the control group. The median follow-up was 4.7 years. Results: A significant reduction in acute Grade 2 or worse dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation was seen with IMRT compared with wedges. A trend was found toward reduced acute Grade 3 or greater dermatitis (6% vs. 1%, p = 0.09) in favor of IMRT. Chronic Grade 2 or worse breast edema was significantly reduced with IMRT compared with conventional wedges. No difference was found in cosmesis scores between the two groups. In patients with larger breasts ({>=}1,600 cm{sup 3}, n = 64), IMRT resulted in reduced acute (Grade 2 or greater) breast edema (0% vs. 36%, p <0.001) and hyperpigmentation (3% vs. 41%, p 0.001) and chronic (Grade 2 or greater) long-term edema (3% vs. 30%, p 0.007). Conclusion: The use of IMRT in the treatment of the whole breast results in a significant decrease in acute dermatitis, edema, and hyperpigmentation and a reduction in the development of chronic breast edema compared with conventional wedge-based RT.

  6. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  7. Short-term clinical effect of conformal radiotherapy combined with tegafur gimeracil oteracil potassium in treating recurrent esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yuyan; Shen, Yuzhen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Yan; Tan, Haihua; Li, Jianzhe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with recurrent esophagus cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve senile patients who suffered from esophagus cancer were selected and randomly divided into two groups, namely, observation group (56 cases) and control group (56 cases). The observation group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy and the control group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy only. Results: All patients completed the treatment, with good compliance. Effective rate of the observation group was 82.1%, which was significantly higher than the control group (67.9%), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Main toxic and side effects of patients of two groups were radiation esophagitis, gastrointestinal reaction, hematologic toxicities and radiative skin reaction. Differences of incidence rates of all types of toxic and side effects were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The one-year and two-year survival rates of patients of the observation group were 80.4% and 53.6%, respectively, while the control group was 55.4% and 30.4%; differences between two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy has definite curative effect in treating patients with recurrent esophagus cancer and can improve survival rate of patients, without increasing adverse reaction. PMID:27882010

  8. Short-term clinical effect of conformal radiotherapy combined with tegafur gimeracil oteracil potassium in treating recurrent esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yuyan; Shen, Yuzhen; Yan, Hua; Liu, Yan; Tan, Haihua; Li, Jianzhe

    2016-01-01

    To observe clinical effects of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with recurrent esophagus cancer. One hundred and twelve senile patients who suffered from esophagus cancer were selected and randomly divided into two groups, namely, observation group (56 cases) and control group (56 cases). The observation group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy and the control group adopted three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy only. All patients completed the treatment, with good compliance. Effective rate of the observation group was 82.1%, which was significantly higher than the control group (67.9%), and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Main toxic and side effects of patients of two groups were radiation esophagitis, gastrointestinal reaction, hematologic toxicities and radiative skin reaction. Differences of incidence rates of all types of toxic and side effects were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The one-year and two-year survival rates of patients of the observation group were 80.4% and 53.6%, respectively, while the control group was 55.4% and 30.4%; differences between two groups were statistically significant (P<0.05). Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with Tegafur Gimeracil Oteracil Potassium chemotherapy has definite curative effect in treating patients with recurrent esophagus cancer and can improve survival rate of patients, without increasing adverse reaction.

  9. Dynamic splitting of Gaussian pencil beams in heterogeneity-correction algorithms for radiotherapy with heavy charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Komori, Masataka; Yonai, Shunsuke; Ishizaki, Azusa

    2009-04-01

    The pencil-beam algorithm is valid only when elementary Gaussian beams are small enough compared to the lateral heterogeneity of a medium, which is not always true in actual radiotherapy with protons and ions. This work addresses a solution for the problem. We found approximate self-similarity of Gaussian distributions, with which Gaussian beams can split into narrower and deflecting daughter beams when their sizes have overreached lateral heterogeneity in the beam-transport calculation. The effectiveness was assessed in a carbon-ion beam experiment in the presence of steep range compensation, where the splitting calculation reproduced a detour effect amounting to about 10% in dose or as large as the lateral particle disequilibrium effect. The efficiency was analyzed in calculations for carbon-ion and proton radiations with a heterogeneous phantom model, where the beam splitting increased computing times by factors of 4.7 and 3.2. The present method generally improves the accuracy of the pencil-beam algorithm without severe inefficiency. It will therefore be useful for treatment planning and potentially other demanding applications.

  10. [Follow-up study of clinical effects of californium-252 neutron intracavitary radiotherapy and external beam radiotherapy in endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Lei, Xin; Shan, Jin-lu; Tang, Cheng; Zhao, Ke-wei

    2007-11-01

    To observe the three year local control rate, overall survival rate, complications and prognostic factors of endometrial cancer treated with (252)Cf neutron intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Forty endometrial cancer patients staged Ib - IVa by the standard of Federation of International Gynecologic Organization (FIGO), who had not received any treatment were enrolled in this study. Treatment schedules were: (252)Cf ICBT, 10 - 13 Gy(i)/fraction per week, the total dose to point A and point F 35 - 45 Gy(i) and 38 - 50 Gy(i) respectively in 4 fractions. The EBRT was given to the whole pelvic field, with 6 MV or 8 MV X-ray, 2 Gy per fraction, 4 times per week. The total dose was 45 to 50 Gy (the field was blocked 4 cm after 20 - 30 Gy), the total treatment time was 5 - 6 weeks. The follow-up time was 36 - 96 months, with an average of 42 months. The three year local control and overall survival rate was 88% (35/40) and 75% (30/40) respectively for all patients. Of those patients of stage Ib, they were 93% (14/15) and 87% (13/15), respectively, higher than stage II [80% (12/15), 87% (13/15); P > 0.05], significantly higher than stage III, IV [60% (6/10), 50% (5/10); P < 0.01]. Three year local control and overall survival rate of G(1) grade was 92% (23/25) and 88% (22/25) respectively, significantly higher than G(2) - G(3) grade [80% (12/15), 53% (8/15); P < 0.01]. Three year local control and overall survival rate of adenocarcinoma was 93% (28/30) and 87% (26/30) respectively, significantly higher than squamous adenocarcinoma and papillary adenocarcinoma [70% (7/10), 30% (3/10); P < 0.01]. The grade 2 late radiation cystitis was 2% (1/40), and grade 2, 3 radiation proctitis and sigmoiditis were 10% (4/40). Combined (252)Cf ICBT and EBRT may be safe and effective for advanced endometrial cancer. The most important prognostic factors were stage, pathological type and differentiation of endometrial cancer.

  11. Multidisciplinary Team Contributions Within a Dedicated Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic: A Prospective Descriptive Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pituskin, Edith; Fairchild, Alysa; Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann; Ghosh, Sunita

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. Results: A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Conclusions: Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT.

  12. Multidisciplinary team contributions within a dedicated outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic: a prospective descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Pituskin, Edith; Fairchild, Alysa; Dutka, Jennifer; Gagnon, Lori; Driga, Amy; Tachynski, Patty; Borschneck, Jo-Ann; Ghosh, Sunita

    2010-10-01

    Patients with bone metastases may experience pain, fatigue, and decreased mobility. Multiple medications for analgesia are often required, each with attendant side effects. Although palliative-intent radiotherapy (RT) is effective in decreasing pain, additional supportive care interventions may be overlooked. Our objective was to describe the feasibility of multidisciplinary assessment of patients with symptomatic bone metastases attending a dedicated outpatient palliative RT clinic. Consecutive patients referred for RT for painful bone metastases were screened for symptoms and needs relevant to their medications, nutritional intake, activities of daily living, and psychosocial and spiritual concerns from January 1 to December 31, 2007. Consultations by appropriate team members and resulting recommendations were collected prospectively. Patients who received RT were contacted by telephone 4 weeks later to assess symptom outcomes. A total of 106 clinic visits by 82 individual patients occurred. As determined by screening form responses, the clinical Pharmacist, Occupational Therapist, Registered Dietician and Social Worker were consulted to provide assessments and recommendations within the time constraints presented by 1-day palliative RT delivery. In addition to pain relief, significant improvements in tiredness, depression, anxiety, drowsiness and overall well-being were reported at 4 weeks. Systematic screening of this population revealed previously unmet needs, addressed in the form of custom verbal and written recommendations. Multidisciplinary assessment is associated with a high number of recommendations and decreased symptom distress. Our findings lend strong support to the routine assessment by multiple supportive care professionals for patients with advanced cancer being considered for palliative RT. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Update of the International Consensus on Palliative Radiotherapy Endpoints for Future Clinical Trials in Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward; Hoskin, Peter; Mitera, Gunita; Zeng Liang; Lutz, Stephen; Roos, Daniel; Hahn, Carol; Linden, Yvette van der; Hartsell, William; Kumar, Eshwar

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To update the international consensus on palliative radiotherapy endpoints for future clinical trials in bone metastases by surveying international experts regarding previous uncertainties within the 2002 consensus, changes that may be necessary based on practice pattern changes and research findings since that time. Methods and Materials: A two-phase survey was used to determine revisions and new additions to the 2002 consensus. A total of 49 experts from the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, the Faculty of Radiation Oncology of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, and the Canadian Association of Radiation Oncology who are directly involved in the care of patients with bone metastases participated in this survey. Results: Consensus was established in areas involving response definitions, eligibility criteria for future trials, reirradiation, changes in systemic therapy, radiation techniques, parameters at follow-up, and timing of assessments. Conclusion: An outline for trials in bone metastases was updated based on survey and consensus. Investigators leading trials in bone metastases are encouraged to adopt the revised guideline to promote consistent reporting. Areas for future research were identified. It is intended for the consensus to be re-examined in the future on a regular basis.

  14. Clinical Outcomes of Hypopharyngeal Cancer Receiving Definitive Radiotherapy with Concurrent Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Masakuni; Maebayashi, Toshiya; Aizawa, Takuya; Ishibashi, Naoya; Saito, Tsutomu

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate clinical outcomes of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with hypopharyngeal cancer (HPC). This retrospective study included 80 patients (75 males) aged 48 to 78 years (median=66 years) with a histological diagnosis of HPC. The 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin (FP) regimen was used until 2007 and then switched to the docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF) regimen. Radiotherapy was administered to a total dose of 60 to 72 Gy (median=66 Gy). The 5-year overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 49.3% and 60.7%, respectively. Improved disease-free survival was associated with lower N-stage (hazard ratio=0.249; 95% confidence interval=0.096-0.643; p=0.041). There were no significant differences in overall and disease-free survival between patients receiving CCRT with the TPF regimen and those who received FP for a long period of treatment but did not finish two courses. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  15. Orbital marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of Malt: Radiotherapy results and clinical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Chang-Ok . E-mail: cosuh317@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr; Shim, Su Jung; Lee, Sang-wook; Yang, Woo Ick; Lee, Sang Yeul; Hahn, Jee Sook

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To elucidate the clinical behavior and treatment outcome of low-grade primary orbital lymphoma arising from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (Malt). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients with pathologically confirmed marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of MALT were treated with radiotherapy (RT). Thirty-eight patients (79.1%) received thorough staging workup studies including bone marrow biopsy. Radiation doses ranged from 5.4 to 30.6 Gy (median, 30.6 Gy). Median follow-up period was 70 months. Results: Only 2 patients revealed extraorbital lymphoma involvement (bone marrow, skin). Forty-six of 52 eye lesions showed complete response to RT. Six lesions demonstrated a partial response and showed gradual regression during the follow-up period of 39-72 months. Three patients experienced local recurrences at 34, 48, and 52 months after RT, which seemed to be related to improper use of the lens shield. Salvage re-RT was successful. The 10-year actuarial relapse-free survival, cause-specific survival, and overall survival rates were 93.1%, 97.9%, and 86.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the MALT lymphoma of the orbit was localized at diagnosis and extraorbital relapse rarely occurred. Therefore, extensive staging workup at the time of diagnosis and follow-up studies to detect distant relapse may not be obligatory. Low-dose RT alone with proper lens shielding is the optimum treatment modality for orbital MALT lymphoma.

  16. An update in symptom clusters using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System in a palliative radiotherapy clinic.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Vithusha; Zhang, Liying; Chan, Stephanie; Wan, Bo Angela; Drost, Leah; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Barnes, Elizabeth; McDonald, Rachel; Rowbottom, Leigha; Zaki, Pearl; Chow, Ronald; Hwang, Matthew K; DeAngelis, Carlo; Lao, Nicholas; Chow, Edward

    2017-05-23

    To identify symptom clusters in advanced cancer patients attending a palliative radiotherapy clinic using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS). Principal component analysis (PCA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were used to identify symptom clusters among the nine ESAS items using scores from each patient's first visit. ESAS scores from 182 patients were analyzed. The PCA identified three symptom clusters (cluster 1: depression-anxiety-well-being, cluster 2: pain-tiredness-drowsiness, cluster 3: nausea-dyspnea-loss of appetite). The EFA identified two clusters (cluster 1: tiredness-drowsiness-loss of appetite-well-being-pain-nausea-dyspnea, cluster 2: depression-anxiety). The HCA identified three clusters similar to the PCA with an exception of the loss of appetite item being classified under cluster 1 rather than 3. Two to three symptom clusters were identified using three analytical methods, with similar patterns reported in the literature. Particular groups of items co-occurred consistently across all three analyses: depression and anxiety; nausea and dyspnea; as well as pain, tiredness, and drowsiness. Three similar symptom clusters were identified in our patient population using the PCA and HCA; whereas, the EFA produced two clusters: one physical and one psychological cluster. Given the implications of symptom clusters in the management of quality of life, clinicians should be aware of these clusters to aid in the palliative treatment of patients.

  17. The clinical outcome of intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Puataweepong, Putipun; Dhanachai, Mantana; Hansasuta, Ake; Dangprasert, Somjai; Sitathanee, Chomporn; Puddhikarant, Parmon; Jiarpinitnun, Chuleeporn; Ruangkanchanasetr, Rawee; Dechsupa, Patchareporn; Pairat, Kumutinee

    2014-01-01

    Recent publications have reported stereotactic radiosurgery as an effective and safe treatment for intracranial hemangioblastomas. However, because of the low incidence of these particular tumors, reports on large patient number studies have not yet been available. The objective of this study was to analyze the clinical results of 14 patients with 56 intracranial hemangioblastomas treated with linear accelerator (linac)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT) in the same institute. The median age of patients was 41 years (range, 28–73 years). Nine of the patients (64%) had von Hippel-Lindau disease. A total of 39 lesions (70%) were treated with CyberKnife (CK), and 17 lesions (30%) were treated with X-Knife. The median pretreatment volume was 0.26 cm3 (range, 0.026–20.4 cm3). The median marginal dose was 20 Gy (range, 10–32 Gy) in 1 fraction (range, 1–10 fractions). The median follow-up time was 24 months (range, 11–89 months). At the last follow-up, 47 tumors (84%) were stable, 7 (13%) decreased and 2 (4%) increased. The 1-, 2- and 6-year local control rates were 98%, 88% and 73%, respectively. No radiation complications were observed in this study. There was a trend toward local failure only in cystic tumors, but this trend was not found to be statistically significant. SRS/SRT achieved a high local control rate in intracranial hemangioblastomas without radiation-induced complications. PMID:24554558

  18. Clinical outcome and prognosis of carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha

    Objective To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and side-response of high-LET carbon ion radiotherapy on thoracic malignant tumors. Methods Ten patients with pathological confirmed thoracic malignant tumors received treatment using heavy ion accelerator, which included 6 cases with non-small lung cancer, one case with small lung cancer, 2 cases with metastatic sarcomas and one case with invasive thymoma. The applied regimen included fractioned dose (5.5-6.8GyE/Fraction), one faction/day, and 7 fractions/week. The total dose ranged from 55 to 70 GyE. Results The short-term results showed that the response rate (the complete response (CR) rate +the partial response (PR) rate) was 10% at the first month, 40% at the third month and 90% at the sixth month. The overall response rate was 90% and the rate of stable disease was 10%. There was no relation between the response rate and tumor pathology (P>0.05) while significance between the response rate and the tumor volume.At median follow-up of 27 months (range, 6 to 36 months), the local control rate and free-disease rate were respectively 100% an 90% at the first year, 90% and 80% at the secondary year, 80% and 70% at the third year. The death rate due to disease progression was 20% and the non-specific death rate was 10%. Side and toxicity effects: Grade I skin effect occurred in three cases and Grade I lung effect occurred in two cases. The blood counts didn’t reach significance among pre-radiation course, peri-radiation course and post-radiation course (P>0.05). The subgoups of T cells detected in humoral immunity and cytoimmunity didn’t change between pre-radiation and post radiation(P>0.05). Conclusions Carbon ion radiotherapy is effective and safe in the management of patients with thoracic malignant tumors. There were no obvious side effects. The long term of clinical outcome and the late effect need to be further observed.

  19. Early clinical evaluation of a novel three-dimensional structure delineation software tool (SCULPTER) for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    McBain, C A; Moore, C J; Green, M M L; Price, G; Sykes, J S; Amer, A; Khoo, V S; Price, P

    2008-08-01

    Modern radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) necessitates increased delineation of target volumes and organs at risk. Conventional manual delineation is a laborious, time-consuming and subjective process. It is prone to inconsistency and variability, but has the potential to be improved using automated segmentation algorithms. We carried out a pilot clinical evaluation of SCULPTER (Structure Creation Using Limited Point Topology Evidence in Radiotherapy) - a novel prototype software tool designed to improve structure delineation for RTP. Anonymized MR and CT image datasets from patients who underwent radiotherapy for bladder or prostate cancer were studied. An experienced radiation oncologist used manual and SCULPTER-assisted methods to create clinically acceptable organ delineations. SCULPTER was also tested by four other RTP professionals. Resulting contours were compared by qualitative inspection and quantitatively by using the volumes of the structures delineated and the time taken for completion. The SCULPTER tool was easy to apply to both MR and CT images and diverse anatomical sites. SCULPTER delineations closely reproduced manual contours with no significant volume differences detected, but SCULPTER delineations were significantly quicker (p<0.05) in most cases. In conclusion, clinical application of SCULPTER resulted in rapid and simple organ delineations with equivalent accuracy to manual methods, demonstrating proof-of-principle of the SCULPTER system and supporting its potential utility in RTP.

  20. Intermediate neoadjuvant radiotherapy for T3 low/middle rectal cancer: postoperative outcomes of a non-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bisceglia, Giovanni; Mastrodonato, Nicola; Tardio, Berardino; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Corsa, Pietro; Troiano, Michele; Parisi, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Background The benefits of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal carcinoma are well known. However, there is still considerable uncertainty about the optimal radiation treatment. There is an ongoing debate about the choice between very short treatments immediately followed by surgical resection and prolonged treatments with delayed surgery. In this paper, we describe an interim analysis of a non-controlled clinical trial in which radiotherapy delivered with intermediate dose/duration was followed by surgery after about 2 weeks to improve local control and survival after curative radiosurgery for cT3 low/middle rectal cancer. Methods Preoperative radiotherapy (36 Gy in 3 weeks) was delivered in 248 consecutive patients with cT3NxM0 rectal adenocarcinoma within 10 cm from the anal verge, followed by surgery within the third week after treatment completion. Results 166 patients (66.94%) underwent anterior resection, 80 patients (32.26%) the Miles' procedure and 2 patients (0.8%) the Hartmann's procedure. Local resectability rate was 99.6%, with 226 curative-intent resections. The overall rate of complications was 27.4%. 5-year oncologic outcomes were evaluated on 223 patients. The median follow-up time was 8.9 years (range 5-17.4 years); local recurrence (LR) rate and distal recurrence (DR) rate after 5 years were 6.28% and 21.97%, respectively. Overall survival was 74.2%; disease free survival was 73.5%; local control was 93.4 % and metastasis-free survival was 82.1%. Conclusions preoperative radiotherapy with intermediate dose/duration and interval between radiotherapy and surgery achieves high local control in patients with cT3NxM0 rectal cancer, and high DR rate seems to be the major limitation to improved survival. PMID:25373926

  1. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  2. Radiotherapy-Induced Malfunction in Contemporary Cardiovascular Implantable Electronic Devices: Clinical Incidence and Predictors.

    PubMed

    Grant, Jonathan D; Jensen, Garrett L; Tang, Chad; Pollard, Julianne M; Kry, Stephen F; Krishnan, Sunil; Dougherty, Anne H; Gomez, Daniel R; Rozner, Marc A

    2015-08-01

    Risk stratification and management paradigms for patients with cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) requiring radiotherapy (RT) vary widely and are based on limited clinical data. To identify the incidence and predictors of CIED malfunction and describe associated clinical consequences in a large cohort of patients treated with photon- and electron-based RT. Retrospective analysis of all patients with a functioning CIED who underwent RT between August 2005 and January 2014 with CIED interrogation data following RT at an academic cancer center. We identified 249 courses of photon- and electron-based RT in 215 patients (123 pacemakers [57%]; 92 implantable cardioverter-defibrillators [43%]). Substantial neutron production was generated in 71 courses (29%). Implantation of CIED with subsequent therapeutic radiation treatment (neutron producing with 15- or 18-MV photons and non-neutron producing with electrons, GammaKnife, or 6-MV photons). Malfunction of CIED, characterized as single-event upset (data loss, parameter resets, unrecoverable resets), and delayed effects including signal interference, pacing threshold changes, and premature battery depletion. Malfunction of CIED attributable to RT occurred during 18 courses (7%), with 15 CIEDs experiencing single-event upsets, and 3, transient signal interference. All single-event upsets occurred during neutron-producing RT, at a rate of 21%, 10%, and 34% per neutron-producing course for CIEDs, pacemakers, and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, respectively. No single-event upsets were found among 178 courses of non-neutron-producing RT. Incident CIED dose did not correlate with device malfunction. Patients treated to the abdomen and pelvis region were more likely to undergo a single-event upset (hazard ratio, 5.2 [95% CI, 1.2-22.6]; P = .03). Six patients with a CIED parameter reset developed clinical symptoms: 3 experienced hypotension and/or bradycardia, 2 experienced abnormal chest ticking

  3. Modeling parameterized geometry in GPU-based Monte Carlo particle transport simulation for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Yujie; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Xun

    2016-08-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport simulation on a graphics-processing unit (GPU) platform has been extensively studied recently due to the efficiency advantage achieved via massive parallelization. Almost all of the existing GPU-based MC packages were developed for voxelized geometry. This limited application scope of these packages. The purpose of this paper is to develop a module to model parametric geometry and integrate it in GPU-based MC simulations. In our module, each continuous region was defined by its bounding surfaces that were parameterized by quadratic functions. Particle navigation functions in this geometry were developed. The module was incorporated to two previously developed GPU-based MC packages and was tested in two example problems: (1) low energy photon transport simulation in a brachytherapy case with a shielded cylinder applicator and (2) MeV coupled photon/electron transport simulation in a phantom containing several inserts of different shapes. In both cases, the calculated dose distributions agreed well with those calculated in the corresponding voxelized geometry. The averaged dose differences were 1.03% and 0.29%, respectively. We also used the developed package to perform simulations of a Varian VS 2000 brachytherapy source and generated a phase-space file. The computation time under the parameterized geometry depended on the memory location storing the geometry data. When the data was stored in GPU's shared memory, the highest computational speed was achieved. Incorporation of parameterized geometry yielded a computation time that was ~3 times of that in the corresponding voxelized geometry. We also developed a strategy to use an auxiliary index array to reduce frequency of geometry calculations and hence improve efficiency. With this strategy, the computational time ranged in 1.75-2.03 times of the voxelized geometry for coupled photon/electron transport depending on the voxel dimension of the auxiliary index array, and in 0

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable clinical stage IA lung adenocarcinoma: comparison of survival outcomes in two clinical trials with propensity score analysis (JCOG1313-A).

    PubMed

    Eba, Junko; Nakamura, Kenichi; Mizusawa, Junki; Suzuki, Kenji; Nagata, Yasushi; Koike, Teruaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Asamura, Hisao; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2016-08-01

    No randomized controlled trials comparing stereotactic body radiotherapy and lobectomy for operable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer have been successfully conducted. This study compared survival outcomes in two multi-institutional clinical trials for stereotactic body radiotherapy (Japan Clinical Oncology Group JCOG0403) and lobectomy (Japan Clinical Oncology Group JCOG0201) with propensity score analysis. Inclusion criteria were operable, cT1N0M0 and adenocarcinoma diagnosed prior to registration of each trial. Forty of 169 patients from JCOG0403 and 219 of 811 patients from JCOG0201 were included. The primary endpoint was overall survival adjusted with propensity score analysis. The patient selection factors included in the logistic model to estimate the propensity score were age, sex, tumor diameter and consolidation/tumor ratio. Among patient selection factors, age distribution was quite different with little overlap: the median was 79 (interquartile range: 74.5-83.5) in stereotactic body radiotherapy and 62 (interquartile range: 55-68) in lobectomy. In propensity score analysis, 21 patients from each group were matched and the hazard ratio for stereotactic body radiotherapy over lobectomy was 9.00 (95% confidence interval: 1.14-71.04). In the post hoc subgroup analysis with propensity score analysis of inverse probability of treatment weighting, patients were limited to be aged 75 or younger because JCOG0201 only included them when aged 75 or younger. Thirteen patients for stereotactic body radiotherapy and 219 for lobectomy were compared, and the hazard ratio for stereotactic body radiotherapy over lobectomy was 1.19 (95% confidence interval: 0.38-3.73). The point estimates of hazard ratio favored lobectomy over stereotactic body radiotherapy in the limited number of patients. A randomized controlled study is needed for valid comparison. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  5. Clinical evidence of particle beam therapy (proton).

    PubMed

    Ogino, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Proton beam therapy (PBT) makes it possible to deliver a high concentration of radiation to a tumor using its Bragg peak, and it is simple to utilize as its radiobiological characteristics are identical to those of photon beams. PBT has now been used for half a century, and more than 60,000 patients worldwide are reported to have been treated with proton beams. The most significant change to PBT occurred in the 1990s, when the Loma Linda University Medical Center became the first hospital in the world to operate a medically dedicated proton therapy facility. Following its success, similar medically dedicated facilities have been constructed. Internationally, results have demonstrated the therapeutic superiority of PBT over alternative treatment options for several disease sites. Further advances in PBT are expected from both clinical and technological perspectives.

  6. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% {+-} 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% {+-} 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 {+-} 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 {+-} 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 {+-} 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 {+-} 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  7. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors: Early Clinical Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Trofimov, Alexei; Safai, Sairos; Adams, Judith; Fullerton, Barbara; Ebb, David; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report early clinical outcomes for children with central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumors treated with protons; to compare dose distributions for intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton radiation (3D-CPT), and intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning (IMPT) for whole-ventricular irradiation with and without an involved-field boost. Methods and Materials: All children with CNS germinoma or nongerminomatous germ cell tumor who received treatment at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1998 and 2007 were included in this study. The IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT plans were generated and compared for a representative case. Results: Twenty-two patients were treated with 3D-CPT. At a median follow-up of 28 months, there were no CNS recurrences; 1 patient had a recurrence outside the CNS. Local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 95%, and 100%, respectively. Comparable tumor volume coverage was achieved with IMRT, 3D-CPT, and IMPT. Substantial normal tissue sparing was seen with any form of proton therapy as compared with IMRT. The use of IMPT may yield additional sparing of the brain and temporal lobes. Conclusions: Preliminary disease control with proton therapy compares favorably to the literature. Dosimetric comparisons demonstrate the advantage of proton radiation over IMRT for whole-ventricle radiation. Superior dose distributions were accomplished with fewer beam angles utilizing 3D-CPT and scanned protons. Intensity-modulated proton therapy with pencil beam scanning may improve dose distribution as compared with 3D-CPT for this treatment.

  8. Evaluating national practice of preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer based on clinical auditing.

    PubMed

    van Leersum, N J; Snijders, H S; Wouters, M W J M; Henneman, D; Marijnen, C A M; Rutten, H R; Tollenaar, R A E M; Tanis, P J

    2013-09-01

    Internationally, the use of preoperative radiotherapy (RT) for rectal cancer varies largely, related to different decision-making based on the harm-benefit ratio. In the Dutch guideline, RT is indicated in all cT2-4 tumours. We aimed to evaluate the use of RT in the Netherlands and to discuss Dutch practice in the context of current literature. Data of the Dutch Surgical Colorectal Audit (DSCA) were used and 6784 patients surgically treated for primary rectal cancer in 2009-2011 were included. The application and type of RT were described according to age, comorbidity, tumour localization and tumour stage at population level with analysis of hospital variation for specific subsets. In total, 85% of patients who underwent resection for rectal cancer received RT. Comorbidity (Charlson Comorbidity Index 2+) and older age (≥70 years) were associated with a slight decrease in application of RT (75 and 80% respectively). In stage I tumours, 77% of patients received RT, but large hospital variation existed (0-100%). The proportion chemoradiotherapy of the whole group of RT increased with increasing N-stage, increasing T-stage, decreasing distance from the anus, younger age and less comorbidity with hospital variation from 0 to 73%. From a European perspective, a high percentage of rectal cancer patients are treated with RT in the Netherlands. Considerable hospital variation was observed for RT in stage I and the proportion of chemoradiotherapy among all RT schemes. Data from clinical auditing enable evaluation of national practice and current standards from both a scientific and international perspective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using Histopathology Breast Cancer Data to Reduce Clinical Target Volume Margins at Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stroom, Joep Schlief, Angelique; Alderliesten, Tanja; Peterse, Hans; Bartelink, Harry; Gilhuijs, Kenneth

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to quantify the incidence and extension of microscopic disease around primary breast tumors in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy (BCT), focusing on a potential application to reduce radiotherapy boost volumes. Methods and Materials: An extensive pathology tumor-distribution study was performed using 38 wide local excision specimens of BCT patients. Specimen orientation was recorded and microscopic findings reconstructed to assess the incidence of microscopic disease around the macroscopic tumor. A model of disease spread was built, showing probability of disease extension outside a treated volume (P{sub out,vol}). The model was applied in 10 new BCT patients. Taking asymmetry of tumor excision into account, new asymmetric margins for the clinical target volume of the boost (CTV{sub boost}) were evaluated that minimize the volume without increasing P{sub out,TTV} (TTV being total treated volume: V{sub surgery} + CTV{sub boost}). Potential reductions in CTV{sub boost} and TTV were evaluated. Results: Microscopic disease beyond the tumor boundary occurred isotropically at distances > 1 cm (intended surgical margin) and > 1.5 cm (intended TTV margin) in 53% and 36% of the excision specimens, respectively. In the 10 prospective patients, the average P{sub out,TTV} was, however, only 16% due to larger surgical margins than intended in some directions. Asymmetric CTV{sub boost} margins reduced the CTV{sub boost} and TTV by 27% (20 cc) and 12% (21 cc) on average, without compromising tumor coverage. Conclusions: Microscopic disease extension may occur beyond the current CTV{sub boost} in approximately one sixth of patients. An asymmetric CTV{sub boost} that corrects for asymmetry of the surgical excision has the potential to reduce boost volumes while maintaining tumor coverage.

  10. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  11. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS).This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5-85.5 months).The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities.TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Oropharyngeal Cancer: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Megan E.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Pinto, Harlan; Chang, Daniel T.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes, failures, and toxicities in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. Methods And Materials: Between Aug 2001 and Oct 2007, 107 patients were treated with IMRT with curative intent at Stanford University. Twenty-two patients were treated postoperatively, and 85 were treated definitively. Concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered to 86 patients (80%) and cetuximab to 8 patients (7%). The prescribed dose was 66 Gy at 2.2 Gy/fraction for definitively treated cases and 60 Gy at 2 Gy/fraction for postoperative cases. Median follow-up was 29 months among surviving patients (range, 4-105 months). Results: Eight patients had persistent disease or local-regional failure at a median of 6.5 months (range, 0-9.9 months). Six local failures occurred entirely within the high-risk clinical target volume (CTV) (one with simultaneous distant metastasis). One patient relapsed within the high- and intermediate-risk CTV. One patient had a recurrence at the junction between the IMRT and low-neck fields. Seven patients developed distant metastasis as the first site of failure. The 3-year local-regional control (LRC), freedom from distant metastasis, overall survival, and disease-free survival rates were 92%, 92%, 83%, and 81%, respectively. T stage (T4 vs. T1-T3) was predictive of poorer LRC (p = 0.001), overall survival (p = 0.001), and disease-free survival (p < 0.001) rates. Acute toxicity consisted of 58% grade 3 mucosal and 5% grade 3 skin reactions. Six patients (6%) developed grade >=3 late complications. Conclusions: IMRT provides excellent LRC for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Distant metastases are a major failure pattern. No marginal failures were observed.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of an Immbolization System for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Stathakis, Sotirios; Crownover, Richard; Esquivel, Carlos; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-07-01

    In this study, a clinical evaluation of the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} System combined with the TomoTherapy megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) was performed for lung and liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to reduce interfractional setup uncertainty. Twenty patients treated with 3-5 fractions of SBRT were analyzed retrospectively. The Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system was used in both CT simulation and during patient treatment setup. Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion placed posteriorly over the thoracic region, an abdominal compression plate, and a knee and foot sponge. Pretreatment MVCT scans of the TomoTherapy HI-ART II unit were fused with the planning kVCT before delivery of each fraction to determine the interfractional setup error. A total of 84 shifts were analyzed to assess the interfractional setup accuracy. Results showed that the mean interfractional setup errors and standard deviations were -0.9 {+-} 3.1 mm, 1.2 {+-} 5.5 mm, and 6.5 {+-} 2.6 mm for lateral (IEC-X), longitudinal (IEC-Y), and vertical (IEC-Z) variations, respectively. The maximum motion was 17.1 mm in the longitudinal direction. When all 3 translational coordinates were analyzed, a mean composite displacement vector of 8.2 {+-} 2.0 mm (range 4.1-11.7 mm) was obtained for all patients. Based on the findings, image-guided SBRT using the Body Pro-Lok{sup TM} system in conjunction with the MVCT of TomoTherapy is capable of minimizing interfractional setup error and improving treatment accuracy.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: Interim Results of a Prospective Phase II Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Pawlicki, Todd; Cotrutz, Cristian; Presti, Joseph C.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The radiobiology of prostate cancer favors a hypofractionated dose regimen. We report results of a prospective Phase II clinical trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Forty-one low-risk prostate cancer patients with 6 months' minimum follow-up received 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy with image-guided SBRT alone using the CyberKnife. The early (<3 months) and late (>6 months) urinary and rectal toxicities were assessed using validated quality of life questionnaires (International Prostate Symptom Score, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Patterns of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response are analyzed. Results: The median follow-up was 33 months. There were no RTOG Grade 4 acute or late rectal/urinary complications. There were 2 patients with RTOG Grade 3 late urinary toxicity and none with RTOG Grade 3 rectal complications. A reduced rate of severe rectal toxicities was observed with every-other-day vs. 5 consecutive days treatment regimen (0% vs. 38%, p = 0.0035). A benign PSA bounce (median, 0.4 ng/mL) was observed in 12 patients (29%) occurring at 18 months (median) after treatment. At last follow-up, no patient has had a PSA failure regardless of biochemical failure definition. Of 32 patients with 12 months minimum follow-up, 25 patients (78%) achieved a PSA nadir {<=}0.4 ng/mL. A PSA decline to progressively lower nadirs up to 3 years after treatment was observed. Conclusions: The early and late toxicity profile and PSA response for prostate SBRT are highly encouraging. Continued accrual and follow-up will be necessary to confirm durable biochemical control rates and low toxicity profiles.

  15. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials

    PubMed Central

    Aird, Edwin GA; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia AD; Thomas, Russell AS; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK over the past 30 years, including the involvement of the UK in international audits. A summary of audit results is given, with an overview of methodologies employed and lessons learnt. Recent and forthcoming more complex audits are considered, with a focus on future needs including the arrival of proton therapy in the UK and other advanced techniques such as four-dimensional radiotherapy delivery and verification, stereotactic radiotherapy and MR linear accelerators. The work of the main quality assurance and auditing bodies is discussed, including how they are working together to streamline audit and to ensure that all radiotherapy centres are involved. Undertaking regular external audit motivates centres to modernize and develop techniques and provides assurance, not only that radiotherapy is planned and delivered accurately but also that the patient dose delivered is as prescribed. PMID:26329469

  16. Radiotherapy dosimetry audit: three decades of improving standards and accuracy in UK clinical practice and trials.

    PubMed

    Clark, Catharine H; Aird, Edwin G A; Bolton, Steve; Miles, Elizabeth A; Nisbet, Andrew; Snaith, Julia A D; Thomas, Russell A S; Venables, Karen; Thwaites, David I

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetry audit plays an important role in the development and safety of radiotherapy. National and large scale audits are able to set, maintain and improve standards, as well as having the potential to identify issues which may cause harm to patients. They can support implementation of complex techniques and can facilitate awareness and understanding of any issues which may exist by benchmarking centres with similar equipment. This review examines the development of dosimetry audit in the UK over the past 30 years, including the involvement of the UK in international audits. A summary of audit results is given, with an overview of methodologies employed and lessons learnt. Recent and forthcoming more complex audits are considered, with a focus on future needs including the arrival of proton therapy in the UK and other advanced techniques such as four-dimensional radiotherapy delivery and verification, stereotactic radiotherapy and MR linear accelerators. The work of the main quality assurance and auditing bodies is discussed, including how they are working together to streamline audit and to ensure that all radiotherapy centres are involved. Undertaking regular external audit motivates centres to modernize and develop techniques and provides assurance, not only that radiotherapy is planned and delivered accurately but also that the patient dose delivered is as prescribed.

  17. A framework for deformable image registration validation in radiotherapy clinical applications

    PubMed Central

    Varadhan, Raj; Karangelis, Grigorios; Krishnan, Karthik; Hui, Susanta

    2013-01-01

    any image datasets, to evaluate the overall accuracy and limitations of a DIR algorithm used in radiation oncology. The evaluation based on anatomical correspondence, physical characteristics of deformation field, and image characteristics can facilitate DIR verification with the ultimate goal of implementing adaptive radiotherapy. The suitability of application of a particular evaluation metric in validating DIR is dependent on the clinical deformation observed. PMID:23318394

  18. Gradient of γ rays and β particles irradiation’s energy produced by accelerator and its use in radiotherapy of cancer diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Kastrati, Labinot Nafezi, Gazmend; Shehi, Gëzim

    2016-03-25

    The Ionising irradiations used mostly in the treatment of tumoral diseases are: X, γ, β and e irradiations. The discussion will be about radiations, produced in accelerators, with photon energy 6 MV and 15 MV and electron energy from 5 MeV to 15 MeV. Due to the differences between γ and β radiations, their absorbtion in living tissues will be different. It is important to know, the absorption performance before and after the electronic equilibrium. For these purposes, we’ve use the function of dose gradient, for irradiations γ and β. It represents the velocity of dose change as a function of depth in tissue. From skin to maximum dose value, the increase of G-function is more accentuated for γ-rays than for β-particles, while after that the G-function decreasing is less sharp for γ-rays, while for β-particles, it is almost promptly. This fact allow us to use in radiotherapy, not only γ-rays but β-particles, too. The lasts, represents, a much more efficient tool, especially in terms of radiation protection, of health adjacent tissues and organs. Finally, we’ll to discus, about the advantages in terms of radiation protection of both, γ-rays and β-particles used in radiotherapy.

  19. Radiotherapy-Induced Malignancies: Review of Clinical Features, Pathobiology, and Evolving Approaches for Mitigating Risk

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Steve; Nakamura, Jean L.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most significant effects of radiation therapy on normal tissues is mutagenesis, which is the basis for radiation-induced malignancies. Radiation-induced malignancies are late complications arising after radiotherapy, increasing in frequency among survivors of both pediatric and adult cancers. Genetic backgrounds harboring germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes are recognized risk factors. Some success has been found with using genome wide association studies to identify germline polymorphisms associated with susceptibility. The insights generated by genetics, epidemiology, and the development of experimental models are defining potential strategies to offer to individuals at risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Concurrent technological efforts are developing novel radiotherapy delivery to reduce irradiation of normal tissues, and thereby, to mitigate the risk of radiation-induced malignancies. The goal of this review is to discuss epidemiologic, modeling, and radiotherapy delivery data, where these lines of research intersect and their potential impact on patient care. PMID:23565507

  20. Clinical evaluation of radiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer after metallic stent placement

    PubMed Central

    Yu, You-Tao; Yang, Guang; Liu, Yan; Shen, Bao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer after expandable metallic stent placement. METHODS: Ten cases of advanced esophageal cancer were evaluated, 7 having complete obstruction and 3 with digestive-respiratory fistula. Ten nitinol stents were placed at the site of stenosis. Patients were treated with a total dose of 1200 cGy divided into 3 fractions of 400 cGy 4-7 d after stents placement. RESULTS: All the 10 stents were placed successfully at one time. After radiotherapy for advanced esophageal cancer, the survival period of the cases ranged from 14 to 22 mo, with a mean survival of 17 mo. No re-stenosis occurred among all the 10 cases. CONCLUSION: Stent placement combined with radiotherapy for esophageal cancer is helpful to prolong patients’ survival and reduce occurrence of re-stenosis. PMID:15237455

  1. Laser Doppler flowmetry: an early diagnosis instrument in detecting the soft tissue changes that occur during radiotherapy to the head and neck area, clinical case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petre, L. C.; Miron, M. I.; Ianes, E.

    2016-03-01

    Aim of the study: Our goal was to monitor soft tissue changes occurring during radiotherapy - both through clinical examination and using LDF - in order to establish Laser Doppler as an early diagnosis instrument in this situation, and also to assess what kind of dental procedures could be provided during radiotherapy, in order to increase patients' quality of life. Material and Method: Our study included two male patients, who received head and neck radiotherapy. Patient A, 68 years old, underwent 31 radiotherapy exposures. Patient B, 52 years old, underwent 24 exposures. They received a thorough clinical examination, and a LDF evaluation of gingival blood flow in areas close to the irradiated site, after the first, the 18th, and the last radiotherapy exposure. Results: Patient A presented radiotherapy induced mucositis, after the 18th radiotherapy exposure. After the last exposure the mucositis worsened, additionally, radiodermitis appeared on the neck. LDF showed an increase in blood flow of the irradiated area, even after the first exposure, and it persisted throughout treatment. Patient B showed no clinical changes, besides a hyperkeratinisation of the gingiva in the irradiated area, after the last exposure. LDF showed an overall increase in vascularity of the area throughout treatment. Discussion: Even after the first radiotherapy exposure, and also when clinical changes were not apparent, LDF measurements revealed an increase in blood flow in the gingiva of irradiated patients. LDF might allow us to establish the most appropriate moment in time for each dental treatment, in order to increase the quality of life.

