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Sample records for particle extraction system

  1. Application of aqueous two-phase micellar system to improve extraction of adenoviral particles from cell lysate.

    PubMed

    Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Lopes, André Moreni; Viana Marques, Daniela de Araújo; Mazzola, Priscila Gava; da Silva, Joas Lucas; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Hirata, Rosário Dominguez Crespo; Gatti, Maria Silvia Viccari; Pessoa, Adalberto

    2017-12-04

    Viral vectors are important in medical approaches, such as disease prevention and gene therapy, and their production depends on efficient prepurification steps. In the present study, an aqueous two-phase micellar system (ATPMS) was evaluated to extract human adenovirus type 5 particles from a cell lysate. Adenovirus was cultured in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells to a concentration of 1.4 × 10 10 particles/mL. Cells were lysed, and the system formed by direct addition of Triton X-114 in a 2 3 full factorial design with center points. The systems were formed with Triton X-114 at a final concentration of 1.0, 6.0, and 11.0% (w/w), cell lysate pH of 6.0, 6.5, and 7.0, and incubation temperatures at 33, 35, and 37 °C. Adenovirus particles recovered from partition phases were measured by qPCR. The best system condition was with 11.0% (w/w) of Triton X-114, a cell lysate pH of 7.0, and an incubation temperature at 33 °C, yielding 3.51 × 10 10 adenovirus particles/mL, which increased the initial adenovirus particles concentration by 2.3-fold, purifying it by 2.2-fold from the cell lysate, and removing cell debris. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that the use of an aqueous two-phase micellar system in the early steps of downstream processing could improve viral particle extraction from cultured cells while integrating clarification, concentration, and prepurification steps. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Cutting Silica Aerogel for Particle Extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Glesias, R.; Grigoropoulos, C. P.; Weschler, M.

    2005-01-01

    The detailed laboratory analyses of extraterrestrial particles have revolutionized our knowledge of planetary bodies in the last three decades. This knowledge of chemical composition, morphology, mineralogy, and isotopics of particles cannot be provided by remote sensing. In order to acquire these detail information in the laboratories, the samples need be intact, unmelted. Such intact capture of hypervelocity particles has been developed in 1996. Subsequently silica aerogel was introduced as the preferred medium for intact capturing of hypervelocity particles and later showed it to be particularly suitable for the space environment. STARDUST, the 4th NASA Discovery mission to capture samples from 81P/Wild 2 and contemporary interstellar dust, is the culmination of these new technologies. In early laboratory experiments of launching hypervelocity projectiles into aerogel, there was the need to cut aerogel to isolate or extract captured particles/tracks. This is especially challenging for space captures, since there will be many particles/tracks of wide ranging scales closely located, even collocated. It is critical to isolate and extract one particle without compromising its neighbors since the full significance of a particle is not known until it is extracted and analyzed. To date, three basic techniques have been explored: mechanical cutting, lasers cutting and ion beam milling. We report the current findings.

  3. Biosynthesis of silver fine particles and particles decorated with nanoparticles using the extract of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Chávez, V. H. G.; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Núñez, Nuria O.; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel

    2015-04-01

    Given the upsurge of new technologies based on nanomaterials, the development of sustainable methods to obtain functional nanostructures has become an imperative task. In this matter, several recent researches have shown that the biodegradable natural antioxidants of several plant extracts can be used simultaneously as reducing and stabilizing agents in the wet chemical synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, opening new opportunities to design greener synthesis. However, the challenge of these new techniques is to produce stable colloidal nanoparticles with controlled particle uniformity, size, shape and aggregation state, in similar manner than the well-established synthetic methods. In the present work, colloidal metallic silver nanoparticles have been synthesized using silver nitrate and extracts of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds at room temperature in a facile one-step procedure. The resulting products were colloidal suspensions of two populations of silver nanoparticles, one of them with particle sizes of few nanometers and the other with particles of tens of nm. Strikingly, the variation of the AgNO3/extract weight ratio in the reaction medium yielded to the variation of the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles: high AgNO3/extract concentration ratios yielded to randomly dispersed particles, whereas for lower AgNO3/extract ratios, the biggest particles appeared coated with the finest nanoparticles. This biosynthesized colloidal system, with controlled particle aggregation states, presents plasmonic and SERS properties with potential applications in molecular sensors and nanophotonic devices.

  4. Biosynthesis of silver fine particles and particles decorated with nanoparticles using the extract of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds.

    PubMed

    Luna, Carlos; Chávez, V H G; Barriga-Castro, Enrique Díaz; Núñez, Nuria O; Mendoza-Reséndez, Raquel

    2015-04-15

    Given the upsurge of new technologies based on nanomaterials, the development of sustainable methods to obtain functional nanostructures has become an imperative task. In this matter, several recent researches have shown that the biodegradable natural antioxidants of several plant extracts can be used simultaneously as reducing and stabilizing agents in the wet chemical synthesis of metallic nanoparticles, opening new opportunities to design greener synthesis. However, the challenge of these new techniques is to produce stable colloidal nanoparticles with controlled particle uniformity, size, shape and aggregation state, in similar manner than the well-established synthetic methods. In the present work, colloidal metallic silver nanoparticles have been synthesized using silver nitrate and extracts of Illicium verum (star anise) seeds at room temperature in a facile one-step procedure. The resulting products were colloidal suspensions of two populations of silver nanoparticles, one of them with particle sizes of few nanometers and the other with particles of tens of nm. Strikingly, the variation of the AgNO3/extract weight ratio in the reaction medium yielded to the variation of the spatial distribution of the nanoparticles: high AgNO3/extract concentration ratios yielded to randomly dispersed particles, whereas for lower AgNO3/extract ratios, the biggest particles appeared coated with the finest nanoparticles. This biosynthesized colloidal system, with controlled particle aggregation states, presents plasmonic and SERS properties with potential applications in molecular sensors and nanophotonic devices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Extracting joint weak values with local, single-particle measurements.

    PubMed

    Resch, K J; Steinberg, A M

    2004-04-02

    Weak measurement is a new technique which allows one to describe the evolution of postselected quantum systems. It appears to be useful for resolving a variety of thorny quantum paradoxes, particularly when used to study properties of pairs of particles. Unfortunately, such nonlocal or joint observables often prove difficult to measure directly in practice (for instance, in optics-a common testing ground for this technique-strong photon-photon interactions would be needed to implement an appropriate von Neumann interaction). Here we derive a general, experimentally feasible, method for extracting these joint weak values from correlations between single-particle observables.

  6. Two-structured solid particle model for predicting and analyzing supercritical extraction performance.

    PubMed

    Samadi, Sara; Vaziri, Behrooz Mahmoodzadeh

    2017-07-14

    Solid extraction process, using the supercritical fluid, is a modern science and technology, which has come in vogue regarding its considerable advantages. In the present article, a new and comprehensive model is presented for predicting the performance and separation yield of the supercritical extraction process. The base of process modeling is partial differential mass balances. In the proposed model, the solid particles are considered twofold: (a) particles with intact structure, (b) particles with destructed structure. A distinct mass transfer coefficient has been used for extraction of each part of solid particles to express different extraction regimes and to evaluate the process accurately (internal mass transfer coefficient was used for the intact-structure particles and external mass transfer coefficient was employed for the destructed-structure particles). In order to evaluate and validate the proposed model, the obtained results from simulations were compared with two series of available experimental data for extraction of chamomile extract with supercritical carbon dioxide, which had an excellent agreement. This is indicative of high potentiality of the model in predicting the extraction process, precisely. In the following, the effect of major parameters on supercritical extraction process, like pressure, temperature, supercritical fluid flow rate, and the size of solid particles was evaluated. The model can be used as a superb starting point for scientific and experimental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluating the capabilities of aerosol-to-liquid particle extraction system (ALPXS)/ICP-MS for monitoring trace metals in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Jayawardene, Innocent; Rasmussen, Pat E; Chenier, Marc; Gardner, H David

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the application of the Aerosol-to-Liquid Particle Extraction System (ALPXS), which uses wet electrostatic precipitation to collect airborne particles, for multi-element indoor stationary monitoring. Optimum conditions are determined for capturing airborne particles for metal determination by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), for measuring field blanks, and for calculating limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ). Due to the relatively high flow rate (300 L min(-1)), a sampling duration of 1 hr to 2 hr was adequate to capture airborne particle-bound metals under the investigated experimental conditions. The performance of the ALPXS during a building renovation demonstrated signal-to-noise ratios appropriate for sampling airborne particles in environments with elevated metal concentrations, such as workplace settings. The ALPXS shows promise as a research tool for providing useful information on short-term variations (transient signals) and for trapping particles into aqueous solutions where needed for subsequent characterization. As the ALPXS does not provide size-specific samples, and its efficiency at different flow rates has yet to be quantified, the ALPXS would not replace standard filter-based protocols accepted for regulatory applications (e.g., exposure measurements), but rather would provide additional information if used in conjunction with filter based methods. Implications: This study investigates the capability of the Aerosol-to-Liquid Particle Extraction System (ALPXS) for stationary sampling of airborne metals in indoor workplace environments, with subsequent analysis by ICP-MS. The high flow rate (300 L/min) permits a short sampling duration (< 2 hr). Results indicated that the ALPXS was capable of monitoring short-term changes in metal emissions during a renovation activity. This portable instrument may prove to be advantageous in occupational settings as a qualitative indicator of elevated

  8. Protection against Experimental Cryptococcosis following Vaccination with Glucan Particles Containing Cryptococcus Alkaline Extracts.

    PubMed

    Specht, Charles A; Lee, Chrono K; Huang, Haibin; Tipper, Donald J; Shen, Zu T; Lodge, Jennifer K; Leszyk, John; Ostroff, Gary R; Levitz, Stuart M

    2015-12-22

    A vaccine capable of protecting at-risk persons against infections due to Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii could reduce the substantial global burden of human cryptococcosis. Vaccine development has been hampered though, by lack of knowledge as to which antigens are immunoprotective and the need for an effective vaccine delivery system. We made alkaline extracts from mutant cryptococcal strains that lacked capsule or chitosan. The extracts were then packaged into glucan particles (GPs), which are purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls composed primarily of β-1,3-glucans. Subcutaneous vaccination with the GP-based vaccines provided significant protection against subsequent pulmonary infection with highly virulent strains of C. neoformans and C. gattii. The alkaline extract derived from the acapsular strain was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the most abundant proteins were identified. Separation of the alkaline extract by size exclusion chromatography revealed fractions that conferred protection when loaded in GP-based vaccines. Robust Th1- and Th17-biased CD4(+) T cell recall responses were observed in the lungs of vaccinated and infected mice. Thus, our preclinical studies have indicated promising cryptococcal vaccine candidates in alkaline extracts delivered in GPs. Ongoing studies are directed at identifying the individual components of the extracts that confer protection and thus would be promising candidates for a human vaccine. The encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans and its closely related sister species, Cryptococcus gattii, are major causes of morbidity and mortality, particularly in immunocompromised persons. This study reports on the preclinical development of vaccines to protect at-risk populations from cryptococcosis. Antigens were extracted from Cryptococcus by treatment with an alkaline solution. The extracted antigens were then packaged into glucan particles, which are hollow

  9. Hypercrosslinked particles for the extraction of sweeteners using dispersive solid-phase extraction from environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Lakade, Sameer S; Zhou, Qing; Li, Aimin; Borrull, Francesc; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa M

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a new extraction material, namely, Q-100, based on hypercrosslinked magnetic particles, which was tested in dispersive solid-phase extraction for a group of sweeteners from environmental samples. The hypercrosslinked Q-100 magnetic particles had the advantage of suitable pore size distribution and high surface area, and showed good retention behavior toward sweeteners. Different dispersive solid-phase extraction parameters such as amount of magnetic particles or extraction time were optimized. Under optimum conditions, Q-100 showed suitable apparent recovery, ranging in the case of river water sample from 21 to 88% for all the sweeteners, except for alitame (12%). The validated method based on dispersive solid-phase extraction using Q-100 followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry provided good linearity and limits of quantification between 0.01 and 0.1 μg/L. The method was applied to analyze samples from river water and effluent wastewater, and four sweeteners (acesulfame, saccharin, cyclamate, and sucralose) were found in both types of sample. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Wheat bran particle size influence on phytochemical extractability and antioxidant properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is unknown if particle size plays a role in extracting health promoting compounds in wheat bran because the extraction of antioxidant and phenolic compounds with particle size reduction has not been well documented. In this study, unmilled whole bran (coarse treatment) was compared to whole bran ...

  11. An expert system for chemical speciation of individual particles using low-Z particle electron probe X-ray microanalysis data.

    PubMed

    Ro, Chul-Un; Kim, HyeKyeong; Van Grieken, René

    2004-03-01

    An electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) technique, using an energy-dispersive X-ray detector with an ultrathin window, designated a low-Z particle EPMA, has been developed. The low-Z particle EPMA allows the quantitative determination of concentrations of low-Z elements, such as C, N, and O, as well as chemical elements that can be analyzed by conventional energy-dispersive EPMA, in individual particles. Since a data set is usually composed of data for several thousands of particles in order to make environmentally meaningful observations of real atmospheric aerosol samples, the development of a method that fully extracts chemical information contained in the low-Z particle EPMA data is important. An expert system that can rapidly and reliably perform chemical speciation from the low-Z particle EPMA data is presented. This expert system tries to mimic the logic used by experts and is implemented by applying macroprogramming available in MS Excel software. Its feasibility is confirmed by applying the expert system to data for various types of standard particles and a real atmospheric aerosol sample. By applying the expert system, the time necessary for chemical speciation becomes shortened very much and detailed information on particle data can be saved and extracted later if more information is needed for further analysis.

  12. Supercritical Fluid Extraction and Analysis of Tropospheric Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Kristen J.

    An integrated sampling and supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) cell has been designed for whole-sample analysis of organic compounds on tropospheric aerosol particles. The low-volume extraction cell has been interfaced with a sampling manifold for aerosol particle collection in the field. After sample collection, the entire SFE cell was coupled to a gas chromatograph; after on-line extraction, the cryogenically -focused sample was separated and the volatile compounds detected with either a mass spectrometer or a flame ionization detector. A 20-minute extraction at 450 atm and 90 ^circC with pure supercritical CO _2 is sufficient for quantitative extraction of most volatile compounds in aerosol particle samples. A comparison between SFE and thermal desorption, the traditional whole-sample technique for analyses of this type, was performed using ambient aerosol particle samples, as well as samples containing known amounts of standard analytes. The results of these studies indicate that SFE of atmospheric aerosol particles provides quantitative measurement of several classes of organic compounds. SFE provides information that is complementary to that gained by the thermal desorption analysis. The results also indicate that SFE with CO _2 can be validated as an alternative to thermal desorption for quantitative recovery of several organic compounds. In 1989, the organic constituents of atmospheric aerosol particles collected at Niwot Ridge, Colorado, along with various physical and meteorological data, were measured during a collaborative field study. Temporal changes in the composition of samples collected during summertime at the rural site were studied. Thermal desorption-GC/FID was used to quantify selected compounds in samples collected during the field study. The statistical analysis of the 1989 Niwot Ridge data set is presented in this work. Principal component analysis was performed on thirty-one variables selected from the data set in order to ascertain

  13. High-resolution extraction of particle size via Fourier Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengfu; Zhao, Yu; Chen, Guanghua; Luo, Zhenxiong; Ye, Yan

    2017-11-01

    This paper proposes a method which can extract the particle size information with a resolution beyond λ/NA. This is achieved by applying Fourier Ptychographic (FP) ideas to the present problem. In a typical FP imaging platform, a 2D LED array is used as light sources for angle-varied illuminations, a series of low-resolution images was taken by a full sequential scan of the array of LEDs. Here, we demonstrate the particle size information is extracted by turning on each single LED on a circle. The simulated results show that the proposed method can reduce the total number of images, without loss of reliability in the results.

  14. Wheat bran particle size influence on phytochemical extractability and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Lauren Renee; Kubola, Jittawan; Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Herald, Thomas J; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    It is unknown if particle size plays a role in extracting health promoting compounds in wheat bran because the extraction of antioxidant and phenolic compounds with particle size reduction has not been well documented. In this study, unmilled whole bran (coarse treatment) was compared to whole bran milled to medium and fine treatments from the same wheat bran. Antioxidant properties (capacity, ability, power), carotenoids and phenolic compounds (phenolic acids, flavonoids, anthocyanins) were measured and compared. The ability of whole bran fractions of differing particle size distributions to inhibit free radicals was assessed using four in vitro models, namely, diphenylpicrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity, ferric reducing/antioxidant power (FRAP) assay, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), and total antioxidant capacity. Significant differences in phytochemical concentrations and antioxidant properties were observed between whole bran fractions of reduced particle size distribution for some assays. The coarse treatment exhibited significantly higher antioxidant properties compared to the fine treatment; except for the ORAC value, in which coarse was significantly lower. For soluble and bound extractions, the coarse treatment was comparatively higher in total antioxidant capacity (426.72 mg ascorbic acid eq./g) and FRAP value (53.04 μmol FeSO4/g) than bran milled to the finer treatment (314.55 ascorbic acid eq./g and 40.84 μmol FeSO4/g, respectively). Likewise, the fine treatment was higher in phenolic acid (7.36 mg FAE/g), flavonoid (206.74 μg catechin/g), anthocyanin (63.0 μg/g), and carotenoid contents (beta carotene, 14.25 μg/100 g; zeaxanthin, 35.21 μg/100 g; lutein 174.59 μg/100 g) as compared to the coarse treatment. An increase of surface area to mass increased the ORAC value by over 80%. With reduction in particle size, there was a significant increase in extracted anthocyanins, carotenoids and ORAC value. Particle size does effect the

  15. Extraction of shear viscosity in stationary states of relativistic particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reining, F.; Bouras, I.; El, A.; Wesp, C.; Xu, Z.; Greiner, C.

    2012-02-01

    Starting from a classical picture of shear viscosity we construct a stationary velocity gradient in a microscopic parton cascade. Employing the Navier-Stokes ansatz we extract the shear viscosity coefficient η. For elastic isotropic scatterings we find an excellent agreement with the analytic values. This confirms the applicability of this method. Furthermore, for both elastic and inelastic scatterings with pQCD based cross sections we extract the shear viscosity coefficient η for a pure gluonic system and find a good agreement with already published calculations.

  16. Method and Device for Extraction of Liquids from a Solid Particle Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deMayo, Benjamin (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method, system, and device for separating oil from oil sands or oil shale is disclosed. The method includes heating the oil sands, spinning the heated oil sands, confining the sand particles mechanically, and recovering the oil substantially free of the sand. The method can be used without the addition of chemical extraction agents. The system includes a source of centrifugal force, a heat source, a separation device, and a recovery device. The separation device includes a method of confining the sands while allowing the oil to escape, such as through an aperture.

  17. Integration of carboxyl modified magnetic particles and aqueous two-phase extraction for selective separation of proteins.

    PubMed

    Gai, Qingqing; Qu, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Yukui

    2011-07-15

    Both of the magnetic particle adsorption and aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) were simple, fast and low-cost method for protein separation. Selective proteins adsorption by carboxyl modified magnetic particles was investigated according to protein isoelectric point, solution pH and ionic strength. Aqueous two-phase system of PEG/sulphate exhibited selective separation and extraction for proteins before and after magnetic adsorption. The two combination ways, magnetic adsorption followed by ATPE and ATPE followed by magnetic adsorption, for the separation of proteins mixture of lysozyme, bovine serum albumin, trypsin, cytochrome C and myloglobin were discussed and compared. The way of magnetic adsorption followed by ATPE was also applied to human serum separation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  19. Energy extraction of a spinning particle via the super Penrose process from an extremal Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Wen-Biao

    2018-03-01

    The energy extraction of the collisional Penrose process has been investigated in recent years. Previous researchers mainly concentrated on the case of nonspin massive or massless particles, and they discovered that when the collision occurs near the horizon of extremal rotating black holes, the arbitrary large efficiency can be achieved with the particle's angular momentum below the critical value as L1<2 . In this paper, the energy extraction of spinning massive particles is calculated via the super Penrose process. We obtain the dependence of the impact factor and the turning points on the particle's spin s . The super Penrose process can occur only when s ≤1 and J1<2 , where J1 is the spinning particle's angular momentum. It is found that the efficiency of the energy extraction is monotonously increasing with the particle's spin s increasing for s <1 , and it can become arbitrarily high when the collision occurs close to the horizon. We compare the maximum extracted energy of spinning particles with that of the nonspin case and find a significant increase of the extracted energy. When s →1 , the maximum extracted energy can be orders of magnitude larger than that of the nonspin case. For the astrophysical black holes, the large efficiency is also obtained. Naturally, when the particle's spin s ≪1 , we can degenerate the result back to the nonspin case.

  20. Review of particle-in-cell modeling for the extraction region of large negative hydrogen ion sources for fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünderlich, D.; Mochalskyy, S.; Montellano, I. M.; Revel, A.

    2018-05-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are used since the early 1960s for calculating self-consistently the motion of charged particles in plasmas, taking into account external electric and magnetic fields as well as the fields created by the particles itself. Due to the used very small time steps (in the order of the inverse plasma frequency) and mesh size, the computational requirements can be very high and they drastically increase with increasing plasma density and size of the calculation domain. Thus, usually small computational domains and/or reduced dimensionality are used. In the last years, the available central processing unit (CPU) power strongly increased. Together with a massive parallelization of the codes, it is now possible to describe in 3D the extraction of charged particles from a plasma, using calculation domains with an edge length of several centimeters, consisting of one extraction aperture, the plasma in direct vicinity of the aperture, and a part of the extraction system. Large negative hydrogen or deuterium ion sources are essential parts of the neutral beam injection (NBI) system in future fusion devices like the international fusion experiment ITER and the demonstration reactor (DEMO). For ITER NBI RF driven sources with a source area of 0.9 × 1.9 m2 and 1280 extraction apertures will be used. The extraction of negative ions is accompanied by the co-extraction of electrons which are deflected onto an electron dump. Typically, the maximum negative extracted ion current is limited by the amount and the temporal instability of the co-extracted electrons, especially for operation in deuterium. Different PIC codes are available for the extraction region of large driven negative ion sources for fusion. Additionally, some effort is ongoing in developing codes that describe in a simplified manner (coarser mesh or reduced dimensionality) the plasma of the whole ion source. The presentation first gives a brief overview of the current status of the ion

  1. Extracting observables from lattice data in the three-particle sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusetsky, Akaki; Hammer, Hans-Werner; Pang, Jin-Yi

    2018-03-01

    The three-particle quantization condition is derived, using the particle-dimer picture in the non-relativistic effective field theory. The procedure for the extraction of various observables in the three-particle sector (the particle-dimer scattering amplitudes, breakup amplitudes, etc.) from the finite-volume lattice spectrum is discussed in detail. As an illustration of the general formalism, the expression for the finite-volume energy shift of the three-body bound-state in the unitary limit is re-derived. The role of the threebody force, which is essential for the renormalization, is highlighted, and the extension of the result beyond the unitary limit is studied. Comparison with other approaches, known in the literature, is carried out.

  2. Automated DNA extraction from genetically modified maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Ota, Hiroyuki; Lim, Tae-Kyu; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Harada, Manabu; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2006-09-18

    A novel, automated system, PNE-1080, equipped with eight automated pestle units and a spectrophotometer was developed for genomic DNA extraction from maize using aminosilane-modified bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs). The use of aminosilane-modified BMPs allowed highly accurate DNA recovery. The (A(260)-A(320)):(A(280)-A(320)) ratio of the extracted DNA was 1.9+/-0.1. The DNA quality was sufficiently pure for PCR analysis. The PNE-1080 offered rapid assay completion (30 min) with high accuracy. Furthermore, the results of real-time PCR confirmed that our proposed method permitted the accurate determination of genetically modified DNA composition and correlated well with results obtained by conventional cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-based methods.

  3. The green synthesis of fine particles of gold using an aqueous extract of Monotheca buxifolia (Flac.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar, Natasha; Khan, Abbas; Shah, Mohib; Azam, Andaleeb; Zaman, Khair; Parven, Zahida

    2016-12-01

    This study deals with the synthesis and physicochemical investigation of gold nanoparticles using an aqueous extract of Monotheca buxifolia (Flac.). On the treatment of aqueous solution of tetrachloroauric acid with the plant extract, gold nanoparticles were rapidly fabricated. The synthesized particles were characterized by UV-Vis spectrophotometry (UV), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The formation of AuNPs was confirmed by noting the change in color through visual observations as well as via UV-Vis spectroscopy. UV‒Vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold nanoparticles showed an absorption peak at around 540 nm. FTIR was used to identify the chemical composition of gold nanoparticles and Au-capped plant extract. The presence of elemental gold was also confirmed through EDX analysis. SEM analysis of the gold nanoparticles showed that they have a uniform spherical shape with an average size in the range of 70-78 nm. This green system showed to be better capping and stabilizing agent for the fine particles. Further, the antioxidant activity of Monotheca buxifolia (Flac.) extract and Au-capped with the plant extract was also evaluated using FeCl3/K3[Fe(CN)]6 in vitro assay.

  4. Uranium extraction from TRISO-coated fuel particles using supercritical CO2 containing tri-n-butyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyang; Duan, Wuhua; Xu, Jingming; Zhu, Yongjun

    2012-11-30

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are advanced nuclear systems that will receive heavy use in the future. It is important to develop spent nuclear fuel reprocessing technologies for HTGR. A new method for recovering uranium from tristructural-isotropic (TRISO-) coated fuel particles with supercritical CO(2) containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent was investigated. TRISO-coated fuel particles from HTGR fuel elements were first crushed to expose UO(2) pellet fuel kernels. The crushed TRISO-coated fuel particles were then treated under O(2) stream at 750°C, resulting in a mixture of U(3)O(8) powder and SiC shells. The conversion of U(3)O(8) into solid uranyl nitrate by its reaction with liquid N(2)O(4) in the presence of a small amount of water was carried out. Complete conversion was achieved after 60 min of reaction at 80°C, whereas the SiC shells were not converted by N(2)O(4). Uranyl nitrate in the converted mixture was extracted with supercritical CO(2) containing TBP. The cumulative extraction efficiency was above 98% after 20 min of online extraction at 50°C and 25 MPa, whereas the SiC shells were not extracted by TBP. The results suggest an attractive strategy for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from HTGR to minimize the generation of secondary radioactive waste. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Information extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  6. Effect of three extraction techniques on submitochondrial particle and Microtox bioassays for airborne particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Torres-Pérez, Mónica I; Jiménez-Velez, Braulio D; Mansilla-Rivera, Imar; Rodríguez-Sierra, Carlos J

    2005-03-01

    The effect that three extraction techniques (e.g., Soxhlet, ultrasound and microwave-assisted extraction) have on the toxicity, as measured by submitochondrial particle (SMP) and Microtox assays, of organic extracts was compared from three sources of airborne particulate matter (APM). The extraction technique influenced the toxicity response of APM extracts and it was dependent on the bioassay method, and APM sample source. APM extracts from microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) were similar or more toxic than the conventional extraction techniques of Soxhlet and ultrasound, thus, providing an alternate extraction method. The microwave extraction technique has the advantage of using less solvent volume, less extraction time, and the capacity to simultaneously extract twelve samples. The ordering of APM toxicity was generally urban dust > diesel dust > PM10 (particles with diameter < 10 microm), thus, reflecting different chemical composition of the samples. This study is the first to report the suitability of two standard in-vitro bioassays for the future toxicological characterization of APM collected from Puerto Rico, with the SMP generally showing better sensitivity to the well-known Microtox bioassay.

  7. New Mechanism of Extractive Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Heterogeneous Solid Particles.

    PubMed

    Kumbhani, S; Longin, T; Wingen, L M; Kidd, C; Perraud, V; Finlayson-Pitts, B J

    2018-02-06

    Real-time in situ mass spectrometry analysis of airborne particles is important in several applications, including exposure studies in ambient air, industrial settings, and assessing impacts on visibility and climate. However, obtaining molecular and 3D structural information is more challenging, especially for heterogeneous solid or semisolid particles. We report a study of extractive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EESI-MS) for the analysis of solid particles with an organic coating. The goal is to elucidate how much of the overall particle content is sampled, and determine the sensitivity of this technique to the surface layers. It is shown that, for NaNO 3 particles coated with glutaric acid (GA), very little of the solid NaNO 3 core is sampled compared to the GA coating, whereas for GA particles coated with malonic acid (MA), significant signals from both the MA coating and the GA core are observed. However, conventional ESI-MS of the same samples collected on a Teflon filter (and then extracted) detects much more core material compared to EESI-MS in both cases. These results show that, for the experimental conditions used here, EESI-MS does not sample the entire particle but, instead, is more sensitive to surface layers. Separate experiments on single-component particles of NaNO 3 , GA, or citric acid show that there must be a kinetics limitation to dissolution that is important in determining EESI-MS sensitivity. We propose a new mechanism of EESI solvent droplet interaction with solid particles that is consistent with the experimental observations. In conjunction with previous EESI-MS studies of organic particles, these results suggest that EESI does not necessarily sample the entire particle when solid, and that not only solubility but also surface energies and the kinetics of dissolution play an important role.

  8. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particle extracts: influence of fuel composition in two diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Henderson, T.R.; Royer, R.E.

    The influence of diesel fuel composition on mutagenicity of exhaust particle associated organic compounds has been investigated using nine fuels varying in aromatic content and distillation properties. The tests were conducted with Oldsmobile Delta-88 and Peugot 504 diesel cars operated according to the EPA Federal Test Procedure. The particulate exhaust from each test was collected on a filter, extracted in dichloromethane and the resulting extract evaluated for mutagenicity in Salmonella strain TA-100. Mutagenicity of extracts of particles collected from the Oldsmobile were highest in the higher aromatic content fuels (> 30%) but similar for intermediate (20%) and low (13%) aromaticmore » content fuels. No influence of aromaticity on mutagenicity was observed in samples collected from the Peugeot under the same conditions. Thus, fuel aromatic content may enhance the production of mutagenic combustion products at higher concentrations, but may be dependent upon engine type. A good correlation was observed between mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the initial boiling point of the fuel (r = 0.89). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of the aromatic fraction of the fuels showed that the fuel producing the most mutagenic combustion products was highest in phenanthrene type compounds.« less

  9. Protection against Experimental Cryptococcosis following Vaccination with Glucan Particles Containing Cryptococcus Alkaline Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chrono K.; Huang, Haibin; Shen, Zu T.; Lodge, Jennifer K.; Leszyk, John; Ostroff, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT A vaccine capable of protecting at-risk persons against infections due to Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii could reduce the substantial global burden of human cryptococcosis. Vaccine development has been hampered though, by lack of knowledge as to which antigens are immunoprotective and the need for an effective vaccine delivery system. We made alkaline extracts from mutant cryptococcal strains that lacked capsule or chitosan. The extracts were then packaged into glucan particles (GPs), which are purified Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell walls composed primarily of β-1,3-glucans. Subcutaneous vaccination with the GP-based vaccines provided significant protection against subsequent pulmonary infection with highly virulent strains of C. neoformans and C. gattii. The alkaline extract derived from the acapsular strain was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the most abundant proteins were identified. Separation of the alkaline extract by size exclusion chromatography revealed fractions that conferred protection when loaded in GP-based vaccines. Robust Th1- and Th17-biased CD4+ T cell recall responses were observed in the lungs of vaccinated and infected mice. Thus, our preclinical studies have indicated promising cryptococcal vaccine candidates in alkaline extracts delivered in GPs. Ongoing studies are directed at identifying the individual components of the extracts that confer protection and thus would be promising candidates for a human vaccine. PMID:26695631

  10. The Use of Tooth Particles as a Biomaterial in Post-Extraction Sockets. Experimental Study in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Guirado, José Luis; Maté-Sánchez de Val, José Eduardo; Ramos-Oltra, María Luisa; Pérez-Albacete Martínez, Carlos; Ramírez-Fernández, María Piedad; Maiquez-Gosálvez, Manuel; Gehrke, Sergio A; Fernández-Domínguez, Manuel; Romanos, Georgios E; Delgado-Ruiz, Rafael Arcesio

    2018-05-06

    Objectives : The objective of this study was to evaluate new bone formation derived from freshly crushed extracted teeth, grafted immediately in post-extraction sites in an animal model, compared with sites without graft filling, evaluated at 30 and 90 days. Material and Methods : The bilateral premolars P2, P3, P4 and the first mandibular molar were extracted atraumatically from six Beagle dogs. The clean, dry teeth were ground immediately using the Smart Dentin Grinder. The tooth particles obtained were subsequently sieved through a special sorting filter into two compartments; the upper container isolating particles over 1200 μm, the lower container isolated particles over 300 μm. The crushed teeth were grafted into the post-extraction sockets at P3, P4 and M1 (test group) (larger and smaller post-extraction alveoli), while P2 sites were left unfilled and acted as a control group. Tissue healing and bone formation were evaluated by histological and histomorphometric analysis after 30 and 90 days. Results : At 30 days, test site bone formation was greater in the test group than the control group ( p < 0.05); less immature bone was observed in the test group (25.71%) than the control group (55.98%). At 90 days, significant differences in bone formation were found with more in the test group than the control group. No significant differences were found in new bone formation when comparing the small and large alveoli post-extraction sites. Conclusions : Tooth particles extracted from dog’s teeth, grafted immediately after extractions can be considered a suitable biomaterial for socket preservation.

  11. Electrosprayed Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) Submicron Particles Loaded by Green Tea Extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamaruddin; Sriyanti, I.; Edikresnha, D.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal, K.

    2018-05-01

    Electrospraying technique has been successfully used to synthesize composite submicron particles of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and green tea extract (GTE). The precursor solutions were PVP in ethanol (15 wt%) and GTE in ethanol (10 wt%), which were then mixed at varying ratio. The mixed solution then underwent electrospraying process at an applied voltage of 15 kV, a distance of collector to the nozzle at 15 cm, and a flow rate of 3 µL/min. The composite submicron particles of PVP-GTE showed smooth and fine spherical morphology without fibers or beaded fibers. To a certain degree, the increase of GTE content in the PVP-GTE mixed solution decreased the average diameter of PVP-GTE composite particles. Moreover, the analysis of the FTIR spectra confirmed the existing molecular interaction between PVP and GTE in the composite submicron particles as shown by the shift of PVP wavenumber towards GTE, which has typically smaller wavenumber.

  12. GPU surface extraction using the closest point embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mark; Hansen, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Isosurface extraction is a fundamental technique used for both surface reconstruction and mesh generation. One method to extract well-formed isosurfaces is a particle system; unfortunately, particle systems can be slow. In this paper, we introduce an enhanced parallel particle system that uses the closest point embedding as the surface representation to speedup the particle system for isosurface extraction. The closest point embedding is used in the Closest Point Method (CPM), a technique that uses a standard three dimensional numerical PDE solver on two dimensional embedded surfaces. To fully take advantage of the closest point embedding, it is coupled with a Barnes-Hut tree code on the GPU. This new technique produces well-formed, conformal unstructured triangular and tetrahedral meshes from labeled multi-material volume datasets. Further, this new parallel implementation of the particle system is faster than any known methods for conformal multi-material mesh extraction. The resulting speed-ups gained in this implementation can reduce the time from labeled data to mesh from hours to minutes and benefits users, such as bioengineers, who employ triangular and tetrahedral meshes

  13. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particle extracts: influence of fuel composition in two diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, C.R.; Henderson, T.R.; Royer, R.E.

    The influence of diesel fuel composition on mutagenicity of exhaust particle associated organic compounds has been investigated using nine fuels varying in aromatic content and distillation properties. The tests were conducted with Oldsmobile Delta-88 and Peugot 504 diesel cars operated according to the EPA Federal Test Procedure. The particulate exhaust from each test was collected on a filter, extracted in dichloromethane and the resulting extract evaluated for mutagenicity in Salmonella strain TA-100. Mutagenicity of extracts of particles collected from the Oldsmobile were highest in the higher aromatic content fuels (greater than 30%) but similar for intermediate (20%) and low (13%)more » aromatic content fuels. No influence of aromaticity on mutagenicity was observed in samples collected from the Peugeot under the same conditions. Thus, fuel aromatic content may enhance the production of mutagenic combustion products at higher concentrations, but may be dependent upon engine type. A good correlation was observed between mutagenicity of the particle extracts and the initial boiling point of the fuel (r . 0.89). Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of the aromatic fraction of the fuels showed that the fuel producing the most mutagenic combustion products was highest in phenanthrene type compounds.« less

  14. Development of the beam extraction synchronization system at the Fermilab Booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiya, K.; Chaurize, S.; Drennan, C. C.; Pellico, W.; Sullivan, T.; Triplett, A. K.; Waller, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    The new beam extraction synchronization control system called "Magnetic Cogging" was developed at the Fermilab Booster and it replaces a system called "RF Cogging" as part of the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP).[1] The flux throughput goal for the PIP is 2.2×1017 protons per hour, which is double the present flux. The flux increase will be accomplished by doubling the number of beam cycles which, in turn, will double the beam loss in the Booster accelerator if nothing else is done. The Booster accelerates beam from 400 MeV to 8 GeV and extracts it to the Main Injector (MI) or Recycler Ring (RR). Cogging controls the beam extraction gap position which is created early in the Booster cycle and synchronizes the gap to the rising edge of the Booster extraction kicker and the MI/RR injection kicker. The RF Cogging system controls the gap position by changing only the radial position of the beam thus limiting the beam aperture and creating beam loss due to beam scraping. The Magnetic Cogging system controls the gap position with the magnetic field of the dipole correctors while the radial position feedback keeps the beam on a central orbit. Also with Magnetic Cogging the gap creation can occur earlier in the Booster cycle when the removed particles are at a lower energy. Thus Magnetic Cogging reduces the deposited energy of the lost particles (beam energy loss) and results in less beam loss activation. Energy loss was reduced by 40% by moving the gap creation energy from 700 MeV to 400 MeV when the Booster Cogging system was switched from RF Cogging to Magnetic Cogging in March 2015.

  15. Solvent extraction system for plutonium colloids and other oxide nano-particles

    DOEpatents

    Soderholm, Lynda; Wilson, Richard E; Chiarizia, Renato; Skanthakumar, Suntharalingam

    2014-06-03

    The invention provides a method for extracting plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, the method comprising supplying plutonium in a first aqueous phase; contacting the plutonium aqueous phase with a mixture of a dielectric and a moiety having a first acidity so as to allow the plutonium to substantially extract into the mixture; and contacting the extracted plutonium with second a aqueous phase, wherein the second aqueous phase has a second acidity higher than the first acidity, so as to allow the extracted plutonium to extract into the second aqueous phase. The invented method facilitates isolation of plutonium polymer without the formation of crud or unwanted emulsions.

  16. Force fields of charged particles in micro-nanofluidic preconcentration systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Lingyan; Ouyang, Wei; Li, Zirui; Han, Jongyoon

    2017-12-01

    Electrokinetic concentration devices based on the ion concentration polarization (ICP) phenomenon have drawn much attention due to their simple setup, high enrichment factor, and easy integration with many subsequent processes, such as separation, reaction, and extraction etc. Despite significant progress in the experimental research, fundamental understanding and detailed modeling of the preconcentration systems is still lacking. The mechanism of the electrokinetic trapping of charged particles is currently limited to the force balance analysis between the electric force and fluid drag force in an over-simplified one-dimensional (1D) model, which misses many signatures of the actual system. This letter studies the particle trapping phenomena that are not explainable in the 1D model through the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) force fields. The trapping of charged particles is shown to significantly distort the electric field and fluid flow pattern, which in turn leads to the different trapping behaviors of particles of different sizes. The mechanisms behind the protrusions and instability of the focused band, which are important factors determining overall preconcentration efficiency, are revealed through analyzing the rotating fluxes of particles in the vicinity of the ion-selective membrane. The differences in the enrichment factors of differently sized particles are understood through the interplay between the electric force and convective fluid flow. These results provide insights into the electrokinetic concentration effect, which could facilitate the design and optimization of ICP-based preconcentration systems.

  17. Usnea barbata CO2-supercritical extract in alkyl polyglucoside-based emulsion system: contribution of Confocal Raman imaging to the formulation development of a natural product.

    PubMed

    Zugic, Ana; Lunter, Dominique Jasmin; Daniels, Rolf; Pantelic, Ivana; Tasic Kostov, Marija; Tadic, Vanja; Misic, Dusan; Arsic, Ivana; Savic, Snezana

    2016-08-01

    Topical treatment of skin infections is often limited by drawbacks related to both antimicrobial agents and their vehicles. In addition, considering the growing promotion of natural therapeutic products, our objective was to develop and evaluate naturally-based emulsion system, as prospective topical formulation for skin infections-treatment. Therefore, alkyl polyglucoside surfactants were used for stabilization of a vehicle serving as potential carrier for supercritical CO2-extract of Usnea barbata, lichen with well-documented antimicrobial activity, incorporated using two protocols and three concentrations. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization suggested possible involvement of extract's particles in stabilization of the investigated system. Raman spectral imaging served as the key method in disclosing extract's particles potential to participate in the microstructure of the tested emulsion system via three mechanisms: (1) particle-particle aggregation, (2) adsorption at the oil-water interface and (3) hydrophobic particle-surfactant interactions. Stated extract-vehicle interaction proved to be correlated to the preparation procedure and extract concentration on one hand and to affect the physicochemical and biopharmaceutical features of investigated system, on the other hand. Thereafter, formulation with the best preliminary stability and liberation profile was selected for further efficiency and in vivo skin irritation potential evaluation, implying pertinent in vitro antimicrobial activity against G+ bacteria and overall satisfying preliminary safety profile.

  18. Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypczyk, Paul; Short, Anthony J.; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-06-01

    Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a ‘weight’ that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and gives a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

  19. Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczyk, Paul; Short, Anthony J; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-06-27

    Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a 'weight' that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and gives a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

  20. Particle dynamics and particle-cell interaction in microfluidic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamm, Matthew T.

    Particle-laden flow in a microchannel resulting in aggregation of microparticles was investigated to determine the dependence of the cluster growth rate on the following parameters: suspension void fraction, shear strain rate, and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio. The growth rate of an average cluster was found to increase linearly with suspension void fraction, and to obey a power-law relationships with shear strain rate as S 0.9 and channel-height to particle-diameter ratio as (h/d )--3.5. Ceramic liposomal nanoparticles and silica microparticles were functionalized with antibodies that act as targeting ligands. The bio-functionality and physical integrity of the cerasomes were characterized. Surface functionalization allows cerasomes to deliver drugs with selectivity and specificity that is not possible using standard liposomes. The functionalized particle-target cell binding process was characterized using BT-20 breast cancer cells. Two microfluidic systems were used; one with both species in suspension, the other with cells immobilized inside a microchannel and particle suspension as the mobile phase. Effects of incubation time, particle concentration, and shear strain rate on particle-cell binding were investigated. With both species in suspension, the particle-cell binding process was found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. Particle desorption and cellular loss of binding affinity in time were found to be negligible; cell-particle-cell interaction was identified as the limiting mechanism in particle-cell binding. Findings suggest that separation of a bound particle from a cell may be detrimental to cellular binding affinity. Cell-particle-cell interactions were prevented by immobilizing cells inside a microchannel. The initial stage of particle-cell binding was investigated and was again found to be reasonably well-described by a first-order model. For both systems, the time constant was found to be inversely proportional to

  1. Method for coating ultrafine particles, system for coating ultrafine particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the particles to a standing wave; and contacting the subjected particlesmore » with a coating moiety.« less

  2. A 3D particle visualization system for temperature management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, B.; Rodriguez, N.; Puech, W.; Rey, H.; Vasques, X.

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with a 3D visualization technique proposed to analyze and manage energy efficiency from a data center. Data are extracted from sensors located in the IBM Green Data Center in Montpellier France. These sensors measure different information such as hygrometry, pressure and temperature. We want to visualize in real-time the large among of data produced by these sensors. A visualization engine has been designed, based on particles system and a client server paradigm. In order to solve performance problems, a Level Of Detail solution has been developed. These methods are based on the earlier work introduced by J. Clark in 1976. In this paper we introduce a particle method used for this work and subsequently we explain different simplification methods applied to improve our solution.

  3. Effects of a Variety of Food Extracts and Juices on the Specific Binding Ability of Norovirus GII.4 P Particles

    PubMed Central

    LI, DAN; BAERT, LEEN; XIA, MING; ZHONG, WEIMING; JIANG, XI; UYTTENDAELE, MIEKE

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks. PMID:22980024

  4. Effects of a variety of food extracts and juices on the specific binding ability of norovirus GII.4 P particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Baert, Leen; Xia, Ming; Zhong, Weiming; Jiang, Xi; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2012-07-01

    The effects of 13 food extracts and juices, including shellfish, fruits, and vegetables, on the binding ability of human norovirus (NoV) were examined, using P particles of human NoV GII.4 as a research surrogate. The enhancements (positive values) or reductions (negative values) of NoV P particle detection (changes in optical density at 450 nm) in the presence of different food extracts and juices as compared with P particles diluted in phosphate-buffered saline were tested by saliva-binding, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in triplicate. In the presence of different food extracts and juices at different concentrations, an increase or decrease of the receptor-binding ability of the NoV P particles was observed. Due to a higher specific binding and thus a higher accumulation of the viral particles, oysters may be contaminated with human NoV more often than other shellfish species (mussel, hard clams, and razor clams). Cranberry and pomegranate juices were shown to reduce the specific binding ability of human NoV P particles. No such binding inhibition effects were observed for the other tested extracts of fresh produce (strawberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry tomato, spinach, romaine lettuce) or, notably, for raspberry, which has been associated with human NoV outbreaks.

  5. Experimental extractions of particle position from inline holograms using single coefficient of Wigner-Ville analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Joewono; Dawprateep, Saowaros; Chuamchaitrakool, Porntip

    2017-07-01

    Extractions of particle positions from inline holograms using a single coefficient of Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) are experimentally verified. WVD analysis of holograms gives local variation of fringe frequency. Regardless of an axial position of particles, one of the WVD coefficients has the unique characteristics of having the lowest amplitude and being located on a line with a slope inversely proportional to the particle position. Experimental results obtained using two image sensors with different resolutions verify the feasibility of the present method.

  6. Molecular identification of polymers and anthropogenic particles extracted from oceanic water and fish stomach - A Raman micro-spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ghosal, Sutapa; Chen, Michael; Wagner, Jeff; Wang, Zhong-Min; Wall, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    Pacific Ocean trawl samples, stomach contents of laboratory-raised fish as well as fish from the subtropical gyres were analyzed by Raman micro-spectroscopy (RMS) to identify polymer residues and any detectable persistent organic pollutants (POP). The goal was to access specific molecular information at the individual particle level in order to identify polymer debris in the natural environment. The identification process was aided by a laboratory generated automated fluorescence removal algorithm. Pacific Ocean trawl samples of plastic debris associated with fish collection sites were analyzed to determine the types of polymers commonly present. Subsequently, stomach contents of fish from these locations were analyzed for ingested polymer debris. Extraction of polymer debris from fish stomach using KOH versus ultrapure water were evaluated to determine the optimal method of extraction. Pulsed ultrasonic extraction in ultrapure water was determined to be the method of choice for extraction with minimal chemical intrusion. The Pacific Ocean trawl samples yielded primarily polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) particles >1 mm, PE being the most prevalent type. Additional microplastic residues (1 mm - 10 μm) extracted by filtration, included a polystyrene (PS) particle in addition to PE and PP. Flame retardant, deca-BDE was tentatively identified on some of the PP trawl particles. Polymer residues were also extracted from the stomachs of Atlantic and Pacific Ocean fish. Two types of polymer related debris were identified in the Atlantic Ocean fish: (1) polymer fragments and (2) fragments with combined polymer and fatty acid signatures. In terms of polymer fragments, only PE and PP were detected in the fish stomachs from both locations. A variety of particles were extracted from oceanic fish as potential plastic pieces based on optical examination. However, subsequent RMS examination identified them as various non-plastic fragments, highlighting the importance

  7. New method to enhance the extraction yield of rutin from Sophora japonica using a novel ultrasonic extraction system by determining optimum ultrasonic frequency.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianqing; Qu, Baida; Liu, Da; Zheng, Naiqin

    2015-11-01

    A new method has been proposed for enhancing extraction yield of rutin from Sophora japonica, in which a novel ultrasonic extraction system has been developed to perform the determination of optimum ultrasonic frequency by a two-step procedure. This study has systematically investigated the influence of a continuous frequency range of 20-92 kHz on rutin yields. The effects of different operating conditions on rutin yields have also been studied in detail such as solvent concentration, solvent to solid ratio, ultrasound power, temperature and particle size. A higher extraction yield was obtained at the ultrasonic frequency of 60-62 kHz which was little affected under other extraction conditions. Comparative studies between existing methods and the present method were done to verify the effectiveness of this method. Results indicated that the new extraction method gave a higher extraction yield compared with existing ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and soxhlet extraction (SE). Thus, the potential use of this method may be promising for extraction of natural materials on an industrial scale in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  9. In situ Orbit Extraction from Live, High Precision Collisionless Simulations of Systems Formed by Cold Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Mendoza, H.; Aguilar, L. A.

    2018-04-01

    We performed high precision, N-body simulations of the cold collapse of initially spherical, collisionless systems using the GYRFALCON code of Dehnen (2000). The collapses produce very prolate spheroidal configurations. After the collapse, the systems are simulated for 85 and 170 half-mass radius dynamical timescales, during which energy conservation is better than 0.005%. We use this period to extract individual particle orbits directly from the simulations. We then use the TAXON code of Carpintero and Aguilar (1998) to classify 1 to 1.5% of the extracted orbits from our final, relaxed configurations: less than 15% are chaotic orbits, 30% are box orbits and 60% are tube orbits (long and short axis). Our goal has been to prove that direct orbit extraction is feasible, and that there is no need to "freeze" the final N-body system configuration to extract a time-independent potential.

  10. Particle measurement systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Steele, Paul T [Livermore, CA

    2011-10-04

    A system according to one embodiment includes a light source for generating light fringes; a sampling mechanism for directing a particle through the light fringes; and at least one light detector for detecting light scattered by the particle as the particle passes through the light fringes. A method according to one embodiment includes generating light fringes using a light source; directing a particle through the light fringes; and detecting light scattered by the particle as the particle passes through the light fringes using at least one light detector.

  11. The extraction and measurement of bone morphogenetic protein 7 from bovine cortical bone as a function of particle size.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, William S; Ali, Saba N

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), present in parts per billion in bone, endow demineralized bone matrix (DBM) with osteoinductive properties suitable for clinical use. Although BMPs are mainly associated with bone matrix, they also associate with other bone compartments as well, including the mineral phase. The purpose of this study was to gain a more complete understanding of the distribution of BMPs in undemineralized bone. Eleven discrete particle size ranges of bovine cortical bone were prepared, ranging between less than 25 μm and 600 to 710 μm for the smallest and largest sizes, respectively. The bone was extracted with 4-M guanidine-HCl/0.05-M Tris-HCl, and the amount of BMP-7 released was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. In addition, 106- to 710-μm bone particles were demineralized and similarly extracted for comparison. The measured BMP-7 content of the DBM was 24.6 ± 1.56 ng/g. The values for bone increased nonlinearly with decreasing particle size, ranging from 1.13 ± 0.50 ng/g for the 600- to 710-μm particles to 4.18 ± 1.14 ng/g for the less than 25-μm particles (P < 0.001). However, modeling the bone particles as solid spheres to estimate total surface area showed that the extracted BMP-7 per unit area was greater for larger particle sizes. These seemingly opposing results suggest that BMPs may become proportionally damaged or altered in response to the increased forces required to generate smaller particles and, as such, may not be detectable with enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. In addition, minimization of bone particle size is not an effective strategy to approach the BMP availability of DBM.

  12. Snow particles extracted from X-ray computed microtomography imagery and their single-scattering properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Adachi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Tanikawa, Tomonori; Aoki, Teruo; Masuda, Kazuhiko

    2018-04-01

    Sizes and shapes of snow particles were determined from X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) images, and their single-scattering properties were calculated at visible and near-infrared wavelengths using a Geometrical Optics Method (GOM). We analyzed seven snow samples including fresh and aged artificial snow and natural snow obtained from field samples. Individual snow particles were numerically extracted, and the shape of each snow particle was defined by applying a rendering method. The size distribution and specific surface area distribution were estimated from the geometrical properties of the snow particles, and an effective particle radius was derived for each snow sample. The GOM calculations at wavelengths of 0.532 and 1.242 μm revealed that the realistic snow particles had similar scattering phase functions as those of previously modeled irregular shaped particles. Furthermore, distinct dendritic particles had a characteristic scattering phase function and asymmetry factor. The single-scattering properties of particles of effective radius reff were compared with the size-averaged single-scattering properties. We found that the particles of reff could be used as representative particles for calculating the average single-scattering properties of the snow. Furthermore, the single-scattering properties of the micro-CT particles were compared to those of particle shape models using our current snow retrieval algorithm. For the single-scattering phase function, the results of the micro-CT particles were consistent with those of a conceptual two-shape model. However, the particle size dependence differed for the single-scattering albedo and asymmetry factor.

  13. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  14. Particle transport in low-energy ventilation systems. Part 1: theory of steady states.

    PubMed

    Bolster, D T; Linden, P F

    2009-04-01

    Many modern low-energy ventilation schemes, such as displacement or natural ventilation, take advantage of temperature stratification in a space, extracting the warmest air from the top of the room. The adoption of these energy-efficient ventilation systems still requires the provision of acceptable indoor air quality. In this work we study the steady state transport of particulate contaminants in a displacement-ventilated space. Representing heat sources as ideal sources of buoyancy, analytical models are developed that allow us to compare the average efficiency of contaminant removal between traditional and modern low-energy systems. We found that on average traditional and low-energy systems are similar in overall pollutant removal efficiency, although quite different vertical distributions of contaminant can exist, thus affecting individual exposure. While the main focus of this work is on particles where the dominant mode of deposition is by gravitational settling, we also discuss additional deposition mechanisms and show that the qualitative observations we make carry over to cases where such mechanisms must be included. We illustrate that while average concentration of particles for traditional mixing systems and low energy displacement systems are similar, local concentrations can vary significantly with displacement systems. Depending on the source of the particles this can be better or worse in terms of occupant exposure and engineers should take due diligence accordingly when designing ventilation systems.

  15. Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Ankit; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2015-06-09

    Transistor-based particle detection systems and methods may be configured to detect charged and non-charged particles. Such systems may include a supporting structure contacting a gate of a transistor and separating the gate from a dielectric of the transistor, and the transistor may have a near pull-in bias and a sub-threshold region bias to facilitate particle detection. The transistor may be configured to change current flow through the transistor in response to a change in stiffness of the gate caused by securing of a particle to the gate, and the transistor-based particle detection system may configured to detect the non-charged particle at least from the change in current flow.

  16. Hyphenating size‐exclusion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometry; using on‐line liquid‐liquid extraction to study the lipid composition of lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Michael; Griffin, Julian L.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Lipoproteins belong to the most commonly measured clinical biochemical parameters. Lipidomics is an orthogonal approach and aims to profile the individual lipid molecules that jointly form the lipoprotein particles. However, in the first step of the extraction of lipid molecules from serum, an organic solvent is used leading to dissociation of the lipoproteins. Thus far it has been impossible to combine lipidomics and lipoprotein analysis in one analytical system. Methods Human plasma was diluted in phosphate‐buffered saline (PBS) and injected onto a Superose 6 PC 3.2 column with PBS as a mobile phase to separate lipoproteins. The eluent was led to a Syrris FLLEX module, which also received CHCl3/MeOH (3:1). The two phases were mixed and subsequently separated using a Teflon membrane in an especially designed pressurized flow chamber. The organic phase was led to a standard electrospray source of an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. Results Size‐exclusion chromatography (SEC) has been commonly applied to separate lipoproteins and is considered a practical alternative to ultracentrifugation. Through the on‐line liquid‐liquid extraction method it becomes possible to obtained detailed mass spectra of lipids across different lipoprotein fractions. The extracted ion chromatograms of specific lipid signals showed their distribution against the size of lipoprotein particles. Conclusions The application of on‐line liquid‐liquid extraction allows for the continuous electrospray‐based mass spectral analysis of SEC eluent, providing the detailed lipid composition of lipoprotein particles separated by size. This approach provides new possibilities for the study of the biochemistry of lipoproteins. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26443395

  17. System for particle concentration and detection

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Whaley, Josh A.; Zimmerman, Mark D.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tran, Huu M.; Maurer, Scott M.; Munslow, William D.

    2013-03-19

    A new microfluidic system comprising an automated prototype insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) triggering microfluidic device for pathogen monitoring that can eventually be run outside the laboratory in a real world environment has been used to demonstrate the feasibility of automated trapping and detection of particles. The system broadly comprised an aerosol collector for collecting air-borne particles, an iDEP chip within which to temporarily trap the collected particles and a laser and fluorescence detector with which to induce a fluorescence signal and detect a change in that signal as particles are trapped within the iDEP chip.

  18. Perpetual extraction of work from a nonequilibrium dynamical system under Markovian feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosugi, Taichi

    2013-09-01

    By treating both control parameters and dynamical variables as probabilistic variables, we develop a succinct theory of perpetual extraction of work from a generic classical nonequilibrium system subject to a heat bath via repeated measurements under a Markovian feedback control. It is demonstrated that a problem for perpetual extraction of work in a nonequilibrium system is reduced to a problem of Markov chain in the higher-dimensional phase space. We derive a version of the detailed fluctuation theorem, which was originally derived for classical nonequilibrium systems by Horowitz and Vaikuntanathan [Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.061120 82, 061120 (2010)], in a form suitable for the analyses of perpetual extraction of work. Since our theory is formulated for generic dynamics of probability distribution function in phase space, its application to a physical system is straightforward. As simple applications of the theory, two exactly solvable models are analyzed. The one is a nonequilibrium two-state system and the other is a particle confined to a one-dimensional harmonic potential in thermal equilibrium. For the former example, it is demonstrated that the observer on the transitory steps to the stationary state can lose energy and that work larger than that achieved in the stationary state can be extracted. For the latter example, it is demonstrated that the optimal protocol for the extraction of work via repeated measurements can differ from that via a single measurement. The validity of our version of the detailed fluctuation theorem, which determines the upper bound of the expected work in the stationary state, is also confirmed for both examples. These observations provide useful insights into exploration for realistic modeling of a machine that extracts work from its environment.

