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Sample records for particle growing mechanisms

  1. Extreme Mechanics of Growing Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-03-01

    Growth is a distinguishing feature of all living things. Unlike standard materials, living matter can autonomously respond to alterations in its environment. As a result of a continuous ultrastructural turnover and renewal of cells and extracellular matrix, living matter can undergo extreme changes in composition, size, and shape within the order of months, weeks, or days. While hard matter typically adapts by increasing its density to grow strong, soft matter adapts by increasing its volume to grow large. Here we provide a state-of-the-art review of growing matter, and compare existing mathematical models for growth and remodeling of living systems. Applications are plentiful ranging from plant growth to tumor growth, from asthma in the lungs to restenosis in the vasculature, from plastic to reconstructive surgery, and from skeletal muscle adaptation to heart failure. Using these examples, we discuss current challenges and potential future directions. We hope to initiate critical discussions around the biophysical modeling of growing matter as a powerful tool to better understand biological systems in health and disease. This research has been supported by the NSF CAREER award CMMI 0952021.

  2. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  3. Particles Growing in Solutions: Depletion Forces and Instability of Homogeneous Particle Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Crystallites, droplets and amorphous precipitates growing from supersaturated solution are surrounded by zones, which are depleted with respect to the molecules they are built of. If two such particles of colloidal size are separated by a distance comparable to their diameters, then the depletion within the gap between particles is deeper than that at the outer portion of the particles. This will cause depletion attraction between the particles should appear. It may cause particle coagulation and decay of the originally homogeneous particle distribution into a system of clouds within which the particle number density is higher, separated by the region of the lower number density. Stability criterion, Q = 4 pi R(exp 3)c/3 >> 1, was analytically found along with typical particle density distribution wavevector q = (Q/I)(exp 1/2)(a/R)(exp 1/4). Here, R and a are the particle and molecular radii, respectively, c is the average molecular number density in solution and I is the squared diffusion length covered by a molecule during a typical time characterizing decay of molecular concentration in solution due to consumption of the molecules by the growing particles.

  4. Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, M B

    2011-03-03

    This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

  5. Growing Characteristics of Fine Ice Particles in Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto; Okada, Kazuto; Fujisawa, Ryo

    Time variation characteristics of ice particles in a surfactant solution have been investigated. The effect of surfactants on corrosion characteristics was also studied. The results were compared with those treated with poly(vinyl alcohol). From the results, the present surfactant, cetyl dimethyl betaine was not found to be effective on preventing Ostward ripening of ice particles as poly(vinyl alcohol) showed. Then, it was concluded some effective technology has to be installed with surfactants when this surfactant treatment is realized. On the corrosion characteristics, it was found that the present surfactant shows the same level as tap water.

  6. Mechanical Stress Induces Remodeling of Vascular Networks in Growing Leaves.

    PubMed

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Sharon, Eran; Armon, Shahaf; Nakayama, Naomi; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-04-01

    Differentiation into well-defined patterns and tissue growth are recognized as key processes in organismal development. However, it is unclear whether patterns are passively, homogeneously dilated by growth or whether they remodel during tissue expansion. Leaf vascular networks are well-fitted to investigate this issue, since leaves are approximately two-dimensional and grow manyfold in size. Here we study experimentally and computationally how vein patterns affect growth. We first model the growing vasculature as a network of viscoelastic rods and consider its response to external mechanical stress. We use the so-called texture tensor to quantify the local network geometry and reveal that growth is heterogeneous, resembling non-affine deformations in composite materials. We then apply mechanical forces to growing leaves after veins have differentiated, which respond by anisotropic growth and reorientation of the network in the direction of external stress. External mechanical stress appears to make growth more homogeneous, in contrast with the model with viscoelastic rods. However, we reconcile the model with experimental data by incorporating randomness in rod thickness and a threshold in the rod growth law, making the rods viscoelastoplastic. Altogether, we show that the higher stiffness of veins leads to their reorientation along external forces, along with a reduction in growth heterogeneity. This process may lead to the reinforcement of leaves against mechanical stress. More generally, our work contributes to a framework whereby growth and patterns are coordinated through the differences in mechanical properties between cell types.