  2. Predictive value of clinical examination, transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging prior to radiotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Hawnaur, J M; Johnson, R J; Carrington, B M; Hunter, R D

    1998-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare tumour staging and volume assessment by examination under anaesthesia (EUA), transrectal ultrasound (TRU) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix, and to correlate findings with long-term outcome following treatment by radiotherapy. Tumour staging was performed on 60 patients immediately before starting radiotherapy. Clinicians and radiologists performing EUA, TRU or MRI were blinded to the results of other investigations. Tumour stage and dimensions were recorded prospectively for each technique, and analysed for concordance. The relationship between pre-treatment stage, size of tumour and patient outcome after radiotherapy was assessed, using clinical status 5 years after treatment as the truth measure. EUA, TRU and MRI assigned the same tumour stage in only 30% of patients and EUA and MRI agreed tumour stage in a further 27%. In cases of disagreement, the MRI stage correlated better with outcome than the TRU or EUA stage. There was a significant difference between tumour volume obtained from measurements made on MRI and those from TRU. 62% of patients with enlarged lymph nodes on pre-treatment MRI either died, or developed tumour recurrence or metastases. The ability of MRI to assess the full extent of bulky tumours and the presence of lymph node enlargement was an advantage over both EUA and TRU in identifying patients with a poor prognosis.

  3. Optimizing LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy of uveal melanomas: 7 years' clinical experience

    SciTech Connect

    Dieckmann, Karin . E-mail: Karin.Dieckmann@akhwien.at; Georg, Dietmar; Bogner, Joachim; Zehetmayer, Martin; Petersch, Bernhard; Chorvat, Martin; Weitmann, Hajo; Poetter, Richard

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To report on the clinical outcome of LINAC-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of uveal melanomas. Additionally, a new prototype (hardware and software) for automated eye monitoring and gated SRT using a noninvasive eye fixation technique is described. Patients and Methods: Between June 1997 and March 2004, 158 patients suffering from uveal melanoma were treated at a LINAC with 6 MV (5 x 14 Gy; 5 x 12 Gy prescribed to 80% isodose) photon beams. To guarantee identical patient setup during treatment planning (CT and MRI) and treatment delivery, patients were immobilized with a BrainLAB thermoplastic mask. Eye immobilization was achieved by instructing the patient to fixate on a light source integrated into the mask system. A mini-video camera was used to provide on-line information about the eye and pupil position, respectively. A new CT and magnetic resonance (MR) compatible prototype, based on head-and-neck fixation and the infrared tracking system ExacTrac, has been developed and evaluated since 2002. This system records maximum temporal and angular deviations during treatment and, based on tolerance limits, a feedback signal to the LINAC enables gated SRT. Results: After a median follow-up of 33.4 months (range, 3-85 months), local control was achieved in 98%. Fifteen patients (9.0%) developed metastases. Secondary enucleation was performed in 23 patients (13.8%). Long-term side effects were retinopathy (n = 70; 44%), cataract (n = 30; 23%), optic neuropathy (n = 65; 41%), and secondary neovascular glaucoma (n = 23; 13.8%). Typical situations when preset deviation criteria were exceeded were slow drifts (fatigue), large sudden eye movements (irritation), or eye closing (fatigue). In these cases, radiation was reliably interrupted by the gating system. In our clinical setup, the novel system for computer-controlled gated SRT of uveal melanoma was well tolerated by about 30 of the patients treated with this system so far. Conclusion: LINAC-based SRT of

  4. Multi-System Verification of Registrations for Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Straube, William L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Purdy, James A.; Li, X. Allen; Xiao Ying

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: To provide quantitative information on the image registration differences from multiple systems for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) credentialing and margin reduction in clinical trials. Methods and Materials: Images and IGRT shift results from three different treatment systems (Tomotherapy Hi-Art, Elekta Synergy, Varian Trilogy) have been sent from various institutions to the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) for evaluation for the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Nine patient datasets (five head-and-neck and four prostate) were included in the comparison, with each patient having 1-4 daily individual IGRT studies. In all cases, daily shifts were re-calculated by re-registration of the planning CT with the daily IGRT data using three independent software systems (MIMvista, FocalSim, VelocityAI). Automatic fusion was used in all calculations. The results were compared with those submitted from institutions. Similar regions of interest (ROIs) and same initial positions were used in registrations for inter-system comparison. Different slice spacings for CBCT sampling and different ROIs for registration were used in some cases to observe the variation of registration due to these factors. Results: For the 54 comparisons with head-and-neck datasets, the absolute values of differences of the registration results between different systems were 2.6 {+-} 2.1 mm (mean {+-} SD; range 0.1-8.6 mm, left-right [LR]), 1.7 {+-} 1.3 mm (0.0-4.9 mm, superior-inferior [SI]), and 1.8 {+-} 1.1 mm (0.1-4.0 mm, anterior-posterior [AP]). For the 66 comparisons in prostate cases, the differences were 1.1 {+-} 1.0 mm (0.0-4.6 mm, LR), 2.1 {+-} 1.7 mm (0.0-6.6 mm, SI), and 2.0 {+-} 1.8 mm (0.1-6.9 mm, AP). The differences caused by the slice spacing variation were relatively small, and the different ROI selections in FocalSim and MIMvista also had limited impact. Conclusion: The extent of differences was reported when different systems were used for image

  5. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-09-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition.

  6. Effects of nutritional intervention in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy: A prospective randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-Xing; Li, Wentao; Huang, Shi-Gao; Dang, Yazhang; Gao, Hongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck malignant tumors have numerous locations of the disease. After patients receive radiotherapy, their nutritional status is very poor, thus the curative effect is unsatisfactory. The aims of the present study were to investigate and analyze the nutritional status of patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy (RT) in order to provide positive nutrition intervention for assisting the radiotherapy effect. A total of 40 patients with head and neck cancer were selected using a method of subjective global assessment (SGA) to assess nutritional status, including calorie intake and energy expenditure. In a randomized, controlled study, 20 patients received intensive dietary counseling and nutritional therapy (G1) and 20 received regular dietary as controls (G0) preradiotherapy and postradiotherapy. The primary endpoint was calorie intake and energy expenditure. The secondary endpoint was SGA rating with nutritional therapy. At the end of RT, energy intake showed a net increase in G1 (1,691±301 kcal) compared with that in G0 (1,066±312 kcal) (P<0.05); energy expenditure increased in G1 (1,673±279 kcal) compared with G0 (1,490±298 kcal) (P<0.05). The prevalence of severe malnutrition following radiotherapy was significantly different between the two study groups (10 patients in G0 and 4 patients in G1; P<0.05). The number of the normal malnutrition patients postRT in G0 decreased from 4 to 2 and conversely, in G1 it increased from 3 to 6 (P<0.05). In conclusion, patients with head and neck cancer were most malnutritioned, which impacted on clinical outcome. Timely nutritional intervention can effectively prevent weight loss and muscle wasting. Additionally, it may improve quality of life by decreasing the frequency of severe malnutrition. PMID:27588193

  7. Clinical efficacy of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhong; Song, Si Yeol; Kim, Jong Hoon; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon; Kim, Tae Won; Jeong, Seong-Yun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2015-11-21

    Limited data describe the prognosis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer. Thus, we evaluated treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for those patients. The study involved patients received stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for one to three lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer at a single institution. A total dose of 40-60 Gy (median, 48 Gy) in three or four fractions was prescribed. A total of 79 metastatic lung lesions from 50 patients who underwent curative resection for their primary colorectal cancer or salvage treatment at a recurrent site were included. The one- and three-year local control rates were 88.7 % and 70.6 %, respectively. The three-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 64.0 % and 24.0 %, respectively. Patients with tumor volume ≤1.5 mL had a significantly better overall survival rate than those with tumor volume >1.5 mL (68.0 % vs. 60.0 % at three-year, p = 0.02). Local control was associated with a trend towards better survival (p = 0.06). No pulmonary complications greater than grade 2 were observed. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy is a competitive treatment modality for the management of lung metastases arising from colorectal cancer.

  8. The impact of radiotherapy costs on clinical outcomes in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boero, Isabel J.; Paravati, Anthony; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Mell, Loren K.; Murphy, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose In cost-effective healthcare systems, the cost of services should parallel patient complexity or quality of care. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the cost of radiotherapy correlates with patient-related outcomes among a large cohort of breast cancer patients treated with adjuvant breast radiation. Materials and Methods 23,127 women with non-metastatic breast cancer undergoing radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 2000-2009. Medicare reimbursements were used as a proxy for cost of radiotherapy, and Medicare claims were examined to identify local toxicities, and breast cancer-related endpoints. The impact of cost on these outcomes was studied with multivariable Fine-Gray models to account for competing risks. Results The median cost (and interquartile range) of a course of breast radiation was $8,100 ($6,700-$9,700). Increased radiation costs were not associated with the occurrence of treatment-related toxicities (all p-values > 0.05), ipsilateral breast recurrence (p=0.55), or breast cancer-related mortality (p=0.55). Conclusion Higher costs for adjuvant radiation in breast cancer were not associated with a decreased risk of patient-related outcomes, suggesting inefficiency in Medicare reimbursements. Future efforts should focus on prospective evaluation of alternative payment models for radiotherapy. PMID:26472317

  9. Modeling in vivo relative biological effectiveness in particle therapy for clinically relevant endpoints.

    PubMed

    Lühr, Armin; von Neubeck, Cläre; Helmbrecht, Stephan; Baumann, Michael; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Krause, Mechthild

    2017-08-29

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of particle therapy compared to photon radiotherapy is known to be variable but the exact dependencies are still subject to debate. In vitro data suggested that RBE is to a large extend independent of ion type if parametrized by the beam quality Q. This study analyzed the RBE dependence of pre-clinical data on late toxicity with an emphasis on the beam quality. Published pre-clinical RBE dose-response data of the spinal cord following one and two fractions of photon and carbon ion irradiation were compiled. The beam quality for each treatment condition was obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. The αp and βp parameters of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model for particle irradiation were determined from the pre-clinical data and was provided as a function of Q. An introduced model proposed αp to increase linearly with Q and βp to remain constant. RBE values predicted by the model were compared to the published data. The αp parameter was highly correlated with Q (R(2) = 0.96) with a linear slope of 0.019 Gy(-1). No significant variation of βp with Q was found. RBE and Q were also highly correlated (R(2) = 0.98) for one and two fractions. The (extrapolated) RBE at Q = 0 (theoretical photon limit) for one and two fractions was 1.22 and significantly larger than 1 (p = .004). The model reproduced the dependence of RBE on fractionation well. Fraction dose and beam quality Q were sufficient to describe the RBE variability for a late toxicity model within a carbon ion treatment field. Assuming the independence of the identified RBE parameters on the ion type might suggest the translation of variable (pre-) clinical RBE data from carbon ion to proton therapy.

  10. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Radiotherapy, and the Risk of Acute and Chronic Toxicity: The Mayo Clinic Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Pinn, Melva E.; Gold, Douglas G. M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.; Brown, Paul D.; Miller, Robert C.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the acute and chronic toxic effects of radiotherapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods and Materials: Medical records of 21 consecutive patients with SLE, who had received 34 courses of external beam radiotherapy and one low-dose-rate prostate implant, were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with discoid lupus erythematosus were excluded. Results: Median survival was 2.3 years and median follow-up 5.6 years. Eight (42%) of 19 patients evaluable for acute toxicity during radiotherapy experienced acute toxicity of Grade 1 or greater, and 4 (21%) had acute toxicity of Grade 3 or greater. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22-72%) and 56% (95% CI, 28-81%), respectively. The 5- and 10-year incidence of chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater was 28% (95% CI, 18-60%) and 40% (95% CI, 16-72%), respectively. Univariate analysis showed that chronic toxicity of Grade 1 or greater correlated with SLE renal involvement (p < 0.006) and possibly with the presence of five or more American Rheumatism Association criteria (p < 0.053). Chronic toxicity of Grade 3 or greater correlated with an absence of photosensitivity (p < 0.02), absence of arthritis (p < 0.03), and presence of a malar rash (p < 0.04). Conclusions: The risk of acute and chronic toxicity in patients with SLE who received radiotherapy was moderate but was not prohibitive of the use of radiotherapy. Patients with more advanced SLE may be at increased risk for chronic toxicity.

  11. Postoperative Proton Radiotherapy for Localized and Locoregional Breast Cancer: Potential for Clinically Relevant Improvements?

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Khan, Shaka; MacArtain, Anne M.; Heuberger, Juerg; Goitein, Gudrun; Gruber, Guenther; Lutters, Gerd; Hug, Eugen B.; Bodis, Stephan; Lomax, Antony J.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To study the potential reduction of dose to organs at risk (OARs) with intensity-modulated proton radiotherapy (IMPT) compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) photon radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Comparative treatment-planning was performed using planning computed tomography scans of 20 left-sided breast cancer patients. For each patient, three increasingly complex locoregional volumes (planning target volumes [PTVs]) were defined: whole breast (WB) or chest wall (CW) = (PTV1), WB/CW plus medial-supraclavicular (MSC), lateral-supraclavicular (LSC), and level III axillary (AxIII) nodes = (PTV2) and WB/CW+MSC+LSC+AxIII plus internal mammary chain = (PTV3). For each patient, 3D-CRT, IMRT, and IMPT plans were optimized for PTV coverage. Dose to OARs was compared while maintaining target coverage. Results: All the techniques met the required PTV coverage except the 3D-CRT plans for PTV3-scenario. All 3D-CRT plans for PTV3 exceeded left-lung V20. IMPT vs. 3D-CRT: significant dose reductions were observed for all OARs using IMPT for all PTVs. IMPT vs. IMRT: For PTV2 and PTV3, low (V5) left lung and cardiac doses were reduced by a factor >2.5, and cardiac doses (V22.5) were by a factor of >20 lower with IMPT compared with IMRT. Conclusions: When complex-target irradiation is needed, 3D-CRT often compromises the target coverage and increases the dose to OARs; IMRT can provide better results but will increase the integral dose. The benefit of IMPT is based on improved target coverage and reduction of low doses to OARs, potentially reducing the risk of late-toxicity. These results indicate a potential role of proton-radiotherapy for extended locoregional irradiation in left breast cancer.

  12. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    distributions in the regions affected by the metal artifacts was also observed in patient data. However, in absence of a reference ground truth (CT set without metal inserts), these differences should not be interpreted as improvement/deterioration of the accuracy of calculated dose. With limited data presented, it was observed that proton dosimetry was affected more than photons as expected. Physicians were significantly more confident contouring anatomy in the regions affected by artifacts. While site specific preferences were detected, all indicated that they would consistently use IMAR corrected images. Conclusions: IMAR correction algorithm could be readily implemented in an existing clinical workflow upon commercial release. While residual errors still exist in IMAR corrected images, these images present with better overall conspicuity of the patient/phantom geometry and offer more accurate CT numbers for improved local dosimetry. The variety of different scenarios included herein attest to the utility of the evaluated IMAR for a wide range of radiotherapy clinical scenarios.

  13. Alternate calibration method of radiochromic EBT3 film for quality assurance verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Soah; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Hwang, Taejin; Yoon, Jai-Woong; Koo, Taeryool; Han, Tae Jin; Kim, Haeyoung; Lee, Me Yeon; Bae, Hoonsik; Kim, Kyoung Ju

    2016-07-01

    EBT3 film is utilized as a dosimetry quality assurance tool for the verification of clinical radiotherapy treatments. In this work, we suggest a percentage-depth-dose (PDD) calibration method that can calibrate several EBT3 film pieces together at different dose levels because photon beams provide different dose levels at different depths along the axis of the beam. We investigated the feasibility of the film PDD calibration method based on PDD data and compared the results those from the traditional film calibration method. Photon beams at 6 MV were delivered to EBT3 film pieces for both calibration methods. For the PDD-based calibration, the film pieces were placed on solid phantoms at the depth of maximum dose (dmax) and at depths of 3, 5, 8, 12, 17, and 22 cm, and a photon beam was delivered twice, at 100 cGy and 400 cGy, to extend the calibration dose range under the same conditions. Fourteen film pieces, to maintain their consistency, were irradiated at doses ranging from approximately 30 to 400 cGy for both film calibrations. The film pieces were located at the center position on the scan bed of an Epson 1680 flatbed scanner in the parallel direction. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans were created, and their dose distributions were delivered to the film. The dose distributions for the traditional method and those for the PDD-based calibration method were evaluated using a Gamma analysis. The PDD dose values using a CC13 ion chamber and those obtained by using a FC65-G Farmer chamber and measured at the depth of interest produced very similar results. With the objective test criterion of a 1% dosage agreement at 1 mm, the passing rates for the four cases of the three IMRT plans were essentially identical. The traditional and the PDD-based calibrations provided similar plan verification results. We also describe another alternative for calibrating EBT3 films, i.e., a PDD-based calibration method that provides an easy and time-saving approach

  14. Clinical investigation: Regional nodal failure patterns in breast cancer patients treated with mastectomy without radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Eric A. . E-mail: estrom@mdanderson.org; Woodward, Wendy A.; Katz, Angela; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Perkins, George H.; Jhingran, Anuja; Theriault, Richard; Singletary, Eva; Sahin, Aysegul; McNeese, Marsha D.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe regional nodal failure patterns in patients who had undergone mastectomy with axillary dissection to define subgroups of patients who might benefit from supplemental regional nodal radiation to the axilla or supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Methods and Materials: The cohort consisted of 1031 patients treated with mastectomy (including a level I-II axillary dissection) and doxorubicin-based systemic therapy without radiation on five clinical trials at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. Patient records, including pathology reports, were retrospectively reviewed. All regional recurrences (with or without distant metastasis) were recorded. Median follow-up was 116 months (range, 6-262 months). Results: Twenty-one patients recurred within the low-mid axilla (10-year actuarial rate 3%). Of these, 16 were isolated regional failures (no chest wall failure). The risk of failure in the low-mid axilla was not significantly higher for patients with increasing numbers of involved nodes, increasing percentage of involved nodes, larger nodal size or gross extranodal extension. Only 3 of 100 patients with <10 nodes examined recurred in the low-mid axilla. Seventy-seven patients had a recurrence in the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex (10-year actuarial rate 8%). Forty-nine were isolated regional recurrences. Significant predictors of failures in this region included {>=}4 involved axillary lymph nodes, >20% involved axillary nodes, and the presence of gross extranodal extension (10-year actuarial rates 15%, 14%, and 19%, respectively, p < 0.0005). The extent of axillary dissection and the size of the largest involved node were not predictive of failure within the supraclavicular fossa/axillary apex. Conclusions: These results suggest that failure in the level I-II axilla is an uncommon occurrence after modified radical mastectomy and chemotherapy. Therefore, supplemental radiotherapy to the dissected axilla is not warranted for

  15. Long-term outcomes of radiotherapy for stage II testicular seminoma--the Mayo Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Hallemeier, Christopher L; Pisansky, Thomas M; Davis, Brian J; Choo, Richard

    2013-11-01

    To report long-term outcomes of patients with stage II testicular seminoma treated with radiotherapy (RT). A retrospective review was performed of 52 patients who received megavoltage RT for stage II testicular seminoma at Mayo Clinic between 1974 and 2007. Forty-eight patients (92%) had computed tomography staging. Overall survival (OS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and cause-specific survival (CSS) were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method. Major cardiac event (MCE) was defined as myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting or stenting, or valve replacement. Second malignancy (SM) was defined as biopsy-confirmed malignancy occurring in the RT field. The median patient age at diagnosis was 36 years. Stage was IIA (n = 24), IIB (n = 7), IIC (n = 17), and II not otherwise specified (NOS, n = 4). The median infradiaphragmatic RT dose was 30.7 Gy. Twenty-six patients (50%) received prophylactic mediastinal/supraclavicular (MSCV) RT. The median follow-up was 19 years. Estimates of OS, RFS, and CSS were 94%, 80%, and 96% at 10 years, and 83%, 72%, and 96% at 20 years, respectively. RFS at 10 years for stage IIA, IIB, IIC, and II NOS were 83%, 54%, 81%, and 100%, respectively (log-rank P = 0.21). Ten patients (19%) experienced disease relapse in the MSCV region (n = 7), para-aortic lymph nodes (n = 1), lung (n = 1), or peritoneal cavity (n = 1). Eight patients were successfully salvaged with chemotherapy and/or surgery, while 2 died of seminoma. Risk of MSCV relapse was significantly lower in patients who received MSCV RT vs. those who did not (10-year estimates: 4% vs. 21%, respectively, log-rank P = 0.01). MCE occurred in 10 patients (19%) at a median of 18 years (range 7-30) after RT. SM occurred in 5 patients (10%) at a median of 27 years (range 20-34) after RT. In patients with stage II testicular seminoma treated with RT, relapse in the irradiated site was uncommon. Infradiaphragmatic RT alone was associated with a significant risk of MSCV failure

  16. Experience-Based Quality Control of Clinical Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kevin L.; Brame, R. Scott; Low, Daniel A.; Mutic, Sasa

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To incorporate a quality control tool, according to previous planning experience and patient-specific anatomic information, into the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plan generation process and to determine whether the tool improved treatment plan quality. Methods and Materials: A retrospective study of 42 IMRT plans demonstrated a correlation between the fraction of organs at risk (OARs) overlapping the planning target volume and the mean dose. This yielded a model, predicted dose = prescription dose (0.2 + 0.8 [1 - exp(-3 overlapping planning target volume/volume of OAR)]), that predicted the achievable mean doses according to the planning target volume overlap/volume of OAR and the prescription dose. The model was incorporated into the planning process by way of a user-executable script that reported the predicted dose for any OAR. The script was introduced to clinicians engaged in IMRT planning and deployed thereafter. The script's effect was evaluated by tracking {delta} = (mean dose-predicted dose)/predicted dose, the fraction by which the mean dose exceeded the model. Results: All OARs under investigation (rectum and bladder in prostate cancer; parotid glands, esophagus, and larynx in head-and-neck cancer) exhibited both smaller {delta} and reduced variability after script implementation. These effects were substantial for the parotid glands, for which the previous {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.24 was reduced to {delta} = 0.13 {+-} 0.10. The clinical relevance was most evident in the subset of cases in which the parotid glands were potentially salvageable (predicted dose <30 Gy). Before script implementation, an average of 30.1 Gy was delivered to the salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 20.3 Gy. After implementation, an average of 18.7 Gy was delivered to salvageable cases, with an average predicted dose of 17.2 Gy. In the prostate cases, the rectum model excess was reduced from {delta} = 0.28 {+-} 0.20 to {delta} = 0.07 {+-} 0

  17. Development of a new ridge filter with honeycomb geometry for a pencil beam scanning system in particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tansho, R.; Furukawa, T.; Hara, Y.; Mizushima, K.; Saotome, N.; Saraya, Y.; Shirai, T.; Noda, K.

    2017-09-01

    A ridge filter (RGF), a beam energy modulation device, is usually used for particle radiotherapy with a pencil beam scanning system. The conventional RGF has a one-dimensional (1D) periodic laterally stepped structure in orthogonal plane with a central beam direction. The energy of a beam passing through the different thicknesses of the stepped RGF is modulated. Although the lateral pencil beam size is required to cover the several stepped RGF units to modulate its energy as designed, the current trend is to decrease lateral beam size to improve the scanning system. As a result, the beam size becomes smaller than the size of the individual RGF unit. The aim of this study was to develop a new RGF with two-dimensional (2D) honeycomb geometry to simultaneously achieve both a decrease in lateral beam size and the desired energy modulation. The conventional 1D-RGF and the 2D-RGF with honeycomb geometry were both designed so that the Bragg peak size of a 79 MeV/u carbon ion pencil beam in water was 1 mm RMS in the beam direction. To validate the design of the 2D-RGF, we calculated depth dose distributions in water using a simplified Monte Carlo method. In the calculations, we decreased the lateral pencil beam size at the entrance of the RGF and investigated the threshold of lateral beam size with which the pencil beam can reproduce the desired Bragg peak size for each type of RGF. In addition, we calculated lateral dose distributions in air downstream from the RGF and evaluated the inhomogeneity of the lateral dose distributions. Using the 2D-RGF, the threshold of lateral beam size with which the pencil beam can reproduce the desired Bragg peak size was smaller than that using the 1D-RGF. Moreover, the distance from the RGF at which the lateral dose distribution becomes uniform was shorter using the 2D-RGF than that using the 1D-RGF. These results indicate that when the periodic length of both RGFs is the same, the 2D-RGF allows use of a pencil beam with smaller lateral

  18. Early clinical and neuroradiological worsening after radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide in patients with glioblastoma: tumour progression or radionecrosis?

    PubMed

    Peca, C; Pacelli, R; Elefante, A; Del Basso De Caro, M L; Vergara, P; Mariniello, G; Giamundo, A; Maiuri, F

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the diagnosis and management of patients with resected brain glioblastomas who presented early clinical and neuroradiological worsening after the completion of the Stupp protocol. Its aim is to discuss the occurrence of early radionecrosis. Fifty patients with brain glioblastoma treated by surgical resection and Stupp protocol were reviewed; 15 among them (30%) had early clinical and neuroradiological worsening at the 6-month follow-up. The MR spectroscopy and surgical findings of these patients are reviewed. MR spectroscopy was in favour of tumour recurrence in 14 among 15 patients and showed radionecrosis in one. Among 10 patients who were reoperated on, 7 had histologically verified tumour recurrence or regrowth, whereas in 3 histopathology showed necrosis without evidence of tumour. The 7 patients with tumour progression had prevalence of focal neuroradiological signs (6/7) and a survival of 7.5-12 months (median survival 10 months). The 4 patients with early radionecrosis (including one patient who was not reoperated on) had clinical worsening with mental deterioration, confusion and ataxia, and MR spectroscopy positive for tumour recurrence in 3. Three were alive 24-30 months after the end of the radiotherapy, whereas one died at 40 months. Early radionecrosis after the Stupp protocol is not a rare event due to the radiosensitization effect of temozolomide. This phenomenon may predict a durable response to radiotherapy. MR spectroscopy may simulate tumour recurrence. A correct diagnosis is necessary to avoid useless reoperations and incorrect withdrawal of temozolomide.

  19. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  20. A systematic review of antiproton radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittner, Martin-Immanuel; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Wilkens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Antiprotons have been proposed as possible particles for radiotherapy; over the past years, the renewed interest in the potential biomedical relevance led to an increased research activity. It is the aim of this review to deliver a comprehensive overview regarding the evidence accumulated so far, analysing the background and depicting the current status of antiprotons in radiotherapy. A literature search has been conducted, including major scientific and commercial databases. All articles and a number of relevant conference abstracts published in the respective field have been included in this systematic review. The physical basis of antiproton radiotherapy is complex; however, the characterisation of the energy deposition profile supports its potential use in radiotherapy. Also the dosimetry improved considerably over the past few years. Regarding the biological properties, data on the effects on cells are presented; however, definite conclusions regarding the relative biological effectiveness cannot be made at the moment and radiobiological evidence of enhanced effectiveness remains scarce. In addition, there is new evidence supporting the potential imaging properties, for example for online dose verification. Clinical settings which might profit from the use of antiprotons have been further tracked. Judging from the evidence available so far, clinical constellations requiring optimal sparing in the entrance region of the beam and re-irradiations might profit most from antiproton radiotherapy. While several open questions remain to be answered, first steps towards a thorough characterisation of this interesting modality have been made.

  1. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Bladder/Prostate Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Dosimetry Compared to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cotter, Shane E.; Herrup, David A.; Friedmann, Alison; Macdonald, Shannon M.; Pieretti, Raphael V.; Robinson, Gregoire; Adams, Judith; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: In this study, we report the clinical outcomes of 7 children with bladder/prostate rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated with proton radiation and compare proton treatment plans with matched intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, with an emphasis on dose savings to reproductive and skeletal structures. Methods and Materials: Follow-up consisted of scheduled clinic appointments at our institution or direct communication with the treating physicians for referred patients. Each proton radiotherapy plan used for treatment was directly compared to an IMRT plan generated for the study. Clinical target volumes and normal tissue volumes were held constant to facilitate dosimetric comparisons. Each plan was optimized for target coverage and normal tissue sparing. Results: Seven male patients were treated with proton radiotherapy for bladder/prostate RMS at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 2002 and 2008. Median age at treatment was 30 months (11-70 months). Median follow-up was 27 months (10-90 months). Four patients underwent a gross total resection prior to radiation, and all patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Radiation doses ranged from 36 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) to 50.4 CGE. Five of 7 patients were without evidence of disease and with intact bladders at study completion. Target volume dosimetry was equivalent between the two modalities for all 7 patients. Proton radiotherapy led to a significant decrease in mean organ dose to the bladder (25.1 CGE vs. 33.2 Gy; p = 0.03), testes (0.0 CGE vs. 0.6 Gy; p = 0.016), femoral heads (1.6 CGE vs. 10.6 Gy; p = 0.016), growth plates (21.7 CGE vs. 32.4 Gy; p = 0.016), and pelvic bones (8.8 CGE vs. 13.5 Gy; p = 0.016) compared to IMRT. Conclusions: This study provides evidence of significant dose savings to normal structures with proton radiotherapy compared to IMRT and is well tolerated in this patient population. The long-term impact of these reduced doses can be tested in future studies

  2. Use of Protoporphyrin Fluorescence to Determine Clinical Target Volume for Non-melanotic Skin Cancers Treated with Primary Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Best, Lara; Vujovic, Olga; Jordan, Kevin; Fisher, Barbara; Carey, Deborah; Bourdeau, Deborah; Yu, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Purpose  Non-melanotic skin cancers remain the most commonly diagnosed cancers. Radiotherapy and surgery are the most common treatment options. Radiotherapy has a recurrence rate of up to 20% for basal or squamous cell cancers. One of the difficulties is to determine the extent of disease for poorly demarcated tumors. This study utilizes protoporphyrin (PpIX) fluorescence to provide information on the extent of subclinical disease for poorly demarcated tumors treated with radiotherapy. Materials and Methods  For 33 patients, PpIX photo-delineation was used to determine the clinical target volume (CTV2), which was compared to current conventional margins used to account for microscopic disease. Results  The use of PpIX photo-delineation demonstrated a significantly larger CTV of 15 mm compared to the conventional 10 mm (p = 0.03) for poorly demarcated lesions. A larger CTV was also demonstrated with PpIX photo-delineation for all basal cell carcinomas (13 mm, p = 0.03) as well as for non-nasal lesions (14 mm, p = 0.04). A trend towards an increased CTV was also noted for squamous cell carcinomas (16 mm, p = 0.19) and nasal primary sites (14 mm, p = 0.11). Nasal primary malignancies had multifocal PpIX uptake in 94% of cases. There was one case of local recurrence and one case of distant recurrence, with an average follow-up time of 22 months. Conclusions  The margins currently used to account for subclinical disease may underestimate the extent of microscopic spread for poorly demarcated tumors. Longer follow-up with larger pools of patients are necessary to determine if using PpIX photo-delineation translates into significantly improved clinical outcomes. PMID:27725923

  3. Recurrence pattern of squamous cell carcinoma in the midthoracic esophagus: implications for the clinical target volume design of postoperative radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Luo, Yijun; Li, Minghuan; Yan, Hongjiang; Sun, Mingping; Fan, Tingyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative radiotherapy has shown positive efficacy in lowering the recurrence rate and improving the survival rate for patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). However, controversies still exist about the postoperative prophylactic radiation target volume. This study was designed to analyze the patterns of recurrence and to provide a reference for determination of the postoperative radiotherapy target volume for patients with midthoracic ESCC. Patients and methods A total of 338 patients with recurrent or metastatic midthoracic ESCC after radical surgery were retrospectively examined. The patterns of recurrence including locoregional and distant metastasis were analyzed for these patients. Results The rates of lymph node (LN) metastasis were 28.4% supraclavicular, 77.2% upper mediastinal, 32.0% middle mediastinal, 50.0% lower mediastinal, and 19.5% abdominal LNs. In subgroup analyses, the rate of abdominal LN metastasis was significantly higher in patients with histological node-positive than that in patients with histological node-negative (P=0.033). Further analysis in patients with histological node-positive demonstrated that patients with three or more positive nodes are more prone to abdominal LN metastasis, compared with patients with one or two positive nodes (χ2=4.367, P=0.037). The length of tumor and histological differentiation were also the high-risk factors for abdominal LN metastasis. Conclusion For midthoracic ESCC with histological node-negative, or one or two positive nodes, the supraclavicular and stations 2, 4, 5, and 7 LNs should be delineated as clinical target volume of postoperative prophylactic irradiation, and upper abdominal LNs should be excluded. While for midthoracic ESCC with three or more positive nodes, upper abdominal LNs should also be included. The length of tumor and histological differentiation should be considered comprehensively to design the clinical target volume for radiotherapy. PMID

  4. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy is associated with greater recurrence-free survival than stereotactic body radiotherapy for clinical stage I lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Lorraine D; Echeverria, Alfredo E; Samuelian, Jason; Mayor, Jessica; Casal, Roberto F; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Omer, Shuab; Preventza, Ourania; Mai, Weiyuan; Chen, George; Simpson, Katherine H; Moghanaki, Drew; Zhu, Angela W

    2017-08-16

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent data suggest that in operable patients, stereotactic body radiotherapy produces outcomes comparable to those of surgical resection. In veterans with early non-small cell lung cancer, we compared the outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy and video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 183 patients (94.0% male) with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (n = 56) or video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (n = 127) from 2009 to 2014. Propensity matching was used to produce more comparable groups. Primary end points were tumor control and overall, recurrence-free, and lung-cancer-specific survival, as estimated by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis. Multivariable analysis was used to identify independent predictors. In the overall cohort, the patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy were older than the patients who received video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (median age, 79.5 vs 64 years) and had more comorbidities. In the 37 propensity-matched pairs, the 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 54.3% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 90.6% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P = .0038). Actuarial lung cancer-specific 3-year survival was 78.1% (stereotactic body radiotherapy) versus 93.6% (video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy) (P = .055). One-year overall, 3-year overall, and 3-year recurrence-free survivals were 89.2%, 52.9%, and 38.5% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 94.6%, 85.7%, and 82.8% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P < .005 for all), respectively. In multivariable analysis, stereotactic body radiotherapy independently predicted recurrence and poorer survival. In veteran patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy resulted in better

  5. [Clinical implementation of dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy].

    PubMed

    Yao, Weirong; Xu, Shouping; Du Lei; Xie, Chuanbin; Ma, Lin

    2012-09-01

    To implement dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for helical tomotherapy. Dose reconstruction was implemented on adaptive helical tomotherapy with the online megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging from a patient with nasopharyngeal cancer. The differences of isodose line between actual and planned deposition were analysis in 3D distribution, on which the hot spot and cold spot were lined. The dose delivered to these areas was modulated in later fractions to keep the planned requirement. The differences between actual and planned isodose line were shown on the image visually. The modulation to the hot spot and cold spot in later fraction corrected the incorrectly delivered dose to achieve the requirement of primary plan. The dose reconstruction and dose-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy can be implemented in adaptive helical tomotherapy.

  6. [Clinical and paraclinical follow-up after radiotherapy for head and neck cancer].

    PubMed

    Clément-Colmou, K; Troussier, I; Bardet, É; Lapeyre, M

    2015-10-01

    Head and neck cancer management often involves heavy multimodal treatments including radiotherapy. Despite the improvement of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, acute and late toxicities remain important. After such treatment, patients have to face different potential problems, depending on the post-therapeutic delay. In this way, short-term follow-up permits to appreciate the healing of acute toxicities and response to treatment. Long-term follow-up aims to recognize second primitive tumours and distant failure, and to detect and manage late toxicities. Medical and psychosocial supportive cares are essential, even after several years of complete remission. The objective of this article is to review the modalities of short-term and long-term follow-up of patients who receive a radiotherapy for head and neck cancer.

  7. State-of-the-art radiotherapy in the management of clinically localized prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bermudez, R Scott; Izaguirre, Alejandra; Roach, Mack

    2007-02-01

    Four Phase III trials demonstrating higher prostate-specific antigen control rates in prostate cancer patients treated with higher doses of radiation have changed the standard of care. Emerging on-line technologies, improved imaging and computer algorithms, combined with an improved understanding of how best to apply them, have allowed radiation oncologists to move ever closer to the optimal application of curative radiation. This technology allows a higher dose to be delivered to tumor-bearing areas while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissues. Real-time adaptive techniques have made each step more accurate, and commercialization has increasingly moved these advances further into the community setting. Phase III trials have also helped to define the role of hormonal therapy in combination with radiation and the benefits of prophylactic pelvic nodal radiotherapy in subsets of patients. We have also learnt how to optimize the use of prostate-specific antigen to better determine success and failure following radiotherapy.

  8. Clinical benefits of new immobilization system for hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma by helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Zhou, Yong-Kang; Chen, Yi-Xing; Shi, Shi-Ming; Zeng, Zhao-Chong

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive clinical evaluation was conducted, assessing the Body Pro-Lok immobilization and positioning system to facilitate hypofractionated radiotherapy of intrahepatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using helical tomotherapy to improve treatment precision. Clinical applications of the Body Pro-Lok system were investigated (as above) in terms of interfractional and intrafractional setup errors and compressive abdominal breath control. To assess interfractional setup errors, a total of 42 patients who were given 5 to 20 fractions of helical tomotherapy for intrahepatic HCC were analyzed. Overall, 15 patients were immobilized using simple vacuum cushion (group A), and the Body Pro-Lok system was used in 27 patients (group B), performing megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans 196 times and 435 times, respectively. Pretreatment MVCT scans were registered to the planning kilovoltage computed tomography (KVCT) for error determination, and group comparisons were made. To establish intrafractional setup errors, 17 patients with intrahepatic HCC were selected at random for immobilization by Body Pro-Lok system, undergoing MVCT scans after helical tomotherapy every week. A total of 46 MVCT re-scans were analyzed for this purpose. In researching breath control, 12 patients, randomly selected, were immobilized by Body Pro-Lok system and subjected to 2-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans, with compressive abdominal control or in freely breathing states, respectively. Respiratory-induced liver motion was then compared. Mean interfractional setup errors were as follows: (1) group A: X, 2.97 ± 2.47mm; Y, 4.85 ± 4.04mm; and Z, 3.77 ± 3.21mm; pitch, 0.66 ± 0.62°; roll, 1.09 ± 1.06°; and yaw, 0.85 ± 0.82°; and (2) group B: X, 2.23 ± 1.79mm; Y, 4.10 ± 3.36mm; and Z, 1.67 ± 1.91mm; pitch, 0.45 ± 0.38°; roll, 0.77 ± 0.63°; and yaw, 0.52 ± 0.49°. Between-group differences were statistically significant in 6 directions (p < 0.05). Mean intrafractional setup

  9. Combination ibandronate and radiotherapy for the treatment of bone metastases: Clinical evaluation and radiologic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Vassiliou, Vassilios; Kalogeropoulou, Christine; Christopoulos, Christos; Solomou, Ekaterini; Leotsinides, Michael; Kardamakis, Dimitrios . E-mail: kardim@med.upatras.gr

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Ibandronate is a single-nitrogen, noncyclic bisphosphonate with proven efficacy for reducing metastatic bone pain. In this study, we assessed the palliative effects of combined ibandronate and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients with bone metastases from various solid tumors received external-beam radiotherapy, 30-40 Gy over 3-4.5, weeks combined with 10 cycles of monthly intravenous ibandronate, 6 mg. Results: After combined therapy, mean bone pain scores (graded from 0 to 10) were reduced from 6.3 at baseline to 0.8 after 3 months, with further reductions at later time points (all p < 0.001). Opioid use decreased from 84% of patients at baseline (38/45) to 24% (11/45) at 3 months, with further subsequent reductions (all p < 0.001). Mean performance status and functioning scores also significantly improved. Bone density (assessed by computed tomography scan) increased by 20% vs. baseline at 3 months, 46% at 6 months, and 73% at 10 months (all p < 0.001). Lesion improvement was also demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment was well tolerated with no renal toxicity. Conclusions: In this pilot study, combined radiotherapy and ibandronate provided substantial bone pain relief and increased bone density. Computed tomography-based or magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations offer objective methods for assessing therapeutic outcomes.

  10. Radiotherapy for malignancy in patients with scleroderma: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, Douglas G.; Miller, Robert C.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Osborn, Thomas G.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency of acute and chronic adverse effects in patients with scleroderma who receive radiotherapy for treatment of cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed of 20 patients with scleroderma who received radiotherapy. Acute and chronic toxic effects attributable to radiotherapy were analyzed, and freedom from radiation-related toxicity was calculated. Results: Of the 20 patients, 15 had acute toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher toxicity for 3 patients. Seven patients had self-limited Grade 1 or 2 radiation dermatitis, and no patient had Grade 3 or higher radiation dermatitis. Thirteen patients had chronic toxic effects, with Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity for 3 patients. The median estimated time to any grade chronic toxicity was 0.4 years, and the median estimated time to Grade 3 or higher chronic toxicity has not been reached. Conclusions: The results suggest that although some patients with scleroderma treated with radiation experience considerable toxic effects, the occurrence of Grade 3 or higher toxicity may be less than previously anticipated.

  11. Multiple sclerosis, brain radiotherapy, and risk of neurotoxicity: The Mayo Clinic experience

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C. . E-mail: miller.robert@mayo.edu; Lachance, Daniel H.; Lucchinetti, Claudia F.; Keegan, B. Mark; Gavrilova, Ralitza H.; Brown, Paul D.; Weinshenker, Brian G.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was a retrospective assessment of neurotoxicity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) receiving external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to the brain. Methods and Materials: We studied 15 consecutively treated patients with MS who received brain EBRT. Neurologic toxicity was assessed with the Common Toxicity Criteria v.3.0. Results: Median follow-up for the 5 living patients was 6.0 years (range, 3.3-27.4 years). No exacerbation of MS occurred in any patient during EBRT. Five patients had Grade 4 neurologic toxicity and 1 had possible Grade 5 toxicity. Kaplan-Meier estimated risk of neurotoxicity greater than Grade 4 at 5 years was 57% (95% confidence interval, 27%-82%). Toxicity occurred at 37.5 to 54.0 Gy at a median of 1.0 year (range, 0.2-4.3 years) after EBRT. Univariate analysis showed an association between opposed-field irradiation of the temporal lobes, central white matter, and brainstem and increased risk of neurotoxicity (p < 0.04). Three of 6 cases of toxicity occurred in patients treated before 1986. Conclusions: External beam radiotherapy of the brain in patients with MS may be associated with an increased risk of neurotoxicity compared with patients without demyelinating illnesses. However, this risk is associated with treatment techniques that may not be comparable to modern, conformal radiotherapy.