  19. Design and validation of an advanced entrained flow reactor system for studies of rapid solid biomass fuel particle conversion and ash formation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, David R.; Holmgren, Per; Skoglund, Nils; Broström, Markus

    2018-06-01

    The design and validation of a newly commissioned entrained flow reactor is described in the present paper. The reactor was designed for advanced studies of fuel conversion and ash formation in powder flames, and the capabilities of the reactor were experimentally validated using two different solid biomass fuels. The drop tube geometry was equipped with a flat flame burner to heat and support the powder flame, optical access ports, a particle image velocimetry (PIV) system for in situ conversion monitoring, and probes for extraction of gases and particulate matter. A detailed description of the system is provided based on simulations and measurements, establishing the detailed temperature distribution and gas flow profiles. Mass balance closures of approximately 98% were achieved by combining gas analysis and particle extraction. Biomass fuel particles were successfully tracked using shadow imaging PIV, and the resulting data were used to determine the size, shape, velocity, and residence time of converting particles. Successful extractive sampling of coarse and fine particles during combustion while retaining their morphology was demonstrated, and it opens up for detailed time resolved studies of rapid ash transformation reactions; in the validation experiments, clear and systematic fractionation trends for K, Cl, S, and Si were observed for the two fuels tested. The combination of in situ access, accurate residence time estimations, and precise particle sampling for subsequent chemical analysis allows for a wide range of future studies, with implications and possibilities discussed in the paper.

  20. Design and process aspects of laboratory scale SCF particle formation systems.

    PubMed

    Vemavarapu, Chandra; Mollan, Matthew J; Lodaya, Mayur; Needham, Thomas E

    2005-03-23

    Consistent production of solid drug materials of desired particle and crystallographic morphologies under cGMP conditions is a frequent challenge to pharmaceutical researchers. Supercritical fluid (SCF) technology gained significant attention in pharmaceutical research by not only showing a promise in this regard but also accommodating the principles of green chemistry. Given that this technology attained commercialization in coffee decaffeination and in the extraction of hops and other essential oils, a majority of the off-the-shelf SCF instrumentation is designed for extraction purposes. Only a selective few vendors appear to be in the early stages of manufacturing equipment designed for particle formation. The scarcity of information on the design and process engineering of laboratory scale equipment is recognized as a significant shortcoming to the technological progress. The purpose of this article is therefore to provide the information and resources necessary for startup research involving particle formation using supercritical fluids. The various stages of particle formation by supercritical fluid processing can be broadly classified into delivery, reaction, pre-expansion, expansion and collection. The importance of each of these processes in tailoring the particle morphology is discussed in this article along with presenting various alternatives to perform these operations.

  1. Extraction and analysis of silver and gold nanoparticles from biological tissues using single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gray, Evan P; Coleman, Jessica G; Bednar, Anthony J; Kennedy, Alan J; Ranville, James F; Higgins, Christopher P

    2013-12-17

    Expanded use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in consumer products increases the potential for environmental release and unintended biological exposures. As a result, measurement techniques are needed to accurately quantify ENP size, mass, and particle number distributions in biological matrices. This work combines single particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (spICPMS) with tissue extraction to quantify and characterize metallic ENPs in environmentally relevant biological tissues for the first time. ENPs were extracted from tissues via alkaline digestion using tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Method development was performed using ground beef and was verified in Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus . ENPs investigated include 100 and 60 nm Au and Ag stabilized by polyvynylpyrrolidone (PVP). Mass- and number-based recovery of spiked Au and Ag ENPs was high (83-121%) from all tissues tested. Additional experiments suggested ENP mixtures (60 and 100 nm Ag ENPs) could be extracted and quantitatively analyzed. Biological exposures were also conducted to verify the applicability of the method for aquatic organisms. Size distributions and particle number concentrations were determined for ENPs extracted from D. magna exposed to 98 μg/L 100 nm Au and 4.8 μg/L 100 nm Ag ENPs. The D. magna nanoparticulate body burden for Au ENP uptake was 613 ± 230 μg/kgww, while the measured nanoparticulate body burden for D. magna exposed to Ag ENPs was 59 ± 52 μg/kgww. Notably, the particle size distributions determined from D. magna tissues suggested minimal shifts in the size distributions of ENPs accumulated, as compared to the exposure media.

  2. Design of extraction system in BRing at HIAF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shuang; Yang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Jinquan; Shen, Guodong; Ren, Hang; Liu, Jie; Shangguan, Jingbing; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Jingjing; Mao, Lijun; Sheng, Lina; Yin, Dayu; Wang, Geng; Wu, Bo; Yao, Liping; Tang, Meitang; Cai, Fucheng; Chen, Xiaoqiang

    2018-06-01

    The Booster Ring (BRing), which is the key part of HIAF (High Intensity heavy ion Accelerator Facility) complex at IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences), can provide uranium (A / q = 7) beam with a wide extraction energy range of 200-800 MeV/u. To fulfill a flexible beam extraction for multi-purpose experiments, both fast and slow extraction systems will be accommodated in the BRing. The fast extraction system is used for extracting short bunched beam horizontally in single-turn. The slow extraction system is used to provide quasi-continuous beam by the third order resonance and RF-knockout scheme. To achieve a compact structure, the two extraction systems are designed to share the same extraction channel. The general design of the fast and slow extraction systems and simulation results are discussed in this paper.

  3. Calculation of extracted ion beam particle distribution including within-extractor collisions from H-alpha Doppler shift measurements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Seong; Kim, Jinchoon; In, Sang Ryul; Jeong, Seung Ho

    2008-02-01

    Prototype long pulse ion sources are being developed and tested toward the goal of a deuterium beam extraction of 120 keV/65 A. The latest prototype source consists of a magnetic bucket plasma generator and a four-grid copper accelerator system with multicircular apertures of 568 holes. To measure the angular divergence and the ion species of the ion beam, an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA) system for a Doppler-shifted H-alpha lights was set up at the end of a gas-cell neutralizer. But the OMA data are very difficult to analyze due to a large background level on the top of the three energy peaks (coming from H(+), H(2) (+), and H(3) (+)). These background spectra in the OMA signals seem to result from partially accelerated ion beams in the accelerator. Extracted ions could undergo a premature charge exchange as the accelerator column tends to have a high hydrogen partial pressure from the unused gas from the plasma generator, resulting in a continuous background of partially accelerated beam particles at the accelerator exit. This effect is calculated by accounting for all the possible atomic collision processes and numerically summing up three ion species across the accelerator column. The collection of all the atomic reaction cross sections and the numerical summing up will be presented. The result considerably depends on the background pressure and the ion beam species ratio (H(+), H(2) (+), and H(3) (+)). This effect constitutes more than 20% of the whole particle distribution. And the energy distribution of those suffering from collisions is broad and shows a broad maximum in the vicinity of the half and the third energy region.

  4. Microfluidic solvent extraction of poly(vinyl alcohol) droplets: effect of polymer structure on particle and capsule formation.

    PubMed

    Sharratt, W N; Brooker, A; Robles, E S J; Cabral, J T

    2018-04-26

    We investigate the formation of poly(vinyl alcohol) microparticles by the selective extraction of aqueous polymer solution droplets, templated by microfluidics and subsequently immersed in a non-solvent bath. The role of polymer molecular mass (18-105 kg mol-1), degree of hydrolysis (88-99%) and thus solubility, and initial solution concentration (0.01-10% w/w) are quantified. Monodisperse droplets with radii ranging from 50 to 500 μm were produced at a flow-focusing junction with carrier phase hexadecane and extracted into ethyl acetate. Solvent exchange and extraction result in droplet shrinkage, demixing, coarsening and phase-inversion, yielding polymer microparticles with well-defined dimensions and internal microstructure. Polymer concentration, varied from below the overlap concentration c* to above the concentrated crossover c**, as estimated by viscosity measurements, was found to have the largest impact on the final particle size and extraction timescale, while polymer mass and hydrolysis played a secondary role. These results are consistent with the observation that the average polymer concentration upon solidification greatly exceeds c**, and that the internal microparticle porosity is largely unchanged. However, reducing the initial polymer concentration to well below c* (approximately 100×) and increasing droplet size yields thin-walled (100's of nm) capsules which controllably crumple upon extraction. The symmetry of the process can be readily broken by imposing extraction conditions at an impermeable surface, yielding large, buckled, cavity morphologies. Based on these results, we establish robust design criteria for polymer capsules and particles, demonstrated here for poly(vinyl alcohol), with well-defined shape, dimensions and internal microstructure.

  5. Numerical Study of Particle Damping Mechanism in Piston Vibration System via Particle Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Shah, Binoy; Keer, Leon; Wang, Jane; Snurr, Randall

    2008-03-01

    Mechanical damping systems with granular particles as the damping media have promising applications in extreme temperature conditions. In particle-based damping systems, the mechanical energy is dissipated through the inelastic collision and friction of particles. In the past, many experiments have been performed to investigate the particle damping problems. However, the detailed energy dissipation mechanism is still unclear due to the complex collision and flow behavior of dense particles. In this work, we use 3-D particle dynamics simulation to investigate the damping mechanism of an oscillating cylinder piston immerged in millimeter-size steel particles. The time evolution of the energy dissipation through the friction and inelastic collision is accurately monitored during the damping process. The contribution from the particle-particle interaction and particle-wall interaction is also separated for investigation. The effects of moisture, surface roughness, and density of particles are carefully investigated in the simulation. The comparison between the numerical simulation and experiment is also performed. The simulation results can help us understand the particle damping mechanism and design the new generation of particle damping devices.

  6. Particle-sampling statistics in laser anemometers Sample-and-hold systems and saturable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, R. V.; Jensen, A. S.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of the data-processing system on the particle statistics obtained with laser anemometry of flows containing suspended particles is examined. Attention is given to the sample and hold processor, a pseudo-analog device which retains the last measurement until a new measurement is made, followed by time-averaging of the data. The second system considered features a dead time, i.e., a saturable system with a significant reset time with storage in a data buffer. It is noted that the saturable system operates independent of the particle arrival rate. The probabilities of a particle arrival in a given time period are calculated for both processing systems. It is shown that the system outputs are dependent on the mean particle flow rate, the flow correlation time, and the flow statistics, indicating that the particle density affects both systems. The results are significant for instances of good correlation between the particle density and velocity, such as occurs near the edge of a jet.

  7. Reactive extraction at liquid-liquid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieszczycka, Karolina

    2018-01-01

    The chapter summarizes the state of knowledge about a metal transport in two-phase system. The first part of this review focuses on the distribution law and main factors determination in classical solvent extraction (solubility and polarity of the solute, as well as inter- and intramolecules interaction. Next part of the chapter is devoted to the reactive solvent extraction and the molecular modeling requiring knowledge on type of extractants, complexation mechanisms, metals ions speciation and oxidation during complexes forming, and other parameters that enable to understand the extraction process. Also the kinetic data that is needed for proper modeling, simulation and design of processes needed for critical separations are discussed. Extraction at liquid-solid system using solvent impregnated resins is partially identical as in the case of the corresponding solvent extraction, therefore this subject was also presented in all aspects of separation process (equilibrium, mechanism, kinetics).

  8. Scanning systems for particle cancer therapy

    DOEpatents

    Trbojevic, Dejan

    2015-08-04

    A particle beam to treat malignant tissue is delivered to a patient by a gantry. The gantry includes a plurality of small magnets sequentially arranged along a beam tube to transfer the particle beam with strong focusing and a small dispersion function, whereby a beam size is very small, allowing for the small magnet size. Magnets arranged along the beam tube uses combined function magnets where the magnetic field is a combination of a bending dipole field with a focusing or defocusing quadrupole field. A triplet set of combined function magnets defines the beam size at the patient. A scanning system of magnets arranged along the beam tube after the bending system delivers the particle beam in a direction normal to the patient, to minimize healthy skin and tissue exposure to the particle beam.

  9. From cell extracts to fish schools to granular layers: the universal hydrodynamics of self-driven systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram

    2007-03-01

    Collections of self-driven or ``active'' particles are now recognised as a distinct kind of nonequilibrium matter, and an understanding of their phases, hydrodynamics, mechanical response, and correlations is a vital and rapidly developing part of the statistical physics of soft-matter systems far from equilibrium. My talk will review our recent results, from theory, simulation and experiment, on order, fluctuations, and flow instabilities in collections of active particles, in suspension or on a solid surface. Our work, which began by adapting theories of flocking to include the hydrodynamics of the ambient fluid, provides the theoretical framework for understanding active matter in all its diversity: contractile filaments in cell extracts, crawling or dividing cells, collectively swimming bacteria, fish schools, and agitated monolayers of orientable granular particles.

  10. Forces in inhomogeneous open active-particle systems.

    PubMed

    Razin, Nitzan; Voituriez, Raphael; Elgeti, Jens; Gov, Nir S

    2017-11-01

    We study the force that noninteracting pointlike active particles apply to a symmetric inert object in the presence of a gradient of activity and particle sources and sinks. We consider two simple patterns of sources and sinks that are common in biological systems. We analytically solve a one-dimensional model designed to emulate higher-dimensional systems, and study a two-dimensional model by numerical simulations. We specify when the particle flux due to the creation and annihilation of particles can act to smooth the density profile that is induced by a gradient in the velocity of the active particles, and find the net resultant force due to both the gradient in activity and the particle flux. These results are compared qualitatively to observations of nuclear motion inside the oocyte, that is driven by a gradient in activity of actin-coated vesicles.

  11. [DNA extraction from bones and teeth using AutoMate Express forensic DNA extraction system].

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin-Lin; Xu, Nian-Lai; Xie, Wei; Ding, Shao-Cheng; Wang, Dong-Jing; Ma, Li-Qin; Li, You-Ying

    2013-04-01

    To explore a new method in order to extract DNA from bones and teeth automatically. Samples of 33 bones and 15 teeth were acquired by freeze-mill method and manual method, respectively. DNA materials were extracted and quantified from the triturated samples by AutoMate Express forensic DNA extraction system. DNA extraction from bones and teeth were completed in 3 hours using the AutoMate Express forensic DNA extraction system. There was no statistical difference between the two methods in the DNA concentration of bones. Both bones and teeth got the good STR typing by freeze-mill method, and the DNA concentration of teeth was higher than those by manual method. AutoMate Express forensic DNA extraction system is a new method to extract DNA from bones and teeth, which can be applied in forensic practice.

  12. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zakhari, Monica E A; Anderson, Patrick D; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012)1359-664010.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1%. The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  13. Effect of particle-size dynamics on properties of dense spongy-particle systems: Approach towards equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhari, Monica E. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Hütter, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Open-porous deformable particles, often envisaged as sponges, are ubiquitous in biological and industrial systems (e.g., casein micelles in dairy products and microgels in cosmetics). The rich behavior of these suspensions is owing to the elasticity of the supporting network of the particle, and the viscosity of permeating solvent. Therefore, the rate-dependent size change of these particles depends on their structure, i.e., the permeability. This work aims at investigating the effect of the particle-size dynamics and the underlying particle structure, i.e., the particle permeability, on the transient and long-time behavior of suspensions of spongy particles in the absence of applied deformation, using the dynamic two-scale model developed by Hütter et al. [Farad. Discuss. 158, 407 (2012), 10.1039/c2fd20025b]. In the high-density limit, the transient behavior is found to be accelerated by the particle-size dynamics, even at average size changes as small as 1 % . The accelerated dynamics is evidenced by (i) the higher short-time diffusion coefficient as compared to elastic-particle systems and (ii) the accelerated formation of the stable fcc crystal structure. Furthermore, after long times, the particle-size dynamics of spongy particles is shown to result in lower stationary values of the energy and normal stresses as compared to elastic-particle systems. This dependence of the long-time behavior of these systems on the permeability, that essentially is a transport coefficient and hence must not affect the equilibrium properties, confirms that full equilibration has not been reached.

  14. Development of magnetic octadecylsilane particles as solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of fat-soluble vitamins in fruit juice-milk beverage by capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chaofan; Jia, Li; Liu, Qingqing; Zhang, Sheng

    2010-07-01

    A sensitive, fast and simple method based on magnetic octadecylsilane particles was developed for the extraction of three fat-soluble vitamins followed by capillary LC (CLC) analysis with UV detection. Magnetic octadecylsilane particles were prepared based on three-step reactions including co-precipitation, sol-gel polymerization and alkylation. The characterization of the prepared product was studied by scanning electron microscope and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry. The particles were used as magnetic SPE adsorbent for the extraction of fat-soluble vitamins in fruit juice-milk beverage. The extraction condition and efficiency of the particles for fat-soluble vitamins were investigated. By coupling magnetic SPE with capillary LC with UV detection, low concentrations of fat-soluble vitamins in fruit juice-milk beverage can be detected without the interference from other substances in the sample matrix.

  15. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system is a device that produces by acceleration high energy charged particles (e.g., electrons and protons...

  18. Extending self-organizing particle systems to problem solving.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alejandro; Reggia, James A

    2004-01-01

    Self-organizing particle systems consist of numerous autonomous, purely reflexive agents ("particles") whose collective movements through space are determined primarily by local influences they exert upon one another. Inspired by biological phenomena (bird flocking, fish schooling, etc.), particle systems have been used not only for biological modeling, but also increasingly for applications requiring the simulation of collective movements such as computer-generated animation. In this research, we take some first steps in extending particle systems so that they not only move collectively, but also solve simple problems. This is done by giving the individual particles (agents) a rudimentary intelligence in the form of a very limited memory and a top-down, goal-directed control mechanism that, triggered by appropriate conditions, switches them between different behavioral states and thus different movement dynamics. Such enhanced particle systems are shown to be able to function effectively in performing simulated search-and-collect tasks. Further, computational experiments show that collectively moving agent teams are more effective than similar but independently moving ones in carrying out such tasks, and that agent teams of either type that split off members of the collective to protect previously acquired resources are most effective. This work shows that the reflexive agents of contemporary particle systems can readily be extended to support goal-directed problem solving while retaining their collective movement behaviors. These results may prove useful not only for future modeling of animal behavior, but also in computer animation, coordinated movement control in robotic teams, particle swarm optimization, and computer games.

  19. Filler particle size and composite resin classification systems.

    PubMed

    Lang, B R; Jaarda, M; Wang, R F

    1992-11-01

    The currently used composite resin classification systems need review if they are to continue to serve as descriptives and quantitative parameters denoting the filler particle content of these materials. Examination of the particles in 12 composite resins using a technique of washing the filler particles from the matrix of the composite resin was presented as yet another method of grouping composites according to filler particle content. Light microscopic examination of the filler particles that remained provided a separation of the 12 materials into four easily distinguished groups based on filler particle sizes. The wear of the 12 composite resins determined in a previous study was examined in relation to the classification of the materials by the currently available systems. The wear values were also examined using the groupings of the materials according to their filler particle sizes as determined by separating the particles from the matrix by the washing technique. Grouping composites on the basis of the filler particle sizes found after washing was easily correlated with wear and supported the suggestion that composites with smaller filler particles wear less.

  20. Computing diffusivities from particle models out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embacher, Peter; Dirr, Nicolas; Zimmer, Johannes; Reina, Celia

    2018-04-01

    A new method is proposed to numerically extract the diffusivity of a (typically nonlinear) diffusion equation from underlying stochastic particle systems. The proposed strategy requires the system to be in local equilibrium and have Gaussian fluctuations but it is otherwise allowed to undergo arbitrary out-of-equilibrium evolutions. This could be potentially relevant for particle data obtained from experimental applications. The key idea underlying the method is that finite, yet large, particle systems formally obey stochastic partial differential equations of gradient flow type satisfying a fluctuation-dissipation relation. The strategy is here applied to three classic particle models, namely independent random walkers, a zero-range process and a symmetric simple exclusion process in one space dimension, to allow the comparison with analytic solutions.

  1. A pilot scale ultrasonic system to enhance extraction processes with dense gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, E.; Blasco, M.; Tornero, A.; Casas, E.; Roselló, C.; Simal, S.; Acosta, V. M.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.

    2012-05-01

    The use of dense gases (supercritical fluids) as extracting agents has been attracting wide interest for years. In particular, supercritical carbon dioxide is considered nowadays as a green and very useful solvent. Nevertheless, the extraction process has a slow dynamics. Power ultrasound represents an efficient way for accelerating and enhancing the kinetics of the process by producing strong agitation and turbulence, compressions and decompressions, and heating in the media. For this purpose, a device prototype for using ultrasound in supercritical media was developed, tested and validated in extraction processes of oil from grounded almonds (55% oil content, wet basis and 3-4 mm particle size) in a 5 L extraction unit. An amount of 1500 g of grounded almonds was placed in a cylindrical basket during the trials inside the dense gas extractor (DGE) where solvent was introduced at different flow rates, pressures and temperatures. In all cases the ultrasonic energy confirmed the enhancement and acceleration of the almond oil extraction kinetics using supercritical CO2. Presently the power ultrasound effect in such a process is being deeply analyzed in a 5 L extraction unit before scaling-up a new ultrasonic system. This technology, still under development, has been designed for a bigger dense gas pilot-plant consisting of two extractors (20 L capacity), two separation units and has the possibility of operating at a pressure up to 50 MPa. The goal of this work is to study the effect of high-power ultrasound coupled to dense gas extraction inside the basket with the product, and to present a prototype for the use of power ultrasound in extraction processes with dense gases inside a new 20 L extractor unit.

  2. Emergent Weyl excitations in systems of polar particles.

    PubMed

    Syzranov, Sergey V; Wall, Michael L; Zhu, Bihui; Gurarie, Victor; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-12-12

    Weyl fermions are massless chiral particles first predicted in 1929 and once thought to describe neutrinos. Although never observed as elementary particles, quasiparticles with Weyl dispersion have recently been experimentally discovered in solid-state systems causing a furore in the research community. Systems with Weyl excitations can display a plethora of fascinating phenomena and offer great potential for improved quantum technologies. Here, we show that Weyl excitations generically exist in three-dimensional systems of dipolar particles with weakly broken time-reversal symmetry (by for example a magnetic field). They emerge as a result of dipolar-interaction-induced transfer of angular momentum between the J=0 and J=1 internal particle levels. We also discuss momentum-resolved Ramsey spectroscopy methods for observing Weyl quasiparticles in cold alkaline-earth-atom systems. Our results provide a pathway for a feasible experimental realization of Weyl quasiparticles and related phenomena in clean and controllable atomic systems.

  3. Systems for detecting charged particles in object inspection

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2013-08-20

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons. In one implementation, a monitoring system has a cosmic ray-produced charged particle tracker with a plurality of drift cells. The drift cells, which can be for example aluminum drift tubes, can be arranged at least above and below a volume to be scanned to thereby track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons, while also detecting gamma rays. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can also detect any radioactive sources occupying the volume from gamma rays emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift tubes can be sealed to eliminate the need for a gas handling system. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  4. Tracking Simulation of Third-Integer Resonant Extraction for Fermilab's Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chong Shik; Amundson, James; Michelotti, Leo

    2015-02-13

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab requires acceleration and transport of intense proton beams in order to deliver stable, uniform particle spills to the production target. To meet the experimental requirement, particles will be extracted slowly from the Delivery Ring to the external beamline. Using Synergia2, we have performed multi-particle tracking simulations of third-integer resonant extraction in the Delivery Ring, including space charge effects, physical beamline elements, and apertures. A piecewise linear ramp profile of tune quadrupoles was used to maintain a constant averaged spill rate throughout extraction. To study and minimize beam losses, we implemented and introduced a number ofmore » features, beamline element apertures, and septum plane alignments. Additionally, the RF Knockout (RFKO) technique, which excites particles transversely, is employed for spill regulation. Combined with a feedback system, it assists in fine-tuning spill uniformity. Simulation studies were carried out to optimize the RFKO feedback scheme, which will be helpful in designing the final spill regulation system.« less

  5. Dissolution and characterization of biofunctional keratin particles extracted from chicken feathers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Swati; Gupta, Arun; Chik, Syed Mohd Saufi Bin Tuan; Yeo Gek Kee, Chua; Poddar, Pradeep Kumar

    2017-04-01

    In the present study chicken feathers were hydrolyzed in alkaline environment. The pH value of feather hydrolyzed solution was adjusted according to the principle of isoelectric precipitation. Three kinds of precipitates of keratin polypeptide were collected at pH of 3.5, 5.5 and 7.5 respectively. The keratin solution were freeze dried and denoted as FKP1, FKP2, FKP3 respectively. All keratin particles possessed smooth, uniform and round surface by scanning electron microscope (SEM). FKP1, FKP2 and FKP3 had higher glass transition temperature examined by thermogravimetry (TG). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) revealed that the extracted keratin retained the most of protein backbone, with the breakage of disulfide cross-links and hydrogen bonds.

  6. SU-F-J-190: Time Resolved Range Measurement System Using Scintillator and CCD Camera for the Slow Beam Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Saotome, N; Furukawa, T; Mizushima, K

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the time structure of the range, we have verified the rang shift due to the betatron tune shift with several synchrotron parameters. Methods: A cylindrical plastic scintillator block and a CCD camera were installed on the black box. Using image processing, the range was determined the 80 percent of distal dose of the depth light distribution. The root mean square error of the range measurement using the scintillator and CCD system is about 0.2 mm. Range measurement was performed at interval of 170 msec. The chromaticity of the synchrotron was changed in the range of plus ormore » minus 1% from reference chromaticity in this study. All of the particle inside the synchrotron ring were extracted with the output beam intensity 1.8×10{sup 8} and 5.0×10{sub 7} particle per sec. Results: The time strictures of the range were changed by changing of the chromaticity. The reproducibility of the measurement was sufficient to observe the time structures of the range. The range shift was depending on the number of the residual particle inside the synchrotron ring. Conclusion: In slow beam extraction for scanned carbon-ion therapy, the range shift is undesirable because it causes the dose uncertainty in the target. We introduced the time-resolved range measurement using scintillator and CCD system. The scintillator and CCD system have enabled to verify the range shift with sufficient spatial resolution and reproducibility.« less

  7. Characterization of Particle Size Standard NIST 1019b with SynchrotronX-ray Microtomography and Digital Data Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Jon M.; Rivers, Mark L.; Perlowitz, Michael A.

    We show that synchrotron x-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) followed by digital data extraction can be used to examine the size distribution and particle morphologies of the polydisperse (750 to 2450 {micro}m diameter) particle size standard NIST 1019b. Our size distribution results are within errors of certified values with data collected at 19.5 {micro}m/voxel. One of the advantages of using {mu}CT to investigate the particles examined here is that the morphology of the glass beads can be directly examined. We use the shape metrics aspect ratio and sphericity to examine of individual standard beads morphologies as a function of spherical equivalent diameters.more » We find that the majority of standard beads possess near-spherical aspect ratios and sphericities, but deviations are present at the lower end of the size range. The majority (> 98%) of particles also possess an equant form when examined using a common measure of equidimensionality. Although the NIST 1019b standard consists of loose particles, we point out that an advantage of {mu}CT is that coherent materials comprised of particles can be examined without disaggregation.« less

  8. TES: A Text Extraction System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, A.; Hui, S. C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes how TES, a text extraction system, is able to electronically retrieve a set of sentences from a document to form an indicative abstract. Discusses various text abstraction techniques and related work in the area, provides an overview of the TES system, and compares system results against manually produced abstracts. (LAM)

  9. Permanent magnet system to guide superparamagnetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baun, Olga; Blümler, Peter

    2017-10-01

    A new concept of using permanent magnet systems for guiding superparamagnetic nano-particles on arbitrary trajectories over a large volume is proposed. The basic idea is to use one magnet system which provides a strong, homogeneous, dipolar magnetic field to magnetize and orient the particles, and a second constantly graded, quadrupolar field, superimposed on the first, to generate a force on the oriented particles. In this configuration the motion of the particles is driven predominantly by the component of the gradient field which is parallel to the direction of the homogeneous field. As a result, particles are guided with constant force and in a single direction over the entire volume. The direction is simply adjusted by varying the angle between quadrupole and dipole. Since a single gradient is impossible due to Gauß' law, the other gradient component of the quadrupole determines the angular deviation of the force. However, the latter can be neglected if the homogeneous field is stronger than the local contribution of the quadrupole field. A possible realization of this idea is a coaxial arrangement of two Halbach cylinders. A dipole to evenly magnetize and orient the particles, and a quadrupole to generate the force. The local force was calculated analytically for this particular geometry and the directional limits were analyzed and discussed. A simple prototype was constructed to demonstrate the principle in two dimensions on several nano-particles of different size, which were moved along a rough square by manual adjustment of the force angle. The observed velocities of superparamagnetic particles in this prototype were always several orders of magnitude higher than the theoretically expected value. This discrepancy is attributed to the observed formation of long particle chains as a result of their polarization by the homogeneous field. The magnetic moment of such a chain is then the combination of that of its constituents, while its hydrodynamic radius

  10. Batch extracting process using magnetic particle held solvents

    DOEpatents

    Nunez, L.; Vandergrift, G.F.

    1995-11-21

    A process is described for selectively removing metal values which may include catalytic values from a mixture containing same, wherein a magnetic particle is contacted with a liquid solvent which selectively dissolves the metal values to absorb the liquid solvent onto the magnetic particle. Thereafter the solvent-containing magnetic particles are contacted with a mixture containing the heavy metal values to transfer metal values into the solvent carried by the magnetic particles, and then magnetically separating the magnetic particles. Ion exchange resins may be used for selective solvents. 5 figs.

  11. 21 CFR 892.5050 - Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...-particle radiation therapy system. (a) Identification. A medical charged-particle radiation therapy system...) intended for use in radiation therapy. This generic type of device may include signal analysis and display...

  12. The chemical phenol extraction of intermetallic particles from casting AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Mrówka-Nowotnik, G; Sieniawski, J; Nowotnik, A

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a chemical extraction technique for determination of intermetallic phases formed in the casting AlSi5Cu1Mg aluminium alloy. Commercial aluminium alloys contain a wide range of intermetallic particles that are formed during casting, homogenization and thermomechanical processing. During solidification, particles of intermetallics are dispersed in interdendritic spaces as fine primary phases. Coarse intermetallic compounds that are formed in this aluminium alloy are characterized by unique atomic arrangement (crystallographic structure), morphology, stability, physical and mechanical properties. The volume fraction, chemistry and morphology of the intermetallics significantly affect properties and material behaviour during thermomechanical processing. Therefore, accurate determination of intermetallics is essential to understand and control microstructural evolution in Al alloys. Thus, in this paper it is shown that chemical phenol extraction method can be applied for precise qualitative evaluation. The results of optical light microscopy LOM, scanning electron microscopy SEM and X-ray diffraction XRD analysis reveal that as-cast AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy contains a wide range of intermetallic phases such as Al(4)Fe, gamma- Al(3)FeSi, alpha-Al(8)Fe(2)Si, beta-Al(5)FeSi, Al(12)FeMnSi.

  13. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles.

    PubMed

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-03-03

    Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted.

  14. Peptide/protein vaccine delivery system based on PLGA particles

    PubMed Central

    Allahyari, Mojgan; Mohit, Elham

    2016-01-01

    abstract Due to the excellent safety profile of poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles in human, and their biodegradability, many studies have focused on the application of PLGA particles as a controlled-release vaccine delivery system. Antigenic proteins/peptides can be encapsulated into or adsorbed to the surface of PLGA particles. The gradual release of loaded antigens from PLGA particles is necessary for the induction of efficient immunity. Various factors can influence protein release rates from PLGA particles, which can be defined intrinsic features of the polymer, particle characteristics as well as protein and environmental related factors. The use of PLGA particles encapsulating antigens of different diseases such as hepatitis B, tuberculosis, chlamydia, malaria, leishmania, toxoplasma and allergy antigens will be described herein. The co-delivery of antigens and immunostimulants (IS) with PLGA particles can prevent the systemic adverse effects of immunopotentiators and activate both dendritic cells (DCs) and natural killer (NKs) cells, consequently enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of antigen-loaded PLGA particles. We will review co-delivery of different TLR ligands with antigens in various models, highlighting the specific strengths and weaknesses of the system. Strategies to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of DC-based vaccine using PLGA particles can be designed to target DCs by functionalized PLGA particle encapsulating siRNAs of suppressive gene, and disease specific antigens. Finally, specific examples of cellular targeting where decorating the surface of PLGA particles target orally administrated vaccine to M-cells will be highlighted. PMID:26513024

  15. A portable foot-parameter-extracting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, MingKai; Liang, Jin; Li, Wenpan; Liu, Shifan

    2016-03-01

    In order to solve the problem of automatic foot measurement in garment customization, a new automatic footparameter- extracting system based on stereo vision, photogrammetry and heterodyne multiple frequency phase shift technology is proposed and implemented. The key technologies applied in the system are studied, including calibration of projector, alignment of point clouds, and foot measurement. Firstly, a new projector calibration algorithm based on plane model has been put forward to get the initial calibration parameters and a feature point detection scheme of calibration board image is developed. Then, an almost perfect match of two clouds is achieved by performing a first alignment using the Sampled Consensus - Initial Alignment algorithm (SAC-IA) and refining the alignment using the Iterative Closest Point algorithm (ICP). Finally, the approaches used for foot-parameterextracting and the system scheme are presented in detail. Experimental results show that the RMS error of the calibration result is 0.03 pixel and the foot parameter extracting experiment shows the feasibility of the extracting algorithm. Compared with the traditional measurement method, the system can be more portable, accurate and robust.

  16. shock driven instability of a multi-phase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob; Black, Wolfgang; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon

    2015-11-01

    A computational study of a shock driven instability of a multiphse particle-gas system is presented. This instability can evolve in a similar fashion to the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, but has addition parameters to be considered. Particle relaxation times, and density differences of the gas and particle-gas system can be adjusted to produce results which are different from the classical RM instability. We will show simulation results from the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a particle-in-cell approach to study the effects of the particle-gas system parameters. Mixing parameters will be presented to highlight the suppression of circulation and gas mixing by the particle phase.

  17. [Construction of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG particles surface display system].

    PubMed

    Su, Runyu; Nie, Boyao; Yuan, Shengling; Tao, Haoxia; Liu, Chunjie; Yang, Bailiang; Wang, Yanchun

    2017-01-25

    To describe a novel particles surface display system which is consisted of gram-positive enhancer matrix (GEM) particles and anchor proteins for bacteria-like particles vaccines, we treated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG bacteria with 10% heated-TCA for preparing GEM particles, and then identified the harvested GEM particles by electron microscopy, RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. Meanwhile, Escherichia coli was induced to express hybrid proteins PA3-EGFP and P60-EGFP, and GEM particles were incubated with them. Then binding of anchor proteins were determined by Western blotting, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy and spectrofluorometry. GEM particles preserved original size and shape, and proteins and DNA contents of GEM particles were released substantially. The two anchor proteins both had efficiently immobilized on the surface of GEM. GEM particles that were bounded by anchor proteins were brushy. The fluorescence of GEM particles anchoring PA3 was slightly brighter than P60, but the difference was not significant (P>0.05). GEM particles prepared from L. rhamnosus GG have a good binding efficiency with anchor proteins PA3-EGFP and P60-EGFP. Therefore, this novel foreign protein surface display system could be used for bacteria-like particle vaccines.

  18. Smart Extraction and Analysis System for Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Hussain, Maqbool; Khan, Wajahat Ali; Ali, Taqdir; Jamshed, Arif; Lee, Sungyoung

    2017-05-01

    With the increasing use of electronic health records (EHRs), there is a growing need to expand the utilization of EHR data to support clinical research. The key challenge in achieving this goal is the unavailability of smart systems and methods to overcome the issue of data preparation, structuring, and sharing for smooth clinical research. We developed a robust analysis system called the smart extraction and analysis system (SEAS) that consists of two subsystems: (1) the information extraction system (IES), for extracting information from clinical documents, and (2) the survival analysis system (SAS), for a descriptive and predictive analysis to compile the survival statistics and predict the future chance of survivability. The IES subsystem is based on a novel permutation-based pattern recognition method that extracts information from unstructured clinical documents. Similarly, the SAS subsystem is based on a classification and regression tree (CART)-based prediction model for survival analysis. SEAS is evaluated and validated on a real-world case study of head and neck cancer. The overall information extraction accuracy of the system for semistructured text is recorded at 99%, while that for unstructured text is 97%. Furthermore, the automated, unstructured information extraction has reduced the average time spent on manual data entry by 75%, without compromising the accuracy of the system. Moreover, around 88% of patients are found in a terminal or dead state for the highest clinical stage of disease (level IV). Similarly, there is an ∼36% probability of a patient being alive if at least one of the lifestyle risk factors was positive. We presented our work on the development of SEAS to replace costly and time-consuming manual methods with smart automatic extraction of information and survival prediction methods. SEAS has reduced the time and energy of human resources spent unnecessarily on manual tasks.

  19. Particle emission from artificial cometary materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koelzer, Gabriele; Kochan, Hermann; Thiel, Klaus

    1992-01-01

    During KOSI (comet simulation) experiments, mineral-ice mixtures are observed in simulated space conditions. Emission of ice-/dust particles from the sample surface is observed by means of different devices. The particle trajectories are recorded with a video system. In the following analysis we extracted the parameters: particle count rate, spatial distribution of starting points on the sample surface, and elevation angle and particle velocity at distances up to 5 cm from the sample surface. Different kinds of detectors are mounted on a frame in front of the sample to register the emitted particles and to collect their dust residues. By means of these instruments the particle count rates, the particle sizes and the composition of the particles can be correlated. The results are related to the gas flux density and the temperature on the sample surface during the insolation period. The particle emission is interpreted in terms of phenomena on the sample surface, e.g., formation of a dust mantle.

  20. Grafting of allylimidazole and n-vinylcaprolactam as a thermosensitive polymer onto magnetic nano-particles for the extraction and determination of celecoxib in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Morovati, Atefeh; Ahmad Panahi, Homayon; Yazdani, Farzaneh

    2016-11-20

    In this research, a novel method is reported for the surface grafting of n-vinylcaprolactam as a thermosensitive agent and allylimidazole with affinity toward celecoxib onto magnetic nano-particles. The grafted nano-particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. The surface morphology was studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy. The resulting grafted nano-particles were used for the determination of trace celecoxib in biological human fluids and pharmaceutical samples. The profile of celecoxib uptake by the modified magnetic nano-particles indicated good accessibility of the active sites in the grafted copolymer. It was found that the adsorption behavior could be fitted by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. Solid phase extraction for biological fluids such as urine and serum were investigated. In this study, urine extraction recovery of more than 95% was obtained. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. New apparatus of single particle trap system for aerosol visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, Hidenori; Fujioka, Tomomi; Endo, Tetsuo; Kitayama, Chiho; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio

    2014-08-01

    Control of transport and deposition of charged aerosol particles is important in various manufacturing processes. Aerosol visualization is an effective method to directly observe light scattering signal from laser-irradiated single aerosol particle trapped in a visualization cell. New single particle trap system triggered by light scattering pulse signal was developed in this study. The performance of the device was evaluated experimentally. Experimental setup consisted of an aerosol generator, a differential mobility analyzer (DMA), an optical particle counter (OPC) and the single particle trap system. Polystylene latex standard (PSL) particles (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 μm) were generated and classified according to the charge by the DMA. Singly charged 0.5 and 1.0 μm particles and doubly charged 2.0 μm particles were used as test particles. The single particle trap system was composed of a light scattering signal detector and a visualization cell. When the particle passed through the detector, trigger signal with a given delay time sent to the solenoid valves upstream and downstream of the visualization cell for trapping the particle in the visualization cell. The motion of particle in the visualization cell was monitored by CCD camera and the gravitational settling velocity and the electrostatic migration velocity were measured from the video image. The aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was in good agreement with Stokes diameter calculated from the electrostatic migration velocity for individual particles. It was also found that the aerodynamic diameter obtained from the settling velocity was a one-to-one function of the scattered light intensity of individual particles. The applicability of this system will be discussed.

  2. Mutagenicity of particulate emissions from the M16 rifle: variation with particle size.

    PubMed

    Palmer, W G; Andrews, A W; Mellini, D; Terra, J A; Hoffmann, F J; Hoke, S H

    1994-08-01

    Emissions generated by firing the M16 rifle with the propellant WC844 in a combustion chamber designed to simulate conditions of actual use were tested for mutagenic activity in the Salmonella/Ames assay. Dimethyl sulfoxide extracts of emissions collected from either the breech or muzzle end of the rifle were mutagenic in three strains of Salmonella (TA1537, TA1538, and TA98) both in the presence and absence of metabolic activation systems (S9). The extracts were negative in strains TA100 and TA102. Aerosols generated by firing the M16 rifle were fractionated according to aerodynamic diameter. Submicrometer particles were far more mutagenic than particles with aerodynamic diameters between 1 and 15 microns. The mutagens associated with the smaller particles were more active in the presence of S9, while extracts of larger particles were as active, or more active, in the absence of S9. Heavier particles, which settled rapidly out of the airstream, were not mutagenic.

  3. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of yeast extracts containing rotavirus-like particles: a potential veterinary vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Limas, William A; Pastor, Ana Ruth; Esquivel-Soto, Ernesto; Esquivel-Guadarrama, Fernando; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A

    2014-05-19

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in many animal species of economic interest. A simple, safe and cost-effective vaccine is required for the control and prevention of rotavirus in animals. In this study, we evaluated the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae extracts containing rotavirus-like particles (RLP) as a vaccine candidate in an adult mice model. Two doses of 1mg of yeast extract containing rotavirus proteins (between 0.3 and 3 μg) resulted in an immunological response capable of reducing the replication of rotavirus after infection. Viral shedding in all mice groups diminished in comparison with the control group when challenged with 100 50% diarrhea doses (DD50) of murine rotavirus strain EDIM. Interestingly, when immunizing intranasally protection against rotavirus infection was observed even when no increase in rotavirus-specific antibody titers was evident, suggesting that cellular responses were responsible of protection. Our results indicate that raw yeast extracts containing rotavirus proteins and RLP are a simple, cost-effective alternative for veterinary vaccines against rotavirus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Negative differential mobility in interacting particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Amit Kumar; Basu, Urna; Mohanty, P. K.

    2018-05-01

    Driven particles in the presence of crowded environment, obstacles, or kinetic constraints often exhibit negative differential mobility (NDM) due to their decreased dynamical activity. Based on the empirical studies of conserved lattice gas model, two species exclusion model and other interacting particle systems we propose a new mechanism for complex many-particle systems where slowing down of certain non-driven degrees of freedom by the external field can give rise to NDM. To prove that the slowing down of the non-driven degrees is indeed the underlying cause, we consider several driven diffusive systems including two species exclusion models, misanthrope process, and show from the exact steady state results that NDM indeed appears when some non-driven modes are slowed down deliberately. For clarity, we also provide a simple pedagogical example of two interacting random walkers on a ring which conforms to the proposed scenario.

  5. Organic extract of diesel exhaust particles stimulates expression of Ia and costimulatory molecules associated with antigen presentation in rat peripheral blood monocytes but not in alveolar macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Eiko; Kobayashi, Takahiro

    2005-12-15

    We hypothesized that diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induce the activation of antigen-presenting cells (APC) in lung. The present study was designed to clarify the following about DEP: (1) whether it affects the expression of Ia and B7 molecules in alveolar macrophages (AM) as a mature cell or in peripheral blood monocytes (PBM) as an immature cell (2) if it affects the antigen-presenting (AP) activity of PBM (3) what component of DEP is responsible for the effects, and (4) whether the effect of DEP is related to oxidative stress. DEP was extracted with methylene chloride. Cells were exposed to whole DEP,more » organic extract, or residual particles for 24 h. Cell-surface molecules were measured by flow cytometry. AP activity was assessed by antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Whole DEP or organic extract significantly increased the expression of Ia and B7 molecules on PBM but not on AM. No significant effect of residual particles was observed. A low concentration of organic extract also increased the AP activity of PBM. When the induction of an antioxidative enzyme was assessed, heme oxygenase-1 protein was found to be significantly increased by exposure to whole DEP, and the organic extract was more effective than the residual particles. Furthermore, the organic extract-induced expression of Ia antigen on PBM was reduced by the addition of an antioxidative agent. These results suggest that DEP may act on immature APC and enhance their AP activity and that the action contributing to oxidative stress may be mediated by organic compounds of DEP.« less

  6. Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    DOEpatents

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Ghanayem, Steve G.; Cantwell, Nancy; Rader, Daniel J.; Geller, Anthony S.

    1998-01-01

    The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

  7. Characterization of steady streaming for a particle manipulation system.

    PubMed

    Amit, Roni; Abadi, Avi; Kosa, Gabor

    2016-04-01

    Accurate positioning of biological cells or microscopic particle without directly contacting them is a challenging task in biomedical engineering. Various trapping methods for controlling the position of a particle have been suggested. The common driving methods are based on laser and ultrasonic actuation principles. In this work we suggest a design for a hydrodynamic particle manoeuvring system. The system operates using steady streaming in a viscous fluid media induced by high frequency vibration of piezoelectric cantilevers. A particle within the workspace of the system can be trapped and manipulated to a desired position by the fairly unidirectional flow field created by the beams. In this paper, the flow field in the particle manipulation system is characterized numerically and experimentally. We find that the flow field resembles the analytical solutions of a flow field created by an oscillating sphere. Furthermore, we validate numerically the quadratic relation between the steady streaming velocity and the vibration amplitude of the beam. The calibration of the piezoelectric actuator's oscillation amplitudes enables effective positioning of particles with a diameter of 20 um to 1 mm. We find that a 30X0.8X2 mm(3) piezoelectric beam vibrating at its first resonance frequency, 200 Hz, is able to move a particle at a typical flow velocity ranging between 0.05 mm/sec and 0.13 mm/s in 430 cSt Si oil (Re=0.2).

  8. FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS INFORMATION SYSTEM: SUMMARY REPORT (SUMMER 1976)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes the initial loading of data into the Fine Particle Emissions Information System (FPEIS), a computerized database on primary fine particle emissions to the atmosphere from stationary sources, designed to assist engineers and scientists engaged in fine particl...

  9. An Investigation of Aggregation in Synergistic Solvent Extraction Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy Steven

    With an increasing focus on anthropogenic climate change, nuclear reactors present an attractive option for base load power generation with regard to air pollution and carbon emissions, especially when compared with traditional fossil fuel based options. However, used nuclear fuel (UNF) is highly radiotoxic and contains minor actinides (americium and curium) which remain more radiotoxic than natural uranium ore for hundreds of thousands of years, presenting a challenge for long-term storage . Advanced nuclear fuel recycling can reduce this required storage time to thousands of years by removing the highly radiotoxic minor actinides. Many advanced separation schemes have been proposed to achieve this separation but none have been implemented to date. A key feature among many proposed schemes is the use of more than one extraction reagent in a single extraction phase, which can lead to the phenomenon known as "synergism" in which the extraction efficiency for a combination of the reagents is greater than that of the individual extractants alone. This feature is not well understood for many systems and a comprehensive picture of the mechanism behind synergism does not exist. There are several proposed mechanisms for synergism though none have been used to model multiple extraction systems. This work examines several proposed advanced extractant combinations which exhibit synergism: 2-bromodecanoic acid (BDA) with 2,2':6',2"-terpyridine (TERPY), tri-n-butylphosphine oxide (TPBO) with 2-thenoyltrifluoro acetone (HTTA), and dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (HDNNS) with 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxy-dodecan-6-oxime (LIX). We examine two proposed synergistic mechanisms involving and attempt to verify the ability of these mechanisms to predict the extraction behavior of the chosen systems. These are a reverse micellar catalyzed extraction model and a mixed complex formation model. Neither was able to effectively predict the synergistic behavior of the systems. We further examine

  10. Dispersed particle extraction--a new procedure for trace element enrichment from natural aqueous samples with subsequent ICP-OES analysis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Gerald; Neouze, Marie-Alexandra; Limbeck, Andreas

    2013-01-15

    A novel sample pre-treatment method for multi trace element enrichment from environmental waters prior to optical emission spectrometry analysis with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES) is proposed, based on dispersed particle extraction (DPE). This method is based on the use of silica nanoparticles functionalized with strong cation exchange ligands. After separation from the investigated sample solution, the nanoparticles used for the extraction are directly introduced in the ICP for measurement of the adsorbed target analytes. A prerequisite for the successful application of the developed slurry approach is the use of sorbent particles with a mean size of 500 nm instead of commercially available μm sized beads. The proposed method offers the known advantages of common bead-injection (BI) techniques, and further circumvents the elution step required in conventional solid phase extraction procedures. With the use of 14.4 mL sample and addition of ammonium acetate buffer and particle slurry limits of detection (LODs) from 0.03 μg L(-1) for Be to 0.48 μg L(-1) for Fe, with relative standard deviations ranging from 1.7% for Fe and 5.5% for Cr and an average enrichment factor of 10.4 could be achieved. By implementing this method the possibility to access sorbent materials with irreversible bonding mechanisms for sample pre-treatment is established, thus improvements in the selectivity of sample pre-treatment procedures can be achieved. The presented procedure was tested for accuracy with NIST standard reference material 1643e (fresh water) and was applied to drinking water samples from the vicinity of Vienna. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Extraction of Trivalent Actinides and Lanthanides from Californium Campaign Rework Solution Using TODGA-based Solvent Extraction System

    SciTech Connect

    Benker, Dennis; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Dryman, Joshua Cory

    This report presents the studies carried out to demonstrate the possibility of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides and lanthanides from highly acidic solutions using a neutral ligand-based solvent extraction system. These studies stemmed from the perceived advantage of such systems over cationexchange- based solvent extraction systems that require an extensive feed adjustment to make a low-acid feed. The targeted feed solutions are highly acidic aqueous phases obtained after the dissolution of curium targets during a californium (Cf) campaign. Results obtained with actual Cf campaign solutions, but highly diluted to be manageable in a glove box, are presented, followed by results ofmore » tests run in the hot cells with Cf campaign rework solutions. It was demonstrated that a solvent extraction system based on the tetraoctyl diglycolamide molecule is capable of quantitatively extracting trivalent actinides from highly acidic solutions. This system was validated using actual feeds from a Cf campaign.« less

  12. Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, D.J.

    1995-03-07

    A liquid-liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average individual particle sizes of approximately 40 nanometers. 2 figs.

  13. Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid-liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average. individual particle sizes of approximately 40 manometers.

  14. Method for extracting metals from aqueous waste streams for long term storage

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    1995-01-01

    A liquid--liquid extraction method for removing metals and hydrous metal colloids from waste streams is provided wherein said waste streams are contacted with a solvent system containing a water-in-oil microemulsion wherein the inverted micelles contain the extracted metal. A silicon alkoxide, either alone or in combination with other metal alkoxide compounds is added to the water-in-oil microemulsion, thereby allowing encapsulation of the extracted metal within a silicon oxide network. Lastly, the now-encapsulated metal is precipitated from the water-in-oil microemulsion phase to yield aggregates of metal-silicate particles having average individual particle sizes of approximately 40 nanometers.

  15. Structures and dynamics in a two-dimensional dipolar dust particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, X. N.; Liu, Y. H.; Kravchenko, O. V.; Lapushkina, T. A.; Azarova, O. A.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, F.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of electric dipole moment, the number of dipolar particles, and system temperature on the structures and dynamics of a dipolar dust particle system are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the larger electric dipole moment is favorable for the formation of a long-chain structure, the larger number of dipolar dust particles promotes the formation of the multi-chain structure, and the higher system temperature can cause higher rotation frequency. The trajectories, mean square displacement (MSD), and the corresponding spectrum functions of the MSDs are also calculated to illustrate the dynamics of the dipolar dust particle system, which is also closely related to the growth of dust particles. Some simulations are qualitatively in agreement with our experiments and can provide a guide for the study on dust growth, especially on the large-sized particles.

  16. Design of Particle-Based Thermal Energy Storage for a Concentrating Solar Power System

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zhiwen; Zhang, Ruichong; Sawaged, Fadi

    Solid particles can operate at higher temperature than current molten salt or oil, and they can be a heat-transfer and storage medium in a concentrating solar power (CSP) system. By using inexpensive solid particles and containment material for thermal energy storage (TES), the particle-TES cost can be significantly lower than other TES methods such as a nitrate-salt system. The particle-TES system can hold hot particles at more than 800 degrees C with high thermal performance. The high particle temperatures increase the temperature difference between the hot and cold particles, and they improve the TES capacity. The particle-based CSP system ismore » able to support high-efficiency power generation, such as the supercritical carbon-dioxide Brayton power cycle, to achieve >50% thermal-electric conversion efficiency. This paper describes a solid particle-TES system that integrates into a CSP plant. The hot particles discharge to a heat exchanger to drive the power cycle. The returning cold particles circulate through a particle receiver to absorb solar heat and charge the TES. This paper shows the design of a particle-TES system including containment silos, foundation, silo insulation, and particle materials. The analysis provides results for four TES capacities and two silo configurations. The design analysis indicates that the system can achieve high thermal efficiency, storage effectiveness (i.e., percentage usage of the hot particles), and exergetic efficiency. An insulation method for the hot silo was considered. The particle-TES system can achieve high performance and low cost, and it holds potential for next-generation CSP technology.« less

  17. Evaluating Unsupervised Methods to Size and Classify Suspended Particles Using Digital Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, E. J.; Buscombe, D.; Graham, G.; Nimmo-Smith, A.

    2013-12-01

    The use of digital holography to image suspended particles in-situ using submersible systems is on the ascendancy. Such systems allow visualization of the in-focus particles without the depth-of-field issues associated with conventional imaging. The size and concentration of all particles, and each individual particle, can be rapidly and automatically assessed. The automated methods by which to extract these quantities can be readily evaluated using manual measurements. These methods are not possible using instruments based on optical and acoustic (back- or forward-) scattering, so-called 'sediment surrogate' methods, which are sensitive to the bulk quantities of all suspended particles in a sample volume, and rely on mathematically inverting a measured signal to derive the property of interest. Depending on the intended application, the number of holograms required to elucidate a process could range from tens to millions. Therefore manual particle extraction is not feasible for most data-sets. This has created a pressing need among the growing community of holography users, for accurate, automated processing which is comparable in output to more well-established in-situ sizing techniques such as laser diffraction. Here we discuss the computational considerations required to focus and segment individual particles from raw digital holograms, and then size and classify these particles by type; all using unsupervised (automated) image processing. To do so, we draw upon imagery from both controlled laboratory conditions to near-shore coastal environments, using different holographic system designs, and constituting a significant variety in particle types, sizes and shapes. We evaluate the success of these techniques, and suggest directions for future developments.

  18. Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System (CMS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-04

    Coastal Inlets Research Program Particle Tracking Model (PTM) with Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) The Particle Tracking Model (PTM) is a Lagrangian...currents and waves. The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) supports the PTM with the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ), which provides coupled wave...and current forcing for PTM simulations. CMS -PTM is implemented in the Surface-water Modeling System, a GUI environment for input development

  19. In-situ determination of metallic variation and multi-association in single particles by combining synchrotron microprobe, sequential chemical extraction and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu-Min; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Shi-Suo; Wang, Si-Jia; Xia, Yi; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2014-07-15

    Due to the heterogeneity of metal distribution, it is challenging to identify the speciation, source and fate of metals in solid samples at micro scales. To overcome these challenges single particles of air pollution control residues were detected in situ by synchrotron microprobe after each step of chemical extraction and analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis. Results showed that Pb, Cu and Zn co-existed as acid soluble fractions during chemical extraction, regardless of their individual distribution as chlorides or oxides in the raw particles. Besides the forms of Fe2O3, MnO2 and FeCr2O4, Fe, Mn, Cr and Ni were closely associated with each other, mainly as reducible fractions. In addition, the two groups of metals had interrelations with the Si-containing insoluble matrix. The binding could not be directly detected by micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD) and XRD, suggesting their partial existence as amorphous forms or in the solid solution. The combined method on single particles can effectively determine metallic multi-associations and various extraction behaviors that could not be identified by XRD, μ-XRD or X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results are useful for further source identification and migration tracing of heavy metals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Pseudophasic extraction method for the separation of ultra-fine minerals

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2002-01-01

    An improved aqueous-based extraction method for the separation and recovery of ultra-fine mineral particles. The process operates within the pseudophase region of the conventional aqueous biphasic extraction system where a low-molecular-weight, water soluble polymer alone is used in combination with a salt and operates within the pseudo-biphase regime of the conventional aqueous biphasic extraction system. A combination of low molecular weight, mutually immiscible polymers are used with or without a salt. This method is especially suited for the purification of clays that are useful as rheological control agents and for the preparation of nanocomposites.

  1. Gravitational instantons as models for charged particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchetti, Guido; Manton, Nicholas S.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we propose ALF gravitational instantons of types A k and D k as models for charged particle systems. We calculate the charges of the two families. These are -( k + 1) for A k , which is proposed as a model for k + 1 electrons, and 2 - k for D k , which is proposed as a model for either a particle of charge +2 and k electrons or a proton and k - 1 electrons. Making use of preferred topological and metrical structures of the manifolds, namely metrically preferred representatives of middle dimension homology classes, we construct two different energy functionals which reproduce the Coulomb interaction energy for a system of charged particles.

  2. Dissolution characteristics of sericite in chalcopyrite bioleaching and its effect on copper extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ying-bo; Li, Hao; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sericite particle size, rotation speed, and leaching temperature on sericite dissolution and copper extraction in a chalcopyrite bioleaching system were examined. Finer particles, appropriate temperature and rotation speed for Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans resulted in a higher Al3+ dissolution concentration. The Al3+ dissolution concentration reached its highest concentration of 38.66 mg/L after 48-d leaching when the sericite particle size, temperature, and rotation speed were -43 μm, 30°C, and 160 r/min, respectively. Meanwhile, the sericite particle size, rotation speed, and temperature can affect copper extraction. The copper extraction rate is higher when the sericite particle size is finer. An appropriately high temperature is favorable for copper leaching. The dissolution of sericite fitted the shrinking core model, 1-(2/3) α-(1- α)2/3 = k 1 t, which indicates that internal diffusion is the decision step controlling the overall reaction rate in the leaching process. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed small precipitates covered on the surface of sericite after leaching, which increased the diffusion resistance of the leaching solution and dissolved ions.