  7. Mechanical Stress Induces Remodeling of Vascular Networks in Growing Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Julien, Jean-Daniel; Sharon, Eran; Armon, Shahaf; Nakayama, Naomi; Adda-Bedia, Mokhtar; Boudaoud, Arezki

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation into well-defined patterns and tissue growth are recognized as key processes in organismal development. However, it is unclear whether patterns are passively, homogeneously dilated by growth or whether they remodel during tissue expansion. Leaf vascular networks are well-fitted to investigate this issue, since leaves are approximately two-dimensional and grow manyfold in size. Here we study experimentally and computationally how vein patterns affect growth. We first model the growing vasculature as a network of viscoelastic rods and consider its response to external mechanical stress. We use the so-called texture tensor to quantify the local network geometry and reveal that growth is heterogeneous, resembling non-affine deformations in composite materials. We then apply mechanical forces to growing leaves after veins have differentiated, which respond by anisotropic growth and reorientation of the network in the direction of external stress. External mechanical stress appears to make growth more homogeneous, in contrast with the model with viscoelastic rods. However, we reconcile the model with experimental data by incorporating randomness in rod thickness and a threshold in the rod growth law, making the rods viscoelastoplastic. Altogether, we show that the higher stiffness of veins leads to their reorientation along external forces, along with a reduction in growth heterogeneity. This process may lead to the reinforcement of leaves against mechanical stress. More generally, our work contributes to a framework whereby growth and patterns are coordinated through the differences in mechanical properties between cell types. PMID:27074136

  8. Bacterial flagella grow through an injection-diffusion mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Renault, Thibaud T; Abraham, Anthony O; Bergmiller, Tobias; Paradis, Guillaume; Rainville, Simon; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Guet, Călin C; Tu, Yuhai; Namba, Keiichi; Keener, James P; Minamino, Tohru; Erhardt, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a self-assembling nanomachine. The external flagellar filament, several times longer than a bacterial cell body, is made of a few tens of thousands subunits of a single protein: flagellin. A fundamental problem concerns the molecular mechanism of how the flagellum grows outside the cell, where no discernible energy source is available. Here, we monitored the dynamic assembly of individual flagella using in situ labelling and real-time immunostaining of elongating flagellar filaments. We report that the rate of flagellum growth, initially ∼1,700 amino acids per second, decreases with length and that the previously proposed chain mechanism does not contribute to the filament elongation dynamics. Inhibition of the proton motive force-dependent export apparatus revealed a major contribution of substrate injection in driving filament elongation. The combination of experimental and mathematical evidence demonstrates that a simple, injection-diffusion mechanism controls bacterial flagella growth outside the cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23136.001 PMID:28262091

  9. On the mechanics of growing thin biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-02-01

    Despite their seemingly delicate appearance, thin biological membranes fulfill various crucial roles in the human body and can sustain substantial mechanical loads. Unlike engineering structures, biological membranes are able to grow and adapt to changes in their mechanical environment. Finite element modeling of biological growth holds the potential to better understand the interplay of membrane form and function and to reliably predict the effects of disease or medical intervention. However, standard continuum elements typically fail to represent thin biological membranes efficiently, accurately, and robustly. Moreover, continuum models are typically cumbersome to generate from surface-based medical imaging data. Here we propose a computational model for finite membrane growth using a classical midsurface representation compatible with standard shell elements. By assuming elastic incompressibility and membrane-only growth, the model a priori satisfies the zero-normal stress condition. To demonstrate its modular nature, we implement the membrane growth model into the general-purpose non-linear finite element package Abaqus/Standard using the concept of user subroutines. To probe efficiently and robustness, we simulate selected benchmark examples of growing biological membranes under different loading conditions. To demonstrate the clinical potential, we simulate the functional adaptation of a heart valve leaflet in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We believe that our novel approach will be widely applicable to simulate the adaptive chronic growth of thin biological structures including skin membranes, mucous membranes, fetal membranes, tympanic membranes, corneoscleral membranes, and heart valve membranes. Ultimately, our model can be used to identify diseased states, predict disease evolution, and guide the design of interventional or pharmaceutic therapies to arrest or revert disease progression.