  12. A preclinical rodent model of acute radiation-induced lung injury after ablative focal irradiation reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Lee, Hae-June; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Eun, Sung Ho; Lee, Jung Il; Park, Kwangwoo; Lee, Ji Min; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-07-01

    In a previous study, we established an image-guided small-animal micro-irradiation system mimicking clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this study was to develop a rodent model of acute phase lung injury after ablative irradiation. A radiation dose of 90 Gy was focally delivered to the left lung of C57BL/6 mice using a small animal stereotactic irradiator. At days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 14 after irradiation, the lungs were perfused with formalin for fixation and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Masson's trichrome. At days 7 and 14 after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (CT) images of the lung were taken and lung functional measurements were performed with a flexiVent™ system. Gross morphological injury was evident 9 days after irradiation of normal lung tissues and dynamic sequential events occurring during the acute phase were validated by histopathological analysis. CT images of the mouse lungs indicated partial obstruction located in the peripheral area of the left lung. Significant alteration in inspiratory capacity and tissue damping were detected on day 14 after irradiation. An animal model of radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) in the acute phase reflecting clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy was established and validated with histopathological and functional analysis. This model enhances our understanding of the dynamic sequential events occurring in the acute phase of radiation-induced lung injury induced by ablative dose focal volume irradiation.

  13. Clinical management of gastroesophageal junction tumors: past and recent evidences for the role of radiotherapy in the multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Francesco; Morganti, Alessio G; Di Matteo, Francesco M; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Valentini, Vincenzo

    2014-02-05

    Gastroesophageal cancers (such as esophageal, gastric and gastroesophageal-junction -GEJ- lesions) are worldwide a leading cause of death being relatively rare but highly aggressive. In the past years, a clear shift in the location of upper gastrointestinal tract tumors has been recorded, both affecting the scientific research and the modern clinical practice. The integration of pre- or peri-operative multimodal approaches, as radiotherapy and chemotherapy (often combined), seems promising to further improve clinical outcome for such presentations. In the past, the definition of GEJ led to controversies and confusion: GEJ tumors have been managed either grouped to gastric or esophageal lesions, following slightly different surgical, radiotherapeutic and systemic approaches. Recently, the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) changed the staging and classification system of GEJ to harmonize some staging issues for esophageal and gastric cancer. This review discusses the most relevant historical and recent evidences of neoadjuvant treatment involving Radiotherapy for GEJ tumors, and describes the efficacy of such treatment in the frame of multimodal integrated therapies, from the new point of view of the recent classification of such tumors.

  14. Development, physical properties and clinical applicability of a mechanical Multileaf Collimator for the use in Cobalt-60 radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Marco; Echner, Gernot; Runz, Armin; Baumann, Martin; Xu, Mark; Ueltzhöffer, Stefan; Häring, Peter; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2015-04-21

    According to the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) there are 2348 Cobalt-60 (Co-60) teletherapy units worldwide, most of them in low and middle income countries, compared to 11046 clinical accelerators. To improve teletherapy with Co-60, a mechanical Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) was developed, working with pneumatic pressure and thus independent of electricity supply. Instead of tungsten, brass was used as leaf material to make the mechanical MLC more affordable. The physical properties and clinical applicability of this mechanical MLC are presented here. The leakage strongly depends on the fieldsize of the therapy unit due to scatter effects. The maximum transmission through the leaves measured 2.5 cm from the end-to-end gap, within a field size of 20 cm × 30 cm defined by jaws of the therapy unit at 80 cm SAD, amounts 4.2%, normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field, created by the mechanical MLC. Within a precollimated field size of 12.5 cm × 12.5 cm, the end-to-end leakage is 6.5% normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field as well. This characteristic is clinically acceptable considering the criteria for non-IMRT MLCs of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 60601-2-1). The penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was measured to be 9.14 mm in plane and 8.38 mm cross plane. The clinical applicability of the designed mechanical MLC was affirmed by measurements relating to all relevant clinical properties such as penumbra, leakage, output factors and field widths. Hence this novel device presents an apt way forward to make radiotherapy with conformal fields possible in low-infrastructure environments, using gantry based Co-60 therapy units.

  15. Development, physical properties and clinical applicability of a mechanical Multileaf Collimator for the use in Cobalt-60 radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhans, Marco; Echner, Gernot; Runz, Armin; Baumann, Martin; Xu, Mark; Ueltzhöffer, Stefan; Häring, Peter; Schlegel, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    According to the Directory of Radiotherapy Centres (DIRAC) there are 2348 Cobalt-60 (Co-60) teletherapy units worldwide, most of them in low and middle income countries, compared to 11046 clinical accelerators. To improve teletherapy with Co-60, a mechanical Multi-Leaf Collimator (MLC) was developed, working with pneumatic pressure and thus independent of electricity supply. Instead of tungsten, brass was used as leaf material to make the mechanical MLC more affordable. The physical properties and clinical applicability of this mechanical MLC are presented here. The leakage strongly depends on the fieldsize of the therapy unit due to scatter effects. The maximum transmission through the leaves measured 2.5 cm from the end-to-end gap, within a field size of 20 cm × 30 cm defined by jaws of the therapy unit at 80 cm SAD, amounts 4.2%, normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field, created by the mechanical MLC. Within a precollimated field size of 12.5 cm × 12.5 cm, the end-to-end leakage is 6.5% normalized to an open 10 cm × 10 cm field as well. This characteristic is clinically acceptable considering the criteria for non-IMRT MLCs of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC 60601-2-1). The penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was measured to be 9.14 mm in plane and 8.38 mm cross plane. The clinical applicability of the designed mechanical MLC was affirmed by measurements relating to all relevant clinical properties such as penumbra, leakage, output factors and field widths. Hence this novel device presents an apt way forward to make radiotherapy with conformal fields possible in low-infrastructure environments, using gantry based Co-60 therapy units.

  16. Charged Particle Therapy Steps Into the Clinical Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberer, Th.

    Beams of heavy charged particles like protons or carbon ions represent the ideal tool for the treatment of deep-seated, inoperable and radioresistant tumors. For more than 4 decades research with beams of charged particles has been performed. In total more than 40000 patients have been treated, mostly using protons being delivered by accelerators that were designed for basic research centers. In Berkeley, USA heavier particles like helium or neon ions were used to conduct clinical trials until 1992. Based on that somewhat limited technological standard and triggered by the promising results from Berkeley the first dedicated charged particle facilities were constructed. In order to maximally exploit the advantageous physical and radiobiological characteristics of these beams enormous effort was put into developing dynamic beam delivery techniques and tailoring the capabilities of the accelerators, the planning systems and the quality assurance procedures and equipment to the requirements resulting from these new treatment modalities. Active beam delivery systems integrated in rotating gantries, if necessary, will allow the production of superior dose distributions that precisely follow the medical prescription. The technological progress being made during the last 10 years defines the state of the art of the upcoming next-generation facilities for the clinical environment in Europe and Japan.

  17. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  18. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lips, Irene M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Kotte, Alexis N.T.J.; Leerdam, Monique E. van; Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  19. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: A Review of Clinical Experiences and Preclinical Research, with an Emphasis on DNA Damage/Repair.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Osama; Sishc, Brock J; Saha, Janapriya; Pompos, Arnold; Rahimi, Asal; Story, Michael D; Davis, Anthony J; Kim, D W Nathan

    2017-06-09

    Compared to conventional photon-based external beam radiation (PhXRT), carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) has superior dose distribution, higher linear energy transfer (LET), and a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This enhanced RBE is driven by a unique DNA damage signature characterized by clustered lesions that overwhelm the DNA repair capacity of malignant cells. These physical and radiobiological characteristics imbue heavy ions with potent tumoricidal capacity, while having the potential for simultaneously maximally sparing normal tissues. Thus, CIRT could potentially be used to treat some of the most difficult to treat tumors, including those that are hypoxic, radio-resistant, or deep-seated. Clinical data, mostly from Japan and Germany, are promising, with favorable oncologic outcomes and acceptable toxicity. In this manuscript, we review the physical and biological rationales for CIRT, with an emphasis on DNA damage and repair, as well as providing a comprehensive overview of the translational and clinical data using CIRT.

  20. Carbon Ion Radiotherapy: A Review of Clinical Experiences and Preclinical Research, with an Emphasis on DNA Damage/Repair

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Osama; Sishc, Brock J.; Saha, Janapriya; Pompos, Arnold; Rahimi, Asal; Story, Michael D.; Davis, Anthony J.; Kim, D.W. Nathan

    2017-01-01

    Compared to conventional photon-based external beam radiation (PhXRT), carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) has superior dose distribution, higher linear energy transfer (LET), and a higher relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This enhanced RBE is driven by a unique DNA damage signature characterized by clustered lesions that overwhelm the DNA repair capacity of malignant cells. These physical and radiobiological characteristics imbue heavy ions with potent tumoricidal capacity, while having the potential for simultaneously maximally sparing normal tissues. Thus, CIRT could potentially be used to treat some of the most difficult to treat tumors, including those that are hypoxic, radio-resistant, or deep-seated. Clinical data, mostly from Japan and Germany, are promising, with favorable oncologic outcomes and acceptable toxicity. In this manuscript, we review the physical and biological rationales for CIRT, with an emphasis on DNA damage and repair, as well as providing a comprehensive overview of the translational and clinical data using CIRT. PMID:28598362

  1. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: preclinical and early clinical data.

    PubMed

    Reboul, François L

    2004-02-01

    Over the past 20 years, combined treatment with radiotherapy and second-generation chemotherapy drugs was extensively studied in patients with locally advanced NSCLC and became the standard over radiotherapy alone in patients with good performance status. Radiosensitizing properties of cisplatin have been identified in the laboratory. Close temporal administration of cisplatin and radiation is mandatory for enhanced antitumor efficacy, but results in significant toxicity to normal tissues. Early clinical studies demonstrated that the concurrent administration of cisplatin during STD-RT was feasible, with acceptable esophageal toxicity, and had the potential of significantly improving locoregional control. Carboplatin administered concurrently with accelerated HFX-RT was responsible for a higher rate of esophageal toxicity. Further improvement in survival also requires an effective treatment of micro-metastatic disease through full-dose delivery of cytotoxic drugs and the addition of at least one more active drug in conjunction with cisplatin and radiotherapy to further improve locoregional control of the disease. In most clinical studies, etoposide was the second drug of choice because of its own radiosensitizing properties and possible synergy with cisplatin. In numerous phase II studies, concurrent radiotherapy and PE resulted in reproducible results in terms of local control (30%-40%), median survival (15-18 months), survival at 2 years (35%-40%), and survival at 5 years (25%-30%). In phase III studies, these results were shown to be superior to radiotherapy alone and to induction chemotherapy followed by STD-RT. The question of the potential benefit of HFX-RT combined with PE has been addressed in phase II and III studies. At this time, there is no firm evidence that concurrent chemotherapy with HFX-RT is superior to concurrent chemotherapy with STD-RT in terms of local control and survival. Only a significant benefit in terms of local control or survival would

  2. Fatigue in advanced cancer patients attending an outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic as screened by the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Koo, Kaitlin; Zhang, Liying; Jon, Florencia; Dennis, Kristopher; Holden, Lori; Nguyen, Janet; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Chow, Edward

    2012-05-01

    Advanced cancer patients present with a variety of physical and psychological symptoms. Fatigue is one such symptom which reduces overall quality of life and is difficult to manage. The purpose of this study was to report the presence, severity, and correlating factors of fatigue in advanced cancer patients attending an outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic. Patients referred to the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program between January 1999 and October 2009 completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) prior to consultation. Demographic information including age, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), gender, and primary cancer sites were collected. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine relationships between demographic information, other ESAS items, and levels of fatigue. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression analysis was used to determine the most significant predictors of fatigue. A p value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 1,397 patients completed the ESAS prior to consultation. Median age was 68 years (range, 21-95), median KPS was 60 (range, 10-100), and slightly more males completed the ESAS (53.0%). Common primary cancers were of the lung (35.8%), breast (20.7%), and prostate (17.7%). Only 179 (12.8%) patients reported no fatigue; the majority of patients reported moderate (31.8%) or severe (34.4%) fatigue. A low KPS (p < 0.0001), being female (p = 0.0056), or being referred for bone metastases (p = 0.0185) significantly correlated with higher levels of fatigue. Patients with a genitourinary primary cancer (p = 0.0078) and/or referred for malignant spinal cord compression (p = 0.0004) reported less fatigue. All other ESAS items were significantly related to fatigue. The most significant predictors of fatigue were pain (p < 0.0001, odds ratio (OR) = 1.07), nausea (p = 0.0010, OR = 1.10), depression (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.10), drowsiness (p < 0.0001, OR = 1.33), dyspnea (p = 0.0003, OR = 1

  3. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  4. Applications of synchrotron X-rays to radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blattmann, H.; Gebbers, J.-O.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Bravin, A.; Le Duc, G.; Burkard, W.; Di Michiel, M.; Djonov, V.; Slatkin, D. N.; Stepanek, J.; Laissue, J. A.

    2005-08-01

    Radiotherapy is among the most useful treatments of cancer. Penetrating radiation (ionizing particles or bremsstrahlung photons) is aimed toward the tumor-bearing target, gradually delivering as high radiation to it as is usefully suppressive of tumor growth, yet tolerated by normal vital tissues inevitably irradiated with the tumor. The high collimation and dose rate of synchrotron X-ray beams, even when monochromatized, favor radiotherapy. Photon activation therapy, tomotherapy, microbeam radiation therapy, and radiosurgery mediated by synchrotron wigglers are conceptually promising for difficult tumors. Radiotherapy of malignant brain tumors in rats has been encouraging, but suitable beam lines exist at only a few research facilities and much basic work must be done before the promise of synchrotron-based radiotherapy can be realized clinically.

  5. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured. PMID:27579310

  6. Localized Low-Dose Radiotherapy for Follicular Lymphoma: History, Clinical Results, Mechanisms of Action, and Future Outlooks

    SciTech Connect

    Ganem, Gerard; Cartron, Guillaume; Girinsky, Theodore; Haas, Rick L.M.; Cosset, Jean Marc; Solal-Celigny, Philippe

    2010-11-15

    The extreme radiosensitivity of indolent lymphomas was reported in the early years of radiotherapy (RT). The efficacy of low-dose total body irradiation (1.5-2 Gy) was particularly demonstrative. Higher doses were considered appropriate for localized disease. The optimal (or conventional) dose of curative RT derived from the early studies was determined to be 30-35 Gy. Nevertheless, in older series addressing the tumoricidal radiation dose in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, investigators noted that a significant number of 'nodular' lymphomas were controlled with a dose of <22 Gy for >3 years. The idea of reintroducing localized low-dose radiotherapy (LDRT) for indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas came from a clinical observation. The first study showing the high efficacy of LDRT (4 Gy in two fractions of 2 Gy within 3 days) in selected patients with chemoresistant, indolent, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas was published in 1994. Since this first report, at least eight series of patients treated with localized LDRT have been published, showing a 55% complete response rate in irradiated sites, with a median duration of 15-42 months. How LDRT induces lymphoma cell death remains partly unknown. However, some important advances have recently been reported. Localized LDRT induces an apoptosis of follicular lymphoma cells. This apoptotic cell death elicits an immune response mediated by macrophages and dendritic cells. Follicular lymphoma is probably an ideal model to explore these mechanisms. This review also discusses the future of LDRT for follicular lymphoma.

  7. Comprehensive Evaluation of Personal, Clinical, and Radiation Dosimetric Parameters for Acute Skin Reaction during Whole Breast Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jung Ae; Yoon, Won Sup; Lee, Nam Kwon; Park, Young Je; Lee, Suk; Kim, Chul Yong; Son, Gil Soo

    2016-01-01

    Skin reaction is major problem during whole breast radiotherapy. To identify factors related to skin reactions during whole breast radiotherapy, various personal, clinical, and radiation dosimetric parameters were evaluated. From January 2012 to December 2013, a total of 125 patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant whole breast irradiation were retrospectively reviewed. All patients had both whole breast irradiation and boost to the tumour bed. Skin reaction was measured on the first day of boost therapy based on photography of the radiation field and medical records. For each area of axilla and inferior fold, the intensity score of erythema (score 1 to 5) and extent (score 0 to 1) were summed. The relationship of various parameters to skin reaction was evaluated using chi-square and linear regression tests. The V 100 (volume receiving 100% of prescribed radiation dose, p < 0.001, both axilla and inferior fold) and age (p = 0.039 for axilla and 0.026 for inferior fold) were significant parameters in multivariate analyses. The calculated axilla dose (p = 0.003) and breast separation (p = 0.036) were also risk factors for axilla and inferior fold, respectively. Young age and large V 100 are significant factors for acute skin reaction that can be simply and cost-effectively measured.

  8. Validation of a Predictive Model for Survival in Metastatic Cancer Patients Attending an Outpatient Palliative Radiotherapy Clinic

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, Edward Abdolell, Mohamed; Panzarella, Tony; Harris, Kristin; Bezjak, Andrea; Warde, Padraig; Tannock, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate a predictive model for survival of patients attending a palliative radiotherapy clinic. Methods and Materials: We described previously a model that had good predictive value for survival of patients referred during 1999 (1). The six prognostic factors (primary cancer site, site of metastases, Karnofsky performance score, and the fatigue, appetite and shortness-of-breath items from the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) identified in this training set were extracted from the prospective database for the year 2000. We generated a partial score whereby each prognostic factor was assigned a value proportional to its prognostic weight. The sum of the partial scores for each patient was used to construct a survival prediction score (SPS). Patients were also grouped according to the number of these risk factors (NRF) that they possessed. The probability of survival at 3, 6, and 12 months was generated. The models were evaluated for their ability to predict survival in this validation set with appropriate statistical tests. Results: The median survival and survival probabilities of the training and validation sets were similar when separated into three groups using both SPS and NRF methods. There was no statistical difference in the performance of the SPS and NRF methods in survival prediction. Conclusion: Both the SPS and NRF models for predicting survival in patients referred for palliative radiotherapy have been validated. The NRF model is preferred because it is simpler and avoids the need to remember the weightings among the prognostic factors.

  9. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  10. Distal intramural spread of rectal cancer after preoperative radiotherapy: The results of a multicenter randomized clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Chmielik, Ewa; Bujko, Krzysztof . E-mail: bujko@coi.waw.pl; Nasierowska-Guttmejer, Anna; Nowacki, Marek P.; Kepka, Lucyna; Sopylo, Rafal; Wojnar, Andrzej; Majewski, Przemyslaw; Sygut, Jacek; Karmolinski, Andrzej; Huzarski, Tomasz; Wandzel, Piotr

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the extent of distal intramural spread (DIS) after preoperative radiotherapy for rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 316 patients with T{sub 3-4} primary resectable rectal cancer were randomized to receive either preoperative 5x5 Gy radiation with immediate surgery or chemoradiation (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy per fraction plus boluses of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin) with delayed surgery. The slides of the 106 patients who received short-course radiation and of the 86 who received chemoradiation were available for central microscopic evaluation of DIS. Results: The length of DIS did not differ significantly (p = 0.64) between the short-course group and the chemoradiation group and was 0 in 47% vs. 49%; 1 to 5 mm in 41% vs. 42%; 6 to 10 mm in 8% vs. 9%, and greater than 10 mm in 4% vs. 0, respectively. Among the 11 clinically complete responders, DIS was found 1 to 5 mm from the microscopically detected ulceration of the mucosa in 5 patients. The discontinuous DIS was more frequent in the chemoradiation group as compared with the short-course group (i.e., 57% vs. 16% of cases, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Approximately 1 out of 10 advanced rectal cancers after preoperative radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy was characterized by DIS of over 5 mm. No significant difference was seen in the length of DIS between the 2 groups.

  11. Treatment of pediatric patients and young adults with particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center (HIT): establishment of workflow and initial clinical data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report on establishment of workflow and clinical results of particle therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Materials and methods We treated 36 pediatric patients (aged 21 or younger) with particle therapy at HIT. Median age was 12 years (range 2-21 years), five patients (14%) were younger than 5 years of age. Indications included pilocytic astrocytoma, parameningeal and orbital rhabdomyosarcoma, skull base and cervical chordoma, osteosarcoma and adenoid-cystic carcinoma (ACC), as well as one patient with an angiofibroma of the nasopharynx. For the treatment of small children, an anesthesia unit at HIT was established in cooperation with the Department of Anesthesiology. Results Treatment concepts depended on tumor type, staging, age of the patient, as well as availability of specific study protocols. In all patients, particle radiotherapy was well tolerated and no interruptions due to toxicity had to be undertaken. During follow-up, only mild toxicites were observed. Only one patient died of tumor progression: Carbon ion radiotherapy was performed as an individual treatment approach in a child with a skull base recurrence of the previously irradiated rhabdomyosarcoma. Besides this patient, tumor recurrence was observed in two additional patients. Conclusion Clinical protocols have been generated to evaluate the real potential of particle therapy, also with respect to carbon ions in distinct pediatric patient populations. The strong cooperation between the pediatric department and the department of radiation oncology enable an interdisciplinary treatment and stream-lined workflow and acceptance of the treatment for the patients and their parents. PMID:23072718

  12. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control.

    PubMed

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine.

  13. Medical physics in radiotherapy: The importance of preserving clinical responsibilities and expanding the profession's role in research, education, and quality control

    PubMed Central

    Malicki, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Medical physicists have long had an integral role in radiotherapy. In recent decades, medical physicists have slowly but surely stepped back from direct clinical responsibilities in planning radiotherapy treatments while medical dosimetrists have assumed more responsibility. In this article, I argue against this gradual withdrawal from routine therapy planning. It is essential that physicists be involved, at least to some extent, in treatment planning and clinical dosimetry for each and every patient; otherwise, physicists can no longer be considered clinical specialists. More importantly, this withdrawal could negatively impact treatment quality and patient safety. Medical physicists must have a sound understanding of human anatomy and physiology in order to be competent partners to radiation oncologists. In addition, they must possess a thorough knowledge of the physics of radiation as it interacts with body tissues, and also understand the limitations of the algorithms used in radiotherapy. Medical physicists should also take the lead in evaluating emerging challenges in quality and safety of radiotherapy. In this sense, the input of physicists in clinical audits and risk assessment is crucial. The way forward is to proactively take the necessary steps to maintain and advance our important role in clinical medicine. PMID:25949219

  14. Evaluation of 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT radiotherapy plans for left breast cancer based on clinical dosimetric study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiyun; Chen, Xinde; He, Zhijian; Li, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to compare dosimetric differences based on three types of radiotherapy plans for postoperative left breast cancer. In particular, based on a clinical dosimetric study, the three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity- modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and VMAT plans were implemented on 15 cases of postoperative patients with left breast cancer with prescription doses of 5000cGy. Dose volume histogram (DVH) was used to analyze each evaluation index of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs). Except for homogeneous index (HI), D2, each CTV evaluation index of 3D-CRT plan was inferior to IMRT and VMAT plans (P<0.05). Compared with the VMAT plans, IMRT has a statistical significance only in Dmean, V95 (P<0.05). On the contrary, Dmean pertaining to the VMAT plan is much closer to the prescription dose with a V95 coverage rate as high as 97.44%. For the infected lung, V5, V10 of 3D-CRT were the lowest (P<0.05), while V20, V30 were the highest (P<0.05) among the three types of plans. Here, the V5, V10 of infected lung were slightly higher (P<0.05) for the VMAT and IMRT plans. Each evaluation index of the contralateral lung and heart in 3D-CRT was the lowest (P<0.05). D1 of contralateral breast was lower in both IMRT and VMAT plans, which were 1770.89±121.16cGy and 1839.92±92.77cGy, respectively. While D1 of the spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT plans was higher, which were 1990.12±61.52cGy and 1927.38±43.67cGy, respectively. When the radiation dose of 500-1500cGy was delivered to the normal tissues, 3D-CRT significantly shows the lowest volume, VMAT is relatively higher. Monitor Units (MU) and treatment time (T) of VMAT were the least, only 49.33% and 55.86% of those of IMRT. The three types of plans can meet the clinical dosimetry demands of postoperative radiotherapy for left breast cancer. The target of IMRT and VMAT plans has a better conformity, and the VMAT plan takes the advantages of less MU and treatment time

  15. Atypical Clinical Behavior of p16-Confirmed HPV-Related Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Radical Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Shaohui; Liu Feifei; Waldron, John; Ringash, Jolie; Hope, Andrew; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report atypical clinical behavior observed in human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective cohort study was conducted for all newly diagnosed OPC cases treated with radiotherapy on July 1, 2003 to April 30, 2009. HPV positivity was determined by p16 immunostaining in tumors. The incidence of additional malignancies and the pattern of distant metastases (DMs) were compared between the HPV-positive (HPV+) and HPV-negative (HPV-) cohorts. Results: HPV status was evaluated in 318 of 613 consecutive OPC cases (52%), showing 236 HPV+ and 82 HPV- patients. Compared with HPV-, HPV+ cases were less likely to have additional malignancies (prior: 11% vs. 20%, p = 0.038; synchronous: 1% vs. 9%, p = 0.001; metachronous: 6% vs. 16%, p = 0.003). Whereas the majority (10 of 12) of HPV- additional head-and-neck (HN) mucosal malignancies were in the oral cavity, there was none (0 of 7) in the HPV+ cohort (p < 0.001). HPV+ synchronous HN second primaries (SPs) were in the supraglottis, post-cricoid, and nasopharynx; metachronous HN SPs were in the glottis, supraglottis, and ethmoid plus glottis/post-cricoid region. All SPs that could be tested were HPV+. There was no difference in DM rate (10% vs. 15%, p = 0.272), but HPV+ DMs were more likely to involve multiple organs (46% vs. 0%, p = 0.005) and unusual sites. Conclusions: This study reports atypical clinical behavior seen in HPV+ OPC, including multicentric lesions in HN mucosa and DM to multiple organs and unusual sites. The frequency of these events is low, but they may have clinical implications. The routine assessment of HPV status for all OPC is warranted.

  16. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients. PMID:23391264

  17. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Nambu, Atsushi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-07

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1-10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  18. Proton radiotherapy for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical outcome and a dosimetric comparison with photons

    SciTech Connect

    Yock, Torunn . E-mail: tyock@partners.org; Schneider, Robert C.; Friedmann, Alison; Adams, Judith C.; Fullerton, Barbara; Tarbell, Nancy

    2005-11-15

    Background: Over 85% of pediatric orbital rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are cured with combined chemotherapy and radiation. However, the late effects of photon radiation compromise function and cosmetic outcome. Proton radiation can provide excellent tumor dose distributions while sparing normal tissues better than photon irradiation. Methods and Materials: Conformal 3D photon and proton radiotherapy plans were generated for children treated with proton irradiation for orbital RMS at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dose-volume histograms (90%, 50%, 10%) were generated and compared for important orbital and central nervous system structures. Average percentages of total dose prescribed were calculated based on the 3 dose-volume histogram levels for normal orbital structures for both the proton and photon plans. The percent of normal tissue spared by using protons was calculated. Results: Seven children were treated for orbital rhabdomyosarcoma with proton irradiation and standard chemotherapy. The median follow-up is 6.3 years (range, 3.5-9.7 years). Local and distant controls compare favorably to those in other published accounts. There was an advantage in limiting the dose to the brain, pituitary, hypothalamus, temporal lobes, and ipsilateral and contralateral orbital structures. Tumor size and location affect the degree of sparing of normal structures. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy is superior to 3D conformal photon radiation in the treatment of orbital RMS. Proton therapy maintains excellent tumor coverage while reducing the radiation dose to adjacent normal structures. Proton radiation therapy minimizes long-term side effects.

  19. MR-guidance – a clinical study to evaluate a shuttle- based MR-linac connection to provide MR-guided radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this clinical study is to investigate the clinical feasibility and safety of a shuttle-based MR-linac connection to provide MR-guided radiotherapy. Methods/Design A total of 40 patients with an indication for a neoadjuvant, adjuvant or definitive radiation treatment will be recruited including tumors of the head and neck region, thorax, upper gastrointestinal tract and pelvic region. All study patients will receive standard therapy, i.e. highly conformal radiation techniques like CT-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with or without concomitant chemotherapy or other antitumor medication, and additionally daily short MR scans in treatment position with the same immobilisation equipment used for irradiation for position verification and imaging of the anatomical and functional changes during the course of radiotherapy. For daily position control, skin marks and a stereotactic frame will be used for both imaging modalities. Patient transfer between the MR device and the linear accelerator will be performed with a shuttle system which uses an air-bearing patient platform for both procedures. The daily acquired MR and CT data sets will be digitally registrated, correlated with the planning CT and compared with each other regarding translational and rotational errors. Aim of this clinical study is to establish a shuttle-based approach for realising MR-guided radiotherapy for certain clinical situations. Second objectives are to compare MR-guided radiotherapy with the gold standard of CT image guidance for quality assurance of radiotherapy, to establish an appropiate MR protocol therefore, and to assess the possibility of using MR-based image guidance not only for position verification but also for adaptive strategies in radiotherapy. Discussion Compared to CT, MRI might offer the advantage of providing IGRT without delivering an additional radiation dose to the patients and the possibility of optimisation of adaptive therapy

  20. Clinical and biological factors affecting response to radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Homer, J J; Slevin, N J; Musgrove, B T; Sloan, P; Price, P; West, C M L

    2007-10-01

    The main aim of this article was to review the clinical and biological factors that have been shown to influence the response of the head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) to primary radiotherapy and briefly discuss how some of these factors could be exploited to improve outcome. Medline based search covering 1982-2006 to identify the HNSCC literature where the effect of clinical and biological factors on locoregional control and overall survival were investigated. Clinical factors are routinely used in management decisions. Nevertheless, identically staged tumours receiving the same treatment may have different outcomes. Biological factors such as hypoxia, proliferation and radio-sensitivity play an important role in radiation response. However, these are not currently used in practise because tests that are clinically reliable and feasible are not available. High-quality translational research will allow us to develop biological tests that can be used in routine clinical practise to tailor individual treatment, with the ability to improve patient outcome further by modifying the underlying tumour biology.

  1. Inhalation anesthesia in experimental radiotherapy: a reliable and time-saving system for multifractionation studies in a clinical department

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    An inhalation anesthesia system has been employed to overcome several of the limitations associated with the use of sodium pentobarbital and other i.p. administered anesthetics in experimental radiotherapy. The described method is reliable and time-saving. The depth and duration of anesthesia are easily controllable. Only 4 deaths have occurred with more than 6000 animal exposures. The use of polystyrene jigs is shown to provide adequate thermal isolation. Oxygen as a carrier of the anesthetic agent is expected to prevent a reduced tissue oxygenation and its radiobiological consequences. The whole system is constructed as a mobile unit in which up to 16 mice or rats can be anesthetized simultaneously and irradiated in a single field with clinical treatment equipment during short time intervals between patient irradiations. The described advantages of this method make it specially suited for experiments with protracted fractionation schedules.

  2. Design of, and some clinical experience with, a novel optical surface measurement system in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, G. J.; Marchant, T. E.; Parkhurst, J. M.; Sharrock, P. J.; Whitfield, G.; Moore, C. J.

    2010-04-01

    Optical imaging is becoming more prevalent in image guided radiotherapy as a complementary technology to traditional ionizing radiation based modalities. We present a novel structured light based device that can capture a patient's body surface topology with a large field of view and high spatial and temporal resolution. The system is composed of three cross-calibrated sensor heads that enable 'wrap around' imaging previously unavailable with similar line of sight optical techniques. The system has been installed in a treatment bunker at the Christie Hospital alongside an Elekta linear accelerator equipped with cone beam CT (CBCT) on-board imaging. In this paper we describe the system, focussing on the methodologies required to create a robust and practical device. We show examples of measurements made to ascertain its repeatability and accuracy, and present some initial experiences in using the device for pre-treatment patient set-up.

  3. Prospective evaluation of a hydrogel spacer for rectal separation in dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background As dose-escalation in prostate cancer radiotherapy improves cure rates, a major concern is rectal toxicity. We prospectively assessed an innovative approach of hydrogel injection between prostate and rectum to reduce the radiation dose to the rectum and thus side effects in dose-escalated prostate radiotherapy. Methods Acute toxicity and planning parameters were prospectively evaluated in patients with T1-2 N0 M0 prostate cancer receiving dose-escalated radiotherapy after injection of a hydrogel spacer. Before and after hydrogel injection, we performed MRI scans for anatomical assessment of rectal separation. Radiotherapy was planned and administered to 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Results From eleven patients scheduled for spacer injection the procedure could be performed in ten. In one patient hydrodissection of the Denonvillier space was not possible. Radiation treatment planning showed low rectal doses despite dose-escalation to the target. In accordance with this, acute rectal toxicity was mild without grade 2 events and there was complete resolution within four to twelve weeks. Conclusions This prospective study suggests that hydrogel injection is feasible and may prevent rectal toxicity in dose-escalated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Further evaluation is necessary including the definition of patients who might benefit from this approach. Trial registration: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003273. PMID:23336502

  4. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 53: quality assurance for clinical radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B; Doppke, K; Hunt, M; Kutcher, G; Starkschall, G; Stern, R; Van Dyke, J

    1998-10-01

    In recent years, the sophistication and complexity of clinical treatment planning and treatment planning systems has increased significantly, particularly including three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning systems, and the use of conformal treatment planning and delivery techniques. This has led to the need for a comprehensive set of quality assurance (QA) guidelines that can be applied to clinical treatment planning. This document is the report of Task Group 53 of the Radiation Therapy Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The purpose of this report is to guide and assist the clinical medical physicist in developing and implementing a comprehensive but viable program of quality assurance for modern radiotherapy treatment planning. The scope of the QA needs for treatment planning is quite broad, encompassing image-based definition of patient anatomy, 3D beam descriptions for complex beams including multileaf collimator apertures, 3D dose calculation algorithms, and complex plan evaluation tools including dose volume histograms. The Task Group recommends an organizational framework for the task of creating a QA program which is individualized to the needs of each institution and addresses the issues of acceptance testing, commissioning the planning system and planning process, routine quality assurance, and ongoing QA of the planning process. This report, while not prescribing specific QA tests, provides the framework and guidance to allow radiation oncology physicists to design comprehensive and practical treatment planning QA programs for their clinics.

  5. The potential clinical relevance of visible particles in parenteral drugs.

    PubMed

    Doessegger, Lucette; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Szczesny, Piotr; Rockstroh, Helmut; Kallmeyer, Georg; Langenkamp, Anja; Herrmann, Joerg; Famulare, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Visible particulates (VP) are one subclass of defects seen during the final visual inspection of parenteral products and are currently one of the top ten reasons for recalls 1,2. The risk posed by particles is still unclear with limited experience reported in humans but remains an important consideration during the manufacture and use of parenteral products. From the experimental and clinical knowledge of the distribution of particulate matter in the body, clinical complications would include events occurring around parenteral administration e.g., as a result of mechanical pulmonary artery obstruction and injection site reaction, or sub-acute or chronic events e.g., granuloma. The challenge is to better understand the implication for patients of single vials with VP and align the risk with the probabilistic detection process used by manufacturers for accept/reject decisions of individual units of product.

  6. Clinical Outcome in Posthysterectomy Cervical Cancer Patients Treated With Concurrent Cisplatin and Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy: Comparison With Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, M.-F.; Tseng, C.-J.; Tseng, C.-C.; Kuo, Y.-C.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chen, W.-C. . E-mail: rto_chen@yahoo.com.tw

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: To assess local control and acute and chronic toxicity with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as adjuvant treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and February 2006, 68 patients at high risk of cervical cancer after hysterectomy were treated with adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2}) for six cycles every week. Thirty-three patients received adjuvant radiotherapy by IMRT. Before the IMRT series was initiated, 35 other patients underwent conventional four-field radiotherapy (Box-RT). The two groups did not differ significantly in respect of clinicopathologic and treatment factors. Results: IMRT provided compatible local tumor control compared with Box-RT. The actuarial 1-year locoregional control for patients in the IMRT and Box-RT groups was 93% and 94%, respectively. IMRT was well tolerated, with significant reduction in acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities compared with the Box-RT group (GI 36 vs. 80%, p = 0.00012; GU 30 vs. 60%, p = 0.022). Furthermore, the IMRT group had lower rates of chronic GI and GU toxicities than the Box-RT patients (GI 6 vs. 34%, p = 0.002; GU 9 vs. 23%, p = 0.231). Conclusion: Our results suggest that IMRT significantly improved the tolerance to adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with compatible locoregional control compared with conventional Box-RT. However, longer follow-up and more patients are needed to confirm the benefits of IMRT.

  7. Clinical observational study of conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan chemotherapy in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, P; Zhang, Z H; Li, L; Du, X L; Shan, C P; Sheng, X G

    2015-04-22

    This retrospective study aimed to observe the cura-tive effect and adverse reactions of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan chemotherapy in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian carcinoma. The chemoradiotherapy group (N = 22) received 15 mv X-rays with 1.8 to 2.0 Gy/f/d radiation, 5 times per week. The total dose was 45 to 65 Gy; the median dose was 52.5 Gy. Topotecan chemotherapy (2.0 mg/m(2)) was administered after the first week of radiotherapy on days 1, 8, and 15; it was repeated every 28 days. The only che-motherapy group (N = 20) received topotecan chemotherapy (4.0 mg/m(2)) in the first week, and the dose was administered on days 1, 8, and 15; it was repeated every 28 days. The median follow-up times were 18.5 months (2 to 37.7) and 10.8 months (1.5 to 29.6) in the chemoradiotherapy and in the only chemotherapy groups, respectively. The total response rates were 42.1% (8/19) and 11.1% (2/18), respectively. The clinical benefit rates were 68.4% (13/19) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.05). The median disease progression-free periods were 9.8 and 6.6 months, respectively, with significant difference (P < 0.001). The median survival times were 19.7 and 12.5 months, respective-ly, with significant difference (P < 0.05). The degrees of digestive tract reaction rates were 26.3% (5/19) and 16.7% (3/18), whereas the hematology toxicity rates were 21.1% (4/19) and 22.2% (4/18), respectively, with no significant difference (P > 0.05). As three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy combined with topotecan che-motherapy had good curative effect on platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, with mild adverse reactions, this tech-nique can be used as a remedial measure.

  8. Development of a small animal model to simulate clinical stereotactic body radiotherapy-induced central and peripheral lung injuries

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhen-Yu; Eun, Sung Ho; Park, Kwangwoo; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Il; Lee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Ji Min; Story, Michael D.; Cho, Jaeho

    2014-01-01

    Given the tremendous potential of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), investigations of the underlying radiobiology associated with SBRT-induced normal tissue injury are of paramount importance. This study was designed to develop an animal model that simulates centrally and peripherally located clinical SBRT-induced lung injuries. A 90-Gy irradiation dose was focally delivered to the central and peripheral areas of the left mouse lung with an image-guided small-animal irradiation system. At 1, 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images of the lung were taken. Lung function measurements were performed with the Flexivent® system (SCIREQ©, Montreal, Canada). For the histopathological analysis, the lungs were fixed by perfusing with formalin, and paraffin sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's Trichrome. Gross inspection clearly indicated local lung injury confined to the central and peripheral areas of the left lung. Typical histopathological alterations corresponding to clinical manifestations were observed. The micro-CT analysis results appeared to correlate with the histopathological findings. Mouse lung tissue damping increased dramatically at central settings, compared with that at the control or peripheral settings. An animal model to simulate clinical SBRT-induced central and peripheral lung injuries was developed and validated with histopathological, radiological and functional analyses. This model increases our understanding of SBRT-induced central and peripheral lung injuries and will help to improve radiation therapy in the future. PMID:24556815

  9. Radical External Beam Radiotherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer in Japan: Changing Trends in the Patterns of Care Process Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Onishi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Masahiko; Araya, Masayuki; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To delineate changing trends in radical external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: Data from 841 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with EBRT in the Japanese Patterns of Care Study (PCS) from 1996 to 2005 were analyzed. Results: Significant increases in the proportions of patients with stage T1 to T2 disease and decrease in prostate-specific antigen values were observed. Also, there were significant increases in the percentages of patients treated with radiotherapy by their own choice. Median radiation doses were 65.0 Gy and 68.4 Gy from 1996 to 1998 and from 1999 to 2001, respectively, increasing to 70 Gy from 2003 to 2005. Moreover, conformal therapy was more frequently used from 2003 to 2005 (84.9%) than from 1996 to 1998 (49.1%) and from 1999 to 2001 (50.2%). On the other hand, the percentage of patients receiving hormone therapy from 2003 to 2005 (81.1%) was almost the same as that from 1996 to 1998 (86.3%) and from 1999 to 2001 (89.7%). Compared with the PCS in the United States, patient characteristics and patterns of treatments from 2003 to 2005 have become more similar to those in the United States than those from 1996 to 1998 and those from 1999 to 2001. Conclusions: This study indicates a trend toward increasing numbers of patients with early-stage disease and increasing proportions of patients treated with higher radiation doses with advanced equipment among Japanese prostate cancer patients treated with EBRT during 1996 to 2005 survey periods. Patterns of care for prostate cancer in Japan are becoming more similar to those in the United States.

  10. Improved Dosimetric and Clinical Outcomes With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer of Unknown Primary Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Li Baoqing; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marsano, Joseph; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Purdy, James A.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To compare differences in dosimetric, clinical, and quality-of-life endpoints among a cohort of patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT) for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 51 patients treated by radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck presenting as cervical lymph node metastasis of occult primary origin were reviewed. Twenty-four patients (47%) were treated using CRT, and 27 (53%) were treated using IMRT. The proportions of patients receiving concurrent chemotherapy were 54% and 63%, respectively. Results: The 2-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and disease-specific survival for the entire patient population were 86%, 89%, and84%, respectively. There were no significant differences in any of these endpoints with respect to radiation therapy technique (p > 0.05 for all). Dosimetric analysis revealed that the use of IMRT resulted in significant improvements with respect to mean dose and V30 to the contralateral (spared) parotid gland. In addition, mean doses to the ipsilateral inner and middle ear structures were significantly reduced with IMRT (p < 0.05 for all). The incidence of severe xerostomia in the late setting was 58% and 11% among patients treated by CRT and IMRT, respectively (p < 0.001). The percentages of patients who were G-tube dependent at 6 months after treatment were 42% and 11%, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusions: IMRT results in significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio among patients treated by radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer of unknown primary origin.

  11. Long-term side effects of radiotherapy for pediatric localized neuroblastoma : results from clinical trials NB90 and NB94.