  3. Atomic Bose-Hubbard Systems with Single-Particle Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preiss, Philipp Moritz

    Experiments with ultracold atoms in optical lattices provide outstanding opportunities to realize exotic quantum states due to a high degree of tunability and control. In this thesis, I present experiments that extend this control from global parameters to the level of individual particles. Using a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb, we have developed a single-site addressing scheme based on digital amplitude holograms. The system self-corrects for aberrations in the imaging setup and creates arbitrary beam profiles. We are thus able to shape optical potentials on the scale of single lattice sites and control the dynamics of individual atoms. We study the role of quantum statistics and interactions in the Bose-Hubbard model on the fundamental level of two particles. Bosonic quantum statistics are apparent in the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference of massive particles, which we observe in tailored double-well potentials. These underlying statistics, in combination with tunable repulsive interactions, dominate the dynamics in single- and two-particle quantum walks. We observe highly coherent position-space Bloch oscillations, bosonic bunching in Hanbury Brown-Twiss interference and the fermionization of strongly interacting bosons. Many-body states of indistinguishable quantum particles are characterized by large-scale spatial entanglement, which is difficult to detect in itinerant systems. Here, we extend the concept of Hong-Ou-Mandel interference from individual particles to many-body states to directly quantify entanglement entropy. We perform collective measurements on two copies of a quantum state and detect entanglement entropy through many-body interference. We measure the second order Renyi entropy in small Bose-Hubbard systems and detect the buildup of spatial entanglement across the superfluid-insulator transition. Our experiments open new opportunities for the single-particle-resolved preparation and characterization of many-body quantum states.

  4. Gaussian white noise as a resource for work extraction.

    PubMed

    Dechant, Andreas; Baule, Adrian; Sasa, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    We show that uncorrelated Gaussian noise can drive a system out of equilibrium and can serve as a resource from which work can be extracted. We consider an overdamped particle in a periodic potential with an internal degree of freedom and a state-dependent friction, coupled to an equilibrium bath. Applying additional Gaussian white noise drives the system into a nonequilibrium steady state and causes a finite current if the potential is spatially asymmetric. The model thus operates as a Brownian ratchet, whose current we calculate explicitly in three complementary limits. Since the particle current is driven solely by additive Gaussian white noise, this shows that the latter can potentially perform work against an external load. By comparing the extracted power to the energy injection due to the noise, we discuss the efficiency of such a ratchet.

  5. Test Particle Stability in Exoplanet Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frewen, Shane; Hansen, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Astronomy is currently going through a golden age of exoplanet discovery. Yet despite that, there is limited research on the evolution of exoplanet systems driven by stellar evolution. In this work we look at the stability of test particles in known exoplanet systems during the host star's main sequence and white dwarf stages. In particular, we compare the instability regions that develop before and after the star loses mass to form a white dwarf, a process which causes the semi-major axes of the outer planets to expand adiabatically. We investigate the possibility of secular and resonant perturbations resulting in these regions as well as the method of removal of test particles for the instability regions, such as ejection and collision with the central star. To run our simulations we used the MERCURY software package (Chambers, 1999) and evolved our systems for over 108 years using a hybrid symplectic/Bulirsch-Stoer integrator.

  6. [Application of micro-power system in the surgery of tooth extraction].

    PubMed

    Kaijin, Hu; Yongfeng, Li

    2015-02-01

    Tooth extraction is a common operation in oral surgery. Traditional-extraction instruments, such as bone chisel, elevator, and bone hammer, lead to not only severe trauma but also unnecessary complications, and patients easily become nervous and apprehensive if tooth extraction is performed using these violent instruments. In recent years, with the develop- ment of minimally invasive concept and technology, various micro-power instruments have been used for tooth extraction. This innovative technology can reduce the iatrogenic trauma and complications of tooth extraction. Additionally, this technology can greatly decrease the patient's physical and mental pressure. The new equipment compensates for the deficiency of traditional tooth extraction equipment and facilitates the gradual replacement of the latter. Diverse micro-power systems have distinct strengths and weaknesses, so some auxiliary instruments are still needed during tooth extraction. This paper focuses on the various micro-power systems for tooth extraction and tries to compare the advantages and disadvantages of these systems. Selection and usage of auxiliary equipment are also introduced. Thus, this paper provides reference for the proper application of the micro-power systems in tooth extraction.

  7. Safety and Efficacy of Transvenous Lead Extraction Utilizing the Evolution Mechanical Lead Extraction System: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Saumya; Ekeruo, Ijeoma A; Nand, Nikita P; Sundara Raman, Ajay; Zhang, Xu; Reddy, Sunil K; Hariharan, Ramesh

    2018-02-01

    The goal of this study is to assess the safety and efficacy of mechanical lead extraction utilizing the Evolution system. Compared with other techniques commonly used for lead extraction, data regarding the safety and efficacy of mechanical lead extraction using the Evolution system is limited and needs further evaluation. Between June 1, 2009 and September 30, 2016, we retrospectively analyzed 400 consecutive patients who exclusively underwent mechanical lead extraction utilizing the Evolution system. A total of 400 patients underwent mechanical lead extraction of 683 leads. Mean age of extracted leads was 6.77 ± 4.42 years (range 1 to 31 years). The extracted device system was an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in 274 patients (68.5%) and a pacemaker system in 126 patients (31.5%). Complete lead removal rate was 97% with a clinical success rate of 99.75%. Incomplete lead removal with <4-cm remnant was associated with older leads (lead age >8 years). Failure to achieve clinical success was noted in 1 patient (0.25%). Cardiac papillary avulsion, system-related infection, and cardiac tamponade were the major complications noted in 6 patients (1.5%). Minor complications were encountered in 24 patients (6%), of which hematoma requiring evacuation was the most common minor complication. There were no patient deaths. In our single-center study, lead extractions utilizing the Evolution mechanical lead extraction system were safe and effective and resulted in high clinical and procedural success, with low complication rates and no fatalities. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Evaluation for extraction process of Shenqi Tongmai Yizhi particles based on antioxidant capacity in vitro and its spectrum-effect relation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Li; Liu, Yu-Ling; Fan, Li-Jiao; Wang, Yue-Liang; Chen, Kai; Li, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Based on DPPH method, the antioxidant activities of Shenqi Tongmai Yizhi particles with different extraction processes were compared. The contribution to the anti-oxidant capacity in vitro was explored by means of grey relational analysis on different chemical compositions in the fingerprint. The results showed that the IC₅₀ concentration values of water extract, water extract from alcohol precipitation, alcohol extract, and alcohol and water extract were 0.801 4, 0.859 1, 0.796 1, 0.918 0 g•L⁻¹; and the alcohol extract is the best method to extract antioxidative components, with the highest antioxidant activity and lowest IC₅₀. When the mass concentration of the herbs reached a certain degree, its free radical clearance rate was similar to that of vitamin C control group. The order of different chemical contributions of constituents to the antioxidant activity in the fingerprint was 4>3>33>53>9>10>11>34>15>59>8>61>52>20>42>18>29. The preliminary exploration for the spectrum efficiency relations provides reference for studying traditional Chinese medicine compound processing method and the pharmacodyamic material basis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  9. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensorsmore » (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.« less

  10. System design of a 1 MW north-facing, solid particle receiver

    DOE PAGES

    Christian, J.; Ho, C.

    2015-05-01

    Falling solid particle receivers (SPR) utilize small particles as a heat collecting medium within a cavity receiver structure. The components required to operate an SPR include the receiver (to heat the particles), bottom hopper (to catch the falling particles), particle lift elevator (to lift particles back to the top of the receiver), top hopper (to store particles before being dropped through the receiver), and ducting. In addition to the required components, there are additional features needed for an experimental system. These features include: a support structure to house all components, calibration panel to measure incident radiation, cooling loops, and sensorsmore » (flux gages, thermocouples, pressure gages). Each of these components had to be designed to withstand temperatures ranging from ambient to 700 °C. Thermal stresses from thermal expansion become a key factor in these types of high temperature systems. The SPR will be housing ~3000 kg of solid particles. The final system will be tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM.« less

  11. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15..., CONSTRUCTION, AND MATERIALS: SPECIFICATIONS AND APPROVAL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT Fire-Protective Systems § 161.002-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for...

  12. Collisional Penrose process with spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Sajal

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we have investigated collisional Penrose process (CPP) using spinning particles in a Kerr spacetime. Recent studies have shown that the collision between two spinning particles can produce a significantly high energy in the center of mass frame. Here, we explicitly compute the energy extraction and efficiency as measured by an observer at infinity. We consider the colliding particles as well as the escaping particles may contain spins. It has been shown that the energy extraction is larger than the non-spinning case and also their possibility to escape to infinity is wider than the geodesics.

  13. EXTRACTOR FOR HIGH ENERGY CHARGED PARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Lambertson, G.R.

    1964-04-01

    A particle-extracting apparatus for use with a beam of high-energy charged particles such as travel in an evacuated chamber along a circular equilibrium axis is described. A magnetized target is impacted relatively against the beam whereby the beam particles are deflected from the beam by the magnetic induction in the target. To this end the target may be moved into the beam or the beam may coast into the target and achieve high angular particle deflection and slow extraction. A deflecting septum magnet may additionally be used for deflection at even sharper angles. (AEC)

  14. Green bio-oil extraction for oil crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zainab, H.; Nurfatirah, N.; Norfaezah, A.; Othman, H.

    2016-06-01

    The move towards a green bio-oil extraction technique is highlighted in this paper. The commonly practised organic solvent oil extraction technique could be replaced with a modified microwave extraction. Jatropha seeds (Jatropha curcas) were used to extract bio-oil. Clean samples were heated in an oven at 110 ° C for 24 hours to remove moisture content and ground to obtain particle size smaller than 500μm. Extraction was carried out at different extraction times 15 min, 30 min, 45 min, 60 min and 120 min to determine oil yield. The biooil yield obtained from microwave assisted extraction system at 90 minutes was 36% while that from soxhlet extraction for 6 hours was 42%. Bio-oil extracted using the microwave assisted extraction (MAE) system could enhance yield of bio-oil compared to soxhlet extraction. The MAE extraction system is rapid using only water as solvent which is a nonhazardous, environment-friendly technique compared to soxhlet extraction (SE) method using hexane as solvent. Thus, this is a green technique of bio-oil extraction using only water as extractant. Bio-oil extraction from the pyrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB), a biomass waste from oil palm crop, was enhanced using a biocatalyst derived from seashell waste. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while addition of seashell based biocatalyst was 44.6%. Oil yield for non-catalytic extraction was 43.8% while with addition of seashell-based biocatalyst was 44.6%. The pH of bio-oil increased from 3.5 to 4.3. The viscosity of bio-oil obtained by catalytic means increased from 20.5 to 37.8 cP. A rapid and environment friendly extraction technique is preferable to enhance bio-oil yield. The microwave assisted approach is a green, rapid and environmental friendly extraction technique for the production of bio-oil bearing crops.

  15. Combined dispersive solid-phase extraction-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction-derivatization for gas chromatography-mass spectrometric determination of aliphatic amines on atmospheric fine particles.

    PubMed

    Majedi, Seyed Mohammad; Lee, Hian Kee

    2017-02-24

    Short-chain aliphatic amines are ubiquitous in the atmospheric environment. They play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. As such, there is a pressing need to monitor these particle-bound compounds present at trace quantities. The present work describes an efficient, one-step microextraction technique for the preconcentration and detection of trace levels of 10 aliphatic amines on fine particles (particulate matter of 2.5μm or less (PM 2.5 )) in the atmosphere. After extraction of amines from particles in acidified water samples, carbon-based sorbents (in dispersive solid-phase extraction mode), and vortex agitation were utilized for simultaneous derivatization-extraction and dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. The approach significantly increased the recoveries and enrichment of the amine derivatives. This one-step, combined technique is proposed for the first time. Several influential factors including type and concentration of derivatization reagent (for gas chromatographic separation), type of buffer, sample pH, types and volumes of extraction and disperser solvents, type and amount of sorbent, vortex time and temperature, desorption solvent type and volume, and salt content were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, high enrichment factors (in the range of between 307 and 382) and good reproducibility (relative standard deviations, below 7.0%, n=5) were achieved. The linearity ranged from 0.1μg/L-100μg/L, and from 0.5μg/L-100μg/L, depending on the analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.02μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.01ng/m 3 in air) and 0.09μg/L (corresponding to ∼0.04ng/m 3 in air). The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of PM 2.5 samples collected by air sampling through polytetrafluoroethylene filters. The concentration levels of amines ranged from 1.04 to 4.16ng/m 3 in the air sampled. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Support Vector Machine Based on Adaptive Acceleration Particle Swarm Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Abdulameer, Mohammed Hasan; Othman, Zulaiha Ali

    2014-01-01

    Existing face recognition methods utilize particle swarm optimizer (PSO) and opposition based particle swarm optimizer (OPSO) to optimize the parameters of SVM. However, the utilization of random values in the velocity calculation decreases the performance of these techniques; that is, during the velocity computation, we normally use random values for the acceleration coefficients and this creates randomness in the solution. To address this problem, an adaptive acceleration particle swarm optimization (AAPSO) technique is proposed. To evaluate our proposed method, we employ both face and iris recognition based on AAPSO with SVM (AAPSO-SVM). In the face and iris recognition systems, performance is evaluated using two human face databases, YALE and CASIA, and the UBiris dataset. In this method, we initially perform feature extraction and then recognition on the extracted features. In the recognition process, the extracted features are used for SVM training and testing. During the training and testing, the SVM parameters are optimized with the AAPSO technique, and in AAPSO, the acceleration coefficients are computed using the particle fitness values. The parameters in SVM, which are optimized by AAPSO, perform efficiently for both face and iris recognition. A comparative analysis between our proposed AAPSO-SVM and the PSO-SVM technique is presented. PMID:24790584

  17. Application of RVA and Time-Lapse Photography to Explore Effects of Extent of Chlorination, Milling Extraction Rate, and Particle-Size Reduction of Flour on Cake-Baking Functionality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Three factors (extent of chlorination, milling extraction rate and particle-size reduction) in the cake-bakeing functionality of Croplan 594W flour were explored by Rapid Visco-Analyzer (RVA) and time-lapse photography. The extent of chlorination and milling extraction rate showed dramatic effects,...

  18. A fully automated liquid–liquid extraction system utilizing interface detection

    PubMed Central

    Maslana, Eugene; Schmitt, Robert; Pan, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    The development of the Abbott Liquid-Liquid Extraction Station was a result of the need for an automated system to perform aqueous extraction on large sets of newly synthesized organic compounds used for drug discovery. The system utilizes a cylindrical laboratory robot to shuttle sample vials between two loading racks, two identical extraction stations, and a centrifuge. Extraction is performed by detecting the phase interface (by difference in refractive index) of the moving column of fluid drawn from the bottom of each vial containing a biphasic mixture. The integration of interface detection with fluid extraction maximizes sample throughput. Abbott-developed electronics process the detector signals. Sample mixing is performed by high-speed solvent injection. Centrifuging of the samples reduces interface emulsions. Operating software permits the user to program wash protocols with any one of six solvents per wash cycle with as many cycle repeats as necessary. Station capacity is eighty, 15 ml vials. This system has proven successful with a broad spectrum of both ethyl acetate and methylene chloride based chemistries. The development and characterization of this automated extraction system will be presented. PMID:18924693

  19. Particle Collection Efficiency of a Lens-Liquid Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Ross Y. M.; Ng, Moses L. F.; Chao, Christopher Y. H.; Li, Z. G.

    2011-09-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have shown that indoor air quality has substantial impact on the health of building occupants [1]. Possible sources of indoor air contamination include hazardous gases as well as particulate matters (PMs) [2]. Experimental studies show that the size distribution of PMs in indoor air ranges from tens of nanometers to a few hundreds of micrometers [3]. Vacuum cleaners can be used as a major tool to collect PMs from floor/carpets, which are the main sources of indoor PMs. However, the particle collection efficiency of typical cyclonic filters in the vacuums drops significantly for particles of diameter below 10 μm. In this work, we propose a lens-liquid filtration system (see Figure 1), where the flow channel is formed by a liquid free surface and a planar plate with fin/lens structures. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed by using FLUENT to optimize the structure of the proposed system toward high particle collection efficiency and satisfactory pressure drop. Numerical simulations show that the system can collect 250 nm diameter particles with collection efficiency of 50%.

  20. [DNA Extraction from Old Bones by AutoMate Express™ System].

    PubMed

    Li, B; Lü, Z

    2017-08-01

    To establish a method for extracting DNA from old bones by AutoMate Express™ system. Bones were grinded into powder by freeze-mill. After extraction by AutoMate Express™, DNA were amplified and genotyped by Identifiler®Plus and MinFiler™ kits. DNA were extracted from 10 old bone samples, which kept in different environments with the postmortem interval from 10 to 20 years, in 3 hours by AutoMate Express™ system. Complete STR typing results were obtained from 8 samples. AutoMate Express™ system can quickly and efficiently extract DNA from old bones, which can be applied in forensic practice. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  1. Self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyungsup; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Shin, Yong; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2016-01-07

    Over the past few decades, lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technologies have played a great role in revolutionizing the way in vitro medical diagnostics are conducted and transforming bulky and expensive laboratory instruments and labour-intensive tests into easy to use, cost-effective miniaturized systems with faster analysis time, which can be used for near-patient or point-of-care (POC) tests. Fluidic pumps and valves are among the key components for LOC systems; however, they often require on-line electrical power or batteries and make the whole system bulky and complex, therefore limiting its application to POC testing especially in low-resource setting. This is particularly problematic for molecular diagnostics where multi-step sample processing (e.g. lysing, washing, elution) is necessary. In this work, we have developed a self-powered switch-controlled nucleic acid extraction system (SSNES). The main components of SSNES are a powerless vacuum actuator using two disposable syringes and a switchgear made of PMMA blocks and an O-ring. In the vacuum actuator, an opened syringe and a blocked syringe are bound together and act as a working syringe and an actuating syringe, respectively. The negative pressure in the opened syringe is generated by a restoring force of the compressed air inside the blocked syringe and utilized as the vacuum source. The Venus symbol shape of the switchgear provides multiple functions including being a reagent reservoir, a push-button for the vacuum actuator, and an on-off valve. The SSNES consists of three sets of vacuum actuators, switchgears and microfluidic components. The entire system can be easily fabricated and is fully disposable. We have successfully demonstrated DNA extraction from a urine sample using a dimethyl adipimidate (DMA)-based extraction method and the performance of the DNA extraction has been confirmed by genetic (HRAS) analysis of DNA biomarkers from the extracted DNAs using the SSNES. Therefore, the SSNES can be widely

  2. Streaming and particle motion in acoustically-actuated leaky systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nama, Nitesh; Barnkob, Rune; Jun Huang, Tony; Kahler, Christian; Costanzo, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    The integration of acoustics with microfluidics has shown great promise for applications within biology, chemistry, and medicine. A commonly employed system to achieve this integration consists of a fluid-filled, polymer-walled microchannel that is acoustically actuated via standing surface acoustic waves. However, despite significant experimental advancements, the precise physical understanding of such systems remains a work in progress. In this work, we investigate the nature of acoustic fields that are setup inside the microchannel as well as the fundamental driving mechanism governing the fluid and particle motion in these systems. We provide an experimental benchmark using state-of-art 3D measurements of fluid and particle motion and present a Lagrangian velocity based temporal multiscale numerical framework to explain the experimental observations. Following verification and validation, we employ our numerical model to reveal the presence of a pseudo-standing acoustic wave that drives the acoustic streaming and particle motion in these systems.

  3. Chembio extraction on a chip by nanoliter droplet ejection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongyu; Kwon, Jae Wan; Kim, Eun Sok

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a novel liquid separation technique for chembio extraction by an ultrasonic nanoliter-liquid-droplet ejector built on a PZT sheet. This technique extracts material from an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) in a precise amount through digital control of the number of nanoliter droplets, without any mixing between the two liquids in the ATPS. The ultrasonic droplet ejector uses an acoustic streaming effect produced by an acoustic beam focused on the liquid surface, and ejects liquid droplets only from the liquid surface without disturbing most of the liquid below the surface. This unique characteristic of the focused acoustic beam is perfect (1) for separating a top-layer liquid (from the bulk of liquid) that contains particles of interest or (2) for recovering a top-layer liquid that has different phase from a bottom-layer liquid. Three kinds of liquid extraction are demonstrated with the ultrasonic droplet ejector: (1) 16 microl of top layer in Dextran-polyethylene glycol-water ATPS (aqueous two-phase system) is recovered within 20 s; (2) micron sized particles that float on water surface are ejected out with water droplets; and (3) oil layer on top of water is separated out.

  4. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15...-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for... smoke, together with visual and audible alarms for indicating the presence of smoke. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR...

  5. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15...-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for... smoke, together with visual and audible alarms for indicating the presence of smoke. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR...

  6. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15...-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for... smoke, together with visual and audible alarms for indicating the presence of smoke. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR...

  7. 46 CFR 161.002-15 - Sample extraction smoke detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Sample extraction smoke detection systems. 161.002-15...-15 Sample extraction smoke detection systems. The smoke detecting system must consist of a means for... smoke, together with visual and audible alarms for indicating the presence of smoke. [CGD 94-108, 61 FR...

  8. Brunet-Derrida Behavior of Branching-Selection Particle Systems on the Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérard, Jean; Gouéré, Jean-Baptiste

    2010-09-01

    We consider a class of branching-selection particle systems on {mathbb{R}} similar to the one considered by E. Brunet and B. Derrida in their 1997 paper “Shift in the velocity of a front due to a cutoff”. Based on numerical simulations and heuristic arguments, Brunet and Derrida showed that, as the population size N of the particle system goes to infinity, the asymptotic velocity of the system converges to a limiting value at the unexpectedly slow rate (log N)-2. In this paper, we give a rigorous mathematical proof of this fact, for the class of particle systems we consider. The proof makes use of ideas and results by R. Pemantle, and by N. Gantert, Y. Hu and Z. Shi, and relies on a comparison of the particle system with a family of N independent branching random walks killed below a linear space-time barrier.

  9. Focusing particle concentrator with application to ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Hering, Susanne; Lewis, Gregory; Spielman, Steven R.

    2013-06-11

    Technology is presented for the high efficiency concentration of fine and ultrafine airborne particles into a small fraction of the sampled airflow by condensational enlargement, aerodynamic focusing and flow separation. A nozzle concentrator structure including an acceleration nozzle with a flow extraction structure may be coupled to a containment vessel. The containment vessel may include a water condensation growth tube to facilitate the concentration of ultrafine particles. The containment vessel may further include a separate carrier flow introduced at the center of the sampled flow, upstream of the acceleration nozzle of the nozzle concentrator to facilitate the separation of particle and vapor constituents.

  10. Arduino-based automation of a DNA extraction system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Won; Lee, Mi-So; Ryu, Mun-Ho; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies to detect infectious diseases with the molecular genetic method. This study presents an automation process for a DNA extraction system based on microfluidics and magnetic bead, which is part of a portable molecular genetic test system. This DNA extraction system consists of a cartridge with chambers, syringes, four linear stepper actuators, and a rotary stepper actuator. The actuators provide a sequence of steps in the DNA extraction process, such as transporting, mixing, and washing for the gene specimen, magnetic bead, and reagent solutions. The proposed automation system consists of a PC-based host application and an Arduino-based controller. The host application compiles a G code sequence file and interfaces with the controller to execute the compiled sequence. The controller executes stepper motor axis motion, time delay, and input-output manipulation. It drives the stepper motor with an open library, which provides a smooth linear acceleration profile. The controller also provides a homing sequence to establish the motor's reference position, and hard limit checking to prevent any over-travelling. The proposed system was implemented and its functionality was investigated, especially regarding positioning accuracy and velocity profile.

  11. System for forming janus particles

    DOEpatents

    Hong, Liang [Midland, MI; Jiang, Shan [Champaign, IL; Granick, Steve [Champaign, IL

    2011-01-25

    The invention is a method of forming Janus particles, that includes forming an emulsion that contains initial particles, a first liquid, and a second liquid; solidifying the first liquid to form a solid that contains at least a portion of the initial particles on a surface of the solid; and treating the exposed particle sides with a first surface modifying agent, to form the Janus particles. Each of the initial particles on the surface has an exposed particle side and a blocked particle side.

  12. A Miniature System for Separating Aerosol Particles and Measuring Mass Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Dao; Shih, Wen-Pin; Chen, Chuin-Shan; Dai, Chi-An

    2010-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a new sensing system which consists of two virtual impactors and two quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) sensors for measuring particle mass concentration and size distribution. The virtual impactors utilized different inertial forces of particles in air flow to classify different particle sizes. They were designed to classify particle diameter, d, into three different ranges: d < 2.28 μm, 2.28 μm ≤ d ≤ 3.20 μm, d > 3.20 μm. The QCM sensors were coated with a hydrogel, which was found to be a reliable adhesive for capturing aerosol particles. The QCM sensor coated with hydrogel was used to measure the mass loading of particles by utilizing its characteristic of resonant frequency shift. An integrated system has been demonstrated. PMID:22319317

  13. Novel Nano-particle, Temperature-Independent Damping System: Basic Science and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-31

    based impact damping or a fluid -based viscous damping system, and/d =fn in a frictional damping systems.. The increase in frequency is caused by either...to provide temperature independent damping. While the damping performance of a dry particle medium unlike a viscous fluid is said to be unaffected by...the mechanical components of the dampers are filled with selected particles. The advantages of particle damping over the conventional damping

  14. FEX: A Knowledge-Based System For Planimetric Feature Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelek, John S.

    1988-10-01

    Topographical planimetric features include natural surfaces (rivers, lakes) and man-made surfaces (roads, railways, bridges). In conventional planimetric feature extraction, a photointerpreter manually interprets and extracts features from imagery on a stereoplotter. Visual planimetric feature extraction is a very labour intensive operation. The advantages of automating feature extraction include: time and labour savings; accuracy improvements; and planimetric data consistency. FEX (Feature EXtraction) combines techniques from image processing, remote sensing and artificial intelligence for automatic feature extraction. The feature extraction process co-ordinates the information and knowledge in a hierarchical data structure. The system simulates the reasoning of a photointerpreter in determining the planimetric features. Present efforts have concentrated on the extraction of road-like features in SPOT imagery. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Artificial Intelligence (AI), SPOT, image understanding, knowledge base, apars.

  15. METAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, G.W. Jr.; Rhodes, D.E.

    1957-11-01

    An improved method for extracting uranium from aqueous solutions by solvent extraction is presented. A difficulty encountered in solvent extraction operations using an organic extractant (e.g., tributyl phosphate dissolved in kerosene or carbon tetrachloride) is that emulsions sometimes form, and phase separation is difficult or impossible. This difficulty is overcome by dissolving the organic extractant in a molten wax which is a solid at operating temperatures. After cooling, the wax which now contains the extractant, is broken into small particles (preferably flakes) and this wax complex'' is used to contact the uranium bearing solutions and extract the metal therefrom. Microcrystalline petroleum wax and certain ethylene polymers have been found suitable for this purpose.

  16. Adaptable, high recall, event extraction system with minimal configuration

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Biomedical event extraction has been a major focus of biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) research since the first BioNLP shared task was held in 2009. Accordingly, a large number of event extraction systems have been developed. Most such systems, however, have been developed for specific tasks and/or incorporated task specific settings, making their application to new corpora and tasks problematic without modification of the systems themselves. There is thus a need for event extraction systems that can achieve high levels of accuracy when applied to corpora in new domains, without the need for exhaustive tuning or modification, whilst retaining competitive levels of performance. Results We have enhanced our state-of-the-art event extraction system, EventMine, to alleviate the need for task-specific tuning. Task-specific details are specified in a configuration file, while extensive task-specific parameter tuning is avoided through the integration of a weighting method, a covariate shift method, and their combination. The task-specific configuration and weighting method have been employed within the context of two different sub-tasks of BioNLP shared task 2013, i.e. Cancer Genetics (CG) and Pathway Curation (PC), removing the need to modify the system specifically for each task. With minimal task specific configuration and tuning, EventMine achieved the 1st place in the PC task, and 2nd in the CG, achieving the highest recall for both tasks. The system has been further enhanced following the shared task by incorporating the covariate shift method and entity generalisations based on the task definitions, leading to further performance improvements. Conclusions We have shown that it is possible to apply a state-of-the-art event extraction system to new tasks with high levels of performance, without having to modify the system internally. Both covariate shift and weighting methods are useful in facilitating the production of high recall systems

  17. Adaptable, high recall, event extraction system with minimal configuration.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Makoto; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical event extraction has been a major focus of biomedical natural language processing (BioNLP) research since the first BioNLP shared task was held in 2009. Accordingly, a large number of event extraction systems have been developed. Most such systems, however, have been developed for specific tasks and/or incorporated task specific settings, making their application to new corpora and tasks problematic without modification of the systems themselves. There is thus a need for event extraction systems that can achieve high levels of accuracy when applied to corpora in new domains, without the need for exhaustive tuning or modification, whilst retaining competitive levels of performance. We have enhanced our state-of-the-art event extraction system, EventMine, to alleviate the need for task-specific tuning. Task-specific details are specified in a configuration file, while extensive task-specific parameter tuning is avoided through the integration of a weighting method, a covariate shift method, and their combination. The task-specific configuration and weighting method have been employed within the context of two different sub-tasks of BioNLP shared task 2013, i.e. Cancer Genetics (CG) and Pathway Curation (PC), removing the need to modify the system specifically for each task. With minimal task specific configuration and tuning, EventMine achieved the 1st place in the PC task, and 2nd in the CG, achieving the highest recall for both tasks. The system has been further enhanced following the shared task by incorporating the covariate shift method and entity generalisations based on the task definitions, leading to further performance improvements. We have shown that it is possible to apply a state-of-the-art event extraction system to new tasks with high levels of performance, without having to modify the system internally. Both covariate shift and weighting methods are useful in facilitating the production of high recall systems. These methods and their

  18. Spherical and cylindrical particle resonator as a cloak system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minin, I. V.; Minin, O. V.; Eremeev, A. I.; Tseplyaev, I. S.

    2018-05-01

    The concept of dielectric spherical or cylindrical particle in resonant mode as a cloak system is offered. In fundamental modes (modes with the smallest volume correspond to |m| = l, and s = 1) the field is concentrated mostly in the equatorial plane and at the surface of the sphere. Thus under resonance modes, such perturbation due to cuboid particle inserted in the spherical or cylindrical particle has almost no effect on the field forming resonance regardless of the value of internal particle material (defect) as long as this material does not cover the region where resonance takes place.

  19. Development of blood extraction system for health monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi; Nakanishi, Naoyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop the compact human blood sampling device applied for a health monitoring system(HMS), which is called "Mobile Hospital". The HMS consists of (1) a micro electrical pumping system for blood extraction, (2) a bio-sensor to detect and evaluate an amount of Glucose, Cholesterol and Urea in extracted blood, by using enzyme such as Glucoseoxidase (GOD), Cholesteroloxidase and Urease. The mechanical design elements of the device are bio-compatible microneedle, indentation unit using a shape memory alloy(SMA) actuator and pumping unit using a piezoelectric microactuator. The design concept is the biomimetic micromachine of female mosquito"s blood sampling mechanism. The performances of the main mechanical elements such as indentation force of the microneedle, actual stroke of the indentation unit using a SMA actuator and liquid sampling ability of the pumping unit using PZT piezoelectric microactuator were measured. The 3 mm stroke of the indentation load generated by SMA actuator was 0.8mN. The amount of imitation blood extracted by using bimorph PZT actuators was about 0.5 microliters for 10 sec. A 60-micrometer outer diameter and 25-micrometer inner diameter Titanium microneedle, which size is same as female mosquito"s labium, was produced by sputter deposition.

  20. Reaction Mechanisms and Particle Interaction in Burning Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Shoshin, Yuriy L.; Murdyy, Ruslan S.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms by which particle interactions affect ignition and combustion in the two-phase systems. Combustion of metal aerosols representing the two-phase systems is carried out in the microgravity environment enabling one to avoid the buoyant flows that mask the particle motion due to the particle-particle interaction effects. In addition, relatively large, e.g., 100 micron diameter particles can be used, that remain aerosolized (i.e., do not fall down as they would at normal gravity) so that their behavior ahead, behind, and within the propagating flame can be resolved optically. An experimental apparatus exploiting this approach has been designed for the 2.2-s drop tower microgravity experiments. A typical experiment includes fluidizing metal particles under microgravity in an acoustic field, turning off the acoustic exciter, and igniting the created aerosol at a constant pressure using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of the individual particle combustion and particle interactions are studied using high-speed movie and video cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Recorded flame images are digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparisons are employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosols. Condensed combustion products are collected after each experiment for the phase, composition, and morphology analyses. New experiments described in this paper address combustion of Ti and Al particle clouds in air and combustion of Mg particle clouds in CO2. In addition, microgravity combustion experiments have been conducted with the particles of the newly produced Al-Mg mechanical alloys aerosolized in air.

  1. Rubber particle proteins REF1 and SRPP1 interact differently with native lipids extracted from Hevea brasiliensis latex.

    PubMed

    Wadeesirisak, Kanthida; Castano, Sabine; Berthelot, Karine; Vaysse, Laurent; Bonfils, Frédéric; Peruch, Frédéric; Rattanaporn, Kittipong; Liengprayoon, Siriluck; Lecomte, Sophie; Bottier, Céline

    2017-02-01

    Rubber particle membranes from the Hevea latex contain predominantly two proteins, REF1 and SRPP1 involved in poly(cis-1,4-isoprene) synthesis or rubber quality. The repartition of both proteins on the small or large rubber particles seems to differ, but their role in the irreversible coagulation of the rubber particle is still unknown. In this study we highlighted the different modes of interactions of both recombinant proteins with different classes of lipids extracted from Hevea brasiliensis latex, and defined as phospholipids (PL), glycolipids (GL) and neutral lipids (NL). We combined two biophysical methods, polarization modulated-infrared reflection adsorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and ellipsometry to elucidate their interactions with monolayers of each class of lipids. REF1 and SRPP1 interactions with native lipids are clearly different; SRPP1 interacts mostly in surface with PL, GL or NL, without modification of its structure. In contrast REF1 inserts deeply in the lipid monolayers with all lipid classes. With NL, REF1 is even able to switch from α-helice conformation to β-sheet structure, as in its aggregated form (amyloid form). Interaction between REF1 and NL may therefore have a specific role in the irreversible coagulation of rubber particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Blended particle filters for large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems

    PubMed Central

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in contemporary data science is the development of statistically accurate particle filters to capture non-Gaussian features in large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems. Blended particle filters that capture non-Gaussian features in an adaptively evolving low-dimensional subspace through particles interacting with evolving Gaussian statistics on the remaining portion of phase space are introduced here. These blended particle filters are constructed in this paper through a mathematical formalism involving conditional Gaussian mixtures combined with statistically nonlinear forecast models compatible with this structure developed recently with high skill for uncertainty quantification. Stringent test cases for filtering involving the 40-dimensional Lorenz 96 model with a 5-dimensional adaptive subspace for nonlinear blended filtering in various turbulent regimes with at least nine positive Lyapunov exponents are used here. These cases demonstrate the high skill of the blended particle filter algorithms in capturing both highly non-Gaussian dynamical features as well as crucial nonlinear statistics for accurate filtering in extreme filtering regimes with sparse infrequent high-quality observations. The formalism developed here is also useful for multiscale filtering of turbulent systems and a simple application is sketched below. PMID:24825886

  3. Construction of the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Masami, Mukai; Yutaka, Ando; Yasuo, Okuda; Naoto, Takahashi; Yoshihisa, Yoda; Hiroshi, Tsuji; Tadashi, Kamada

    2013-01-01

    Our hospital started the charged particle therapy since 1996. New institutions for charged particle therapy are planned in the world. Our hospital are accepting many visitors from those newly planned medical institutions and having many opportunities to provide with the training to them. Based upon our experiences, we have developed the radiation oncology teaching files system for charged particle therapy. We adopted the PowerPoint of Microsoft as a basic framework of our teaching files system. By using our export function of the viewer any physician can create teaching files easily and effectively. Now our teaching file system has 33 cases for clinical and physics contents. We expect that we can improve the safety and accuracy of charged particle therapy by using our teaching files system substantially.

  4. On a two-particle bound system on the half-line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Joachim; Mühlenbruch, Tobias

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we provide an extension of the model discussed in [10] describing two singularly interacting particles on the half-line ℝ+. In this model, the particles are interacting only whenever at least one particle is situated at the origin. Stimulated by [11] we then provide a generalisation of this model in order to include additional interactions between the particles leading to a molecular-like state. We give a precise mathematical formulation of the Hamiltonian of the system and perform spectral analysis. In particular, we are interested in the effect of the singular two-particle interactions onto the molecule.

  5. Entanglement distribution in multi-particle systems in terms of unified entropy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Zhang, Fu-Gang; Li, Yongming

    2017-04-25

    We investigate the entanglement distribution in multi-particle systems in terms of unified (q, s)-entropy. We find that for any tripartite mixed state, the unified (q, s)-entropy entanglement of assistance follows a polygamy relation. This polygamy relation also holds in multi-particle systems. Furthermore, a generalized monogamy relation is provided for unified (q, s)-entropy entanglement in the multi-qubit system.

  6. Anisometric Particle Systems—from Shape Characterization to Suspension Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorová, Eva; Pabst, Willi; Vaněrková, Lucie

    2009-06-01

    Methods for the characterization of anisometric particle systems are discussed. For prolate particles, the aspect ratio determination via microscopic image analysis is recalled, and aspect ratio distributions as well as shape-size dependences are commented upon. For oblate particles a simple relation is recalled with can be used to determine an average aspect ratio when size distributions are available from two methods, typically from sedimentation analysis and laser diffraction. The connection between particle shape (aspect ratio) and suspension rheology is outlined and it is shown how a generic procedure, based on Brenner's theory, can be applied to predict the intrinsic viscosity when the aspect ratio is known. On the other hand it is shown, how information on the intrinsic viscosity and the critical solids volume fraction can be extracted from experiments, when the measured concentration dependence of the effective suspension viscosity is adequately interpreted (using the Krieger relation for fitting). The examples mentioned in this paper include systems with oblate or prolate ceramic particles (kaolins, pyrophyllite, wollastonite, silicon carbide) as well as (prolate) pharmaceuticals (mesalamine, ibuprofen, nifuroxazide, paracetamol).

  7. Radiation forces on small particles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, J. A.; Lamy, P. L.; Soter, S.

    1979-01-01

    Solar radiation forces on small particles in the solar system are examined, and the resulting orbital evolution of interplanetary and circumplanetary dust is considered. An expression is derived for the effects of radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag on small, spherical particles using the energy and momentum transformation laws of special relativity, and numerical examples are presented to illustrate that radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag are only important for particles within a narrow size range. The orbital consequences of these radiation forces are considered both for heliocentric and planetocentric orbiting particles, and the coupling between particle sizes and dynamics is discussed. A qualitative derivation is presented for the differential Doppler effect, which is due to the differential Doppler shifting of radiation from approaching and receding solar hemispheres, and the Yarkovsky effect, which is important for rotating meter-to kilometer-sized particles, is briefly described.

  8. Relating the finite-volume spectrum and the two-and-three-particle S matrix for relativistic systems of identical scalar particles

    DOE PAGES

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2017-04-18

    Working in relativistic quantum field theory, we derive the quantization condition satisfied by coupled two- and three-particle systems of identical scalar particles confined to a cubic spatial volume with periodicitymore » $L$. This gives the relation between the finite-volume spectrum and the infinite-volume $$\\textbf 2 \\to \\textbf 2$$, $$\\textbf 2 \\to \\textbf 3$$ and $$\\textbf 3 \\to \\textbf 3$$ scattering amplitudes for such theories. The result holds for relativistic systems composed of scalar particles with nonzero mass $m$, whose center of mass energy lies below the four-particle threshold, and for which the two-particle K-matrix has no singularities below the three-particle threshold. Finally, the quantization condition is exact up to corrections of the order $$\\mathcal{O}(e^{-mL})$$ and holds for any choice of total momenta satisfying the boundary conditions.« less

  9. Relating the finite-volume spectrum and the two-and-three-particle S matrix for relativistic systems of identical scalar particles

    SciTech Connect

    Briceño, Raúl A.; Hansen, Maxwell T.; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    Working in relativistic quantum field theory, we derive the quantization condition satisfied by coupled two- and three-particle systems of identical scalar particles confined to a cubic spatial volume with periodicitymore » $L$. This gives the relation between the finite-volume spectrum and the infinite-volume $$\\textbf 2 \\to \\textbf 2$$, $$\\textbf 2 \\to \\textbf 3$$ and $$\\textbf 3 \\to \\textbf 3$$ scattering amplitudes for such theories. The result holds for relativistic systems composed of scalar particles with nonzero mass $m$, whose center of mass energy lies below the four-particle threshold, and for which the two-particle K-matrix has no singularities below the three-particle threshold. Finally, the quantization condition is exact up to corrections of the order $$\\mathcal{O}(e^{-mL})$$ and holds for any choice of total momenta satisfying the boundary conditions.« less

  10. Real-time detection method and system for identifying individual aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric E [San Francisco, CA; Coffee, Keith R [Patterson, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA; Tobias, Herbert J [Kensington, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Madden, Norm [Livermore, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Berkeley, CA; Steele, Paul T [Livermore, CA; Woods, Bruce W [Livermore, CA

    2007-08-21

    An improved method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are collimated, tracked, and screened to determine which ones qualify for mass spectrometric analysis based on predetermined qualification or selection criteria. Screening techniques include one or more of determining particle size, shape, symmetry, and fluorescence. Only qualifying particles passing all screening criteria are subject to desorption/ionization and single particle mass spectrometry to produce corresponding test spectra, which is used to determine the identities of each of the qualifying aerosol particles by comparing the test spectra against predetermined spectra for known particle types. In this manner, activation cycling of a particle ablation laser of a single particle mass spectrometer is reduced.

  11. Traffic and related self-driven many-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbing, Dirk

    2001-10-01

    Since the subject of traffic dynamics has captured the interest of physicists, many surprising effects have been revealed and explained. Some of the questions now understood are the following: Why are vehicles sometimes stopped by ``phantom traffic jams'' even though drivers all like to drive fast? What are the mechanisms behind stop-and-go traffic? Why are there several different kinds of congestion, and how are they related? Why do most traffic jams occur considerably before the road capacity is reached? Can a temporary reduction in the volume of traffic cause a lasting traffic jam? Under which conditions can speed limits speed up traffic? Why do pedestrians moving in opposite directions normally organize into lanes, while similar systems ``freeze by heating''? All of these questions have been answered by applying and extending methods from statistical physics and nonlinear dynamics to self-driven many-particle systems. This article considers the empirical data and then reviews the main approaches to modeling pedestrian and vehicle traffic. These include microscopic (particle-based), mesoscopic (gas-kinetic), and macroscopic (fluid-dynamic) models. Attention is also paid to the formulation of a micro-macro link, to aspects of universality, and to other unifying concepts, such as a general modeling framework for self-driven many-particle systems, including spin systems. While the primary focus is upon vehicle and pedestrian traffic, applications to biological or socio-economic systems such as bacterial colonies, flocks of birds, panics, and stock market dynamics are touched upon as well.

  12. INTEGRATION OF PARTICLE-GAS SYSTEMS WITH STIFF MUTUAL DRAG INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Johansen, Anders, E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se, E-mail: anders@astro.lu.se

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation of numerous mm/cm-sized particles embedded in a gaseous disk has become an important tool in the study of planet formation and in understanding the dust distribution in observed protoplanetary disks. However, the mutual drag force between the gas and the particles can become so stiff—particularly because of small particles and/or strong local solid concentration—that an explicit integration of this system is computationally formidable. In this work, we consider the integration of the mutual drag force in a system of Eulerian gas and Lagrangian solid particles. Despite the entanglement between the gas and the particles under the particle-mesh construct,more » we are able to devise a numerical algorithm that effectively decomposes the globally coupled system of equations for the mutual drag force, and makes it possible to integrate this system on a cell-by-cell basis, which considerably reduces the computational task required. We use an analytical solution for the temporal evolution of each cell to relieve the time-step constraint posed by the mutual drag force, as well as to achieve the highest degree of accuracy. To validate our algorithm, we use an extensive suite of benchmarks with known solutions in one, two, and three dimensions, including the linear growth and the nonlinear saturation of the streaming instability. We demonstrate numerical convergence and satisfactory consistency in all cases. Our algorithm can, for example, be applied to model the evolution of the streaming instability with mm/cm-sized pebbles at high mass loading, which has important consequences for the formation scenarios of planetesimals.« less

  13. On creating macroscopically identical granular systems with different numbers of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Devaraj; Rivas, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    One of the fundamental differences between granular and molecular hydrodynamics is the enormous difference in the total number of constituents. The small number of particles implies that the role of fluctuations in granular dynamics is of paramount importance. To obtain more insight in these fluctuations, we investigate to what extent it is possible to create identical granular hydrodynamic states with different number of particles. A definition is given of macroscopically equivalent systems, and the dependency of the conservation equations on the particle size is studied. We show that, in certain cases, and by appropriately scaling the microscopic variables, we are able to compare systems with significantly different number of particles that present the same macroscopic phenomenology. We apply these scalings in simulations of a vertically vibrated system, namely the density inverted granular Leidenfrost state and its transition to a buoyancy-driven convective state.

  14. Assessment of the influence of traffic-related particles in urban dust using sequential selective extraction and oral bioaccessibility tests.

    PubMed

    Patinha, C; Durães, N; Sousa, P; Dias, A C; Reis, A P; Noack, Y; Ferreira da Silva, E

    2015-08-01

    Urban dust is a heterogeneous mix, where traffic-related particles can combine with soil mineral compounds, forming a unique and site-specific material. These traffic-related particles are usually enriched in potentially harmful elements, enhancing the health risk for population by inhalation or ingestion. Urban dust samples from Estarreja city and traffic-related particles (brake dust and white traffic paint) were studied to understand the relative contribution of the traffic particles in the geochemical behaviour of urban dust and to evaluate the long-term impacts of the metals on an urban environment, as well as the risk to the populations. It was possible to distinguish two groups of urban dust samples according to Cu behaviour: (1) one group with low amounts of fine particles (<38 µm), low contents of organic material, high percentage of Cu in soluble phases, and low Cu bioaccessible fraction (Bf) values. This group showed similar chemical behaviour with the brake dust samples of low- to mid-range car brands (with more than 10 years old), composed by coarser wear particles; and (2) another group with greater amounts of fine particles (<38 µm), with low percentage of Cu associated with soluble phases, and with greater Cu Bf values. This group behaved similar to those found for brake dust of mid- to high-range car brands (with less than 10 years old). The results obtained showed that there is no direct correlation between the geoavailability of metals estimated by sequential selective chemical extraction (SSCE) and the in vitro oral bioaccessibility (UBM) test. Thus, oral bioaccessibility of urban dust is site specific. Geoavailability was greatly dependent on particle size, where the bioaccessibility tended to increase with a reduction in particle diameter. As anthropogenic particles showed high metal concentration and a smaller size than mineral particles, urban dusts are of major concern to the populations' health, since fine particles are easily re

  15. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  16. Nanolipoprotein particles and related compositions, methods and systems

    DOEpatents

    Hoeprich, Paul D; Fischer, Nicholas O; Mason, Peter W; Blanchette, Craig D

    2014-11-11

    Functionalized nanolipoprotein particle presenting an anchor substrate compound for binding with a corresponding anchor compound presented on a target molecule, and related compositions methods and systems.

  17. A simplified In Situ cosmogenic 14C extraction system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pigati, J.S.; Lifton, N.A.; Timothy, Jull A.J.; Quade, Jay

    2010-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and testing of a new, simplified in situ radiocarbon extraction system at the University of Arizona. Blank levels for the new system are low ((234 ?? 11) ?? 103 atoms (1 ??; n = 7)) and stable. The precision of a given measurement depends on the concentration of 14C, but is typically <5% for concentrations of 100 ?? 103 atoms g-1 or more. The new system is relatively small and easy to construct, costs significantly less than the original in situ 14C extraction system at Arizona, and lends itself to future automation. ?? 2010 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona.

  18. Integrating Information Extraction Agents into a Tourism Recommender System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esparcia, Sergio; Sánchez-Anguix, Víctor; Argente, Estefanía; García-Fornes, Ana; Julián, Vicente

    Recommender systems face some problems. On the one hand information needs to be maintained updated, which can result in a costly task if it is not performed automatically. On the other hand, it may be interesting to include third party services in the recommendation since they improve its quality. In this paper, we present an add-on for the Social-Net Tourism Recommender System that uses information extraction and natural language processing techniques in order to automatically extract and classify information from the Web. Its goal is to maintain the system updated and obtain information about third party services that are not offered by service providers inside the system.

  19. Modeling the C. elegans nematode and its environment using a particle system.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Mauno; Wong, Garry

    2008-07-21

    A particle system, as understood in computer science, is a novel technique for modeling living organisms in their environment. Such particle systems have traditionally been used for modeling the complex dynamics of fluids and gases. In the present study, a particle system was devised to model the movement and feeding behavior of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in three different virtual environments: gel, liquid, and soil. The results demonstrate that distinct movements of the nematode can be attributed to its mechanical interactions with the virtual environment. These results also revealed emergent properties associated with modeling organisms within environment-based systems.

  20. Porous extraction paddle: a solid phase extraction technique for studying the urine metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Gang; MacNeil, Michael; Yao, Yuanyuan; Giese, Roger W.

    2016-01-01

    RATIONALE A method was needed to accomplish solid phase extraction of a large urine volume in a convenient way where resources are limited, towards a goal of metabolome and xenobiotic exposome analysis at another, distant location. METHODS A porous extraction paddle (PEP) was set up, comprising a porous nylon bag containing extraction particles that is flattened and immobilized between two stainless steel meshes. Stirring the PEP after attachment to a shaft of a motor mounted on the lid of the jar containing the urine accomplishes extraction. The bag contained a mixture of nonpolar and partly nonpolar particles to extract a diversity of corresponding compounds. RESULTS Elution of a urine-exposed, water-washed PEP with aqueous methanol containing triethylammonium acetate (conditions intended to give a complete elution), followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, demonstrated that a diversity of compounds had been extracted ranging from uric acid to peptides. CONCLUSION The PEP allows the user to extract a large liquid sample in a jar simply by turning on a motor. The technique will be helpful in conducting metabolomics and xenobiotic exposome studies of urine, encouraging the extraction of large volumes to set up a convenient repository sample (e.g. 2 g of exposed adsorbent in a cryovial) for shipment and re-analysis in various ways in the future, including scaled-up isolation of unknown chemicals for identification. PMID:27624170

  1. Porous extraction paddle: a solid phase extraction technique for studying the urine metabolome.

    PubMed

    Shao, Gang; MacNeil, Michael; Yao, Yuanyuan; Giese, Roger W

    2016-09-14

    A method was needed to accomplish solid phase extraction of a large urine volume in a convenient way where resources are limited, towards a goal of metabolome and xenobiotic exposome analysis at another, distant location. A porous extraction paddle (PEP) was set up, comprising a porous nylon bag containing extraction particles that is flattened and immobilized between two stainless steel meshes. Stirring the PEP after attachment to a shaft of a motor mounted on the lid of the jar containing the urine accomplishes extraction. The bag contained a mixture of nonpolar and partly nonpolar particles to extract a diversity of corresponding compounds. Elution of a urine-exposed, water-washed PEP with aqueous methanol containing triethylammonium acetate (conditions intended to give a complete elution), followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS, demonstrated that a diversity of compounds had been extracted ranging from uric acid to peptides. The PEP allows the user to extract a large liquid sample in a jar simply by turning on a motor. The technique will be helpful in conducting metabolomics and xenobiotic exposome studies of urine, encouraging the extraction of large volumes to set up a convenient repository sample (e.g. 2 g of exposed adsorbent in a cryovial) for shipment and re-analysis in various ways in the future, including scaled-up isolation of unknown chemicals for identification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Neutron Polarization Analysis for Biphasic Solvent Extraction Systems

    DOE PAGES

    Motokawa, Ryuhei; Endo, Hitoshi; Nagao, Michihiro; ...

    2016-06-16

    Here we performed neutron polarization analysis (NPA) of extracted organic phases containing complexes, comprised of Zr(NO 3) 4 and tri-n-butyl phosphate, which enabled decomposition of the intensity distribution of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) into the coherent and incoherent scattering components. The coherent scattering intensity, containing structural information, and the incoherent scattering compete over a wide range of magnitude of scattering vector, q, specifically when q is larger than q* ≈ 1/R g, where R g is the radius of gyration of scatterer. Therefore, it is important to determine the incoherent scattering intensity exactly to perform an accurate structural analysis frommore » SANS data when R g is small, such as the aforementioned extracted coordination species. Although NPA is the best method for evaluating the incoherent scattering component for accurately determining the coherent scattering in SANS, this method is not used frequently in SANS data analysis because it is technically challenging. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that experimental determination of the incoherent scattering using NPA is suitable for sample systems containing a small scatterer with a weak coherent scattering intensity, such as extracted complexes in biphasic solvent extraction systems.« less

  3. SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES: A SURVEY OF SYSTEMS IN THE SITE PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solvent extraction of contaminated soils, sludges and sediments has been successfully completed at a number ofSuperfund sites. Each commercialized process uses a unique operating system to extract organic contaminants from solids. These operating systems may be classified by the ...

  4. Development of a novel niosomal system for oral delivery of Ginkgo biloba extract

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ye; Wen, Jingyuan; Garg, Sanjay; Liu, Da; Zhou, Yulin; Teng, Lirong; Zhang, Weiyu

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to develop an optimal niosomal system to deliver Ginkgo biloba extract (GbE) with improved oral bioavailability and to replace the conventional GbE tablets. Methods In this study, the film dispersion-homogenization method was used to prepare GbE niosomes. The resulting GbE niosome suspension was freeze-dried or spray-dried to improve the stability of the niosomes. GbE-loaded niosomes were formulated and characterized in terms of their morphology, particle size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, and angle of repose, and differential scanning calorimetry analysis was performed. In vitro release and in vivo distribution studies were also carried out. Results The particle size of the optimal delivery system prepared with Tween 80, Span 80, and cholesterol was about 141 nm. There was a significant difference (P < 0.05) in drug entrapment efficiency between the spray-drying method (about 77.5%) and the freeze-drying method (about 50.1%). The stability study revealed no significant change in drug entrapment efficiency for the GbE niosomes at 4°C and 25°C after 3 months. The in vitro release study suggested that GbE niosomes can prolong the release of flavonoid glycosides in phosphate-buffered solution (pH 6.8) for up to 48 hours. The in vivo distribution study showed that the flavonoid glycoside content in the heart, lung, kidney, brain, and blood of rats treated with the GbE niosome carrier system was greater than in the rats treated with the oral GbE tablet (P < 0.01). No flavonoid glycosides were detected in the brain tissue of rats given the oral GbE tablets, but they were detected in the brain tissue of rats given the GbE niosomes. Conclusion Niosomes are a promising oral system for delivery of GbE to the brain. PMID:23378764

  5. Fracture of a Brittle-Particle Ductile Matrix Composite with Applications to a Coating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianculli, Steven J.

    In material systems consisting of hard second phase particles in a ductile matrix, failure initiating from cracking of the second phase particles is an important failure mechanism. This dissertation applies the principles of fracture mechanics to consider this problem, first from the standpoint of fracture of the particles, and then the onset of crack propagation from fractured particles. This research was inspired by the observation of the failure mechanism of a commercial zinc-based anti-corrosion coating and the analysis was initially approached as coatings problem. As the work progressed it became evident that failure mechanism was relevant to a broad range of composite material systems and research approach was generalized to consider failure of a system consisting of ellipsoidal second phase particles in a ductile matrix. The starting point for the analysis is the classical Eshelby Problem, which considered stress transfer from the matrix to an ellipsoidal inclusion. The particle fracture problem is approached by considering cracks within particles and how they are affected by the particle/matrix interface, the difference in properties between the particle and matrix, and by particle shape. These effects are mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The trends developed show that, although the particle fracture problem is very complex, the potential for fracture among a range of particle shapes can, for certain ranges in particle shape, be considered easily on the basis of the Eshelby Stress alone. Additionally, the evaluation of cracks near the curved particle/matrix interface adds to the existing body of work of cracks approaching bi-material interfaces in layered material systems. The onset of crack propagation from fractured particles is then considered as a function of particle shape and mismatch in material properties between the particle and matrix. This behavior is mapped out for a wide range of material combinations. The final section of

  6. Models Extracted from Text for System-Software Safety Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation describes extraction and integration of requirements information and safety information in visualizations to support early review of completeness, correctness, and consistency of lengthy and diverse system safety analyses. Software tools have been developed and extended to perform the following tasks: 1) extract model parts and safety information from text in interface requirements documents, failure modes and effects analyses and hazard reports; 2) map and integrate the information to develop system architecture models and visualizations for safety analysts; and 3) provide model output to support virtual system integration testing. This presentation illustrates the methods and products with a rocket motor initiation case.

  7. Algorithmic structural segmentation of defective particle systems: a lithium-ion battery study.

    PubMed

    Westhoff, D; Finegan, D P; Shearing, P R; Schmidt, V

    2018-04-01

    We describe a segmentation algorithm that is able to identify defects (cracks, holes and breakages) in particle systems. This information is used to segment image data into individual particles, where each particle and its defects are identified accordingly. We apply the method to particle systems that appear in Li-ion battery electrodes. First, the algorithm is validated using simulated data from a stochastic 3D microstructure model, where we have full information about defects. This allows us to quantify the accuracy of the segmentation result. Then we show that the algorithm can successfully be applied to tomographic image data from real battery anodes and cathodes, which are composed of particle systems with very different morpohological properties. Finally, we show how the results of the segmentation algorithm can be used for structural analysis. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. Particle Analysis Pitfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, David; Dazzo, Tony

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of particle analysis to assist in preparing for the 4th Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Servicing mission. During this mission the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) will be repaired. The particle analysis consisted of Finite element mesh creation, Black-body viewfactors generated using I-DEAS TMG Thermal Analysis, Grey-body viewfactors calculated using Markov method, Particle distribution modeled using an iterative Monte Carlo process, (time-consuming); in house software called MASTRAM, Differential analysis performed in Excel, and Visualization provided by Tecplot and I-DEAS. Several tests were performed and are reviewed: Conformal Coat Particle Study, Card Extraction Study, Cover Fastener Removal Particle Generation Study, and E-Graf Vibration Particulate Study. The lessons learned during this analysis are also reviewed.

  9. Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry System for Investigation of Unsteady Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The objective of the project titled “Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (S-PIV) System for...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 30-04-2016 1-Feb-2015 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Acquisition of Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry System For...ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Particle Image Velocimetry REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  10. Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, R C; Frangioudakis, A

    2000-01-01

    We combine a radiation-pressure-based levitation system with a dual fiber, laser trapping system to demonstrate the potential of delivering single particles into the fiber trap. The forces versus position and the trajectory of the particle subjected to the laser beams are examined with an enhanced ray optics model. A sequence of video images taken from the experimental apparatus demonstrates the principle of particle delivery, trapping, and further manipulation.