  10. On the mechanics of growing thin biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rausch, Manuel K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Despite their seemingly delicate appearance, thin biological membranes fulfill various crucial roles in the human body and can sustain substantial mechanical loads. Unlike engineering structures, biological membranes are able to grow and adapt to changes in their mechanical environment. Finite element modeling of biological growth holds the potential to better understand the interplay of membrane form and function and to reliably predict the effects of disease or medical intervention. However, standard continuum elements typically fail to represent thin biological membranes efficiently, accurately, and robustly. Moreover, continuum models are typically cumbersome to generate from surface-based medical imaging data. Here we propose a computational model for finite membrane growth using a classical midsurface representation compatible with standard shell elements. By assuming elastic incompressibility and membrane-only growth, the model a priori satisfies the zero-normal stress condition. To demonstrate its modular nature, we implement the membrane growth model into the general-purpose non-linear finite element package Abaqus/Standard using the concept of user subroutines. To probe efficiently and robustness, we simulate selected benchmark examples of growing biological membranes under different loading conditions. To demonstrate the clinical potential, we simulate the functional adaptation of a heart valve leaflet in ischemic cardiomyopathy. We believe that our novel approach will be widely applicable to simulate the adaptive chronic growth of thin biological structures including skin membranes, mucous membranes, fetal membranes, tympanic membranes, corneoscleral membranes, and heart valve membranes. Ultimately, our model can be used to identify diseased states, predict disease evolution, and guide the design of interventional or pharmaceutic therapies to arrest or revert disease progression. PMID:24563551

  11. Nonequilibrium Flows with Smooth Particle Applied Mechanics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kum, Oyeon

    simulations of Rayleigh-Benard convection. Nevertheless, the smooth particle trajectories are essentially Newtonian trajectories, for particles with mass m, subject to an effective potential function 2Pn-^{ -2}w(r). Accordingly, high-pressure subsonic problems, with v^2 << c^2, cannot be reliably solved using this method. A further limitation of the method is its inability to treat free surfaces accurately. Not just subsonic flows can be treated. Shock waves propagate very well in smooth particle systems. For the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability problem with a small amplitude interface perturbation, compared to the wavelength, the interface amplitude grows linearly and the growth rate agrees with the analytic value within 3%. The smooth particle method promises to be of special interest whenever it is desirable to include fluctuations. Smooth particles also provide an interesting eddy viscosity for use in turbulence studies.

  12. Mechanism of light-particle emission

    SciTech Connect

    Nagamiya, S.

    1982-02-01

    A general overview of the field of high-energy nuclear collisions studied from light particle spectra, pions, kaons, lambdas, protons, deuterons, and light composite fragments is given. Specifically, the basic reaction mechanism that determines the main features of particle emission such as the energy and angular distributions, the multiplicity, the production rate, the projectile and target mass dependences, the beam-energy dependences, etc. are discussed. Very general features of high-energy nuclear collisions are described. The major question is what characterizes these collisions. Proton emission is discussed since the proton is the dominant particle emitted at a large angle. The mechanism of composite-fragment formation is discussed. Also pion production and strange particle production are considered.

  13. Chemical mechanisms governing atmospheric new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bzdek, Bryan Richard