    PubMed

    Ducassou, Anne; Gambart, Marion; Munzer, Caroline; Padovani, Laetitia; Carrie, Christian; Haas-Kogan, Daphne; Bernier-Chastagner, Valérie; Demoor, Charlotte; Claude, Line; Helfre, Sylvie; Bolle, Stéphanie; Leseur, Julie; Huchet, Aymeri; Rubie, Hervé; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Coze, Carole; Defachelles, Anne-Sophie; Marabelle, Aurélien; Ducassou, Stéphane; Devalck, Christine; Gandemer, Virginie; Munzer, Martine; Laprie, Anne

    2015-07-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most frequent indication for extracranial pediatric radiotherapy. As long-term survival of high-risk localized NB has greatly improved, we reviewed treatment-related late toxicities in pediatric patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for localized NB within two French prospective clinical trials: NB90 and NB94. From 1990-2000, 610 children were enrolled. Among these, 35 were treated with induction chemotherapy, surgery, and RT. The recommended RT dose was 24 Gy at ≤ 2 years, 34 Gy at > 2 years, ± a 5 Gy boost in both age groups. The 22 patients still alive after 5 years were analyzed. The median follow-up time was 14 years (range 5-21 years). Late effects after therapy occurred in 73 % of patients (16/22), within the RT field for 50 % (11/22). The most frequent in-field effects were musculoskeletal abnormalities (n = 7) that occurred only with doses > 31 Gy/1.5 Gy fraction (p = 0.037). Other effects were endocrine in 3 patients and second malignancies in 2 patients. Four patients presented with multiple in-field late effects only with doses > 31 Gy. After a median follow-up of 14 years, late effects with multimodality treatment were frequent. The most frequent effects were musculoskeletal abnormalities and the threshold for their occurrence was 31 Gy.

  12. A comparative study based on image quality and clinical task performance for CT reconstruction algorithms in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark A; Low, Daniel A; Li, Harold H; Michalski, Jeff M; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-07-01

    CT image reconstruction is typically evaluated based on the ability to reduce the radiation dose to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) while maintaining acceptable image quality. However, the determination of common image quality metrics, such as noise, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio, is often insufficient for describing clinical radiotherapy task performance. In this study we designed and implemented a new comparative analysis method associating image quality, radiation dose, and patient size with radiotherapy task performance, with the purpose of guiding the clinical radiotherapy usage of CT reconstruction algorithms. The iDose4iterative reconstruction algorithm was selected as the target for comparison, wherein filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was regarded as the baseline. Both phantom and patient images were analyzed. A layer-adjustable anthropomorphic pelvis phantom capable of mimicking 38-58 cm lateral diameter-sized patients was imaged and reconstructed by the FBP and iDose4 algorithms with varying noise-reduction-levels, respectively. The resulting image sets were quantitatively assessed by two image quality indices, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, and two clinical task-based indices, target CT Hounsfield number (for electron density determination) and structure contouring accuracy (for dose-volume calculations). Additionally, CT images of 34 patients reconstructed with iDose4 with six noise reduction levels were qualitatively evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point scoring mechanism. For the phantom experiments, iDose4 achieved noise reduction up to 66.1% and CNR improvement up to 53.2%, compared to FBP without considering the changes of spatial resolution among images and the clinical acceptance of reconstructed images. Such improvements consistently appeared across different iDose4 noise reduction levels, exhibiting limited interlevel noise (<5 HU) and target CT number variations (<1 HU). The radiation

  13. A comparative study based on image quality and clinical task performance for CT reconstruction algorithms in radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Dolly, Steven; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Anastasio, Mark A; Low, Daniel A; Li, Harold H; Michalski, Jeff M; Thorstad, Wade L; Gay, Hiram; Mutic, Sasa

    2016-07-08

    CT image reconstruction is typically evaluated based on the ability to reduce the radiation dose to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) while maintaining acceptable image quality. However, the determination of common image quality metrics, such as noise, contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio, is often insufficient for describing clinical radiotherapy task performance. In this study we designed and implemented a new comparative analysis method associating image quality, radiation dose, and patient size with radiotherapy task performance, with the purpose of guiding the clinical radiotherapy usage of CT reconstruction algorithms. The iDose4 iterative reconstruction algorithm was selected as the target for comparison, wherein filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction was regarded as the baseline. Both phantom and patient images were analyzed. A layer-adjustable anthropomorphic pelvis phantom capable of mimicking 38-58 cm lateral diameter-sized patients was imaged and reconstructed by the FBP and iDose4 algorithms with varying noise-reduction-levels, respectively. The resulting image sets were quantitatively assessed by two image quality indices, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, and two clinical task-based indices, target CT Hounsfield number (for electron density determination) and structure contouring accuracy (for dose-volume calculations). Additionally, CT images of 34 patients reconstructed with iDose4 with six noise reduction levels were qualitatively evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point scoring mechanism. For the phantom experiments, iDose4 achieved noise reduction up to 66.1% and CNR improvement up to 53.2%, compared to FBP without considering the changes of spatial resolution among images and the clinical acceptance of reconstructed images. Such improvements consistently appeared across different iDose4 noise reduction levels, exhibiting limited interlevel noise (< 5 HU) and target CT number variations (< 1 HU). The radiation

  14. Melanoma: Last call for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Espenel, Sophie; Vallard, Alexis; Rancoule, Chloé; Garcia, Max-Adrien; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Chargari, Cyrus; Deutsch, Eric; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma is traditionally considered to be a radioresistant tumor. However, radiotherapy and immunotherapy latest developments might upset this radiobiological dogma. Stereotactic radiotherapy allows high dose per fraction delivery, with high dose rate. More DNA lethal damages, less sublethal damages reparation, endothelial cell apoptosis, and finally clonogenic cell dysfunction are produced, resulting in improved local control. Radiotherapy can also enhance immune responses, inducing neoantigens formation, tumor antigen presentation, and cytokines release. A synergic effect of radiotherapy with immunotherapy is expected, and might lead to abscopal effects. If hadrontherapy biological properties seem able to suppress hypoxia-induced radioresistance and increase biological efficacy, ballistic advantages over photon radiations might also improve radiotherapy outcomes on usually poor prognosis locations. The present review addresses biological and clinical effects of high fraction dose, bystander effect, abscopal effect, and hadrontherapy features in melanoma. Clinical trials results are warranted to establish indications of innovative radiotherapy in melanoma.

  15. Clinical Applications of Geometrical Field Matching in Radiotherapy Based on a New Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Victor; Arenas, Meritxell; Pons, Ferran; Sempau, Josep

    2011-07-01

    A new analytical formalism has been published recently that provides all the parameters necessary for geometrical field matching in radiotherapy. The present work applies the general expressions for craniospinal irradiation, breast irradiation with a supraclavicular half-field, and breast irradiation with a supraclavicular full-field. We also explore the formalism as a tool to analyze and compare different techniques. Field matching is achieved by imposing both parallelism and coincidence between the side planes of adjacent fields. The rotation angles and either the field aperture for a certain isocenter position or the isocenter coordinates for a given field aperture are supplied. All of the already known exact solutions are reproduced. New expressions for the field aperture and for the isocenter coordinates, which were not previously available, are also computed. If tangential fields at a fixed source-to-skin distance are used together with a supraclavicular full-field, different apertures for each tangential field are required to achieve a correct match. If an isocentric technique for the tangential fields or a supraclavicular half-field is used, this complication is avoided. The breast technique with the supraclavicular half-field is recommended, because it presents several advantages with respect to the supraclavicular full-field. This formalism provides a useful tool in cases where matching of adjacent fields is necessary.

  16. Clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eonju; Kim, Tae Gyu; Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Nam, Heerim; Lee, Hyebin; Lee, Joon Hyeok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the outcomes of patients with spinal metastases from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), who were treated by stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods This retrospective study evaluated 23 patients who underwent SBRT from October 2008 to August 2012 for 36 spinal metastases from HCC. SBRT consisted of approximately 2 fractionation schedules, which were 18 to 40 Gy in 1 to 4 fractions for group A lesions (n = 15) and 50 Gy in 10 fractions for group B lesions (n = 21). Results The median follow-up period was 7 months (range, 2 to 16 months). Seven patients developed grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, and one developed grade 2 leucopenia. Compression fractures occurred in association with 25% of the lesions, with a median time to fracture of 2 months. Pain relief occurred in 92.3% and 68.4% of group A and B lesions, respectively. Radiologic response (complete and partial response) occurred in 80.0% and 61.9% of group A and B lesions, respectively. The estimated 1-year spinal-tumor progression-free survival rate was 78.5%. The median overall survival period and 1-year overall survival rate were 9 months (range, 2 to 16 months) and 25.7%, respectively. Conclusion SBRT for spinal metastases from HCC is well tolerated and effective at providing pain relief and radiologic response. Because compression fractures develop at a high rate following SBRT for spinal metastases from primary HCC, careful follow up of the patient is required. PMID:26484305

  17. Assessment of Bladder Motion for Clinical Radiotherapy Practice Using Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McBain, Catherine A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Buckley, David L.; Sykes, Jonathan S.; Green, Melanie M.; Cowan, Richard A.; Hutchinson, Charles E.; Moore, Christopher J.; Price, Patricia M.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. Methods and Materials: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. Results: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. Conclusions: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.

  18. Adjuvant treatment with concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer: a clinical experience.

    PubMed

    De Marzi, Patrizia; Frigerio, Luigi; Cipriani, Sonia; Parazzini, Fabio; Busci, Luisa; Carlini, Laura; Viganò, Riccardo; Mangili, Giorgia

    2010-03-01

    The concurrent use of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT) as adjuvant treatment after surgery in high-risk endometrial cancer has been generally considered cautiously. Recently some of us have reported preliminary data on the efficacy and tolerability of concomitant CT and RT. In this paper, we update our experience. A total of 47 patients aged >18 years and <80 years with histological diagnosis of high-risk endometrial endometrioid carcinomas entered the study. Inclusion criteria were stages IC G3, IIB, IIIA (patients with positive washing without other unfavourable prognostic factors were omitted), IIIB and IIIC. The radiation plan consisted of a total dose of 50.4 Gy, given in five fractions per week (1.8 Gy: daily dose) for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel (P) at a dose of 60 mg/m(2) was infused intravenously in 250 mL of normal saline for 1 h once weekly during RT for 5 weeks. Three further cycles of Paclitaxel, at a dose of 80 mg/m(2), have been given weekly at the end of RT. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The overall 5-year relapse-free survival was 81.8% (95% CI, 65.2-90.9). The 5-year percent overall disease-specific survival was 88.4% (95% CI, 71.1-95.6). These results, based on a larger series, support our previous data: Paclitaxel plus RT may represent an effective and well-tolerated treatment in high-risk endometrial cancer patients.

  19. Androgen deprivation therapy in combination with radiotherapy for high-risk clinically localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Tsutomu

    2012-04-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has remained the main therapeutic option for patients with advanced prostate cancer (PCa) for about 70 years. Several reports and our findings revealed that aggressive PCa can occur under a low dihydrotestosterone (DHT) level environment where the PCa of a low malignancy with high DHT dependency cannot easily occur. Low DHT levels in the prostate with aggressive PCa are probably sufficient to propagate the growth of the tumor, and the prostate with aggressive PCa can produce androgens from the adrenal precursors more autonomously than that with non-aggressive PCa does under the low testosterone environment with testicular suppression. In patients treated with ADT the pituitary-adrenal axis mediated by adrenocorticotropic hormone has a central role in the regulation of androgen synthesis. Several experimental studies have confirmed the potential benefits from the combination of ADT with radiotherapy (RT). A combination of external RT with short-term ADT is recommended based on the results of phase III randomized trials. In contrast, the combination of RT plus 6 months of ADT provides inferior survival as compared with RT plus 3 years of ADT in the treatment of locally advanced PCa. Notably, randomized trials included patients with diverse risk groups treated with older RT modalities, a variety of ADT scheduling and duration and, importantly, suboptimal RT doses. The use of ADT with higher doses of RT or newer RT modalities has to be properly assessed.

  20. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01): Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Daniel; Roxby, Paul; Kron, Tomas; Rolfo, Aldo; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment). Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated “help-desk” team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%), technical problems (46%) while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support. PMID:23776308

  1. The clinical characteristics of secondary primary tumors in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Lei, Hao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ling; Qu, Song; Liang, Xia; Wang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical characteristics associated with the risk of developing secondary primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who underwent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Data from 527 patients with biopsy-proven nonmetastatic NPC who were treated with IMRT between January 2007 and December 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. The cumulative incidence of SPTs after IMRT completion was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Intergroup differences in the cumulative incidence were determined using the log-rank test. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to confirm the risk factors associated with IMRT-induced SPTs. The median follow-up duration was 45.5 months (range, 4–97 months). Of the 527 patients, 12 (2.3%) developed posttreatment SPTs (9 men, 3 women), 6 of which were located in the irradiation field. SPTs were mostly located in the upper aerodigestive tract (n = 7), head and neck (n = 6), lungs (n = 3), and tongue (n = 2). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cumulative SPT risk rates were 0.4%, 1.4%, and 3.1%, respectively, and the mean annual growth in cumulative incidence was approximately 0.6%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cumulative in-field SPT risk rates were 0.4%, 0.8%, and 1.5%, respectively, and the mean annual growth in the in-field cumulative incidence was approximately 0.3%. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that sex, age, clinical stage, chemotherapy, and overall IMRT duration did not significantly affect SPT risk. However, the history of smoking was the independent risk factor associated with SPT. The 5-year SPT incidence among patients with NPC after IMRT is concordant with or lower than that in previous 2-dimensional radiotherapy studies study. Among patients with NPC who underwent IMRT, the upper aerodigestive tract was the most common SPT site, and lung cancer was the most common pathology. Smoking history, but not sex, age, clinical stage, chemotherapy, and

  2. Organizational development trajectory of a large academic radiotherapy department set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial: the MAASTRO experience

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, L; Dekker, A; Hermanns, E; Houben, R; Govers, M; van Merode, F; Lambin, P

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To simultaneously improve patient care processes and clinical research activities by starting a hypothesis-driven reorganization trajectory mimicking the rigorous methodology of a prospective clinical trial. Methods: The design of this reorganization trajectory was based on the model of a prospective trial. It consisted of (1) listing problems and analysing their potential causes, (2) defining interventions, (3) defining end points and (4) measuring the effect of the interventions (i.e. at baseline and after 1 and 2 years). The primary end point for patient care was the number of organizational root causes of incidents/near incidents; for clinical research, it was the number of patients in trials. There were several secondary end points. We analysed the data using two sample z-tests, χ2 test, a Mann–Whitney U test and the one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. Results: The number of organizational root causes was reduced by 27% (p < 0.001). There was no effect on the percentage of patients included in trials. Conclusion: The reorganizational trajectory was successful for the primary end point of patient care and had no effect on clinical research. Some confounding events hampered our ability to draw strong conclusions. Nevertheless, the transparency of this approach can give medical professionals more confidence in moving forward with other organizational changes in the same way. Advances in knowledge: This article is novel because managerial interventions were set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial. This study is the first of its kind in radiotherapy, and this approach can contribute to discussions about the effectiveness of managerial interventions. PMID:25679320

  3. Organizational development trajectory of a large academic radiotherapy department set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial: the MAASTRO experience.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, M; Boersma, L; Dekker, A; Hermanns, E; Houben, R; Govers, M; van Merode, F; Lambin, P

    2015-05-01

    To simultaneously improve patient care processes and clinical research activities by starting a hypothesis-driven reorganization trajectory mimicking the rigorous methodology of a prospective clinical trial. The design of this reorganization trajectory was based on the model of a prospective trial. It consisted of (1) listing problems and analysing their potential causes, (2) defining interventions, (3) defining end points and (4) measuring the effect of the interventions (i.e. at baseline and after 1 and 2 years). The primary end point for patient care was the number of organizational root causes of incidents/near incidents; for clinical research, it was the number of patients in trials. There were several secondary end points. We analysed the data using two sample z-tests, χ(2) test, a Mann-Whitney U test and the one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. The number of organizational root causes was reduced by 27% (p < 0.001). There was no effect on the percentage of patients included in trials. The reorganizational trajectory was successful for the primary end point of patient care and had no effect on clinical research. Some confounding events hampered our ability to draw strong conclusions. Nevertheless, the transparency of this approach can give medical professionals more confidence in moving forward with other organizational changes in the same way. This article is novel because managerial interventions were set up similarly to a prospective clinical trial. This study is the first of its kind in radiotherapy, and this approach can contribute to discussions about the effectiveness of managerial interventions.

  4. Clinical challenges in the implementation of a tomotherapy service for head and neck cancer patients in a regional UK radiotherapy centre

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, S; Mott, J H; Smyth, G; Dickson, S; Dobrowsky, W; Kelly, C G

    2011-01-01

    Objective Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly being used to treat head and neck cancer cases. Methods We discuss the clinical challenges associated with the setting up of an image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy service for a subset of head and neck cancer patients, using a recently commissioned helical tomotherapy (HT) Hi Art (Tomotherapy Inc, WI) machine in this article. We also discuss the clinical aspects of the tomotherapy planning process, treatment and image guidance experiences for the first 10 head and neck cancer cases. The concepts of geographical miss along with tomotherapy-specific effects, including that of field width and megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging strategy, have been highlighted using the first 10 head and neck cases treated. Results There is a need for effective streamlining of all aspects of the service to ensure compliance with cancer waiting time targets. We discuss how patient toxicity audits are crucial to guide refinement of the newly set-up planning dose constraints. Conclusion This article highlights the important clinical issues one must consider when setting up a head and neck IMRT, image-guided radiotherapy service. It shares some of the clinical challenges we have faced during the setting up of a tomotherapy service. Implementation of a clinical tomotherapy service requires a multidisciplinary team approach and relies heavily on good team working and effective communication between different staff groups. PMID:21159810

  5. Clinical Feasibility of Using an EPID in cine Mode for Image-Guided Verification of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Berbeco, Ross I.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To introduce a novel method for monitoring tumor location during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) while the treatment beam is on by using a conventional electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods and Materials: In our clinic, selected patients were treated under a phase I institutional review board-approved SBRT protocol for limited hepatic metastases from solid tumors. Before treatment planning multiple gold fiducial markers were implanted on the periphery of the tumor. During treatment the EPID was used in cine mode to collect the exit radiation and produce a sequence of images for each field. An in-house program was developed for calculating the location of the fiducials and their relative distance to the planned locations. Results: Three case studies illustrate the utility of the technique. Patient A exhibited a systematic shift of 4 mm during one of the treatment beams. Patient B showed an inferior drift of the target of approximately 1 cm from the time of setup to the end of the fraction. Patient C had a poor setup on the first day of treatment that was quantified and accounted for on subsequent treatment days. Conclusions: Target localization throughout each treatment beam can be quickly assessed with the presented technique. Treatment monitoring with an EPID in cine mode is shown to be a clinically feasible and useful tool.

  6. Shading correction algorithm for cone-beam CT in radiotherapy: extensive clinical validation of image quality improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, K. D.; Marchant, T. E.; Moore, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    A shading correction algorithm for the improvement of cone-beam CT (CBCT) images (Phys. Med. Biol. 53 5719{33) has been further developed, optimised and validated extensively using 135 clinical CBCT images of patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment of the pelvis, lungs and head and neck. An automated technique has been developed to efficiently analyse the large number of clinical images. Small regions of similar tissue (for example fat tissue) are automatically identified using CT images. The same regions on the corresponding CBCT image are analysed to ensure that they do not contain pixels representing multiple types of tissue. The mean value of all selected pixels and the non-uniformity, defined as the median absolute deviation of the mean values in each small region, are calculated. Comparisons between CT and raw and corrected CBCT images are then made. Analysis of fat regions in pelvis images shows an average difference in mean pixel value between CT and CBCT of 136:0 HU in raw CBCT images, which is reduced to 2:0 HU after the application of the shading correction algorithm. The average difference in non-uniformity of fat pixels is reduced from 33:7 in raw CBCT to 2:8 in shading-corrected CBCT images. Similar results are obtained in the analysis of lung and head and neck images.

  7. Clinical Outcome of Sacral Chordoma With Carbon Ion Radiotherapy Compared With Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshihiro; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Tsukushi, Satoshi; Yamada, Yoshihisa; Sugiura, Hideshi; Shido, Yoji; Wasa, Junji; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy, post-treatment function, toxicity, and complications of carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) for sacral chordoma compared with surgery. Methods and Materials: The records of 17 primary sacral chordoma patients treated since 1990 with surgery (n = 10) or carbon ion RT (n = 7) were retrospectively analyzed for disease-specific survival, local recurrence-free survival, complications, and functional outcome. The applied carbon ion dose ranged from 54.0 Gray equivalent (GyE) to 73.6 GyE (median 70.4). Results: The mean age at treatment was 55 years for the surgery group and 65 years for the carbon ion RT group. The median duration of follow-up was 76 months for the surgery group and 49 months for the carbon ion RT group. The local recurrence-free survival rate at 5 years was 62.5% for the surgery and 100% for the carbon ion RT group, and the disease-specific survival rate at 5 years was 85.7% and 53.3%, respectively. Urinary-anorectal function worsened in 6 patients (60%) in the surgery group, but it was unchanged in all the patients who had undergone carbon ion RT. Postoperative wound complications requiring reoperation occurred in 3 patients (30%) after surgery and in 1 patient (14%) after carbon ion RT. The functional outcome evaluated using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society scoring system revealed 55% in the surgery group and 75% in the carbon ion RT group. Of the six factors in this scoring system, the carbon ion RT group had significantly greater scores in emotional acceptance than did the surgery group. Conclusion: Carbon ion RT results in a high local control rate and preservation of urinary-anorectal function compared with surgery.

  8. Clinical Outcome of Adjuvant Treatment of Endometrial Cancer Using Aperture-Based Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Myriam; Nadeau, Sylvain M.Sc.; Gingras, Luc; Raymond, Paul-Emile; Beaulieu, Frederic; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre; Germain, Isabelle

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To assess disease control and acute and chronic toxicity with aperture-based intensity-modulated radiotherapy (AB-IMRT) for postoperative pelvic irradiation of endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January and July 2005, after hysterectomy for endometrial cancer, 15 patients received 45 Gy to the pelvis using AB-IMRT. The AB-IMRT plans were generated by an in-house treatment planning system (Ballista). The AB-IMRT plans were used for treatment and were dosimetrically compared with three other approaches: conventional four-field, enlarged four-field, and beamlet-based IMRT (BB-IMRT). Disease control and toxicity were prospectively recorded and compared with retrospective data from 30 patients treated with a conventional four-field technique. Results: At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 23-30), no relapse was noted among the AB-IMRT group compared with five relapses in the control group (p = 0.1). The characteristics of each group were similar, except for the mean body mass index, timing of brachytherapy, and applicator type used. Patients treated with AB-IMRT experienced more frequent Grade 2 or greater gastrointestinal acute toxicity (87% vs. 53%, p 0.02). No statistically significant difference was noted between the two groups regarding the incidence or severity of chronic toxicities. AB-IMRT plans significantly improved target coverage (93% vs. 76% of planning target volume receiving 45 Gy for AB-IMRT vs. conventional four-field technique, respectively). The sparing of organs at risk was similar to that of BB-IMRT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that AB-IMRT provides excellent disease control with equivalent late toxicity compared with the conventional four-field technique. AB-IMRT provided treatment delivery and quality assurance advantages compared with BB-IMRT and could reduce the risk of second malignancy compared with BB-IMRT.

  9. Intraoperative radiotherapy during lung cancer surgery: Technical description and early clinical results

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, F.A.; Ortiz de Urbina, D.; Abuchaibe, O.; Azinovic, I.; Aristu, J.; Santos, M.; Escude, L.; Herreros, J.; Llorens, R. )

    1990-07-01

    A phase I-II study of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) for Stage III lung cancer was performed in 34 patients during a period of 58 months. Loco-regional treatment included tumor resection if technically feasible, IORT boost of electron beams using moderate single doses (10-15 Gy) to tumor bearing areas and external photon beam irradiation (46-50 Gy in 5 weeks) using conventional fields. Indications for this study were unresectable hiliar tumors (14, 41%), and mediastinal, hiliar and/or chest wall residual disease following resection (20, 59%). Thirty-four procedures, with 40 IORT fields, have been analyzed to describe the relevant technical aspects and the toxicity. IORT was delivered using acrylic transparent cones of different diameters. Surgical approach consisted in a lateral thoracotomy in all patients (21 right side and 13 left side). Tissues included within the IORT field were: tumor or residual tumor tissues (34, 100%), collapsed lung parenchyma and main bronchus not surgically manipulated (14, 41%), bronchial stump and vascular suture following resection (19, 55%), mediastinal structures (20, 58%), and brachial plexus (1, 3%). The bronchial suture was covered with pleural or pericardial flap after IORT in 10 cases (29%). Life threatening toxicity related to IORT consisted in broncho-pleural fistula (1, 3%) and massive hemoptysis (1, 3%). Other reversible toxic events were acute pneumonitis (12, 85%) and esophagitis (10, 50%). Long term asymptomatic lung fibrosis was detected in 11 cases (32%). Median survival time for the entire group has been 12 months. With a median follow-up time of 12 months the freedom from thoracic recurrence rate is 30% (65% in cases with tumor resection). Projected actuarial survival rates at 4 years were 28% for resected group and 7% for unresected cases.

  10. Low or High Fractionation Dose {beta}-Radiotherapy for Pterygium? A Randomized Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; De Fendi, Ligia Issa; Fonseca, Ellen Carrara; Stefano, Eduardo Jose

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Postoperative adjuvant treatment using {beta}-radiotherapy (RT) is a proven technique for reducing the recurrence of pterygium. A randomized trial was conducted to determine whether a low fractionation dose of 2 Gy within 10 fractions would provide local control similar to that after a high fractionation dose of 5 Gy within 7 fractions for surgically resected pterygium. Methods: A randomized trial was conducted in 200 patients (216 pterygia) between February 2006 and July 2007. Only patients with fresh pterygium resected using a bare sclera method and given RT within 3 days were included. Postoperative RT was delivered using a strontium-90 eye applicator. The pterygia were randomly treated using either 5 Gy within 7 fractions (Group 1) or 2 Gy within 10 fractions (Group 2). The local control rate was calculated from the date of surgery. Results: Of the 216 pterygia included, 112 were allocated to Group 1 and 104 to Group 2. The 3-year local control rate for Groups 1 and 2 was 93.8% and 92.3%, respectively (p = .616). A statistically significant difference for cosmetic effect (p = .034), photophobia (p = .02), irritation (p = .001), and scleromalacia (p = .017) was noted in favor of Group 2. Conclusions: No better local control rate for postoperative pterygium was obtained using high-dose fractionation vs. low-dose fractionation. However, a low-dose fractionation schedule produced better cosmetic effects and resulted in fewer symptoms than high-dose fractionation. Moreover, pterygia can be safely treated in terms of local recurrence using RT schedules with a biologic effective dose of 24-52.5 Gy{sub 10.}.

  11. Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ying; Guo, Zhanwen; Zhang, Haibo; Wang, Ning; Xu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    are in the USA, three are in Germany, two are in France, and there is one institute in India. Research interests including urology and nephrology, clinical neurology, as well as rehabilitation are involved in precision radiotherapy for brain tumors studies. CONCLUSION: Precision radiotherapy for brain tumors remains a highly active area of research and development. PMID:25624798

  12. Treatment outcomes of particle radiotherapy using protons or carbon ions as a single-modality therapy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masaru; Demizu, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Mima, Masayuki; Terashima, Kazuki; Fujii, Osamu; Jin, Dongcun; Niwa, Yasue; Morimoto, Koichi; Akagi, Takashi; Daimon, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Murakami, Masao; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse the outcomes of cases of adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs) of the head and neck that were treated at a single institution with particle therapy consisting of either protons or carbon ions. Between February 2002 and March 2012, 80 patients were treated with proton therapy (PT) or carbon ion therapy (CIT) alone. PT and CIT were employed in 40 (50%) patients each, and more than half of the patients received 65.0 GyE in 26 fractions (n=47, 59%). The median duration of follow-up was 38 months (range, 6-115 months). For all patients, the 5-year for overall survival (OS) rate, progression-free survival (PFS) rate, and local control (LC) rate were 63%, 39%, and 75%, respectively. No significant differences between PT and CIT were observed. The 5-year LC rates for T4 and inoperable cases were 66% and 68%, respectively. Twenty-one patients (26%) experienced grade 3 or greater late toxicities, including three patients who developed grade 5 bleeding from nasopharyngeal ulcers. Particle radiotherapy for ACC achieves favourable LC, and its efficacy in inoperable or T4 cases is promising. There were no significant differences between PT and CIT in terms of OS, PFS and LC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Monte Carlo role in radiobiological modelling of radiotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, Issam; Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Radiobiological models are essential components of modern radiotherapy. They are increasingly applied to optimize and evaluate the quality of different treatment planning modalities. They are frequently used in designing new radiotherapy clinical trials by estimating the expected therapeutic ratio of new protocols. In radiobiology, the therapeutic ratio is estimated from the expected gain in tumour control probability (TCP) to the risk of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). However, estimates of TCP/NTCP are currently based on the deterministic and simplistic linear-quadratic formalism with limited prediction power when applied prospectively. Given the complex and stochastic nature of the physical, chemical and biological interactions associated with spatial and temporal radiation induced effects in living tissues, it is conjectured that methods based on Monte Carlo (MC) analysis may provide better estimates of TCP/NTCP for radiotherapy treatment planning and trial design. Indeed, over the past few decades, methods based on MC have demonstrated superior performance for accurate simulation of radiation transport, tumour growth and particle track structures; however, successful application of modelling radiobiological response and outcomes in radiotherapy is still hampered with several challenges. In this review, we provide an overview of some of the main techniques used in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy, with focus on the MC role as a promising computational vehicle. We highlight the current challenges, issues and future potentials of the MC approach towards a comprehensive systems-based framework in radiobiological modelling for radiotherapy.

  14. TU-CD-304-05: 4Ï€ Non-Coplanar Radiotherapy: From Mathematical Modeling to Clinical Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Tran, A; Ruan, D; Cao, M; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Low, D; Sheng, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and clinically implement 4π radiotherapy, an inverse optimization platform that maximally utilizes non-coplanar intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beams to significantly improve critical organ sparing. Methods: A 3D scanner was used to digitize the human and phantom subject surfaces, which were positioned in the computer assisted design (CAD) model of a TrueBeam machine to create a virtual geometrical model, based on which, the feasible beam space was calculated for different tumor locations. Beamlets were computed for all feasible beams using convolution/superposition. A column generation algorithm was employed to optimize patient specific beam orientations and fluence maps. Optimal routing through all selected beams were calculated by a level set method. The resultant plans were converted to XML files and delivered to phantoms in the TrueBeam developer mode. Finally, 4π plans were recomputed in Eclipse and manually delivered to recurrent GBM patients. Results: Compared to IMRT utilizing manually selected beams and volumetric modulated arc therapy plans, markedly improved dosimetry was observed using 4π for the brain, head and neck, liver, lung, and prostate patients. The improvements were due to significantly improved conformality and reduced high dose spillage to organs mediolateral to the PTV. The virtual geometrical model was experimentally validated. Safety margins with 99.9% confidence in collision avoidance were included to the model based model accuracy estimates determined via 300 physical machine to phantom distance measurements. Automated delivery in the developer mode was completed in 10 minutes and collision free. Manual 4 π treatment on the GBM cases resulted in significant brainstem sparing and took 35–45 minutes including multiple images, which showed submillimeter cranial intrafractional motion. Conclusion: The mathematical modeling utilized in 4π is accurate to create and guide highly complex non-coplanar IMRT

  15. Effect of Oral Silymarin Administration on Prevention of Radiotherapy Induced Mucositis: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Elyasi, Sepideh; Hosseini, Sare; Niazi Moghadam, Mohammad Reza; Aledavood, Seyed Amir; Karimi, Gholamreza

    2016-11-01

    Mucositis is a frequent severe complication of radiation therapy in patient with head and neck cancer. Silymarin is a polyphenolic flavonoid extracted from the milk thistle that exhibits strong antioxidant and antiinflammatory activities. In this study, we evaluate silymarin efficacy in prevention of radiotherapy induced mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer, as the first human study. During this pilot, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial, the effect of oral silymarin 420 mg daily in three divided doses starting at the first day of radiotherapy for 6 weeks, on oral mucositis occurrence was assessed. Twenty-seven patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria assigned to the silymarin or placebo group. World Health Organization and National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria oral mucositis grading scale scores were recorded at baseline and weekly during these 6 weeks. The median World Health Organization and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria scores were significantly lower in silymarin group at the end of the first to sixth week (p < 0.05). The scores increased significantly in both placebo and silymarin groups during radiotherapy, but there was a delay for mucositis development and progression in silymarin group. Prophylactic administration of conventional form of silymarin tablets could significantly reduce the severity of radiotherapy induced mucositis and delay its occurrence in patients with head and neck cancer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Modeling of beam customization devices in the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for heavy charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki

    2011-03-07

    A broad-beam-delivery system for radiotherapy with protons or ions often employs multiple collimators and a range-compensating filter, which offer complex and potentially useful beam customization. It is however difficult for conventional pencil-beam algorithms to deal with fine structures of these devices due to beam-size growth during transport. This study aims to avoid the difficulty with a novel computational model. The pencil beams are initially defined at the range-compensating filter with angular-acceptance correction for upstream collimation followed by stopping and scattering. They are individually transported with possible splitting near the aperture edge of a downstream collimator to form a sharp field edge. The dose distribution for a carbon-ion beam was calculated and compared with existing experimental data. The penumbra sizes of various collimator edges agreed between them to a submillimeter level. This beam-customization model will be used in the greater framework of the pencil-beam splitting algorithm for accurate and efficient patient dose calculation.

  17. Further Radiobiologic Modeling of Palliative Radiotherapy: Use of Virtual Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Bleddyn Dale, Roger G.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To study duration of response in palliative radiotherapy in a population of tumors. Methods and Materials: Models of dynamic changes in cell number with time were used to develop a function for the remission time (T{sub rem}) after palliative radiotherapy: T{sub rem}=(BED)/K -t{sub 1}(1+({alpha}.K)/z ), where BED is the biologically effective dose, t{sub 1} the duration of symptoms (i.e., the time between the onset of symptoms and the initiation of radiotherapy), K the daily BED repopulation equivalent, {alpha} the linear radiosensitivity parameter in the linear-quadratic model, and z the tumor regression rate. Results: Simulations of clinical trials show marked variations in remission statistics depending on the tumor characteristics and are highly compatible with the results of clinical trials. Dose escalation produces both a higher proportion and extended duration of remissions, especially in tumors with high {alpha}/{beta} ratios and K values, but the predicted dose responses of acute and late side effects show that caution is necessary. The prospect of using particle beam therapy to reduce normal tissue radiation exposures or using hypoxic sensitizers to improve the tumor cell kill might significantly improve the results of palliative radiotherapy in carefully selected patients and could also be used for safer palliative re-treatments in patients with the potential for prolonged survival. The effect of tumor heterogeneity in determining palliative responses probably exceeds that in radical radiotherapy; as few as 100 patients in each treatment arm produce statistically unreliable results. Conclusions: Virtual trials of palliative radiotherapy can be useful to test the effects of competing schedules and better determine future strategies, including improved design of clinical trials as well as combinations of radiotherapy with other anticancer modalities.

  18. Charged Particle Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Heath D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Krishnan, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Historically, the use of external beam radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been limited by toxicity to the uninvolved liver and surrounding structures. Advances in photon radiotherapy have improved dose conformality to the tumor and facilitated dose escalation, a key contributor to improved HCC radiation treatment outcomes. However, despite these advances in photon radiotherapy, significant volumes of liver still receive low doses of radiation that can preclude dose escalation, particularly in patients with limited functional liver reserves. By capitalizing on the lack of exit dose along the beam path beyond the tumor and higher biological effectiveness, charged particle therapy offers the promise of maximizing tumor control via dose escalation without excessive liver toxicity. In this review we discuss the distinctive biophysical attributes of both proton and carbon ion radiotherapy, particularly as they pertain to treatment of HCC. We also review the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using charged particles for the treatment of HCC. PMID:21939857

  19. Guideline and preliminary clinical practice results for dose specification and target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shih-Hua; Chao, K S Clifford; Leu, Yi-Shing; Lee, Jehn-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Ji; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Hong-Wen; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) is indicated for patients with high-risk oral cavity cancer (OCC). Based on multi-institutional reports, we developed a guideline for postoperative RT for patients with OCC. A multidisciplinary OCC team was recruited to develop a questionnaire concerning details of risk-factor categorization, target delineation, and dose specification. Thirty-one radiation oncologists from 18 institutions completed the questionnaire, and data were subjected to extensive review to establish the guideline by expert meeting. In this study, we also report the results for patients treated in accordance with the guideline at our institution between 2007 and 2011. Forty-one patients received RT compatible with this guideline with a median 26.8-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients (78%) remained disease-free, 6 (15%) developed locoregional recurrence (4 in-field, 1 marginal, and 1 out-field) and 4 (10%) developed distant metastasis. The overall 2-year survival rate was 86.7%. This guideline is promising and should be validated and refined in further clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy: an overview of the physiopathology, clinical evidence, and management of the oral damage

    PubMed Central

    Pinna, Roberto; Campus, Guglielmo; Cumbo, Enzo; Mura, Ida; Milia, Egle

    2015-01-01

    Background The irradiation of head and neck cancer (HNC) often causes damage to the salivary glands. The resulting salivary gland hypofunction and xerostomia seriously reduce the patient’s quality of life. Purpose To analyze the literature of actual management strategies for radiation-induced hypofunction and xerostomia in HNC patients. Methods MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were electronically evaluated for articles published from January 1, 1970, to June 30, 2013. Two reviewers independently screened and included papers according to the predefined selection criteria. Results Sixty-one articles met the inclusion criteria. The systematic review of the literature suggests that the most suitable methods for managing the clinical and pathophysiological consequences of HNC radiotherapy might be the pharmacological approach, for example, through the use of cholinergic agonists when residual secretory capacity is still present, and the use of salivary substitutes. In addition, a modified diet and the patient’s motivation to enhance oral hygiene can lead to a significant improvement. Conclusion Radiation-induced xerostomia could be considered a multifactorial disease. It could depend on the type of cancer treatment and the cumulative radiation dose to the gland tissue. A preventive approach and the correct treatment of the particular radiotherapeutic patient can help to improve the condition of xerostomia. PMID:25691810

  1. Stereotactic linear accelerator radiotherapy for pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ajithkumar, Thankama; Brada, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Last decade has seen important advances in radiotherapy technology which combine precise tumor localization with accurate targeted delivery of radiation. This technique of high precision conformal radiotherapy, described as stereotactic radiotherapy or radiosurgery, uses modern linear accelerators available in most radiation oncology departments. The article describes the new technique as applied to the treatment of pituitary adenoma and reviews published clinical results.

  2. Commissioning and clinical results utilizing the Gildenberg-Laitinen Adapter Device for X-ray in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ashamalla, H; Addeo, D; Ikoro, N C; Ross, P; Cosma, M; Nasr, N

    2003-06-01

    The Gildenberg-Laitinen Adapter Device for X-Ray (GLAD-X/LS) frame is a positioning device that allows the use of the same fiducial points as the Brown-Robert-Wells (BRW) system. Thus it permits treatment planning to be accomplished by the Radionics X-knife Radiosurgery Program. We investigated the commissioning and clinical benefits of the GLAD-X/LS for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) in patients who were unable to tolerate the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame. Commissioning of the GLAD-X/LS system was done via use of a Rando Phantom. A target volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm was drilled into the phantom head. An ion chamber and thermoluminescence dosimetric chips (TLDs) were implanted in the target. A simulated treatment course consisting of 5 stereotactic radiotherapy fractions (300 cGy, 30 mm collimator) was delivered to the phantom head. A total of 27 patients who could not tolerate the GTC frame were treated using the GLAD-X/LS system. A total of 35 isocenters were used; the median number of treatment fractions was eight. Reproducibility of the x, y, and z coordinates was examined and correlated to the same determined using orthogonal port films. Relocation accuracy and reproducibility were further assessed comparing the x, y, and z coordinates of the target center with multiplanar reconstructed coronal and sagittal images. Patient tolerance of the device was also evaluated daily throughout the treatment. The measured TLD and ion chamber doses were within 3% of the prescribed dose at the isocenter. The same dose accuracy was also found at incremental distances of 5 mm, 10 mm, and 15 mm from the isocenter. All patients tolerated the treatment and the device well. Six patients experienced mild ear canal pain, and softer or smaller earpieces were substituted. The mean relocation accuracy was 1.5 mm +/- 0.8. The GLAD-X/LS system has excellent accuracy and reproducibility with the mean relocation accuracy of 1.5 mm +/- 0.8. The device is well-tolerated by

  3. Clinical impact of IMPORT HIGH trial (CRUK/06/003) on breast radiotherapy practices in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Ciurlionis, Laura; Kirby, Anna M; Locke, Imogen; Venables, Karen; Yarnold, John R; Titley, Jenny; Bliss, Judith; Coles, Charlotte E

    2015-01-01

    Objective: IMPORT HIGH is a multicentre randomized UK trial testing dose-escalated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) after tumour excision in females with early breast cancer and higher than average local recurrence risk. A survey was carried out to investigate the impact of this trial on the adoption of advanced breast radiotherapy (RT) techniques in the UK. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all 26 IMPORT HIGH recruiting RT centres to determine whether the trial has influenced non-trial breast RT techniques in terms of volume delineation, dosimetry, treatment delivery and verification. In order to compare the clinical practice of breast RT between IMPORT HIGH and non–IMPORT HIGH centres, parts of the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) breast RT audit result were used in this study. Results: 26/26 participating centres completed the questionnaire. After joining the trial, the number of centres routinely using tumour bed clips to guide whole-breast RT rose from 5 (19%) to 21 (81%). 20/26 (77%) centres now contour target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) in some or all patients compared with 14 (54%) before the trial. 14/26 (54%) centres offer inverse-planned IMRT for selected non-trial patients with breast cancer, and 10/14 (71%) have adopted the IMPORT HIGH trial protocol for target volume and OARs dose constraints. Only 2/26 (8%) centres used clip information routinely for breast treatment verification prior to IMPORT HIGH, a minority that has since risen to 7/26 (27%). Data on 1386 patients was included from the RCR audit. This suggested that more cases from IMPORT HIGH centres had surgical clips implanted (83 vs 67%), were treated using CT guided planning with full three-dimensional dose compensation (100 vs 75%), and were treated with photon boost RT (30 vs 8%). Conclusion: The study suggests that participation in the IMPORT HIGH trial has played an important part in providing the guidance and support networks needed for the safe integration of

  4. Simulation study of dose enhancement in a cell due to nearby carbon and oxygen in particle radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae Ik; Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Jung, Won-Gyun; Yoo, SeungHoon; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Yoon, Myonggeun; Incerti, S.´ebastian; Geso, Moshi; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the dose-deposition enhancement due to alpha-particle irradiation in a cellular model by using the carbon and the oxygen chemical compositions. A simulation study was performed to study dose enhancement due to carbon and oxygen for a human cell where the Geant4 code used for alpha-particle irradiation of a cellular phantom. The characteristics of the dose enhancements based on the concentrations of carbon and oxygen in the nucleus and cytoplasm by the alpha-particle radiation was investigated and was compared with those obtained by gold and gadolinium. The results showed that both the carbon- and the oxygen-induced dose enhancements were more effective than those of gold and gadolinium. We found that the dose enhancement effect was more dominant in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm if the carbon or the oxygen were uniformly distributed in the whole cell. For the condition that the added chemical composition was inserted only into the cytoplasm, the effect of the dose enhancement in the nucleus was weak. We showed that high-stopping-power materials offer a more effective dose enhancement efficacy and suggest that carbon nanotubes and oxygenation are promising candidates for dose enhancement tools in particle therapy.