  11. Real-Time Detection Method And System For Identifying Individual Aerosol Particles

    DOEpatents

    Gard, Eric Evan; Fergenson, David Philip

    2005-10-25

    A method and system of identifying individual aerosol particles in real time. Sample aerosol particles are compared against and identified with substantially matching known particle types by producing positive and negative test spectra of an individual aerosol particle using a bipolar single particle mass spectrometer. Each test spectrum is compared to spectra of the same respective polarity in a database of predetermined positive and negative spectra for known particle types and a set of substantially matching spectra is obtained. Finally the identity of the individual aerosol particle is determined from the set of substantially matching spectra by determining a best matching one of the known particle types having both a substantially matching positive spectrum and a substantially matching negative spectrum associated with the best matching known particle type.

  12. Determination of five pyrethroids in tea drinks by dispersive solid phase extraction with polyaniline-coated magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanpeng; Sun, Ying; Gao, Yan; Xu, Bo; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2014-02-01

    The polyaniline-coated magnetic particles with bowl-shaped morphology (Fe3O4/C/PANI microbowls) were successfully prepared and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared microbowls were used as the magnetic adsorbent in dispersive solid phase extraction of five pyrethroids, including cyhalothrin, beta-cypermethrin, esfenvalerate, permethrin and bifenthrin in plain tea drinks. The effects of experiment factors, including amount of Fe3O4/C/PANI microbowls, pH value, ultrasound extraction time and desorption conditions, were investigated. The extraction recoveries obtained with 8 mg of magnetic microbowls were satisfactory, and the microbowls can be reused after easy washing. Thus, a simple, selective and effective method for the determination of the pyrethroids was established successfully. The results showed that the method had good linearity (r=0.9992-0.9998), and the limits of detections (LODs) were from 0.025 to 0.032 ng mL(-1). The intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 2.4-6.1% and 3.5-8.8%, respectively. Recoveries obtained by analyzing the real tea drinks were in the range of 72.1-118.4%. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Corn silk aqueous extracts and intraocular pressure of systemic and non-systemic hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    George, Gladys O; Idu, Faustina K

    2015-03-01

    Hypotensive properties have been attributed to the stigma/style of Zea mays L (corn silk). Although the effect of corn silk extract on blood pressure has been documented in animal studies, we are not aware of any study on its effect on human blood pressure and intraocular pressure. A randomised study was carried out on the effect of water only, masked doses of corn silk aqueous extract (60, 130, 192.5 and 260 mg/kg body weight) on intraocular pressure and blood pressure of 20 systemic and 20 non-systemic hypertensive subjects. Intraocular pressure and blood pressure were measured at baseline and every hour for eight hours after administering water or a masked dose of corn silk aqueous extract. Each dose was administered at two-week intervals to each subject in the two study groups. The results showed that the last three doses of corn silk aqueous extract gave a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.001) in mean intraocular pressure and blood pressure within eight hours of administration. The peak effect on intraocular pressure was observed after four hours and this was preceded by the peak effect on blood pressure, which occurred after three hours of administration. The hypotensive effect was dose-dependent in the two groups. Corn silk aqueous extract has a lowering effect on intraocular pressure in systemic and non-systemic hypertensive subjects. This may have resulted from the fall in blood pressure that is due to potassium-induced natriuresis and diuresis caused by the high potassium content in the high doses of the corn silk extract. © 2015 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2015 Optometry Australia.

  14. Toward automated analysis of particle holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caulfield, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary study of approaches for extracting and analyzing data from particle holograms is discussed. It concludes that: (1) for thin spherical particles, out-of-focus methods are optimum; (2) for thin nonspherical particles, out-of-focus methods are useful but must be supplemented by in-focus methods; (3) a complex method of projection and back projection can remove out-of-focus data for deep particles.

  15. Microfluidic system for high throughput characterisation of echogenic particles.

    PubMed

    Rademeyer, Paul; Carugo, Dario; Lee, Jeong Yu; Stride, Eleanor

    2015-01-21

    Echogenic particles, such as microbubbles and volatile liquid micro/nano droplets, have shown considerable potential in a variety of clinical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The accurate prediction of their response to ultrasound excitation is however extremely challenging, and this has hindered the optimisation of techniques such as quantitative ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery. Existing characterisation techniques, such as ultra-high speed microscopy provide important insights, but suffer from a number of limitations; most significantly difficulty in obtaining large data sets suitable for statistical analysis and the need to physically constrain the particles, thereby altering their dynamics. Here a microfluidic system is presented that overcomes these challenges to enable the measurement of single echogenic particle response to ultrasound excitation. A co-axial flow focusing device is used to direct a continuous stream of unconstrained particles through the combined focal region of an ultrasound transducer and a laser. Both the optical and acoustic scatter from individual particles are then simultaneously recorded. Calibration of the device and example results for different types of echogenic particle are presented, demonstrating a high throughput of up to 20 particles per second and the ability to resolve changes in particle radius down to 0.1 μm with an uncertainty of less than 3%.

  16. Phase transitions in a system of hard Y-shaped particles on the triangular lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Dipanjan; Nath, Trisha; Rajesh, R.

    2018-03-01

    We study the different phases and the phase transitions in a system of Y-shaped particles, examples of which include immunoglobulin-G and trinaphthylene molecules, on a triangular lattice interacting exclusively through excluded volume interactions. Each particle consists of a central site and three of its six nearest neighbors chosen alternately, such that there are two types of particles which are mirror images of each other. We study the equilibrium properties of the system using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations that implement an algorithm with cluster moves that is able to equilibrate the system at densities close to full packing. We show that, with increasing density, the system undergoes two entropy-driven phase transitions with two broken-symmetry phases. At low densities, the system is in a disordered phase. As intermediate phases, there is a solidlike sublattice phase in which one type of particle is preferred over the other and the particles preferentially occupy one of four sublattices, thus breaking both particle symmetry as well as translational invariance. At even higher densities, the phase is a columnar phase, where the particle symmetry is restored, and the particles preferentially occupy even or odd rows along one of the three directions. This phase has translational order in only one direction, and breaks rotational invariance. From finite-size scaling, we demonstrate that both the transitions are first order in nature. We also show that the simpler system with only one type of particle undergoes a single discontinuous phase transition from a disordered phase to a solidlike sublattice phase with an increasing density of particles.

  17. Numerical Treatment of the Boltzmann Equation for Self-Propelled Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüroff, Florian; Weber, Christoph A.; Frey, Erwin

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic theories constitute one of the most promising tools to decipher the characteristic spatiotemporal dynamics in systems of actively propelled particles. In this context, the Boltzmann equation plays a pivotal role, since it provides a natural translation between a particle-level description of the system's dynamics and the corresponding hydrodynamic fields. Yet, the intricate mathematical structure of the Boltzmann equation substantially limits the progress toward a full understanding of this equation by solely analytical means. Here, we propose a general framework to numerically solve the Boltzmann equation for self-propelled particle systems in two spatial dimensions and with arbitrary boundary conditions. We discuss potential applications of this numerical framework to active matter systems and use the algorithm to give a detailed analysis to a model system of self-propelled particles with polar interactions. In accordance with previous studies, we find that spatially homogeneous isotropic and broken-symmetry states populate two distinct regions in parameter space, which are separated by a narrow region of spatially inhomogeneous, density-segregated moving patterns. We find clear evidence that these three regions in parameter space are connected by first-order phase transitions and that the transition between the spatially homogeneous isotropic and polar ordered phases bears striking similarities to liquid-gas phase transitions in equilibrium systems. Within the density-segregated parameter regime, we find a novel stable limit-cycle solution of the Boltzmann equation, which consists of parallel lanes of polar clusters moving in opposite directions, so as to render the overall symmetry of the system's ordered state nematic, despite purely polar interactions on the level of single particles.

  18. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  19. System Design of One-chip Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer for SCOPE mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuhara, Hajime; Ueda, Yoshikatsu; Kojima, Hiro; Yamakawa, Hiroshi

    In past science spacecrafts such like GEOTAIL, we usually capture electric and magnetic field waveforms and observe energetic eletron and ion particles as velocity distributions by each sensor. We analyze plasma wave-particle interactions by these respective data and the discussions are sometimes restricted by the difference of time resolution and by the data loss in desired regions. One-chip Wave Particle Interaction Analyzer (OWPIA) conducts direct quantitative observations of wave-particle interaction by direct 'E dot v' calculation on-board. This new instruments have a capability to use all plasma waveform data and electron particle informations. In the OWPIA system, we have to calibrate the digital observation data and transform the same coordinate system. All necessary calculations are processed in Field Programmable Gate Array(FPGA). In our study, we introduce a basic concept of the OWPIA system and a optimization method for each calculation functions installed in FPGA. And we also discuss the process speed, the FPGA utilization efficiency, the total power consumption.

  20. A critical review on the spray drying of fruit extract: effect of additives on physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Duduku; Nithyanandam, Rajesh; Sarbatly, Rosalam

    2014-01-01

    Spray drying accomplishes drying while particles are suspended in the air and is one method in the family of suspended particle processing systems, along with fluid-bed drying, flash drying, spray granulation, spray agglomeration, spray reaction, spray cooling, and spray absorption. This drying process is unique because it involves both particle formation and drying. The present paper reviews spray drying of fruit extracts, such as acai, acerola pomace, gac, mango, orange, cactus pear, opuntia stricta fruit, watermelon, and durian, and the effects of additives on physicochemical properties such as antioxidant activity, total carotenoid content, lycopene and β-carotene content, hygroscopy, moisture content, volatile retention, stickiness, color, solubility, glass transition temperature, bulk density, rehydration, caking, appearance under electron microscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction. The literature clearly demonstrates that the effect of additives and encapsulation play a vital role in determining the physicochemical properties of fruit extract powder. The technical difficulties in spray drying of fruit extracts can be overcome by modifying the spray dryer design. It also reveals that spray drying is a novel technology for converting fruit extract into powder form.

  1. An adhered-particle analysis system based on concave points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wencheng; Guan, Fengnian; Feng, Lin

    2018-04-01

    Particles adhered together will influence the image analysis in computer vision system. In this paper, a method based on concave point is designed. First, corner detection algorithm is adopted to obtain a rough estimation of potential concave points after image segmentation. Then, it computes the area ratio of the candidates to accurately localize the final separation points. Finally, it uses the separation points of each particle and the neighboring pixels to estimate the original particles before adhesion and provides estimated profile images. The experimental results have shown that this approach can provide good results that match the human visual cognitive mechanism.

  2. Method, apparatus and system for low-energy beta particle detection

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.; Drigert, Mark W.

    2012-09-25

    An apparatus, method, and system relating to radiation detection of low-energy beta particles are disclosed. An embodiment includes a radiation detector with a first scintillator and a second scintillator operably coupled to each other. The first scintillator and the second scintillator are each structured to generate a light pulse responsive to interaction with beta particles. The first scintillator is structured to experience full energy deposition of low-energy beta particles, and permit a higher-energy beta particle to pass therethrough and interact with the second scintillator. The radiation detector further includes a light-to-electrical converter operably coupled to the second scintillator and configured to convert light pulses generated by the first scintillator and the second scintillator into electrical signals. The first scintillator and the second scintillator have at least one mutually different characteristic to enable an electronic system to determine whether a given light pulse is generated in the first scintillator or the second scintillator.

  3. Sequential Extractions and Toxicity Potential of Trace Metals Absorbed into Airborne Particles in an Urban Atmosphere of Southwestern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ediagbonya, Thompson Faraday

    2018-01-01

    The paper investigates the hypothesis that biotoxicities of trace metals depend not only on the concentration as expressed by the total amount, but also on their geochemical fractions and bioavailability. Airborne particles were collected using SKC Air Check XR 5000 high volume Sampler at a human breathing height of 1.5–2.0 meters, during the dry season months from November 2014 to March 2015 at different locations in Akure (7°10′N and 5°15′E). The geochemical-based sequential extractions were performed on the particles using a series of increasingly stringent solutions selected to extract metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, and Mn) into four operational geochemical phases—exchangeable, reducible, organic, and residual—and then quantified using an Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed metals concentration of order Pb > Cr > Cd > Zn > Ni > Cu > Mn. However, most metals in the samples exist in nonmobile fractions: exchangeable (6.43–16.2%), reducible (32.58–47.39%), organic (4.73–9.88%), and residual (18.28–27.53%). The pollution indices show ingestion as the leading route of metal exposure, with noncarcinogenic (HQ) and cancer risk (HI) for humans in the area being higher than 1.0 × 10−4, indicating a health threat. PMID:29686588

  4. Stable transformation via particle bombardment in two different soybean regeneration systems.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Newell, C; Kolacz, K; Tredo, L; Finer, J; Hinchee, M

    1993-05-01

    The Biolistics(®) particle delivery system for the transformation of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) was evaluated in two different regeneration systems. The first system was multiple shoot proliferation from shoot tips obtained from immature zygotic embryos of the cultivar Williams 82, and the second was somatic embryogenesis from a long term proliferative suspension culture of the cultivar Fayette. Bombardment of shoot tips with tungsten particles, coated with precipitated DNA containing the gene for β-glucuronidase (GUS), produced GUS-positive sectors in 30% of the regenerated shoots. However, none of the regenerants which developed into plants continued to produce GUS positive tissue. Bombardment of embryogenic suspension cultures produced GUS positive globular somatic embryos which proliferated into GUS positive somatic embryos and plants. An average of 4 independent transgenic lines were generated per bombarded flask of an embryogenic suspension. Particle bombardment delivered particles into the first two cell layers of either shoot tips or somatic embryos. Histological analysis indicated that shoot organogenesis appeared to involve more than the first two superficial cell layers of a shoot tip, while somatic embryo proliferation occurred from the first cell layer of existing somatic embryos. The different transformation results obtained with these two systems appeared to be directly related to differences in the cell types which were responsible for regeneration and their accessibility to particle penetration.

  5. [Histomorphometric evaluation of ridge preservation after molar tooth extraction].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Y L; Hu, W J; Xu, T; Zhen, M; Lu, R F

    2017-02-18

    To evaluate bone formation in human extraction sockets with absorbed surrounding walls augmented with Bio-Oss and Bio-Gide after a 6-month healing period by histologic and histomorphometric analyses. Six fresh molar tooth extraction sockets in 6 patients who required periodontally compromised moral tooth extraction were included in this study. The six fresh extraction sockets were grafted with Bio-Oss particle covered with Bio-Gide. The 2.8 mm×6.0 mm cylindric bone specimens were taken from the graft sites with aid of stent 6 months after the surgery. Histologic and histomorphometric analyses were performed. The histological results showed Bio-Oss particles were easily distinguished from the newly formed bone, small amounts of new bone were formed among the Bio-Oss particles, large amounts of connective tissue were found. Intimate contact between the newly formed bone and the small part of Bio-Oss particles was present. All the biopsy cylinders measurement demonstrated a high inter-individual variability in the percentage of the bone, connective tissues and Bio-Oss particles. The new bone occupied 11.54% (0-28.40%) of the total area; the connective tissues were 53.42% (34.08%-74.59%) and the Bio-Oss particles were 35.04% (13.92%-50.87%). The percentage of the particles, which were in contact with bone tissues, amounted to 20.13% (0-48.50%). Sites grafted with Bio-Oss particles covered with Bio-Gide were comprised of connective tissues and small amounts of newly formed bone surrounding the graft particles.

  6. Effects of types of ventilation system on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Jee, N-Y; Jeong, J-W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify the influence of ventilation systems on indoor particle concentrations in residential buildings. Fifteen occupied, single-family apartments were selected from three sites. The three sites have three different ventilation systems: unbalanced mechanical ventilation, balanced mechanical ventilation, and natural ventilation. Field measurements were conducted between April and June 2012, when outdoor air temperatures were comfortable. Number concentrations of particles, PM2.5 and CO2 , were continuously measured both outdoors and indoors. In the apartments with natural ventilation, I/O ratios of particle number concentrations ranged from 0.56 to 0.72 for submicron particles, and from 0.25 to 0.60 for particles larger than 1.0 μm. The daily average indoor particle concentration decreased to 50% below the outdoor level for submicron particles and 25% below the outdoor level for fine particles, when the apartments were mechanically ventilated. The two mechanical ventilation systems reduced the I/O ratios by 26% for submicron particles and 65% for fine particles compared with the natural ventilation. These results showed that mechanical ventilation can reduce exposure to outdoor particles in residential buildings. Results of this study confirm that mechanical ventilation with filtration can significantly reduce indoor particle levels compared with natural ventilation. The I/O ratios of particles substantially varied at the naturally ventilated apartments because of the influence of variable window opening conditions and unsteadiness of wind flow on the penetration of outdoor air particles. For better prediction of the exposure to outdoor particles in naturally ventilated residential buildings, it is important to understand the penetration of outdoor particles with variable window opening conditions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An efficient venturi scrubber system to remove submicron particles in exhaust gas.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chuen-Jinn; Lin, Chia-Hung; Wang, Yu-Min; Hunag, Cheng-Hsiung; Li, Shou-Nan; Wu, Zong-Xue; Wang, Feng-Cai

    2005-03-01

    An efficient venturi scrubber system making use of heterogeneous nucleation and condensational growth of particles was designed and tested to remove fine particles from the exhaust of a local scrubber where residual SiH4 gas was abated and lots of fine SiO2 particles were generated. In front of the venturi scrubber, normal-temperature fine-water mist mixes with high-temperature exhaust gas to cool it to the saturation temperature, allowing submicron particles to grow into micron sizes. The grown particles are then scrubbed efficiently in the venturi scrubber. Test results show that the present venturi scrubber system is effective for removing submicron particles. For SiO2 particles greater than 0.1microm, the removal efficiency is greater than 80-90%, depending on particle concentration. The corresponding pressure drop is relatively low. For example, the pressure drop of the venturi scrubber is approximately 15.4 +/- 2.4 cm H2O when the liquid-to-gas ratio is 1.50 L/m3. A theoretical calculation has been conducted to simulate particle growth process and the removal efficiency of the venturi scrubber. The theoretical results agree with the experimental data reasonably well when SiO2 particle diameter is greater than 0.1 microm.

  8. Discreteness effects in a reacting system of particles with finite interaction radius.

    PubMed

    Berti, S; López, C; Vergni, D; Vulpiani, A

    2007-09-01

    An autocatalytic reacting system with particles interacting at a finite distance is studied. We investigate the effects of the discrete-particle character of the model on properties like reaction rate, quenching phenomenon, and front propagation, focusing on differences with respect to the continuous case. We introduce a renormalized reaction rate depending both on the interaction radius and the particle density, and we relate it to macroscopic observables (e.g., front speed and front thickness) of the system.

  9. Particle leakage in extracorporeal blood purification systems based on microparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Schildboeck, Claudia; Brandl, Martin; Falkenhagen, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed 'Microspheres based Detoxification System' (MDS) designed for any extracorporeal adsorption therapy uses microparticles as adsorbents characterized by a size of 1-20 microm in diameter which are recirculated in the secondary (filtrate) circuit connected to a hollow fiber filter located in the primary (blood) circuit. In the case of a leakage or rupture in the hollow fiber filter, microspheres can enter patients' blood circuits and cause embolic episodes in different organs with varying degrees of clinical relevance. Aim of this study was to determine the amount of particles infused to a patient during a long-term treatment under different failure conditions of the filter. The filters were prepared by cutting single hollow fibers. Fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and a mixture of glycerol and water were used as a medium together with microparticles potentially used in the MDS. The amounts of particles transferred from the filtrate into the primary circuit were measured. The analysis of particle transfer in the case of a single cut hollow fiber inside the membrane results in particle volumes of up to 26 ml calculated for 10 h. Particle leakage in microparticle suspension based detoxification systems can lead to considerable particle transfer to the patient. Therefore, a particle detection unit which is able to detect critical amounts of particles (<1 ml particle volume/treatment) in the extracorporeal blood line is necessary for patient safety. (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Using decision-tree classifier systems to extract knowledge from databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, D. C.; Sabharwal, C. L.; Hacke, Keith; Bond, W. E.

    1990-01-01

    One difficulty in applying artificial intelligence techniques to the solution of real world problems is that the development and maintenance of many AI systems, such as those used in diagnostics, require large amounts of human resources. At the same time, databases frequently exist which contain information about the process(es) of interest. Recently, efforts to reduce development and maintenance costs of AI systems have focused on using machine learning techniques to extract knowledge from existing databases. Research is described in the area of knowledge extraction using a class of machine learning techniques called decision-tree classifier systems. Results of this research suggest ways of performing knowledge extraction which may be applied in numerous situations. In addition, a measurement called the concept strength metric (CSM) is described which can be used to determine how well the resulting decision tree can differentiate between the concepts it has learned. The CSM can be used to determine whether or not additional knowledge needs to be extracted from the database. An experiment involving real world data is presented to illustrate the concepts described.

  11. A relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic description for systems including particle number changing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, Andrej; Muronga, Azwinndini; Xu, Zhe; Greiner, Carsten

    2010-12-01

    Relativistic dissipative hydrodynamic equations are extended by taking into account particle number changing processes in a gluon system, which expands in one dimension boost-invariantly. Chemical equilibration is treated by a rate equation for the particle number density based on Boltzmann equation and Grad's ansatz for the off-equilibrium particle phase space distribution. We find that not only the particle production, but also the temperature and the momentum spectra of the gluon system, obtained from the hydrodynamic calculations, are sensitive to the rates of particle number changing processes. Comparisons of the hydrodynamic calculations with the transport ones employing the parton cascade BAMPS show the inaccuracy of the rate equation at large shear viscosity to entropy density ratio. To improve the rate equation, Grad's ansatz has to be modified beyond the second moments in momentum.

  12. Semi-Lagrangian particle methods for high-dimensional Vlasov-Poisson systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottet, Georges-Henri

    2018-07-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of high order semi-Lagrangian particle methods to handle high dimensional Vlasov-Poisson systems. It is based on recent developments in the numerical analysis of particle methods and the paper focuses on specific algorithmic features to handle large dimensions. The methods are tested with uniform particle distributions in particular against a recent multi-resolution wavelet based method on a 4D plasma instability case and a 6D gravitational case. Conservation properties, accuracy and computational costs are monitored. The excellent accuracy/cost trade-off shown by the method opens new perspective for accurate simulations of high dimensional kinetic equations by particle methods.

  13. On-sun testing of an advanced falling particle receiver system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Clifford K.; Christian, Joshua M.; Yellowhair, Julius; Siegel, Nathan; Jeter, Sheldon; Golob, Matthew; Abdel-Khalik, Said I.; Nguyen, Clayton; Al-Ansary, Hany

    2016-05-01

    A 1 MWth high-temperature falling particle receiver was constructed and tested at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories. The continuously recirculating system included a particle elevator, top and bottom hoppers, and a cavity receiver that comprised a staggered array of porous chevron-shaped mesh structures that slowed the particle flow through the concentrated solar flux. Initial tests were performed with a peak irradiance of ~300 kW/m2 and a particle mass flow rate of 3.3 kg/s. Peak particle temperatures reached over 700 °C near the center of the receiver, but the particle temperature increase near the sides was lower due to a non-uniform irradiance distribution. At a particle inlet temperature of ~440 °C, the particle temperature increase was 27 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~60% for an average irradiance of 110 kW/m2. At an average irradiance of 211 kW/m2, the particle temperature increase was 57.1 °C per meter of drop length, and the thermal efficiency was ~65%. Tests with higher irradiances are being performed and are expected to yield greater particle temperature increases and efficiencies.

  14. Breathing of Graphite Particles in a Lithium-Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Keiji; Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Yura, Nobuki; Tamura, Ryota

    2012-04-01

    We imaged changes in volume of graphite particles in a Li-ion battery due to the insertion and extraction of Li ions using scanning probe microscopy. When Li ions were extracted from the graphite particles, the particles were contracted, while expansion was induced in the interspaces between the particles. Variations of the images of volume changes depending on modulation frequencies clearly showed lithium intercalation. A linear relationship between the amplitudes of volume changes and the products of the diffusion elements and the reciprocals of the frequencies has been proven. Thus, the detected signals quantitatively well corresponded to the lithium ion movements.

  15. ParticleCall: A particle filter for base calling in next-generation sequencing systems

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing systems are capable of rapid and cost-effective DNA sequencing, thus enabling routine sequencing tasks and taking us one step closer to personalized medicine. Accuracy and lengths of their reads, however, are yet to surpass those provided by the conventional Sanger sequencing method. This motivates the search for computationally efficient algorithms capable of reliable and accurate detection of the order of nucleotides in short DNA fragments from the acquired data. Results In this paper, we consider Illumina’s sequencing-by-synthesis platform which relies on reversible terminator chemistry and describe the acquired signal by reformulating its mathematical model as a Hidden Markov Model. Relying on this model and sequential Monte Carlo methods, we develop a parameter estimation and base calling scheme called ParticleCall. ParticleCall is tested on a data set obtained by sequencing phiX174 bacteriophage using Illumina’s Genome Analyzer II. The results show that the developed base calling scheme is significantly more computationally efficient than the best performing unsupervised method currently available, while achieving the same accuracy. Conclusions The proposed ParticleCall provides more accurate calls than the Illumina’s base calling algorithm, Bustard. At the same time, ParticleCall is significantly more computationally efficient than other recent schemes with similar performance, rendering it more feasible for high-throughput sequencing data analysis. Improvement of base calling accuracy will have immediate beneficial effects on the performance of downstream applications such as SNP and genotype calling. ParticleCall is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/particlecall. PMID:22776067

  16. Hybrid Quantum Systems with Trapped Charged Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Leibfried, Dietrich; Simmonds, Raymond; Wineland, Dave

    We will review a joint effort by the Ion Storage Group and the Advanced Microwave Photonics Group at NIST (Boulder, CO) to design a hybrid system that interfaces charged particles with macroscopic high-Q resonators. We specifically consider coupling trapped charges to superconducting LC resonators, the mechanical modes of Silicon-Nitride membranes, and piezo-electric materials. We aim to achieve the strong coupling regime, where a single quantum of motion of the trapped charge can be coherently exchanged with harmonic motion of the macroscopic entity (electrical and/or mechanical). These kind of devices could potentially take advantage of both macroscopic control techniques and the long quantum coherence of its trapped charged particles.

  17. Fabrication, Characterization, and Biological Activity of Avermectin Nano-delivery Systems with Different Particle Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Anqi; Wang, Yan; Sun, Changjiao; Wang, Chunxin; Cui, Bo; Zhao, Xiang; Zeng, Zhanghua; Yao, Junwei; Yang, Dongsheng; Liu, Guoqiang; Cui, Haixin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-delivery systems for the active ingredients of pesticides can improve the utilization rates of pesticides and prolong their control effects. This is due to the nanocarrier envelope and controlled release function. However, particles containing active ingredients in controlled release pesticide formulations are generally large and have wide size distributions. There have been limited studies about the effect of particle size on the controlled release properties and biological activities of pesticide delivery systems. In the current study, avermectin (Av) nano-delivery systems were constructed with different particle sizes and their performances were evaluated. The Av release rate in the nano-delivery system could be effectively controlled by changing the particle size. The biological activity increased with decreasing particle size. These results suggest that Av nano-delivery systems can significantly improve the controllable release, photostability, and biological activity, which will improve efficiency and reduce pesticide residues.

  18. Sedimentation of athermal particles in clay suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clotet, Xavier; Kudrolli, Arshad

    2015-03-01

    We discuss sedimentation of athermal particles in dense clay suspensions which appear liquid-like to glass-like. These studies are motivated by the physics important to a diverse range of problems including remediation of oil sands after the extraction of hydrocarbons, and formation of filter cakes in bore wells. We approach this problem by first considering collective sedimentation of athermal spherical particles in a viscous liquid in quasi-two dimensional and three dimensional containers. We examine the system using optical and x-ray tomography techniques which gives particle level information besides global information on the evolution of the volume fraction. Unlike sediments in the dilute limit - which can be modeled as isolated particles that sediment with a constant velocity and slow down exponentially as they approach the bottom of the container - we find interaction between the particles through the viscous fluids leads to qualitatively differences. We find significant avalanching behavior and cooperative motion as the grains collectively settle, and non-exponential increase in settling time. We discuss the effect of stirring caused by the sedimenting particles on their viscosity and consequently the sedimentation rates as a function of particle concentration. Supported by Petroleum Research Fund Grant PRF # 54045-ND9.

  19. AZO films with Al nano-particles to improve the light extraction efficiency of GaN-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Ying-Hung; Yan, Jheng-Tai; Lee, Hsin-Ying; Lee, Ching-Ting

    2008-02-01

    The co-sputtering Al-doped ZnO (AZO) films with Al nano-particles were used to increase the extraction efficiency of GaN-based light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Fixing the ZnO radio frequency (RF) power of 100W and changing the Al DC power from 0 to 13W, the AZO films with various Al contents can be obtained. In the experimental results, the AZO films deposited with Al DC power of 0, 4.5 and 7W do not have Al segregation. However, the segregated Al nano-particles can be found in the AZO films deposited by Al DC power of 10W and 13W. The co-sputtering 170 nm-thick AZO films with and without Al nano-particles were deposited on the transparent area of LEDs and compared the light output intensity of conventional LEDs. The light intensity of LEDs with AZO films with Al DC power 0, 4.5 and 7W increased 10% than that of conventional LEDs. This was due to the AZO film played a role of anti-reflection coating (ARC) layer. The light intensity of LEDs with AZO film deposited using Al DC power of 10W and 13W increased about 35% and 30%, respectively. It can be deduced that the output light is scattered by the Al nano-particles existed in the AZO film.

  20. High transport efficiency of nanoparticles through a total-consumption sample introduction system and its beneficial application for particle size evaluation in single-particle ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichi; Mitsuhashi, Hiroaki; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Takatsu, Akiko; Inagaki, Kazumi; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2017-02-01

    In order to facilitate reliable and efficient determination of both the particle number concentration (PNC) and the size of nanoparticles (NPs) by single-particle ICP-MS (spICP-MS) without the need to correct for the particle transport efficiency (TE, a possible source of bias in the results), a total-consumption sample introduction system consisting of a large-bore, high-performance concentric nebulizer and a small-volume on-axis cylinder chamber was utilized. Such a system potentially permits a particle TE of 100 %, meaning that there is no need to include a particle TE correction when calculating the PNC and the NP size. When the particle TE through the sample introduction system was evaluated by comparing the frequency of sharp transient signals from the NPs in a measured NP standard of precisely known PNC to the particle frequency for a measured NP suspension, the TE for platinum NPs with a nominal diameter of 70 nm was found to be very high (i.e., 93 %), and showed satisfactory repeatability (relative standard deviation of 1.0 % for four consecutive measurements). These results indicated that employing this total consumption system allows the particle TE correction to be ignored when calculating the PNC. When the particle size was determined using a solution-standard-based calibration approach without an NP standard, the particle diameters of platinum and silver NPs with nominal diameters of 30-100 nm were found to agree well with the particle diameters determined by transmission electron microscopy, regardless of whether a correction was performed for the particle TE. Thus, applying the proposed system enables NP size to be accurately evaluated using a solution-standard-based calibration approach without the need to correct for the particle TE.

  1. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug-disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed fromhttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr The online CD-REST demonstration system is available athttp://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL:http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr;http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. The effect of air temperature on the sappan wood extract drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaeni, M.; Triyastuti, M. S.; Asiah, N.; Annisa, A. N.; Novita, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The sappan wood extract contain natural colour called brazilin that can be used as a food colouring and antioxidant. The product is commonly found as a dry extract powder for consummer convenience. The spray dryer with air dehumidification can be an option to retain the colour and antioxidant agent. This paper discusses the effect of air temperature on sappan wood extract drying that was mixed with maltodextrin. As responses, the particle size, final moisture content, and extract solubility degradation were observed. In all cases, the process conducted in temperature ranging 90 - 110°C can retain the brazilin quality as seen in solubility and particle size. In addition, the sappan wood extract can be fully dried with moisture content below 2%. Moreover, with the increase of air temperature, the particle size of dry extract can be smaller.

  3. Field Assessment of Enclosed Cab Filtration System Performance Using Particle Counting Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Organiscak, John A.; Cecala, Andrew B.; Noll, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Enclosed cab filtration systems are typically used on mobile mining equipment to reduce miners’ exposure to airborne dust generated during mining operations. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Office of Mine Safety and Health Research (OMSHR) has recently worked with a mining equipment manufacturer to examine a new cab filtration system design for underground industrial minerals equipment. This cab filtration system uses a combination of three particulate filters to reduce equipment operators’ exposure to dust and diesel particulates present in underground industrial mineral mines. NIOSH initially examined this cab filtration system using a two-instrument particle counting method at the equipment company’s manufacturing shop facility to assess several alternative filters. This cab filtration system design was further studied on several pieces of equipment during a two- to seven-month period at two underground limestone mines. The two-instrument particle counting method was used outside the underground mine at the end of the production shifts to regularly test the cabs’ long-term protection factor performance with particulates present in the ambient air. This particle counting method showed that three of the four cabs achieved protection factors greater than 1,000 during the field studies. The fourth cab did not perform at this level because it had a damaged filter in the system. The particle counting measurements of submicron particles present in the ambient air were shown to be a timely and useful quantification method in assessing cab performance during these field studies. PMID:23915268

  4. A review of electron bombardment thruster systems/spacecraft field and particle interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byers, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Information on the field and particle interfaces of electron bombardment ion thruster systems was summarized. Major areas discussed were the nonpropellant particles, neutral propellant, ion beam, low energy plasma, and fields. Spacecraft functions and subsystems reviewed were solar arrays, thermal control systems, optical sensors, communications, science, structures and materials, and potential control.

  5. 3D numerical simulations of negative hydrogen ion extraction using realistic plasma parameters, geometry of the extraction aperture and full 3D magnetic field map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalskyy, S.; Wünderlich, D.; Ruf, B.; Franzen, P.; Fantz, U.; Minea, T.

    2014-02-01

    Decreasing the co-extracted electron current while simultaneously keeping negative ion (NI) current sufficiently high is a crucial issue on the development plasma source system for ITER Neutral Beam Injector. To support finding the best extraction conditions the 3D Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collision electrostatic code ONIX (Orsay Negative Ion eXtraction) has been developed. Close collaboration with experiments and other numerical models allows performing realistic simulations with relevant input parameters: plasma properties, geometry of the extraction aperture, full 3D magnetic field map, etc. For the first time ONIX has been benchmarked with commercial positive ions tracing code KOBRA3D. A very good agreement in terms of the meniscus position and depth has been found. Simulation of NI extraction with different e/NI ratio in bulk plasma shows high relevance of the direct negative ion extraction from the surface produced NI in order to obtain extracted NI current as in the experimental results from BATMAN testbed.

  6. Solvent extraction of diatomite

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.

    1984-07-24

    There is provided a method of extracting hydrocarbons from a diatomite ore. The particle size of the ore is first reduced to form a processed ore. The processed ore is then mixed with a substantially irregular granular material to form an unstratified ore mixture having increased permeability to an extracting solvent. The unstratified ore mixture is then permeated with an extracting solvent to obtain a hydrocarbon-solvent stream from which hydrocarbons are subsequently separated. The irregular granular material may be sand.

  7. Formation of hydroxyl radical from San Joaquin Valley particles extracted in a cell-free solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) are linked to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PM. While hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most reactive of the ROS species, there are few quantitative studies of •OH generation from PM. Here we report on •OH formation from PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California. We quantified •OH in PM extracts using a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). The results show that generally the urban Fresno PM generates much more •OH than the rural Westside PM. The presence of Asc at a physiologically relevant concentration in the extraction solution greatly enhances •OH formation from all the samples. Fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more •OH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm) normalized by air volume collected, while the coarse PM typically generates more •OH normalized by PM mass. •OH production by SJV PM is reduced on average by (97 ± 6) % when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating a dominant role of transition metals. By measuring calibration curves of •OH generation from copper and iron, and quantifying copper and iron concentrations in our particle extracts, we find that PBS-soluble copper is primarily responsible for •OH production by the SJV PM, while iron often makes a significant contribution. Extrapolating our results to expected burdens of PM-derived •OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily PM exposures in the San Joaquin Valley are unlikely to result in a high amount of pulmonary •OH, although high PM events could produce much higher levels of •OH, which might lead to cytotoxicity.

  8. Two-particle multichannel systems in a finite volume with arbitrary spin

    DOE PAGES

    Briceno, Raul A.

    2014-04-08

    The quantization condition for two-particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume with either periodic or twisted boundary conditions is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is relativistic, holds for all momenta below the three- and four-particle thresholds, and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by L/r, where L is the spatial extent of the volume and r is the range of the interactions between the particles. With hadronic systems the rangemore » of the interaction is set by the inverse of the pion mass, m π, and as a result the formalism presented is suitable for m πL>>1. Implications of the formalism for the studies of multichannel baryon-baryon systems are discussed.« less

  9. Rejuvenation of antioxidant system in central nervous system of aged rats by grape seed extract.

    PubMed

    Balu, Muthaiya; Sangeetha, Purushotham; Haripriya, Dayalan; Panneerselvam, Chinnakannu

    2005-08-05

    Oxidative stress is considered as a major risk factor that contributes to age-related increase in lipid peroxidation and declined antioxidants in the central nervous system during aging. Grape seed extract, one of the bioflavonoid, is widely used for its medicinal properties. In the present study, we evaluated the role of grape seed extract on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in discrete regions of the central nervous system of young and aged rats. Male albino rats of Wistar strain were divided into four groups: Group I-control young rats, Group II-young rats treated with grape seed extract (100 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days, Group III-aged control rats and Group IV-aged rats supplemented with grape seed extract (100 mg/kg body weight) for 30 days. Age-associated increase in lipid peroxidation was observed in the spinal cord, cerebral cortex, striatum and the hippocampus regions of aged rats (Group III). Activities of antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and levels of non-enzymic antioxidants like reduced glutathione, Vitamin C and Vitamin E were found to be significantly decreased in all the brain regions studied in aged rats when compared to young rats. However, normalized lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defenses were reported in the grape seed extract-supplemented aged rats. These findings demonstrated that grape seed extract enhanced the antioxidant status and decreased the incidence of free radical-induced lipid peroxidation in the central nervous system of aged rats.

  10. Determination of broken KAM surfaces for particle orbits in toroidal confinement systems

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2015-10-05

    Here, the destruction of Kolmogorov–Arnold–Moser surfaces in a Hamiltonian system is an important topic in nonlinear dynamics, and in particular in the theory of particle orbits in toroidal magnetic confinement systems. Analytic models for transport due to mode-particle resonances are not sufficiently correct to give the effect of these resonances on transport. In this paper we compare three different methods for the detection of the loss of stability of orbits in the dynamics of charged particles in a toroidal magnetic confinement device in the presence of time dependent magnetic perturbations.

  11. Statistics of energy partitions for many-particle systems in arbitrary dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Lombardi, Andrea; Sevryuk, Mikhail B.

    2014-05-01

    In some previous articles, we defined several partitions of the total kinetic energy T of a system of N classical particles in ℝ d into components corresponding to various modes of motion. In the present paper, we propose formulas for the mean values of these components in the normalization T = 1 (for any d and N) under the assumption that the masses of all the particles are equal. These formulas are proven at the "physical level" of rigor and numerically confirmed for planar systems ( d = 2) at 3 ⩽ N ⩽ 100. The case where the masses of the particles are chosen at random is also considered. The paper complements our article of 2008 [Russian J. Phys. Chem. B, 2(6):947-963] where similar numerical experiments were carried out for spatial systems ( d = 3) at 3 ⩽ N ⩽ 100.

  12. An autoregressive model-based particle filtering algorithms for extraction of respiratory rates as high as 90 breaths per minute from pulse oximeter.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinseok; Chon, Ki H

    2010-09-01

    We present particle filtering (PF) algorithms for an accurate respiratory rate extraction from pulse oximeter recordings over a broad range: 12-90 breaths/min. These methods are based on an autoregressive (AR) model, where the aim is to find the pole angle with the highest magnitude as it corresponds to the respiratory rate. However, when SNR is low, the pole angle with the highest magnitude may not always lead to accurate estimation of the respiratory rate. To circumvent this limitation, we propose a probabilistic approach, using a sequential Monte Carlo method, named PF, which is combined with the optimal parameter search (OPS) criterion for an accurate AR model-based respiratory rate extraction. The PF technique has been widely adopted in many tracking applications, especially for nonlinear and/or non-Gaussian problems. We examine the performances of five different likelihood functions of the PF algorithm: the strongest neighbor, nearest neighbor (NN), weighted nearest neighbor (WNN), probability data association (PDA), and weighted probability data association (WPDA). The performance of these five combined OPS-PF algorithms was measured against a solely OPS-based AR algorithm for respiratory rate extraction from pulse oximeter recordings. The pulse oximeter data were collected from 33 healthy subjects with breathing rates ranging from 12 to 90 breaths/ min. It was found that significant improvement in accuracy can be achieved by employing particle filters, and that the combined OPS-PF employing either the NN or WNN likelihood function achieved the best results for all respiratory rates considered in this paper. The main advantage of the combined OPS-PF with either the NN or WNN likelihood function is that for the first time, respiratory rates as high as 90 breaths/min can be accurately extracted from pulse oximeter recordings.

  13. Winding solutions for the two-particle system in ? gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, M.

    1998-03-01

    We use a computer to follow the evolution of two gravitating particles in a (2 + 1)-dimensional closed universe. In a closed universe there is enough energy to produce a Gott-pair, i.e. a pair of particles with tachyonic centre of mass, from regular initial data. We study such a pair and find that they can wind around each other with ever increasing momentum. As was shown by 't Hooft, the universe must crunch before any closed timelike curve can be traversed. We study the two-particle system and quantize it, long before this crunch happens, in the high-momentum limit. We find that both the relevant configuration variable and its conjugate momentum become discretized.

  14. Electron beam extraction on plasma cathode electron sources system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwadi, Agus; Taufik, M., Lely Susita R.; Suprapto, Saefurrochman, H., Anjar A.; Wibowo, Kurnia; Aziz, Ihwanul; Siswanto, Bambang

    2017-03-01

    ELECTRON BEAM EXTRACTION ON PLASMA CATHODE ELECTRON SOURCES SYSTEM. The electron beam extraction through window of Plasma Generator Chamber (PGC) for Pulsed Electron Irradiator (PEI) device and simulation of plasma potential has been studied. Plasma electron beam is extracted to acceleration region for enlarging their power by the external accelerating high voltage (Vext) and then it is passed foil window of the PEI for being irradiated to any target (atmospheric pressure). Electron beam extraction from plasma surface must be able to overcome potential barrier at the extraction window region which is shown by estimate simulation (Opera program) based on data of plasma surface potential of 150 V with Ueks values are varied by 150 kV, 175 kV and 200 kV respectively. PGC is made of 304 stainless steel with cylindrical shape in 30 cm of diameter, 90 cm length, electrons extraction window as many as 975 holes on the area of (15 × 65) cm2 with extraction hole cell in 0.3 mm of radius each other, an cylindrical shape IEP chamber is made of 304 stainless steel in 70 cm diameter and 30 cm length. The research result shown that the acquisition of electron beam extraction current depends on plasma parameters (electron density ne, temperature Te), accelerating high voltage Vext, the value of discharge parameter G, anode area Sa, electron extraction window area Se and extraction efficiency value α.

  15. Interacting particle systems on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Vishal

    In this dissertation, the dynamics of socially or biologically interacting populations are investigated. The individual members of the population are treated as particles that interact via links on a social or biological network represented as a graph. The effect of the structure of the graph on the properties of the interacting particle system is studied using statistical physics techniques. In the first chapter, the central concepts of graph theory and social and biological networks are presented. Next, interacting particle systems that are drawn from physics, mathematics and biology are discussed in the second chapter. In the third chapter, the random walk on a graph is studied. The mean time for a random walk to traverse between two arbitrary sites of a random graph is evaluated. Using an effective medium approximation it is found that the mean first-passage time between pairs of sites, as well as all moments of this first-passage time, are insensitive to the density of links in the graph. The inverse of the mean-first passage time varies non-monotonically with the density of links near the percolation transition of the random graph. Much of the behavior can be understood by simple heuristic arguments. Evolutionary dynamics, by which mutants overspread an otherwise uniform population on heterogeneous graphs, are studied in the fourth chapter. Such a process underlies' epidemic propagation, emergence of fads, social cooperation or invasion of an ecological niche by a new species. The first part of this chapter is devoted to neutral dynamics, in which the mutant genotype does not have a selective advantage over the resident genotype. The time to extinction of one of the two genotypes is derived. In the second part of this chapter, selective advantage or fitness is introduced such that the mutant genotype has a higher birth rate or a lower death rate. This selective advantage leads to a dynamical competition in which selection dominates for large populations

  16. Theoretical Studies of Strongly Interacting Fine Particle Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearon, Michael

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A theoretical analysis of the time dependent behaviour of a system of fine magnetic particles as a function of applied field and temperature was carried out. The model used was based on a theory assuming Neel relaxation with a distribution of particle sizes. This theory predicted a linear variation of S_{max} with temperature and a finite intercept, which is not reflected by experimental observations. The remanence curves of strongly interacting fine-particle systems were also investigated theoretically. It was shown that the Henkel plot of the dc demagnetisation remanence vs the isothermal remanence is a useful representation of interactions. The form of the plot was found to be a reflection of the magnetic and physical microstructure of the material, which is consistent with experimental data. The relationship between the Henkel plot and the noise of a particulate recording medium, another property dependent on the microstructure, is also considered. The Interaction Field Factor (IFF), a single parameter characterising the non-linearity of the Henkel plot, is investigated. These results are consistent with a previous experimental study. Finally the results of the noise power spectral density for erased and saturated recording media are presented, so that characterisation of interparticle interactions may be carried out with greater accuracy.

  17. Comparative evaluation of three commercial systems for nucleic acid extraction from urine specimens.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Wei; Sefers, Susan E; Li, Haijing; Kohn, Debra J; Procop, Gary W

    2005-09-01

    A nucleic acid extraction system that can handle small numbers of specimens with a short test turnaround time and short hands-on time is desirable for emergent testing. We performed a comparative validation on three systems: the MagNA Pure compact system (Compact), the NucliSens miniMAG extraction instrument (miniMAG), and the BioRobot EZ1 system (EZ1). A total of 75 urine specimens submitted for polyomavirus BK virus detection were used. The human beta-actin gene was detected on 75 (100%), 75 (100%), and 72 (96%) nucleic acid extracts prepared by the miniMAG, EZ1, and Compact, respectively. The miniMAG produced the highest quantity of nucleic acids and the best precision among the three systems. The agreement rate was 100% for BKV detection on nucleic acid extracts prepared by the three extraction systems. When a full panel of specimens was run, the hands-on time and test turnaround time were 105.7 and 121.1 min for miniMAG, 6.1 and 22.6 min for EZ1, and 7.4 and 33.7 min for Compact, respectively. The EZ1 and Compact systems processed automatic nucleic acid extraction properly, providing a good solution to the need for sporadic but emergent specimen detection. The miniMAG yielded the highest quantity of nucleic acids, suggesting that this system would be the best for specimens containing a low number of microorganisms of interest.

  18. Integrable particle systems vs solutions to the KP and 2D Toda equations

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijsenaars, S.N.

    Starting from the relation between integrable relativistic N-particle systems with hyperbolic interactions and elementary N-soliton solutions to the KP and 2D Toda equations, we show how fusion properties of the soliton solutions are mirrored by fusion properties of the Poisson commuting particle dynamics. We also obtain previously known relations between elliptic solutions and integrable N-particle systems with elliptic interactions, without invoking finite-gap integration theory. {copyright} 1997 Academic Press, Inc.

  19. Statistical quasi-particle theory for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, Rui-Xue; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive account on the recently developed dissipaton-equation-of-motion (DEOM) theory. This is a statistical quasi-particle theory for quantum dissipative dynamics. It accurately describes the influence of bulk environments, with a few number of quasi-particles, the dissipatons. The novel dissipaton algebra is then followed, which readily bridges the Schrödinger equation to the DEOM theory. As a fundamental theory of quantum mechanics in open systems, DEOM characterizes both the stationary and dynamic properties of system-and-bath interferences. It treats not only the quantum dissipative systems of primary interest, but also the hybrid environment dynamics that could be experimentally measurable. Examples are the linear or nonlinear Fano interferences and the Herzberg-Teller vibronic couplings in optical spectroscopies. This review covers the DEOM construction, the underlying dissipaton algebra and theorems, the physical meanings of dynamical variables, the possible identifications of dissipatons, and some recent advancements in efficient DEOM evaluations on various problems. The relations of the present theory to other nonperturbative methods are also critically presented.

  20. Particle simulation of plasmas and stellar systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, T.; Clark, A.; Craddock, G.G.

    1985-04-01

    A computational technique is introduced which allows the student and researcher an opportunity to observe the physical behavior of a class of many-body systems. A series of examples is offered which illustrates the diversity of problems that may be studied using particle simulation. These simulations were in fact assigned as homework in a course on computational physics.

  1. The Bumper Boats Effect: Effect of Inertia on Self Propelled Active Particles Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Chengyu; Bruss, Isaac; Glotzer, Sharon

    Active matter has been well studied using the standard Brownian dynamics model, which assumes that the self-propelled particles have no inertia. However, many examples of active systems, such as sub-millimeter bacteria and colloids, have non-negligible inertia. Using particle-based Langevin Dynamics simulation with HOOMD-blue, we study the role of particle inertia on the collective emergent behavior of self-propelled particles. We find that inertia hinders motility-induced phase separation. This is because the effective speed of particles is reduced due to particle-particle collisions-\\x9Dmuch like bumper boats, which take time to reach terminal velocity after a crash. We are able to fully account for this effect by tracking a particle's average rather than terminal velocity, allowing us to extend the standard Brownian dynamics model to account for the effects of momentum. This study aims to inform experimental systems where the inertia of the active particles is non-negligible. We acknowledge the funding support from the Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES), an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award # DE-SC0000989.

  2. Energetic Particles from Outside our Solar System Increase Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-16

    This artist concept shows NASA Voyager 1 spacecraft in a new region at the edge of our solar system where the amount of high-energy particles diffusing into our solar system from outside has increased.

  3. Microfluidic process monitor for industrial solvent extraction system

    DOEpatents

    Gelis, Artem; Pereira, Candido; Nichols, Kevin Paul Flood

    2016-01-12

    The present invention provides a system for solvent extraction utilizing a first electrode with a raised area formed on its surface, which defines a portion of a microfluidic channel; a second electrode with a flat surface, defining another portion of the microfluidic channel that opposes the raised area of the first electrode; a reversibly deformable substrate disposed between the first electrode and second electrode, adapted to accommodate the raised area of the first electrode and having a portion that extends beyond the raised area of the first electrode, that portion defining the remaining portions of the microfluidic channel; and an electrolyte of at least two immiscible liquids that flows through the microfluidic channel. Also provided is a system for performing multiple solvent extractions utilizing several microfluidic chips or unit operations connected in series.

  4. Systemic characterization and evaluation of particle packings as initial sets for discrete element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Farias, Márcio Muniz de; Morales, Irvin Pablo Pérez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Oñate, Eugenio

    2018-07-01

    A methodology that comprises several characterization properties for particle packings is proposed in this paper. The methodology takes into account factors such as dimension and shape of particles, space occupation, homogeneity, connectivity and isotropy, among others. This classification and integration of several properties allows to carry out a characterization process to systemically evaluate the particle packings in order to guarantee the quality of the initial meshes in discrete element simulations, in both the micro- and the macroscales. Several new properties were created, and improvements in existing ones are presented. Properties from other disciplines were adapted to be used in the evaluation of particle systems. The methodology allows to easily characterize media at the level of the microscale (continuous geometries—steels, rocks microstructures, etc., and discrete geometries) and the macroscale. A global, systemic and integral system for characterizing and evaluating particle sets, based on fuzzy logic, is presented. Such system allows researchers to have a unique evaluation criterion based on the aim of their research. Examples of applications are shown.

  5. Systemic characterization and evaluation of particle packings as initial sets for discrete element simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Farias, Márcio Muniz de; Morales, Irvin Pablo Pérez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-10-01

    A methodology that comprises several characterization properties for particle packings is proposed in this paper. The methodology takes into account factors such as dimension and shape of particles, space occupation, homogeneity, connectivity and isotropy, among others. This classification and integration of several properties allows to carry out a characterization process to systemically evaluate the particle packings in order to guarantee the quality of the initial meshes in discrete element simulations, in both the micro- and the macroscales. Several new properties were created, and improvements in existing ones are presented. Properties from other disciplines were adapted to be used in the evaluation of particle systems. The methodology allows to easily characterize media at the level of the microscale (continuous geometries—steels, rocks microstructures, etc., and discrete geometries) and the macroscale. A global, systemic and integral system for characterizing and evaluating particle sets, based on fuzzy logic, is presented. Such system allows researchers to have a unique evaluation criterion based on the aim of their research. Examples of applications are shown.

  6. Impact of particles on sediment accumulation in a drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Vreeburg, J H G; Schippers, D; Verberk, J Q J C; van Dijk, J C

    2008-10-01

    Discolouration of drinking water is one of the main reasons customers complain to their water company. Though corrosion of cast iron is often seen as the main source for this problem, the particles originating from the treatment plant play an important and potentially dominant role in the generation of a discolouration risk in drinking water distribution systems. To investigate this thesis a study was performed in a drinking water distribution system. In two similar isolated network areas the effect of particles on discolouration risk was studied with particle counting, the Resuspension Potential Method (RPM) and assessment of the total accumulated sediment. In the 'Control Area', supplied with normal drinking water, the discolouration risk was regenerated within 1.5 year. In the 'Research Area', supplied with particle-free water, this will take 10-15 years. An obvious remedy for controlling the discolouration risk is to improve the treatment with respect to the short peaks that are caused by particle breakthrough.

  7. Lock-and-key dimerization in dense Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodson, Wade D.; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    We develop a translational-rotational cage model that describes the behavior of dense two-dimensional (2D) Brownian systems of hard annular sector particles (ASPs), resembling C shapes. At high particle densities, pairs of ASPs can form mutually interdigitating lock-and-key dimers. This cage model considers either one or two mobile central ASPs which can translate and rotate within a static cage of surrounding ASPs that mimics the system's average local structure and density. By comparing with recent measurements made on dispersions of microscale lithographic ASPs [P. Y. Wang and T. G. Mason, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 137, 15308 (2015), 10.1021/jacs.5b10549], we show that mobile two-particle predictions of the probability of dimerization Pdimer, equilibrium constant K , and 2D osmotic pressure Π2 D as a function of the particle area fraction ϕA correspond closely to these experiments. By contrast, predictions based on only a single mobile particle do not agree well with either the two-particle predictions or the experimental data. Thus, we show that collective entropy can play an essential role in the behavior of dense Brownian systems composed of nontrivial hard shapes, such as ASPs.

  8. SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A nitrogen oxide flux chamber was modified to measure the flux of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Part of the modification involved the development of methods to extract SVOCs from polyurethane foam (PUF), sand, and soil. Breakthroughs and extraction efficiencies were ...

  9. Extraction of beryllium from refractory beryllium oxide with dilute ammonium bifluoride and determination by fluorescence: a multiparameter performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Goldcamp, Michael J; Goldcamp, Diane M; Ashley, Kevin; Fernback, Joseph E; Agrawal, Anoop; Millson, Mark; Marlow, David; Harrison, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure can cause a number of deleterious health effects, including beryllium sensitization and the potentially fatal chronic beryllium disease. Efficient methods for monitoring beryllium contamination in workplaces are valuable to help prevent dangerous exposures to this element. In this work, performance data on the extraction of beryllium from various size fractions of high-fired beryllium oxide (BeO) particles (from < 32 microm up to 212 microm) using dilute aqueous ammonium bifluoride (ABF) solution were obtained under various conditions. Beryllium concentrations were determined by fluorescence using a hydroxybenzoquinoline fluorophore. The effects of ABF concentration and volume, extraction temperature, sample tube types, and presence of filter or wipe media were examined. Three percent ABF extracts beryllium nearly twice as quickly as 1% ABF; extraction solution volume has minimal influence. Elevated temperatures increase the rate of extraction dramatically compared with room temperature extraction. Sample tubes with constricted tips yield poor extraction rates owing to the inability of the extraction medium to access the undissolved particles. The relative rates of extraction of Be from BeO of varying particle sizes were examined. Beryllium from BeO particles in fractions ranging from less than 32 microm up to 212 microm were subjected to various extraction schemes. The smallest BeO particles are extracted more quickly than the largest particles, although at 90 degrees C even the largest BeO particles reach nearly quantitative extraction within 4 hr in 3% ABF. Extraction from mixed cellulosic-ester filters, cellulosic surface-sampling filters, wetted cellulosic dust wipes, and cotton gloves yielded 90% or greater recoveries. Scanning electron microscopy of BeO particles, including partially dissolved particles, shows that dissolution in dilute ABF occurs not just on the exterior surface but also via accessing particles' interiors due to porosity

  10. Online particle detection with Neural Networks based on topological calorimetry information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciodaro, T.; Deva, D.; de Seixas, J. M.; Damazio, D.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the latest results from the Ringer algorithm, which is based on artificial neural networks for the electron identification at the online filtering system of the ATLAS particle detector, in the context of the LHC experiment at CERN. The algorithm performs topological feature extraction using the ATLAS calorimetry information (energy measurements). The extracted information is presented to a neural network classifier. Studies showed that the Ringer algorithm achieves high detection efficiency, while keeping the false alarm rate low. Optimizations, guided by detailed analysis, reduced the algorithm execution time by 59%. Also, the total memory necessary to store the Ringer algorithm information represents less than 6.2 percent of the total filtering system amount.