  5. Predictive models of toxicity with external radiotherapy for prostate cancer: clinical issues.

    PubMed

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    The objective of the current study was to analyze the state of the art and present limitations of available predictive clinical models (when available) estimating the risk of genitourinary tract and small bowel complications, erectile dysfunction, and acute and late symptoms of the rectal syndrome caused by prostate cancer external irradiation. An analysis of the literature indicated that very limited attention has been devoted to the development of "integrated," patient-tailored, user-friendly, and clinically usable tools for the prediction of external beam radiotoxicity. In this article, the authors reported on the multivariate correlation between late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities and clinical/dosimetric risk factors, as well as on the first set of nomograms developed to predict acute and late rectal side effects. At the present state of knowledge, the use of nomograms as predictive instruments of radiotoxicity appears to be particularly attractive for several main reasons. They are "user friendly" and easily developed using the results of multivariate analyses, as they weigh the combined effects of multiple independent factors found to be correlated with the selected clinical endpoint. The integrated evaluation of clinical and dosimetric parameters in the single patient can help to provide a tailored probability of the specific outcome considered. Predicting a high probability of toxicity could avoid unnecessary daily costs for the individual patient in terms of quality of life modification during and after treatment, helping patients in the decision-making process of choosing the best individual, quality of life-related treatment, and clinicians in better tailoring the treatment to patient's characteristics. Cancer 2009;115(13 suppl):3141-9. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  6. [Extensor mechanism allograft and radiotherapy in the treatment of soft tissue sarcomas around the knee: Presentation of two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Illana-Mahiques, M; Baixauli-García, F; Angulo-Sánchez, M A; Amaya-Valero, J V; García-Forcada, I L

    2015-01-01

    Knee involvement of soft tissue sarcomas is rare and very difficult to treat. Reconstruction of the extensor mechanism of the knee is essential to restore the functionality. Functional outcome is compromised by poor soft tissue coverage, adjuvant local radiotherapy, and resection of the extensor apparatus. No results were found in the literature as regards treatment by resection and reconstruction of the extensor mechanism in combination with adjuvant radiotherapy. The effects of radiotherapy are also unknown in the allografts. . Two cases are presented of soft tissue sarcoma around de knee treated by resection, reconstruction of the extensor mechanism with cryopreserved cadaver allograft, and local radiotherapy. After more than 3 years of follow up, both patients are free of disease and have a good joint balance. Resection of the tumor with adequate safety margins and reconstruction using cadaveric allograft preserves the extensor mechanism and function of the limb. The soft tissue coverage is an added problem that can be solved by propeller fasciocutaneous flap coverage. After surgery, the limb must be immobilized with a knee brace locked in extension. Local radiotherapy contributes to local control of the disease. The reconstruction of the extensor mechanism of the knee with allograft is a functional alternative to amputation, and it does not contraindicate adjuvant radiotherapy to improve local control of the disease. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of a ketogenic diet intervention during radiotherapy on body composition: I. Initial clinical experience with six prospectively studied patients.

    PubMed

    Klement, Rainer J; Sweeney, Reinhart A

    2016-03-05

    Based on promising preclinical data, ketogenic diets (KDs) have been proposed as supplementary measures for cancer patients undergoing standard-of-care therapy. However, data is still scarce on the tolerability and effects of KDs on cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Here we present six cases of patients who underwent RT and concurrently consumed a self-administered KD in our clinic within a busy community hospital setting. All patients were followed prospectively with measurements of blood parameters, quality of life and body weight and composition using bioelectrical impedance analysis. No adverse diet-related side effects occurred. Two patients had no elevated ketone body levels in serum despite self-reporting compliance to the diet. There was consensus that the KD was satiating and weight loss occurred in all patients, although this was only significant in two patients. Our data indicate that weight loss was mainly due to fat mass loss with concurrent preservation of muscle mass. Overall quality of life remained fairly stable, and all subjects reported feeling good on the diet. Tumor regression occurred as expected in five patients with early stage disease; however one subject with metastatic small cell lung cancer experienced slight progression during three cycles of combined chemotherapy + KD and progressed rapidly after ending the KD. Our data lend support to the hypothesis that KDs administered as supportive measures during standard therapy are safe and might be helpful in preservation of muscle mass. Further studies with control groups are needed to confirm these findings and address questions regarding any putative anti-tumor effects. Based on the experience with these six cases we implemented further steps to improve issues with KD compliance and initiated a clinical study that is described in a companion paper.

  8. Clinical implications of different calculation algorithms in breast radiotherapy: a comparison between pencil beam and collapsed cone convolution.

    PubMed

    Cilla, S; Digesù, C; Macchia, G; Deodato, F; Sallustio, G; Piermattei, A; Morganti, A G

    2014-06-01

    This investigation focused on the clinical implications of the use of the Collapsed Cone Convolution algorithm (CCC) in breast radiotherapy and investigated the dosimetric differences as respect to Pencil Beam Convolution algorithm (PBC). 15 breast treatment plans produced using the PBC algorithm were re-calculated using the CCC algorithm with the same MUs. In a second step, plans were re-optimized using CCC algorithm with modification of wedges and beam weightings to achieve optimal coverage (CCCr plans). For each patient, dosimetric comparison was performed using the standard tangential technique (SWT) and a forward-planned IMRT technique (f-IMRT). The CCC algorithm showed significant increased dose inhomogeneity. Mean and minimum PTV doses decreased by 1.4% and 2.8% (both techniques). Mean V95% decreased to 83.7% and 90.3%, respectively for the SWT and f-IMRT. V95% was correlated to the ratio of PTV and lung volumes into the treatment field. The re-optimized CCCr plans achieved similar target coverage, but high-dose volume was significantly larger (V107%: 7.6% vs 2.3% (SWT), 7.1% vs 2.1% (f-IMRT). There was a significantly increase in the ipsilateral lung volume receiving low doses (V5 Gy: 31.3% vs 26.2% in SWT, 27.0% vs 23.0% in f-IMRT). MUs needed for PTV coverage in CCCr plans were higher by 3%. The PBC algorithm overestimated PTV coverage in terms of all important dosimetric metrics. If previous clinical experience are based on the use of PBC model, especially needed is discussion between medical physicists and radiation oncologists to fully understand the dosimetric changes. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Benefits of Including Clinical Factors in Rectal Normal Tissue Complication Probability Modeling After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Defraene, Gilles; Van den Bergh, Laura; Al-Mamgani, Abrahim; Haustermans, Karin; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Van den Heuvel, Frank; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To study the impact of clinical predisposing factors on rectal normal tissue complication probability modeling using the updated results of the Dutch prostate dose-escalation trial. Methods and Materials: Toxicity data of 512 patients (conformally treated to 68 Gy [n = 284] and 78 Gy [n = 228]) with complete follow-up at 3 years after radiotherapy were studied. Scored end points were rectal bleeding, high stool frequency, and fecal incontinence. Two traditional dose-based models (Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) and Relative Seriality (RS) and a logistic model were fitted using a maximum likelihood approach. Furthermore, these model fits were improved by including the most significant clinical factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was used to compare the discriminating ability of all fits. Results: Including clinical factors significantly increased the predictive power of the models for all end points. In the optimal LKB, RS, and logistic models for rectal bleeding and fecal incontinence, the first significant (p = 0.011-0.013) clinical factor was 'previous abdominal surgery.' As second significant (p = 0.012-0.016) factor, 'cardiac history' was included in all three rectal bleeding fits, whereas including 'diabetes' was significant (p = 0.039-0.048) in fecal incontinence modeling but only in the LKB and logistic models. High stool frequency fits only benefitted significantly (p = 0.003-0.006) from the inclusion of the baseline toxicity score. For all models rectal bleeding fits had the highest AUC (0.77) where it was 0.63 and 0.68 for high stool frequency and fecal incontinence, respectively. LKB and logistic model fits resulted in similar values for the volume parameter. The steepness parameter was somewhat higher in the logistic model, also resulting in a slightly lower D{sub 50}. Anal wall DVHs were used for fecal incontinence, whereas anorectal wall dose best described the other two endpoints. Conclusions: Comparable

  10. Revisiting the ultra-high dose rate effect: implications for charged particle radiotherapy using protons and light ions

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P; Jones, B; Yokoi, T; Hill, M; Vojnovic, B

    2012-01-01

    Objective To reinvestigate ultra-high dose rate radiation (UHDRR) radiobiology and consider potential implications for hadrontherapy. Methods A literature search of cellular UHDRR exposures was performed. Standard oxygen diffusion equations were used to estimate the time taken to replace UHDRR-related oxygen depletion. Dose rates from conventional and novel methods of hadrontherapy accelerators were considered, including spot scanning beam delivery, which intensifies dose rate. Results The literature findings were that, for X-ray and electron dose rates of around 109 Gy s–1, 5–10 Gy depletes cellular oxygen, significantly changing the radiosensitivity of cells already in low oxygen tension (around 3 mmHg or 0.4 kPa). The time taken to reverse the oxygen depletion of such cells is estimated to be over 20–30 s at distances of over 100 μm from a tumour blood vessel. In this time window, tumours have a higher hypoxic fraction (capable of reducing tumour control), so the next application of radiation within the same fraction should be at a time that exceeds these estimates in the case of scanned beams or with ultra-fast laser-generated particles. Conclusion This study has potential implications for particle therapy, including laser-generated particles, where dose rate is greatly increased. Conventional accelerators probably do not achieve the critical UHDRR conditions. However, specific UHDRR oxygen depletion experiments using proton and ion beams are indicated. PMID:22496068

  11. Clinical Indications for Carbon Ion Radiotherapy and Radiation Therapy with Other Heavier Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combs, Stephanie E.

    A number of studies have shown excellent and convincing clinical results for various indications after treatment with ions heavier than protons. These include skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, recurrent rectal cancer, high-risk meningiomas, or soft-tissue and bone sarcomas. This chapter outlines these trials and provides a medical rationale for their choice before they are discussed in depth in subsequent chapters.

  12. Multi-institutional clinical experience with the Calypso System in localization and continuous, real-time monitoring of the prostate gland during external radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kupelian, Patrick . E-mail: patrick.kupelian@orhs.org; Willoughby, Twyla; Mahadevan, Arul; Djemil, Toufik; Weinstein, Geoffrey; Jani, Shirish; Enke, Charles; Solberg, Timothy; Flores, Nicholas

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical experience with an electromagnetic treatment target positioning and continuous monitoring system in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Calypso System is a target positioning device that continuously monitors the location of three implanted electromagnetic transponders at a rate of 10 Hz. The system was used at five centers to position 41 patients over a full course of therapy. Electromagnetic positioning was compared to setup using skin marks and to stereoscopic X-ray localization of the transponders. Continuous monitoring was performed in 35 patients. Results: The difference between skin mark vs. the Calypso System alignment was found to be >5 mm in vector length in more than 75% of fractions. Comparisons between the Calypso System and X-ray localization showed good agreement. Qualitatively, the continuous motion was unpredictable and varied from persistent drift to transient rapid movements. Displacements {>=}3 and {>=}5 mm for cumulative durations of at least 30 s were observed during 41% and 15% of sessions. In individual patients, the number of fractions with displacements {>=}3 mm ranged from 3% to 87%; whereas the number of fractions with displacements {>=}5 mm ranged from 0% to 56%. Conclusion: The Calypso System is a clinically efficient and objective localization method for positioning prostate patients undergoing radiotherapy. Initial treatment setup can be performed rapidly, accurately, and objectively before radiation delivery. The extent and frequency of prostate motion during radiotherapy delivery can be easily monitored and used for motion management.

  13. Dosimetric verification in participating institutions in a stereotactic body radiotherapy trial for stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Japan clinical oncology group trial (JCOG0403)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Teiji; Kunieda, Etsuo; Shirato, Hiroki; Ishikura, Satoshi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Tateoka, Kunihiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Narita, Yuichirou; Ikeda, Masataka; Goka, Tomonori

    2006-11-01

    A multicentre phase II trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy for T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer was initiated in Japan as the Japan Clinical Oncology Group trial (JCOG0403). Before starting the trial, a decision was made to evaluate the treatment machine and treatment planning in participating institutions to minimize the variations of the prescription dose between the institutions. We visited the 16 participating institutions and examined the absolute dose at the centre of a simulated spherical tumour of 3.0 cm diameter in the lung using the radiation treatment planning systems in each institution. A lung phantom for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) was developed and used for the treatment planning and film dosimetry. In the JCOG radiotherapy study group, the no model-based calculation algorithm or the model-based calculation algorithm with a dose kernel unscaled for heterogeneities were selected for use in the initial SBRT trials started in 2004, and the model-based calculation algorithm with a dose kernel scaled for heterogeneities was selected for the coming trial. The findings of this study suggest that the clinical results of lung SBRT trials should be carefully evaluated in comparison with the actual dose given to patients.

  14. Effect of Radiotherapy on Painful Bone Metastases: A Secondary Analysis of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group Symptom Control Trial SC.23.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Rachel; Ding, Keyue; Brundage, Michael; Meyer, Ralph M; Nabid, Abdenour; Chabot, Pierre; Coulombe, Genevieve; Ahmed, Shahida; Kuk, Joda; Dar, A Rashid; Mahmud, Aamer; Fairchild, Alysa; Wilson, Carolyn F; Wu, Jackson S Y; Dennis, Kristopher; DeAngelis, Carlo; Wong, Rebecca K S; Zhu, Liting; Chan, Stephanie; Chow, Edward

    2017-07-01

    Many studies that found improved quality of life (QOL) after radiotherapy of bone metastases have small sample sizes and do not use specific questionnaires. How soon after radiotherapy one can expect an improvement in QOL is unknown. To investigate QOL at days 10 and 42 after radiotherapy with a bone metastases-specific QOL tool. In this secondary analysis of the NCIC Clinical Trials Group Symptom Control Trial SC.23, a double-blind randomized clinical trial that investigated dexamethasone for the prophylaxis of pain flare after radiotherapy, patients were accrued from 23 Canadian centers from May 30, 2011, to December 11, 2014, and were followed up for 42 days after treatment. Participants referred for radiotherapy for bone metastases were required to have a pain score at the site(s) of treatment of at least 2 (range, 0-10). Patients were treated with a single 8-Gy radiotherapy dose for 1 or 2 bone metastases. Patients reported their worst pain score and analgesic intake at baseline and days 10 and 42 after treatment. Pain response was assessed with International Bone Metastases Consensus Endpoint Definitions. Self-reported QOL was completed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Bone Metastases Module (QLQ-BM22) and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) at the same time points. A total of 298 patients were accrued (median age, 68.8 [range, 32-94] years at day 10 and 68.0 [range, 34-90] years at day 42). A total of 122 patients (40.9%) responded to radiotherapy at day 10 and 116 patients (38.9%) at day 42. At day 10, compared with nonresponders, patients with a pain response had a greater reduction in pain (mean reduction, 17.0 vs 1.8; P = .002) and pain characteristics (mean reduction, 12.8 vs 1.1; P = .002), as well as greater improvements in functional interference (mean increase, 11.6 vs 3.6; P = .01) and

  15. Tongue-out versus tongue-in position during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for base of tongue cancer: Clinical implications for minimizing post-radiotherapy swallowing dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Kulasekere, Christina; Hatch, Craig; Bugno, Jacob; Derrwaldt, Ronald

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether different tongue positions change the radiation doses to swallowing organs at risks: the pharyngeal constrictor, oral cavity, and larynx during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for base of tongue (BOT) cancer. IMRT plans with Tongue-out (IMRT-TO) and tongue-in position (IMRT-TI) was compared in 3 cases. Distance from BOT to pharyngeal constrictor was increased to 1.8 ± 0.8 cm with IMRT-TO from 0.9 ± 0.6 cm with IMRT-TI (P < .01). Compared to IMRT-TI, IMRT-TO significantly decreased the radiation dose to the anterior oral cavity, oral tongue, superior pharyngeal constrictor, middle pharyngeal constrictor, and supraglottic larynx (all P ≤ .04). IMRT-TO also had a smaller volume irradiated than IMRT-TI to the anterior oral cavity and the oral tongue receiving ≥30 Gy (V30) and V35, and superior pharyngeal constrictor and middle pharyngeal constrictor for V55 and V65 (all P ≤ .04). Dosimetric advantage with IMRT-TO over IMRT-TI may potentially reduce post-IMRT swallowing dysfunction in selected patients with BOT cancer. 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Neoadjuvant radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy for locally advanced endometrial cancer clinically extending to the cervix or parametria.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John A; Boisen, Michelle M; Comerci, John T; Kim, Hayeon; Houser, Christopher J; Sukumvanich, Paniti; Olawaiye, Alexander B; Kelley, Joseph L; Edwards, Robert P; Huang, Marilyn; Courtney-Brooks, Madeleine; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-11-01

    For locally-advanced uterine cancer clinically extending to the cervix, two treatment paradigms exist: surgical staging radical hysterectomy with tailored adjuvant therapy or neoadjuvant therapy followed by a less extensive simple hysterectomy. Currently, insufficient data exists to guide consensus guidelines and practical application of preoperative radiotherapy. Retrospective IRB approved cohort study from 1999 to 2014 of 36 endometrial cancer patients with clinical involvement of cervix±parametria treated with neoadjuvant external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4Gy in 25-28 fractions) and image-based HDR brachytherapy (5-5.5Gy times 3-4 fractions)±chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy performed at a median of 6weeks after radiotherapy. All patients had clinical cervical extension, 50% also had parametria extension, and 31% had nodal involvement. At the time of surgery 91% had no clinical cervical involvement, 58% had no pathologic cervical involvement, and all had margin negative resection. The pathologic complete response rate was 24%. Median follow-up from the time of surgery was 20months (range: 0-153). The 3-year local control, regional control, distant control, disease free survival and overall survival rates were 96%, 89%, 84%, 73%, and 100%. The 3-year rate of grade 3 complications was 11%, with no grade 4+ toxicity. Neoadjuvant radiation therapy±chemotherapy followed by extrafascial hysterectomy appears to be a viable option for patients with endometrial cancer clinically extending to the cervix and parametria. The HDR brachytherapy schema of 5-5.5Gy times 3-4 fractions, for a cumulative EQD2 of 60-70Gy, is well tolerated with high rates of clinical and pathological response. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SU-E-T-23: A Developing Australian Network for Datamining and Modelling Routine Radiotherapy Clinical Data and Radiomics Information for Rapid Learning and Clinical Decision Support

    SciTech Connect

    Thwaites, D; Holloway, L; Bailey, M; Carolan, M; Miller, A; Barakat, S; Field, M; Delaney, G; Vinod, S; Dekker, A; Lustberg, T; Soest, J van; Walsh, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Large amounts of routine radiotherapy (RT) data are available, which can potentially add clinical evidence to support better decisions. A developing collaborative Australian network, with a leading European partner, aims to validate, implement and extend European predictive models (PMs) for Australian practice and assess their impact on future patient decisions. Wider objectives include: developing multi-institutional rapid learning, using distributed learning approaches; and assessing and incorporating radiomics information into PMs. Methods: Two initial standalone pilots were conducted; one on NSCLC, the other on larynx, patient datasets in two different centres. Open-source rapid learning systems were installed, for data extraction and mining to collect relevant clinical parameters from the centres’ databases. The European DSSs were learned (“training cohort”) and validated against local data sets (“clinical cohort”). Further NSCLC studies are underway in three more centres to pilot a wider distributed learning network. Initial radiomics work is underway. Results: For the NSCLC pilot, 159/419 patient datasets were identified meeting the PM criteria, and hence eligible for inclusion in the curative clinical cohort (for the larynx pilot, 109/125). Some missing data were imputed using Bayesian methods. For both, the European PMs successfully predicted prognosis groups, but with some differences in practice reflected. For example, the PM-predicted good prognosis NSCLC group was differentiated from a combined medium/poor prognosis group (2YOS 69% vs. 27%, p<0.001). Stage was less discriminatory in identifying prognostic groups. In the good prognosis group two-year overall survival was 65% in curatively and 18% in palliatively treated patients. Conclusion: The technical infrastructure and basic European PMs support prognosis prediction for these Australian patient groups, showing promise for supporting future personalized treatment decisions

  18. Proton Radiotherapy for Childhood Ependymoma: Initial Clinical Outcomes and Dose Comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Shannon M. Safai, Sairos; Trofimov, Alexei; Wolfgang, John; Fullerton, Barbara; Yeap, Beow Y.; Bortfeld, Thomas; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical outcomes for pediatric patients treated with proton beam radiation for intracranial ependymoma and compare the dose distributions of intensity-modulated radiation therapy with photons (IMRT), three-dimensional conformal proton radiation, and intensity-modulated proton radiation therapy (IMPT) for representative patients. Methods and Materials: All children with intracranial ependymoma confined to the supratentorial or infratentorial brain treated at the Francis H. Burr Proton Facility and Harvard Cyclotron between November 2000 and March 2006 were included in this study. Seventeen patients were treated with protons. Proton, IMRT, and IMPT plans were generated with similar clinical constraints for representative infratentorial and supratentorial ependymoma cases. Tumor and normal tissue dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Results: At a median follow-up of 26 months from the start date of radiation therapy, local control, progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 86%, 80%, and 89%, respectively. Subtotal resection was significantly associated with decreased local control (p = 0.016). Similar tumor volume coverage was achieved with IMPT, proton therapy, and IMRT. Substantial normal tissue sparing was seen with proton therapy compared with IMRT. Use of IMPT will allow for additional sparing of some critical structures. Conclusions: Preliminary disease control with proton therapy compares favorably with the literature. Dosimetric comparisons show the advantage of proton radiation compared with IMRT in the treatment of ependymoma. Further sparing of normal structures appears possible with IMPT. Superior dose distributions were accomplished with fewer beam angles with the use of protons and IMPT.

  19. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for central lung tumors: Plan quality and long-term clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tekatli, Hilâl; Senan, Suresh; Dahele, Max; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2015-10-01

    Central lung SABR is less established due to toxicity concerns. We describe plan quality and clinical outcomes for patients treated with VMAT SABR using 8×7.5Gy. We studied 80 consecutive patients with primary NSCLC and PTV ⩽2cm from the proximal bronchial tree (PBT), treated between 2008 and 2013. Dosimetric data were compared with institutional guidelines and study protocols, and long-term clinical outcomes were analyzed. PTV V95% was 60Gy in 96% of patients. Dmax was ⩾60Gy in 40% of patients for PBT, 26.3% for aorta, 55% for heart, and 1.3% for trachea. Esophageal maximum Dmax was 58Gy. Mean lung V5Gy/V20Gy was 21/8%. 54 patients (68%) exceeded RTOG0813 Dmax for ⩾1 organ-at-risk (OAR), with 27 exceeding PBT Dmax. 5 of 78 patients (6.4%) with adequate follow-up information had grade 3 toxicity. Grade 4 toxicity was not observed. Treatment-related death was considered possible (n=3) or likely (n=3) in 6 patients (7.5%). With median follow-up of 47months, 3-year survival was 53%, compared with 57% for 252 peripheral tumors treated with 3/5-fractions SABR in the same period (p=0.369). Although a substantial proportion of central SABR patients received ⩾60Gy to OARs, the 3-year survival was no different from peripheral SABR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Computerized tomographic simulation compared with clinical mark-up in palliative radiotherapy: A prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Peiman; Cheung, Fred; Pond, Gregory; Easton, Debbie; Cops, Frederick; Bezjak, Andrea; McLean, Michael; Levin, Wilfred; Billingsley, Susan; Williams, Diane; Wong, Rebecca . E-mail: Rebecca.Wong@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the impact of computed tomographic (CT) planning in comparison to clinical mark-up (CM) for palliative radiation of chest wall metastases. Methods and Materials In patients treated with CM for chest wall bone metastases (without conventional simulation/fluoroscopy), two consecutive planning CT scans were acquired with and without an external marker to delineate the CM treatment field. The two sets of scans were fused for evaluation of clinical tumor volume (CTV) coverage by the CM technique. Under-coverage was defined as the proportion of CTV not covered by the CM 80% isodose. Results Twenty-one treatments (ribs 17, sternum 2, and scapula 2) formed the basis of our study. Due to technical reasons, comparable data between CM and CT plans were available for 19 treatments only. CM resulted in a mean CTV under-coverage of 36%. Eleven sites (58%) had an under-coverage of >20%. Mean volume of normal tissues receiving {>=}80% of the dose was 5.4% in CM and 9.3% in CT plans (p = 0.017). Based on dose-volume histogram comparisons, CT planning resulted in a change of treatment technique from direct apposition to a tangential pair in 7 of 19 cases. Conclusions CT planning demonstrated a 36% under-coverage of CTV with CM of ribs and chest wall metastases.

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy with High Energy Photon and Hadron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelfke, U.

    2004-07-01

    This short contribution will briefly describe the basic concepts of intensity modulated radiation therapy with high energy photons (IMRT) and charged particle beams (IMPT). Dose delivery and optimization strategies like the `Inverse Planning' approach will be explained for both radiation modalities and their potential advantages are demonstrated for characteristic clinical examples. Finally, future development like image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiation therapy, based on functional imaging methods, will be introduced.

  2. Clinical Behaviors and Outcomes for Adenocarcinoma or Adenosquamous Carcinoma of Cervix Treated by Radical Hysterectomy and Adjuvant Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yi-Ting; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Lee, Steve P.; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To compare clinical behaviors and treatment outcomes between patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma (AC/ASC) of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy (RH) and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 318 Stage IB-IIB cervical cancer patients, 202 (63.5%) with SCC and 116 (36.5%) with AC/ASC, treated by RH and adjuvant RT/CCRT, were included. The indications for RT/CCRT were deep stromal invasion, positive resection margin, parametrial invasion, or lymph node (LN) metastasis. Postoperative CCRT was administered in 65 SCC patients (32%) and 80 AC/ASC patients (69%). Patients with presence of parametrial invasion or LN metastasis were stratified into a high-risk group, and the rest into an intermediate-risk group. The patterns of failure and factors influencing survival were evaluated. Results: The treatment failed in 39 SCC patients (19.3%) and 39 AC/ASC patients (33.6%). The 5-year relapse-free survival rates for SCC and AC/ASC patients were 83.4% and 66.5%, respectively (p = 0.000). Distant metastasis was the major failure pattern in both groups. After multivariate analysis, prognostic factors for local recurrence included younger age, parametrial invasion, AC/ASC histology, and positive resection margin; for distant recurrence they included parametrial invasion, LN metastasis, and AC/ASC histology. Compared with SCC patients, those with AC/ASC had higher local relapse rates for the intermediate-risk group but a higher distant metastasis rate for the high-risk group. Postoperative CCRT tended to improve survival for intermediate-risk but not for high-risk AC/ASC patients. Conclusions: Adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma is an independent prognostic factor for cervical cancer patients treated by RH and postoperative RT. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy could improve survival for intermediate-risk, but not necessarily high-risk, AC/ASC patients.

  3. Clinical Experiences With Onboard Imager KV Images for Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Linda X. Chen, Chin C.; Garg, Madhur; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Mah, Dennis

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To report our clinical experiences with on-board imager (OBI) kV image verification for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and radiotherapy (SRT) treatments. Methods and Materials: Between January 2007 and May 2008, 42 patients (57 lesions) were treated with SRS with head frame immobilization and 13 patients (14 lesions) were treated with SRT with face mask immobilization at our institution. No margin was added to the gross tumor for SRS patients, and a 3-mm three-dimensional margin was added to the gross tumor to create the planning target volume for SRT patients. After localizing the patient with stereotactic target positioner (TaPo), orthogonal kV images using OBI were taken and fused to planning digital reconstructed radiographs. Suggested couch shifts in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were recorded. kV images were also taken immediately after treatment for 21 SRS patients and on a weekly basis for 6 SRT patients to assess any intrafraction changes. Results: For SRS patients, 57 pretreatment kV images were evaluated and the suggested shifts were all within 1 mm in any direction (i.e., within the accuracy of image fusion). For SRT patients, the suggested shifts were out of the 3-mm tolerance for 31 of 309 setups. Intrafraction motions were detected in 3 SRT patients. Conclusions: kV imaging provided a useful tool for SRS or SRT setups. For SRS setup with head frame, it provides radiographic confirmation of localization using the stereotactic target positioner. For SRT with mask, a 3-mm margin is adequate and feasible for routine setup when TaPo is combined with kV imaging.

  4. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  5. The relationships between demographic and clinical characteristics and quality of life during and after radiotherapy: in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hofsø, Kristin; Bjordal, Kristin; Diep, Lien My; Rustøen, Tone

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal study was to investigate quality of life (QOL) before, during, and after the course of radiotherapy (RT) and to identify risk factors for diminished QOL in women with breast cancer. Patients (N = 188) completed the short-form 12 (SF-12), the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale, Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and the Self-Administrated Comorbidity Questionnaire 1 week prior to the start of RT. To assess changes in QOL, patients also completed the SF-12 1, 2, 3, and 6 months after the baseline. A random-intercept and slope model (mixed model) for each patient was used to estimate linear trends for the mental component score and physical component score of QOL (five time points for each patient). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic and clinical characteristics. The physical component score (PCS) did not change significantly (p = 0.078) during the course of RT in women with breast cancer. An increase in the number of symptoms and a higher comorbidity profile was negatively related to the PCS. The mental component score (MCS) did not change from the start of RT until the 2-month assessment, but increased significantly after 2 months (p = 0.044). An increase in the number of symptoms was negatively related to the MCS. The MCS and PCS of QOL remained stable at a diminished level except for the MCS which improved between 2 and 6 months after the start of RT. The total number of symptoms was the only variable that was negatively associated with both component scores (MCS and PCS) during the 6 months.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy combined with transarterial chemoembolization for huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nan Bao; Lv, Guang Ming; Chen, Zhong Hua

    2014-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) combined with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) for huge (≥10 cm) hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). Between May, 2006 and December, 2012, 72 patients with huge HCCs were treated by SBRT following incomplete TACE. The median total dose of 35.6 Gy was delivered over 12-14 days with a fractional dose of 2.6-3.0 Gy and 6 fractions per week. The patients were classified into those with tumor encapsulation (group A, n=33) and those without tumor encapsulation (group B, n=39). The clinical outcomes of tumor response, overall cumulative survival and toxicities/complications were retrospectively analyzed. Among the 72 patients, CR, PR, SD and PD were achieved in 6 (8.3%), 51 (70.8%), 9 (12.5%) and 6 patients (8.3%), respectively, within a median follow-up of 18 months. The objective response rate was 79.1%. The overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates and the median survival time were 38, 12 and 3% and 12.2 months, respectively. In group A, the overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 56, 21 and 6%, respectively, with a median survival of 19 months; in group B, the overall cumulative 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 23, 4 and 0%, respectively, with a median survival of 10.8 months (P=0.023). The treatment was well tolerated, with no severe radiation-induced liver disease and no reported > grade 3 toxicity. Tumor encapsulation was found to be a significant prognostic factor for survival. In conclusion, the combination of SBRT and TACE was shown to be a safe and effective treatment option for patients with unresectable huge HCC.

  7. Retrospective Comparison of External Beam Radiotherapy and Radical Prostatectomy in High-Risk, Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Papalia, Rocco; Simone, Giuseppe; De Carli, Piero; Gallucci, Michele

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: Because of the lack of conclusive and well-conducted randomized studies, the optimal therapy for prostate tumors remains controversial. The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the results of radical surgery vs. a conservative approach such as external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus androgen deprivation therapy using an intent-to-treat analysis on two pretreatment defined, concurrently treated, high-risk patient populations. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 162 patients with high-risk prostate cancer underwent an EBRT plus androgen deprivation therapy program at the RT department of our institute. In the same period, 122 patients with the same high-risk disease underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at the urologic department of our institute. Patients with adverse pathologic factors also underwent adjuvant EBRT with or without androgen deprivation therapy. The primary endpoint was freedom from biochemical failure. Results: The two groups of high-risk patients were homogeneous in terms of freedom from biochemical failure on the basis of the clinical T stage, biopsy Gleason score, and initial prostate-specific antigen level. The median follow-up was 38.6 and 33.8 months in the EBRT and RP groups, respectively. The actuarial analysis of the freedom from biochemical failure showed a 3-year rate of 86.8% and 69.8% in the EBRT and RP group, respectively (p = .001). Multivariate analysis of the whole group revealed the initial prostate-specific antigen level and treatment type (EBRT vs. RP) as significant covariates. Conclusion: This retrospective intention-to-treat analysis showed a significantly better outcome after EBRT than after RP in patients with high-risk prostate cancer, although a well-conducted randomized comparison would be the best procedure to confirm these results.

  8. Shading correction for cone-beam CT in radiotherapy: validation of dose calculation accuracy using clinical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) images are routinely acquired to verify patient position in radiotherapy (RT), but are typically not calibrated in Hounsfield Units (HU) and feature non-uniformity due to X-ray scatter and detector persistence effects. This prevents direct use of CBCT for re-calculation of RT delivered dose. We previously developed a prior-image based correction method to restore HU values and improve uniformity of CBCT images. Here we validate the accuracy with which corrected CBCT can be used for dosimetric assessment of RT delivery, using CBCT images and RT plans for 45 patients including pelvis, lung and head sites. Dose distributions were calculated based on each patient's original RT plan and using CBCT image values for tissue heterogeneity correction. Clinically relevant dose metrics were calculated (e.g. median and minimum target dose, maximum organ at risk dose). Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an "override ratio" method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to "gold standard" CT. For pelvis and head images the proportion of dose errors >2% was reduced from 40% to 1.3% after applying shading correction. For lung images the proportion of dose errors >3% was reduced from 66% to 2.2%. Application of shading correction to CBCT images greatly improves their utility for dosimetric assessment of RT delivery, allowing high confidence that CBCT dose calculations are accurate within 2-3%.

  9. Comparison of Efficacy of Regional and Extensive Clinical Target Volumes in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao Xueying; Wang Wei; Zhou Zhiguo; Gao Xianshu; Chang, Joe Y.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the effect of different clinical target volumes (CTVs) on survival rate after postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and Materials: We studied 102 patients who underwent postoperative RT after radical resection for esophageal SCC (T3/4 or N1). The radiation dose was {>=}50 Gy. In the extensive portal group (E group, 43 patients), the CTV encompassed the bilateral supraclavicular region, all mediastinal lymph nodes, the anastomosis site, and the left gastric and pericardial lymphatic. In the regional portal group (R group, 59 patients), the CTV was confined to tumor bed and the lymph nodes in the immediate region of the primary lesion. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were compared between the groups, and multivariate/univariate analysis for factors predicting survival was studied. Results: For the entire group, the 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates were 76.3%, 50.5%, and 42.9%, respectively (median survival, 30 months). The 1-, 3-, and 5-year survival rates were 76.5%, 52.1%, and 41.3%, respectively, in the E group and 76.2%, 49.2%, and 44.6%, respectively, in the R group (not significant). According to the multivariate analysis, N stage, number of lymph nodes with metastatic disease, and tumor length were the independent prognostic factors for survival. Conclusions: Using a regional portal in postoperative RT for esophageal SCC is not associated with compromised survival compared with extensive portal RT and therefore should be considered. N stage, number of affected lymph nodes, and tumor length predict poor survival.

  10. Early Clinical Outcome With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Extended-Field, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beriwal, Sushil . E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu; Gan, Gregory N.; Heron, Dwight E.; Selvaraj, Raj N.; Kim, Hayeon; Lalonde, Ron; Kelley, Joseph L.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the early clinical outcomes with concurrent cisplatin and extended-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (EF-IMRT) for carcinoma of the cervix. Methods and Materials: Thirty-six patients with Stage IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with EF-IMRT were evaluated. The pelvic lymph nodes were involved in 19 patients, and of these 19 patients, 10 also had para-aortic nodal disease. The treatment volume included the cervix, uterus, parametria, presacral space, upper vagina, and pelvic, common iliac, and para-aortic nodes to the superior border of L1. Patients were assessed for acute toxicities according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. All late toxicities were scored with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late toxicity score. Results: All patients completed the prescribed course of EF-IMRT. All but 2 patients received brachytherapy. Median length of treatment was 53 days. The median follow-up was 18 months. Acute Grade {>=}3 gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and myelotoxicity were seen in 1, 1, and 10 patients, respectively. Thirty-four patients had complete response to treatment. Of these 34 patients, 11 developed recurrences. The first site of recurrence was in-field in 2 patients (pelvis in 1, pelvis and para-aortic in 1) and distant in 9 patients. The 2-year actuarial locoregional control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and Grade {>=}3 toxicity rates for the entire cohort were 80%, 51%, 65%, and 10%, respectively. Conclusion: Extended-field IMRT with concurrent chemotherapy was tolerated well, with acceptable acute and early late toxicities. The locoregional control rate was good, with distant metastases being the predominant mode of failure. We are continuing to accrue a larger number of patients and longer follow-up data to further extend our initial observations with this approach.

  11. Outcomes of Positron Emission Tomography-Staged Clinical N3 Breast Cancer Treated With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy, Surgery, and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae Jin; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Kwan Ho; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Han-Sung; Chie, Eui Kyu; Ha, Sung Whan

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the treatment outcome and efficacy of regional lymph node irradiation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and surgery in positron emission tomography (PET)-positive clinical N3 (cN3) breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with ipsilateral infraclavicular (ICL), internal mammary (IMN), or supraclavicular (SCL) lymph node involvement in the absence of distant metastases, as revealed by an initial PET scan, were retrospectively analyzed. The clinical nodal stage at diagnosis (2002 AJCC) was cN3a in 14 patients (26%), cN3b in 12 patients (22%), and cN3c in 29 patients (53%). All patients were treated with NCT, followed by mastectomy or breast-conserving surgery and subsequent radiotherapy (RT) with curative intent. Results: At the median follow-up of 38 months (range, 9-80 months), 20 patients (36%) had developed treatment failures, including distant metastases either alone or combined with locoregional recurrences that included one ipsilateral breast recurrence (IBR), six regional failures (RF), and one case of combined IBR and RF. Only 3 patients (5.5%) exhibited treatment failure at the initial PET-positive clinical N3 lymph node. The 5-year locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival rates were 80%, 60%, and 79%, respectively. RT delivered to PET-positive IMN regions in cN3b patients and at higher doses ({>=}55 Gy) to SCL regions in cN3c patients was not associated with improved 5-year IMN/SCL relapse-free survival or DFS. Conclusion: NCT followed by surgery and RT, including the regional lymph nodes, resulted in excellent locoregional control for patients with PET-positive cN3 breast cancer. The primary treatment failure in this group was due to distant metastasis rather than RF. Neither higher-dose RT directed at PET-positive SCL nodes nor coverage of PET-positive IMN nodes was associated with additional gains in locoregional control or DFS.

  12. Interactive contour delineation of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Clinical evaluation on NSCLC patients

    SciTech Connect

    Dolz, J.; Kirişli, H. A.; Massoptier, L.; Fechter, T.; Karnitzki, S.; Oehlke, O.; Nestle, U.; Vermandel, M.

    2016-05-15

    required for thoracic radiation therapy has been presented and clinically evaluated. The introduction of the proposed system in clinical routine may offer valuable new option to radiation oncologists in performing RTP.

  13. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver.

    PubMed

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-07

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ∼60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  14. Clinical consequences of relative biological effectiveness variations in proton radiotherapy of the prostate, brain and liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabe, Alejandro; España, Samuel; Grassberger, Clemens; Paganetti, Harald

    2013-04-01

    Proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is known to depend on the (α/β)x of irradiated tissues, with evidence of ˜60% variation over (α/β)x values from 1-10 Gy. The range of (α/β)x values reported for prostate tumors (1.2-5.0 Gy), brain tumors (10-15 Gy) and liver tumors (13-17 Gy) imply that the proton RBE for these tissues could vary significantly compared to the commonly used generic value of 1.1. Our aim is to evaluate the impact of this uncertainty on the proton dose in Gy(RBE) absorbed in normal and tumor tissues. This evaluation was performed for standard and hypofractionated regimens. RBE-weighted total dose (RWTD) distributions for 15 patients (five prostate tumors, five brain tumors and five liver tumors) were calculated using an in-house developed RBE model as a function of dose, dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) and (α/β)x. Variations of the dose-volume histograms (DVHs) for the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the organs at risk due to changes of (α/β)x and fractionation regimen were calculated and the RWTD received by 10% and 90% of the organ volume reported. The goodness of the plan, bearing the uncertainties, was then evaluated compared to the delivered plan, which considers a constant RBE of 1.1. For standard fractionated regimens, the prostate tumors, liver tumors and all critical structures in the brain showed typically larger RBE values than 1.1. However, in hypofractionated regimens lower values of RBE than 1.1 were observed in most cases. Based on DVH analysis we found that the RBE variations were clinically significant in particular for the prostate GTV and the critical structures in the brain. Despite the uncertainties in the biological input parameters when estimating RBE values, the results show that the use of a variable RBE with dose, LETd and (α/β)x could help to further optimize the target dose in proton treatment planning. Most importantly, this study shows that the consideration of RBE variations could

  15. TU-PIS-Exhibit Hall-4: Philips Pinnacle3 clinical solutions for adaptive radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bzdusek, K.

    2015-06-15

    Brachytherapy devices and software are designed to last for a certain period of time. Due to a number of considerations, such as material factors, wear-and-tear, backwards compatibility, and others, they all reach a date when they are no longer supported by the manufacturer. Most of these products have a limited duration for their use, and the information is provided to the user at time of purchase. Because of issues or concerns determined by the manufacturer, certain products are retired sooner than the anticipated date, and the user is immediately notified. In these situations, the institution is facing some difficult choices: remove these products from the clinic or perform tests and continue their usage. Both of these choices come with a financial burden: replacing the product or assuming a potential medicolegal liability. This session will provide attendees with the knowledge and tools to make better decisions when facing these issues. Learning Objectives: Understand the meaning of “end-of-life or “life expectancy” for brachytherapy devices and software Review items (devices and software) affected by “end-of-life” restrictions Learn how to effectively formulate “end-of-life” policies at your institution Learn about possible implications of “end-of-life” policy Review other possible approaches to “end-of-life” issue.

  16. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Glioma: Improved Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume Using the Geodesic Distance Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, DanFang; Yan, SenXiang; Lu, ZhongJie; Xie, Cong; Chen, Wei; Xu, Xing; Li, Xinke; Yu, Haogang; Zhu, Xinli; Zheng, LingYan

    2014-01-01

    Objects To introduce a new method for generating the clinical target volume (CTV) from gross tumor volume (GTV) using the geodesic distance calculation for glioma. Methods One glioblastoma patient was enrolled. The GTV and natural barriers were contoured on each slice of the computer tomography (CT) simulation images. Then, a graphic processing unit based on a parallel Euclidean distance transform was used to generate the CTV considering natural barriers. Three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique was applied to show the delineation results. Speed of operation and precision were compared between this new delineation method and the traditional method. Results In considering spatial barriers, the shortest distance from the point sheltered from these barriers equals the sum of the distance along the shortest path between the two points; this consists of several segments and evades the spatial barriers, rather than being the direct Euclidean distance between two points. The CTV was generated irregularly rather than as a spherical shape. The time required to generate the CTV was greatly reduced. Moreover, this new method improved inter- and intra-observer variability in defining the CTV. Conclusions Compared with the traditional CTV delineation, this new method using geodesic distance calculation not only greatly shortens the time to modify the CTV, but also has better reproducibility. PMID:24896082

  17. DNA double strand breaks as predictor of efficacy of the alpha-particle emitter Ac-225 and the electron emitter Lu-177 for somatostatin receptor targeted radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5-10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and alpha-irradiation, is an early key

  18. DNA Double Strand Breaks as Predictor of Efficacy of the Alpha-Particle Emitter Ac-225 and the Electron Emitter Lu-177 for Somatostatin Receptor Targeted Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Franziska; Fahrer, Jörg; Maus, Stephan; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Venkatachalam, Senthil; Fottner, Christian; Weber, Matthias M.; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Kaina, Bernd; Miederer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Key biologic effects of the alpha-particle emitter Actinium-225 in comparison to the beta-particle emitter Lutetium-177 labeled somatostatin-analogue DOTATOC in vitro and in vivo were studied to evaluate the significance of γH2AX-foci formation. Methods To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) between the two isotopes (as - biological consequence of different ionisation-densities along a particle-track), somatostatin expressing AR42J cells were incubated with Ac-225-DOTATOC and Lu-177-DOTATOC up to 48 h and viability was analyzed using the MTT assay. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) were quantified by immunofluorescence staining of γH2AX-foci. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. In vivo uptake of both radiolabeled somatostatin-analogues into subcutaneously growing AR42J tumors and the number of cells displaying γH2AX-foci were measured. Therapeutic efficacy was assayed by monitoring tumor growth after treatment with activities estimated from in vitro cytotoxicity. Results Ac-225-DOTATOC resulted in ED50 values of 14 kBq/ml after 48 h, whereas Lu-177-DOTATOC displayed ED50 values of 10 MBq/ml. The number of DSB grew with increasing concentration of Ac-225-DOTATOC and similarly with Lu-177-DOTATOC when applying a factor of 700-fold higher activity compared to Ac-225. Already 24 h after incubation with 2.5–10 kBq/ml, Ac-225-DOTATOC cell-cycle studies showed up to a 60% increase in the percentage of tumor cells in G2/M phase. After 72 h an apoptotic subG1 peak was also detectable. Tumor uptake for both radio peptides at 48 h was identical (7.5%ID/g), though the overall number of cells with γH2AX-foci was higher in tumors treated with 48 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC compared to tumors treated with 30 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC (35% vs. 21%). Tumors with a volume of 0.34 ml reached delayed exponential tumor growth after 25 days (44 kBq Ac-225-DOTATOC) and after 21 days (34 MBq Lu-177-DOTATOC). Conclusion γH2AX-foci formation, triggered by beta- and

  19. Outcomes of stereotactic radiotherapy for a new clinical stage I lung cancer arising postpneumonectomy.

    PubMed

    Haasbeek, Cornelis J A; Lagerwaard, Frank J; de Jaeger, Katrien; Slotman, Ben J; Senan, Suresh

    2009-02-01

    Resection of second primary lung tumors that arise after previous pneumonectomy is associated with a high risk of complications. In this study, the authors reviewed outcomes after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for such patients. SRT was undergone by 15 patients who developed a new clinical stage I lung cancer at a median of 8.9 years postpneumonectomy, half of whom had severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD). SRT target volumes encompassed all respiratory motion using 4-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scans, and risk-adapted radiation schemes that ranged from 3 x 20 grays (Gy) to 8 x 7.5 Gy were used, depending on tumor size, location, and overlap with prior radiation treatment. All schemes had a biologic effective dose >100 Gy. Follow-up CT scans were obtained at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after SRT and yearly thereafter. At a median follow-up of 16.5 months, no local failures were observed, and only 2 patients experienced grade > or = 3 toxicity. One patient had transient pneumonitis that required steroids, and another patient required an increase in oxygen use. The 1-year actuarial disease-free survival rate was 92%. One patient died 10 months post-SRT after developing regional and distant metastases, and 1 patient developed an isolated regional failure. All other patients remained alive and disease free. SRT was a safe and effective treatment for stage I lung tumors that arose after prior pneumonectomy, even in patients who had severe COPD. SRT was tolerated well, and the current findings suggest that surveillance for second tumors is indicated in all patients after pneumonectomy. (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  20. Improving the Predictive Value of Preclinical Studies in Support of Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, C. Norman; Higgins, Geoff S.; Brown, J. Martin; Baumann, Michael; Kirsch, David G.; Willers, Henning; Prasanna, Pataje G.S.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Bernhard, Eric J.; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need to improve reproducibility and translatability of preclinical data in order to fully exploit opportunities for molecular therapeutics involving radiation and radio-chemotherapy. For in vitro the clonogenic assay remains the current state-of-the-art of preclinical assays, while newer moderate- and high-throughput assays offer the potential for rapid initial screening. Studies of radiation response modification by molecularly targeted agents can be improved using more physiologic 3D culture models. Elucidating effects on the cancer stem cells (CSC, and CSC-like) and developing biomarkers for defining targets and measuring responses are also important. In vivo studies are necessary to confirm in vitro findings, further define mechanism of action and address immune modulation and treatment-induced modification of the microenvironment. Newer in vivo models include genetically engineered and patient derived xenograft mouse models and spontaneously occurring cancers in domesticated animals. Selection of appropriate endpoints is important for in vivo studies, for example, regrowth delay measures bulk tumor killing while local tumor control assesses effects on CSC. The reliability of individual assays requires standardization of procedures and cross-laboratory validation. Radiation modifiers must be tested as part of clinical standard of care, which includes radio-chemotherapy for most tumors. Radiation models are compatible with, but also differ from those used for drug screening. Furthermore, the mechanism of a drug as a chemotherapy enhancer may be different than its interaction with radiation and/or radio-chemotherapy. This provides an opportunity to expand the use of molecular-targeted agents. PMID:27154913

  1. Defining the Clinical Target Volume for Bladder Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Anjarwalla, Salim; Gilbert, Hugh; Kinder, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: There are currently no data for the expansion margin required to define the clinical target volume (CTV) around bladder tumors. This information is particularly relevant when perivesical soft tissue changes are seen on the planning scan. While this appearance may reflect extravesical extension (EVE), it may also be an artifact of previous transurethral resection (TUR). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy were studied. All patients underwent preoperative TUR and staging computed tomography (CT) scans. The presence and extent of tumor growth beyond the outer bladder wall was measured radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Forty one (51%) patients had histologically confirmed tumor extension into perivesical fat. The median and mean extensions beyond the outer bladder wall were 1.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. Thirty five (44%) patients had EVE, as seen on CT scans. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for EVE were 56% and 79%, respectively. False-positive results were infrequent and not affected by either the timing or the amount of tissue resected at TUR. CT scans consistently tended to overestimate the extent of EVE. Tumor size and the presence of either lymphovascular invasion or squamoid differentiation predict a greater extent of EVE. Conclusions: In patients with radiological evidence of extravesical disease, the CTV should comprise the outer bladder wall plus a 10-mm margin. In patients with no evidence of extravesical disease on CT scans, the CTV should be restricted to the outer bladder wall plus a 6-mm margin. These recommendations would encompass microscopic disease extension in 90% of cases.

  2. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  3. Prospective multicenter study of combined treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy in breast cancer women with the rare clinical scenario of ipsilateral supraclavicular node recurrence without distant metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Pergolizzi, Stefano . E-mail: Stefano.Pergolizzi@unime.it; Adamo, Vincenzo; Russi, Elvio; Santacaterina, Anna; Maisano, Roberto; Numico, Gianmauro; Palazzolo, Carmela; Ferrau, Francesco; Settineri, Nicola; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Girlando, Andrea; Spadaro, Pietro; Cascinu, Stefano

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of chemotherapy combined with curative radiotherapy in breast cancer patients who presented with recurrent ipsilateral supraclavicular lymph node metastases (ISLM) without 'nonregional disease,' we designed an observational study performed prospectively. Patients and Methods: Forty-four consecutive patients with ISLM from breast cancer as part of recurrent regional disease without distant metastases were included in this study. All patients received chemotherapy with doxorubicin-based schema or paclitaxel for six courses and curative radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions of 2 Gy/5 days a week). An 'involved field' radiation was delivered during the interval between the third and fourth chemotherapy course; hormonal therapy was given based on receptor status. Results: The rate of overall clinical response after chemotherapy and radiotherapy was 94.9%. Median time to progression and overall survival were 28 and 40 months, respectively; the 5-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 35% (95% confidence interval, 19-51) and 20% (95% confidence interval, 6-34), respectively. Conclusion: A curative course of intravenous chemotherapy and radical irradiation is feasible in patients with ISLM. All patients presenting recurrence in supraclavicular nodes should be treated with definitive locoregional treatments and systemic therapy because the outcomes are better than might be historically assumed.

  4. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  5. Consensus guidelines for delineation of clinical target volume for intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy in postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J

    2008-06-01

    To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaboration of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  6. Enhancing clinical effectiveness of pre-radiotherapy workflow by using multidisciplinary-cooperating e-control and e-alerts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Hung, Shih-Kai; Lee, Moon-Sing; Chiou, Wen-Yen; Lai, Chun-Liang; Shih, Yi-Ting; Yeh, Pei-Han; Lin, Yi-An; Tsai, Wei-Ta; Hsieh, Hui-Ling; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Huang, Li-Wen; Lin, Po-Hao; Liu, Dai-Wei; Hsu, Feng-Chun; Tsai, Shiang-Jiun; Liu, Jia-Chi; Chung, En-Seu; Lin, Hon-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Radiotherapy (RT) is useful in managing cancer diseases. In clinical practice, early initiation of RT is crucial for enhancing tumor control. But, delivering precise RT requires a series of pre-RT working processes in a tight staff-cooperation manner. In this regard, using information system to conduct e-control and e-alerts has been suggested to improve practice effectiveness; however, this effect is not well defined in a real-world RT setting. We designed an information system to perform e-control and e-alerts for the whole process of pre-RT workflow to shorten processing time, to improve overall staff satisfaction, and to enhance working confidence. A quality-improving study conducted in a large RT center. Externally validated data were retrospectively analyzed for comparison before (from Sep. 2012 to Dec. 2012, n = 223) and after (from Sep. 2013 to Dec. 2013, n = 240) implementation of pre-RT e-control and e-alerts. Applying the e-control with delay-working e-alerts in pre-RT workflow was the main intervention. Nine workstations were identified in pre-RT workflow. The primary outcome measure was the processing time in each pre-RT workstations before and after implementing the e-control and e-alerts. Secondary measures were staff-working confidence and near-missing cases during the process of pre-RT workflow. After implementing e-control, overall processing time of pre-RT workflow was shortened from 12.2 days to 8.9 days (P < .001). Follow-up data (till Jul. 2016) showed a durable effect of 9.2 days, being still below the predefined threshold of <10 days. Using a multidisciplinary-cooperating information system is useful to conduct e-control and e-alerts in the whole process of pre-RT workflow. Clinical effectiveness, staff satisfaction, and working confidence are able to be enhanced obviously. PMID:28614257

  7. Results of a multicentric in silico clinical trial (ROCOCO): comparing radiotherapy with photons and protons for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Erik; Engelsman, Martijn; Rasch, Coen; Persoon, Lucas; Qamhiyeh, Sima; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Verhaegen, Frank; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Lambin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This multicentric in silico trial compares photon and proton radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer patients. The hypothesis is that proton radiotherapy decreases the dose and the volume of irradiated normal tissues even when escalating to the maximum tolerable dose of one or more of the organs at risk (OAR). Twenty-five patients, stage IA-IIIB, were prospectively included. On 4D F18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans, the gross tumor, clinical and planning target volumes, and OAR were delineated. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) photon and passive scattered conformal proton therapy (PSPT) plans were created to give 70 Gy to the tumor in 35 fractions. Dose (de-)escalation was performed by rescaling to the maximum tolerable dose. Protons resulted in the lowest dose to the OAR, while keeping the dose to the target at 70 Gy. The integral dose (ID) was higher for 3DCRT (59%) and IMRT (43%) than for PSPT. The mean lung dose reduced from 18.9 Gy for 3DCRT and 16.4 Gy for IMRT to 13.5 Gy for PSPT. For 10 patients, escalation to 87 Gy was possible for all 3 modalities. The mean lung dose and ID were 40 and 65% higher for photons than for protons, respectively. The treatment planning results of the Radiation Oncology Collaborative Comparison trial show a reduction of ID and the dose to the OAR when treating with protons instead of photons, even with dose escalation. This shows that PSPT is able to give a high tumor dose, while keeping the OAR dose lower than with the photon modalities.

  8. Clinical Factors Predicting Late Severe Urinary Toxicity After Postoperative Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: A Single-Institute Analysis of 742 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Fiorino, Claudio; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Alongi, Filippo; Berardi, Genoveffa; Bolognesi, Angelo; Briganti, Alberto; Broggi, Sara; Deli, Aniko; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Perna, Lucia; Pasetti, Marcella; Salvadori, Giovannella; Montorsi, Francesco; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical factors independently predictive of long-term severe urinary sequelae after postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: Between 1993 and 2005, 742 consecutive patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy with either adjuvant (n = 556; median radiation dose, 70.2 Gy) or salvage (n = 186; median radiation dose, 72 Gy) intent. Results: After a median follow-up of 99 months, the 8-year risk of Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 late urinary toxicity was almost identical (23.9% vs. 23.7% and 12% vs. 10%) in the adjuvant and salvage cohorts, respectively. On univariate analysis, acute toxicity was significantly predictive of late Grade 2 or greater sequelae in both subgroups (p <.0001 in both cases), and hypertension (p = .02) and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (p = .02) correlated significantly in the adjuvant cohort only. The variables predictive of late Grade 3 sequelae were acute Grade 2 or greater toxicity in both groups and whole-pelvis radiotherapy (8-year risk of Grade 3 events, 21% vs. 11%, p = .007), hypertension (8-year risk, 18% vs. 10%, p = .005), age {<=} 62 years at RT (8-year risk, 16% vs. 11%, p = .04) in the adjuvant subset, and radiation dose >72 Gy (8-year risk, 19% vs. 6%, p = .007) and age >71 years (8-year risk, 16% vs. 6%, p = .006) in the salvage subgroup. Multivariate analysis confirmed the independent predictive role of all the covariates indicated as statistically significant on univariate analysis. Conclusions: The risk of late Grade 2 or greater and Grade 3 urinary toxicity was almost identical, regardless of the RT intent. In the salvage cohort, older age and greater radiation doses resulted in a worse toxicity profile, and younger, hypertensive patients experienced a greater rate of severe late sequelae in the adjuvant setting. The causes of this latter correlation and apparently different etiopathogenesis of chronic damage in the two subgroups were unclear and deserve additional investigation.

  9. Freedom from local and regional failure of contralateral neck with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy for node-positive tonsil cancer: updated results of an institutional clinical management approach.

    PubMed

    Dan, Tu D; Raben, David; Schneider, Charles J; Hockstein, Neil G; Witt, Robert L; Dzeda, Michael; Cormier, Jennifer F; Raben, Adam

    2015-06-01

    To update the outcomes of an institutional clinical management approach using ipsilateral neck radiotherapy in the treatment of node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil with a well-lateralized primary lesion. Between August 2003 and April 2014, 61 consecutive patients with ipsilateral node-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the tonsil without involvement of the base of the tongue or midline soft palate were treated at a community hospital-based cancer center with radiotherapy to the primary site and ipsilateral neck. Overall survival, disease-free survival and freedom from contralateral failure were calculated. Median follow up was 37.2months (range 4-121months). Freedom from contralateral nodal failure at 5years was 98% with one contralateral nodal failure noted. The patient underwent a salvage neck dissection and was treated with post-operative radiotherapy with no evidence of disease to date. 5-year overall survival (OS) was 92.4% and 5year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86.7%. This represents the single largest series reported from a community hospital-based cancer center in which lateralized tonsil cancers with N+ disease were treated with ipsilateral neck radiotherapy. In this carefully selected cohort of patients with well-lateralized tonsil cancers, the risk of contralateral nodal failure appears to be <5%, suggesting that prophylactic radiation of the contralateral neck may not be necessary. Future planned studies will focus on prospectively selecting subgroups of patients eligible for treatment de-intensification as survivorship issues in excellent prognosis HPV positive patients are increasingly becoming relevant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  11. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-21

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  12. Comparing gold nano-particle enhanced radiotherapy with protons, megavoltage photons and kilovoltage photons: a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; McMahon, Stephen J.; Scarpelli, Matthew; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have shown potential to be used as a radiosensitizer for radiation therapy. Despite extensive research activity to study GNP radiosensitization using photon beams, only a few studies have been carried out using proton beams. In this work Monte Carlo simulations were used to assess the dose enhancement of GNPs for proton therapy. The enhancement effect was compared between a clinical proton spectrum, a clinical 6 MV photon spectrum, and a kilovoltage photon source similar to those used in many radiobiology lab settings. We showed that the mechanism by which GNPs can lead to dose enhancements in radiation therapy differs when comparing photon and proton radiation. The GNP dose enhancement using protons can be up to 14 and is independent of proton energy, while the dose enhancement is highly dependent on the photon energy used. For the same amount of energy absorbed in the GNP, interactions with protons, kVp photons and MV photons produce similar doses within several nanometers of the GNP surface, and differences are below 15% for the first 10 nm. However, secondary electrons produced by kilovoltage photons have the longest range in water as compared to protons and MV photons, e.g. they cause a dose enhancement 20 times higher than the one caused by protons 10 μm away from the GNP surface. We conclude that GNPs have the potential to enhance radiation therapy depending on the type of radiation source. Proton therapy can be enhanced significantly only if the GNPs are in close proximity to the biological target.

  13. Radiotherapy or chemotherapy for clinical stage IIA and IIB seminoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis of patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Giannatempo, P; Greco, T; Mariani, L; Nicolai, N; Tana, S; Farè, E; Raggi, D; Piva, L; Catanzaro, M; Biasoni, D; Torelli, T; Stagni, S; Avuzzi, B; Maffezzini, M; Landoni, G; De Braud, F; Gianni, A M; Sonpavde, G; Salvioni, R; Necchi, A

    2015-04-01

    Outcomes of radiotherapy (RT) compared with chemotherapy (CT) remain poorly defined for clinical stage (CS) IIA and IIB seminoma. We aimed to evaluate the current role of the two treatment modalities in this setting of testicular seminoma. A systematic review and meta-analysis (MA) was carried out to identify all evaluable studies. Search was limited to studies published after 1990 and included the Medline, Embase databases, and abstracts from ASCO (GU), ESMO, AUA, and ASTRO meetings up to April 2014. Sensitivity analyses were applied including the following: CSIIA and CSIIB, paraortic + iliac RT only in both stages, RT dose (≥30 versus <30 Gy), and PEB/EP regimens only. Thirteen studies have been selected for MA on relapse outcome. No randomized trials compared RT and CT. There were 4 prospective and 9 retrospective studies, with a total of 607 patients receiving RT and 283 patients CT. The pooled relapse rate (RR) was similar between the RT [0.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.14, P for heterogeneity = 0.096, I(2) = 38%] and CT groups (0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.15, P for heterogeneity <0.001, I(2) = 82.5%). However, in the sensitivity analysis, the pooled RR for RT in CSIIB was 0.12 (95% CI 0.06-0.17) while it was 0.05 (95% CI 0-0.11) for CT. Long-term side-effects and incidence of second cancers were more frequently reported following RT. The overall incidence of nontesticular second malignancies was 0.04 (95% CI 0.01-0.02) in the RT group and 0.02 (95% CI 0.003-0.04) in the CT group. Although RT and CT appeared to be equal options in CSIIA and IIB seminoma, a trend in favor of CT for a lower incidence of side-effects and RR in CSIIB was found. This evidence is limited by the retrospective quality of studies and their small sample size. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. miR-21 expression and clinical outcome in locally advanced pancreatic cancer: exploratory analysis of the pancreatic cancer Erbitux, radiotherapy and UFT (PERU) trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Khurum; Cunningham, David; Peckitt, Clare; Barton, Sarah; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Watkins, David; Starling, Naureen; Rao, Sheela; Begum, Ruwaida; Thomas, Janet; Oates, Jacqui; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Fassan, Matteo; Braconi, Chiara; Chau, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Background Locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with high mortality, and biomarker-driven treatment approach is currently lacking. This study evaluated safety and efficacy of a combination approach of chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) +/− cetuximab, and the prognostic role of miR-21 in patients with LAPC treated with a multimodality approach. Patients and Methods This was a randomised phase II trial in which patients with inoperable LAPC were offered gemcitabine and capecitabine (GEM-CAP) for 16 weeks. Patients with stable disease or response after GEM-CAP were randomised to capecitabine or UFT plus radiotherapy (RT) (A), or capecitabine or UFT plus cetuximab plus RT (B). The primary outcome of the study was overall survival (OS). Clinical outcome was compared according to baseline circulating miR-21 levels. Results 17 patients were enrolled and treated with GEM-CAP, with 13 patients achieving disease control and being randomised to arms A (n:7) and B (n:6). After a median follow-up of 61.2 months, median progression free survival (PFS) was 10.4 months and 12.7 months, median OS was 15.8 months and 22.0 months in arms A and B respectively (p > 0.05). Patients with high baseline plasma miR-21 had worse PFS (3.5 vs. 12.7 months; p:0.032) and OS (5.1 vs 15.3 months; p:0.5) compared to patients with low miR-21. Circulating miR-21 levels reflected miR-21 expression within the tissues. Conclusions Addition of Cetuximab to CRT following induction chemotherapy did not improve survival. High miR-21 baseline plasma expression was associated with poor clinical outcome in LAPC patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemo-radiotherapy. PMID:26862857

  15. Health-Related Quality of Life 2 Years After Treatment With Radical Prostatectomy, Prostate Brachytherapy, or External Beam Radiotherapy in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrer, Montserrat Suarez, Jose Francisco; Guedea, Ferran; Fernandez, Pablo; Macias, Victor; Marino, Alfonso; Hervas, Asuncion; Herruzo, Ismael; Ortiz, Maria Jose; Villavicencio, Humberto; Craven-Bratle, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Aguilo, Ferran

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with localized prostate cancer, from before treatment to 2 years after the intervention. Methods and Materials: This was a longitudinal, prospective study of 614 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy (134), three-dimensional external conformal radiotherapy (205), and brachytherapy (275). The HRQL questionnaires administered before and after treatment (months 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24) were the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Differences between groups were tested by analysis of variance and within-group changes by univariate repeated-measures analysis of variance. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) models were constructed to assess between-group differences in HRQL at 2 years of follow-up after adjusting for clinical variables. Results: In each treatment group, HRQL initially deteriorated after treatment with subsequent partial recovery. However, some dimension scores were still significantly lower after 2 years of treatment. The GEE models showed that, compared with the brachytherapy group, radical prostatectomy patients had worse EPIC sexual summary and urinary incontinence scores (-20.4 and -14.1; p < 0.001), and external radiotherapy patients had worse EPIC bowel, sexual, and hormonal summary scores (-3.55, -5.24, and -1.94; p < 0.05). Prostatectomy patients had significantly better EPIC urinary irritation scores than brachytherapy patients (+4.16; p < 0.001). Conclusions: Relevant differences between treatment groups persisted after 2 years of follow-up. Radical prostatectomy had a considerable negative effect on sexual functioning and urinary continence. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy had a moderate negative impact on bowel

  16. Current status of kilovoltage (kV) radiotherapy in the UK: installed equipment, clinical workload, physics quality control and radiation dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Antony L; Pearson, Michael; Whittard, Paul; McHugh, Katie E; Eaton, David J

    2016-12-01

    To assess the status and practice of kilovoltage (kV) radiotherapy in the UK. 96% of the radiotherapy centres in the UK responded to a comprehensive survey. An analysis of the installed equipment base, patient numbers, clinical treatment sites, quality control (QC) testing and radiation dosimetry processes were undertaken. 73% of UK centres have at least one kV treatment unit, with 58 units installed across the UK. Although 35% of units are over 10 years old, 39% units have been installed in the last 5 years. Approximately 6000 patients are treated with kV units in the UK each year, the most common site (44%) being basal cell carcinoma. A benchmark of QC practice in the UK is presented, against which individual centres can compare their procedures, frequency of testing and acceptable tolerance values. We propose the use of internal "notification" and "suspension" levels for analysis. All surveyed centres were using recommended Codes of Practice for kV dosimetry in the UK; approximately the same number using in-air and in-water methodologies for medium energy, with two-thirds of all centres citing "clinical relevance" as the reason for choice of code. 64% of centres had hosted an external dosimetry audit within the last 3 years, with only one centre never being independently audited. The majority of centres use locally measured applicator factors and published backscatter factors for treatments. Monitor unit calculations are performed using software in only 36% of centres. A comprehensive review of current kV practice in the UK is presented. Advances in knowledge: Data and discussion on contemporary kV radiotherapy in the UK, with a particular focus on physics aspects.

  17. Effect of irradiation on neovascularization in rat skinfold chambers: Implications for clinical trials of low-dose radiotherapy for wet-type age-related macular degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Katsuyoshi . E-mail: k-hori@idac.tohoku.ac.jp; Saito, Sachiko; Tamai, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Purpose: Wet-type age-related macular degeneration is a refractory eye disease that involves choroidal neovascularization. Randomized controlled trials of low-dose radiotherapy for this disease performed in Japan showed that, at 12 months of follow-up, visual acuity was significantly well preserved and the neovascular membrane size decreased. Because understanding the effect of irradiation on new vascular networks is an important prerequisite for clinical trials, we used a rat skinfold chamber technique to investigate X-ray-induced changes in neovasculature microcirculation. Methods and materials: Neovascularization was induced in rat skinfold chambers via polyvinyl chloride resin plates. Neovessels were irradiated in a single 10-Gy dose, after which, changes in vascular density, blood velocity, tissue blood flow, and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP), were measured. Results: Vascular density, tissue blood flow, and IFP measurements in resin-induced inflammatory tissue were much higher than those measurements in normal tissue. Although overall blood velocity was low and sluggish or blood-flow stasis occurred in the neovascular network, after a single 10-Gy dose of radiation, the velocity increased, stasis improved markedly, and many dilated vessels narrowed. Thereafter, vascular density, blood flow, and IFP significantly decreased and approached normal values. Conclusion: These findings may help explain clinical results related to radiotherapy-induced changes in neovascular membranes in age-related macular degeneration. Both vascular morphology and vascular function in inflammatory tissue returned to normal, without vessel destruction, after an appropriate radiation dose.

  18. Clinical stage 1 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: long-term follow-up of patients treated by the British National Lymphoma Investigation with radiotherapy alone as initial therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan Hudson, B.; Vaughan Hudson, G.; MacLennan, K. A.; Anderson, L.; Linch, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed of 451 adult patients with clinical stage 1/1E non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treated initially with radiotherapy alone. Histopathologically 208 patients had low-grade disease and 243 patients high-grade disease. The complete remission (CR) rate was higher in patients with low-grade disease (98%) than in those with high-grade disease (84%) (P < 0.0001). The relapse rate was similar in both histological categories, and relapse usually occurred within 5 years. The resulting overall actuarial percentage of patients achieving CR and remaining disease free (at 10 years) was 47% in patients with low-grade disease and 45% for those with high-grade disease. Salvage therapy was frequently successful in younger patients, and the overall cause-specific survival at 10 years was 71% for low-grade disease and 67% for high-grade disease. In those patients under 60 years of age at diagnosis, the overall cause-specific survival at 10 years was 84% and 80% for those with low-grade and high-grade disease respectively. These long-term results in young patients with clinical stage 1 disease are encouraging, and it will be difficult to demonstrate improved survival with initial chemotherapy either with or without radiotherapy, until new prognostic factors are found to identify poor-risk patients. PMID:8198975

  19. Particle therapy for noncancer diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Bert, Christoph; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Durante, Marco

    2012-04-15

    Radiation therapy using high-energy charged particles is generally acknowledged as a powerful new technique in cancer treatment. However, particle therapy in oncology is still controversial, specifically because it is unclear whether the putative clinical advantages justify the high additional costs. However, particle therapy can find important applications in the management of noncancer diseases, especially in radiosurgery. Extension to other diseases and targets (both cranial and extracranial) may widen the applications of the technique and decrease the cost/benefit ratio of the accelerator facilities. Future challenges in this field include the use of different particles and energies, motion management in particle body radiotherapy and extension to new targets currently treated by catheter ablation (atrial fibrillation and renal denervation) or stereotactic radiation therapy (trigeminal neuralgia, epilepsy, and macular degeneration). Particle body radiosurgery could be a future key application of accelerator-based particle therapy facilities in 10 years from today.

  20. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  1. Intraoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Tobias, Jeffrey S; Baum, Michael; Keshtgar, Mohammed; Joseph, David; Wenz, Frederik; Houghton, Joan; Saunders, Christobel; Corica, Tammy; D'Souza, Derek; Sainsbury, Richard; Massarut, Samuele; Taylor, Irving; Hilaris, Basil

    2004-03-01

    Postoperative radiotherapy, which forms part of breast-conserving therapy, may not need to encompass the whole breast. Apart from the consumption of huge resources and patients' time, postoperative radiotherapy deters many women from receiving the benefits of breast-conserving surgery, forcing them to choose a mastectomy instead. If radiotherapy could be given in the operating theatre immediately after surgery, many of these disadvantages could be overcome. One striking fact about local recurrence after breast-conserving surgery is that most occurs in the area of breast immediately next to the primary tumour; this is despite the finding that two-thirds of mastectomy samples have microscopic tumours distributed throughout the breast, even when radiotherapy is omitted. Thus, only the area adjacent to the tumour may need treatment with radiotherapy. On the basis of this premise, clinical scientists have used new technology to administer radiotherapy to the area at greatest risk of local recurrence, with the aim of completing the whole local treatment in one sitting. In this review, we have elaborated on the rationale and different methods of delivery of intraoperative radiotherapy. If this approach is validated by the results of current randomised trials, it could save time, money, and breasts.

  2. The clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation combined with chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy on patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongsheng; Qu, Yong; Shang, Qingjun; Yan, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Xiang; Liang, Donghai; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the clinical effects of low-dose splenic irradiation on locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Thirty-eight patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly divided into a control group and a combined treatment group. The control group only received chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, while the combined treatment group received low-dose splenic irradiation followed by chest three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy after 6 hours. T lymphocyte subsets of the blood cells were tested before, during, and after treatment once a week. The side effects induced by radiation were observed, and a follow-up was done to observe the survival statistics. Results The ratio differences in CD4+ cells, CD8+ cells, and CD4+/CD8+ before and after treatment were not statistically significant (P>0.05) in both the groups. The immune indexes were also not statistically significant (P>0.05) before and after radiotherapy in the combined treatment group. However, the numbers of CD4+ cells and CD4+/CD8+ ratios before radiotherapy were higher than after radiotherapy in the control group. There were no differences in the incidence of radiation toxicities between the two groups; however, the incidence of grade III or IV radiation toxicities was lower, and the dose at which the radiation toxicities appeared was higher in the combined treatment group. The total response rate was 63.16% (12/19) in the combined treatment group vs 42.11% (8/19) in the control group. The median 2-year progression-free survival (15 months in the combined treatment group vs 10 months in the control group) was statistically significant (P<0.05). The median 2-year overall survival (17.1 months in the combined treatment group vs 15.8 months in the control group) was not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Low-dose radiation can alleviate the radiation toxicities, improve the short-term efficacy of radiotherapy, and improve

  3. Californium-252 neutron brachytherapy combined with external pelvic radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy for cervical cancer: a retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shen; Ye, Ling; Tian, Yun-Hong; Wang, Li-Gen; Huang, Zuo-Ping; Li, Feng; Hou, Bing; Song, Ni; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Tao

    2017-02-28

    Cervical cancer is the sixth most common cancer in Chinese women. A standard treatment modality for cervical cancer is the combination of surgery, chemotherapy, external-beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the long-term treatment outcomes of patients with cervical cancer who were treated with californium-252 neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 150 patients with primary stages IB-IVB cervical cancer who received neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy concurrently with cisplatin chemotherapy. All patients were followed up. Using an actuarial analysis, patient outcomes and treatment-related adverse effects were evaluated and compared. The median overall survival (OS) was 33.2 months. The 3-year progression-free survival rates for patients with stages I-II, III, and IV diseases were 81.0% (68/84), 65.0% (39/60), and 0% (0/6), respectively; the 3-year OS rates were 90.5% (76/84), 85.0% (51/60), and 16.7% (1/6), respectively. Vaginal bleeding was controlled within the median time of 4.0 days. One month after treatment, 97.3% of patients achieved short-term local control. The local recurrence rates for patients with stages I-II, III, and IV disease were 4.8% (4/84), 11.7% (7/60), and 33.3% (2/6), respectively, and the occurrence rates of distant metastasis were 16.7% (14/84), 25.0% (15/60), and 100.0% (6/6), respectively. Cancer stage, tumor size, and lymph node metastasis were identified as prognostic risk factors, but only lymph node metastasis was found to be an independent prognostic factor. The most common adverse effects during treatment were grades 1 and 2 irradiation-related proctitis and radiocystitis. For patients with cervical cancer, neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy produces a rapid response and greatly

  4. SU-E-T-175: Clinical Evaluations of Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Y; Li, Y; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil-beam or superposition-convolution type dose calculation algorithms are routinely used in inverse plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, due to their limited accuracy in some challenging cases, e.g. lung, the resulting dose may lose its optimality after being recomputed using an accurate algorithm, e.g. Monte Carlo (MC). It is the objective of this study to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of a new method to include MC in the treatment planning process. Methods: We developed a scheme to iteratively perform MC-based beamlet dose calculations and plan optimization. In the MC stage, a GPU-based dose engine was used and the particle number sampled from a beamlet was proportional to its optimized fluence from the previous step. We tested this scheme in four lung cancer IMRT cases. For each case, the original plan dose, plan dose re-computed by MC, and dose optimized by our scheme were obtained. Clinically relevant dosimetric quantities in these three plans were compared. Results: Although the original plan achieved a satisfactory PDV dose coverage, after re-computing doses using MC method, it was found that the PTV D95% were reduced by 4.60%–6.67%. After re-optimizing these cases with our scheme, the PTV coverage was improved to the same level as in the original plan, while the critical OAR coverages were maintained to clinically acceptable levels. Regarding the computation time, it took on average 144 sec per case using only one GPU card, including both MC-based beamlet dose calculation and treatment plan optimization. Conclusion: The achieved dosimetric gains and high computational efficiency indicate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed MC-based IMRT optimization method. Comprehensive validations in more patient cases are in progress.

  5. Estimating the Magnitude and Field-Size Dependence of Radiotherapy-Induced Mortality and Tumor Control After Postoperative Radiotherapy For Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Calculations From Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Miles, Edward F. . E-mail: edward.miles@duke.edu; Kelsey, Chris R.; Kirkpatrick, John P.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-07-15

    Purpose: To create, on the basis of available data, a mathematical model to describe the tumor stage- and field size-dependent risks/benefits of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and to assess whether this simple model can accurately describe the reported changes in overall survival. Methods and Materials: The increase in overall survival afforded by PORT is assumed equal to the increase in cancer-specific survival minus the rate of RT-induced mortality. The increase in cancer-specific survival is the product of the probabilities of (residual local disease) x (sterilization of residual disease with PORT) x (absence of metastatic disease). Data were extracted from the literature to estimate these probabilities. Different models were considered to relate the RT-induced mortality to field size. Results: The rate of RT-induced mortality seems to be proportional to the cube of the field size. When these mortality rates are included in the model, the predicted changes in overall survival approximate the literature values. Conclusion: Clinical data can be explained by a simple model that suggests that RT-induced mortality is strongly dependent on field size and at least partly offsets the benefit afforded by PORT. Smaller RT fields, tailored to treat the areas most at risk for recurrence, provide the highest therapeutic ratio. The data used do not reflect the impact of chemotherapy, which will reduce the rate of distant metastases and enhance the efficacy of RT.

  6. TH-E-BRF-05: Comparison of Survival-Time Prediction Models After Radiotherapy for High-Grade Glioma Patients Based On Clinical and DVH Features

    SciTech Connect

    Magome, T; Haga, A; Igaki, H; Sekiya, N; Masutani, Y; Sakumi, A; Mukasa, A; Nakagawa, K

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Although many outcome prediction models based on dose-volume information have been proposed, it is well known that the prognosis may be affected also by multiple clinical factors. The purpose of this study is to predict the survival time after radiotherapy for high-grade glioma patients based on features including clinical and dose-volume histogram (DVH) information. Methods: A total of 35 patients with high-grade glioma (oligodendroglioma: 2, anaplastic astrocytoma: 3, glioblastoma: 30) were selected in this study. All patients were treated with prescribed dose of 30–80 Gy after surgical resection or biopsy from 2006 to 2013 at The University of Tokyo Hospital. All cases were randomly separated into training dataset (30 cases) and test dataset (5 cases). The survival time after radiotherapy was predicted based on a multiple linear regression analysis and artificial neural network (ANN) by using 204 candidate features. The candidate features included the 12 clinical features (tumor location, extent of surgical resection, treatment duration of radiotherapy, etc.), and the 192 DVH features (maximum dose, minimum dose, D95, V60, etc.). The effective features for the prediction were selected according to a step-wise method by using 30 training cases. The prediction accuracy was evaluated by a coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) between the predicted and actual survival time for the training and test dataset. Results: In the multiple regression analysis, the value of R{sup 2} between the predicted and actual survival time was 0.460 for the training dataset and 0.375 for the test dataset. On the other hand, in the ANN analysis, the value of R{sup 2} was 0.806 for the training dataset and 0.811 for the test dataset. Conclusion: Although a large number of patients would be needed for more accurate and robust prediction, our preliminary Result showed the potential to predict the outcome in the patients with high-grade glioma. This work was partly supported by

  7. Intraoperative radiotherapy given as a boost for early breast cancer: Long-term clinical and cosmetic results

    SciTech Connect

    Lemanski, Claire; Azria, David . E-mail: azria@valdorel.fnclcc.fr; Thezenas, Simon; Gutowski, Marian; Saint-Aubert, Bernard; Rouanet, Philippe; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Ailleres, Norbert; Dubois, Jean-Bernard

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: The standard radiotherapy (RT) of breast cancer consists of 50 Gy external beam RT (EBRT) to the whole breast followed by an electron boost of 10-16 Gy to the tumor bed, but this has several cosmetic disadvantages. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) could be an alternative to overcome these. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 50 women with early breast cancer operated on in a dedicated IORT facility. Median dose of 10 Gy was delivered using 9-MeV electron beams. All patients received postoperative EBRT (50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions). Late toxicity and cosmetic results were assessed independently by two physicians according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event v3.0 grading system and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires. Results: After a median follow-up of 9.1 years (range, 5-15 years), two local recurrences were observed within the primary tumor bed. At the time of analysis, 45 patients are alive with (n = 1) or without disease. Among the 42 disease-free remaining patients, 6 experienced Grade 2 late subcutaneous fibrosis within the boost area. Overall, the scores indicated a very good quality of life and cosmesis was good to excellent in the evaluated patients. Conclusion: Our results confirm that IORT given as a boost after breast-conserving surgery is a reliable alternative to conventional postoperative fractionated boost radiation.

  8. Definitive radiotherapy for early (T1-T2) Glottic Squamous cell carcinoma: a 20 year Cleveland clinic experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To report our 20 yr experience of definitive radiotherapy for early glottic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods and materials Radiation records of 141 patients were retrospectively evaluated for patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Cox proportional hazard models were used to perform univariate (UVA) and multivariate analyses (MVA). Cause specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were plotted using cumulative incidence and Kaplan-Meir curves, respectively. Results Of the 91% patients that presented with impaired voice, 73% noted significant improvement. Chronic laryngeal edema and dysphagia were noted in 18% and 7%, respectively. The five year LC was 94% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), 65% (T2b); the ten year LC was 89% (T1a), 83% (T1b), 87% (T2a), and 53% (T2b). The cumulative incidence of death due to larynx cancer at 10 yrs was 5.5%, respectively. On MVA, T-stage, heavy alcohol consumption during treatment, and used of weighted fields were predictive for poor outcome (p < 0.05). The five year CSS and OS was 95.9% and 76.8%, respectively. Conclusions Definitive radiotherapy provides excellent LC and CSS for early glottis carcinoma, with excellent voice preservation and minimal long term toxicity. Alternative management strategies should be pursued for T2b glottis carcinomas. PMID:23164282

  9. Inhalation anesthesia in experimental radiotherapy: a reliable and time-saving system for multifractionation studies in a clinical department. [Rats; Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, K.K.; Van Der Kogel, A.J.; Van Der Schueren, E.

    1982-01-01

    An inhalation anesthesia system has been employed to overcome several of the limitations associated wih the use of sodium pentobarbital and other i.p. administered anesthetics in experimental radiotherapy. The described method is reliable and time-saving. The depth and duration of anesthesia are easily controllable. Only 4 deaths have occurred with more than 6000 animal exposures. The use of polystyrene jigs is shown to provide adequate thermal isolation. Oxygen as a carrier of the anesthetic agent is expected to prevent a reduced tissue oxygenation and its radiobiologial consequences. The whole system is constructed as a mobile unit in which up to 16 mice or rats can be anesthetized simultaneously and irradiated in a single field with clinical treatment equipment during short time intervals between patient irradiations. The described advantages of this method make it specially suited for experiments with protracted fractionation schedules.

  10. Derivation and representation of dose-volume response from large clinical trial data sets: an example from the RADAR prostate radiotherapy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Kearvall, R.; Kennedy, A.; Richardson, S.; Krawiec, M.; Stewart, N.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Large multicentre radiotherapy trials incorporating assessment of multiple outcomes at multiple timepoints can generate extensive datasets. We have investigated graphical techniques for presentation of this data and the associated underlying dose-volume response information, necessary for guiding statistical analyses and translating outcomes to future patient treatments. A relational database was used to archive reviewed plan data for patients accrued to the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial. Viewing software was used to clean and enhance the data. Scripts were developed to export arbitrary dose-histogram data which was combined with clinical toxicity data with a median follow-up of 72 months. Graphical representations of dose-volume response developed include prevalence atlasing, univariate logistic regression and dose-volume-point odds ratios, and continuous cut-point derivation via ROC analysis. These representations indicate variable association of toxicities across structures and time-points.