  11. SNS Extraction Fast Kicker System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-06-01

    SNS EXTRACTION FAST KICKER SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT * W. Zhang ξ, J. Sandberg, R. Lambiase, Y.Y. Lee, R. Lockey, J. Mi, T. Nehring, C. Pai, N. Tsoupas...Oak Ridge, TN 37831 * SNS is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 for...the U.S. Department of Energy. SNS is a partnership of six national laboratories: Argonne, Brookhaven, Jefferson, Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, and

  12. Interaction of Plant Extracts with Central Nervous System Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lundstrom, Kenneth; Pham, Huyen Thanh; Dinh, Long Doan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Plant extracts have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various maladies including neurological diseases. Several central nervous system receptors have been demonstrated to interact with plant extracts and components affecting the pharmacology and thereby potentially playing a role in human disease and treatment. For instance, extracts from Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort) targeted several CNS receptors. Similarly, extracts from Piper nigrum, Stephania cambodica, and Styphnolobium japonicum exerted inhibition of agonist-induced activity of the human neurokinin-1 receptor. Methods: Different methods have been established for receptor binding and functional assays based on radioactive and fluorescence-labeled ligands in cell lines and primary cell cultures. Behavioral studies of the effect of plant extracts have been conducted in rodents. Plant extracts have further been subjected to mood and cognition studies in humans. Results: Mechanisms of action at molecular and cellular levels have been elucidated for medicinal plants in support of standardization of herbal products and identification of active extract compounds. In several studies, plant extracts demonstrated affinity to a number of CNS receptors in parallel indicating the complexity of this interaction. In vivo studies showed modifications of CNS receptor affinity and behavioral responses in animal models after treatment with medicinal herbs. Certain plant extracts demonstrated neuroprotection and enhanced cognitive performance, respectively, when evaluated in humans. Noteworthy, the penetration of plant extracts and their protective effect on the blood-brain-barrier are discussed. Conclusion: The affinity of plant extracts and their isolated compounds for CNS receptors indicates an important role for medicinal plants in the treatment of neurological disorders. Moreover, studies in animal and human models have confirmed a scientific basis for the application of medicinal

  13. Oil extraction from Scenedesmus obliquus using a continuous microwave system--design, optimization, and quality characterization.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Sundar; Allen, James D; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Boldor, Dorin

    2011-02-01

    A 1.2 kW, 2450 MHz resonant continuous microwave processing system was designed and optimized for oil extraction from green algae (Scenedesmus obliquus). Algae-water suspension (1:1 w/w) was heated to 80 and 95°C, and subjected to extraction for up to 30 min. Maximum oil yield was achieved at 95°C and 30 min. The microwave system extracted 76-77% of total recoverable oil at 20-30 min and 95°C, compared to only 43-47% for water bath control. Extraction time and temperature had significant influence (p<0.0001) on extraction yield. Oil analysis indicated that microwaves extracted oil containing higher percentages of unsaturated and essential fatty acids (indicating higher quality). This study validates for the first time the efficiency of a continuous microwave system for extraction of lipids from algae. Higher oil yields, faster extraction rates and superior oil quality demonstrate this system's feasibility for oil extraction from a variety of feedstock. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rotation of a 1-GeV particle beam by a fan system of thin crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Britvich, G. I.; Maisheev, V. A.; Chesnokov, Yu. A., E-mail: Yury.Chesnokov@ihep.ru

    2016-10-15

    The deflection of a 1-GeV charged particle beam by a system formed by fan-oriented thin silicon wafers has been studied theoretically and experimentally. Software has been developed for numerical simulation of a particle beam transmission through a fan crystal system. In the U-70 experiment on a proton beam, the particles were deflected by such a system through an angle exceeding 1 mrad. Thus, a new method has been demonstrated for rotating a particle beam, which can be used for creating accelerator beams for medical purposes.

  15. Model-Based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, Elizabeth M.; Moore, David Roger; Li, Li

    Over the last 1.5 years, GE Global Research and Pennsylvania State University defined a model-based, scalable, and multi-stage extracted water desalination system that yields clean water, concentrated brine, and, optionally, salt. The team explored saline brines that ranged across the expected range for extracted water for carbon sequestration reservoirs (40,000 up to 220,000 ppm total dissolved solids, TDS). In addition, the validated the system performance at pilot scale with field-sourced water using GE’s pre-pilot and lab facilities. This project encompassed four principal tasks, in addition to Project Management and Planning: 1) identify a deep saline formation carbon sequestration site andmore » a partner that are suitable for supplying extracted water; 2) conduct a techno-economic assessment and down-selection of pre-treatment and desalination technologies to identify a cost-effective system for extracted water recovery; 3) validate the downselected processes at the lab/pre-pilot scale; and 4) define the scope of the pilot desalination project. Highlights from each task are described below: Deep saline formation characterization The deep saline formations associated with the five DOE NETL 1260 Phase 1 projects were characterized with respect to their mineralogy and formation water composition. Sources of high TDS feed water other than extracted water were explored for high TDS desalination applications, including unconventional oil and gas and seawater reverse osmosis concentrate. Technoeconomic analysis of desalination technologies Techno-economic evaluations of alternate brine concentration technologies, including humidification-dehumidification (HDH), membrane distillation (MD), forward osmosis (FO), turboexpander-freeze, solvent extraction and high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO), were conducted. These technologies were evaluated against conventional falling film-mechanical vapor recompression (FF-MVR) as a baseline desalination process. Furthermore

  16. Optical double-slit particle measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Tichenor, D.A.; Wang, J.C.F.; Hencken, K.R.

    1982-03-25

    A method for in situ measurement of particle size is described. The size information is obtained by scanning an image of the particle across a double-slit mask and observing the transmitted light. This method is useful when the particle size of primary interest is 3..mu..m and larger. The technique is well suited to applications in which the particles are non-spherical and have unknown refractive index. It is particularly well suited to high temperature environments in which the particle incandescence provides the light source.

  17. Optical double-slit particle measuring system

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Tichenor, Daniel A.; Wang, James C. F.

    1984-01-01

    A method for in situ measurement of particle size is described. The size information is obtained by scanning an image of the particle across a double-slit mask and observing the transmitted light. This method is useful when the particle size of primary interest is 3 .mu.m and larger. The technique is well suited to applications in which the particles are non-spherical and have unknown refractive index. It is particularly well suited to high temperature environments in which the particle incandescence provides the light source.

  18. Solid phase extraction membrane

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Kurt C [Nashville, TN; Langer, Roger L [Hudson, WI

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  19. Classical many-particle systems with unique disordered ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Stillinger, F. H.; Torquato, S.

    2017-10-01

    Classical ground states (global energy-minimizing configurations) of many-particle systems are typically unique crystalline structures, implying zero enumeration entropy of distinct patterns (aside from trivial symmetry operations). By contrast, the few previously known disordered classical ground states of many-particle systems are all high-entropy (highly degenerate) states. Here we show computationally that our recently proposed "perfect-glass" many-particle model [Sci. Rep. 6, 36963 (2016), 10.1038/srep36963] possesses disordered classical ground states with a zero entropy: a highly counterintuitive situation . For all of the system sizes, parameters, and space dimensions that we have numerically investigated, the disordered ground states are unique such that they can always be superposed onto each other or their mirror image. At low energies, the density of states obtained from simulations matches those calculated from the harmonic approximation near a single ground state, further confirming ground-state uniqueness. Our discovery provides singular examples in which entropy and disorder are at odds with one another. The zero-entropy ground states provide a unique perspective on the celebrated Kauzmann-entropy crisis in which the extrapolated entropy of a supercooled liquid drops below that of the crystal. We expect that our disordered unique patterns to be of value in fields beyond glass physics, including applications in cryptography as pseudorandom functions with tunable computational complexity.

  20. Systems and methods for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D.

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minimamore » for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.« less

  1. Electronic simulation of the supported liquid membrane in electromembrane extraction systems: Improvement of the extraction by precise periodical reversing of the field polarity.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Hamid Reza; Nojavan, Saeed; Zahedi, Pegah; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny

    2014-09-02

    In order to understand the limitations of electromebrane extraction procedure better, a simple equivalent circuit has been proposed for a supported liquid membrane consisting of a resistor and a low leakage capacitor in series. To verify the equivalent circuit, it was subjected to a simulated periodical polarity changing potential and the resulting time variation of the current was compared with that of a real electromembrane extraction system. The results showed a good agreement between the simulated current patterns and those of the real ones. In order to investigate the impact of various limiting factors, the corresponding values of the equivalent circuit were estimated for a real electromembrane extraction system and were attributed to the physical parameters of the extraction system. A dual charge transfer mechanism was proposed for electromembrane extraction by combining general migration equation and fundamental aspects derived from the simulation. Dual mechanism comprises a current dependent contribution of analyte in total current and could support the possibility of an improvement in performance of an electromembrane extraction by application of an asymmetric polarity changing potential. The optimization of frequency and duty cycle of the asymmetric polarity exchanging potential resulted in a higher recovery (2.17 times greater) in comparison with the conventional electromebrane extraction. The simulation also provided more quantitative approaches toward the investigation of the mechanism of extraction and contribution of different limiting factors in electromembrane extraction. Results showed that the buildup of the double layer is the main limiting factor and the Joule heating has lesser impact on the performance of an electromebrane extraction system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reconstructing particle masses in events with displaced vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottin, Giovanna

    2018-03-01

    We propose a simple way to extract particle masses given a displaced vertex signature in event topologies where two long-lived mother particles decay to visible particles and an invisible daughter. The mother could be either charged or neutral and the neutral daughter could correspond to a dark matter particle in different models. The method allows to extract the parent and daughter masses by using on-shell conditions and energy-momentum conservation, in addition to the displaced decay positions of the parents, which allows to solve the kinematic equations fully on an event-by-event basis. We show the validity of the method by means of simulations including detector effects. If displaced events are seen in discovery searches at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), this technique can be applied.

  3. The setup of an extraction system coupled to a hydrogen isotopes distillation column

    SciTech Connect

    Zamfirache, M.; Bornea, A.; Stefanescu, I.

    2008-07-15

    Among the most difficult problems of cryogenic distillation one stands apart: the extraction of the heavy fraction. By an optimal design of the cycle scheme, this problem could be avoided. A 'worst case scenario' is usually occurring when the extracted fraction consists of one prevalent isotope such as hydrogen and small amounts of the other two hydrogen isotopes (deuterium and/or tritium). This situation is further complicated by two parameters of the distillation column: the extraction flow rate and the hold-up. The present work proposes the conceptual design of an extraction system associated to the cryogenic distillation column used in hydrogenmore » separation processes. During this process, the heavy fraction (DT, T{sub 2}) is separated, its concentration being the highest at the bottom of the distillation column. From this place the extraction of the gaseous phase can now begin. Being filled with adsorbent, the extraction system is used to temporarily store the heavy fraction. Also the extraction system provides samples for the gas Chromatograph. The research work is focused on the existent pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation from our institute to validate the experiments carried out until now. (authors)« less

  4. Particle injector for fluid systems

    DOEpatents

    Ruch, Jeffrey F.

    1997-01-01

    A particle injector device provides injection of particles into a liquid eam. The device includes a funnel portion comprising a conical member having side walls tapering from a top opening (which receives the particles) down to a relatively smaller exit opening. A funnel inlet receives a portion of the liquid stream and the latter is directed onto the side walls of the conical member so as to create a cushion of liquid against which the particles impact. A main section of the device includes an inlet port in communication with the exit opening of the funnel portion. A main liquid inlet receives the main portion of the liquid stream at high pressure and low velocity and a throat region located downstream of the main liquid inlet accelerates liquid received by this inlet from the low velocity to a higher velocity so as to create a low pressure area at the exit opening of the funnel portion. An outlet opening of the main section enables the particles and liquid stream to exit from the injector device.

  5. Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for Vlasov-Maxwell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian

    2015-11-01

    Explicit high-order non-canonical symplectic particle-in-cell algorithms for classical particle-field systems governed by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations are developed. The algorithms conserve a discrete non-canonical symplectic structure derived from the Lagrangian of the particle-field system, which is naturally discrete in particles. The electromagnetic field is spatially discretized using the method of discrete exterior calculus with high-order interpolating differential forms for a cubic grid. The resulting time-domain Lagrangian assumes a non-canonical symplectic structure. It is also gauge invariant and conserves charge. The system is then solved using a structure-preserving splitting method discovered by He et al. [preprint arXiv: 1505.06076 (2015)], which produces fivemore » exactly soluble sub-systems, and high-order structure-preserving algorithms follow by combinations. The explicit, high-order, and conservative nature of the algorithms is especially suitable for long-term simulations of particle-field systems with extremely large number of degrees of freedom on massively parallel supercomputers. The algorithms have been tested and verified by the two physics problems, i.e., the nonlinear Landau damping and the electron Bernstein wave. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.« less

  6. Combining neural networks and signed particles to simulate quantum systems more efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Jean Michel

    2018-04-01

    Recently a new formulation of quantum mechanics has been suggested which describes systems by means of ensembles of classical particles provided with a sign. This novel approach mainly consists of two steps: the computation of the Wigner kernel, a multi-dimensional function describing the effects of the potential over the system, and the field-less evolution of the particles which eventually create new signed particles in the process. Although this method has proved to be extremely advantageous in terms of computational resources - as a matter of fact it is able to simulate in a time-dependent fashion many-body systems on relatively small machines - the Wigner kernel can represent the bottleneck of simulations of certain systems. Moreover, storing the kernel can be another issue as the amount of memory needed is cursed by the dimensionality of the system. In this work, we introduce a new technique which drastically reduces the computation time and memory requirement to simulate time-dependent quantum systems which is based on the use of an appropriately tailored neural network combined with the signed particle formalism. In particular, the suggested neural network is able to compute efficiently and reliably the Wigner kernel without any training as its entire set of weights and biases is specified by analytical formulas. As a consequence, the amount of memory for quantum simulations radically drops since the kernel does not need to be stored anymore as it is now computed by the neural network itself, only on the cells of the (discretized) phase-space which are occupied by particles. As its is clearly shown in the final part of this paper, not only this novel approach drastically reduces the computational time, it also remains accurate. The author believes this work opens the way towards effective design of quantum devices, with incredible practical implications.

  7. Preparation and characterisation of hydrocortisone particles using a supercritical fluids extraction process.

    PubMed

    Velaga, Sitaram P; Ghaderi, Raouf; Carlfors, Johan

    2002-01-14

    Crystallisation and subsequent milling of pharmaceutical powders by traditional methods often cause variations in physicochemical properties thereby influencing bioavailability of the formulation. Crystallisation of drug substances using supercritical fluids (SFs) offers some advantages over existing traditional methods in controlling particle characteristics. The novel particle formation method, solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical (SEDS) fluids was used for the preparation of hydrocortisone (HC) particles. The influence of processing conditions on the solid-state properties of the particles was studied. HC, an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, particles were prepared from acetone and methanol solutions using the SEDS process. The solutions were dispersed with supercritical CO(2), acting as an anti-solvent, through a specially designed co-axial nozzle into a pressured vessel maintained at a specific constant temperature and pressure. The temperatures and pressures studied were 40-90 degrees C and 90-180 bar, respectively. The relative flow rates of drug solution to CO(2) were varied between 0.002 and 0.03. Solid-state characterisation of particles included differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), solubility studies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination. The aerodynamic properties of SEDS prepared particles were determined by a multistage liquid impinger (MLI). Particles produced from acetone solutions were crystalline needles, melting at 221+/-2 degrees C. Their morphology was independent of processing conditions. With methanol solutions, particles were flakes or needles depending on the processing temperature and pressure. This material melted at 216+/-1 degrees C, indicating a different crystal structure from the original material, in agreement with observed differences in the position and intensity of the XRPD peaks. The simulated lung deposition, using the MLI, for HC powder was improved after SEDS

  8. Subway particles are more genotoxic than street particles and induce oxidative stress in cultured human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hanna L; Nilsson, Lennart; Möller, Lennart

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown an association between airborne particles and a wide range of adverse health effects. The mechanisms behind these effects include oxidative stress and inflammation. Even though traffic gives rise to high levels of particles in the urban air, people are exposed to even higher levels in the subway. However, there is a lack of knowledge regarding how particles from different urban subenvironments differ in toxicity. The main aim of the present study was to compare the ability of particles from a subway station and a nearby very busy urban street, respectively, to damage DNA and to induce oxidative stress. Cultured human lung cells (A549) were exposed to particles, DNA damage was analyzed using single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay), and the ability to induce oxidative stress was measured as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in lung cell DNA. We found that the subway particles were approximately eight times more genotoxic and four times more likely to cause oxidative stress in the lung cells. When the particles, water extracts from the particles, or particles treated with the metal chelator deferoxamine mesylate were incubated with 2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 8-oxodG was analyzed, we found that the oxidative capacity of the subway particles was due to redox active solid metals. Furthermore, analysis of the atomic composition showed that the subway particles to a dominating degree (atomic %) consisted of iron, mainly in the form of magnetite (Fe3O4). By using electron microscopy, the interaction between the particles and the lung cells was shown. The in vitro reactivity of the subway particles in combination with the high particle levels in subway systems give cause of concern due to the high number of people that are exposed to subway particles on a daily basis. To what extent the subway particles cause health effects in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  9. Mass spectra of the particle-antiparticle system with a Dirac oscillator interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moshinsky, M.; Loyola, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present view about the structure of mesons is that they are a quark-antiquark system. The mass spectrum corresponding to this system should, in principle, be given by chromodynamics, but this turns out to be a complex affair. Thus it is of some interest to consider relativistic systems of particle-antiparticle, with a simple type of interaction, which could give some insight on the spectra we can expect for mesons. This analysis is carried out when the interaction is of the Dirac oscillator type. It is shown that the Dirac equation of the antiparticle can be obtained from that of the particle by just changing the frequency omega into -omega. Following a procedure suggested by Barut, the equation for the particle-antiparticle system is derived and it is solved by a perturbation procedure. Thus, explicit expressions for the square of the mass spectra are obtained and its implications in the meson case is discussed.

  10. Dynamic fractionation of trace metals in soil and sediment samples using rotating coiled column extraction and sequential injection microcolumn extraction: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Rosende, Maria; Savonina, Elena Yu; Fedotov, Petr S; Miró, Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor; Wennrich, Rainer

    2009-09-15

    Dynamic fractionation has been recognized as an appealing alternative to conventional equilibrium-based sequential extraction procedures (SEPs) for partitioning of trace elements (TE) in environmental solid samples. This paper reports the first attempt for harmonization of flow-through dynamic fractionation using two novel methods, the so-called sequential injection microcolumn (SIMC) extraction and rotating coiled column (RCC) extraction. In SIMC extraction, a column packed with the solid sample is clustered in a sequential injection system, while in RCC, the particulate matter is retained under the action of centrifugal forces. In both methods, the leachants are continuously pumped through the solid substrates by the use of either peristaltic or syringe pumps. A five-step SEP was selected for partitioning of Cu, Pb and Zn in water soluble/exchangeable, acid-soluble, easily reducible, easily oxidizable and moderately reducible fractions from 0.2 to 0.5 g samples at an extractant flow rate of 1.0 mL min(-1) prior to leachate analysis by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Similarities and discrepancies between both dynamic approaches were ascertained by fractionation of TE in certified reference materials, namely, SRM 2711 Montana Soil and GBW 07311 sediment, and two real soil samples as well. Notwithstanding the different extraction conditions set by both methods, similar trends of metal distribution were in generally found. The most critical parameters for reliable assessment of mobilizable pools of TE in worse-case scenarios are the size-distribution of sample particles, the density of particles, the content of organic matter and the concentration of major elements. For reference materials and a soil rich in organic matter, the extraction in RCC results in slightly higher recoveries of environmentally relevant fractions of TE, whereas SIMC leaching is more effective for calcareous soils.

  11. Double-disk solid-phase extraction--Simultaneous cleanup and trace enrichment of herbicides and metabolites from environmental samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ferrar, Imma; Barceló, Damià; Thurman, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Phenylurea and triazine herbicides, including some metabolites, were isolated from water and soil extracts by solid-phase extraction using a layered system of two extraction disks, a method called double-disk solid-phase extraction. The first disk consisted of strong anion exchange (SAX) of 10-μm styrene divinylbenzene (SDB) particles embedded in Teflon, and the second disk was a C18 disk of 10-μm particles also embedded in Teflon. A volume of 500 mL of water or aqueous soil extract is passed through the layered system with the SAX disk first. The purpose of the SAX disk is to remove the humic and fulvic acids from the water or aqueous soil extract by ion exchange through their carboxyl groups. Even during methanol elution of herbicides, the humic substances remain bound to the SAX disk with >85% retention. Elution with methanol results in more than 90% recovery of the herbicides from the layered extraction disks. Removal of the humic and fulvic acids results in greater sensitivity for diode array detection quantitation (0.05 μg/L for herbicides) by substantially reducing the absorbance of the humic peak on the LC chromatogram. The herbicides adsorb to the SAX disk either through hydrogen bonding to the anion-exchange sites or by hydrophobic interaction with the SDB surface of the anion-exchange disk. The method was tested for the analysis of natural water samples from the Mississippi Embayment, a cotton-growing area of the southeastern United States.

  12. Acoustically Driven Fluid and Particle Motion in Confined and Leaky Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnkob, Rune; Nama, Nitesh; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Tony Jun; Costanzo, Francesco; Kähler, Christian J.

    2018-01-01

    The acoustic motion of fluids and particles in confined and acoustically leaky systems is receiving increasing attention for its use in medicine and biotechnology. A number of contradicting physical and numerical models currently exist, but their validity is uncertain due to the unavailability of hard-to-access experimental data for validation. We provide experimental benchmarking data by measuring 3D particle trajectories and demonstrate that the particle trajectories can be described numerically without any fitting parameter by a reduced-fluid model with leaky impedance-wall conditions. The results reveal the hitherto unknown existence of a pseudo-standing wave that drives the acoustic streaming as well as the acoustic radiation force on suspended particles.

  13. Technology Demonstration Summary: CF Systems Organics Extraction System, New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Site Program demonstration of CF Systems' organics extraction technology was conducted to obtain specific operating and cost information that could be used in evaluating the potential applicability of the technology to Superfund sites. The demonstration was conducted concurr...

  14. An automated system for liquid-liquid extraction in monosegmented flow analysis

    PubMed Central

    Facchin, Ileana; Pasquini, Celio

    1997-01-01

    An automated system to perform liquid-liquid extraction in monosegmented flow analysis is described. The system is controlled by a microcomputer that can track the localization of the aqueous monosegmented sample in the manifold. Optical switches are employed to sense the gas-liquid interface of the air bubbles that define the monosegment. The logical level changes, generated by the switches, are flagged by the computer through a home-made interface that also contains the analogue-to-digital converter for signal acquisition. The sequence of operations, necessary for a single extraction or for concentration of the analyte in the organic phase, is triggered by these logical transitions. The system was evaluated for extraction of Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) and concentration of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions at pH 9.9 (NH3/NH4Cl buffer) into chloroform containing PAN (1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol) . The results show a mean repeatability of 3% (rsd) for a 2.0 mg l-1 Cd(II) solution and a linear increase of the concentration factor for a 0.5mg l-1 Cd(II) solution observed for up to nine extraction cycles. PMID:18924792

  15. Chlorine disinfection of grey water for reuse: effect of organics and particles.

    PubMed

    Winward, Gideon P; Avery, Lisa M; Stephenson, Tom; Jefferson, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Adequate disinfection of grey water prior to reuse is important to prevent the potential transmission of disease-causing microorganisms. Chlorine is a widely utilised disinfectant and as such is a leading contender for disinfection of grey water intended for reuse. This study examined the impact of organics and particles on chlorine disinfection of grey water, measured by total coliform inactivation. The efficacy of disinfection was most closely linked with particle size. Larger particles shielded total coliforms from inactivation and disinfection efficacy decreased with increasing particle size. Blending to extract particle-associated coliforms (PACs) following chlorine disinfection revealed that up to 91% of total coliforms in chlorinated grey water were particle associated. The organic concentration of grey water affected chlorine demand but did not influence the disinfection resistance of total coliforms when a free chlorine residual was maintained. Implications for urban water reuse are discussed and it is recommended that grey water treatment systems target suspended solids removal to ensure removal of PACs prior to disinfection.

  16. Quartetting in Nuclear Matter and α Particle Condensation in Nuclear Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röpke, G.; Schuck, P.; Horiuchi, H.; Tohsaki, A.; Funaki, Y.; Yamada, T.

    2008-02-01

    Alternatively to pairing, four-particle correlations may become of importance for the formation of quantum condensates in nuclear matter. With increasing density, four-particle correlations are suppressed because of Pauli blocking. Signatures of α-like clusters are expected to occur in low-density nuclear systems. The famous Hoyle state (02+ at 7.654 MeV in 12C) is identified as being an almost ideal condensate of three α-particles, hold together only by the Coulomb barrier. It, therefore, has a 8Be-α structure of low density. Transition probability and inelastic form factor together with position and other physical quantities are correctly reproduced without any adjustable parameter from our two parameter wave function of α-particle condensate type. The possibility of the existence of α-particle condensed states in heavier nα nuclei is also discussed.

  17. 14C-labeled organic amendments: Characterization in different particle size fractions and humic acids in a long-term field experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tatzber, Michael; Stemmer, Michael; Spiegel, Heide; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge about the stabilization of organic matter input to soil is essential for understanding the influence of different agricultural practices on turnover characteristics in agricultural soil systems. In this study, soil samples from a long-term field experiment were separated into silt- and clay-sized particles. In 1967, 14C labeled farmyard manure was applied to three different cropping systems: crop rotation, monoculture and permanent bare fallow. Humic acids (HAs) were extracted from silt- and clay-sized fractions and characterized using photometry, mid-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Remaining 14C was determined in size fractions as well as in their extracted HAs. Yields of carbon and remaining 14C in HAs from silt-sized particles and Corg in clay-sized particles decreased significantly in the order: crop rotation > monoculture ≫ bare fallow. Thus, crop rotation not only had the largest overall C-pool in the experiment, but it also best stabilized the added manure. Mid-infrared spectroscopy could distinguish between HAs from different particle size soil fractions. With spectroscopic methods significant differences between the cropping systems were detectable in fewer cases compared to quantitative results of HAs (yields, 14C, Corg and Nt). The trends, however, pointed towards increased humification of HAs from bare fallow systems compared to crop rotation and monoculture as well as of HAs from clay-sized particles compared to silt-sized particles. Our study clearly shows that the largest differences were observed between bare fallow on one hand and monoculture and crop rotation on the other. PMID:23482702

  18. 14C-labeled organic amendments: Characterization in different particle size fractions and humic acids in a long-term field experiment.

    PubMed

    Tatzber, Michael; Stemmer, Michael; Spiegel, Heide; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2012-05-01

    Knowledge about the stabilization of organic matter input to soil is essential for understanding the influence of different agricultural practices on turnover characteristics in agricultural soil systems. In this study, soil samples from a long-term field experiment were separated into silt- and clay-sized particles. In 1967, 14 C labeled farmyard manure was applied to three different cropping systems: crop rotation, monoculture and permanent bare fallow. Humic acids (HAs) were extracted from silt- and clay-sized fractions and characterized using photometry, mid-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Remaining 14 C was determined in size fractions as well as in their extracted HAs. Yields of carbon and remaining 14 C in HAs from silt-sized particles and C org in clay-sized particles decreased significantly in the order: crop rotation > monoculture ≫ bare fallow. Thus, crop rotation not only had the largest overall C-pool in the experiment, but it also best stabilized the added manure. Mid-infrared spectroscopy could distinguish between HAs from different particle size soil fractions. With spectroscopic methods significant differences between the cropping systems were detectable in fewer cases compared to quantitative results of HAs (yields, 14 C, C org and N t ). The trends, however, pointed towards increased humification of HAs from bare fallow systems compared to crop rotation and monoculture as well as of HAs from clay-sized particles compared to silt-sized particles. Our study clearly shows that the largest differences were observed between bare fallow on one hand and monoculture and crop rotation on the other.

  19. Central nervous system activity of Illicium verum fruit extracts.

    PubMed

    Chouksey, Divya; Upmanyu, Neeraj; Pawar, R S

    2013-11-01

    To research the acute toxicity of Illicium verum (I. verum) fruit extracts and its action on central nervous system. The TLC and HPTLC techniques were used as fingerprints to determine the chemical components present in I. verum. Male albino rats and mice were utilized for study. The powdered material was successively extracted with n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol using a Soxhlet extractor. Acute toxicity studies were performed as per OECD guidelines. The CNS activity was evaluated on parameters of general behavior, sleeping pattern, locomotor activity, anxiety and myocoordination activity. The animals were trained for seven days prior to experiments and the divided into five groups with six animals in each. The drug was administered by intraperitoneal route according to body weight. The dosing was done as prescribed in each protocol. Toxicity studies reported 2 000 mg/kg as toxicological dose and 1/10 of the same dose was taken as therapeutic dose Intraperitoneal injection of all extracts at dose of 200 mg prolonged phenobarbitone induced sleeping time, produced alteration in general behavior pattern, reduced locomotor activity and produced anxiolytic effects but the extracts do not significantly alter muscles coordination activity. The three extracts of I. verum at the dose of 200 mg, methanol extract was found to produce more prominent effects, then hexane and ethylacetate extracts. The observation suggested that the extracts of I. verum possess potent CNS depressant action and anxiolytic effect without interfering with motor coordination. Copyright © 2013 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Studies on extraction process optimization of Panax notogingseng saponins].

    PubMed

    Qu, Lin-hai; Zheng, Ming; Lou, Yi-jia

    2006-06-01

    To optimize the conditions for the extraction of panax notogingseng saponins (PNS). After selected extraction solvent and suitable particle, we employed orthogonal experimental design to examine the conditions for the extraction by determination of PNS. Significant effect was observed only in extraction times. The optimum condition for extraction of PNS was to extract panax notogingseng (Burk.) F. H. Chen with 10 times 70% ethanol for 1.5 hours for 3 times.

  1. Recent Improvements of Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System: PHITS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tatsuhiko; Niita, Koji; Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hashimoto, Shintaro; Ogawa, Tatsuhiko; Furuta, Takuya; Abe, Shin-ichiro; Kai, Takeshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Okumura, Keisuke; Kai, Tetsuya; Iwase, Hiroshi; Sihver, Lembit

    2017-09-01

    The Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS, has been developed under the collaboration of several research institutes in Japan and Europe. This system can simulate the transport of most particles with energy levels up to 1 TeV (per nucleon for ion) using different nuclear reaction models and data libraries. More than 2,500 registered researchers and technicians have used this system for various applications such as accelerator design, radiation shielding and protection, medical physics, and space- and geo-sciences. This paper summarizes the physics models and functions recently implemented in PHITS, between versions 2.52 and 2.88, especially those related to source generation useful for simulating brachytherapy and internal exposures of radioisotopes.

  2. Particle Velocity Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for determining the velocity of individual food particles within a liquid/solid food mixture that is cooked by an aseptic cooking method whereby the food mixture is heated as it flows through a flowline. At least one upstream and at least one downstream microwave transducer are provided to determine the minimum possible travel time of the fastest food particle through the flowline. In one embodiment, the upstream detector is not required. In another embodiment, a plurality of small dipole antenna markers are secured to a plurality of food particles to provide a plurality of signals as the markers pass the upstream and downstream transducers. The dipole antenna markers may also include a non-linear element to reradiate a harmonic frequency of a transmitter frequency. Upstream and downstream transducers include dipole antennas that are matched to the impedance of the food slurry and a signal transmission cable by various impedance matching means including unbalanced feed to the antennas.

  3. Implicit Particle Filter for Power System State Estimation with Large Scale Renewable Power Integration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunoglu, B.; Hussaini, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Implicit Particle Filter is a sequential Monte Carlo method for data assimilation that guides the particles to the high-probability by an implicit step . It optimizes a nonlinear cost function which can be inherited from legacy assimilation routines . Dynamic state estimation for almost real-time applications in power systems are becomingly increasingly more important with integration of variable wind and solar power generation. New advanced state estimation tools that will replace the old generation state estimation in addition to having a general framework of complexities should be able to address the legacy software and able to integrate the old software in a mathematical framework while allowing the power industry need for a cautious and evolutionary change in comparison to a complete revolutionary approach while addressing nonlinearity and non-normal behaviour. This work implements implicit particle filter as a state estimation tool for the estimation of the states of a power system and presents the first implicit particle filter application study on a power system state estimation. The implicit particle filter is introduced into power systems and the simulations are presented for a three-node benchmark power system . The performance of the filter on the presented problem is analyzed and the results are presented.

  4. Investigation of helicon ion source extraction systems.

    PubMed

    Mordyk, S; Miroshnichenko, V; Shulha, D; Storizhko, V

    2008-02-01

    Various versions of an extraction system for a helicon ion source have been investigated in high plasma density (>10(12) cm(-3)) modes. The measurements of the plasma density were carried out with a microwave interferometer. Experiments were performed with hydrogen and helium gases. The preliminary results indicate that specially designed extractors are very promising for improving ion beam paraxial brightness.

  5. Arrhythmia Classification Based on Multi-Domain Feature Extraction for an ECG Recognition System.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongqiang; Yuan, Danyang; Wang, Youxi; Cui, Dianyin; Cao, Lu

    2016-10-20

    Automatic recognition of arrhythmias is particularly important in the diagnosis of heart diseases. This study presents an electrocardiogram (ECG) recognition system based on multi-domain feature extraction to classify ECG beats. An improved wavelet threshold method for ECG signal pre-processing is applied to remove noise interference. A novel multi-domain feature extraction method is proposed; this method employs kernel-independent component analysis in nonlinear feature extraction and uses discrete wavelet transform to extract frequency domain features. The proposed system utilises a support vector machine classifier optimized with a genetic algorithm to recognize different types of heartbeats. An ECG acquisition experimental platform, in which ECG beats are collected as ECG data for classification, is constructed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system in ECG beat classification. The presented system, when applied to the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, achieves a high classification accuracy of 98.8%. Experimental results based on the ECG acquisition experimental platform show that the system obtains a satisfactory classification accuracy of 97.3% and is able to classify ECG beats efficiently for the automatic identification of cardiac arrhythmias.

  6. Arrhythmia Classification Based on Multi-Domain Feature Extraction for an ECG Recognition System

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongqiang; Yuan, Danyang; Wang, Youxi; Cui, Dianyin; Cao, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Automatic recognition of arrhythmias is particularly important in the diagnosis of heart diseases. This study presents an electrocardiogram (ECG) recognition system based on multi-domain feature extraction to classify ECG beats. An improved wavelet threshold method for ECG signal pre-processing is applied to remove noise interference. A novel multi-domain feature extraction method is proposed; this method employs kernel-independent component analysis in nonlinear feature extraction and uses discrete wavelet transform to extract frequency domain features. The proposed system utilises a support vector machine classifier optimized with a genetic algorithm to recognize different types of heartbeats. An ECG acquisition experimental platform, in which ECG beats are collected as ECG data for classification, is constructed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system in ECG beat classification. The presented system, when applied to the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database, achieves a high classification accuracy of 98.8%. Experimental results based on the ECG acquisition experimental platform show that the system obtains a satisfactory classification accuracy of 97.3% and is able to classify ECG beats efficiently for the automatic identification of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:27775596

  7. History and Technology Developments of Radio Frequency (RF) Systems for Particle Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassiri, A.; Chase, B.; Craievich, P.; Fabris, A.; Frischholz, H.; Jacob, J.; Jensen, E.; Jensen, M.; Kustom, R.; Pasquinelli, R.

    2016-04-01

    This article attempts to give a historical account and review of technological developments and innovations in radio frequency (RF) systems for particle accelerators. The evolution from electrostatic field to the use of RF voltage suggested by R. Wideröe made it possible to overcome the shortcomings of electrostatic accelerators, which limited the maximum achievable electric field due to voltage breakdown. After an introduction, we will provide reviews of technological developments of RF systems for particle accelerators.

  8. Bacteria and Composite Particles in the Glacier-Fed Systems of British Columbia and Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, D. C.; Hodder, K. R.

    2014-12-01

    In controlled environments, bacteria and suspended sediment particles are linked via the creation of a composite structure ("bacteria-sediment associations"; BSA), with associated effects on size, density and hydrodynamics. However, the presence of these particles, and their corresponding effect on sedimentary processes is not well documented in many environments. Here, we compile field data from 20 glacier-fed systems in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada, to illustrate: 1) the presence, and (quantity) of bacteria-sediment associations; 2) the presence of in-situ composite particles and their associated settling velocities; 3) the simulated impact of bacteria-sediment associations on settling velocity via controlled manipulation in the laboratory. In general, a significant portion of the fine suspended sediment typical of these systems was associated with bacteria and/or present in a composite-form -- not as primary, individual particles. Four key findings include: 1) Along a 80 kilometre river transect, up to 40% of bacteria were associated with sediment particles; 2) Manipulation of bacteria concentration in the laboratory has revealed a positive relationship between sediment settling velocity, creation of composite particles and bacteria concentration; 3) Composite particles dominated the suspended sediment load among all 20 systems, especially for larger particles; and 4) Measurements reveal these composite particles are settling at rates significantly below that predicted by Stokes Law. The formation of composite particles is especially important in lakes where laminated sediments are used for paleoenvironmental reconstruction (varved), as bacteria can modulate the rate at which some of this sediment reaches the lake floor. These results highlight the importance of bacteria in Earth surface processes and, more specifically, the sediment dynamics within glacier-fed systems.

  9. The mechanics of active matter: Broken-symmetry hydrodynamics of motile particles and granular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Simha, R. Aditi

    2006-09-01

    This articles reviews briefly our recent theoretical results on order, fluctuations and flow in collections of self-driven particles, in suspension or on a solid surface. The theoretical approach we have developed applies not only to collections of organisms such as schools of fish or collectively swimming bacteria, but also to motor-microtubule extracts with ATP and, most surprisingly, to agitated monolayers of orientable granular particles. We contrast the behaviour of these active systems with that of thermal equilibrium systems with the same symmetry. As an illustration of the role of activity we show that active smectics in three dimensions show true long-range order, unlike their thermal equilibrium counterparts.

  10. Interacting particle systems in time-dependent geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Ball, R. C.; Grosskinsky, S.; Somfai, E.

    2013-09-01

    Many complex structures and stochastic patterns emerge from simple kinetic rules and local interactions, and are governed by scale invariance properties in combination with effects of the global geometry. We consider systems that can be described effectively by space-time trajectories of interacting particles, such as domain boundaries in two-dimensional growth or river networks. We study trajectories embedded in time-dependent geometries, and the main focus is on uniformly expanding or decreasing domains for which we obtain an exact mapping to simple fixed domain systems while preserving the local scale invariance properties. This approach was recently introduced in Ali et al (2013 Phys. Rev. E 87 020102(R)) and here we provide a detailed discussion on its applicability for self-affine Markovian models, and how it can be adapted to self-affine models with memory or explicit time dependence. The mapping corresponds to a nonlinear time transformation which converges to a finite value for a large class of trajectories, enabling an exact analysis of asymptotic properties in expanding domains. We further provide a detailed discussion of different particle interactions and generalized geometries. All our findings are based on exact computations and are illustrated numerically for various examples, including Lévy processes and fractional Brownian motion.

  11. Study of process variables in supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of soybeans.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Nikolas; Hilton, Ramsey; Hendry, Doug; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Jacoby, William

    2014-01-01

    Soybean flakes were extracted using supercritical carbon dioxide at 48.3 MPa and 80 °C, which is a higher temperature than previously reported. Several operational parameters were explored to determine their effect on extractions. Flakes, as typically used in this industry, provided the best extraction performance. Particle size distributions were created through grinding. Reducing average particle diameters smaller than 0.069 mm had no appreciable effect on increasing extraction efficiencies. Exploration of flow rate indicated that a residence time of less than 60 s for the supercritical carbon dioxide would be sufficient for complete extractions. A solvent mass to load mass ratio of 10:1 was found to be sufficient for extraction of oils from soybean flakes. Increasing moisture in the soybeans led to decreasing extraction efficiency of oils. Finally, soybean hulls had no effect on extraction efficiency. Thus, the de-hulling procedure can be removed from the extraction process without decreasing extraction efficiency.

  12. Multielement extraction system for determining 19 trace elements in gold exploration samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J. Robert; Viets, John G.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A multielement extraction system is being used successfully to provide essentially interference-free geochemical analyses to aid in gold exploration. The Methyl isobutyl ketone-Amine synerGistic Iodide Complex (MAGIC) extraction system separates Ag, As, Au, Bi, Cd, Cu, Ga, Hg, In, Mo, Pb, Pd, Pt, Sb, Se, Sn, Te, Tl, and Zn from interfering geological matrices. Quantitative extraction of these elements is accomplished over a broad range of acid normality making it possible to economically determine all 19 elements from a single digestion or leach solution. The resulting organic extracts are amenable to analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS). For many years the principal shortcoming of ICP-AES was the complex spectral and stray-light interferences that were caused by the extreme variability of components such as Fe, Na, and Ca in common geological matrices. The MAGIC extraction allows determination of the extracted elements with enhanced sensitivity, from a virtually uniform matrix, by ICP-AES and FAAS. Because of its simultaneous multichannel capabilities, ICP-AES is the ideal instrumental technique for determining these 19 extracted elements. Ultratrace (sub-part-per-billion) determinations of Au and many of the other extracted elements can be made by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS), following back stripping of the extracts. The combination of the extraction followed by stripping of the organic phase eliminates 99.999% of potential interferences for Au. Gold determination by GFAAS from these extracts under the specified conditions yields a fourfold improvement in sensitivity over conventional GFAAS methods. This sensitivity enhancement and the interference-free matrix allow highly reliable determinations well into the parts-per-trillion range.

  13. Particle deposition in human respiratory system: deposition of concentrated hygroscopic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Suresh K; Gangamma, S

    2009-06-01

    In the nearly saturated human respiratory tract, the presence of water-soluble substances in the inhaled aerosols can cause change in the size distribution of the particles. This consequently alters the lung deposition profiles of the inhaled airborne particles. Similarly, the presence of high concentration of hygroscopic aerosols also affects the water vapor and temperature profiles in the respiratory tract. A model is presented to analyze these effects in human respiratory system. The model solves simultaneously the heat and mass transfer equations to determine the size evolution of respirable particles and gas-phase properties within human respiratory tract. First, the model predictions for nonhygroscopic aerosols are compared with experimental results. The model results are compared with experimental results of sodium chloride particles. The model reproduces the major features of the experimental data. The water vapor profile is significantly modified only when a high concentration of particles is present. The model is used to study the effect of equilibrium assumptions on particle deposition. Simulations show that an infinite dilution solution assumption to calculate the saturation equilibrium over droplet could induce errors in estimating particle growth. This error is significant in the case of particles of size greater than 1 mum and at number concentrations higher than 10(5)/cm(3).

  14. Engineered hybrid spider silk particles as delivery system for peptide vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lucke, Matthias; Mottas, Inès; Herbst, Tina; Hotz, Christian; Römer, Lin; Schierling, Martina; Herold, Heike M; Slotta, Ute; Spinetti, Thibaud; Scheibel, Thomas; Winter, Gerhard; Bourquin, Carole; Engert, Julia

    2018-07-01

    The generation of strong T-cell immunity is one of the main challenges for the development of successful vaccines against cancer and major infectious diseases. Here we have engineered spider silk particles as delivery system for a peptide-based vaccination that leads to effective priming of cytotoxic T-cells. The recombinant spider silk protein eADF4(C16) was fused to the antigenic peptide from ovalbumin, either without linker or with a cathepsin cleavable peptide linker. Particles prepared from the hybrid proteins were taken up by dendritic cells, which are essential for T-cell priming, and successfully activated cytotoxic T-cells, without signs of immunotoxicity or unspecific immunostimulatory activity. Upon subcutaneous injection in mice, the particles were taken up by dendritic cells and accumulated in the lymph nodes, where immune responses are generated. Particles from hybrid proteins containing a cathepsin-cleavable linker induced a strong antigen-specific proliferation of cytotoxic T-cells in vivo, even in the absence of a vaccine adjuvant. We thus demonstrate the efficacy of a new vaccine strategy using a protein-based all-in-one vaccination system, where spider silk particles serve as carriers with an incorporated peptide antigen. Our study further suggests that engineered spider silk-based vaccines are extremely stable, easy to manufacture, and readily customizable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Particle-size distribution (PSD) of pulverized hair: A quantitative approach of milling efficiency and its correlation with drug extraction efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Aline Garcia da Rosa; Spinelli, Eliani; Fiaux, Sorele Batista; Barreto, Adriana da Silva; Rodrigues, Silvana Vianna

    2017-08-01

    Different types of hair were submitted to different milling procedures and their resulting powders were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser diffraction (LD). SEM results were qualitative whereas LD results were quantitative and accurately characterized the hair powders through their particle size distribution (PSD). Different types of hair were submitted to an optimized milling conditions and their PSD was quite similar. A good correlation was obtained between PSD results and ketamine concentration in a hair sample analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Hair samples were frozen in liquid nitrogen for 5min and pulverized at 25Hz for 10min, resulting in 61% of particles <104μm and 39% from 104 to 1000μm. Doing so, a 359% increment on ketamine concentration was obtained for an authentic sample extracted after pulverization comparing with the same sample cut in 1mm fragments. When milling time was extended to 25min, >90% of particles were <60μm and an additional increment of 52.4% in ketamine content was obtained. PSD is a key feature on analysis of pulverized hair as it can affect the method recovery and reproducibility. In addition, PSD is an important issue on sample retesting and quality control procedures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The validation of forensic DNA extraction systems to utilize soil contaminated biological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kasu, Mohaimin; Shires, Karen

    2015-07-01

    The production of full DNA profiles from biological evidence found in soil has a high failure rate due largely to the inhibitory substance humic acid (HA). Abundant in various natural soils, HA co-extracts with DNA during extraction and inhibits DNA profiling by binding to the molecular components of the genotyping assay. To successfully utilize traces of soil contaminated evidence, such as that found at many murder and rape crime scenes in South Africa, a reliable HA removal extraction system would often be selected based on previous validation studies. However, for many standard forensic DNA extraction systems, peer-reviewed publications detailing the efficacy on soil evidence is either lacking or is incomplete. Consequently, these sample types are often not collected or fail to yield suitable DNA material due to the use of unsuitable methodology. The aim of this study was to validate the common forensic DNA collection and extraction systems used in South Africa, namely DNA IQ, FTA elute and Nucleosave for processing blood and saliva contaminated with HA. A forensic appropriate volume of biological evidence was spiked with HA (0, 0.5, 1.5 and 2.5 mg/ml) and processed through each extraction protocol for the evaluation of HA removal using QPCR and STR-genotyping. The DNA IQ magnetic bead system effectively removed HA from highly contaminated blood and saliva, and generated consistently acceptable STR profiles from both artificially spiked samples and crude soil samples. This system is highly recommended for use on soil-contaminated evidence over the cellulose card-based systems currently being preferentially used for DNA sample collection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and particle rearrangements in quasi-two-dimensional colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Manning, M L; Yunker, Peter J; Ellenbroek, Wouter G; Zhang, Zexin; Liu, Andrea J; Yodh, A G

    2011-09-02

    We investigate correlations between low-frequency vibrational modes and rearrangements in two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of thermosensitive microgel particles, which readily permit variation of the sample packing fraction. At each packing fraction, the particle displacement covariance matrix is measured and used to extract the vibrational spectrum of the "shadow" colloidal glass (i.e., the particle network with the same geometry and interactions as the sample colloid but absent damping). Rearrangements are induced by successive, small reductions in the packing fraction. The experimental results suggest that low-frequency quasilocalized phonon modes in colloidal glasses, i.e., modes that present low energy barriers for system rearrangements, are spatially correlated with rearrangements in this thermal system.

  18. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil and Evaluation 
of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties.

    PubMed

    Çavdar, Hasene Keskin; Yanık, Derya Koçak; Gök, Uğur; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2017-03-01

    Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176-300 W), time (5-20 min), particle size ( d =0.125-0.800 mm) and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass). The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19%) was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d =0.125-0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass) in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70% in 8 h) or cold (17.50% in 8 h) extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86%) irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had better physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction.

  19. Model-based Extracted Water Desalination System for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, Rachel; Dees, Elizabeth

    The focus of this research effort centered around water recovery from high Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) extracted waters (180,000 mg/L) using a combination of water recovery (partial desalination) technologies. The research goals of this project were as follows: 1. Define the scope and test location for pilot-scale implementation of the desalination system, 2.Define a scalable, multi-stage extracted water desalination system that yields clean water, concentrated brine, and, salt from saline brines, and 3. Validate overall system performance with field-sourced water using GE pre-pilot lab facilities. Conventional falling film-mechanical vapor recompression (FF-MVR) technology was established as a baseline desalination process. Amore » quality function deployment (QFD) method was used to compare alternate high TDS desalination technologies to the base case FF-MVR technology, including but not limited to: membrane distillation (MD), forward osmosis (FO), and high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO). Technoeconomic analysis of high pressure reverse osmosis (HPRO) was performed comparing the following two cases: 1. a hybrid seawater RO (SWRO) plus HPRO system and 2. 2x standard seawater RO system, to achieve the same total pure water recovery rate. Pre-pilot-scale tests were conducted using field production water to validate key process steps for extracted water pretreatment. Approximately 5,000 gallons of field produced water was processed through, microfiltration, ultrafiltration, and steam regenerable sorbent operations. Improvements in membrane materials of construction were considered as necessary next steps to achieving further improvement in element performance at high pressure. Several modifications showed promising results in their ability to withstand close to 5,000 PSI without gross failure.« less

  20. Inflammation-Related Effects of Diesel Engine Exhaust Particles: Studies on Lung Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Schwarze, P. E.; Totlandsdal, A. I.; Låg, M.; Refsnes, M.; Holme, J. A.; Øvrevik, J.

    2013-01-01

    Diesel exhaust and its particles (DEP) have been under scrutiny for health effects in humans. In the development of these effects inflammation is regarded as a key process. Overall, in vitro studies report similar DEP-induced changes in markers of inflammation, including cytokines and chemokines, as studies in vivo. In vitro studies suggest that soluble extracts of DEP have the greatest impact on the expression and release of proinflammatory markers. Main DEP mediators of effects have still not been identified and are difficult to find, as fuel and engine technology developments lead to continuously altered characteristics of emissions. Involved mechanisms remain somewhat unclear. DEP extracts appear to comprise components that are able to activate various membrane and cytosolic receptors. Through interactions with receptors, ion channels, and phosphorylation enzymes, molecules in the particle extract will trigger various cell signaling pathways that may lead to the release of inflammatory markers directly or indirectly by causing cell death. In vitro studies represent a fast and convenient system which may have implications for technology development. Furthermore, knowledge regarding how particles elicit their effects may contribute to understanding of DEP-induced health effects in vivo, with possible implications for identifying susceptible groups of people and effect biomarkers. PMID:23509760

  1. Particle deposition due to turbulent diffusion in the upper respiratory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamill, P.

    1979-01-01

    Aerosol deposition in the upper respiratory system (trachea to segmental bronchi) is considered and the importance of turbulent diffusion as a deposition mechanism is evaluated. It is demonstrated that for large particles (diameter greater than about 5 microns), turbulent diffusion is the dominant deposition mechanism in the trachea. Conditions under which turbulent diffusion may be important in successive generations of the pulmonary system are determined. The probability of particle deposition is compared with probabilities of deposition, as determined by the equations generally used in regional deposition models. The analysis is theoretical; no new experimental data is presented.

  2. A geometric approach to identify cavities in particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyiatzis, Evangelos; Böhm, Michael C.; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-11-01

    The implementation of a geometric algorithm to identify cavities in particle systems in an open-source python program is presented. The algorithm makes use of the Delaunay space tessellation. The present python software is based on platform-independent tools, leading to a portable program. Its successful execution provides information concerning the accessible volume fraction of the system, the size and shape of the cavities and the group of atoms forming each of them. The program can be easily incorporated into the LAMMPS software. An advantage of the present algorithm is that no a priori assumption on the cavity shape has to be made. As an example, the cavity size and shape distributions in a polyethylene melt system are presented for three spherical probe particles. This paper serves also as an introductory manual to the script. It summarizes the algorithm, its implementation, the required user-defined parameters as well as the format of the input and output files. Additionally, we demonstrate possible applications of our approach and compare its capability with the ones of well documented cavity size estimators.

  3. Sub-Coulomb He 3 transfer and its use to extract three-particle asymptotic normalization coefficients

    DOE PAGES

    Avila, M. L.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.; ...

    2018-01-22

    In this work, data for the 13C( 6Li,t) 16O reaction, obtained in inverse kinematics at a 13C incident energy of 7.72 MeV, are presented. A distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis was used to extract spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for the < 16O | 13C + 3He> overlaps, subject to the assumption of a fixed < 6Li | 3He + 3H> overlap. The variation of the extracted spectroscopic factors and ANCs as a function of various inputs to the DWBA calculations was explored. The extracted ANCs were found to vary as a cubic function of the radiusmore » of the potential well binding the transferred 3He to the 13C core while the spectroscopic factors varied as a quartic function of the radius. Finally, the ANC values could be determined to within a factor of two for this system.« less

  4. Sub-Coulomb He 3 transfer and its use to extract three-particle asymptotic normalization coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Avila, M. L.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.

    In this work, data for the 13C( 6Li,t) 16O reaction, obtained in inverse kinematics at a 13C incident energy of 7.72 MeV, are presented. A distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis was used to extract spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for the < 16O | 13C + 3He> overlaps, subject to the assumption of a fixed < 6Li | 3He + 3H> overlap. The variation of the extracted spectroscopic factors and ANCs as a function of various inputs to the DWBA calculations was explored. The extracted ANCs were found to vary as a cubic function of the radiusmore » of the potential well binding the transferred 3He to the 13C core while the spectroscopic factors varied as a quartic function of the radius. Finally, the ANC values could be determined to within a factor of two for this system.« less

  5. Sub-Coulomb 3He transfer and its use to extract three-particle asymptotic normalization coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.; Keeley, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Koshchiy, E.; Kuchera, A. N.; Rogachev, G. V.; Rusek, K.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2018-01-01

    Data for the 13C(6Li,t )16O reaction, obtained in inverse kinematics at a 13C incident energy of 7.72 MeV, are presented. A distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) analysis was used to extract spectroscopic factors and asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for the 〈" close="〉6Li∣3He +3H 〉">16O∣13C +3He overlaps, subject to the assumption of a fixed extracted spectroscopic factors and ANCs as a function of various inputs to the DWBA calculations was explored. The extracted ANCs were found to vary as a cubic function of the radius of the potential well binding the transferred 3He to the 13C core while the spectroscopic factors varied as a quartic function of the radius. The ANC values could be determined to within a factor of two for this system.

  6. Continuous time random walk with local particle-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianping; Jiang, Guancheng

    2018-05-01

    The continuous time random walk (CTRW) is often applied to the study of particle motion in disordered media. Yet most such applications do not allow for particle-particle (walker-walker) interaction. In this paper, we consider a CTRW with particle-particle interaction; however, for simplicity, we restrain the interaction to be local. The generalized Chapman-Kolmogorov equation is modified by introducing a perturbation function that fluctuates around 1, which models the effect of interaction. Subsequently, a time-fractional nonlinear advection-diffusion equation is derived from this walking system. Under the initial condition of condensed particles at the origin and the free-boundary condition, we numerically solve this equation with both attractive and repulsive particle-particle interactions. Moreover, a Monte Carlo simulation is devised to verify the results of the above numerical work. The equation and the simulation unanimously predict that this walking system converges to the conventional one in the long-time limit. However, for systems where the free-boundary condition and long-time limit are not simultaneously satisfied, this convergence does not hold.

  7. Particle systems for adaptive, isotropic meshing of CAD models

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Joshua A.; Whitaker, Ross T.

    2012-01-01

    We present a particle-based approach for generating adaptive triangular surface and tetrahedral volume meshes from computer-aided design models. Input shapes are treated as a collection of smooth, parametric surface patches that can meet non-smoothly on boundaries. Our approach uses a hierarchical sampling scheme that places particles on features in order of increasing dimensionality. These particles reach a good distribution by minimizing an energy computed in 3D world space, with movements occurring in the parametric space of each surface patch. Rather than using a pre-computed measure of feature size, our system automatically adapts to both curvature as well as a notion of topological separation. It also enforces a measure of smoothness on these constraints to construct a sizing field that acts as a proxy to piecewise-smooth feature size. We evaluate our technique with comparisons against other popular triangular meshing techniques for this domain. PMID:23162181

  8. Micromechanical Modeling of Storage Particles in Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purkayastha, Rajlakshmi Tarun

    the use of coatings in order to mitigate the large expansion and stresses, which leads to spalling off of the material. We therefore extended the results for spherical storage particles to include the presence of an additional layer of material surrounding the storage particle. We perform a parameter study to see at which material properties are most beneficial in reducing stresses within the particle, and the results were tabulated. It was seen that thicker layers can lead to mitigation in the value of maximum stresses. A simple fracture analysis was carried out and the material parameters which would most likely cause crack growth to occur were identified. Finally an integrated 2-D model of a lithium ion battery was developed to study the mechanical stress in storage particles as a function of material properties. The effect of morphology on the stress and lithium concentration is studied for the case of extraction of lithium in terms of the previously developed non-dimensional parameters. Both, particles functioning in isolation were studied, as well as in closely-packed systems. The results show that the particle distance from the separator, in combination with the material properties of the particle, is critical in predicting the stress generated within the particle.

  9. A Risk Assessment System with Automatic Extraction of Event Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capet, Philippe; Delavallade, Thomas; Nakamura, Takuya; Sandor, Agnes; Tarsitano, Cedric; Voyatzi, Stavroula

    In this article we describe the joint effort of experts in linguistics, information extraction and risk assessment to integrate EventSpotter, an automatic event extraction engine, into ADAC, an automated early warning system. By detecting as early as possible weak signals of emerging risks ADAC provides a dynamic synthetic picture of situations involving risk. The ADAC system calculates risk on the basis of fuzzy logic rules operated on a template graph whose leaves are event types. EventSpotter is based on a general purpose natural language dependency parser, XIP, enhanced with domain-specific lexical resources (Lexicon-Grammar). Its role is to automatically feed the leaves with input data.

  10. Sub 2 nm Particle Characterization in Systems with Aerosol Formation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang

    Aerosol science and technology enable continual advances in material synthesis and atmospheric pollutant control. Among these advances, one important frontier is characterizing the initial stages of particle formation by real time measurement of particles below 2 nm in size. Sub 2 nm particles play important roles by acting as seeds for particle growth, ultimately determining the final properties of the generated particles. Tailoring nanoparticle properties requires a thorough understanding and precise control of the particle formation processes, which in turn requires characterizing nanoparticle formation from the initial stages. The knowledge on particle formation in early stages can also be applied in quantum dot synthesis and material doping. This dissertation pursued two approaches in investigating incipient particle characterization in systems with aerosol formation and growth: (1) using a high-resolution differential mobility analyzer (DMA) to measure the size distributions of sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, and (2) analyzing the physical and chemical pathways of aerosol formation during combustion. Part. 1. Particle size distributions reveal important information about particle formation dynamics. DMAs are widely utilized to measure particle size distributions. However, our knowledge of the initial stages of particle formation is incomplete, due to the Brownian broadening effects in conventional DMAs. The first part of this dissertation studied the applicability of high-resolution DMAs in characterizing sub 2 nm particles generated from high-temperature aerosol reactors, including a flame aerosol reactor (FLAR) and a furnace aerosol reactor (FUAR). Comparison against a conventional DMA (Nano DMA, Model 3085, TSI Inc.) demonstrated that the increased sheath flow rates and shortened residence time indeed greatly suppressed the diffusion broadening effect in a high-resolution DMA (half mini type). The incipient particle

  11. Changes in the aromatic profile of espresso coffee as a function of the grinding grade and extraction time: a study by the electronic nose system.