  11. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  12. Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A 21st Century Perspective and Review of Multiple Randomized Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Bar Ad, Voichita Paltiel, Ora; Glatstein, Eli

    2008-12-01

    The treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma has improved dramatically over the past decades. Over the last half century, Hodgkin's lymphoma has become one of the most curable cancers of adulthood. More than 90% of the patients with localized stages of the disease can be cured with modern treatment strategies. Long-term toxicities are now the major concern for survivors of early-stage disease. Contemporary therapeutic approaches for Hodgkin's lymphoma attempt to preserve the high cure rate achieved, while reducing treatment-related acute and late toxicities. The aim of this review is to re-examine the historical and the current role of radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, given the latest evidence of an increasing role of chemotherapy for the treatment of this malignancy. The literature search was performed in PubMed Plus. Studies on children were excluded.

  13. [Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuhnt, T; Müller, A C; Janich, M; Gerlach, R; Hädecke, J; Duncker, G I W; Dunst, J

    2004-11-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, an autoimmune disorder of the thyroid, whereas the precise pathogenesis still remains unclear. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis the occurrence of proptosis is an extremely rare event. The therapy for middle and severe courses of GO shows in partly disappointing results, although several therapy modalities are possible (glucocorticoid therapy, radiotherapy, antithyroid drug treatment, surgery). All these therapies lead in only 40 - 70 % to an improvement of the pathogenic symptoms. An intensive interdisciplinary cooperation is necessary to satisfy the requirements for the treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy. As a consequence of the very different results of the few of clinical studies that were accomplished with reference to this topic, treatment by radiotherapy in the management of the disease is presently controversially discussed. In the German-speaking countries the radiotherapy is, however, firmly established as a therapy option in the treatment of the moderate disease classes (class 2-5 according to NO SPECS), especially if diplopia is present. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. Altogether, radiotherapy is assessed as an effective and sure method. The administration of glucocorticoids can take place before the beginning of or during the radiotherapy. For the success of treatment the correct selection of patients who may possibly profit from a radiotherapy is absolutely essential. By realising that GO proceeds normally over a period of 2-5 years, which is followed by a period of fibrotic alteration, the application of the radiotherapy in the early, active phase is indispensable. A precise explanation for the effects of radiotherapy in treatment of the GO does not exist at present. The determination of the most effective irradiation doses was made from retrospectively evaluated

  14. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  15. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  16. Quantitative effect of combined chemotherapy and fractionated radiotherapy on the incidence of radiation-induced lung damage: A prospective clinical study

    SciTech Connect

    Mah, K.; Van Dyk, J.; Braban, L.E.; Hao, Y.; Keane, T.J. ); Poon, P.Y. )

    1994-02-01

    The objective of this work was to assess the incidence of radiological changes compatible with radiation-induced lung damage as determined by computed tomography (CT), and subsequently calculate the dose effect factors (DEF) for specified chemotherapeutic regimens. Radiation treatments were administered once daily, 5 days-per-week. Six clinical protocols were evaluated: ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine, and DTIC) followed by 35 Gy in 20 fractions; MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) followed by 35 Gy in 20; MOPP/ABVD followed by 35 Gy in 20; CAV (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, and vincristine) followed by 25 Gy in 10; and 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) concurrent with either 50-52 Gy in 20-21 or 30-36 Gy in 10-15 fractions. CT examinations were taken before and at predetermined intervals following radiotherapy. CT evidence for the development of radiation-induced damage was defined as an increase in lung density within the irradiated volume. The radiation dose to lung was calculated using a CT-based algorithm to account for tissue inhomogeneities. Different fractionation schedules were converted using two isoeffect models, the estimated single dose (ED) and the normalized total dose (NTD). The actuarial incidence of radiological pneumonitis was 71% for the ABVD, 49% for MOPP, 52% for MOPP/ABVD, 67% for CAV, 73% for 5-FU radical, and 58% for 5-FU palliative protocols. Depending on the isoeffect model selected and the method of analysis, the DEF was 1.11-1.14 for the ABVD, 0.96-0.97 for the MOPP, 0.96-1.02 for the MOPP/ABVD, 1.03-1.10 for the CAV, 0.74-0.79 for the 5-FU radical, and 0.94 for the 5-FU palliative protocols. DEF were measured by comparing the incidence of CT-observed lung damage in patients receiving chemotherapy and radiotherapy to those receiving radiotherapy alone. The addition of ABVD or CAV appeared to reduce the tolerance of lung to radiation. 40 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Early stage ovarian cancer: a randomized clinical trial comparing whole abdominal radiotherapy, melphalan, and intraperitoneal chromic phosphate: a National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, D.; Shelley, W.; Starreveld, A.; Kirk, M.; Boyes, D.; Gerulath, A.; Levitt, M.; Fraser, R.; Carmichael, J.; Methot, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Two hundred fifty-seven eligible patients with stage I, IIA high risk ovarian carcinoma and IIB, IIIO (disease confined to pelvis), were randomized to either total abdominal radiotherapy (arm A) 2,250 rad in 20 fractions (107 patients), melphalan (arm B) 8 mg/m2/d X 4 every 4 weeks X 18 courses (106 patients), or intraperitoneal chromic phosphate (arm C) 10 to 20 mCi (44 patients). All patients were initially treated with pelvic radiotherapy; arm A, 2,250 rad in ten fractions; and arms B and C, 4,500 rad in 20 fractions. Entry to arm C was discontinued early because of toxicity. In a multifactor analysis using proportional hazards models, no significant difference in survival was observed although there was a marginally significant difference in disease-free survival (P = .015) with arm B being superior to arm A. Stage (P less than .0001), grade (P less than .0001), and histology (P less than .008) were predictors of survival in the multifactor analysis. Performance status, age, and residual disease were significant predictors in the single factor analysis but were not predictive when correction was made for the effects of stage, grade, and histology. Five-year survival rates are 62% for arm A, 61% for arm B, and 66% for arm C. Median duration of follow-up is 8 years. Long-term complications of radiotherapy were seen in 19 patients on arm A, 11 on arm B, and 11 on arm C. Four patients who had received melphalan developed either a myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia. Violations in covering the whole abdominal target volume were correlated with survival.

  18. Examining prognostic factors and patterns of failure in nasopharyngeal carcinoma following concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy: impact on future clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Cheng, S H; Yen, K L; Jian, J J; Tsai, S Y; Chu, N M; Leu, S Y; Chan, K Y; Tan, T D; Cheng, J C; Hsieh, C Y; Huang, A T

    2001-07-01

    Concomitant chemotherapy and radiotherapy (CCRT), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy, has improved the outcome of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the prognosis and patterns of failure after this combined-modality treatment are not yet clear. In this report, the prognostic factors and failure patterns we observed with CCRT may shed new light in the design of future trials. One hundred forty-nine (149) patients with newly diagnosed and histologically proven NPC were prospectively treated with CCRT followed by adjuvant chemotherapy between April 1990 and December 1997. One hundred and thirty-three (89.3%) patients had MRI of head and neck for primary evaluation before treatment. Radiotherapy was delivered either at 2 Gy per fraction per day up to 70 Gy or 1.2 Gy per fraction, 2 fractions per day, up to 74.4 Gy. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. According to the AJCC 1997 staging system, 32 patients were in Stage II, 53 in Stage III, and 64 in Stage IV (M0). Univariate analysis revealed that WHO (World Health Organization) Type II histology, T4 classification, and parapharyngeal extension were poor prognostic factors for locoregional control. Multivariate analysis revealed that T4 disease was the most important adverse factor that affects locoregional control, the risk ratio being 5.965 (p = 0.02). Univariate analysis for distant metastasis revealed that T4 and N3 classifications, serum LDH level > 410 U/L (normal range, 180-460), parapharyngeal extension, and infiltration of the clivus were significantly associated with poor prognosis. Multivariate analysis, however, revealed that T4 classification and N3 category were the only two factors that predicted distant metastasis; the risk ratios were 3.994 (p = 0.02) and 3.390 (p = 0.01), respectively. Therefore, based on the risk factor analysis, we were able to identify low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. Low-risk patients were those without the risk factors mentioned above. They

  19. Adjuvant and Definitive Radiotherapy for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sabolch, Aaron; Feng, Mary; Griffith, Kent; Hammer, Gary; Doherty, Gerard; Ben-Josef, Edgar

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of both adjuvant and definitive radiotherapy on local control of adrenocortical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Outcomes were analyzed from 58 patients with 64 instances of treatment for adrenocortical carcinoma at the University of Michigan's Multidisciplinary Adrenal Cancer Clinic. Thirty-seven of these instances were for primary disease, whereas the remaining 27 were for recurrent disease. Thirty-eight of the treatment regimens involved surgery alone, 10 surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and 16 definitive radiotherapy for unresectable disease. The effects of patient, tumor, and treatment factors were modeled simultaneously using multiple variable Cox proportional hazards regression for associations with local recurrence, distant recurrence, and overall survival. Results: Local failure occurred in 16 of the 38 instances that involved surgery alone, in 2 of the 10 that consisted of surgery plus adjuvant radiotherapy, and in 1 instance of definitive radiotherapy. Lack of radiotherapy use was associated with 4.7 times the risk of local failure compared with treatment regimens that involved radiotherapy (95% confidence interval, 1.2-19.0; p = 0.030). Conclusions: Radiotherapy seems to significantly lower the risk of local recurrence/progression in patients with adrenocortical carcinoma. Adjuvant radiotherapy should be strongly considered after surgical resection.

  20. Selective omission of level V nodal coverage for patients with oropharyngeal cancer: Clinical validation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy experience and dosimetric significance.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Pranshu; Urban, Erich; Pagan, Jonathan D; Geye, Heather M; Patel, Vatsal B; Bayliss, R Adam A; Bender, Edward T; Harari, Paul M

    2016-04-01

    We sought to validate the consensus recommendation and assess dosimetric significance of selective omission of nodal level V from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) clinical target volume (CTV) for oropharyngeal cancer. IMRT plans and clinical outcomes for 112 patients with oropharyngeal cancer (nodal classification N0-N2b) were analyzed for coverage of ipsilateral and contralateral nodal level V. Additionally, new IMRT plans were generated in 6 randomly selected patients to assess its dosimetric impact. With median follow-up of 3.4 years, there were no failures identified in nodal level V with or without nodal level V omission. Upon dosimetric evaluation, significant reduction in integral dose, V10 Gy , V20 Gy , V30 Gy , V40 Gy , and V50 Gy was observed by excluding unilateral and bilateral level V from the CTV. We clinically validate the consensus recommendation for selective omission of level V nodal coverage in IMRT planning of patients with oropharyngeal cancer and demonstrate significant dosimetric advantages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acute Toxicity Profile and Compliance to Accelerated Radiotherapy Plus Carbogen and Nicotinamide for Clinical Stage T2-4 Laryngeal Cancer: Results of a Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens, Geert O.; Terhaard, Chris H.; Doornaert, Patricia A.; Bijl, Hendrik P.; Ende, Piet van den; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A.; Kaanders, Johannes H.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Results: Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. Conclusion: With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit.

  2. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Balosso, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  3. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam irradiation: a prospective phase I-II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai-Liang; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Qian, Hao; Wang, Li-Juan; Yang, Huan-Jun; Fu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Shen

    2003-12-01

    To observe in a clinical trial the feasibility, tolerance, and efficacy of reirradiation by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Between June 1999 and March 2001, 23 lung carcinoma patients with locoregional recurrence after EBRT were enrolled in this study. Of the 23 patients, 21 were men and 2 were women (median age 68 years, range 43-79). At the first course of RT, 9 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, 7 adenocarcinoma, and 7 small cell carcinoma. The interval between the first course of RT and recurrence varied from 6 to 42 months (median 13). The median dose of the first course of RT was 66 Gy (range 30-78). Reirradiation was carried out using 3D-CRT and only covered the radiographic lesions. The median dose of reirradiation was 51 Gy (range 46-60), which was delivered by a conventionally fractionated schedule (i.e., 1.8-2.0 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/wk). The toxicity was assessed according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. The median follow-up time was 15 months (range 2-37). Acute radiation esophagitis occurred in 9% of patients (Grade 1-2). Acute radiation pneumonitis developed in 22% of patients (Grade 1-2). No cases of acute Grade 3 or greater toxicity had been recorded at last follow-up. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed in 26% of patients (Grade 2-3); no other severe late complications have been observed. The 1- and 2-year survival rate was 59% and 21%, respectively. The locoregional progression-free rate at 1 and 2 years was 51% and 42%, respectively. Reirradiation using 3D-CRT was tolerated by this group of recurrent lung carcinoma patients without severe complications. The 2-year outcome was encouraging. Reirradiation with 3D-CRT can be considered an option for the management of locoregionally recurrent lung carcinoma.

  4. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-04: Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT): Review of Technical Standards and Credentialing in Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Giaddui, T; Chen, W; Yu, J; Gong, Y; Galvin, J; Xiao, Y; Cui, Y; Yin, F; Craig, T; Dawson, L; Al-Hallaq, H; Chmura, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRT to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT

  5. Technical Note: Partial body irradiation of mice using a customized PMMA apparatus and a clinical 3D planning/LINAC radiotherapy system

    SciTech Connect

    Karagounis, Ilias V.; Koukourakis, Michael I. E-mail: mkoukour@med.duth.gr; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M.

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: In vivo radiobiology experiments involving partial body irradiation (PBI) of mice are of major importance because they allow for the evaluation of individual organ tolerance; overcoming current limitations of experiments using lower dose, whole body irradiation. In the current study, the authors characterize and validate an effective and efficient apparatus for multiple animal PBI, directed to the head, thorax, or abdomen of mice. Methods: The apparatus is made of polymethylmethacrylate and consists of a rectangular parallelepiped prism (40 cm × 16 cm × 8 cm), in which five holes were drilled to accomodate standard 60 ml syringes, each housing an unanesthetized, fully immobilized mouse. Following CT-scanning and radiotherapy treatment planning, radiation fields were designed to irradiate the head, thorax, or abdomen of the animal. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to confirm the treatment planning dosimetry for primary beam and scattered radiation. Results: Mice are efficiently placed into 60 ml syringes and immobilized, without the use of anesthetics. Although partial rotational movement around the longitudinal axis and a minor 2 mm forward/backward movement are permitted, this does not compromise the irradiation of the chosen body area. TLDs confirmed the dose values predicted by the treatment planning dosimetry, both for primary beam and scattered radiation. Conclusions: The customized PMMA apparatus described and validated is cost-effective, convenient to use, and efficient in performing PBI without the use of anesthesia. The developed apparatus permits the isolated irradiation of the mouse head, thorax, and abdomen. Importantly, the apparatus allows the delivery of PBI to five mice, simultaneously, representing an efficient way to effectively expose a large number of animals to PBI through multiple daily fractions, simulating clinical radiotherapy treatment schedules.

  6. Post-Irradiation Bladder Syndrome After Radiotherapy of Malignant Neoplasm of Small Pelvis Organs: An Observational, Non-Interventional Clinical Study Assessing VESIcare®/Solifenacin Treatment Results.

    PubMed

    Jaszczyński, Janusz; Kojs, Zbigniew; Stelmach, Andrzej; Wohadło, Łukasz; Łuczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze, Sylwia; Rys, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2016-07-30

    BACKGROUND Radiotherapy is explicitly indicated as one of the excluding factors in diagnosing overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, symptoms of OAB such as urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia, which are consequences of irradiation, led us to test the effectiveness of VESIcare®/Solifenacin in patients demonstrating these symptoms after radiation therapy of small pelvis organs due to malignant neoplasm. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted an observatory clinical study including 300 consecutive patients with symptoms of post-irradiation bladder; 271 of those patients completed the study. The observation time was 6 months and consisted of 3 consecutive visits taking place at 12-week intervals. We used VESIcare® at a dose of 5 mg a day. Every sixth patient was examined urodynamically at the beginning and at the end of the observation period, with an inflow speed of 50 ml/s. RESULTS We noticed improvement and decline in the average number of episodes a day in the following parameters: number of micturitions a day (-36%, P<0.01), nocturia (-50%, P<0.01), urgent episodes (-41%, P<0.03), and episodes of incontinence (-43%, P<0.01). The patients' quality of life improved. The average maximal cystometric volume increased by 34 ml (21%, p<0.01), average bladder volume of "first desire" increased by 42 ml (49%, P<0.01), and average detrusor muscle pressure at maximal cystometric volume diminished by 9 cmH2O (-36%, P<0.03). CONCLUSIONS The substance is well-tolerated. Solifenacin administered long-term to patients with symptoms of OAB after radiotherapy of a malignant neoplasm of the small pelvis organs has a daily impact in decreasing number of urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia.

  7. Acute toxicity profile and compliance to accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancer: results of a phase III randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Janssens, Geert O; Terhaard, Chris H; Doornaert, Patricia A; Bijl, Hendrik P; van den Ende, Piet; Chin, Alim; Pop, Lucas A; Kaanders, Johannes H

    2012-02-01

    To report the acute toxicity profile and compliance from a randomized Phase III trial comparing accelerated radiotherapy (AR) with accelerated radiotherapy plus carbogen and nicotinamide (ARCON) in laryngeal cancer. From April 2001 to February 2008, 345 patients with cT2-4 squamous cell laryngeal cancer were randomized to AR (n = 174) and ARCON (n = 171). Acute toxicity was scored weekly until Week 8 and every 2-4 weeks thereafter. Compliance to carbogen and nicotinamide was reported. Between both treatment arms (AR vs. ARCON) no statistically significant difference was observed for incidence of acute skin reactions (moist desquamation: 56% vs. 58%, p = 0.80), acute mucosal reactions (confluent mucositis: 79% vs. 85%, p = 0.14), and symptoms related to acute mucositis (severe pain on swallowing: 53% vs. 58%, p = 0.37; nasogastric tube feeding: 28% vs. 28%, p = 0.98; narcotic medicines required: 58% vs. 58%, p = 0.97). There was a statistically significant difference in median duration of confluent mucositis in favor of AR (2.0 vs 3.0 weeks, p = 0.01). There was full compliance with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide in 86% and 80% of the patients, with discontinuation in 6% and 12%, respectively. Adjustment of antiemesis prophylaxis was needed in 42% of patients. With the exception of a slight increase in median duration of acute confluent mucositis, the present data reveal a similar acute toxicity profile between both regimens and a good compliance with ARCON for clinical stage T2-4 laryngeal cancers. Treatment outcome and late morbidity will determine the real therapeutic benefit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinical observation and quality of life in terms of nasal sinusitis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: long-term results from different nasal irrigation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Luo, H-H; Fu, Z-C; Liao, S-G; Li, D-S

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between nasal irrigation techniques (NIT) and the survival rate and the quality of life (QOL) in patients with nasal sinusitis (NS). Methods: We studied data from 1134 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) who received radical radiotherapy, which were randomly divided into three groups (A, B and C). Group A used nasal irrigator; Group B used homemade nasal irrigation (NI) connector combined with enemator; and Group C used nasal sprayer. The clinical effects, 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were observed. Furthermore, the QOL in patients with NS was evaluated using the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test 20. Results: The median follow-up time was 69 months. The 5-year OS and PFS were 80.5% and 73.2%, respectively, for all patients. There was no significant difference in OS, PFS, xerostomia and neck skin toxicity grade 3 and greater among groups. There was no difference among groups. The incidence of NS was the highest in group C. Conclusion: The symptoms of NS seriously affected the QOL period of 1 year. Group C showed no improvement during the follow-up period, which for A and B, by contrast, had after 1 year. Although the exact mechanism remains to be explored in NIT, our findings suggest that patients with NPC should nasal irrigate for 2 years after radiotherapy. Advances in knowledge: Our study shows that a nasal irrigator is necessary for patients with NPC for a high QOL in terms of NS. PMID:24814695

  9. Post-Irradiation Bladder Syndrome After Radiotherapy of Malignant Neoplasm of Small Pelvis Organs: An Observational, Non-Interventional Clinical Study Assessing VESIcare®/Solifenacin Treatment Results

    PubMed Central

    Jaszczyński, Janusz; Kojs, Zbigniew; Stelmach, Andrzej; Wohadło, Łukasz; Łuczyńska, Elżbieta; Heinze, Sylwia; Rys, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is explicitly indicated as one of the excluding factors in diagnosing overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, symptoms of OAB such as urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia, which are consequences of irradiation, led us to test the effectiveness of VESIcare®/Solifenacin in patients demonstrating these symptoms after radiation therapy of small pelvis organs due to malignant neoplasm. Material/Methods We conducted an observatory clinical study including 300 consecutive patients with symptoms of post-irradiation bladder; 271 of those patients completed the study. The observation time was 6 months and consisted of 3 consecutive visits taking place at 12-week intervals. We used VESIcare® at a dose of 5 mg a day. Every sixth patient was examined urodynamically at the beginning and at the end of the observation period, with an inflow speed of 50 ml/s. Results We noticed improvement and decline in the average number of episodes a day in the following parameters: number of micturitions a day (−36%, P<0.01), nocturia (−50%, P<0.01), urgent episodes (−41%, P<0.03), and episodes of incontinence (−43%, P<0.01). The patients’ quality of life improved. The average maximal cystometric volume increased by 34 ml (21%, p<0.01), average bladder volume of “first desire” increased by 42 ml (49%, P<0.01), and average detrusor muscle pressure at maximal cystometric volume diminished by 9 cmH2O (−36%, P<0.03). Conclusions The substance is well-tolerated. Solifenacin administered long-term to patients with symptoms of OAB after radiotherapy of a malignant neoplasm of the small pelvis organs has a daily impact in decreasing number of urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia. PMID:27474270

  10. Effect of Bevacizumab Plus Temozolomide-Radiotherapy for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma with Different MGMT Methylation Status: A Meta-Analysis of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chigang; Ren, Junquan; Zhang, Rui; Xin, Tao; Li, Zhongmin; Zhang, Zhiti; Xu, Xinghua; Pang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background MGMT methylation status can influence the therapeutic effect and prognosis of glioblastoma (GBM). There are conflicting results from studies evaluating the efficacy of bevacizumab (BV) when it is combined with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiotherapy (RT) in patients diagnosed with GBM with different MGMT methylation status. Material/Methods Data were extracted from publications in PubMed, Embase, and The Cochrane Library, with the last search performed March 23, 2016. Data on overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and MGMT methylation status were obtained. Results Data from 3 clinical trials for a total of 1443 subjects were used for this meta-analysis. MGMT methylated and unmethylated patients showed improved PFS in the BV group (pooled HRs, 0.769, 95% CIs 0.604–0.978, P=0.032; 0.675, 95%CIs 0.466–0.979, P=0.038). For patients with either type of GBM, BV did not improve the OS based on the pooled HRs 1.132 (95% CIs 0.876–1.462; P=0.345) for methylated and 1.018 (95% CIs 0.879–1.179; P=0.345) for unmethylated. Conclusions Bevacizumab combined with temozolomide-radiotherapy correlated with improved PFS for treatment of patients with different MGMT methylation status of newly diagnosed GBM. There was insufficient evidence to determine the synergistic effects of combining BV with TMZ and RT on improving survival in patients with different MGMT methylation status. PMID:27684457

  11. Comparison of clinical outcomes and toxicity in endometrial cancer patients treated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy or conventional radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Chih; Wang, Lily; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Jin-Ching; Jan, Jian-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the treatment outcomes and toxicity in endometrial cancer patients treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or conventional radiotherapy (CRT). There were 101 patients with stage IA-IIIC2 endometrial carcinoma treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. In total, 36 patients received adjuvant CRT and 65 were treated with adjuvant IMRT. The endpoints were overall survival, local failure-free survival, and disease-free survival. Patients were assessed for acute toxicity weekly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Schema. The 5-year overall survival, local failure-free survival, and disease-free survival for the CRT group and the IMRT group were 82.9% versus 93.5% (p = 0.26), 93.7% versus 89.3% (p = 0.68), and 88.0% versus 82.8% (p = 0.83), respectively. Four (11.1%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity and three (8.3%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity in the CRT group, whereas four (6.2%) patients had Grade 3 or greater acute GI toxicity in the IMRT group and no patient had severe GU toxicity. There was one (2.8%) patient who had Grade 3 or greater late GI toxicity and one (2.8%) patient had Grade 3 or greater late GU toxicity in the CRT group, whereas no patient had severe GI or GU toxicity in the IMRT group. Adjuvant IMRT for endometrial cancer patients had comparable clinical outcomes with CRT and had less acute and late toxicity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Correlation in Rectal Cancer Between Clinical Tumor Response After Neoadjuvant Radiotherapy and Sphincter or Organ Preservation: 10-Year Results of the Lyon R 96-02 Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ortholan, Cecile; Romestaing, Pascale; Chapet, Olivier; Gerard, Jean Pierre

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in rectal cancer, the benefit of a neoadjuvant radiation dose escalation with endocavitary contact radiotherapy (CXRT) in addition to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). This article provides an update of the Lyon R96-02 Phase III trial. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with T2 to T3 carcinoma of the lower rectum were randomly assigned to neoadjuvant EBRT 39 Gy in 13 fractions (43 patients) vs. the same EBRT with CXRT boost, 85 Gy in three fractions (45 patients). Median follow-up was 132 months. Results: The 10-year cumulated rate of permanent colostomy (CRPC) was 63% in the EBRT group vs. 29% in the EBRT+CXRT group (p < 0.001). The 10-year rate of local recurrence was 15% vs. 10% (p = 0.69); 10-year disease-free survival was 54% vs. 53% (p = 0.99); and 10-year overall survival was 56% vs. 55% (p = 0.85). Data of clinical response (CR) were available for 78 patients (36 in the EBRT group and 42 in the EBRT+CXRT group): 12 patients were in complete CR (1 patient vs. 11 patients), 53 patients had a CR {>=}50% (24 patients vs. 29 patients), and 13 patients had a CR <50% (11 patients vs. 2 patients) (p < 0.001). Of the 65 patients with CR {>=}50%, 9 had an organ preservation procedure (meaning no rectal resection) taking advantage of major CR. The 10-year CRPC was 17% for patients with complete CR, 42% for patients with CR {>=}50%, and 77% for patients with CR <50% (p = 0.014). Conclusion: In cancer of the lower rectum, CXRT increases the complete CR, turning in a significantly higher rate of long-term permanent sphincter and organ preservation.

  13. [Clinical analysis of combination of (252)Cf neutron intracavitary brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy for 110 cervical cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Bu, Jie; Li, Ren; Song, Wei; Cao, Jing-xu; Wang, Ying-xuan

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the curative effect and complication of (252)Cf brachytherapy on cervical cancer. From Nov 2002 to Nov 2007, 110 cervical cancer patients were treated by combination of (252)Cf neutron intracavitary brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy. There were 2 cases of stage Ib, 5 stage IIa, 57 stage IIb, 2 stage IIIa, 41 stage IIIb, 2 stage IVa, and 1 stage IVb. The whole pelvic cavity was irradiated with 8 MV X-ray, 1.8 Gy/fraction, 4 - 5 times per week. The total dose of external beam radiotherapy was 40 - 50 Gy (the center of whole pelvic field was blocked by 4 cm in width after 20 - 30 Gy). (252)Cf neutron intracavitary brachytherapy was delivered at 6 - 8 Gy(i)/fraction, and the total dose of reference point A was 30-51 Gy(i). The median dose was 42 Gy(i). The overall 3-year survival rate of all patients was 79.2%, and the local control rate was 90.0%. In particular, the 3-year survival rate was 1/2 for stage I, 84.3% for stage II, 53.7% for stage III. The difference between stage II and stage III was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The 3-year survival in cervical lesions larger than or equal to 4 cm and those less than 4 cm was 68.1% and 71.2%, respectively (P > 0.05). The 3-year survival rate of patients with and without anemia was 42.4% and 78.2%, respectively (P < 0.05). The 3-year survival rate of patients with squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma was 78.5% and 76.9%, respectively (P > 0.05). The late radiation complications of rectum and bladder was 11.8% (13/110) and 2.7% (3/110), respectively. It is concluded that (252)Cf is a better source for intracavitary brachytherapy. According to our initial experience, (252)Cf has advantages of a high local control rate, especially to bulky tumor and adenocarcinoma.

  14. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer?: A meta-analysis of 16 randomized controlled trials following the PRISMA guidelines.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zheng; Liang, Rui; Wang, Cheng-Qiong; Xu, Shaofeng; Li, Nana; He, Yuejuan; Tang, Fushan; Chen, Ling; Ma, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Aidi injection plus radiotherapy is widely used for lung cancer in China. Can Aidi injection alleviate the toxicity and improve the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy in lung cancer? Has Aidi injection the attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy? There is lack of strong evidence to prove it. To reveal its real attenuation and synergistic efficacy to radiotherapy and provide sufficient evidence for adjuvant chemotherapy strategies to lung cancer, we systematically evaluated all related studies. We collected all studies about Aidi injection plus radiotherapy for lung cancer in Medline, Embase, Web of Science, China national knowledge infrastructure database (CNKI), Chinese scientific journals full-text database (VIP), Wanfang database, China biological medicine database (CBM) (established to June 2015), and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (June 2015), evaluated their quality according to the Cochrane evaluation handbook of randomized controlled trials (5.1.0), extracted data following the PICO principles and synthesized the data by Meta analysis. Sixteen randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 1192 lung cancer patients were included, with general methodological quality in most trials. The merged relative risk (RR) values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for objective response rate (ORR), disease control rate (DCR), and quality of life (QOL) were as follows: 1.54, (1.39,1.70), 1.10 (1.02, 1.19), and 2.13 (1.68, 2.68). The merged RR values and their 95% CI of meta-analysis for myelosuppression and neutropenia, radiation pneumonitis, and radiation esophagitis were as follows: 0.51 (0.38, 0.69), 0.53 (0.42, 0.65), 0.52 (0.41, 0.67), and 0.52 (0.40, 0.68). All were statistically significant. The possibility of publication bias was small which objectively reported the results. The evidence available indicates that Aidi injection plus radiotherapy can significantly improve the clinical efficacy and QOL of patients with lung cancer. Aidi

  15. The role of radiotherapy in the management of patients with diffuse low grade glioma: A systematic review and evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    PubMed

    Ryken, Timothy C; Parney, Ian; Buatti, John; Kalkanis, Steven N; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2015-12-01

    (1) What is the optimal role of external beam radiotherapy in the management of adult patients with newly diagnosed low-grade glioma (LGG) in terms of improving outcome (i.e., survival, complications, seizure control or other reported outcomes of interest)? (2) Which radiation strategies (dose, timing, fractionation, stereotactic radiation, brachytherapy, chemotherapy) improve outcomes compared to standard external beam radiation therapy in the initial management of low grade gliomas in adults? (3) Do specific factors (e.g., age, volume, extent of resection, genetic subtype) identify subgroups with better outcomes following radiation therapy than the general population of adults with newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas? These recommendations apply to adults with newly diagnosed diffuse LGG. OUTCOMES IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW GRADE GLIOMA TREATED WITH RADIOTHERAPY: Level I Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong progression free survival, irrespective of extent of resection. Level II Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults as an equivalent alternative to observation in preserving cognitive function, irrespective of extent of resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low grade glioma in adults to improve seizure control in patients with epilepsy and subtotal resection. Level III Radiotherapy is recommended in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults to prolong overall survival in patients with subtotal resection. Level III Consideration of the risk of radiation induced morbidity, including cognitive decline, imaging abnormalities, metabolic dysfunction and malignant transformation, is recommended when the delivery of radiotherapy is selected in the management of newly diagnosed low-grade glioma in adults. STRATEGIES OF RADIOTHERAPY IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH NEWLY DIAGNOSED LOW

  16. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-15

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  17. TU-G-BRB-02: Clinical Trials in Particle Therapy - Open Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, H.

    2015-06-15

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  18. LungTech, an EORTC Phase II trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located lung tumours: a clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Adebahr, S; Collette, S; Shash, E; Lambrecht, M; Le Pechoux, C; Faivre-Finn, C; De Ruysscher, D; Peulen, H; Belderbos, J; Dziadziuszko, R; Fink, C; Guckenberger, M; Hurkmans, C

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supports stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) as a curative treatment option for inoperable early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) resulting in high rates of tumour control and low risk of toxicity. However, promising results are mainly derived from SBRT of peripheral pulmonary lesions, whereas SBRT for the central tumours can lead to severe radiation sequelae owing to the spatial proximity to the serial organs at risk. Robust data on the tolerance of mediastinal structures to high-dose hypofractionated radiation are limited; furthermore, there are many open questions regarding the efficiency, safety and response assessment of SBRT in inoperable, centrally located early stage NSCLC, which are addressed in a prospective multicentre study [sponsored by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC 22113-08113—LungTech)]. In this review, we summarize the current status regarding SBRT for centrally located early stage NSCLC that leads to the rationale of the LungTech trial. Outline and some essential features of the study with focus on a summary of current experiences in dose/fraction-toxicity coherences after SBRT to the mediastinal structures that lead to LungTech normal tissue constraints are provided. PMID:25873481

  19. The approaches in the care for terminal cancer patients in radiotherapy and oncology clinic, Rijeka University Hospital Center.

    PubMed

    Dobrila-Dintinjana, Renata; Redzović, Arnela; Perić, Jana; Petranović, Duska

    2013-04-01

    We sought to determine the proportion of our admitted patients in terminal phase of ilness who recieved some kind of active oncological therapy. We conducted a pilot study on the records of patients who died in the University Hospital. We assessed the percentage of mortality, a therapeutic approach in terms of treating the underlying disease, and access to palliative treatment. Of 2097 patients hospitalized in the UHC Rijeka Department of Radiation Therapy and Oncology during 2010 and 2011, 44 pts died which accounts for 2.1%. The most common primary sites of cancer in patients who died in our Department were the lungs and then the breast. Ten (22.7%) patients were admitted exclusively to receive palliative care, while others (34-77.3%) were admitted for planned active chemo- and/or radiotherapy administration. Within three months before death, 18 (40.9%) patients underwent chemotherapy treatment. The number of patients hospitalized due to providing palliative care is extremely low, which could indicate a good supply of out-patient treatment of cancer patients in the terminal stage of the disease. However, concerned about the high percentage of patients who tried to provide oncology treatments in the three months before his death. The percentages referred to in their daily work is still guided by the principles of healing "to the end" and thus we plunge into the realm disthanasia.

  20. External-beam radiotherapy and/or HDR brachytherapy in postoperative endometrial cancer patients: clinical outcomes and toxicity rates.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, V; Agolli, L; Valeriani, M; Narici, S; Osti, M F; Patacchiola, F; Mossa, B; Moscarini, M; Maurizi Enrici, R

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate local disease control, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local relapse-free survival (LRFS) in patients with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy (VBT )± external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). From September 2007 to February 2011, 40 patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively analysed. Surgery consisted of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy without node dissection (16 patients) or with bilateral pelvic node dissection (24 patients). The stage distribution was as follows: two IA, nine IB, 12 IC, five IIA, eight IIB, two IIIA and two IIIC. Thirty-four patients underwent EBRT and VBT. Six patients received VBT alone. Median follow-up was 26 months. The 5-year OS and DFS were 96.4% and 86.9%, respectively. No local recurrence was observed. Four patients presented distant disease (three had lung metastases and one had hepatic node metastases). Acute EBRT-related toxicities were seen in 15 (38%) patients. We recorded late toxicities in 14 patients (35%). There was no evidence of grade 3-4 toxicity. Adjuvant EBRT and/or VBT in patients with endometrial cancer showed good outcomes in terms of local disease control, with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  1. First Clinical Release of an Online, Adaptive, Aperture-Based Image-Guided Radiotherapy Strategy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy to Correct for Inter- and Intrafractional Rotations of the Prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschmann, Heinz; Kametriser, Gerhard; Steininger, Philipp; Scherer, Philipp; Schoeller, Helmut; Gaisberger, Christoph; Mooslechner, Michaela; Mitterlechner, Bernhard; Weichenberger, Harald; Fastner, Gert; Wurstbauer, Karl; Jeschke, Stephan; Forstner, Rosemarie; Sedlmayer, Felix

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We developed and evaluated a correction strategy for prostate rotations using direct adaptation of segments in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Method and Materials: Implanted fiducials (four gold markers) were used to determine interfractional translations, rotations, and dilations of the prostate. We used hybrid imaging: The markers were automatically detected in two pretreatment planar X-ray projections; their actual position in three-dimensional space was reconstructed from these images at first. The structure set comprising prostate, seminal vesicles, and adjacent rectum wall was transformed accordingly in 6 degrees of freedom. Shapes of IMRT segments were geometrically adapted in a class solution forward-planning approach, derived within seconds on-site and treated immediately. Intrafractional movements were followed in MV electronic portal images captured on the fly. Results: In 31 of 39 patients, for 833 of 1013 fractions (supine, flat couch, knee support, comfortably full bladder, empty rectum, no intraprostatic marker migrations >2 mm of more than one marker), the online aperture adaptation allowed safe reduction of margins clinical target volume-planning target volume (prostate) down to 5 mm when only interfractional corrections were applied: Dominant L-R rotations were found to be 5.3 Degree-Sign (mean of means), standard deviation of means {+-}4.9 Degree-Sign , maximum at 30.7 Degree-Sign . Three-dimensional vector translations relative to skin markings were 9.3 {+-} 4.4 mm (maximum, 23.6 mm). Intrafractional movements in 7.7 {+-} 1.5 min (maximum, 15.1 min) between kV imaging and last beam's electronic portal images showed further L-R rotations of 2.5 Degree-Sign {+-} 2.3 Degree-Sign (maximum, 26.9 Degree-Sign ), and three-dimensional vector translations of 3.0 {+-}3.7 mm (maximum, 10.2 mm). Addressing intrafractional errors could further reduce margins to 3 mm. Conclusion: We demonstrated the clinical feasibility of an online

  2. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P.; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-15

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  3. The future of heavy ion radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jäkel, Oliver; Karger, Christian P; Debus, Jürgen

    2008-12-01

    Currently, there is an increasing interest in heavy ion radiotherapy (RT) and a number of new facilities are being installed in Europe and Japan. This development is accompanied by intensive technical, physical, and clinical research. The authors identify six research fields where progress is likely and propose a thesis on the expected achievements for each of the fields: (1) Synchrotrons with active energy variation and three-dimensional beam scanning will be the standard in ion beam RT. (2) Common standards for precise measurement, prescription, and reporting of dose will be available. (3) Intensity-modulated particle therapy will be state-of-the-art. (4) Time-adaptive treatments of moving targets will be feasible. (5) Therapeutic effectiveness of heavy ions will be known for the most important indications while cost effectiveness will remain to be shown. (6) The potential of high-linear energy transfer radiation will be known. The rationale for each of these theses is described.

  4. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy.

  5. Radiotherapy in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, S.

    1993-10-09

    What is wrong with radiation treatment in the UK Is it bad practice or merely bad publicity Between 1982 and 1991, 1,000 patients receiving isocentric radiation therapy at the North Staffordshire Royal Infirmary received a substantial underdose of radiation; the clinical report on this incident was published last week. The operator had been using a correction factor for tumor-to-skin distance, unaware that this factor had already been applied by the computer system. Although the report pointed out that it is not surprising that the clinicians were not alerted to the undertreatment, is also noted that there were no resources at the hospital to audit the outcome of radiotherapy.

  6. Comparison of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with intensity modulated particle therapy (IMPT) using fixed beams or an ion gantry for the treatment of patients with skull base meningiomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the potential improvement in treatment planning for patients with skull base meningioma using IMRT compared to carbon ion or proton beams with and without a gantry. Methods Five patients originally treated with photon IMRT were selected for the study. Ion beams were chosen using a horizontal beam or an ion gantry. Intensity controlled raster scanning and the intensity modulated particle therapy mode were used for plan optimization. The evaluation included analysis of dose-volume histograms of the target volumes and organs at risk. Results In comparison with carbon and proton beams only with horizontal beams, carbon ion treatment plans could spare the OARs more and concentrated on the target volumes more than proton and photon IMRT treatment plans. Using only a horizontal fixed beam, satisfactory plans could be achieved for skull base tumors. Conclusion The results of the case studies showed that using IMPT has the potential to overcome the lack of a gantry for skull base tumors. Carbon ion plans offered slightly better dose distributions than proton plans, but the differences were not clinically significant with established dose prescription concepts. PMID:22439607

  7. Radiological and Clinical Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy: A Matched Analysis of Three-Dimensional Conformal and Volumetric-modulated Arc Therapy Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Palma, David A.; Senan, Suresh; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R.; Vincent, Andrew; Lagerwaard, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Lung fibrosis is common after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, but the influence of treatment technique on rates of clinical and radiological pneumonitis is not well described. After implementing volumetric modulated arc therapy (RapidArc [RA]; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) for SBRT, we scored the early pulmonary changes seen with arc and conventional three-dimensional SBRT (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-five SBRT patients treated with RA were matched 1:2 with 50 SBRT patients treated with 3D-CRT. Dose fractionations were based on a risk-adapted strategy. Clinical pneumonitis was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Acute radiological changes 3 months posttreatment were scored by three blinded observers. Relationships among treatment type, baseline factors, and outcomes were assessed using Spearman's correlation, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel tests, and logistic regression. Results: The RA and 3D-CRT groups were well matched. Forty-three patients (57%) had radiological pneumonitis 3 months after treatment. Twenty-eight patients (37%) had computed tomography (CT) findings of patchy or diffuse consolidation, and 15 patients (20%) had ground-glass opacities only. Clinical pneumonitis was uncommon, and no differences were seen between 3D-CRT vs. RA patients in rates of grade 2/3 clinical pneumonitis (6% vs. 4%, respectively; p = 0.99), moderate/severe radiological changes (24% vs. 36%, respectively, p = 0.28), or patterns of CT changes (p = 0.47). Radiological severity scores were associated with larger planning target volumes (p = 0.09) and extended fractionation (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Radiological changes after lung SBRT are common with both approaches, but no differences in early clinical or radiological findings were observed after RA. Longer follow-up will be required to exclude late changes.

  8. Non-surgical management of early breast cancer in the United Kingdom: radiotherapy fractionation practices. Clinical Audit Sub-committee of the Faculty of Clinical Oncology, Royal College of Radiologists, and the Joint Council for Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Yarnold, J R; Price, P; Steel, G G

    1995-01-01

    A national survey of British radiotherapy schedules used in women with early breast cancer was undertaken to document variation in treatment practices and to consider its clinical significance. Although the variation is considerable, the analysis suggests that the majority of schedules in use are very similar in terms of treatment intensity when allowance is made for fraction size and overall time. Half the respondents used one of three dosage schedules, which probably differ very little in terms of late normal-tissue effects and tumour control from a conventional schedule giving 50 Gy in daily 2 Gy fractions. Eighty-two percent of respondents were using schedules that are equivalent to a dose of between 45 Gy and 50 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. The study suggests that the protocols in use by a minority of respondents may be unduly conservative or aggressive, and it leads to the proposal that oncologists should set up trials comparing commonly used schedules as a matter of urgency.

  9. Intraoperative Radiotherapy in Childhood Malignant Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sohail R.; Haddy, Theresa B.; Ashayeri, Ebrahim; Goldson, Alfred L.

    1984-01-01

    A 12-year-old black male patient with glioblastoma multiforme was treated with intraoperative radiotherapy followed by conventional external beam radiation and chemotherapy. The authors' clinical experience with these therapeutic measures is discussed. PMID:6330375

  10. Metrological Issues in Molecular Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arienzo, Marco; Capogni, Marco; Smyth, Vere; Cox, Maurice; Johansson, Lena; Solc, Jaroslav; Bobin, Christophe; Rabus, Hans; Joulaeizadeh, Leila

    2014-08-01

    The therapeutic effect from molecular radiation therapy (MRT), on both tumour and normal tissue, is determined by the radiation absorbed dose. Recent research indicates that as a consequence of biological variation across patients the absorbed dose can vary, for the same administered activity, by as much as two orders of magnitude. The international collaborative EURAMET-EMRP project "Metrology for molecular radiotherapy (MetroMRT)" is addressing this problem. The overall aim of the project is to develop methods of calibrating and verifying clinical dosimetry in MRT. In the present paper an overview of the metrological issues in molecular radiotherapy is provided.

  11. Monte Carlo dose calculations in advanced radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Karl Kenneth

    The remarkable accuracy of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation algorithms has led to the widely accepted view that these methods should and will play a central role in the radiotherapy treatment verification and planning of the future. The advantages of using MC clinically are particularly evident for radiation fields passing through inhomogeneities, such as lung and air cavities, and for small fields, including those used in today's advanced intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Many investigators have reported significant dosimetric differences between MC and conventional dose calculations in such complex situations, and have demonstrated experimentally the unmatched ability of MC calculations in modeling charged particle disequilibrium. The advantages of using MC dose calculations do come at a cost. The nature of MC dose calculations require a highly detailed, in-depth representation of the physical system (accelerator head geometry/composition, anatomical patient geometry/composition and particle interaction physics) to allow accurate modeling of external beam radiation therapy treatments. To perform such simulations is computationally demanding and has only recently become feasible within mainstream radiotherapy practices. In addition, the output of the accelerator head simulation can be highly sensitive to inaccuracies within a model that may not be known with sufficient detail. The goal of this dissertation is to both improve and advance the implementation of MC dose calculations in modern external beam radiotherapy. To begin, a novel method is proposed to fine-tune the output of an accelerator model to better represent the measured output. In this method an intensity distribution of the electron beam incident on the model is inferred by employing a simulated annealing algorithm. The method allows an investigation of arbitrary electron beam intensity distributions and is not restricted to the commonly assumed Gaussian intensity. In a second component of

  12. Clinical evaluation of BIOXTRA in relieving signs and symptoms of dry mouth after head and neck radiotherapy of cancer patients at Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gookizadeh, Abbas; Emami, Hamid; Najafizadeh, Nadia; Roayaei, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy of head and neck cancers causes acute and chronic xerostomia and acute mucositis. Xerostomia increases risk of radiation caries and affects on oral comfort, fit of prostheses, speech, swallowing, and the growth of caries-producing organisms. Salivary flow rate can be measured by asking patients some questions. There are different types of commercial synthetic saliva such as BIOXTRA, but until now, no one can effectively relieve xerostomia. We tried to design a clinical research on BIOXTRA efficacy for treating xerostomia. Materials and Methods: In this research, 58 patients with head and neck cancer (except salivary gland cancers) treated in Seyed-al-Shohada Hospital. The patients received at least 40-50 GY; and after 2 months of compilation treatment, they were evaluated by asking about having xerostomia. Before and after treatment with the BIOXTRA, the PH of the oral cavity, candida albicans, and lactobacillus counts measured and documented in laboratory. We used BIOXTRA for 2 weeks, 3 times daily, and then re-evaluated patients with some questions. Results: The counts of candida albicans and lactobacilli statistically significant decreased. Conclusion: Xerostomia for most patients improved clinically during the day and night while PH of the oral cavity increased. PMID:23326802

  13. Clinical Practice Guidance for Radiotherapy Planning After Induction Chemotherapy in Locoregionally Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Joseph K.; Haddad, Robert I.; Kies, Merril S.; Busse, Paul M.; Dong Lei; Brizel, David M.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Tishler, Roy B.; Trotti, Andy M.; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: The use of induction chemotherapy (IC) for locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer is increasing. The response to IC often causes significant alterations in tumor volume and location and shifts in normal anatomy. Proper determination of the radiotherapy (RT) targets after IC becomes challenging, especially with the use of conformal and precision RT techniques. Therefore, a consensus conference was convened to discuss issues related to RT planning and coordination of care for patients receiving IC. Methods and Materials: Ten participants with special expertise in the various aspects of integration of IC and RT for the treatment of locoregionally advanced head-and-neck cancer, including radiation oncologists, medical oncologists, and a medical physicist, participated. The individual members were assigned topics for focused, didactic presentations. Discussion was encouraged after each presentation, and recommendations were formulated. Results: Recommendations and guidelines emerged that emphasize up-front evaluation by all members of the head-and-neck management team, high-quality baseline and postinduction planning scans with the patient in the treatment position, the use of preinduction target volumes, and the use of full-dose RT, even in the face of a complete response. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach is strongly encouraged. Although these recommendations were provided primarily for patients treated with IC, many of these same principles apply to concurrent chemoradiotherapy without IC. A rapid response during RT is quite common, requiring the development of two or more plans in a sizeable fraction of patients, and suggesting the need for similar guidance in the rapidly evolving area of adaptive RT.

  14. Clinical study on the influence of motion and other factors on stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingsheng; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the adrenal tumor motion law and influence factors in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor and provide a reference value basis for determining the planning target volume margins for therapy. Materials and methods The subjects considered in this study were 38 adrenal tumor patients treated with CyberKnife with the placement of 45 gold fiducials. Fiducials were implanted into each adrenal tumor using β-ultrasonic guidance. Motion amplitudes of gold fiducials were measured with a Philips SLS simulator and motion data in the left–right, anterior–posterior, and cranio–caudal directions were obtained. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze influencing factors. t-Test was used for motion amplitude comparison of different tumor locations along the z-axis. Results The motion distances were 0.1–0.4 cm (0.27±0.07 cm), 0.1–0.5 cm (0.31±0.11 cm), and 0.5–1.2 cm (0.87±0.21 cm) along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. Motion amplitude along the z-axis may be affected by tumor location, but movement along the other axes was not affected by age, height, body mass, location, and size. Conclusion The maximum motion distance was along the z-axis. Therefore, this should be the main consideration when defining the planning target volume safety margin. Due to the proximity of the liver, adrenal gland tumor motion amplitude was smaller on the right than the left. This study analyzed adrenal tumor motion amplitude data to evaluate how motion and other factors influence the treatment of adrenal tumor with a goal of providing a reference for stereotactic radiotherapy boundary determination. PMID:27486331

  15. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Tumors of the Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinuses: Clinical Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegner, Ellen A.; Daly, Megan E.; Murphy, James D.; Abelson, Jonathan; Chapman, Chris H.; Chung, Melody; Yu, Yao; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Kaplan, Michael J.; Fischbein, Nancy; Le, Quynh-Thu; Chang, Daniel T.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for tumors of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity (PNS/NC). Methods/Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2009, 52 patients with tumors of the PNS/NC underwent postoperative or definitive radiation with IMRT. Twenty-eight (54%) patients had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Twenty-nine patients (56%) received chemotherapy. The median follow-up was 26.6 months (range, 2.9-118.4) for all patients and 30.9 months for living patients. Results: Eighteen patients (35%) developed local-regional failure (LRF) at median time of 7.2 months. Thirteen local failures (25%) were observed, 12 in-field and 1 marginal. Six regional failures were observed, two in-field and four out-of-field. No patients treated with elective nodal radiation had nodal regional failure. Two-year local-regional control (LRC), in-field LRC, freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM), and overall survival (OS) were 64%, 74%, 71%, and 66% among all patients, respectively, and 43%, 61%, 61%, and 53% among patients with SCC, respectively. On multivariate analysis, SCC and >1 subsite involved had worse LRC (p = 0.0004 and p = 0.046, respectively) and OS (p = 0.003 and p = 0.046, respectively). Cribriform plate invasion (p = 0.005) and residual disease (p = 0.047) also had worse LRC. Acute toxicities included Grade {>=}3 mucositis in 19 patients (37%), and Grade 3 dermatitis in 8 patients (15%). Six patients had Grade {>=}3 late toxicity including one optic toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT for patients with PNS/NC tumors has good outcomes compared with historical series and is well tolerated. Patients with SCC have worse LRC and OS. LRF is the predominant pattern of failure.

  16. Comparison of the cytotoxicity of clinically relevant cobalt-chromium and alumina ceramic wear particles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Germain, M A; Hatton, A; Williams, S; Matthews, J B; Stone, M H; Fisher, J; Ingham, E

    2003-02-01

    Concern over polyethylene wear particle induced aseptic loosening of metal-on-polyethylene hip prostheses has led to renewed interest in alternative materials such as metal-on-metal and alumina ceramic-on-alumina ceramic for total hip replacement. This study compared the effects of clinically relevant cobalt-chromium and alumina ceramic wear particles on the viability of U937 histiocytes and L929 fibroblasts in vitro. Clinically relevant cobalt-chromium wear particles were generated using a flat pin-on-plate tribometer. The mean size of the clinically relevant metal particles was 29.5+/-6.3 nm (range 5-200 nm). Clinically relevant alumina ceramic particles were generated in the Leeds MkII anatomical hip simulator from a Mittelmieier prosthesis using micro-separation motion. This produced particles with a bimodal size distribution. The majority (98%) of the clinically relevant alumina ceramic wear debris was 5-20 nm in size. The cytotoxicity of the clinically relevant wear particles was compared to commercially available cobalt-chromium (9.87 microm+/-5.67) and alumina ceramic (0.503+/-0.19 microm) particles. The effects of the particles on the cells over a 5 day period at different particle volume (microm(3)) to cell number ratios were tested and viability determined using ATP-Lite(TM). Clinically relevant cobalt-chromium particles 50 and 5 microm(3) per cell reduced the viability of U937 cells by 97% and 42% and reduced the viability of L929 cells by 95% and 73%, respectively. At 50 microm(3) per cell, the clinically relevant ceramic particles reduced U937 cell viability by 18%. None of the other concentrations of the clinically relevant particles were toxic. The commercial cobalt-chromium and alumina particles did not affect the viability of either the U937 histiocytes or the L929 fibroblasts.Thus at equivalent particle volumes the clinically relevant cobalt-chromium particles were more toxic then the alumina ceramic particles. This study has emphasised the fact

  17. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  18. [Head and neck adaptive radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Graff, P; Huger, S; Kirby, N; Pouliot, J

    2013-10-01

    Onboard volumetric imaging systems can provide accurate data of the patient's anatomy during a course of head and neck radiotherapy making it possible to assess the actual delivered dose and to evaluate the dosimetric impact of complex daily positioning variations and gradual anatomic changes such as geometric variations of tumors and normal tissues or shrinkage of external contours. Adaptive radiotherapy is defined as the correction of a patient's treatment planning to adapt for individual variations observed during treatment. Strategies are developed to selectively identify patients that require replanning because of an intolerable dosimetric drift. Automated tools are designed to limit time consumption. Deformable image registration algorithms are the cornerstones of these strategies, but a better understanding of their limits of validity is required before adaptive radiotherapy can be safely introduced to daily practice. Moreover, strict evaluation of the clinical benefits is yet to be proven.

  19. One Decade Later: Trends and Disparities in the Application of Post-Mastectomy Radiotherapy Since the Release of the American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Dragun, Anthony E.; Huang, Bin; Gupta, Saurabh; Crew, John B.; Tucker, Thomas C.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: In 2001 ASCO published practice guidelines for post mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). We analyzed factors that influence the receipt of radiotherapy therapy and trends over time. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 8889 women who underwent mastectomy as primary surgical treatment for stage II or III breast cancer between 1995 and 2008 using data from the Kentucky Cancer Registry. We categorized patients according to ASCO group: group 1, PMRT not routinely recommended (T2, N0); group 2, PMRT controversial/evidence insufficient (T1-2, N1); group 3, PMRT recommended or suggested (T3-4 or N2-3). Probability of receiving PMRT was assessed using logistic regression. Results: Overall, 24.0% of women received PMRT over the study period. The rates of PMRT for group 1, 2, and 3 were 7.5%, 19.5%, and 47.3%, respectively. Since 2001, there was an increase in the use of PMRT (from 21.1%-26.5%, P<.0001), which occurred mainly among group 3 members (from 40.8%-51.2%, P<.0001). The average rate remained constant in group 1 (from 7.1%-7.4%, P=.266) and decreased in group 2 (from 20.0%-18.1%, P<.0001). On multivariate analysis, the rate of PMRT was significantly lower for women aged >70 years (vs. younger), rural Appalachia (vs. non-Appalachia) populations, and Medicaid (vs. privately insured) patients. Conclusions: ASCO guidelines have influenced practice in an underserved state; however PMRT remains underused, even for highest-risk patients. Barriers exist for elderly, rural and poor patients, which independently predict for lack of adequate care. Updated guidelines are needed to clarify the use of PMRT for patients with T1-2, N1 disease.

  20. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  1. Clinical outcome of protocol based image (MRI) guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pötter, Richard; Georg, Petra; Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Grimm, Magdalena; Berger, Daniel; Nesvacil, Nicole; Georg, Dietmar; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Reinthaller, Alexander; Sturdza, Alina; Kirisits, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Background To analyse the overall clinical outcome and benefits by applying protocol based image guided adaptive brachytherapy combined with 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± chemotherapy (ChT). Methods Treatment schedule was EBRT with 45–50.4 Gy ± concomitant cisplatin chemotherapy plus 4 × 7 Gy High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Patients were treated in the “protocol period” (2001–2008) with the prospective application of the High Risk CTV concept (D90) and dose volume constraints for organs at risk including biological modelling. Dose volume adaptation was performed with the aim of dose escalation in large tumours (prescribed D90 > 85 Gy), often with inserting additional interstitial needles. Dose volume constraints (D2cc) were 70–75 Gy for rectum and sigmoid and 90 Gy for bladder. Late morbidity was prospectively scored, using LENT/SOMA Score. Disease outcome and treatment related late morbidity were evaluated and compared using actuarial analysis. Findings One hundred and fifty-six consecutive patients (median age 58 years) with cervix cancer FIGO stages IB–IVA were treated with definitive radiotherapy in curative intent. Histology was squamous cell cancer in 134 patients (86%), tumour size was >5 cm in 103 patients (66%), lymph node involvement in 75 patients (48%). Median follow-up was 42 months for all patients. Interstitial techniques were used in addition to intracavitary brachytherapy in 69/156 (44%) patients. Total prescribed mean dose (D90) was 93 ± 13 Gy, D2cc 86 ± 17 Gy for bladder, 65 ± 9 Gy for rectum and 64 ± 9 Gy for sigmoid. Complete remission was achieved in 151/156 patients (97%). Overall local control at 3 years was 95%; 98% for tumours 2–5 cm, and 92% for tumours >5 cm (p = 0.04), 100% for IB, 96% for IIB, 86% for IIIB. Cancer specific survival at 3 years was overall 74%, 83% for tumours 2–5 cm, 70% for tumours >5 cm, 83% for IB, 84% for IIB, 52% for IIIB. Overall

  2. Radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei

    2013-03-15

    Radiotherapy is an indispensible part of the management of all stages of breast cancer. In this article, the common indications for radiotherapy in the management of early breast cancer (stages 0, I, and II) are reviewed, including whole-breast radiotherapy as part of breast-conserving treatment for early invasive breast cancer and pre-invasive disease of ductal carcinoma in situ, post-mastectomy radiotherapy, locoregional radiotherapy, and partial breast irradiation. Key clinical studies that underpin our current practice are discussed briefly.

  3. Clinical outcomes in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer treated with single-session radiosurgery or whole brain radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mix, Michael; Elmarzouky, Rania; O'Connor, Tracey; Plunkett, Robert; Prasad, Dheerendra

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) is used to treat brain metastases from breast cancer (BMB) as the sole treatment or in conjunction with tumor resection and/or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). This study evaluates outcomes in BMB based on treatment techniques and tumor biological features. METHODS The authors reviewed all patients treated with BMB between 2004 and 2014. Patients were identified from a prospectively collected radiosurgery database and institutional tumor registry; 214 patients were identified. Data were collected from aforementioned sources and supplemented with chart review where needed. Independent radiological review was performed for all available brain imaging in those treated with GKRS. Survival analyses are reported using Kaplan-Meier estimates. RESULTS During the 10-year study period, 214 patients with BMB were treated; 23% underwent GKRS alone, 46% underwent a combination of GKRS and WBRT, and 31% underwent WBRT alone. Median survival after diagnosis of BMB in those treated with GKRS alone was 21 months, and in those who received WBRT alone it was 3 months. In those treated with GKRS plus WBRT, no significant difference in median survival was observed between those receiving WBRT upfront or in a salvage setting following GKRS (19 months vs 14 months, p = 0.63). The median survival of patients with total metastatic tumor volume of ≤ 7 cm(3) versus > 7 cm(3) was 20 months vs 7 months (p < 0.001). Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2) positively impacted survival after diagnosis of BMB (19 months vs 12 months, p = 0.03). Estrogen receptor status did not influence survival after diagnosis of BMB. No difference was observed in survival after diagnosis of BMB based on receptor status in those who received WBRT alone. CONCLUSIONS In this single-institution series of BMB, the addition of WBRT to GKRS did not significantly influence survival, nor did the number of lesions treated with GKRS. Survival after the diagnosis of BMB

  4. Clinical and endocrine responses to pituitary radiotherapy in pediatric Cushing's disease: an effective second-line treatment.

    PubMed

    Storr, Helen L; Plowman, P Nicholas; Carroll, Paul V; François, Inge; Krassas, Gerasimos E; Afshar, Farhad; Besser, G Michael; Grossman, Ashley B; Savage, Martin O

    2003-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is considered first-line treatment for Cushing's disease (CD). Options for treatment of postoperative persisting hypercortisolemia are pituitary radiotherapy (RT), repeat TSS, or bilateral adrenalectomy. From 1983 to 2001, we treated 18 pediatric patients (age, 6.4-17.8 yr) with CD. All underwent TSS, and 11 were cured (postoperative serum cortisol, <50 nM). Seven (39%) had 0900-h serum cortisol of 269-900 nM during the immediate postoperative period (2-20 d), indicating lack of cure. These patients (6 males and 1 female; mean age, 12.8 yr; range, 6.4-17.8 yr; 4 prepubertal; 3 pubertal) received external beam RT to the pituitary gland, using a 6-MV linear accelerator, with a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions over 35 d. Until the RT became effective, hypercortisolemia was controlled with ketoconazole (dose, 200-600 mg/d) (n = 4) and metyrapone (750 mg-3 g/d) +/- aminoglutethimide (1 g/d) or o'p'DDD (mitotane, 3 mg/d) (n = 3). All patients were cured after pituitary RT. The mean interval from RT to cure (mean serum cortisol on 5-point day curve, <150 nM) was 0.94 yr (0.25-2.86 yr). Recovery of pituitary-adrenal function (mean cortisol, 150-300 nM) occurred at mean 1.16 yr (0.40-2.86 yr) post RT. At 2 yr post RT, puberty occurred early in one male patient (age, 9.8 yr) but was normal in the others. GH secretion was assessed at 0.6-2.5 yr post RT in all patients: six had GH deficiency (peak on glucagon/insulin provocation, <1.0-17.9 mU/liter) and received human GH replacement. Follow-up of pituitary function 7.6 and 9.5 yr post RT in two patients showed normal gonadotropin secretion and recovery of GH peak to 29.7 and 19.2 mU/liter. The seven patients were followed for mean 6.9 yr (1.4-12.0 yr), with no evidence of recurrence of CD. In conclusion, pituitary RT is an effective and relatively rapid-onset treatment for pediatric CD after failure of TSS. GH deficiency occurred in 86% patients. Long-term follow-up suggests some recovery of GH

  5. Verifying 4D gated radiotherapy using time-integrated electronic portal imaging: a phantom and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    van Sörnsen de Koste, John R; Cuijpers, Johan P; de Geest, Frank GM; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Slotman, Ben J; Senan, Suresh

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiration-gated radiotherapy (RGRT) can decrease treatment toxicity by allowing for smaller treatment volumes for mobile tumors. RGRT is commonly performed using external surrogates of tumor motion. We describe the use of time-integrated electronic portal imaging (TI-EPI) to verify the position of internal structures during RGRT delivery Methods TI-EPI portals were generated by continuously collecting exit dose data (aSi500 EPID, Portal vision, Varian Medical Systems) when a respiratory motion phantom was irradiated during expiration, inspiration and free breathing phases. RGRT was delivered using the Varian RPM system, and grey value profile plots over a fixed trajectory were used to study object positions. Time-related positional information was derived by subtracting grey values from TI-EPI portals sharing the pixel matrix. TI-EPI portals were also collected in 2 patients undergoing RPM-triggered RGRT for a lung and hepatic tumor (with fiducial markers), and corresponding planning 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans were analyzed for motion amplitude. Results Integral grey values of phantom TI-EPI portals correlated well with mean object position in all respiratory phases. Cranio-caudal motion of internal structures ranged from 17.5–20.0 mm on planning 4DCT scans. TI-EPI of bronchial images reproduced with a mean value of 5.3 mm (1 SD 3.0 mm) located cranial to planned position. Mean hepatic fiducial markers reproduced with 3.2 mm (SD 2.2 mm) caudal to planned position. After bony alignment to exclude set-up errors, mean displacement in the two structures was 2.8 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively, and corresponding reproducibility in anatomy improved to 1.6 mm (1 SD). Conclusion TI-EPI appears to be a promising method for verifying delivery of RGRT. The RPM system was a good indirect surrogate of internal anatomy, but use of TI-EPI allowed for a direct link between anatomy and breathing patterns. PMID:17760960

  6. Phase I Clinical Trial Assessing Temozolomide and Tamoxifen With Concomitant Radiotherapy for Treatment of High-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Shilpen; DiBiase, Steven; Meisenberg, Barry; Flannery, Todd; Patel, Ashish; Dhople, Anil; Cheston, Sally; Amin, Pradip

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: The new standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme is concurrent radiotherapy (RT) and temozolomide. The proliferation of high-grade gliomas might be partly dependent on protein kinase C-mediated pathways. Tamoxifen has been shown in vitro to inhibit protein kinase C through estrogen receptor-independent antineoplastic effects. This Phase I trial was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) of tamoxifen when given with temozolomide and concurrent RT to patients with high-grade gliomas. Methods and Materials: A total of 17 consecutive patients in four cohorts with World Health Organization Grade 3 (n = 2) and 4 (n = 15) gliomas were given tamoxifen twice daily during 6 weeks of concurrent RT and temozolomide. Eligibility included histologic diagnosis, age >18 years old, Karnofsky performance status {>=}60, and no previous brain RT or chemotherapy. The starting dose was 50 mg/m{sup 2} divided twice daily. If no dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) occurred in 3 patients, the dose was escalated in 25-mg/m{sup 2} increments until the MTD was reached. When {>=}2 patients within a cohort experienced a DLT, the MTD had been exceeded. Temozolomide was given with RT at 75 mg/m{sup 2}. A dose of 60 Gy in 2 Gy/d fractions to a partial brain field was delivered. Results: A total of 6 patients in Cohort 4 had received tamoxifen at 125 mg/m{sup 2}. One patient was excluded, and the fourth patient developed Grade 4 thrombocytopenia (DLT). Thus, 3 more patients needed to be enrolled. A deep venous thrombosis (DLT) occurred in the sixth patient. Thus, the MTD was 100 mg/m{sup 2}. Conclusions: The MTD of tamoxifen was 100 mg/m{sup 2} when given concurrently with temozolomide 75 mg/m{sup 2} and RT. Tamoxifen might have a role in the initial treatment of high-grade gliomas and should be studied in future Phase II trials building on the newly established platform of concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

  7. Spatial resolution properties of digital autoradiography systems for pre-clinical alpha particle imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Benard, Francois; Celler, Anna; Ruth, Thomas; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Attaching alpha-emitting radionuclides to cancer-targeting agents increases the anti-tumor effects of targeted cancer therapies. The success of alpha therapy for treating bone metastases has increased interest in using targeted alpha therapy (TAT) to treat a broad spectrum of metastatic cancers. Estimating radiation doses to targeted tumors, including small (<250 μm) clusters of cancer cells, and to non-targeted tissues is critical in the pre-clinical development of TATs. However, accurate quantification of heterogeneous distributions of alpha-emitters in small metastases is not possible with existing pre-clinical in-vivo imaging systems. Ex-vivo digital autoradiography using a scintillator in combination with an image intensifier and a charged coupled device (CCD) has gained interest for pre-clinical ex-vivo alpha particle imaging. We present a simulation-based analysis of the fundamental spatial resolution limits of digital autoradiography systems. Spatial resolution was quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and Wagner's equivalent aperture. We modeled systems operating in either particle-counting (PC) or energy-integrating (EI) mode using a cascaded systems approach that accounts for: 1) the stopping power of alpha particles; 2) the distance alpha particles travel within the scintillator; 3) optical blur, and; 4) binning in detector elements. We applied our analysis to imaging of astatine-211 using an LYSO scintillator with thickness ranging from 10 μm to 20 μm. Our analysis demonstrates that when these systems are operated in particle-counting mode with a centroid-calculation algorithm, the effective apertures of 35 μm can be achieved, which suggests that digital autoradiography may enable quantifying the uptake of alpha emitters in tumors consisting of a few cancer cells. Future work will investigate the image noise and energy-resolution properties of digital autoradiography systems.

  8. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  9. SU-E-T-547: A Method to Correlate Treatment Planning Issue with Clinical Analysis for Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K; Jung, E; Newton, J; Cornell, D; Able, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the algorithms and calculation setting effect and contribution weighing on prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) based SBRT were evaluated for clinical analysis. Methods: A low risk prostate patient under SBRT was selected for the treatment planning evaluation. The treatment target was divided into low dose prescription target volume (PTV) and high Dose PTV. Normal tissue constraints include urethra and femur head, and rectum was separated into anterior, lateral and posterior parts. By varying the constraint limit of treatment plan calculation setting and algorithms, the effect on dose coverage and normal tissue dose constraint parameter carried effective comparison for the nominal prescription and constraint. For each setting, their percentage differences to the nominal value were calculated with geometric mean and harmonic mean. Results: In the arbitrary prostate SBRT case, 14 variables were selected for this evaluation by using nominal prescription and constraint. Six VMAT planning settings were anisotropic analytic algorithm stereotactic beam with and without couch structure in grid size of 1mm and 2mm, non stereotactic beam, Acuros algorithm . Their geometry means of the variable sets for these plans were 112.3%, 111.9%, 112.09%, 111.75%, 111.28%, and 112.05%. And the corresponding harmonic means were 2.02%, 2.16%, 3.15%, 4.74%, 5.47% and 5.55%. Conclusions: In this study, the algorithm difference shows relatively larger harmonic mean between prostate SBRT VMAT plans. This study provides a methodology to find sensitive combined variables related to clinical analysis, and similar approach could be applied to the whole treatment procedure from simulation to treatment in radiotherapy for big clinical data analysis.

  10. Postmastectomy Radiotherapy: An American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology Focused Guideline Update.

    PubMed

    Recht, Abram; Comen, Elizabeth A; Fine, Richard E; Fleming, Gini F; Hardenbergh, Patricia H; Ho, Alice Y; Hudis, Clifford A; Hwang, E Shelley; Kirshner, Jeffrey J; Morrow, Monica; Salerno, Kilian E; Sledge, George W; Solin, Lawrence J; Spears, Patricia A; Whelan, Timothy J; Somerfield, Mark R; Edge, Stephen B

    2016-12-20

    Purpose A joint American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology, and Society of Surgical Oncology panel convened to develop a focused update of the American Society of Clinical Oncology guideline concerning use of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT). Methods A recent systematic literature review by Cancer Care Ontario provided the primary evidentiary basis. The joint panel also reviewed targeted literature searches to identify new, potentially practice-changing data. Recommendations The panel unanimously agreed that available evidence shows that PMRT reduces the risks of locoregional failure (LRF), any recurrence, and breast cancer mortality for patients with T1-2 breast cancer with one to three positive axillary nodes. However, some subsets of these patients are likely to have such a low risk of LRF that the absolute benefit of PMRT is outweighed by its potential toxicities. In addition, the acceptable ratio of benefit to toxicity varies among patients and physicians. Thus, the decision to recommend PMRT requires a great deal of clinical judgment. The panel agreed clinicians making such recommendations for individual patients should consider factors that may decrease the risk of LRF, attenuate the benefit of reduced breast cancer-specific mortality, and/or increase risk of complications resulting from PMRT. When clinicians and patients elect to omit axillary dissection after a positive sentinel node biopsy, the panel recommends that these patients receive PMRT only if there is already sufficient information to justify its use without needing to know additional axillary nodes are involved. Patients with axillary nodal involvement after neoadjuvant systemic therapy should receive PMRT. The panel recommends treatment generally be administered to both the internal mammary nodes and the supraclavicular-axillary apical nodes in addition to the chest wall or reconstructed breast.

  11. First clinical results of adaptive radiotherapy based on 3D portal dosimetry for lung cancer patients with atelectasis treated with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    PubMed

    Persoon, Lucas C G G; Egelmeer, Ada G T M; Ollers, Michel C; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Troost, Esther G C; Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-10-01

    Atelectasis in lung cancer patients can change rapidly during a treatment course, which may displace the tumor/healthy tissues, or change tissue densities locally. This may result in differences between the planned and the actually delivered dose. With complex delivery techniques treatment verification is essential and inter-fractional adaptation may be necessary. We present the first clinical results of treatment adaptation based on an in-house developed three-dimensional (3D) portal dose measurement (PDM) system. A method was developed for 3D PDM combined with cone beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT) imaging. Lung cancer patients are monitored routinely with this imaging technique. During treatment, the first three fractions are analyzed with 3D PDM and weekly thereafter. The reconstructed measured dose is compared to the planned dose using dose-volume histograms and a γ evaluation. Patients having |γ|> 1 in more than 5% of the (primary tumor or organ at risk) volume were subjected to further analysis. In this study we show the PDM dose changes for five patients. We detected relevant dose changes induced by changes in atelectasis in the presented cases. Two patients received two treatment adaptations after being detected with PDM confirmed by visual inspection of the kV-CBCTs, and in two other patients the radiation treatment plan was adapted once. In one case no dose delivery change was detected with PDM. The first clinical patients show that 3D PDM combined with kV-CBCT is a valuable quality assurance tool for detecting anatomical alterations and their dosimetric consequences during the course of radiotherapy. In our clinic, 3D PDM is fully automated for ease and speed of the procedure, and for minimization of human error. The technique is able to flag patients with suspected dose discrepancies for potential adaptation of the treatment plan.

  12. Prognostic significance of nodal involvement region in clinical stage IIIc breast cancer patients who received primary systemic treatment, surgery, and radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Park, Won; Suh, Chang Ok; Huh, Seung Jae; Choi, Doo Ho; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Yong Bae

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the prognostic influence of involvement of both internal mammary nodes (IMNs) and supraclavicular nodes (SCNs) in clinical stage IIIc breast cancer patients who underwent primary systemic treatment, surgery, and radiotherapy (RT). Between 2001 and 2009, 110 breast cancer patients with IMN or SCN involvement were treated with primary systemic treatment followed by surgery and RT. The median age was 50 years. Clinical N-stage was cN3b and cN3c in 29 (26.4%) and 81 (73.6%) patients, respectively. Among the 81 patients with cN3c disease, 18 patients had both IMN and SCN involvement. Primary systemic treatment regimen was most commonly doxorubicin plus docetaxel (54.5%) or cyclophosphamide (20.0%). Mastectomy was performed in 71 (64.5%) patients. The RT dose delivered to the chest wall or whole breast was 50-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions. IMN and SCN regions were irradiated in 77 (70.0%) and 107 (97.6%) patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 57.4 months (range, 8.6-149.9 months), 44 patients (40.0%) developed disease recurrence. Among the 18 patients with both IMN and SCN involvement, 12 patients experienced disease recurrence and 11 of them had distant metastases. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) of all patients were 60.2% and 75.5%, respectively. Decreased DFS and OS were observed in the 18 patients with both IMN and SCN involvement (5-year rates, 33.3% and 50.0%; P = 0.0051 and 0.0010, respectively). Involvement of both IMNs and SCNs was associated with worse survival outcomes in patients with clinical stage IIIc breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu; Chen, Zhihong; Zhang, Zhengguo; Fang, Xiaoming; Liang, Guozheng

    2014-05-01

    We explore a facile and nontoxic hydrothermal route for synthesis of a Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material by using l-cysteine as the sulfur source and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as the complexing agent. The effects of the amount of EDTA, the mole ratio of the three metal ions, and the hydrothermal temperature and time on the phase composition of the obtained product have been systematically investigated. The addition of EDTA and an excessive dose of ZnCl2 in the hydrothermal reaction system favor the generation of kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4. Pure kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 has been synthesized at 180°C for 12 h from the reaction system containing 2 mmol of EDTA at 2:2:1 of Cu/Zn/Sn. It is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy that those binary and ternary phases are absent in the kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 product. The kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 material synthesized by the hydrothermal process consists of flower-like particles with 250 to 400 nm in size. It is revealed that the flower-like particles are assembled from single-crystal Cu2ZnSnS4 nanoflakes with ca. 20 nm in size. The band gap of the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystalline material is estimated to be 1.55 eV. The films fabricated from the hierarchical Cu2ZnSnS4 particles exhibit fast photocurrent responses under intermittent visible-light irradiation, implying that they show potentials for use in solar cells and photocatalysis.

  14. Audiovisual biofeedback breathing guidance for lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy: a multi-institutional phase II randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Sean; O'Brien, Ricky; Makhija, Kuldeep; Hegi-Johnson, Fiona; Ludbrook, Jane; Rezo, Angela; Tse, Regina; Eade, Thomas; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, Roland; Gebski, Val; Keall, Paul J

    2015-07-18

    There is a clear link between irregular breathing and errors in medical imaging and radiation treatment. The audiovisual biofeedback system is an advanced form of respiratory guidance that has previously demonstrated to facilitate regular patient breathing. The clinical benefits of audiovisual biofeedback will be investigated in an upcoming multi-institutional, randomised, and stratified clinical trial recruiting a total of 75 lung cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. To comprehensively perform a clinical evaluation of the audiovisual biofeedback system, a multi-institutional study will be performed. Our methodological framework will be based on the widely used Technology Acceptance Model, which gives qualitative scales for two specific variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which are fundamental determinants for user acceptance. A total of 75 lung cancer patients will be recruited across seven radiation oncology departments across Australia. Patients will be randomised in a 2:1 ratio, with 2/3 of the patients being recruited into the intervention arm and 1/3 in the control arm. 2:1 randomisation is appropriate as within the interventional arm there is a screening procedure where only patients whose breathing is more regular with audiovisual biofeedback will continue to use this system for their imaging and treatment procedures. Patients within the intervention arm whose free breathing is more regular than audiovisual biofeedback in the screen procedure will remain in the intervention arm of the study but their imaging and treatment procedures will be performed without audiovisual biofeedback. Patients will also be stratified by treating institution and for treatment intent (palliative vs. radical) to ensure similar balance in the arms across the sites. Patients and hospital staff operating the audiovisual biofeedback system will complete questionnaires to assess their experience with audiovisual biofeedback. The objectives of this

  15. A multicenter survey of stage T1 glottic cancer treated with radiotherapy delivered in 2.25-Gy fractions in clinical practice: An initial 5-year analysis

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Kubota, Seiji; Kawamura, Mariko; Nomoto, Yoshihito; Murao, Takayuki; Yamakawa, Kouji; Ishihara, Shunichi; Hirasawa, Naoki; Asano, Akiko; Yanagawa, Shigeo; Naganawa, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the acute and late toxicity as well as local control (LC) in T1 glottic cancer (GC) patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) in clinical practice. The Tokai Study Group for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology started RT treatment with a dose of 2.25 Gy for T1 GC in 2011. Ten institutions combined data from 104 patients with T1 squamous cell carcinoma between 2011 and 2015. In total, 104 patients with T1 GC were irradiated with a standard radiation dose of 63 Gy in 28 fractions.The median follow-up duration was 18 (3.7–49.5) months. Acute grade 3 adverse events were observed in 7 patients, with 4 patients (5%) having dermatitis and 3 patients (4%) having mucositis. Late adverse events above grade 3 were not observed. Two patients developed local recurrence. The rates of acute adverse events in the present study were comparable to those in previous studies that have used 2 Gy fractions of RT. PMID:28008195

  16. Patterns of Practice in Palliative Radiotherapy for Painful Bone Metastases: Impact of a Regional Rapid Access Clinic on Access to Care

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jackson S.Y.; Kerba, Marc; Wong, Rebecca K.S.; Mckimmon, Erin; Eigl, Bernhard; Hagen, Neil A.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: External beam radiotherapy (RT) is commonly indicated for the palliation of symptomatic bone metastases, but there is evidence of underutilization of this treatment modality in palliative care for cancer populations. This study was conducted to investigate factors that influenced the use of palliative RT services at a regional comprehensive cancer center. Methods and Materials: A cohort of patients with radiographically confirmed bone metastases and first-time users of palliative RT between 2003 and 2005 was retrospectively reviewed from the time of initial diagnosis of bone metastases to death or last follow-up. Type of radiation treatment service provider used (rapid access or routine access) and patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were analyzed for their influences on the number of treatment courses given over the duration of disease. Results: A total of 887 patients received 1,354 courses of palliative RT for bone metastases at a median interval of 4.0 months between courses. Thirty-three percent of patients required more than one RT course. Increased age and travel distance reduced the likelihood and number of treatment courses, while service through a rapid access clinic was independently associated with an increase in subsequent use of palliative RT. Conclusions: A rapid access service model for palliative RT facilitated access to RT. Travel distance and other factors remained substantial barriers to use of palliative RT services. The pattern of practice suggests an unmet need for symptom control in patients with bone metastases.

  17. CONSENSUS GUIDELINES FOR THE DELINEATION OF THE CLINICAL TARGET VOLUME FOR INTENSITY MODULATED PELVIC RADIOTHERAPY IN THE POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT OF ENDOMETRIAL AND CERVICAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop an atlas of the clinical target volumes (CTV) definitions for the post-operative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be utilized for planning pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). METHODS AND MATERIALS The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in development of the atlas. The groups included RTOG the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define areas that were to be included in the CTV and were asked to outline theses areas on individual Computed Tomography (CT) images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June of 2005. RESULTS The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for the post-operative therapy of endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node-region. CONCLUSIONS This manuscript serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for the post-operative IMRT of endometrial and cervical cancer. PMID:18037584

  18. Clinical evaluation of safety and efficacy of Boswellia-based cream for prevention of adjuvant radiotherapy skin damage in mammary carcinoma: a randomized placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Togni, S; Maramaldi, G; Bonetta, A; Giacomelli, L; Di Pierro, F

    2015-04-01

    Acute radiation erythema and other skin reactions are common adverse effects experienced by breast carcinoma patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment. Boswellic acids are pentacyclic triterpenes extracted from the resins of the tropical tree Boswellia serrata with strong anti-inflammatory properties. This study was designed to evaluate the safety and the efficacy of the application of a base cream containing boswellic acids in a proprietary formulation (Bosexil(R)) for the prevention and relief of radiation-induced adverse effects in breast cancer patients. The acute skin reactions were clinically evaluated by visual intensity and computer-assisted skin color analysis, and toxicity was assessed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) rating scale. These findings indicate that the use of a boswellia-based cream is effective in reducing the use of topical corticosteroids and is able to reduce the grade of erythema and the skin superficial symptoms, being well tolerated by the patients. Further studies comparing boswellia cream with other topical agents will be appropriate to confirm the effectiveness of this treatment for breast cancer patients under radiation therapy.

  19. Effect of G-CSF on oral mucositis and traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy: clinical and histologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Juliana; Roithmann, Sérgio; Camilotti, Renata Stifelman; Salum, Fernanda Gonçalves; Cherubini, Karen; Zancanaro de Figueiredo, Maria Antonia

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on oral mucositis (OM) and on the healing of traumatic ulcers produced in the tongue of rats undergoing radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to four groups: (1) RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (G-CSF analog; n = 7); (2) RT + traumatic ulcer + saline (n = 7); (3) no RT + traumatic ulcer + filgrastim (n = 7); and (4) no RT + traumatic ulcer (n = 6). The radiation dose was 30 Gy, and medication was filgrastim (10 μg/kg) for 7 days. Clinically, groups differed in the presence (Fisher's exact test: P = .008) and size of traumatic ulcers after irradiation (Kruskal-Wallis test: P = .032) and in the severity of OM (Fisher's exact test: P = .005 between the irradiated groups). Histologically, there was an increased inflammatory response in the nonirradiated groups (Fisher's exact test: P = .001). Filgrastim reduced manifestations and the severity of trauma-induced ulcers and radiation-induced OM. Significant differences were not observed histologically between the study drug and respective control groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. AEG-1 expression is an independent prognostic factor in rectal cancer patients with preoperative radiotherapy: a study in a Swedish clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gnosa, S; Zhang, H; Brodin, V P; Carstensen, J; Adell, G; Sun, X-F

    2014-01-01

    Background: Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) is widely used to downstage rectal tumours, but the rate of recurrence varies significantly. Therefore, new biomarkers are needed for better treatment and prognosis. It has been shown that astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) is a key mediator of migration, invasion, and treatment resistance. Our aim was to analyse the AEG-1 expression in relation to RT in rectal cancer patients and to test its radiosensitising properties. Methods: The AEG-1 expression was examined by immunohistochemistry in 158 patients from the Swedish clinical trial of RT. Furthermore, we inhibited the AEG-1 expression by siRNA in five colon cancer cell lines and measured the survival after irradiation by colony-forming assay. Results: The AEG-1 expression was increased in the primary tumours compared with the normal mucosa independently of the RT (P<0.01). High AEG-1 expression in the primary tumour of the patients treated with RT correlated independently with higher risk of distant recurrence (P=0.009) and worse disease-free survival (P=0.007). Downregulation of AEG-1 revealed a decreased survival after radiation in radioresistant colon cancer cell lines. Conclusions: The AEG-1 expression was independently related to distant recurrence and disease-free survival in rectal cancer patients with RT and could therefore be a marker to discriminate patients for distant relapse. PMID:24874474