    PubMed

    Severini, C; Ricci, I; Marone, M; Derossi, A; De Pilli, T

    2015-03-04

    The changes in chemical attributes and aromatic profile of espresso coffee (EC) were studied taking into account the extraction time and grinding level as independent variables. Particularly, using an electronic nose system, the changes of the global aromatic profile of EC were highlighted. The results shown as the major amounts of organic acids, solids, and caffeine were extracted in the first 8 s of percolation. The grinding grade significantly affected the quality of EC probably as an effect of the particle size distribution and the percolation pathways of water through the coffee cake. The use of an electronic nose system allowed us to discriminate the fractions of the brew as a function of the percolation time and also the regular coffee obtained from different grinding grades. Particularly, the aromatic profile of a regular coffee (25 mL) was significantly affected by the grinding level of the coffee grounds and percolation time, which are two variables under the control of the bar operator.

  12. Annotation of Korean Learner Corpora for Particle Error Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sun-Hee; Jang, Seok Bae; Seo, Sang-Kyu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we focus on particle errors and discuss an annotation scheme for Korean learner corpora that can be used to extract heuristic patterns of particle errors efficiently. We investigate different properties of particle errors so that they can be later used to identify learner errors automatically, and we provide resourceful annotation…

  13. Particle formation and characterization of mackerel reaction oil by gas saturated solution process.

    PubMed

    Tanbirul Haque, A S M; Chun, Byung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the health benefits of fish oil can be attributed to the presence of omega-3 fatty acids like Docosahexenoic acid (DHA) and Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). There are few dietary sources of EPA and DHA other than oily fish. EPA and DHA have great potential effect on human health. In this research, Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) extracted mackerel oil was reacted by enzyme at different systems to improve the EPA and DHA. Different types of immobilize enzyme TL-IM, RM-IM, Novozyme 435 were assessed for improving PUFAs. Best result was found at non-pressurized system using TL-IM. Reacted oil particle were obtained with polyethylene glycol by gas saturated solution process (PGSS). Different parameters like temperature, pressure, agitation speed and nozzle size effect on particle formulation were observed. SEM and PSA analysis showed, small size non spherical particles were obtained. It was found that after particle formation poly unsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) were present in particle as same in oil. PUFAs release from particle was almost linear against constant time duration. Oil quality in particle not change significantly, in this contrast this study will be helpful for food and pharmaceutical industry to provide high EPA and DHA containing powder.

  14. An Expert System For Tuning Particle-Beam Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lager, Darrel L.; Brand, Hal R.; Maurer, William J.; Searfus, Robert M.; Hernandez, Jose E.

    1989-03-01

    We have developed a proof-of-concept prototype of an expert system for tuning particle beam accelerators. It is designed to function as an intelligent assistant for an operator. In its present form it implements the strategies and reasoning followed by the operator for steering through the beam transport section of the Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory's Site 300. The system is implemented in the language LISP using the Artificial Intelligence concepts of frames, daemons, and a representation we developed called a Monitored Decision Script.

  15. A description of rotations for DEM models of particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campello, Eduardo M. B.

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we show how a vector parameterization of rotations can be adopted to describe the rotational motion of particles within the framework of the discrete element method (DEM). It is based on the use of a special rotation vector, called Rodrigues rotation vector, and accounts for finite rotations in a fully exact manner. The use of fictitious entities such as quaternions or complicated structures such as Euler angles is thereby circumvented. As an additional advantage, stick-slip friction models with inter-particle rolling motion are made possible in a consistent and elegant way. A few examples are provided to illustrate the applicability of the scheme. We believe that simple vector descriptions of rotations are very useful for DEM models of particle systems.

  16. Large space system: Charged particle environment interaction technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.; Roche, J. C.; Grier, N. T.

    1979-01-01

    Large, high voltage space power systems are proposed for future space missions. These systems must operate in the charged-particle environment of space and interactions between this environment and the high voltage surfaces are possible. Ground simulation testing indicated that dielectric surfaces that usually surround biased conductors can influence these interactions. For positive voltages greater than 100 volts, it has been found that the dielectrics contribute to the current collection area. For negative voltages greater than-500 volts, the data indicates that the dielectrics contribute to discharges. A large, high-voltage power system operating in geosynchronous orbit was analyzed. Results of this analysis indicate that very strong electric fields exist in these power systems.

  17. A generalizable NLP framework for fast development of pattern-based biomedical relation extraction systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yifan; Torii, Manabu; Wu, Cathy H; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2014-08-23

    Text mining is increasingly used in the biomedical domain because of its ability to automatically gather information from large amount of scientific articles. One important task in biomedical text mining is relation extraction, which aims to identify designated relations among biological entities reported in literature. A relation extraction system achieving high performance is expensive to develop because of the substantial time and effort required for its design and implementation. Here, we report a novel framework to facilitate the development of a pattern-based biomedical relation extraction system. It has several unique design features: (1) leveraging syntactic variations possible in a language and automatically generating extraction patterns in a systematic manner, (2) applying sentence simplification to improve the coverage of extraction patterns, and (3) identifying referential relations between a syntactic argument of a predicate and the actual target expected in the relation extraction task. A relation extraction system derived using the proposed framework achieved overall F-scores of 72.66% for the Simple events and 55.57% for the Binding events on the BioNLP-ST 2011 GE test set, comparing favorably with the top performing systems that participated in the BioNLP-ST 2011 GE task. We obtained similar results on the BioNLP-ST 2013 GE test set (80.07% and 60.58%, respectively). We conducted additional experiments on the training and development sets to provide a more detailed analysis of the system and its individual modules. This analysis indicates that without increasing the number of patterns, simplification and referential relation linking play a key role in the effective extraction of biomedical relations. In this paper, we present a novel framework for fast development of relation extraction systems. The framework requires only a list of triggers as input, and does not need information from an annotated corpus. Thus, we reduce the involvement of domain

  18. Binary nanoparticle superlattices of soft-particle systems

    DOE PAGES

    Travesset, Alex

    2015-08-04

    The solid-phase diagram of binary systems consisting of particles of diameter σ A=σ and σ B=γσ (γ≤1) interacting with an inverse p = 12 power law is investigated as a paradigm of a soft potential. In addition to the diameter ratio γ that characterizes hard-sphere models, the phase diagram is a function of an additional parameter that controls the relative interaction strength between the different particle types. Phase diagrams are determined from extremes of thermodynamic functions by considering 15 candidate lattices. In general, it is shown that the phase diagram of a soft repulsive potential leads to the morphological diversitymore » observed in experiments with binary nanoparticles, thus providing a general framework to understand their phase diagrams. In addition, particular emphasis is shown to the two most successful crystallization strategies so far: evaporation of solvent from nanoparticles with grafted hydrocarbon ligands and DNA programmable self-assembly.« less

  19. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS), are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. We report a quantitative magnetic separation technology using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micro-pillars with gradient spacing, and use the system to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micro-pillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic-field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miro-pillar array at larger pitches. We develop a semi-analytical model that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells were separated based on the bound quantity of 1μm anti-EpCAM particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system was able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof of concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood were isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential towards a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. PMID:26890496

  20. Quantitative Magnetic Separation of Particles and Cells Using Gradient Magnetic Ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Murray, Coleman; Pao, Edward; Tseng, Peter; Aftab, Shayan; Kulkarni, Rajan; Rettig, Matthew; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-04-13

    Extraction of rare target cells from biosamples is enabling for life science research. Traditional rare cell separation techniques, such as magnetic activated cell sorting, are robust but perform coarse, qualitative separations based on surface antigen expression. A quantitative magnetic separation technology is reported using high-force magnetic ratcheting over arrays of magnetically soft micropillars with gradient spacing, and the system is used to separate and concentrate magnetic beads based on iron oxide content (IOC) and cells based on surface expression. The system consists of a microchip of permalloy micropillar arrays with increasing lateral pitch and a mechatronic device to generate a cycling magnetic field. Particles with higher IOC separate and equilibrate along the miropillar array at larger pitches. A semi-analytical model is developed that predicts behavior for particles and cells. Using the system, LNCaP cells are separated based on the bound quantity of 1 μm anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) particles as a metric for expression. The ratcheting cytometry system is able to resolve a ±13 bound particle differential, successfully distinguishing LNCaP from PC3 populations based on EpCAM expression, correlating with flow cytometry analysis. As a proof-of-concept, EpCAM-labeled cells from patient blood are isolated with 74% purity, demonstrating potential toward a quantitative magnetic separation instrument. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Chemical compositions of primitive solar system particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, Steve R.; Bajt, S.

    1994-01-01

    Chemical studies of micrometeorites are of fundamental importance primarily because atmospheric entry selection effects (such as destruction of friable objects) are less significant than those for conventional meteorites. As a result, particles that have experienced very little postaccretional processing have a significant chance of surviving the Earth encounter and subsequent collection. Thus, chemical analyses of these relatively unaltered micrometeorites may lead to a better understanding of the compositions of the most primitive materials in the solar system and thereby constrain the conditions (physical and chemical) that existed in the early solar nebula. Micrometeorites have been collected from the stratosphere, polar ices, and ocean sediments, but the stratospheric collection is the best source for the most unaltered material because they are small and are not heated to their melting points. Despite the fact that the stratospheric micrometeorites have masses in the nanogram range, a variety of microanalytical techniques have been applied to bulk chemical analyses with part-per-million sensitivity. In some cases, multi-disciplinary studies (e.g., chemistry and mineralogy) have been performed on individual particles. The first-order conclusion is that the chondrite-like particles are chemically similar to carbonaceous chondrites but in detail are distinct from members of the conventional meteorite collection. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the results to date and identify important areas for further study.

  2. Automatic Extraction of Metadata from Scientific Publications for CRIS Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacevic, Aleksandar; Ivanovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Branko; Konjovic, Zora; Surla, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a system for automatic extraction of metadata from scientific papers in PDF format for the information system for monitoring the scientific research activity of the University of Novi Sad (CRIS UNS). Design/methodology/approach: The system is based on machine learning and performs automatic extraction…

  3. Calculating the Degradation Rate of Individual Proteins Using Xenopus Extract Systems.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Gary S; Philpott, Anna

    2018-05-16

    The Xenopus extract system has been used extensively as a simple, quick, and robust method for assessing the stability of proteins against proteasomal degradation. In this protocol, methods are provided for assessing the half-life of in vitro translated radiolabeled proteins using Xenopus egg or embryo extracts. © 2019 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Helium in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.

    1993-01-01

    Helium and neon were extracted from fragments of individual stratosphere-collected interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) by subjecting them to increasing temperature by applying short-duration pulses of power in increasing amounts to the ovens containing the fragments. The experiment was designed to see whether differences in release temperatures could be observed which might provide clues as to the asteroidal or cometary origin of the particles. Variations were observed which show promise for elucidating the problem.

  5. Locating Stardust-like Particles in Aerogel Using X-Ray Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, A. J. G.; Jones, S. M.; Tsapin, A.; Mih, D. T.; Connolly, H. C., Jr.; Graham, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Silica aerogel is the material that the spacecraft STARDUST is using to collect interstellar and cometary silicates. Anticipating the return of the samples to earth in January of 2006, MANY individual investigators and, especially, the investigators in NASA's SRLIDAP program are studying means of both in situ analysis of particles, as well as particle extraction. To help individual PI's with extraction of particles from aerogel in their own laboratories, we are exploring the use of standard laboratory x-ray equipment and commercial techniques for precisely locating specific particles in aerogel. We approached the evaluation of commercial x-ray techniques as follows. First, we determined the most appropriate detector for use with aerogel and particulates. Then, we compared and contrasted techniques useful for university laboratories.

  6. Extraction of rebaudioside-A by sonication from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaf and decolorization of the extract by polymers.

    PubMed

    Gasmalla, Mohammed Abdalbasit A; Yang, Ruijin; Hua, Xiao

    2015-09-01

    Optimization of steviol glycosides extraction from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaf was carried out by investigating the effects of isopropyl alcohol concentration (60 %, v/v), time (6-24 min), temperature (30 °C) and sonic power (300-480 W) on extraction of rebaudioside A from Stevia rebaudiana leaves and decolorization of the extract by polymer (Separan AP30 and Resin ADS-7). The results showed that isopropyl alcohol was suitable for the extraction of rebaudioside A from Stevia rebaudiana leaves and the yield of rebaudioside A achieved 35.61 g/100 g when the output power was 360 W and treatment time was 18 min. The sonication had influence on the particle size of stevia leaf and the color of the extracted solution. As the sonication intensity increased, the particle size decreased. The colour of differently treated stevia solutions were significantly different (P < 0.05). Separan AP30 and adsorption resin ADS-7 were performed to remove the colour impurity. The results showed that more than 65 % of the coloured impurity was removed by Separan AP30 combined with Calcium oxide (CaO).

  7. Effect of finite particle number sampling on baryon number fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Steinheimer, Jan; Koch, Volker

    The effects of finite particle number sampling on the net baryon number cumulants, extracted from fluid dynamical simulations, are studied. The commonly used finite particle number sampling procedure introduces an additional Poissonian (or multinomial if global baryon number conservation is enforced) contribution which increases the extracted moments of the baryon number distribution. If this procedure is applied to a fluctuating fluid dynamics framework, one severely overestimates the actual cumulants. We show that the sampling of so-called test particles suppresses the additional contribution to the moments by at least one power of the number of test particles. We demonstrate this methodmore » in a numerical fluid dynamics simulation that includes the effects of spinodal decomposition due to a first-order phase transition. Furthermore, in the limit where antibaryons can be ignored, we derive analytic formulas which capture exactly the effect of particle sampling on the baryon number cumulants. These formulas may be used to test the various numerical particle sampling algorithms.« less

  8. Effect of finite particle number sampling on baryon number fluctuations

    DOE PAGES

    Steinheimer, Jan; Koch, Volker

    2017-09-28

    The effects of finite particle number sampling on the net baryon number cumulants, extracted from fluid dynamical simulations, are studied. The commonly used finite particle number sampling procedure introduces an additional Poissonian (or multinomial if global baryon number conservation is enforced) contribution which increases the extracted moments of the baryon number distribution. If this procedure is applied to a fluctuating fluid dynamics framework, one severely overestimates the actual cumulants. We show that the sampling of so-called test particles suppresses the additional contribution to the moments by at least one power of the number of test particles. We demonstrate this methodmore » in a numerical fluid dynamics simulation that includes the effects of spinodal decomposition due to a first-order phase transition. Furthermore, in the limit where antibaryons can be ignored, we derive analytic formulas which capture exactly the effect of particle sampling on the baryon number cumulants. These formulas may be used to test the various numerical particle sampling algorithms.« less

  9. Capture of nonmagnetic particles and living cells using a microelectromagnetic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aki, Atsushi; Ito, Osamu; Morimoto, Hisao; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yoshikata; Mizuki, Toru; Hanajiri, Tatsuro; Usami, Ron; Maekawa, Toru

    2008-11-01

    We develop a microelectromagnetic system to trap nonmagnetic materials such as micropolystyrene particles and yeast cells in particular areas. We fabricate gold films, the width of the central narrow part is 22 μm, and flow an electric current through the films. We then apply an external uniform dc magnetic field to weaken the local magnetic field at the narrow part so that a nonuniform magnetic field is produced. We demonstrate that the particles, which are dispersed in magnetic fluid, are successfully trapped at the narrow part of the film. We evaluate the driving force acting on a microparticle in the nonuniform magnetic field and carry out a Stokesian dynamics simulation of the motion of the particles. We show that yeast cells are also trapped at the narrow part of the film. Finally, we fabricate multichannel microelectromagnets so that yeast cells are trapped at multiple points in the microelectromagnetic system. The present system may be applied to cell transfection on a cell microarray and, therefore, eventually contribute to progress in the identification and determination technologies of different drug targets and the functions of genes and proteins.

  10. Techno-economic analysis of extraction-based separation systems for acetone, butanol, and ethanol recovery and purification.

    PubMed

    Grisales Díaz, Víctor Hugo; Olivar Tost, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Dual extraction, high-temperature extraction, mixture extraction, and oleyl alcohol extraction have been proposed in the literature for acetone, butanol, and ethanol (ABE) production. However, energy and economic evaluation under similar assumptions of extraction-based separation systems are necessary. Hence, the new process proposed in this work, direct steam distillation (DSD), for regeneration of high-boiling extractants was compared with several extraction-based separation systems. The evaluation was performed under similar assumptions through simulation in Aspen Plus V7.3 ® software. Two end distillation systems (number of non-ideal stages between 70 and 80) were studied. Heat integration and vacuum operation of some units were proposed reducing the energy requirements. Energy requirement of hybrid processes, substrate concentration of 200 g/l, was between 6.4 and 8.3 MJ-fuel/kg-ABE. The minimum energy requirements of extraction-based separation systems, feeding a water concentration in the substrate equivalent to extractant selectivity, and ideal assumptions were between 2.6 and 3.5 MJ-fuel/kg-ABE, respectively. The efficiencies of recovery systems for baseline case and ideal evaluation were 0.53-0.57 and 0.81-0.84, respectively. The main advantages of DSD were the operation of the regeneration column at atmospheric pressure, the utilization of low-pressure steam, and the low energy requirements of preheating. The in situ recovery processes, DSD, and mixture extraction with conventional regeneration were the approaches with the lowest energy requirements and total annualized costs.

  11. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.; ...

    2017-04-12

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  12. Ejected Particle Size Distributions from Shocked Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, M. M.; Buttler, W. T.; Frayer, D. K.

    Here, we present size distributions for particles ejected from features machined onto the surface of shocked Sn targets. The functional form of the size distributions is assumed to be log-normal, and the characteristic parameters of the distribution are extracted from the measured angular distribution of light scattered from a laser beam incident on the ejected particles. We also found strong evidence for a bimodal distribution of particle sizes with smaller particles evolved from features machined into the target surface and larger particles being produced at the edges of these features.

  13. Formation of hydroxyl radical from San Joaquin Valley particles extracted in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid

    PubMed Central

    Shen, H.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) are linked to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PM in cardiopulmonary tissues. While hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most reactive of the ROS species, there are few quantitative studies of •OH generation from PM. Here we report on •OH formation from PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California. We quantified •OH in PM extracts using a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50μM ascorbate (Asc). The results show that generally the urban Fresno PM generates much more •OH than the rural Westside PM. The presence of Asc at a physiologically relevant concentration in the extraction solution greatly enhances •OH formation from all the samples. Fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more •OH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e. with diameters of 2.5 to 10 μm) normalized by air volume collected, while the coarse PM typically generates more •OH normalized by PM mass. •OH production by SJV PM is reduced on average by (97±6)% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating a dominant role of transition metals. By measuring calibration curves of •OH generation from copper and iron, and quantifying copper and iron concentrations in our particle extracts, we find that PBS-soluble copper is primarily responsible for •OH production by the SJV PM, while iron often makes a significant contribution. Extrapolating our results to expected burdens of PM-derived •OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily PM exposures in the San Joaquin Valley are unlikely to result in a high amount of pulmonary •OH, although high PM events could produce much higher levels of •OH, which might lead to cytotoxicity. PMID:22121357

  14. Formation of hydroxyl radical from San Joaquin Valley particles extracted in a cell-free surrogate lung fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H.; Anastasio, C.

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the adverse health effects from ambient particulate matter (PM) are linked to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by PM in cardiopulmonary tissues. While hydroxyl radical (•OH) is the most reactive of the ROS species, there are few quantitative studies of •OH generation from PM. Here we report on •OH formation from PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California. We quantified •OH in PM extracts using a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). The results show that generally the urban Fresno PM generates much more •OH than the rural Westside PM. The presence of Asc at a physiologically relevant concentration in the extraction solution greatly enhances •OH formation from all the samples. Fine PM (PM2.5) generally makes more •OH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e. with diameters of 2.5 to 10 μm) normalized by air volume collected, while the coarse PM typically generates more •OH normalized by PM mass. •OH production by SJV PM is reduced on average by (97 ± 6) % when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF) is added to the extraction solution, indicating a dominant role of transition metals. By measuring calibration curves of •OH generation from copper and iron, and quantifying copper and iron concentrations in our particle extracts, we find that PBS-soluble copper is primarily responsible for •OH production by the SJV PM, while iron often makes a significant contribution. Extrapolating our results to expected burdens of PM-derived •OH in human lung lining fluid suggests that typical daily PM exposures in the San Joaquin Valley are unlikely to result in a high amount of pulmonary •OH, although high PM events could produce much higher levels of •OH, which might lead to cytotoxicity.

  15. A comparison of hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide generation in ambient particle extracts and laboratory metal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huiyun; Anastasio, Cort

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) - including superoxide ( rad O 2-), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) - has been suggested as one mechanism underlying the adverse health effects caused by ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study we compare HOOH and rad OH production from fine and coarse PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, as well as from laboratory solutions containing dissolved copper or iron. Samples were extracted in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). In our laboratory solutions we find that Cu is a potent source of both HOOH and rad OH, with approximately 90% of the electrons that can be donated from Asc ending up in HOOH and rad OH after 4 h. In contrast, in Fe solutions there is no measurable HOOH and only a modest production of rad OH. Soluble Cu in the SJV PM samples is also a dominant source of HOOH and rad OH. In both laboratory copper solutions and extracts of ambient particles we find much more production of HOOH compared to rad OH: e.g., HOOH generation is approximately 30-60 times faster than rad OH generation. The formation of HOOH and rad OH are positively correlated, with roughly 3% and 8% of HOOH converted to rad OH after 4 and 24 h of extraction, respectively. Although the SJV PM produce much more HOOH than rad OH, since rad OH is a much stronger oxidant it is unclear which species might be more important for oxidant-mediated toxicity from PM inhalation.

  16. A Comparison of Hydroxyl Radical and Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Ambient Particle Extracts and Laboratory Metal Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Huiyun; Anastasio, Cort

    2011-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) – including superoxide (•O2−), hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), and hydroxyl radical (•OH) – has been suggested as one mechanism underlying the adverse health effects caused by ambient particulate matter (PM). In this study we compare HOOH and •OH production from fine and coarse PM collected at an urban (Fresno) and rural (Westside) site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) of California, as well as from laboratory solutions containing dissolved copper or iron. Samples were extracted in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution containing 50 μM ascorbate (Asc). In our laboratory solutions we find that Cu is a potent source of both HOOH and •OH, with approximately 90% of the electrons that can be donated from Asc ending up in HOOH and •OH after 4 h. In contrast, in Fe solutions there is no measurable HOOH and only a modest production of •OH. Soluble Cu in the SJV PM samples is also a dominant source of HOOH and •OH. In both laboratory copper solutions and extracts of ambient particles we find much more production of HOOH compared to •OH: e.g., HOOH generation is approximately 30 – 60 times faster than •OH generation. The formation of HOOH and •OH are positively correlated, with roughly 3 % and 8 % of HOOH converted to •OH after 4 and 24 hr of extraction, respectively. Although the SJV PM produce much more HOOH than •OH, since •OH is a much stronger oxidant it is unclear which species might be more important for oxidant-mediated toxicity from PM inhalation. PMID:22267949

  17. The design and scale-up of spray dried particle delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Al-Khattawi, Ali; Bayly, Andrew; Phillips, Andrew; Wilson, David

    2018-01-01

    The rising demand for pharmaceutical particles with tailored physicochemical properties has opened new markets for spray drying especially for solubility enhancement, improving inhalation medicines and stabilization of biopharmaceuticals. Despite this, the spray drying literature is scattered and often does not address the principles underpinning robust development of pharmaceuticals. It is therefore necessary to present clearer picture of the field and highlight the factors influencing particle design and scale-up. Areas covered: The review presents a systematic analysis of the trends in development of particle delivery systems using spray drying. This is followed by exploring the mechanisms governing particle formation in the process stages. Particle design factors including those of equipment configurations and feed/process attributes were highlighted. Finally, the review summarises the current industrial approaches for upscaling pharmaceutical spray drying. Expert opinion: Spray drying provides the ability to design particles of the desired functionality. This greatly benefits the pharmaceutical sector especially as product specifications are becoming more encompassing and exacting. One of the biggest barriers to product translation remains one of scale-up/scale-down. A shift from trial and error approaches to model-based particle design helps to enhance control over product properties. To this end, process innovations and advanced manufacturing technologies are particularly welcomed.

  18. Particle beam injector system and method

    DOEpatents

    Guethlein, Gary

    2013-06-18

    Methods and devices enable coupling of a charged particle beam to a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. Coupling of the charged particle beam is accomplished, at least in-part, by relying on of sensitivity of the input phase space acceptance of the radio frequency quadrupole to the angle of the input charged particle beam. A first electric field across a beam deflector deflects the particle beam at an angle that is beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. By momentarily reversing or reducing the established electric field, a narrow portion of the charged particle beam is deflected at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole. In another configuration, beam is directed at an angle within the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole by the first electric field and is deflected beyond the acceptance angle of the radio frequency quadrupole due to the second electric field.

  19. Grid point extraction and coding for structured light system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhan; Chung, Ronald

    2011-09-01

    A structured light system simplifies three-dimensional reconstruction by illuminating a specially designed pattern to the target object, thereby generating a distinct texture on it for imaging and further processing. Success of the system hinges upon what features are to be coded in the projected pattern, extracted in the captured image, and matched between the projector's display panel and the camera's image plane. The codes have to be such that they are largely preserved in the image data upon illumination from the projector, reflection from the target object, and projective distortion in the imaging process. The features also need to be reliably extracted in the image domain. In this article, a two-dimensional pseudorandom pattern consisting of rhombic color elements is proposed, and the grid points between the pattern elements are chosen as the feature points. We describe how a type classification of the grid points plus the pseudorandomness of the projected pattern can equip each grid point with a unique label that is preserved in the captured image. We also present a grid point detector that extracts the grid points without the need of segmenting the pattern elements, and that localizes the grid points in subpixel accuracy. Extensive experiments are presented to illustrate that, with the proposed pattern feature definition and feature detector, more features points in higher accuracy can be reconstructed in comparison with the existing pseudorandomly encoded structured light systems.

  20. Performance of school bus retrofit systems: ultrafine particles and other vehicular pollutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunfang; Zhu, Yifang

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the performance of retrofit systems for diesel-powered school buses, a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) muffler and a spiracle crankcase filtration system (CFS), regarding ultrafine particles (UFPs) and other air pollutants from tailpipe emissions and inside bus cabins. Tailpipe emissions and in-cabin air pollutant levels were measured before and after retrofitting when the buses were idling and during actual pick-up/drop off routes. Retrofit systems significantly reduced tailpipe emissions with a reduction of 20-94% of total particles with both DOC and CFS installed. However, no unequivocal decrease was observed for in-cabin air pollutants after retrofitting. The AC/fan unit and the surrounding air pollutant concentrations played more important roles for determining the in-cabin air quality of school buses than did retrofit technologies. Although current retrofit systems reduce children's exposure while waiting to board at a bus station, retrofitting by itself does not protect children satisfactorily from in-cabin particle exposures. Turning on the bus engine increased in-cabin UFP levels significantly only when the wind blew from the bus' tailpipe toward its hood with its windows open. This indicated that wind direction and window position are significant factors determining how much self-released tailpipe emissions may penetrate into the bus cabin. The use of an air purifier was found to remove in-cabin particles by up to 50% which might be an alternative short-to-medium term strategy to protect children's health.

  1. Cinnamomum casia Extract Encapsulated Nanochitosan as Antihypercholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngadiwiyana; Purbowatiningrum; Fachriyah, Enny; Ismiyarto

    2017-02-01

    Atherosclerosis vascular disease with clinical manifestations such as cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading cause of death in Indonesia. One solution to these problems is a natural antihypercholesterol medicine by utilizing Cinnamomum casia extract. However, the use of natural extracts to lower blood cholesterol levels do not provide optimal results because it is possible that the active components of extract have been degraded/damaged during the absorption process. So that, we need to do the research to get a combination of chitosan nanoparticles-Cinnamomum casia. extract as a compound which has an antihypercholesterol activity through the in vitro study. Modification of natural extracts encapsulated nanochitosan be a freshness in this study, which were conducted using the method of inclusion. The combination of both has the dual function of protecting the natural extracts from degradation and deliver the natural extracts to the target site. Analysis of nanochitosan using the Particle Size Analyzer (PSA) shows the particle size of synthesis product that is equal to 64.9 nm. Encapsulation efficiency of Cinnamomum casia extract-Chitosan Nanoparticles known through UV-VIS spectrophotometry test and obtained the efficiency encapsulation percentage of 84.93%. Zeta Potential at 193,3 mv that chitosan appropriate for a delivery drug. Antihypercholesterol activity tested in vitro assay that showed the extract-nanoparticle chitosan in concentration 150 ppm gave the highest cholesterol decreasing level in the amount of 49.66% w/v. So it can be concluded that Cinnamomum casia extract can be encapsulated in nanoparticles of chitosan and proved that it has a cholesterol-lowering effect through the in vitro study.

  2. Energy extraction from a large-scale microbial fuel cell system treating municipal wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zheng; Wu, Liao; Zhang, Fei; He, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Development of microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology must address the challenges associated with energy extraction from large-scale MFC systems consisting of multiple modules. Herein, energy extraction is investigated with a 200-L MFC system (effective volume of 100 L for this study) treating actual municipal wastewater. A commercially available energy harvesting device (BQ 25504) is used successfully to convert 0.8-2.4 V from the MFCs to 5 V for charging ultracapacitors and running a DC motor. Four different types of serial connection containing different numbers of MFC modules are examined for energy extraction and conversion efficiency. The connection containing three rows of the MFCs has exhibited the best performance with the highest power output of ∼114 mW and the conversion efficiency of ∼80%. The weak performance of one-row MFCs negatively affects the overall performance of the connected MFCs in terms of both energy production and conversion. Those results indicate that an MFC system with balanced performance among individual modules will be critical to energy extraction. Future work will focus on application of the extracted energy to support MFC operation.

  3. Component-Oriented Behavior Extraction for Autonomic System Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakera, Marco; Wagner, Christian; Margaria,Tiziana; Hinchey, Mike; Vassev, Emil; Steffen, Bernhard

    2009-01-01

    Rich and multifaceted domain specific specification languages like the Autonomic System Specification Language (ASSL) help to design reliable systems with self-healing capabilities. The GEAR game-based Model Checker has been used successfully to investigate properties of the ESA Exo- Mars Rover in depth. We show here how to enable GEAR s game-based verification techniques for ASSL via systematic model extraction from a behavioral subset of the language, and illustrate it on a description of the Voyager II space mission.

  4. Particle size alterations of feedstuffs during in situ neutral detergent fiber incubation.

    PubMed

    Krämer, M; Nørgaard, P; Lund, P; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-07-01

    Particle size alterations during neutral detergent fiber (NDF) determination and in situ rumen incubation were analyzed by dry sieving and image analysis to evaluate the in situ procedure for estimation of NDF degradation parameters and indigestible NDF concentration in terms of particle size. Early-cut and late-cut grass silages, corn silage, alfalfa silage, rapeseed meal, and dried distillers grains were examined. Treatments were (1) drying and grinding of forage samples and grinding of concentrates; (2) neutral detergent-soluble (NDS) extraction; (3) machine washing and NDS extraction; (4) 24-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction; and (5) 288-h rumen incubation, machine washing, and NDS extraction. Degradation profiles for potentially degradable NDF were determined and image analysis was used to estimate particle size profiles and thereby the risk for particle loss. Particle dimensions changed during NDF determination and in situ rumen incubation and variations depended on feedstuff and treatment. Corn silage and late-cut grass silage varied most in particle area among feedstuffs, with an increase of 139% between 0 and 24h and a decrease of 77% between 24 and 288 h for corn silage and a decrease of 74% for late-cut grass silage between 24- and 288-h in situ rumen incubation. Especially for late-cut grass silage residues after 288 h in situ rumen incubation, a high mass proportion in the critical zone for escape was found. Particle area decreased linearly with increasing incubation time. Particle loss during in situ rumen incubation cannot be excluded and is likely to vary among feedstuffs. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis of entropy extraction efficiencies in random number generation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-05-01

    Random numbers (RNs) have applications in many areas: lottery games, gambling, computer simulation, and, most importantly, cryptography [N. Gisin et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 74 (2002) 145]. In cryptography theory, the theoretical security of the system calls for high quality RNs. Therefore, developing methods for producing unpredictable RNs with adequate speed is an attractive topic. Early on, despite the lack of theoretical support, pseudo RNs generated by algorithmic methods performed well and satisfied reasonable statistical requirements. However, as implemented, those pseudorandom sequences were completely determined by mathematical formulas and initial seeds, which cannot introduce extra entropy or information. In these cases, “random” bits are generated that are not at all random. Physical random number generators (RNGs), which, in contrast to algorithmic methods, are based on unpredictable physical random phenomena, have attracted considerable research interest. However, the way that we extract random bits from those physical entropy sources has a large influence on the efficiency and performance of the system. In this manuscript, we will review and discuss several randomness extraction schemes that are based on radiation or photon arrival times. We analyze the robustness, post-processing requirements and, in particular, the extraction efficiency of those methods to aid in the construction of efficient, compact and robust physical RNG systems.

  6. Multi-Target State Extraction for the SMC-PHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Si, Weijian; Wang, Liwei; Qu, Zhiyu

    2016-01-01

    The sequential Monte Carlo probability hypothesis density (SMC-PHD) filter has been demonstrated to be a favorable method for multi-target tracking. However, the time-varying target states need to be extracted from the particle approximation of the posterior PHD, which is difficult to implement due to the unknown relations between the large amount of particles and the PHD peaks representing potential target locations. To address this problem, a novel multi-target state extraction algorithm is proposed in this paper. By exploiting the information of measurements and particle likelihoods in the filtering stage, we propose a validation mechanism which aims at selecting effective measurements and particles corresponding to detected targets. Subsequently, the state estimates of the detected and undetected targets are performed separately: the former are obtained from the particle clusters directed by effective measurements, while the latter are obtained from the particles corresponding to undetected targets via clustering method. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method yields better estimation accuracy and reliability compared to existing methods. PMID:27322274

  7. Extraction of Data from a Hospital Information System to Perform Process Mining.

    PubMed

    Neira, Ricardo Alfredo Quintano; de Vries, Gert-Jan; Caffarel, Jennifer; Stretton, Erin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to share our experience in relevant data extraction from a hospital information system in preparation for a research study using process mining techniques. The steps performed were: research definition, mapping the normative processes, identification of tables and fields names of the database, and extraction of data. We then offer lessons learned during data extraction phase. Any errors made in the extraction phase will propagate and have implications on subsequent analyses. Thus, it is essential to take the time needed and devote sufficient attention to detail to perform all activities with the goal of ensuring high quality of the extracted data. We hope this work will be informative for other researchers to plan and execute extraction of data for process mining research studies.

  8. On the BRST Quantization of the Massless Bosonic Particle in Twistor-Like Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandos, Igor; Maznytsia, Alexey; Rudychev, Igor; Sorokin, Dmitri

    We study some features of bosonic-particle path-integral quantization in a twistor-like approach by the use of the BRST-BFV-quantization prescription. In the course of the Hamiltonian analysis we observe links between various formulations of the twistor-like particle by performing a conversion of the Hamiltonian constraints of one formulation to another. A particular feature of the conversion procedure applied to turn the second-class constraints into first-class constraints is that the simplest Lorentz-covariant way to do this is to convert a full mixed set of the initial first- and second-class constraints rather than explicitly extracting and converting only the second-class constraints. Another novel feature of the conversion procedure applied below is that in the case of the D = 4 and D = 6 twistor-like particle the number of new auxiliary Lorentz-covariant coordinates, which one introduces to get a system of first-class constraints in an extended phase space, exceeds the number of independent second-class constraints of the original dynamical system. We calculate the twistor-like particle propagator in D = 3,4,6 space-time dimensions and show that it coincides with that of a conventional massless bosonic particle.

  9. Particle damage sources for fused silica optics and their mitigation on high energy laser systems.

    PubMed

    Bude, J; Carr, C W; Miller, P E; Parham, T; Whitman, P; Monticelli, M; Raman, R; Cross, D; Welday, B; Ravizza, F; Suratwala, T; Davis, J; Fischer, M; Hawley, R; Lee, H; Matthews, M; Norton, M; Nostrand, M; VanBlarcom, D; Sommer, S

    2017-05-15

    High energy laser systems are ultimately limited by laser-induced damage to their critical components. This is especially true of damage to critical fused silica optics, which grows rapidly upon exposure to additional laser pulses. Much progress has been made in eliminating damage precursors in as-processed fused silica optics (the advanced mitigation process, AMP3), and very high damage resistance has been demonstrated in laboratory studies. However, the full potential of these improvements has not yet been realized in actual laser systems. In this work, we explore the importance of additional damage sources-in particular, particle contamination-for fused silica optics fielded in a high-performance laser environment, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser system. We demonstrate that the most dangerous sources of particle contamination in a system-level environment are laser-driven particle sources. In the specific case of the NIF laser, we have identified the two important particle sources which account for nearly all the damage observed on AMP3 optics during full laser operation and present mitigations for these particle sources. Finally, with the elimination of these laser-driven particle sources, we demonstrate essentially damage free operation of AMP3 fused silica for ten large optics (a total of 12,000 cm 2 of beam area) for shots from 8.6 J/cm 2 to 9.5 J/cm 2 of 351 nm light (3 ns Gaussian pulse shapes). Potentially many other pulsed high energy laser systems have similar particle sources, and given the insight provided by this study, their identification and elimination should be possible. The mitigations demonstrated here are currently being employed for all large UV silica optics on the National Ignition Facility.

  10. Particle Swarms in Fractures: Open Versus Partially Closed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, E.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    In the field, fractures may be isolated or connected to fluid reservoirs anywhere along the perimeter of a fracture. These boundaries affect fluid circulation, flow paths and communication with external reservoirs. The transport of drop like collections of colloidal-sized particles (particle swarms) in open and partially closed systems was studied. A uniform aperture synthetic fracture was constructed using two blocks (100 x 100 x 50 mm) of transparent acrylic placed parallel to each other. The fracture was fully submerged a tank filled with 100cSt silicone oil. Fracture apertures were varied from 5-80 mm. Partially closed systems were created by sealing the sides of the fracture with plastic film. The four boundary conditions study were: (Case 1) open, (Case 2) closed on the sides, (Case 3) closed on the bottom, and (Case 4) closed on both the sides and bottom of the fracture. A 15 μL dilute suspension of soda-lime glass particles in oil (2% by mass) were released into the fracture. Particle swarms were illuminated using a green (525 nm) LED array and imaged with a CCD camera. The presence of the additional boundaries modified the speed of the particle swarms (see figure). In Case 1, enhanced swarm transport was observed for a range of apertures, traveling faster than either very small or very large apertures. In Case 2, swarm velocities were enhanced over a larger range of fracture apertures than in any of the other cases. Case 3 shifted the enhanced transport regime to lower apertures and also reduced swarm speed when compared to Case 2. Finally, Case 4 eliminated the enhanced transport regime entirely. Communication between the fluid in the fracture and an external fluid reservoir resulted in enhanced swarm transport in Cases 1-3. The non-rigid nature of a swarm enables drag from the fracture walls to modify the swarm geometry. The particles composing a swarm reorganize in response to the fracture, elongating the swarm and maintaining its density. Unlike a

  11. Evaluation of various solvent systems for lipid extraction from wet microalgal biomass and its effects on primary metabolites of lipid-extracted biomass.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Faiz Ahmad; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Guldhe, Abhishek; Rawat, Ismail; Bux, Faizal

    2017-06-01

    Microalgae have tremendous potential to grow rapidly, synthesize, and accumulate lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates. The effects of solvent extraction of lipids on other metabolites such as proteins and carbohydrates in lipid-extracted algal (LEA) biomass are crucial aspects of algal biorefinery approach. An effective and economically feasible algae-based oil industry will depend on the selection of suitable solvent/s for lipid extraction, which has minimal effect on metabolites in lipid-extracted algae. In current study, six solvent systems were employed to extract lipids from dry and wet biomass of Scenedesmus obliquus. To explore the biorefinery concept, dichloromethane/methanol (2:1 v/v) was a suitable solvent for dry biomass; it gave 18.75% lipids (dry cell weight) in whole algal biomass, 32.79% proteins, and 24.73% carbohydrates in LEA biomass. In the case of wet biomass, in order to exploit all three metabolites, isopropanol/hexane (2:1 v/v) is an appropriate solvent system which gave 7.8% lipids (dry cell weight) in whole algal biomass, 20.97% proteins, and 22.87% carbohydrates in LEA biomass. Graphical abstract: Lipid extraction from wet microalgal biomass and biorefianry approach.

  12. Quasi-particle properties from tunneling in the v = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall state.

    PubMed

    Radu, Iuliana P; Miller, J B; Marcus, C M; Kastner, M A; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2008-05-16

    Quasi-particles with fractional charge and statistics, as well as modified Coulomb interactions, exist in a two-dimensional electron system in the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) regime. Theoretical models of the FQH state at filling fraction v = 5/2 make the further prediction that the wave function can encode the interchange of two quasi-particles, making this state relevant for topological quantum computing. We show that bias-dependent tunneling across a narrow constriction at v = 5/2 exhibits temperature scaling and, from fits to the theoretical scaling form, extract values for the effective charge and the interaction parameter of the quasi-particles. Ranges of values obtained are consistent with those predicted by certain models of the 5/2 state.

  13. Moricandia arvensis extracts protect against DNA damage, mutagenesis in bacteria system and scavenge the superoxide anion.

    PubMed

    Skandrani, Ines; Bouhlel, Ines; Limem, Ilef; Boubaker, Jihed; Bhouri, Wissem; Neffati, Aicha; Ben Sghaier, Mohamed; Kilani, Soumaya; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghedira-Chekir, Leila

    2009-02-01

    The mutagenic potential of total aqueous, total oligomers flavonoids (TOF), ethyl acetate (EA), chloroform (Chl), petroleum ether (PE) and methanol (MeOH) extracts from aerial parts of Moricandia arvensis was assessed using Ames Salmonella tester strains TA100 and TA1535 with and without metabolic activation (S9), and using plasmid pBluescript DNA assay. None of the different extracts produced a mutagenic effect, except aqueous extract when incubated with Salmonella typhimurium TA100 after metabolic activation. Likewise, the antimutagenicity of the same extracts was tested using the "Ames test". Our results showed that M. arvensis extracts possess antimutagenic effects against sodium azide (SA) in the two tested Salmonella assay systems, except metabolized aqueous and PE extracts when tested with S. typhimurium TA100 assay system. Different extracts were also found to be effective in protecting plasmid DNA against the strand breakage induced by hydroxyl radicals, except PE and aqueous extracts. Antioxidant capacity of the tested extracts was evaluated using the enzymatic (xanthine/xanthine oxidase assay) (X/XOD) and the non enzymatic (NBT/Riboflavine assay) systems. TOF extract was the more effective one in inhibiting both xanthine oxidase activity and NBT reduction.

  14. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan; Cheng, Yi-Ling

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposuremore » to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ► To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ► ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ► PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ► The

  15. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of three bufadienolides from Chinese medicine ChanSu.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yinshi; Bi, Jianjie; Zhang, Li; Ye, Baoxing

    2012-11-01

    In this study, the application of ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was shown to be more efficient in extracting anti-tumor bufadienolides (bufalin, cinobufagin and resibufogenin) from important animal medicine of ChanSu than the maceration extraction (ME) and soxhlet extraction (SE) method. The effects of ultrasonic variables including extraction solvent, solvent concentration, solvent to solid ratio, ultrasound power, temperature, extraction time and particle size on the yields of three bufadienolides were investigated. The optimum extraction conditions found were: 70% (v/v) methanol solution, solvent to solid ratio of 10ml/g, ultrasound power of 125W, temperature of 20°C, extraction time of 20min and particle size of 60-80 mesh. The extraction yields of bufalin, cinobufagin and resibufogenin were 43.17±0.85, 52.58±1.12, 137.70±2.65mg/g, respectively. In order to achieve a similar yield as UAE, soxhlet extraction required 6h and maceration extraction required much longer time of 18h. The results indicated that UAE is an alternative method for extracting bufadienolides from ChanSu. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sensor-based auto-focusing system using multi-scale feature extraction and phase correlation matching.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jinbeum; Yoo, Yoonjong; Kim, Jongheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-03-10

    This paper presents a novel auto-focusing system based on a CMOS sensor containing pixels with different phases. Robust extraction of features in a severely defocused image is the fundamental problem of a phase-difference auto-focusing system. In order to solve this problem, a multi-resolution feature extraction algorithm is proposed. Given the extracted features, the proposed auto-focusing system can provide the ideal focusing position using phase correlation matching. The proposed auto-focusing (AF) algorithm consists of four steps: (i) acquisition of left and right images using AF points in the region-of-interest; (ii) feature extraction in the left image under low illumination and out-of-focus blur; (iii) the generation of two feature images using the phase difference between the left and right images; and (iv) estimation of the phase shifting vector using phase correlation matching. Since the proposed system accurately estimates the phase difference in the out-of-focus blurred image under low illumination, it can provide faster, more robust auto focusing than existing systems.

  17. Sensor-Based Auto-Focusing System Using Multi-Scale Feature Extraction and Phase Correlation Matching

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jinbeum; Yoo, Yoonjong; Kim, Jongheon; Paik, Joonki

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel auto-focusing system based on a CMOS sensor containing pixels with different phases. Robust extraction of features in a severely defocused image is the fundamental problem of a phase-difference auto-focusing system. In order to solve this problem, a multi-resolution feature extraction algorithm is proposed. Given the extracted features, the proposed auto-focusing system can provide the ideal focusing position using phase correlation matching. The proposed auto-focusing (AF) algorithm consists of four steps: (i) acquisition of left and right images using AF points in the region-of-interest; (ii) feature extraction in the left image under low illumination and out-of-focus blur; (iii) the generation of two feature images using the phase difference between the left and right images; and (iv) estimation of the phase shifting vector using phase correlation matching. Since the proposed system accurately estimates the phase difference in the out-of-focus blurred image under low illumination, it can provide faster, more robust auto focusing than existing systems. PMID:25763645

  18. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  19. Chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles as Arrabidaea chica standardized extract carrier: synthesis, characterization, biocompatibility, and antiulcerogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Servat-Medina, Leila; González-Gómez, Alvaro; Reyes-Ortega, Felisa; Sousa, Ilza Maria Oliveira; Queiroz, Nubia de Cássia Almeida; Zago, Patricia Maria Wiziack; Jorge, Michelle Pedrosa; Monteiro, Karin Maia; de Carvalho, João Ernesto; San Román, Julio; Foglio, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Natural products using plants have received considerable attention because of their potential to treat various diseases. Arrabidaea chica (Humb. & Bonpl.) B. Verlot is a native tropical American vine with healing properties employed in folk medicine for wound healing, inflammation, and gastrointestinal colic. Applying nanotechnology to plant extracts has revealed an advantageous strategy for herbal drugs considering the numerous features that nanostructured systems offer, including solubility, bioavailability, and pharmacological activity enhancement. The present study reports the preparation and characterization of chitosan-sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (NPs) charged with A. chica standardized extract (AcE). Particle size and zeta potential were measured using a Zetasizer Nano ZS. The NP morphological characteristics were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Our studies indicated that the chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate mass ratio of 5 and volume ratio of 10 were found to be the best condition to achieve the lowest NP sizes, with an average hydrodynamic diameter of 150±13 nm and a zeta potential of +45±2 mV. Particle size decreased with AcE addition (60±10.2 nm), suggesting an interaction between the extract's composition and polymers. The NP biocompatibility was evaluated using human skin fibroblasts. AcE-NP demonstrated capability of maintaining cell viability at the lowest concentrations tested, stimulating cell proliferation at higher concentrations. Antiulcerogenic activity of AcE-NP was also evaluated with an acute gastric ulcer experimental model induced by ethanol and indomethacin. NPs loaded with A. chica extract reduced the ulcerative lesion index using lower doses compared with the free extract, suggesting that extract encapsulation in chitosan NPs allowed for a dose reduction for a gastroprotective effect. The AcE encapsulation offers an approach for further application of the A. chica extract that could be considered a potential

  20. Optimisation of Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) Seed Oil and Evaluation 
of Its Physicochemical and Bioactive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Çavdar, Hasene Keskin; Gök, Uğur; Göğüş, Fahrettin

    2017-01-01

    Summary Pomegranate seed oil was extracted in a closed-vessel high-pressure microwave system. The characteristics of the obtained oil, such as fatty acid composition, free fatty acidity, total phenolic content, antioxidant activity and colour, were compared to those of the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. Response surface methodology was applied to optimise extraction conditions: power (176–300 W), time (5–20 min), particle size (d=0.125–0.800 mm) and solvent to sample ratio (2:1, 6:1 and 10:1, by mass). The predicted highest extraction yield (35.19%) was obtained using microwave power of 220 W, particle size in the range of d=0.125–0.450 mm and solvent-to-sample ratio of 10:1 (by mass) in 5 min extraction time. Microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) resulted in higher extraction yield than that of Soxhlet (34.70% in 8 h) or cold (17.50% in 8 h) extraction. The dominant fatty acid of pomegranate seed oil was punicic acid (86%) irrespective of the extraction method. Oil obtained by MASE had better physicochemical properties, total phenolic content and antioxidant activity than the oil obtained by cold solvent extraction. PMID:28559737

  1. The impact of aerosol composition on the particle to gas partitioning of reactive mercury.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Andrew P; Schauer, James J

    2007-06-01

    A laboratory system was developed to study the gas-particle partitioning of reactive mercury (RM) as a function of aerosol composition in synthetic atmospheric particulate matter. The collection of RM was achieved by filter- and sorbent-based methods. Analyses of the RM collected on the filters and sorbents were performed using thermal extraction combined with cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectroscopy (CVAFS), allowing direct measurement of the RM load on the substrates. Laboratory measurements of the gas-particle partitioning coefficients of RM to atmospheric aerosol particles revealed a strong dependence on aerosol composition, with partitioning coefficients that varied by orders of magnitude depending on the composition of the particles. Particles of sodium nitrate and the chlorides of potassium and sodium had high partitioning coefficients, shifting the RM partitioning toward the particle phase, while ammonium sulfate, levoglucosan, and adipic acid caused the RM to partition toward the gas phase and, therefore, had partitioning coefficients that were lower by orders of magnitude.

  2. Extraction of total nucleic acid based on silica-coated magnetic particles for RT-qPCR detection of plant RNA virus/viroid.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ning; Deng, Congliang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Zhou, Qi; Ge, Guanglu; Liu, Yi; Yan, Wenlong; Xia, Qiang

    2014-02-01

    In this study, a nucleic acid extraction method based on silica-coated magnetic particles (SMPs) and RT-qPCR assay was developed to detect Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), Lily symptomless virus (LSV), Hop stunt viroid (HSVd) and grape yellow speckle viroid 1 (GYSVd-1). The amplification sequences of RT-qPCR were reversely transcribed in vitro as RNA standard templates. The standard curves covered six or seven orders of magnitude with a detection limit of 100 copies per each assay. Extraction efficiency of the SMPs method was evaluated by recovering spiked ssRNAs from plant samples and compared to two commercial kits (TRIzol and RNeasy Plant mini kit). Results showed that the recovery rate of SMPs method was comparable to the commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from lily leaves, whereas it was two or three times higher than commercial kits when spiked ssRNAs were extracted from grapevine leaves. SMPs method was also used to extract viral nucleic acid from15 ArMV-positive lily leaf samples and 15 LSV-positive lily leaf samples. SMPs method did not show statistically significant difference from other methods on detecting ArMV, but LSV. The SMPs method has the same level of virus load as the TRIzol, and its mean virus load of was 0.5log10 lower than the RNeasy Plant mini kit. Nucleic acid was extracted from 19 grapevine-leaf samples with SMPs and the two commercial kits and subsequently screened for HSVd and GYSVd-1 by RT-qPCR. Regardless of HSVd or GYSVd-1, SMPs method outperforms other methods on both positive rate and the viroid load. In conclusion, SMPs method was able to efficiently extract the nucleic acid of RNA viruses or viroids, especially grapevine viroids, from lily-leaf or grapevine-leaf samples for RT-qPCR detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Encapsulation on Antimicrobial Activity of
Herbal Extracts with Lysozyme

    PubMed Central

    Matouskova, Petra; Bokrova, Jitka; Benesova, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Summary Resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics has increased. The use of natural components with antimicrobial properties can be of great significance to reduce this problem. The presented work is focused on the study of the effect of encapsulation of selected plant and animal antimicrobial substances (herbs, spices, lysozyme and nisin) on their activity and stability. Antimicrobial components were packaged into liposomes and polysaccharide particles (alginate, chitosan and starch). Antimicrobial activity was tested against two Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus) and two Gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens) bacteria. Encapsulation was successful in all types of polysaccharide particles and liposomes. The prepared particles exhibited very good long-term stability, especially in aqueous conditions. Antimicrobial activity was retained in all types of particles. Liposomes with encapsulated herb and spice extracts exhibited very good inhibitory effect against all tested bacterial strains. Most of herbal extracts had very good antimicrobial effect against the tested Gram-negative bacterial strains, while Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to lysozyme particles. Thus, particles with co-encapsulated herbs and lysozyme are more active against different types of bacteria, and more stable and more effective during long-term storage. Particles with encapsulated mixture of selected plant extracts and lysozyme could be used as complex antimicrobial preparation with controlled release in the production of food and food supplements, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27956862

  4. Radiator Enhanced Geothermal System - A Revolutionary Method for Extracting Geothermal Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, S.; Marsh, B. D.; Hilpert, M.

    2017-12-01

    A new method of extracting geothermal energy, the Radiator Enhanced Geothermal System (RAD-EGS) has been developed. RAD-EGS attempts to mimic natural hydrothermal systems by 1) generating a vertical vane of artificially produced high porosity/permeability material deep in a hot sedimentary aquifer, 2) injecting water at surface temperatures to the bottom of the vane, where the rock is the hottest, 3) extracting super-heated water at the top of the vane. The novel RAD-EGS differs greatly from the currently available Enhanced Geothermal Systems in vane orientation, determined in the governing local crustal stress field by Shmax and Sl (meaning it is vertical), and in the vane location in a hot sedimentary aquifer, which naturally increases the longevity of the system. In this study, we explore several parameters regimes affecting the water temperature in the extraction well, keeping in mind that the minimum temperature of the extracted water has to be 150 °C in order for a geothermal system to be commercially viable. We used the COMSOL finite element package to simulate coupled heat and fluid transfer within the RAD-EGS model. The following geologic layers from top to bottom are accounted for in the model: i) confining upper layer, ii) hot sedimentary aquifer, and iii) underlying basement rock. The vane is placed vertically within the sedimentary aquifer. An injection well and an extraction well are also included in the simulation. We tested the model for a wide range of various parameters including background heat flux, thickness of geologic layers, geometric properties of the vane, diameter and location of the wells, fluid flow within the wells, regional hydraulic gradient, and permeability and porosity of the layers. The results show that among the aforementioned parameters, background heat flux and the depth of vane emplacement are highly significant in determining the level of commercial viability of the geothermal system. These results indicate that for the

  5. Effects of Fuel Components and Combustion Particle Physicochemical Properties on Toxicological Responses of Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Isabel C.; Sturrock, Anne; Ghiassi, Hossein; Woller, Diana J.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Paine, Robert; Reilly, Christopher; Kelly, Kerry E.

    2017-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of combustion particles that promote lung toxicity are not fully understood, hindered by the fact that combustion particles vary based on the fuel and combustion conditions. Real-world combustion-particle properties also continually change as new fuels are implemented, engines age, and engine technologies evolve. This work used laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled combustion conditions in an effort to understand the relationship between different particle properties and the activation of established toxicological outcomes in human lung cells (H441 and THP-1). Particles were generated from controlled combustion of two simple biofuel/diesel surrogates (methyl decanoate and dodecane/BD, and butanol and dodecane/AD) and compared to a widely studied reference diesel particle (NIST SRM2975/RD). BD, AD, and RD particles exhibited differences in size, surface area, extractable chemical mass, and the content of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Some of these differences were directly associated with different effects on biological responses. BD particles had the greatest surface area, amount of extractable material and oxidizing potential. These particles and extracts induced cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 enzyme mRNA in lung cells. AD particles and extracts had the greatest total PAH content and also caused CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA induction. The RD extract contained the highest relative concentration of 2-ring PAHs and stimulated the greatest level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) cytokine secretion. Finally, AD and RD were more potent activators of TRPA1 than BD, and while neither the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 nor the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) affected CYP1A1 or 1B1 mRNA induction, both inhibitors reduced IL-8 secretion and mRNA induction. These results highlight that differences in fuel and combustion conditions affect the physicochemical properties of particles, and

  6. Effects of fuel components and combustion particle physicochemical properties on toxicological responses of lung cells.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, Isabel C; Sturrock, Anne; Ghiassi, Hossein; Woller, Diana J; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Lighty, JoAnn S; Paine, Robert; Reilly, Christopher; Kelly, Kerry E

    2018-03-21

    The physicochemical properties of combustion particles that promote lung toxicity are not fully understood, hindered by the fact that combustion particles vary based on the fuel and combustion conditions. Real-world combustion-particle properties also continually change as new fuels are implemented, engines age, and engine technologies evolve. This work used laboratory-generated particles produced under controlled combustion conditions in an effort to understand the relationship between different particle properties and the activation of established toxicological outcomes in human lung cells (H441 and THP-1). Particles were generated from controlled combustion of two simple biofuel/diesel surrogates (methyl decanoate and dodecane/biofuel-blended diesel (BD), and butanol and dodecane/alcohol-blended diesel (AD)) and compared to a widely studied reference diesel (RD) particle (NIST SRM2975/RD). BD, AD, and RD particles exhibited differences in size, surface area, extractable chemical mass, and the content of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Some of these differences were directly associated with different effects on biological responses. BD particles had the greatest surface area, amount of extractable material, and oxidizing potential. These particles and extracts induced cytochrome P450 1A1 and 1B1 enzyme mRNA in lung cells. AD particles and extracts had the greatest total PAH content and also caused CYP1A1 and 1B1 mRNA induction. The RD extract contained the highest relative concentration of 2-ring PAHs and stimulated the greatest level of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) cytokine secretion. Finally, AD and RD were more potent activators of TRPA1 than BD, and while neither the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 nor the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) affected CYP1A1 or 1B1 mRNA induction, both inhibitors reduced IL-8 secretion and mRNA induction. These results highlight that differences in fuel and combustion conditions

  7. Use of elevator instruments when luxating and extracting teeth in dentistry: clinical techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In dentistry, elevator instruments are used to luxate teeth, and this technique imparts forces to tooth particles that sever the periodontal ligament around tooth roots inside the socket and expand alveolar bone around tooth particles. These effects can result in extraction of the tooth particles or facilitate systematic forceps extraction of the tooth particles. This article presents basic oral surgery techniques for applying elevators to luxate teeth. Determination of the optimal luxation technique requires understanding of the functions of the straight elevator and the Cryer elevator, the concept of purchase points, how the design elements of elevator working ends and tips influence the functionality of an elevator, application of forces to tooth particles, sectioning teeth at furcations, and bone removal to facilitate luxation. The effectiveness of tooth particle luxation is influenced by elevator tip shape and size, the magnitude and the vectors of forces applied to the tooth particle by the tip, and sectioning and bone removal within the operating field. Controlled extraction procedures are facilitated by a dental operating microscope or the magnification of binocular surgical loupes telescopes, combined with co-axial illumination. PMID:28770164

  8. PSO Algorithm Particle Filters for Improving the Performance of Lane Detection and Tracking Systems in Difficult Roads

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Wen-Chang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a robust lane detection and tracking method by combining particle filters with the particle swarm optimization method. This method mainly uses the particle filters to detect and track the local optimum of the lane model in the input image and then seeks the global optimal solution of the lane model by a particle swarm optimization method. The particle filter can effectively complete lane detection and tracking in complicated or variable lane environments. However, the result obtained is usually a local optimal system status rather than the global optimal system status. Thus, the particle swarm optimization method is used to further refine the global optimal system status in all system statuses. Since the particle swarm optimization method is a global optimization algorithm based on iterative computing, it can find the global optimal lane model by simulating the food finding way of fish school or insects under the mutual cooperation of all particles. In verification testing, the test environments included highways and ordinary roads as well as straight and curved lanes, uphill and downhill lanes, lane changes, etc. Our proposed method can complete the lane detection and tracking more accurately and effectively then existing options. PMID:23235453

  9. Nanoparticle inhalation augments particle-dependent systemic microvascular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Nurkiewicz, Timothy R; Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F; Cumpston, Jared L; Chen, Bean T; Frazer, David G; Castranova, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Background We have shown that pulmonary exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) impairs endothelium dependent dilation in systemic arterioles. Ultrafine PM has been suggested to be inherently more toxic by virtue of its increased surface area. The purpose of this study was to determine if ultrafine PM (or nanoparticle) inhalation produces greater microvascular dysfunction than fine PM. Rats were exposed to fine or ultrafine TiO2 aerosols (primary particle diameters of ~1 μm and ~21 nm, respectively) at concentrations which do not alter bronchoalveolar lavage markers of pulmonary inflammation or lung damage. Results By histopathologic evaluation, no significant inflammatory changes were seen in the lung. However, particle-containing macrophages were frequently seen in intimate contact with the alveolar wall. The spinotrapezius muscle was prepared for in vivo microscopy 24 hours after inhalation exposures. Intraluminal infusion of the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was used to evaluate endothelium-dependent arteriolar dilation. In control rats, A23187 infusion produced dose-dependent arteriolar dilations. In rats exposed to fine TiO2, A23187 infusion elicited vasodilations that were blunted in proportion to pulmonary particle deposition. In rats exposed to ultrafine TiO2, A23187 infusion produced arteriolar constrictions or significantly impaired vasodilator responses as compared to the responses observed in control rats or those exposed to a similar pulmonary load of fine particles. Conclusion These observations suggest that at equivalent pulmonary loads, as compared to fine TiO2, ultrafine TiO2 inhalation produces greater remote microvascular dysfunction. PMID:18269765

  10. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of essential oil from Swietenia mahagoni seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norodin, N. S. M.; Salleh, L. M.; Hartati; Mustafa, N. M.

    2016-11-01

    Swietenia mahagoni (Mahogany) is a traditional plant that is rich with bioactive compounds. In this study, process parameters such as particle size, extraction time, solvent flowrate, temperature and pressure were studied on the extraction of essential oil from Swietenia mahagoni seeds by using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction. Swietenia mahagoni seeds was extracted at a pressure of 20-30 MPa and a temperature of 40-60°C. The effect of particle size on overall extraction of essential oil was done at 30 MPa and 50°C while the extraction time of essential oil at various temperatures and at a constant pressure of 30 MPa was studied. Meanwhile, the effect of flowrate CO2 was determined at the flowrate of 2, 3 and 4 ml/min. From the experimental data, the extraction time of 120 minutes, particle size of 0.5 mm, the flowrate of CO2 of 4 ml/min, at a pressure of 30 MPa and the temperature of 60°C were the best conditions to obtain the highest yield of essential oil.

  11. Parameter extraction using global particle swarm optimization approach and the influence of polymer processing temperature on the solar cell parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A.; Dhar, A.

    2017-08-01

    The accurate estimation of the photovoltaic parameters is fundamental to gain an insight of the physical processes occurring inside a photovoltaic device and thereby to optimize its design, fabrication processes, and quality. A simulative approach of accurately determining the device parameters is crucial for cell array and module simulation when applied in practical on-field applications. In this work, we have developed a global particle swarm optimization (GPSO) approach to estimate the different solar cell parameters viz., ideality factor (η), short circuit current (Isc), open circuit voltage (Voc), shunt resistant (Rsh), and series resistance (Rs) with wide a search range of over ±100 % for each model parameter. After validating the accurateness and global search power of the proposed approach with synthetic and noisy data, we applied the technique to the extract the PV parameters of ZnO/PCDTBT based hybrid solar cells (HSCs) prepared under different annealing conditions. Further, we examine the variation of extracted model parameters to unveil the physical processes occurring when different annealing temperatures are employed during the device fabrication and establish the role of improved charge transport in polymer films from independent FET measurements. The evolution of surface morphology, optical absorption, and chemical compositional behaviour of PCDTBT co-polymer films as a function of processing temperature has also been captured in the study and correlated with the findings from the PV parameters extracted using GPSO approach.

  12. Dual-Particle Imaging System with Neutron Spectroscopy for Safeguard Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hamel, Michael C.; Weber, Thomas M.

    2017-11-01

    A dual-particle imager (DPI) has been designed that is capable of detecting gamma-ray and neutron signatures from shielded SNM. The system combines liquid organic and NaI(Tl) scintillators to form a combined Compton and neutron scatter camera. Effective image reconstruction of detected particles is a crucial component for maximizing the performance of the system; however, a key deficiency exists in the widely used iterative list-mode maximum-likelihood estimation-maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction technique. For MLEM a stopping condition is required to achieve a good quality solution but these conditions fail to achieve maximum image quality. Stochastic origin ensembles (SOE) imaging is a goodmore » candidate to address this problem as it uses Markov chain Monte Carlo to reach a stochastic steady-state solution. The application of SOE to the DPI is presented in this work.« less

  13. Cryogenic Microcalorimeter System for Ultra-High Resolution Alpha-Particle Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croce, M. P.; Bacrania, M. K.; Hoover, A. S.; Rabin, M. W.; Hoteling, N. J.; LaMont, S. P.; Plionis, A. A.; Dry, D. E.; Ullom, J. N.; Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Kotsubo, V.; Cantor, R.

    2009-12-01

    Microcalorimeters have been shown to yield unsurpassed energy resolution for alpha spectrometry, up to 1.06 keV FWHM at 5.3 MeV. These detectors use a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) to measure the temperature change in an absorber from energy deposited by an interacting alpha particle. Our system has four independent detectors mounted inside a liquid nitrogen/liquid helium cryostat. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) cools the detector stage to its operating temperature of 80 mK. Temperature regulation with ˜15-μK peak-to-peak variation is achieved by PID control of the ADR. The detectors are voltage-biased, and the current signal is amplified by a commercial SQUID readout system and digitized for further analysis. This paper will discuss design and operation of our microcalorimeter alpha-particle spectrometer, and will show recent results.

  14. Neutral Mass Spectrometry of Mega-Dalton Particles with Single-Particle Resolution using a Nano-Electromechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelber, Scott; Hanay, Mehmet; Naik, Akshay; Chi, Derrick; Hentz, Sebastien; Bullard, Caryn; Collinet, Eric; Duraffourg, Laurent; Roukes, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) enable mass sensing with unprecedented sensitivity and mass dynamic range. Previous works have relied on statistical analysis of multiple landing events to assemble mass spectra. Here we demonstrate the utility of using multiple modes of the NEMS device in determining the mass of individual molecules landing on the NEMS. Analyte particles in vapor form are produced using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization. Resonant frequencies of the first two modes of a single NEMS device, placed in close proximity to the analyte source, are tracked using parallel phase locked loops. Each analyte molecule landing on the NEMS generates a distinct frequency shift in the two modes. These time correlated frequency jumps are used to evaluate the mass of each analyte particle landing on the NEMS and thus generate mass spectra. We present the latest experimental results using this scheme and also demonstrate the utility for mass spectrometry of large biomolecules. This NEMS-Mass Spec. system offers a new tool for structural biology and pathology for the analysis of large proteins, protein complexes, and viruses.

  15. Rotavirus-like particles primary recovery from insect cells in aqueous two-phase systems.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Jorge; Mena, Jimmy A; Cisneros-Ruiz, Mayra; Ramírez, Octavio T; Palomares, Laura A; Rito-Palomares, Marco

    2006-09-14

    Virus-like particles have a wide range of applications, including vaccination, gene therapy, and even as nanomaterials. Their successful utilization depends on the availability of selective and scalable methods of product recovery and purification that integrate effectively with upstream operations. In this work, a strategy based on aqueous two phase system (ATPS) was developed for the recovery of double-layered rotavirus-like particles (dlRLP) produced by the insect cell-baculovirus expression system. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecular mass, PEG and salt concentrations, and volume ratio (Vr, volume of top phase/volume of bottom phase) were evaluated in order to determine the conditions where dlRLP and contaminants concentrated to opposite phases. Two-stage ATPS consisting of PEG 400-phosphate with a Vr of 13.0 and a tie-line length (TLL) of 35% (w/w) at pH 7.0 provided the best conditions for processing highly concentrated crude extract from disrupted cells (dlRLP concentration of 5 microg/mL). In such conditions intracellular dlRLP accumulated in the top phase (recovery of 90%), whereas cell debris remained in the interface. Furthermore, dlRLP from culture supernatants accumulated preferentially in the interface (recovery of 82%) using ATPS with a Vr of 1.0, pH of 7.0, PEG 3350 (10.1%, w/w) and phosphate (10.9%, w/w). The purity of dlRLP from culture supernatant increased up to 55 times after ATPS. The use of ATPS resulted in a recovery process that produced dlRLP with a purity between 6 and 11% and an overall product yield of 85% (w/w), considering purification from intracellular and extracellular dlRLP. Overall, the strategy proposed in this study is simpler than traditional methods for recovering dlRLP, and represents a scalable and economically viable alternative for production processes of vaccines against rotavirus infection with significant scope for generic commercial application.

  16. Conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system for fluorescence measurements of individual airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Paul; Pinnick, R. G.; Hill, Steven C.; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1996-03-01

    We report the design and operation of a prototype conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system that can record the fluorescence spectra of individual, micrometer-sized aerosols as they traverse an intense 488-nm intracavity laser beam. The instrument's image-intensified CCD detector is gated by elastic scattering or by undispersed fluorescence from particles that enter the spectrograph's field of view. It records spectra only from particles with preselected scattering-fluorescence levels (a fiber-optic-photomultiplier subsystem provides the gating signal). This conditional-sampling procedure reduces data-handling rates and increases the signal-to-noise ratio by restricting the system's exposures to brief periods when aerosols traverse the beam. We demonstrate these advantages by reliably capturing spectra from individual fluorescent microspheres dispersed in an airstream. The conditional-sampling procedure also permits some discrimination among different types of particles, so that spectra may be recorded from the few interesting particles present in a cloud of background aerosol. We demonstrate such discrimination by measuring spectra from selected fluorescent microspheres in a mixture of two types of microspheres, and from bacterial spores in a mixture of spores and nonfluorescent kaolin particles.

  17. High-level systemic expression of conserved influenza epitope in plants on the surface of rod-shaped chimeric particles.

    PubMed

    Petukhova, Natalia V; Gasanova, Tatiana V; Ivanov, Peter A; Atabekov, Joseph G

    2014-04-21

    Recombinant viruses based on the cDNA copy of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) genome carrying different versions of the conserved M2e epitope from influenza virus A cloned into the coat protein (CP) gene were obtained and partially characterized by our group previously; cysteines in the human consensus M2e sequence were changed to serine residues. This work intends to show some biological properties of these viruses following plant infections. Agroinfiltration experiments on Nicotiana benthamiana confirmed the efficient systemic expression of M2e peptides, and two point amino acid substitutions in recombinant CPs significantly influenced the symptoms and development of viral infections. Joint expression of RNA interference suppressor protein p19 from tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) did not affect the accumulation of CP-M2e-ser recombinant protein in non-inoculated leaves. RT-PCR analysis of RNA isolated from either infected leaves or purified TMV-M2e particles proved the genetic stability of TMV‑based viral vectors. Immunoelectron microscopy of crude plant extracts demonstrated that foreign epitopes are located on the surface of chimeric virions. The rod‑shaped geometry of plant-produced M2e epitopes is different from the icosahedral or helical filamentous arrangement of M2e antigens on the carrier virus-like particles (VLP) described earlier. Thereby, we created a simple and efficient system that employs agrobacteria and plant viral vectors in order to produce a candidate broad-spectrum flu vaccine.

  18. Power source selection for neutral particle beam systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, Sidney W.; Chi, John W. H.; Hill, Gregory

    Space based neutral particle beams (NPB) are being considered for use as an SDI weapon as well as a mid-course discriminator. These systems require a radio frequency (RF) power source. Five types of amplifiers were considered for the RF power source: the klystron, the klystrode, the tetrode, the cross field amplifier, and the solid state amplifier. A number of different types of power source systems (nuclear and non-nuclear) were considered for integration with these amplifiers. The most attractive amplifier power system concepts were identified through comparative evaluations that took into account the total masses of integrated amplifier power source systems as well as a number of other factors that consisted of development cost, technology risk, vulnerability, survivability, reliability, and impacts on spacecraft stabilization. These concepts are described and conclusions drawn.

  19. Effective Forces Between Colloidal Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tehver, Riina; Banavar, Jayanth R.; Koplik, Joel

    1999-01-01

    Colloidal suspensions have proven to be excellent model systems for the study of condensed matter and its phase behavior. Many of the properties of colloidal suspensions can be investigated with a systematic variation of the characteristics of the systems and, in addition, the energy, length and time scales associated with them allow for experimental probing of otherwise inaccessible regimes. The latter property also makes colloidal systems vulnerable to external influences such as gravity. Experiments performed in micro-ravity by Chaikin and Russell have been invaluable in extracting the true behavior of the systems without an external field. Weitz and Pusey intend to use mixtures of colloidal particles with additives such as polymers to induce aggregation and form weak, tenuous, highly disordered fractal structures that would be stable in the absence of gravitational forces. When dispersed in a polarizable medium, colloidal particles can ionize, emitting counterions into the solution. The standard interaction potential in these charged colloidal suspensions was first obtained by Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek. The DLVO potential is obtained in the mean-field linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approximation and thus has limited applicability. For more precise calculations, we have used ab initio density functional theory. In our model, colloidal particles are charged hard spheres, the counterions are described by a continuum density field and the solvent is treated as a homogeneous medium with a specified dielectric constant. We calculate the effective forces between charged colloidal particles by integrating over the solvent and counterion degrees of freedom, taking into account the direct interactions between the particles as well as particle-counterion, counterion-counterion Coulomb, counterion entropic and correlation contributions. We obtain the effective interaction potential between charged colloidal particles in different configurations. We evaluate two

  20. Emergent ultra–long-range interactions between active particles in hybrid active–inactive systems

    PubMed Central

    Steimel, Joshua P.; Aragones, Juan L.; Hu, Helen; Qureshi, Naser; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Particle–particle interactions determine the state of a system. Control over the range of such interactions as well as their magnitude has been an active area of research for decades due to the fundamental challenges it poses in science and technology. Very recently, effective interactions between active particles have gathered much attention as they can lead to out-of-equilibrium cooperative states such as flocking. Inspired by nature, where active living cells coexist with lifeless objects and structures, here we study the effective interactions that appear in systems composed of active and passive mixtures of colloids. Our systems are 2D colloidal monolayers composed primarily of passive (inactive) colloids, and a very small fraction of active (spinning) ferromagnetic colloids. We find an emergent ultra–long-range attractive interaction induced by the activity of the spinning particles and mediated by the elasticity of the passive medium. Interestingly, the appearance of such interaction depends on the spinning protocol and has a minimum actuation timescale below which no attraction is observed. Overall, these results clearly show that, in the presence of elastic components, active particles can interact across very long distances without any chemical modification of the environment. Such a mechanism might potentially be important for some biological systems and can be harnessed for newer developments in synthetic active soft materials. PMID:27071096

  1. Particle Based Simulations of Complex Systems with MP2C : Hydrodynamics and Electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutmann, Godehard; Westphal, Lidia; Bolten, Matthias

    2010-09-01

    Particle based simulation methods are well established paths to explore system behavior on microscopic to mesoscopic time and length scales. With the development of new computer architectures it becomes more and more important to concentrate on local algorithms which do not need global data transfer or reorganisation of large arrays of data across processors. This requirement strongly addresses long-range interactions in particle systems, i.e. mainly hydrodynamic and electrostatic contributions. In this article, emphasis is given to the implementation and parallelization of the Multi-Particle Collision Dynamics method for hydrodynamic contributions and a splitting scheme based on Multigrid for electrostatic contributions. Implementations are done for massively parallel architectures and are demonstrated for the IBM Blue Gene/P architecture Jugene in Jülich.

  2. Particle motion and Penrose processes around rotating regular black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon

    2016-07-01

    The neutral particle motion around rotating regular black hole that was derived from the Ayón-Beato-García (ABG) black hole solution by the Newman-Janis algorithm in the preceding paper (Toshmatov et al., Phys. Rev. D, 89:104017, 2014) has been studied. The dependencies of the ISCO (innermost stable circular orbits along geodesics) and unstable orbits on the value of the electric charge of the rotating regular black hole have been shown. Energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole through various processes has been examined. We have found expression of the center of mass energy for the colliding neutral particles coming from infinity, based on the BSW (Baňados-Silk-West) mechanism. The electric charge Q of rotating regular black hole decreases the potential of the gravitational field as compared to the Kerr black hole and the particles demonstrate less bound energy at the circular geodesics. This causes an increase of efficiency of the energy extraction through BSW process in the presence of the electric charge Q from rotating regular black hole. Furthermore, we have studied the particle emission due to the BSW effect assuming that two neutral particles collide near the horizon of the rotating regular extremal black hole and produce another two particles. We have shown that efficiency of the energy extraction is less than the value 146.6 % being valid for the Kerr black hole. It has been also demonstrated that the efficiency of the energy extraction from the rotating regular black hole via the Penrose process decreases with the increase of the electric charge Q and is smaller in comparison to 20.7 % which is the value for the extreme Kerr black hole with the specific angular momentum a= M.

  3. SITE DEMONSTRATION OF THE CF SYSTEMS ORGANIC EXTRACTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CF Systems Organic Extraction Process was used to remove PCBs from contaminated sediment dredged from the New Bedford Harbor. This work was done as part of a field demonstration under EPA's Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program. The purpose of the SITE p...

  4. Particle image velocimetry based on wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunxiao; Li, Enbang; Li, Hongqiang

    2018-01-01

    This paper introduces a technical approach of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) based particle image velocimetry (PIV). It is designed to measure transient flows with different scales of velocity by capturing multiple particle images in one exposure. These images are separated by different wavelengths, and thus the pulse separation time is not influenced by the frame rate of the camera. A triple-pulsed PIV system has been created in order to prove the feasibility of WDM-PIV. This is demonstrated in a sieve plate extraction column model by simultaneously measuring the fast flow in the downcomer and the slow vortices inside the plates. A simple displacement/velocity field combination method has also been developed. The constraints imposed by WDM-PIV are limited wavelength choices of available light sources and cameras. The usage of WDM technique represents a feasible way to realize multiple-pulsed PIV.

  5. Core-Shell Particles as Building Blocks for Systems with High Duality Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimzadegan, Aso; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    Material electromagnetic duality symmetry requires a system to have equal electric and magnetic responses. Intrinsically dual materials that meet the duality conditions at the level of the constitutive relations do not exist in many frequency bands. Nevertheless, discrete objects like metallic helices and homogeneous dielectric spheres can be engineered to approximate the dual behavior. We exploit the extra degrees of freedom of a core-shell dielectric sphere in a particle optimization procedure. The duality symmetry of the resulting particle is more than 1 order of magnitude better than previously reported nonmagnetic objects. We use T -matrix-based multiscattering techniques to show that the improvement is transferred onto the duality symmetry of composite objects when the core-shell particle is used as a building block instead of homogeneous spheres. These results are relevant for the fashioning of systems with high duality symmetry, which are required for some technologically important effects.

  6. Application of Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm in the Heating System Planning Problem

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Rong-Jiang; Yu, Nan-Yang; Hu, Jun-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Based on the life cycle cost (LCC) approach, this paper presents an integral mathematical model and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm for the heating system planning (HSP) problem. The proposed mathematical model minimizes the cost of heating system as the objective for a given life cycle time. For the particularity of HSP problem, the general particle swarm optimization algorithm was improved. An actual case study was calculated to check its feasibility in practical use. The results show that the improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO) algorithm can more preferably solve the HSP problem than PSO algorithm. Moreover, the results also present the potential to provide useful information when making decisions in the practical planning process. Therefore, it is believed that if this approach is applied correctly and in combination with other elements, it can become a powerful and effective optimization tool for HSP problem. PMID:23935429

  7. Application of Modified Particle Swarm Optimization Method for Parameter Extraction of 2-D TEC Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toker, C.; Gokdag, Y. E.; Arikan, F.; Arikan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Ionosphere is a very important part of Space Weather. Modeling and monitoring of ionospheric variability is a major part of satellite communication, navigation and positioning systems. Total Electron Content (TEC), which is defined as the line integral of the electron density along a ray path, is one of the parameters to investigate the ionospheric variability. Dual-frequency GPS receivers, with their world wide availability and efficiency in TEC estimation, have become a major source of global and regional TEC modeling. When Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) of International GPS Service (IGS) centers (http://iono.jpl.nasa.gov/gim.html) are investigated, it can be observed that regional ionosphere along the midlatitude regions can be modeled as a constant, linear or a quadratic surface. Globally, especially around the magnetic equator, the TEC surfaces resemble twisted and dispersed single centered or double centered Gaussian functions. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) proved itself as a fast converging and an effective optimization tool in various diverse fields. Yet, in order to apply this optimization technique into TEC modeling, the method has to be modified for higher efficiency and accuracy in extraction of geophysical parameters such as model parameters of TEC surfaces. In this study, a modified PSO (mPSO) method is applied to regional and global synthetic TEC surfaces. The synthetic surfaces that represent the trend and small scale variability of various ionospheric states are necessary to compare the performance of mPSO over number of iterations, accuracy in parameter estimation and overall surface reconstruction. The Cramer-Rao bounds for each surface type and model are also investigated and performance of mPSO are tested with respect to these bounds. For global models, the sample points that are used in optimization are obtained using IGS receiver network. For regional TEC models, regional networks such as Turkish National Permanent GPS Network (TNPGN

  8. Quantification of correlations in quantum many-particle systems.

    PubMed

    Byczuk, Krzysztof; Kuneš, Jan; Hofstetter, Walter; Vollhardt, Dieter

    2012-02-24

    We introduce a well-defined and unbiased measure of the strength of correlations in quantum many-particle systems which is based on the relative von Neumann entropy computed from the density operator of correlated and uncorrelated states. The usefulness of this general concept is demonstrated by quantifying correlations of interacting electrons in the Hubbard model and in a series of transition-metal oxides using dynamical mean-field theory.

  9. The extraction process optimization of antioxidant polysaccharides from Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Pakrokh Ghavi, Peyman

    2015-04-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) with a central composite rotatable design (CCRD) based on five levels was employed to model and optimize four experimental operating conditions of extraction temperature (10-90 °C) and time (6-30 h), particle size (6-24 mm) and water to solid (W/S, 10-50) ratio, obtaining polysaccharides from Althaea officinalis roots with high yield and antioxidant activity. For each response, a second-order polynomial model with high R(2) values (> 0.966) was developed using multiple linear regression analysis. Results showed that the most significant (P < 0.05) extraction conditions that affect the yield and antioxidant activity of extracted polysaccharides were the main effect of extraction temperature and the interaction effect of the particle size and W/S ratio. The optimum conditions to maximize yield (10.80%) and antioxidant activity (84.09%) for polysaccharides extraction from A. officinalis roots were extraction temperature 60.90 °C, extraction time 12.01 h, particle size 12.0mm and W/S ratio of 40.0. The experimental values were found to be in agreement with those predicted, indicating the models suitability for optimizing the polysaccharides extraction conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection against fine particle-induced pulmonary and systemic inflammation by omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yong; Hao, Lei; Liu, Ying-Hua; Chen, Chih-Yu; Pai, Victor J; Kang, Jing X

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to fine particulate matter, such as through air pollution, has been linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases. However, few measures have been taken to reduce the health risks associated with fine particle exposure. The identification of safe and effective methods to protect against fine particle exposure-related damage is urgently needed. We used synthetic, non-toxic, fluorescent fine particles to investigate the physical distribution of inhaled fine particles and their effects on pulmonary and systemic inflammation in mice. Tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids were elevated via dietary supplementation or the fat-1 transgenic mouse model. Markers of pulmonary and systemic inflammation were assessed. We discovered that fine particulate matter not only accumulates in the lungs but can also penetrate the pulmonary barrier and travel into other organs, including the brain, liver, spleen, kidney, and testis. These particles induced both pulmonary and systemic inflammation and increased oxidative stress. We also show that elevating tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids was effective in reducing fine particle-induced inflammation, whether as a preventive method (prior to exposure) or as an intervention (after exposure). These results advance our understanding of how fine particles contribute to disease development and suggest that increasing tissue omega-3 levels may be a promising nutritional means for reducing the risk of diseases induced by particle exposure. Our findings demonstrate that elevating tissue omega-3 levels can prevent and treat fine particle-induced health problems and thereby present an immediate, practical solution for reducing the disease burden of air pollution. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA adducts induced by in vitro activation of extracts of diesel and biodiesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Nelson, Garret B; Mutlu, Esra; Warren, Sarah H; Gilmour, M Ian; DeMarini, David M

    2015-01-01

    Biodiesel and biodiesel-blend fuels offer a renewable alternative to petroleum diesel, but few data are available concerning the carcinogenic potential of biodiesel exhausts. We compared the formation of covalent DNA adducts by the in vitro metabolic activation of organic extracts of diesel-exhaust particles (DEP) from petroleum diesel and soy biodiesel and correlated DNA adduct levels and mutagenicity in Salmonella TA100. We examined two different DEP from petroleum diesel (C-DEP and B0), one from soy bean oil biodiesel (B100) and one from combustion of a blend of 20% B100 and 80% B0 (B20) for in vitro DNA adduct-forming potential under oxidative or nitroreductive conditions in the presence of calf thymus DNA as well as in vivo in Salmonella TA100. The modified DNA was hydrolyzed and analyzed by (32)P-postlabeling using either butanol extraction or nuclease P1 pre-enrichment. Multiple DNA adducts were produced with chromatographic mobilities consistent with PAH and nitro-PAH adducts. The types and quantities of DNA adducts produced by the two independent petroleum diesel DEP were similar, with both polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)- and nitro-PAH-derived adducts formed. Relative potencies for S9-mediated DNA adduct formation, either per mass of particulate or per MJ(th) energy consumed were B100 > B0 > B20. Soy biodiesel emissions induced DNA damage in the form of presumptive PAH and nitro-PAH DNA adducts that correlated with mutagenicity in Salmonella. B20 is the soy biodiesel used most commonly in the US, and it produced the lowest DNA adduct-emission factor, ∼50% that of petroleum diesel.

  12. Supercritical fluid extraction as a means of reducing the carbon contamination inherent in samples of silica aerogel destined for the capture of CHON cosmic dust particles in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H.-P.; Wright, I. P.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1994-11-01

    Silica aerogel represents an ideal material for use as a cosmic dust capture medium. Its low density enables impacting particles to decelerate and stop within a small quality of the material, but without any severe heating. Hence the particles, which remain unmelted, can subsequently be removed and studied. Since a large proportion of the prospective cosmic dust is likely to be enriched in elements such as carbon and hydrogen (typically 5 wt% C, 20 wt% H2O), it is imperative that the aerogel used in the capture cell contains minimal quantities of these elements. Unfortunately the lowest density aerogels contain carbon at levels of 5 wt%; water is present in even greater amounts. Thus, techniques need to be identified to remove these contaminants. Herein, an attempt is made to use supercritical fluid extraction to remove carbon (and water). The investigation was tried to identify the most suitable parameters (i.e. CO2 density, solvating power using single or multiple extractions, use of modifier, etc.) necessary for removal of contaminants. A set of conditions was derived which was able to remove 90% of carbon contaminants from an aerogel of 0.12 g/cu cm density. This involved the use of multiple extractions with gradient temperatures (i.e. variable CO2 density), but without the use of a methanol modifier. Unfortunately, the same technique was less efficacious at removing carbon from aerogels with densities less than 0.12 g/cu cm. At present the extraction procedure has only been tried on a laboratory scale, but clearly this could be scaled-up in the future.

  13. The charged particle veto system of the cosmic ray electron synchrotron telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geske, Matthew T.

    The Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope is a balloon-borne detector designed to measure cosmic electrons at energies from 2 to 50 TeV. CREST completed a successful 10-day Antarctic flight which launched on December 25, 2011. CREST utilizes a novel detection method, searching for the synchrotron radiation emitted by the interaction of TeV-energy electrons with the geomagnetic field. The main detector component for CREST is a 32 x 32 square array of BaF 2 crystal detectors coupled to photomultiplier tubes, with an inter-crystal spacing of 7.5 cm. This document describes the design, construction and flight of the CREST experiment. A special focus is put upon the charged particle veto system, and its use in the analysis of the CREST results. The veto system, consisting of a series of 27 large slabs of organic plastic scintillator read out through photomultiplier tubes, is designed as a passive mechanism for rejecting charged particle events that could contaminate the X-ray signal from synchrotron radiation. The CREST veto system has 99.15% geometric coverage, with individual detector components exhibiting a mean detection efficiency of 99.7%. In whole, the veto system provides a charged particle rejection factor of better than 7 x 103.

  14. On the frequency response of a Wenglor particle-counting system for aeolian transport measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Bernard O.; Davidson-Arnott, Robin G. D.; Hilton, Michael J.; Fraser, Douglas

    2018-06-01

    A commonly deployed particle-counting system for aeolian saltation flux, consisting of a Wenglor fork sensor and an Onset Hobo Pulse Input Adapter linked to an Onset Hobo Energy Logger Pro data logger, was tested for frequency response. The Wenglor fork sensor is an optical gate device that has very fast switching capacity that can accommodate the time of flight of saltating sand particles through the sensing volume with the exception of very fine sand or silt and very quickly moving particles. The Pulse Input Adapter, in contrast, imposes limitations on the frequency response of the system. The manufacturer of the pulse adapter specifies an upper limit of 120 Hz, although bench tests with an electronic pulse generator indicate that the frequency response of the Pulse Input Adapter, in isolation, is excellent up to 3000 Hz, with only small error (less than 1.6%) due to under-counting during data transfer intervals. A mechanical test of the integrated system (fork sensor, pulse input adapter, and data logger) demonstrates excellent performance up to about 700 Hz (less than 2% error), but significant under-counting above 1000 Hz for unknown reasons. This specific particle-counting system therefore has a frequency response that is well suited for investigation of the dynamics of aeolian saltation as typically encountered in most field conditions on coastal beaches with the exception of extreme wind events and very small particle sizes.

  15. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particle residuals sampled by three different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worringen, A.; Kandler, K.; Benker, N.; Dirsch, T.; Weinbruch, S.; Mertes, S.; Schenk, L.; Kästner, U.; Frank, F.; Nillius, B.; Bundke, U.; Rose, D.; Curtius, J.; Kupiszewski, P.; Weingartner, E.; Schneider, J.; Schmidt, S.; Ebert, M.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, three different techniques are used to separate ice-nucleating particles (INP) and ice particle residuals (IPR) from non-ice-active particles: the Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI), which sample ice particles from mixed phase clouds and allow for the analysis of the residuals, as well as the combination of the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) and the Ice Nuclei Pumped Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI), which provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated ones for analysis. The collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine their size, chemical composition and mixing state. Samples were taken during January/February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch. All INP/IPR-separating techniques had considerable abundances (median 20-70%) of contamination artifacts (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH + IN-PCVI: steel particles). Also, potential measurement artifacts (soluble material) occurred (median abundance < 20%). After removal of the contamination particles, silicates and Ca-rich particles, carbonaceous material and metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types separated by all three techniques. Minor types include soot and Pb-bearing particles. Sea-salt and sulfates were identified by all three methods as INP/IPR. Lead was identified in less than 10% of the INP/IPR. It was mainly present as an internal mixture with other particle types, but also external lead-rich particles were found. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 400 nm geometric diameter. In a few cases, a second super-micron maximum was identified. Soot/carbonaceous material and metal oxides were present mainly in the submicron range. ISI and FINCH yielded silicates and Ca-rich particles mainly with diameters above 1 μm, while the Ice-CVI also

  16. Development of three-dimensional integrated microchannel-electrode system to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics

    PubMed Central

    Obara, H.; Sapkota, A.; Takei, M.

    2016-01-01

    An optical transparent 3-D Integrated Microchannel-Electrode System (3-DIMES) has been developed to understand the particles' movement with electrokinetics in the microchannel. In this system, 40 multilayered electrodes are embedded at the 2 opposite sides along the 5 square cross-sections of the microchannel by using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems technology in order to achieve the optical transparency at the other 2 opposite sides. The concept of the 3-DIMES is that the particles are driven by electrokinetic forces which are dielectrophoretic force, thermal buoyancy, electrothermal force, and electroosmotic force in a three-dimensional scope by selecting the excitation multilayered electrodes. As a first step to understand the particles' movement driven by electrokinetic forces in high conductive fluid (phosphate buffer saline (PBS)) with the 3-DIMES, the velocities of particles' movement with one pair of the electrodes are measured three dimensionally by Particle Image Velocimetry technique in PBS; meanwhile, low conductive fluid (deionized water) is used as a reference. Then, the particles' movement driven by the electrokinetic forces is discussed theoretically to estimate dominant forces exerting on the particles. Finally, from the theoretical estimation, the particles' movement mainly results from the dominant forces which are thermal buoyancy and electrothermal force, while the velocity vortex formed at the 2 edges of the electrodes is because of the electroosmotic force. The conclusions suggest that the 3-DIMES with PBS as high conductive fluid helps to understand the three-dimensional advantageous flow structures for cell manipulation in biomedical applications. PMID:27042247

  17. Particle nonuniformity effects on particle cloud flames in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berlad, A. L.; Tangirala, V.; Seshadri, K.; Facca, L. T.; Ogrin, J.; Ross, H.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental and analytical studies of particle cloud combustion at reduced gravity reveal the substantial roles that particle cloud nonuniformities may play in particle cloud combustion. Macroscopically uniform, quiescent particle cloud systems (at very low gravitational levels and above) sustain processes which can render them nonuniform on both macroscopic and microscopic scales. It is found that a given macroscopically uniform, quiescent particle cloud flame system can display a range of microscopically nonuniform features which lead to a range of combustion features. Microscopically nonuniform particle cloud distributions are difficult experimentally to detect and characterize. A uniformly distributed lycopodium cloud of particle-enriched microscopic nonuniformities in reduced gravity displays a range of burning velocities for any given overall stoichiometry. The range of observed and calculated burning velocities corresponds to the range of particle enriched concentrations within a characteristic microscopic nonuniformity. Sedimentation effects (even in reduced gravity) are also examined.

  18. Two-particle microrheology of quasi-2D viscous systems.

    PubMed

    Prasad, V; Koehler, S A; Weeks, Eric R

    2006-10-27

    We study the spatially correlated motions of colloidal particles in a quasi-2D system (human serum albumin protein molecules at an air-water interface) for different surface viscosities eta s. We observe a transition in the behavior of the correlated motion, from 2D interface dominated at high eta s to bulk fluid dependent at low eta s. The correlated motions can be scaled onto a master curve which captures the features of this transition. This master curve also characterizes the spatial dependence of the flow field of a viscous interface in response to a force. The scale factors used for the master curve allow for the calculation of the surface viscosity eta s that can be compared to one-particle measurements.

  19. Extracting and standardizing medication information in clinical text - the MedEx-UIMA system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Wu, Yonghui; Shah, Anushi; Priyanka, Priyanka; Denny, Joshua C; Xu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of medication information embedded in clinical text is important for research using electronic health records (EHRs). However, most of current medication information extraction systems identify drug and signature entities without mapping them to standard representation. In this study, we introduced the open source Java implementation of MedEx, an existing high-performance medication information extraction system, based on the Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) framework. In addition, we developed new encoding modules in the MedEx-UIMA system, which mapped an extracted drug name/dose/form to both generalized and specific RxNorm concepts and translated drug frequency information to ISO standard. We processed 826 documents by both systems and verified that MedEx-UIMA and MedEx (the Python version) performed similarly by comparing both results. Using two manually annotated test sets that contained 300 drug entries from medication list and 300 drug entries from narrative reports, the MedEx-UIMA system achieved F-measures of 98.5% and 97.5% respectively for encoding drug names to corresponding RxNorm generic drug ingredients, and F-measures of 85.4% and 88.1% respectively for mapping drug names/dose/form to the most specific RxNorm concepts. It also achieved an F-measure of 90.4% for normalizing frequency information to ISO standard. The open source MedEx-UIMA system is freely available online at http://code.google.com/p/medex-uima/.

  20. An analytical method coupling accelerated solvent extraction and HPLC-fluorescence for the quantification of particle-bound PAHs in indoor air sampled with a 3-stages cascade impactor.

    PubMed

    Liaud, Céline; Millet, Maurice; Le Calvé, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Most of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are associated to airborne particles and their health impact depends on the particle size where they are bound. This work aims to develop a high sensitive analytical technique to quantify particulate PAHs sampled with a 3-stages cascade impactor in order to derive simultaneously their individual concentration in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. Three key steps of the method were evaluated separately in order to avoid any PAHs loss during the global sample preparation procedure: (1) the accelerated solvent extraction of PAHs from the filter; (2) the primary concentration of the extract until 1 mL by means of a rotary evaporator at 45°C and 220 mbar and (3) the final concentration of the pre-concentrated extract to about 100-150 µL under a gentle nitrogen stream. Each recovery experiment was realized in triplicates. All these steps evaluated independently show that the overall PAHs loss, even for those with a low molecular weight, should not exceed more than a few percent. Extracts were then analyzed by using a HPLC coupled to fluorescence and Diode Array Detectors with the external standard method. The resulting calibration curves containing between 9 and 12 points were plotted in the concentration range of 0.05-45 µg L(-1) for most of the 16 US-EPA priority PAHs and were fully linear (R(2)>0.999). Limits Of Quantification were in the range 0.05-0.47 µg L(-1) corresponding to 0.75-7.05 pg m(-3) for 20 m(3) of pumped air. Finally, taking into account the average PAHs concentrations previously reported in typical European indoor environments, and considering the use of a 3-stages cascade impactor to collect simultaneously PM>10 µm, 2.5 µmparticle-bound PAHs quantification, the sampling duration was estimated to 20-40 h for a sampling flow fixed to 0.5m(3)h(-1). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Information Extraction for System-Software Safety Analysis: Calendar Year 2008 Year-End Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.

    2009-01-01

    This annual report describes work to integrate a set of tools to support early model-based analysis of failures and hazards due to system-software interactions. The tools perform and assist analysts in the following tasks: 1) extract model parts from text for architecture and safety/hazard models; 2) combine the parts with library information to develop the models for visualization and analysis; 3) perform graph analysis and simulation to identify and evaluate possible paths from hazard sources to vulnerable entities and functions, in nominal and anomalous system-software configurations and scenarios; and 4) identify resulting candidate scenarios for software integration testing. There has been significant technical progress in model extraction from Orion program text sources, architecture model derivation (components and connections) and documentation of extraction sources. Models have been derived from Internal Interface Requirements Documents (IIRDs) and FMEA documents. Linguistic text processing is used to extract model parts and relationships, and the Aerospace Ontology also aids automated model development from the extracted information. Visualizations of these models assist analysts in requirements overview and in checking consistency and completeness.

  2. Results from E ∥B Neutral Particle Analyzer and Calibration Ion Beam System on C-2U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clary, Ryan; Roquemore, A.; Kolmogorov, A.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Magee, R.; Medley, S.; Smirnov, A.; Tiunov, M.; TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    C-2U is a a high-confinement, advanced beam driven FRC which aims to sustain the configuration for > 5 ms, in excess of typical MHD and fast particle instability times, as well as fast particle slowing down times. Fast particle dynamics are critical to C-2U performance and several diagnostics have been deployed to characterize the fast particle population, including neutron and proton detectors, an electrostatic neutral particle analyzer, and neutral particle bolometers. To increase our understanding of fast particle behavior and supplement existing diagnostics an E ∥B NPA was acquired from PPPL which simultaneously measures H0 and D0 flux between 2 and 22 keV with high energy resolution. In addition, a small, high purity, ion beam system has been constructed and tested to calibrate absolutely fast particle detectors. Here we report results of measurements from the E ∥B analyzer on C-2U and inferred fast particle behavior, as well as the status of the calibration ion beam system.

  3. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  4. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    DOE PAGES

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability somewhat similar to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. Because this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a timemore » leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. In conclusion, depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.« less

  5. Computational study of the shock driven instability of a multiphase particle-gas system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarland, Jacob A.; Black, Wolfgang J.; Dahal, Jeevan; Morgan, Brandon E.

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the interaction of a shock wave with a multiphase particle-gas system which creates an instability similar in some ways to the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability but with a larger parameter space. As this parameter space is large, we only present an introductory survey of the effects of many of these parameters. We highlight the effects of particle-gas coupling, incident shock strength, particle size, effective system density differences, and multiple particle relaxation time effects. We focus on dilute flows with mass loading up to 40% and do not attempt to cover all parametric combinations. Instead, we vary one parameter at a time leaving additional parametric combinations for future work. The simulations are run with the Ares code, developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which uses a multiphase particulate transport method to model two-way momentum and energy coupling. A brief validation of these models is presented and coupling effects are explored. It is shown that even for small particles, on the order of 1 μm, multi-phase coupling effects are important and diminish the circulation deposition on the interface by up to 25%. These coupling effects are shown to create large temperature deviations from the dusty gas approximation, up to 20% greater, especially at higher shock strengths. It is also found that for a multiphase instability, the vortex sheet deposited at the interface separates into two sheets. Depending on the particle and particle-gas Atwood numbers, the instability may be suppressed or enhanced by the interactions of these two vortex sheets.

  6. High performance curcumin subcritical water extraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    PubMed

    Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Mohammad; Najafpour-Darzi, Ghasem; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Meisam

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric rhizome, which consists about 2-5% of the total rhizome content and is a more valuable component of turmeric. For reducing the drawbacks of conventional extraction (using organic solvents) of curcumin, the water as a clean solvent was used for extracting curcumin. Subcritical water extraction (SWE) experimental setup was fabricated in a laboratory scale and the influences of some parameters (e.g. extraction temperature, particle size, retention time and pressure) on the yield of extraction were investigated. Optimum extraction conditions such as SWE pressure of 10bar, extractive temperature of 140°C, particle size of 0.71mm and retention time of 14min were defined. The maximum amount of curcumin extracted at the optimum condition was 3.8wt%. The yield of curcumin extraction was more than 76wt% with regards to the maximum possible curcumin content of turmeric, as known to be 5%. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images from the outer surface of turmeric, before and after extraction, clearly demonstrated the effect of each parameter; changes in porosity and hardness of turmeric that is directly related to the amount of extracted curcumin in process optimization of the extraction parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 3-dimensional beam scanning system for particle radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, C.; Alonso, J.; Grunder, H.

    1977-03-01

    In radiation therapy treatment volumes up to several liters have to be irradiated. Today's charged particle programs use ridge filters, scattering foils, occluding rings collimators and boluses to shape the dose distribution. An alternative approach, scanning of a small diameter beam, is analyzed and tentative systems specifications are derived. Critical components are scheduled for fabrication and testing at LBL.

  8. Exploring one-particle orbitals in large many-body localized systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalonga, Benjamin; Yu, Xiongjie; Luitz, David J.; Clark, Bryan K.

    2018-03-01

    Strong disorder in interacting quantum systems can give rise to the phenomenon of many-body localization (MBL), which defies thermalization due to the formation of an extensive number of quasilocal integrals of motion. The one-particle operator content of these integrals of motion is related to the one-particle orbitals (OPOs) of the one-particle density matrix and shows a strong signature across the MBL transition as recently pointed out by Bera et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 046603 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.046603; Ann. Phys. 529, 1600356 (2017), 10.1002/andp.201600356]. We study the properties of the OPOs of many-body eigenstates of an MBL system in one dimension. Using shift-and-invert MPS, a matrix product state method to target highly excited many-body eigenstates introduced previously [Phys. Rev. Lett. 118, 017201 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.017201], we are able to obtain accurate results for large systems of sizes up to L =64 . We find that the OPOs drawn from eigenstates at different energy densities have high overlap and their occupations are correlated with the energy of the eigenstates. Moreover, the standard deviation of the inverse participation ratio of these orbitals is maximal at the nose of the mobility edge. Also, the OPOs decay exponentially in real space, with a correlation length that increases at low disorder. In addition, we find that the probability distribution of the strength of the large-range coupling constants of the number operators generated by the OPOs approach a log-uniform distribution at strong disorder.

  9. REMOVAL OF PCBS FROM A CONTAMINATED SOIL USING CF-SYSTEMS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA's START team in cooperation with EPA's SITE program evaluated a pilot scale solvent extraction process developed by CF-Systems. This process uses liquified propane to extract organic contaminants from soils, sludges, and sediments. A pilot-scale evaluation was conducte...

  10. Estimating bioaccessibility of trace elements in particles suspended in the Athabasca River using sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Javed, Muhammad Babar; Shotyk, William

    2018-05-10

    Employing protocols developed for polar snow and ice, water samples were collected upstream, midstream and downstream of open pit bitumen mines and upgraders along the Lower Athabasca River (AR). The purpose was to: i) estimate the bioaccessibility of trace elements associated with particulate matter in the AR using sequential extraction, and ii) determine whether their forms have been measurably impacted by industrial activities. Of the trace metals known to be enriched in bitumen (V, Ni, Mo and Re), a substantial proportion of V (78-93%) and Ni (35-81%) was found in the residual fraction representing stable minerals. In contrast, Mo and Re were partitioned mainly into more reactive forms (water soluble, acid extractable, reducible and oxidisable). Comparing the non-residual fractions in upstream versus downstream sites, only water soluble Re was significantly (P = 0.005) greater downstream of industry. In respect to the potentially toxic chalcophile elements (Cu, Pb and Tl), no measurable change was observed in Cu and Pb distribution in upstream versus downstream sites. Only residual Tl was found at upstream and midstream sites, whereas a significant proportion of Tl was also present in the reducible fraction in downstream sites. Overall, a greater proportion of trace metals in the residual fraction at midstream sites appears to be due to inputs of atmospheric dust, clearly evident in microscopic images: energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses showed that these particles were predominantly silicates, which are assumed to have limited bioaccessibility. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonic Micro-Blades for the Rapid Extraction of Impact Tracks from Aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, H. A.; Graham, G. A.; Kearsley, A. T.; Grant, P. G.; Snead, C. J.; Bradley, J. P.

    2005-01-01

    The science return of NASA's Stardust Mission with its valuable cargo of cometary debris hinges on the ability to efficiently extract particles from silica aerogel collectors. The current method for extracting cosmic dust impact tracks is a mature procedure involving sequential perforation of the aerogel with glass needles on computer controlled micromanipulators. This method is highly successful at removing well-defined aerogel fragments of reasonable optical clarity while causing minimal damage to the surrounding aerogel collector tile. Such a system will be adopted by the JSC Astromaterials Curation Facility in anticipation of Stardust s arrival in early 2006. In addition to Stardust, aerogel is a possible collector for future sample return missions and is used for capture of hypervelocity ejecta in high power laser experiments of interest to LLNL. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples for study as quickly as possible, and rapid extraction tools requiring little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with micro-blades for the Stardust impact track extraction process. Our ultimate goal is a rapid extraction system in a clean electron beam environment, such as an SEM or dual-beam FIB, for in situ sample preparation, mounting and analysis.

  12. System and method for preparing near-surface heavy oil for extraction using microbial degradation

    DOEpatents

    Busche, Frederick D [Highland Village, TX; Rollins, John B [Southlake, TX; Noyes, Harold J [Golden, CO; Bush, James G [West Richland, WA

    2011-04-12

    A system and method for enhancing the recovery of heavy oil in an oil extraction environment by feeding nutrients to a preferred microbial species (bacteria and/or fungi). A method is described that includes the steps of: sampling and identifying microbial species that reside in the oil extraction environment; collecting fluid property data from the oil extraction environment; collecting nutrient data from the oil extraction environment; identifying a preferred microbial species from the oil extraction environment that can transform the heavy oil into a lighter oil; identifying a nutrient from the oil extraction environment that promotes a proliferation of the preferred microbial species; and introducing the nutrient into the oil extraction environment.

  13. Self-organized magnetic particles to tune the mechanical behavior of a granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Meredith; Wang, Dong; Barés, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    Above a certain density a granular material jams. This property can be controlled by either tuning a global property, such as the packing fraction or by applying shear strain, or at the micro-scale by tuning grain shape, inter-particle friction or externally controlled organization. Here, we introduce a novel way to change a local granular property by adding a weak anisotropic magnetic interaction between particles. We measure the evolution of the pressure, P, and coordination number, Z, for a packing of 2D photo-elastic disks, subject to uniaxial compression. A fraction R m of the particles have embedded cuboidal magnets. The strength of the magnetic interactions between particles is too weak to have a strong direct effect on P or Z when the system is jammed. However, the magnetic interactions play an important role in the evolution of latent force networks when systems containing a large enough fraction of the particles with magnets are driven through unjammed to jammed states. In this case, a statistically stable network of magnetic chains self-organizes before jamming and overlaps with force chains once jamming occurs, strengthening the granular medium. This property opens a novel way to control mechanical properties of granular materials.

  14. Impedance measurements of the extraction kicker system for the rapid cycling synchrotron of China Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang-Sheng; Wang, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Dong; Li, Yong; Liu, Ren-Hong; Xiao, Ou-Zheng

    2016-04-01

    The fast extraction kicker system is one of the most important accelerator components and the main source of impedance in the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron of the China Spallation Neutron Source. It is necessary to understand the kicker impedance before its installation into the tunnel. Conventional and improved wire methods are employed in the impedance measurement. The experimental results for the kicker impedance are explained by comparison with simulation using CST PARTICLE STUDIO. The simulation and measurement results confirm that the window-frame ferrite geometry and the end plate are the important structures causing coupling impedance. It is proved in the measurements that the mismatching from the power form network to the kicker leads to a serious oscillation sideband of the longitudinal and vertical impedance and the oscillation can be reduced by ferrite absorbing material. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175193, 11275221)

  15. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOEpatents

    McMurtrey, Ryan D.; Ginosar, Daniel M.; Moor, Kenneth S.; Shook, G. Michael; Barker, Donna L.

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  16. The Solar Poynting-Robertson Effect On Particles Orbiting Solar System Bodies: Circular Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The Poynting-Robertson effect from sunlight impinging directly on a particle which orbits a Solar System body (planet, asteroid, comet) is considered from the Sun's rest frame. There appear to be no significant first-order terms in V(sub b)/c for circular orbits, where V(sub b) is the body's speed in its orbit about the Sun and c is the speed of light, when the particle's orbital semimajor axis is much smaller than the body's orbital semimajor axis about the Sun as is mainly the case in the Solar System.

  17. Biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles by Citrus limon (lemon) aqueous extract and theoretical prediction of particle size.

    PubMed

    Prathna, T C; Chandrasekaran, N; Raichur, Ashok M; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles were rapidly synthesized at room temperature by treating silver ions with the Citrus limon (lemon) extract. The effect of various process parameters like the reductant concentration, mixing ratio of the reactants and the concentration of silver nitrate were studied in detail. In the standardized process, 10(-2)M silver nitrate solution was interacted for 4h with lemon juice (2% citric acid concentration and 0.5% ascorbic acid concentration) in the ratio of 1:4 (vol:vol). The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance as determined by UV-Visible spectra in the range of 400-500 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the distinctive facets (111, 200, 220, 222 and 311 planes) of silver nanoparticles. We found that citric acid was the principal reducing agent for the nanosynthesis process. FT-IR spectral studies demonstrated citric acid as the probable stabilizing agent. Silver nanoparticles below 50 nm with spherical and spheroidal shape were observed from transmission electron microscopy. The correlation between absorption maxima and particle sizes were derived for different UV-Visible absorption maxima (corresponding to different citric acid concentrations) employing "MiePlot v. 3.4". The theoretical particle size corresponding to 2% citric acid concentration was compared to those obtained by various experimental techniques like X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrostatic interactions in soft particle systems: mesoscale simulations of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Zhu, You-Liang; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2018-05-21

    Computer simulations provide a unique insight into the microscopic details, molecular interactions and dynamic behavior responsible for many distinct physicochemical properties of ionic liquids. Due to the sluggish and heterogeneous dynamics and the long-ranged nanostructured nature of ionic liquids, coarse-grained meso-scale simulations provide an indispensable complement to detailed first-principles calculations and atomistic simulations allowing studies over extended length and time scales with a modest computational cost. Here, we present extensive coarse-grained simulations on a series of ionic liquids of the 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium (alkyl = butyl, heptyl-, and decyl-) family with Cl, [BF4], and [PF6] counterions. Liquid densities, microstructures, translational diffusion coefficients, and re-orientational motion of these model ionic liquid systems have been systematically studied over a wide temperature range. The addition of neutral beads in cationic models leads to a transition of liquid morphologies from dispersed apolar beads in a polar framework to that characterized by bi-continuous sponge-like interpenetrating networks in liquid matrices. Translational diffusion coefficients of both cations and anions decrease upon lengthening of the neutral chains in the cationic models and by enlarging molecular sizes of the anionic groups. Similar features are observed in re-orientational motion and time scales of different cationic models within the studied temperature range. The comparison of the liquid properties of the ionic systems with their neutral counterparts indicates that the distinctive microstructures and dynamical quantities of the model ionic liquid systems are intrinsically related to Coulombic interactions. Finally, we compared the computational efficiencies of three linearly scaling O(N log N) Ewald summation methods, the particle-particle particle-mesh method, the particle-mesh Ewald summation method, and the Ewald summation method based

  19. Smart particles for noble drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheolyoung; Kim, Jihoon; Jang, Seunghyun; Woo, Hee-Gweon; Ko, Young Chun; Sohn, Honglae

    2010-05-01

    Optically encoded smart particles were prepared for noble drug delivery materials. Distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) porous silicon (PSi) was generated by applying a computer-generated pseudo-square wave current waveform. This DBR PSi film was lifted off from the Si substrate and thermally oxidized to convert PSi to porous silicon dioxide (PSD). DBR PSD film was derivatized with 20(S)-Camptothecin (CPT) and fractured by ultrasono-method to give smart particles. DBR PSD smart particles exhibited a sharp photonic band gap in the optical reflectivity spectrum. Optical characteristic of PSD smart particles retained DBR photonic property in aqueous buffer solution. The release of CPT and change of reflection wavelength were measured by UV-vis and reflectance spectrometer, respectively. The intensity of differential peak from reflection resonances of the smart particles was increased with a drug release. The blue shift of reflection peak resulted in the decrease of refractive index of PSD smart particles during the drug release. The concentration of released drug exhibited an linear relationship with a release time.

  20. Nonequilibrium mode-coupling theory for dense active systems of self-propelled particles.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Saroj Kumar; Gov, Nir S

    2017-10-25

    The physics of active systems of self-propelled particles, in the regime of a dense liquid state, is an open puzzle of great current interest, both for statistical physics and because such systems appear in many biological contexts. We develop a nonequilibrium mode-coupling theory (MCT) for such systems, where activity is included as a colored noise with the particles having a self-propulsion force f 0 and a persistence time τ p . Using the extended MCT and a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we calculate the effective temperature T eff of the active fluid. The nonequilibrium nature of the systems is manifested through a time-dependent T eff that approaches a constant in the long-time limit, which depends on the activity parameters f 0 and τ p . We find, phenomenologically, that this long-time limit is captured by the potential energy of a single, trapped active particle (STAP). Through a scaling analysis close to the MCT glass transition point, we show that τ α , the α-relaxation time, behaves as τ α ∼ f 0 -2γ , where γ = 1.74 is the MCT exponent for the passive system. τ α may increase or decrease as a function of τ p depending on the type of active force correlations, but the behavior is always governed by the same value of the exponent γ. Comparison with the numerical solution of the nonequilibrium MCT and simulation results give excellent agreement with scaling analysis.

  1. Connection of European particle therapy centers and generation of a common particle database system within the European ULICE-framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To establish a common database on particle therapy for the evaluation of clinical studies integrating a large variety of voluminous datasets, different documentation styles, and various information systems, especially in the field of radiation oncology. Methods We developed a web-based documentation system for transnational and multicenter clinical studies in particle therapy. 560 patients have been treated from November 2009 to September 2011. Protons, carbon ions or a combination of both, as well as a combination with photons were applied. To date, 12 studies have been initiated and more are in preparation. Results It is possible to immediately access all patient information and exchange, store, process, and visualize text data, any DICOM images and multimedia data. Accessing the system and submitting clinical data is possible for internal and external users. Integrated into the hospital environment, data is imported both manually and automatically. Security and privacy protection as well as data validation and verification are ensured. Studies can be designed to fit individual needs. Conclusions The described database provides a basis for documentation of large patient groups with specific and specialized questions to be answered. Having recently begun electronic documentation, it has become apparent that the benefits lie in the user-friendly and timely workflow for documentation. The ultimate goal is a simplification of research work, better study analyses quality and eventually, the improvement of treatment concepts by evaluating the effectiveness of particle therapy. PMID:22828013

  2. Updating the conceptual model for fine particle mass emissions from combustion systems.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Allen L; Grieshop, Andrew P; Donahue, Neil M; Hunt, Sherri W

    2010-10-01

    Atmospheric transformations determine the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to fine particulate matter (PM) mass. For example, combustion systems emit vapors that condense onto existing particles or form new particles as the emissions are cooled and diluted. Upon entering the atmosphere, emissions are exposed to atmospheric oxidants and sunlight, which causes them to evolve chemically and physically, generating secondary PM. This review discusses these transformations, focusing on organic PM. Organic PM emissions are semi-volatile at atmospheric conditions and thus their partitioning varies continuously with changing temperature and concentration. Because organics contribute a large portion of the PM mass emitted by most combustion sources, these emissions cannot be represented using a traditional, static emission factor. Instead, knowledge of the volatility distribution of emissions is required to explicitly account for changes in gas-particle partitioning. This requires updating how PM emissions from combustion systems are measured and simulated from combustion systems. Secondary PM production often greatly exceeds the direct or primary PM emissions; therefore, secondary PM must be included in any assessment of the contribution of combustion systems to ambient PM concentrations. Low-volatility organic vapors emitted by combustion systems appear to be very important secondary PM precursors that are poorly accounted for in inventories and models. The review concludes by discussing the implications that the dynamic nature of these PM emissions have on source testing for emission inventory development and regulatory purposes. This discussion highlights important linkages between primary and secondary PM, which could lead to simplified certification test procedures while capturing the emission components that contribute most to atmospheric PM mass.

  3. Systems and methods for separating particles and/or substances from a sample fluid

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.; Dougherty, George M.; Dzenitis, John M.; Miles, Robin R.; Clague, David S.

    2016-11-01

    Systems and methods for separating particles and/or toxins from a sample fluid. A method according to one embodiment comprises simultaneously passing a sample fluid and a buffer fluid through a chamber such that a fluidic interface is formed between the sample fluid and the buffer fluid as the fluids pass through the chamber, the sample fluid having particles of interest therein; applying a force to the fluids for urging the particles of interest to pass through the interface into the buffer fluid; and substantially separating the buffer fluid from the sample fluid.

  4. Bioprocess considerations for expanded-bed chromatography of crude canola extract: sample preparation and adsorbent reuse.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yun; Glatz, Charles E

    2003-03-30

    Compared to the conventional microbial and mammalian systems, transgenic plants produce proteins in a different matrix. This provides opportunities and challenges for downstream processing. In the context of the plant host Brassica napus (canola), this work addresses the bioprocessing challenges of solid fractionation, resin fouling by native plant components (e.g., oil, phenolics, etc.), hydrodynamic stability, and resin reuse for expanded bed adsorption for product capture. Plant tissue processing and subsequent protein extraction typically result in an extract with a high content of solids containing a wide particle-size distribution. Without removal of larger particles, the column inlet distributor plugged. The larger particles (> 50 microm) were easily removed through centrifugal settling comparable to that attainable with a scroll decanter. The remaining solids did not affect the column performance. Less than 4% of the lipids and phenolics in the fed extract bound to STREAMLINE trade mark DEAE resin, and this small proportion could be satisfactorily removed using recommended clean-in-place (CIP) procedures. Hydrodynamic expansion and adsorption kinetics of the STREAMLINE trade mark DEAE resin were maintained throughout 10 cycles of reuse, as was the structural integrity of the resin beads. No significant accumulation of N-rich (e.g., proteins) and C/O-rich components (e.g., oil and phenolics) occurred over the same period. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 81: 775-782, 2003.

  5. Constraints on rapidity-dependent initial conditions from charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Weiyao; Moreland, J. Scott; Bernhard, Jonah E.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2017-10-01

    We study the initial three-dimensional spatial configuration of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) produced in relativistic heavy-ion collisions using centrality and pseudorapidity-dependent measurements of the medium's charged particle density and two-particle correlations. A cumulant-generating function is first used to parametrize the rapidity dependence of local entropy deposition and extend arbitrary boost-invariant initial conditions to nonzero beam rapidities. The model is then compared to p +Pb and Pb + Pb charged-particle pseudorapidity densities and two-particle pseudorapidity correlations and systematically optimized using Bayesian parameter estimation to extract high-probability initial condition parameters. The optimized initial conditions are then compared to a number of experimental observables including the pseudorapidity-dependent anisotropic flows, event-plane decorrelations, and flow correlations. We find that the form of the initial local longitudinal entropy profile is well constrained by these experimental measurements.

  6. Health requirements for advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.

    1980-01-01

    Health requirements were developed as long range goals for future advanced coal extraction systems which would be introduced into the market in the year 2000. The goal of the requirements is that underground coal miners work in an environment that is as close as possible to the working conditions of the general population, that they do not exceed mortality and morbidity rates resulting from lung diseases that are comparable to those of the general population, and that their working conditions comply as closely as possible to those of other industries as specified by OSHA regulations. A brief technique for evaluating whether proposed advanced systems meet these safety requirements is presented, as well as a discussion of the costs of respiratory disability compensation.

  7. Detection of small metal particles by a quasi-optical system at sub-millimeter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, Yasuyuki; Domier, C. W.; Ikeda, Makoto; Pham, Anh-Vu; Luhmann, Neville C.

    2016-04-01

    Inspection of alien metal particles in electronic materials such as glass fibers and resins is a critical issue to control the quality and guarantee the safety of products. In this paper, we present a new detection technique using sub-millimeter wave for films as electric materials in product lines. The advantage of using sub-millimeter wave frequency is that it is easy to distinguish conductive particles from a nonconductive material such as plastic films. Scattering of a submillimeter wave by a metal particle is used as the detection principle. By simulation, it is observed that the scattering pattern varies intricately as the diameter varies from 10 to 700 μm at 300 GHz. The demonstration system is composed of a Keysight performance network analyzer (N5247A PNA-X) with 150-330 GHz VDI extension modules, transmitting and receiving antennas, and focusing dielectric lens. An output signal is radiated via an antenna and focused onto a metal particle on a film. The wave scattered by the metal particle is detected by an identical antenna through a lens. The signal scattered from a metal particle is evaluated from the insertion loss between antennas (S21). The result shows that a particle of diameter 300 μm is detectable at 150-330 GHz through S21 in the experimental system that we prepared. Peaks calculated in simulation were detected in experimental data as well as in the curves of the particle diameter versus S21. It was shown that using this peak frequency could improve S21 level without higher frequency.

  8. Electrokinetic and hydrodynamic properties of charged-particles systems. From small electrolyte ions to large colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nägele, G.; Heinen, M.; Banchio, A. J.; Contreras-Aburto, C.

    2013-11-01

    Dynamic processes in dispersions of charged spherical particles are of importance both in fundamental science, and in technical and bio-medical applications. There exists a large variety of charged-particles systems, ranging from nanometer-sized electrolyte ions to micron-sized charge-stabilized colloids. We review recent advances in theoretical methods for the calculation of linear transport coefficients in concentrated particulate systems, with the focus on hydrodynamic interactions and electrokinetic effects. Considered transport properties are the dispersion viscosity, self- and collective diffusion coefficients, sedimentation coefficients, and electrophoretic mobilities and conductivities of ionic particle species in an external electric field. Advances by our group are also discussed, including a novel mode-coupling-theory method for conduction-diffusion and viscoelastic properties of strong electrolyte solutions. Furthermore, results are presented for dispersions of solvent-permeable particles, and particles with non-zero hydrodynamic surface slip. The concentration-dependent swelling of ionic microgels is discussed, as well as a far-reaching dynamic scaling behavior relating colloidal long- to short-time dynamics.

  9. A harmonic linear dynamical system for prominent ECG feature extraction.

    PubMed

    Thi, Ngoc Anh Nguyen; Yang, Hyung-Jeong; Kim, SunHee; Do, Luu Ngoc

    2014-01-01

    Unsupervised mining of electrocardiography (ECG) time series is a crucial task in biomedical applications. To have efficiency of the clustering results, the prominent features extracted from preprocessing analysis on multiple ECG time series need to be investigated. In this paper, a Harmonic Linear Dynamical System is applied to discover vital prominent features via mining the evolving hidden dynamics and correlations in ECG time series. The discovery of the comprehensible and interpretable features of the proposed feature extraction methodology effectively represents the accuracy and the reliability of clustering results. Particularly, the empirical evaluation results of the proposed method demonstrate the improved performance of clustering compared to the previous main stream feature extraction approaches for ECG time series clustering tasks. Furthermore, the experimental results on real-world datasets show scalability with linear computation time to the duration of the time series.

  10. Multiscale simulations of patchy particle systems combining Molecular Dynamics, Path Sampling and Green's Function Reaction Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolhuis, Peter

    Important reaction-diffusion processes, such as biochemical networks in living cells, or self-assembling soft matter, span many orders in length and time scales. In these systems, the reactants' spatial dynamics at mesoscopic length and time scales of microns and seconds is coupled to the reactions between the molecules at microscopic length and time scales of nanometers and milliseconds. This wide range of length and time scales makes these systems notoriously difficult to simulate. While mean-field rate equations cannot describe such processes, the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method enables efficient simulation at the particle level provided the microscopic dynamics can be integrated out. Yet, many processes exhibit non-trivial microscopic dynamics that can qualitatively change the macroscopic behavior, calling for an atomistic, microscopic description. The recently developed multiscale Molecular Dynamics Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) approach combines GFRD for simulating the system at the mesocopic scale where particles are far apart, with microscopic Molecular (or Brownian) Dynamics, for simulating the system at the microscopic scale where reactants are in close proximity. The association and dissociation of particles are treated with rare event path sampling techniques. I will illustrate the efficiency of this method for patchy particle systems. Replacing the microscopic regime with a Markov State Model avoids the microscopic regime completely. The MSM is then pre-computed using advanced path-sampling techniques such as multistate transition interface sampling. I illustrate this approach on patchy particle systems that show multiple modes of binding. MD-GFRD is generic, and can be used to efficiently simulate reaction-diffusion systems at the particle level, including the orientational dynamics, opening up the possibility for large-scale simulations of e.g. protein signaling networks.

  11. Improved estimation of anomalous diffusion exponents in single-particle tracking experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepten, Eldad; Bronshtein, Irena; Garini, Yuval

    2013-05-01

    The mean square displacement is a central tool in the analysis of single-particle tracking experiments, shedding light on various biophysical phenomena. Frequently, parameters are extracted by performing time averages on single-particle trajectories followed by ensemble averaging. This procedure, however, suffers from two systematic errors when applied to particles that perform anomalous diffusion. The first is significant at short-time lags and is induced by measurement errors. The second arises from the natural heterogeneity in biophysical systems. We show how to estimate and correct these two errors and improve the estimation of the anomalous parameters for the whole particle distribution. As a consequence, we manage to characterize ensembles of heterogeneous particles even for rather short and noisy measurements where regular time-averaged mean square displacement analysis fails. We apply this method to both simulations and in vivo measurements of telomere diffusion in 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The motion of telomeres is found to be subdiffusive with an average exponent constant in time. Individual telomere exponents are normally distributed around the average exponent. The proposed methodology has the potential to improve experimental accuracy while maintaining lower experimental costs and complexity.

  12. Optimization of a jet-propelled particle injection system for the uniform transdermal delivery of drug/vaccine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Kendall, Mark A F

    2007-08-01

    A jet-propelled particle injection system, the biolistics, has been developed and employed to accelerate micro-particles for transdermal drug delivery. We have examined a prototype biolistic device employing a converging-diverging supersonic nozzle (CDSN), and found that the micro-particles were delivered with a wide velocity range (200-800 m/s) and spatial distribution. To provide a controllable system for transdermal drug delivery, we present a contoured shock-tube (CST) concept and its embodiment device. The CST configuration utilizes a quasi-steady, quasi-one dimensional and shock-free supersonic flow to deliver the micro-particles with an almost uniform velocity (the mean velocity and the standard deviation, 699 +/- 4.7 m/s) and spatial distribution. The transient gas and particle dynamics in both prototype devices are interrogated with the validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The predicted results for static pressure and Mach number histories, gas flow structures, particle velocity distributions and gas-particle interactions are presented and interpreted. The implications for clinical uses are discussed. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Global Positioning System Energetic Particle Data: The Next Space Weather Data Revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knipp, Delores J.; Giles, Barbara L.

    2016-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) has revolutionized the process of getting from point A to point Band so much more. A large fraction of the worlds population relies on GPS (and its counterparts from other nations) for precision timing, location, and navigation. Most GPS users are unaware that the spacecraft providing the signals they rely on are operating in a very harsh space environment the radiation belts where energetic particles trapped in Earths magnetic field dash about at nearly the speed of light. These subatomic particles relentlessly pummel GPS satellites. So by design, every GPS satellite and its sensors are radiation hardened. Each spacecraft carries particle detectors that provide health and status data to system operators. Although these data reveal much about the state of the space radiation environment, heretofore they have been available only to system operators and supporting scientists. Research scientists have long sought a policy shift to allow more general access. With the release of the National Space Weather Strategy and Action Plan organized by the White House Office of Science Technology Policy (OSTP) a sample of these data have been made available to space weather researchers. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the National Center for Environmental Information released a months worth of GPS energetic particle data from an interval of heightened space weather activity in early 2014 with the hope of stimulating integration of these data sets into the research arena. Even before the public data release GPS support scientists from LANL showed the extraordinary promise of these data.

  14. Single-particle characterization of ice-nucleating particles and ice particles residuals sampled by three different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandler, Konrad; Worringen, Annette; Benker, Nathalie; Dirsch, Thomas; Mertes, Stephan; Schenk, Ludwig; Kästner, Udo; Frank, Fabian; Nillius, Björn; Bundke, Ulrich; Rose, Diana; Curtius, Joachim; Kupiszewski, Piotr; Weingartner, Ernest; Vochezer, Paul; Schneider, Johannes; Schmidt, Susan; Weinbruch, Stephan; Ebert, Martin

    2015-04-01

    During January/February 2013, at the High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch a measurement campaign was carried out, which was centered on atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INP) and ice particle residuals (IPR). Three different techniques for separation of INP and IPR from the non-ice-active particles are compared. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI) and the Ice Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI) sample ice particles from mixed phase clouds and allow for the analysis of the residuals. The combination of the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH) and the Ice Nuclei Pumped Counterflow Virtual Impactor (IN-PCVI) provides ice-activating conditions to aerosol particles and extracts the activated INP for analysis. Collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis to determine size, chemical composition and mixing state. All INP/IPR-separating techniques had considerable abundances (median 20 - 70 %) of instrumental contamination artifacts (ISI: Si-O spheres, probably calibration aerosol; Ice-CVI: Al-O particles; FINCH+IN-PCVI: steel particles). Also, potential sampling artifacts (e.g., pure soluble material) occurred with a median abundance of < 20 %. While these could be explained as IPR by ice break-up, for INP their IN-ability pathway is less clear. After removal of the contamination artifacts, silicates and Ca-rich particles, carbonaceous material and metal oxides were the major INP/IPR particle types separated by all three techniques. Soot was a minor contributor. Lead was detected in less than 10 % of the particles, of which the majority were internal mixtures with other particle types. Sea-salt and sulfates were identified by all three methods as INP/IPR. Most samples showed a maximum of the INP/IPR size distribution at 400 nm geometric diameter. In a few cases, a second super-micron maximum was identified. Soot/carbonaceous material and metal oxides were present mainly in the submicron range. ISI and FINCH

  15. A high velocity impact experiment of micro-scale ice particles using laser-driven system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hyeonju; Kim, Jungwook; Yoh, Jack J.

    2014-11-01

    A jet engine for high speed air breathing propulsion is subject to continuous wear as a result of impacts of micro-scale ice particles during a flight in the atmosphere. The inlet duct and compressor blades are exposed to on-coming frozen moisture particles that may result in the surface damage and significantly shorten the designed lifetime of the aircraft. Under such prolonged high-speed impact loading, the performance parameters such as flight instability and power loss of a jet engine can be significantly degraded. In this work, a laser-driven system was designed to accelerate micro-scale ice particles to the velocity up to Mach 2 using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser beam at 100-600 mJ with 1064 nm wavelength and 9 ns pulse duration. The high speed images (Phantom v711) and double exposure shadowgraphs were used to calculate the average velocity of ice particles and their deceleration. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measurements were also utilized for the analysis of free surface velocity of a metal foil in order to understand the interfacial dynamics between the impacting particles and accepting metal target. The velocity of our ice particles is sufficiently fast for studying the effect of moisture particle collision on an air-breathing duct of high speed aircraft, and thus the results can provide insight into how minute space debris or micrometeorites cause damage to the orbiting spacecraft at large.

  16. An automatic system to detect and extract texts in medical images for de-identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yingxuan; Singh, P. D.; Siddiqui, Khan; Gillam, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Recently, there is an increasing need to share medical images for research purpose. In order to respect and preserve patient privacy, most of the medical images are de-identified with protected health information (PHI) before research sharing. Since manual de-identification is time-consuming and tedious, so an automatic de-identification system is necessary and helpful for the doctors to remove text from medical images. A lot of papers have been written about algorithms of text detection and extraction, however, little has been applied to de-identification of medical images. Since the de-identification system is designed for end-users, it should be effective, accurate and fast. This paper proposes an automatic system to detect and extract text from medical images for de-identification purposes, while keeping the anatomic structures intact. First, considering the text have a remarkable contrast with the background, a region variance based algorithm is used to detect the text regions. In post processing, geometric constraints are applied to the detected text regions to eliminate over-segmentation, e.g., lines and anatomic structures. After that, a region based level set method is used to extract text from the detected text regions. A GUI for the prototype application of the text detection and extraction system is implemented, which shows that our method can detect most of the text in the images. Experimental results validate that our method can detect and extract text in medical images with a 99% recall rate. Future research of this system includes algorithm improvement, performance evaluation, and computation optimization.

  17. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project employs an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn s moon, Titan.

  18. Planetary Airplane Extraction System Development and Subscale Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teter, John E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The Aerial Regional-scale Environmental Survey (ARES) project will employ an airplane as the science platform from which to collect science data in the previously inaccessible, thin atmosphere of Mars. In order for the airplane to arrive safely in the Martian atmosphere, a number of sequences must occur. A critical element in the entry sequence at Mars is an extraction maneuver to separate the airplane quickly (in less than a second) from its protective backshell to reduce the possibility of re-contact, potentially leading to mission failure. This paper describes the development, testing, and lessons learned from building a 1/3 scale model of this airplane extraction system. This design, based on the successful Mars Exploration Rover (MER) extraction mechanism, employs a series of trucks rolling along tracks located on the surface of the central parachute can. Numerous tests using high speed video were conducted at the Langley Research Center to validate this concept. One area of concern was that that although the airplane released cleanly, a pitching moment could be introduced. While targeted for a Mars mission, this concept will enable environmental surveys by aircraft in other planetary bodies with a sensible atmosphere such as Venus or Saturn's moon, Titan.

  19. Inequivalence of single-particle and population lifetimes in a cuprate superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuolong; Sobota, J. A.; Leuenberger, D.

    2015-06-15

    We study optimally doped Bi-2212 (T c=96 K) using femtosecond time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Energy-resolved population lifetimes are extracted and compared with single-particle lifetimes measured by equilibrium photoemission. The population lifetimes deviate from the single-particle lifetimes in the low excitation limit by 1–2 orders of magnitude. Fundamental considerations of electron scattering unveil that these two lifetimes are in general distinct, yet for systems with only electron-phonon scattering they should converge in the low-temperature, low-fluence limit. As a result, the qualitative disparity in our data, even in this limit, suggests that scattering channels beyond electron-phonon interactions play a significant rolemore » in the electron dynamics of cuprate superconductors.« less

  20. Wood dust particle and mass concentrations and filtration efficiency in sanding of wood materials.

    PubMed

    Welling, Irma; Lehtimäki, Matti; Rautio, Sari; Lähde, Tero; Enbom, Seppo; Hynynen, Pasi; Hämeri, Kaarle

    2009-02-01

    The importance of fine particles has become apparent as the knowledge of their effects on health has increased. Fine particle concentrations have been published for outside air, plasma arc cutting, welding, and grinding, but little data exists for the woodworking industry. Sanding was evaluated as the producer of the woodworking industry's finest particles, and was selected as the target study. The number of dust particles in different particle size classes and the mass concentrations were measured in the following environments: workplace air during sanding in plywood production and in the inlet and return air; in the dust emission chamber; and in filter testing. The numbers of fine particles were low, less than 10(4) particles/cm(3) (10(7) particles/L). They were much lower than typical number concentrations near 10(6) particles/cm(3) measured in plasma arc cutting, grinding, and welding. Ultrafine particles in the size class less than 100 nm were found during sanding of MDF (medium density fiberboard) sheets. When the cleaned air is returned to the working areas, the dust content in extraction systems must be monitored continuously. One way to monitor the dust content in the return air is to use an after-filter and measure pressure drop across the filter to indicate leaks in the air-cleaning system. The best after-filtration materials provided a clear increase in pressure drop across the filter in the loading of the filter. The best after-filtration materials proved to be quite effective also for fine particles. The best mass removal efficiencies for fine particles around 0.3 mum were over 80% for some filter materials loaded with sanding wood dust.

  1. Entanglement and nonlocality in multi-particle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Margaret D.; He, Qiong-Yi; Drummond, Peter D.

    2012-02-01

    Entanglement, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and Bell's failure of local-hiddenvariable (LHV) theories are three historically famous forms of "quantum nonlocality". We give experimental criteria for these three forms of nonlocality in multi-particle systems, with the aim of better understanding the transition from microscopic to macroscopic nonlocality. We examine the nonlocality of N separated spin J systems. First, we obtain multipartite Bell inequalities that address the correlation between spin values measured at each site, and then we review spin squeezing inequalities that address the degree of reduction in the variance of collective spins. The latter have been particularly useful as a tool for investigating entanglement in Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC). We present solutions for two topical quantum states: multi-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, and the ground state of a two-well BEC.

  2. [Analytic study of juices obtained by pressure, by cold extraction and warm extraction (the DDS system) of marc from apples of the Golden Delicious variety].

    PubMed

    Tanner, H

    1978-01-01

    The cold water extraction of apple press residues to increase the juice yield has found much interest in recent years. Such a process has been developed by a Swiss company, but the food legislation does not permit it yet. Juice yield is increased up to 91 p. 100 (w.). Therefore we investigated the chemical and sensorical properties of pressed juice, cold water extract of press residues and warm water extract (System DDS) of identical raw material. The water extract differs from the pressed juice mainly by an increased amount of non-sugar extract and changes of the pigment and polyphenole content. The cold water extract had more and the better aroma than the warm extract.

  3. Software manual for operating particle displacement tracking data acquisition and reduction system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    The software manual is presented. The necessary steps required to record, analyze, and reduce Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data using the Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique are described. The new PDT system is an all electronic technique employing a CCD video camera and a large memory buffer frame-grabber board to record low velocity (less than or equal to 20 cm/s) flows. Using a simple encoding scheme, a time sequence of single exposure images are time coded into a single image and then processed to track particle displacements and determine 2-D velocity vectors. All the PDT data acquisition, analysis, and data reduction software is written to run on an 80386 PC.

  4. Different applications of virus-like particles in biology and medicine: Vaccination and delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Shirbaghaee, Zeinab; Bolhassani, Azam

    2016-03-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) mimic the whole construct of virus particles devoid of viral genome as used in subunit vaccine design. VLPs can elicit efficient protective immunity as direct immunogens compared to soluble antigens co-administered with adjuvants in several booster injections. Up to now, several prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems such as insect, yeast, plant, and E. coli were used to express recombinant proteins, especially for VLP production. Recent studies are also generating VLPs in plants using different transient expression vectors for edible vaccines. VLPs and viral particles have been applied for different functions such as gene therapy, vaccination, nanotechnology, and diagnostics. Herein, we describe VLP production in different systems as well as its applications in biology and medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Formulation and in vitro release evaluation of newly synthesized palm kernel oil esters-based nanoemulsion delivery system for 30% ethanolic dried extract derived from local Phyllanthus urinaria for skin antiaging.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Elrashid Saleh; Noor, Azmin Mohd; Sakeena, Mohamed Hameem; Abdullah, Ghassan Z; Abdulkarim, Muthanna F; Sattar, Munavvar Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been a remarkable surge of interest about natural products and their applications in the cosmetic industry. Topical delivery of antioxidants from natural sources is one of the approaches used to reverse signs of skin aging. The aim of this research was to develop a nanoemulsion cream for topical delivery of 30% ethanolic extract derived from local Phyllanthus urinaria (P. urinaria) for skin antiaging. Palm kernel oil esters (PKOEs)-based nanoemulsions were loaded with P. urinaria extract using a spontaneous method and characterized with respect to particle size, zeta potential, and rheological properties. The release profile of the extract was evaluated using in vitro Franz diffusion cells from an artificial membrane and the antioxidant activity of the extract released was evaluated using the 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Formulation F12 consisted of wt/wt, 0.05% P. urinaria extract, 1% cetyl alcohol, 0.5% glyceryl monostearate, 12% PKOEs, and 27% Tween 80/Span 80 (9/1) with a hydrophilic lipophilic balance of 13.9, and a 59.5% phosphate buffer system at pH 7.4. Formulation F36 was comprised of 0.05% P. urinaria extract, 1% cetyl alcohol, 1% glyceryl monostearate, 14% PKOEs, 28% Tween 80/Span 80 (9/1) with a hydrophilic lipophilic balance of 13.9, and 56% phosphate buffer system at pH 7.4 with shear thinning and thixotropy. The droplet size of F12 and F36 was 30.74 nm and 35.71 nm, respectively, and their nanosizes were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy images. Thereafter, 51.30% and 51.02% of the loaded extract was released from F12 and F36 through an artificial cellulose membrane, scavenging 29.89% and 30.05% of DPPH radical activity, respectively. The P. urinaria extract was successfully incorporated into a PKOEs-based nanoemulsion delivery system. In vitro release of the extract from the formulations showed DPPH radical scavenging activity. These formulations can neutralize reactive oxygen species and counteract

  6. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  7. Extraction of valerenic acids from valerian (Valeriana officinalis L.) rhizomes.

    PubMed

    Boyadzhiev, L; Kancheva, D; Gourdon, C; Metcheva, D

    2004-09-01

    Extraction of valerenic acids (valerenic, acetoxyvalerenic and hydroxyvalerenic) from dry ground rhizomes of valerian (Valeriana officinalis L.) was studied. The effect of ethanol concentration in the solvent, extraction temperature and drug particle size on extraction kinetics were investigated and the optimum values of these process parameters were determined for the case of intensively stirred two-phase dispersion. It was found that increased processing temperature favors extraction kinetics, but provokes moderate degradation of valerenic acids.

  8. Oxalic acid pretreatment of rice straw particles and loblolly pine chips : release of hemicellulosic carbohydrates

    Treesearch

    Xianjun Li; Zhiyong Cai; Eric Horn; Jerrold E. Winandy

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of oxalic acid (OA) pretreatment on carbohydrates released from rice straw particles and wood chips. The results showed that OA treatment accelerated carbohydrates extraction from rice straw particles and wood chips. OA pretreatment dramatically increased the amount of carbohydrates extracted, up to 24 times for wood...

  9. Extracting foreground ensemble features to detect abnormal crowd behavior in intelligent video-surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yi-Tung; Wang, Shuenn-Jyi; Tsai, Chung-Hsien

    2017-09-01

    Public safety is a matter of national security and people's livelihoods. In recent years, intelligent video-surveillance systems have become important active-protection systems. A surveillance system that provides early detection and threat assessment could protect people from crowd-related disasters and ensure public safety. Image processing is commonly used to extract features, e.g., people, from a surveillance video. However, little research has been conducted on the relationship between foreground detection and feature extraction. Most current video-surveillance research has been developed for restricted environments, in which the extracted features are limited by having information from a single foreground; they do not effectively represent the diversity of crowd behavior. This paper presents a general framework based on extracting ensemble features from the foreground of a surveillance video to analyze a crowd. The proposed method can flexibly integrate different foreground-detection technologies to adapt to various monitored environments. Furthermore, the extractable representative features depend on the heterogeneous foreground data. Finally, a classification algorithm is applied to these features to automatically model crowd behavior and distinguish an abnormal event from normal patterns. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method's performance is both comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods and satisfies the requirements of real-time applications.

  10. Effects of process parameters on peanut skins extract and CO2 diffusivity by supercritical fluid extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, N. R.; Yian, L. N.; Nasir, H. M.; Idham, Z. Binti; Yunus, M. A. C.

    2018-03-01

    Peanut skins (Arachis hypogea) are an agricultural waste product which has received much attention because they contain high nutritional values and can be potentially utilized in difference industries. At present, only a few studies have been conducted to study the effects of parameters on the peanut skins oil extraction. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the best extraction condition in order to obtain the highest extract yield using supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) with co-solvent Ethanol as compared to Soxhlet extraction method. Diffusivity of carbon dioxide in supercritical fluid extraction was determined using Crank model. The mean particle size used in this study was 425 µm. The supercritical carbon dioxide was performed at temperature (40 – 70 °C), flow rate of co-solvent ethanol (0 - 7.5% Vethanol/Vtotal), and extraction pressure (10 – 30 MPa) were used in this studies. The results showed that the percentage of oil yields and effective diffusivity increase as the pressure, rate of co-solvent, and temperature increased.

  11. Experimental investigation of blast mitigation and particle-blast interaction during the explosive dispersal of particles and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontalier, Q.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-05-01

    The attenuation of a blast wave from a high-explosive charge surrounded by a layer of inert material is investigated experimentally in a spherical geometry for a wide range of materials. The blast wave pressure is inferred from extracting the blast wave velocity with high-speed video as well as direct measurements with pressure transducers. The mitigant consists of either a packed bed of particles, a particle bed saturated with water, or a homogeneous liquid. The reduction in peak blast wave overpressure is primarily dependent on the mitigant to explosive mass ratio, M/ C, with the mitigant material properties playing a secondary role. Relative peak pressure mitigation reduces with distance and for low values of M/ C (< 10) can return to unmitigated pressure levels in the mid-to-far field. Solid particles are more effective at mitigating the blast overpressure than liquids, particularly in the near field and at low values of M/ C, suggesting that the energy dissipation during compaction, deformation, and fracture of the powders plays an important role. The difference in scaled arrival time of the blast and material fronts increases with M/ C and scaled distance, with solid particles giving the largest separation between the blast wave and cloud of particles. Surrounding a high-explosive charge with a layer of particles reduces the positive-phase blast impulse, whereas a liquid layer has no influence on the impulse in the far field. Taking the total impulse due to the blast wave and material impact into account implies that the damage to a nearby structure may actually be augmented for a range of distances. These results should be taken into consideration in the design of explosive mitigant systems.

  12. Experimental investigation of blast mitigation and particle-blast interaction during the explosive dispersal of particles and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontalier, Q.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    The attenuation of a blast wave from a high-explosive charge surrounded by a layer of inert material is investigated experimentally in a spherical geometry for a wide range of materials. The blast wave pressure is inferred from extracting the blast wave velocity with high-speed video as well as direct measurements with pressure transducers. The mitigant consists of either a packed bed of particles, a particle bed saturated with water, or a homogeneous liquid. The reduction in peak blast wave overpressure is primarily dependent on the mitigant to explosive mass ratio, M/C, with the mitigant material properties playing a secondary role. Relative peak pressure mitigation reduces with distance and for low values of M/C (< 10) can return to unmitigated pressure levels in the mid-to-far field. Solid particles are more effective at mitigating the blast overpressure than liquids, particularly in the near field and at low values of M/C, suggesting that the energy dissipation during compaction, deformation, and fracture of the powders plays an important role. The difference in scaled arrival time of the blast and material fronts increases with M/C and scaled distance, with solid particles giving the largest separation between the blast wave and cloud of particles. Surrounding a high-explosive charge with a layer of particles reduces the positive-phase blast impulse, whereas a liquid layer has no influence on the impulse in the far field. Taking the total impulse due to the blast wave and material impact into account implies that the damage to a nearby structure may actually be augmented for a range of distances. These results should be taken into consideration in the design of explosive mitigant systems.

  13. [Analysis of visible extinction spectrum of particle system and selection of optimal wavelength].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-gang; Tang, Hong; Yuan, Gui-bin

    2008-09-01

    In the total light scattering particle sizing technique, the extinction spectrum of particle system contains some information about the particle size and refractive index. The visible extinction spectra of the common monomodal and biomodal R-R particle size distribution were computed, and the variation in the visible extinction spectrum with the particle size and refractive index was analyzed. The corresponding wavelengths were selected as the measurement wavelengths at which the second order differential extinction spectrum was discontinuous. Furthermore, the minimum and the maximum wavelengths in the visible region were also selected as the measurement wavelengths. The genetic algorithm was used as the inversion method under the dependent model The computer simulation and experiments illustrate that it is feasible to make an analysis of the extinction spectrum and use this selection method of the optimal wavelength in the total light scattering particle sizing. The rough contour of the particle size distribution can be determined after the analysis of visible extinction spectrum, so the search range of the particle size parameter is reduced in the optimal algorithm, and then a more accurate inversion result can be obtained using the selection method. The inversion results of monomodal and biomodal distribution are all still satisfactory when 1% stochastic noise is put in the transmission extinction measurement values.

  14. Real-time particle tracking for studying intracellular trafficking of pharmaceutical nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feiran; Watson, Erin; Dempsey, Christopher; Suh, Junghae

    2013-01-01

    Real-time particle tracking is a technique that combines fluorescence microscopy with object tracking and computing and can be used to extract quantitative transport parameters for small particles inside cells. Since the success of a nanocarrier can often be determined by how effectively it delivers cargo to the target organelle, understanding the complex intracellular transport of pharmaceutical nanocarriers is critical. Real-time particle tracking provides insight into the dynamics of the intracellular behavior of nanoparticles, which may lead to significant improvements in the design and development of novel delivery systems. Unfortunately, this technique is not often fully understood, limiting its implementation by researchers in the field of nanomedicine. In this chapter, one of the most complicated aspects of particle tracking, the mean square displacement (MSD) calculation, is explained in a simple manner designed for the novice particle tracker. Pseudo code for performing the MSD calculation in MATLAB is also provided. This chapter contains clear and comprehensive instructions for a series of basic procedures in the technique of particle tracking. Instructions for performing confocal microscopy of nanoparticle samples are provided, and two methods of determining particle trajectories that do not require commercial particle-tracking software are provided. Trajectory analysis and determination of the tracking resolution are also explained. By providing comprehensive instructions needed to perform particle-tracking experiments, this chapter will enable researchers to gain new insight into the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers, potentially leading to the development of more effective and intelligent therapeutic delivery vectors.

  15. Extracting Lyapunov exponents from the echo dynamics of Bose-Einstein condensates on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarkhov, Andrei E.; Wimberger, Sandro; Fine, Boris V.

    2017-08-01

    We propose theoretically an experimentally realizable method to demonstrate the Lyapunov instability and to extract the value of the largest Lyapunov exponent for a chaotic many-particle interacting system. The proposal focuses specifically on a lattice of coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in the classical regime describable by the discrete Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We suggest to use imperfect time reversal of the system's dynamics known as the Loschmidt echo, which can be realized experimentally by reversing the sign of the Hamiltonian of the system. The routine involves tracking and then subtracting the noise of virtually any observable quantity before and after the time reversal. We support the theoretical analysis by direct numerical simulations demonstrating that the largest Lyapunov exponent can indeed be extracted from the Loschmidt echo routine. We also discuss possible values of experimental parameters required for implementing this proposal.

  16. Use of Dimethyl Pimelimidate with Microfluidic System for Nucleic Acids Extraction without Electricity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Choong Eun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Koo, Bonhan; Choi, Kyung-Chul; Chang, Suhwan; Park, Se Yoon; Kim, Ji Yeun; Kim, Sung-Han; Shin, Yong

    2017-07-18

    The isolation of nucleic acids in the lab on a chip is crucial to achieve the maximal effectiveness of point-of-care testing for detection in clinical applications. Here, we report on the use of a simple and versatile single-channel microfluidic platform that combines dimethyl pimelimidate (DMP) for nucleic acids (both RNA and DNA) extraction without electricity using a thin-film system. The system is based on the adaption of DMP into nonchaotropic-based nucleic acids and the capture of reagents into a low-cost thin-film platform for use as a microfluidic total analysis system, which can be utilized for sample processing in clinical diagnostics. Moreover, we assessed the use of the DMP system for the extraction of nucleic acids from various samples, including mammalian cells, bacterial cells, and viruses from human disease, and we also confirmed that the quality and quantity of the nucleic acids extracted were sufficient to allow for the robust detection of biomarkers and/or pathogens in downstream analysis. Furthermore, this DMP system does not require any instruments and electricity, and has improved time efficiency, portability, and affordability. Thus, we believe that the DMP system may change the paradigm of sample processing in clinical diagnostics.

  17. A regularized auxiliary particle filtering approach for system state estimation and battery life prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Wilson; Ma, Fai

    2011-07-01

    System current state estimation (or condition monitoring) and future state prediction (or failure prognostics) constitute the core elements of condition-based maintenance programs. For complex systems whose internal state variables are either inaccessible to sensors or hard to measure under normal operational conditions, inference has to be made from indirect measurements using approaches such as Bayesian learning. In recent years, the auxiliary particle filter (APF) has gained popularity in Bayesian state estimation; the APF technique, however, has some potential limitations in real-world applications. For example, the diversity of the particles may deteriorate when the process noise is small, and the variance of the importance weights could become extremely large when the likelihood varies dramatically over the prior. To tackle these problems, a regularized auxiliary particle filter (RAPF) is developed in this paper for system state estimation and forecasting. This RAPF aims to improve the performance of the APF through two innovative steps: (1) regularize the approximating empirical density and redraw samples from a continuous distribution so as to diversify the particles; and (2) smooth out the rather diffused proposals by a rejection/resampling approach so as to improve the robustness of particle filtering. The effectiveness of the proposed RAPF technique is evaluated through simulations of a nonlinear/non-Gaussian benchmark model for state estimation. It is also implemented for a real application in the remaining useful life (RUL) prediction of lithium-ion batteries.

  18. A moving baseline for evaluation of advanced coal extraction systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickerton, C. R.; Westerfield, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    Results from the initial effort to establish baseline economic performance comparators for a program whose intent is to define, develop, and demonstrate advanced systems suitable for coal resource extraction beyond the year 2000 are reported. Systems used were selected from contemporary coal mining technology and from conservation conjectures of year 2000 technology. The analysis was also based on a seam thickness of 6 ft. Therefore, the results are specific to the study systems and the selected seam extended to other seam thicknesses.

  19. Membrane contactor assisted water extraction system for separating hydrogen peroxide from a working solution, and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Seth W [Lincolnwood, IL; Lin, Yupo J [Naperville, IL; Hestekin', Jamie A [Fayetteville, AR; Henry, Michael P [Batavia, IL; Pujado, Peter [Kildeer, IL; Oroskar, Anil [Oak Brook, IL; Kulprathipanja, Santi [Inverness, IL; Randhava, Sarabjit [Evanston, IL

    2010-09-21

    The present invention relates to a membrane contactor assisted extraction system and method for extracting a single phase species from multi-phase working solutions. More specifically one preferred embodiment of the invention relates to a method and system for membrane contactor assisted water (MCAWE) extraction of hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2O.sub.2) from a working solution.

  20. Preparation of polycaprolactone nanoparticles via supercritical carbon dioxide extraction of emulsions.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, Adejumoke Lara; Trivedi, Vivek; Mitchell, John C

    2017-08-21

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) nanoparticles were produced via supercritical fluid extraction of emulsions (SFEE) using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO 2 ). The efficiency of the scCO 2 extraction was investigated and compared to that of solvent extraction at atmospheric pressure. The effects of process parameters including polymer concentration (0.6-10% w/w in acetone), surfactant concentration (0.07 and 0.14% w/w) and polymer-to-surfactant weight ratio (1:1-16:1 w/w) on the particle size and surface morphology were also investigated. Spherical PCL nanoparticles with mean particle sizes between 190 and 350 nm were obtained depending on the polymer concentration, which was the most important factor where increase in the particle size was directly related to total polymer content in the formulation. Nanoparticles produced were analysed using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that SFEE can be applied for the preparation of PCL nanoparticles without agglomeration and in a comparatively short duration of only 1 h.

  1. Modeling the dynamical sinking of biogenic particles in eastern-boundary upwelling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Vincent; Monroy, Pedro; López, Cristobal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2017-04-01

    Although most of the organic material produced by photosynthesis in the upper ocean is recycled in surface waters, a significant portion sinks into the deep ocean where it is stored for long time-scales. Knowledge of the export flux of organic carbon from the sea surface to depths is needed to estimate the efficiency of the biological carbon pump, a key process of global carbon cycling. We study how the sinking of biogenic particles produced in the euphotic layer is affected by subsurface ocean currents as derived from a regional dynamical model. In the range of sizes and densities appropriate for marine biogenic particles, the sinking trajectories are given by the equation of motion of small particles in a fluid flow (Maxey-Riley equation). We use a modelled 3-dimensional velocity field with major energetic structures in the mesoscale and we assess the influence of physical processes such as the Coriolis force and the inertia of the particles. We find that the latter forces are negligible as compared to the most important terms, which are passive motion with the velocity of the flow and a constant added vertical velocity due to gravity. Horizontal two-dimensional clustering is observed at depth, similar to the inhomogeneities observed in sinking ocean particles. Based on ensemble experiments, we explore the influence of the mean flow and the mesoscale eddy field on particles lateral advection and size fractionation. This modeling framework allows us to extend the concept of particle source funnels and helps interpreting particles fluxes estimated from sediment traps deployed in upwelling systems, informing the spatial mismatch between surface production and particle export.

  2. Evaluations of the Method to Measure Black Carbon Particles Suspended in Rainwater and Snow Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohata, S.; Moteki, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Kondo, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The mass concentrations and size distributions of black carbon (BC) particles in rainwater and snow are important parameters for improved understanding of the wet deposition of BC, is a key process in quantifying the impacts of BC on climate. In this study, we have evaluated a new method to measure these parameters. The approach consists of an ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) used in conjunction with a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). The USN converts sample water into micron-size droplets at a constant rate and then extracts airborne BC particles by dehydrating the water droplets. The mass of individual BC particles is measured by the SP2, based on the laser-induced incandescence technique. The combination of the USN and SP2 enabled the measurement of BC particles using only small amount of sample water, typically 10 ml (Ohata et al., 2011). However, the loss of BC during the extraction process depends on their size. We determined the size-dependent extraction efficiency using polystyrene latex spheres (PSLs) with twelve different diameters between 100-1050 nm. The PSL concentrations in water were determined by the light extinction of at 532nm. The extraction efficiency of the USN showed broad maximum in the diameter range of 200-500nm, and decreased substantially at larger sizes. The extraction efficiency determined using the PSL standards agreed to within ±40% with that determined using laboratory-generated BC concentration standards. We applied this method to the analysis of rainwater collected in Tokyo and Okinawa over the East China Sea. Measured BC size distributions in all rainwater samples showed negligible contribution of the BC particles larger than 600nm to the total BC amounts. However, for BC particles in surface snow collected in Greenland and Antarctica, size distributions were sometimes shifted to much larger size ranges.

  3. Extracting the Information Backbone in Online System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian-Ming; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Information overload is a serious problem in modern society and many solutions such as recommender system have been proposed to filter out irrelevant information. In the literature, researchers have been mainly dedicated to improving the recommendation performance (accuracy and diversity) of the algorithms while they have overlooked the influence of topology of the online user-object bipartite networks. In this paper, we find that some information provided by the bipartite networks is not only redundant but also misleading. With such “less can be more” feature, we design some algorithms to improve the recommendation performance by eliminating some links from the original networks. Moreover, we propose a hybrid method combining the time-aware and topology-aware link removal algorithms to extract the backbone which contains the essential information for the recommender systems. From the practical point of view, our method can improve the performance and reduce the computational time of the recommendation system, thus improving both of their effectiveness and efficiency. PMID:23690946

  4. RNA polymerase activity is associated with viral particles isolated from Leishmania braziliensis subsp. guyanensis.

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, G; Keenan, M C; Patterson, J L

    1990-01-01

    Viral particles purified from species of the protozoan parasite Leishmania braziliensis subsp. guyanensis by centrifugation in CsCl gradients were examined for the presence of viral polymerase. We demonstrated that RNA-dependent RNA polymerase is associated with viral particles. Viral transcription was studied in vitro with pulse-chase experiments and by assaying the RNase sensitivity of the viral transcripts. Viral polymerase synthesized full-length transcripts within 1 h. Double-strained, genome-length, and single-stranded RNAs were produced in this system. The nature of the RNA extracted from virions was also tested by RNase protection assays; both single-stranded and double-stranded RNAs were found. Images PMID:2370680

  5. Effects of copper particles on a model septic system's function and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alicia A; Walker, Sharon L

    2016-03-15

    There is concern surrounding the addition of nanoparticles into consumer products due to toxicity potential and the increased risk of human and environmental exposures to these particles. Copper nanoparticles are found in many common consumer goods; therefore, the disposal and subsequent interactions between potentially toxic Cu-based nanoparticles and microbial communities may have detrimental impacts on wastewater treatment processes. This study investigates the effects of three copper particles (micron- and nano-scale Cu particles, and a nano-scale Cu(OH)2-based fungicide) on the function and operation of a model septic tank. Septic system analyses included water quality evaluations and microbial community characterizations to detect changes in and relationships between the septic tank function and microbial community phenotype/genotype. As would be expected for optimal wastewater treatment, biological oxygen demand (BOD5) was reduced by at least 63% during nano-scale Cu exposure, indicating normal function. pH was reduced to below the optimum anaerobic fermentation range during the micro Cu exposure, suggesting incomplete degradation of organic waste may have occurred. The copper fungicide, Cu(OH)2, caused a 57% increase in total organic carbon (TOC), which is well above the typical range for septic systems and also corresponded to increased BOD5 during the majority of the Cu(OH)2 exposure. The changes in TOC and BOD5 demonstrate that the system was improperly treating waste. Overall, results imply individual exposures to the three Cu particles caused distinct disruptions in septic tank function. However, it was observed that the system was able to recover to typical operating conditions after three weeks post-exposure. These results imply that during periods of Cu introduction, there are likely pulses of improper removal of total organic carbon and significant changes in pH not in the optimal range for the system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  6. Multielement extraction system for the determination of 18 trace elements in geochemical samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.R.; Viets, J.G.

    1981-01-01

    A Methyl isobutyl ketone-Amine synerGistic Iodide Complex (MAGIC) extraction system has been developed for use in geochemical exploration which separates a maximum number of trace elements from interfering matrices. Extraction curves for 18 of these trace elements are presented: Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Ga, In, Tl, Sa, Pb, As, Sb, Bi, Se, and Te. The acid normality of the aqueous phase controls the extraction into the organic phase, and each of these 18 elements has a broad range of HCl normality over which H is quantitatively extracted, making H possible to determine all 18 trace elements from a single sample digestion or leach solution. The extract can be analyzed directly by flame atomic absorption or inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy. Most of these 18 elements can be determined by Nameless atomic absorption after special treatment of the organic extract.

  7. Extracting and standardizing medication information in clinical text – the MedEx-UIMA system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Min; Wu, Yonghui; Shah, Anushi; Priyanka, Priyanka; Denny, Joshua C.; Xu, Hua

    2014-01-01

    Extraction of medication information embedded in clinical text is important for research using electronic health records (EHRs). However, most of current medication information extraction systems identify drug and signature entities without mapping them to standard representation. In this study, we introduced the open source Java implementation of MedEx, an existing high-performance medication information extraction system, based on the Unstructured Information Management Architecture (UIMA) framework. In addition, we developed new encoding modules in the MedEx-UIMA system, which mapped an extracted drug name/dose/form to both generalized and specific RxNorm concepts and translated drug frequency information to ISO standard. We processed 826 documents by both systems and verified that MedEx-UIMA and MedEx (the Python version) performed similarly by comparing both results. Using two manually annotated test sets that contained 300 drug entries from medication list and 300 drug entries from narrative reports, the MedEx-UIMA system achieved F-measures of 98.5% and 97.5% respectively for encoding drug names to corresponding RxNorm generic drug ingredients, and F-measures of 85.4% and 88.1% respectively for mapping drug names/dose/form to the most specific RxNorm concepts. It also achieved an F-measure of 90.4% for normalizing frequency information to ISO standard. The open source MedEx-UIMA system is freely available online at http://code.google.com/p/medex-uima/. PMID:25954575

  8. Study of optimal extraction conditions for achieving high yield and antioxidant activity of tomato seed oil.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Pan, Zhongli; Yue, Tianli; Zhang, Ang; Li, Xuan

    2012-08-01

    Value of tomato seed has not been fully recognized. The objectives of this research were to establish suitable processing conditions for extracting oil from tomato seed by using solvent, determine the impact of processing conditions on yield and antioxidant activity of extracted oil, and elucidate kinetics of the oil extraction process. Four processing parameters, including time, temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio and particle size were studied. A second order model was established to describe the oil extraction process. Based on the results, increasing temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio, and extraction time increased oil yield. In contrast, larger particle size reduced the oil yield. The recommended oil extraction conditions were 8 min of extraction time at temperature of 25 °C, solvent-to-solids ratio of 5/1 (v/w) and particle size of 0.38 mm, which gave oil yield of 20.32% with recovery rate of 78.56%. The DPPH scavenging activity of extracted oil was not significantly affected by the extraction parameters. The inhibitory concentration (IC(50) ) of tomato seed oil was 8.67 mg/mL which was notably low compared to most vegetable oils. A 2nd order model successfully described the kinetics of tomato oil extraction process and parameters of extraction kinetics including initial extraction rate (h), equilibrium concentration of oil (C(s) ), and the extraction rate constant (k) could be precisely predicted with R(2) of at least 0.957. The study revealed that tomato seed which is typically treated as a low value byproduct of tomato processing has great potential in producing oil with high antioxidant capability. The impact of processing conditions including time, temperature, solvent-to-solid ratio and particle size on yield, and antioxidant activity of extracted tomato seed oil are reported. Optimal conditions and models which describe the extraction process are recommended. The information is vital for determining the extraction processing conditions for industrial

  9. A Neuro-Fuzzy System for Extracting Environment Features Based on Ultrasonic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Marichal, Graciliano Nicolás; Hernández, Angela; Acosta, Leopoldo; González, Evelio José

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a method to extract features of the environment based on ultrasonic sensors is presented. A 3D model of a set of sonar systems and a workplace has been developed. The target of this approach is to extract in a short time, while the vehicle is moving, features of the environment. Particularly, the approach shown in this paper has been focused on determining walls and corners, which are very common environment features. In order to prove the viability of the devised approach, a 3D simulated environment has been built. A Neuro-Fuzzy strategy has been used in order to extract environment features from this simulated model. Several trials have been carried out, obtaining satisfactory results in this context. After that, some experimental tests have been conducted using a real vehicle with a set of sonar systems. The obtained results reveal the satisfactory generalization properties of the approach in this case. PMID:22303160

  10. Exact Hybrid Particle/Population Simulation of Rule-Based Models of Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Lori J.; Nair, Niketh S.; Faeder, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed modeling and simulation of biochemical systems is complicated by the problem of combinatorial complexity, an explosion in the number of species and reactions due to myriad protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Rule-based modeling overcomes this problem by representing molecules as structured objects and encoding their interactions as pattern-based rules. This greatly simplifies the process of model specification, avoiding the tedious and error prone task of manually enumerating all species and reactions that can potentially exist in a system. From a simulation perspective, rule-based models can be expanded algorithmically into fully-enumerated reaction networks and simulated using a variety of network-based simulation methods, such as ordinary differential equations or Gillespie's algorithm, provided that the network is not exceedingly large. Alternatively, rule-based models can be simulated directly using particle-based kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This “network-free” approach produces exact stochastic trajectories with a computational cost that is independent of network size. However, memory and run time costs increase with the number of particles, limiting the size of system that can be feasibly simulated. Here, we present a hybrid particle/population simulation method that combines the best attributes of both the network-based and network-free approaches. The method takes as input a rule-based model and a user-specified subset of species to treat as population variables rather than as particles. The model is then transformed by a process of “partial network expansion” into a dynamically equivalent form that can be simulated using a population-adapted network-free simulator. The transformation method has been implemented within the open-source rule-based modeling platform BioNetGen, and resulting hybrid models can be simulated using the particle-based simulator NFsim. Performance tests show that significant memory

  11. Exact hybrid particle/population simulation of rule-based models of biochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Hogg, Justin S; Harris, Leonard A; Stover, Lori J; Nair, Niketh S; Faeder, James R

    2014-04-01

    Detailed modeling and simulation of biochemical systems is complicated by the problem of combinatorial complexity, an explosion in the number of species and reactions due to myriad protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Rule-based modeling overcomes this problem by representing molecules as structured objects and encoding their interactions as pattern-based rules. This greatly simplifies the process of model specification, avoiding the tedious and error prone task of manually enumerating all species and reactions that can potentially exist in a system. From a simulation perspective, rule-based models can be expanded algorithmically into fully-enumerated reaction networks and simulated using a variety of network-based simulation methods, such as ordinary differential equations or Gillespie's algorithm, provided that the network is not exceedingly large. Alternatively, rule-based models can be simulated directly using particle-based kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This "network-free" approach produces exact stochastic trajectories with a computational cost that is independent of network size. However, memory and run time costs increase with the number of particles, limiting the size of system that can be feasibly simulated. Here, we present a hybrid particle/population simulation method that combines the best attributes of both the network-based and network-free approaches. The method takes as input a rule-based model and a user-specified subset of species to treat as population variables rather than as particles. The model is then transformed by a process of "partial network expansion" into a dynamically equivalent form that can be simulated using a population-adapted network-free simulator. The transformation method has been implemented within the open-source rule-based modeling platform BioNetGen, and resulting hybrid models can be simulated using the particle-based simulator NFsim. Performance tests show that significant memory savings

  12. Spatial resolution properties of digital autoradiography systems for pre-clinical alpha particle imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanguay, Jesse; Benard, Francois; Celler, Anna; Ruth, Thomas; Schaffer, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Attaching alpha-emitting radionuclides to cancer-targeting agents increases the anti-tumor effects of targeted cancer therapies. The success of alpha therapy for treating bone metastases has increased interest in using targeted alpha therapy (TAT) to treat a broad spectrum of metastatic cancers. Estimating radiation doses to targeted tumors, including small (<250 μm) clusters of cancer cells, and to non-targeted tissues is critical in the pre-clinical development of TATs. However, accurate quantification of heterogeneous distributions of alpha-emitters in small metastases is not possible with existing pre-clinical in-vivo imaging systems. Ex-vivo digital autoradiography using a scintillator in combination with an image intensifier and a charged coupled device (CCD) has gained interest for pre-clinical ex-vivo alpha particle imaging. We present a simulation-based analysis of the fundamental spatial resolution limits of digital autoradiography systems. Spatial resolution was quantified in terms of the modulation transfer function (MTF) and Wagner's equivalent aperture. We modeled systems operating in either particle-counting (PC) or energy-integrating (EI) mode using a cascaded systems approach that accounts for: 1) the stopping power of alpha particles; 2) the distance alpha particles travel within the scintillator; 3) optical blur, and; 4) binning in detector elements. We applied our analysis to imaging of astatine-211 using an LYSO scintillator with thickness ranging from 10 μm to 20 μm. Our analysis demonstrates that when these systems are operated in particle-counting mode with a centroid-calculation algorithm, the effective apertures of 35 μm can be achieved, which suggests that digital autoradiography may enable quantifying the uptake of alpha emitters in tumors consisting of a few cancer cells. Future work will investigate the image noise and energy-resolution properties of digital autoradiography systems.

  13. Terra Vac In Situ Vacuum Extraction System: Applications Analysis Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is an evaluation of the Terra Vac in situ vacuum extraction system and its applicability as a treatment method for waste site cleanup. This report analyzes the results from the Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program’s 56-day demonstration at t...

  14. Performance of multi-aperture grid extraction systems for an ITER-relevant RF-driven negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzen, P.; Gutser, R.; Fantz, U.; Kraus, W.; Falter, H.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; McNeely, P.; Nocentini, R.; Riedl, R.; Stäbler, A.; Wünderlich, D.

    2011-07-01

    The ITER neutral beam system requires a negative hydrogen ion beam of 48 A with an energy of 0.87 MeV, and a negative deuterium beam of 40 A with an energy of 1 MeV. The beam is extracted from a large ion source of dimension 1.9 × 0.9 m2 by an acceleration system consisting of seven grids with 1280 apertures each. Currently, apertures with a diameter of 14 mm in the first grid are foreseen. In 2007, the IPP RF source was chosen as the ITER reference source due to its reduced maintenance compared with arc-driven sources and the successful development at the BATMAN test facility of being equipped with the small IPP prototype RF source ( {\\sim}\\frac{1}{8} of the area of the ITER NBI source). These results, however, were obtained with an extraction system with 8 mm diameter apertures. This paper reports on the comparison of the source performance at BATMAN of an ITER-relevant extraction system equipped with chamfered apertures with a 14 mm diameter and 8 mm diameter aperture extraction system. The most important result is that there is almost no difference in the achieved current density—being consistent with ion trajectory calculations—and the amount of co-extracted electrons. Furthermore, some aspects of the beam optics of both extraction systems are discussed.

  15. Method for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles, device for fluidizing and coating ultrafine particles

    DOEpatents

    Li, Jie; Liu, Yung Y

    2015-01-20

    The invention provides a method for dispersing particles within a reaction field, the method comprising confining the particles to the reaction field using a standing wave. The invention also provides a system for coating particles, the system comprising a reaction zone; a means for producing fluidized particles within the reaction zone; a fluid to produce a standing wave within the reaction zone; and a means for introducing coating moieties to the reaction zone. The invention also provides a method for coating particles, the method comprising fluidizing the particles, subjecting the