    The goal of this dissertation is to understand the chemistry that governs new particle formation, a ubiquitous and important atmospheric process. New particle formation occurs when gas phase precursors condense to create small molecular clusters on the order of 1 nm diameter. Those clusters must then grow rapidly and ultimately may serve as the seeds for cloud droplets. However, modelers have substantial difficulty predicting the frequency and efficiency of new particle formation. This predictive difficulty is an important contributor to the uncertainty in aerosol effects on global climate and therefore also contributes to the large uncertainty in anthropogenic effects on climate. To reduce these uncertainties, a more precise understanding of how particles nucleate and grow in the atmospheric is required. In this dissertation, mass spectrometry is used to determine the chemical processes involved in new particle formation. Gas phase species such as sulfuric acid, ammonia, amines, and organic matter are contributors but exactly how and how much each contributes to the growth of nanoparticles is not well understood. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and Nano Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (NAMS) are used to study the chemical composition and reactivity of clusters < 3 nm diameter and nanoparticles 10-20 nm diameter, respectively. The FTICR-MS studies are laboratory based, whereas the NAMS studies are field based. Measurements of cluster composition and reactivity using FTICR-MS permit prediction of the composition of ambient molecular clusters. For ambient molecular clusters to become relevant to climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei, they must grow rapidly. NAMS measurements at 20 nm diameter permit determination of nanoparticle growth pathways. This dissertation shows that sulfuric acid adds to both clusters and nanoparticles in a collision limited manner. On the other hand, ammonia uptake in both size regimes may not

  14. 3D deformation field in growing plant roots reveals both mechanical and biological responses to axial mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Bizet, François; Bengough, A Glyn; Hummel, Irène; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Dupuy, Lionel X

    2016-10-01

    Strong regions and physical barriers in soils may slow root elongation, leading to reduced water and nutrient uptake and decreased yield. In this study, the biomechanical responses of roots to axial mechanical forces were assessed by combining 3D live imaging, kinematics and a novel mechanical sensor. This system quantified Young's elastic modulus of intact poplar roots (32MPa), a rapid <0.2 mN touch-elongation sensitivity, and the critical elongation force applied by growing roots that resulted in bending. Kinematic analysis revealed a multiphase bio-mechanical response of elongation rate and curvature in 3D. Measured critical elongation force was accurately predicted from an Euler buckling model, indicating that no biologically mediated accommodation to mechanical forces influenced bending during this short period of time. Force applied by growing roots increased more than 15-fold when buckling was prevented by lateral bracing of the root. The junction between the growing and the mature zones was identified as a zone of mechanical weakness that seemed critical to the bending process. This work identified key limiting factors for root growth and buckling under mechanical constraints. The findings are relevant to crop and soil sciences, and advance our understanding of root growth in heterogeneous structured soils.

  15. 3D deformation field in growing plant roots reveals both mechanical and biological responses to axial mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Bizet, François; Bengough, A. Glyn; Hummel, Irène; Bogeat-Triboulot, Marie-Béatrice; Dupuy, Lionel X.

    2016-01-01

    Strong regions and physical barriers in soils may slow root elongation, leading to reduced water and nutrient uptake and decreased yield. In this study, the biomechanical responses of roots to axial mechanical forces were assessed by combining 3D live imaging, kinematics and a novel mechanical sensor. This system quantified Young’s elastic modulus of intact poplar roots (32MPa), a rapid <0.2 mN touch-elongation sensitivity, and the critical elongation force applied by growing roots that resulted in bending. Kinematic analysis revealed a multiphase bio-mechanical response of elongation rate and curvature in 3D. Measured critical elongation force was accurately predicted from an Euler buckling model, indicating that no biologically mediated accommodation to mechanical forces influenced bending during this short period of time. Force applied by growing roots increased more than 15-fold when buckling was prevented by lateral bracing of the root. The junction between the growing and the mature zones was identified as a zone of mechanical weakness that seemed critical to the bending process. This work identified key limiting factors for root growth and buckling under mechanical constraints. The findings are relevant to crop and soil sciences, and advance our understanding of root growth in heterogeneous structured soils. PMID:27664958

  16. Molelcular dynamics, smooth particle applied mechanics and Clausius` inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    Recent developments in molecular dynamics furnish new interconnections among three classical fields: particle mechanics, continuum mechanics, and thermodynamics. The resulting links clarify the importance of Lyapunov instability to irreversibility.

  17. Nonequilibrium flows with smooth particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Kum, Oyeon

    1995-07-01

    Smooth particle methods are relatively new methods for simulating solid and fluid flows through they have a 20-year history of solving complex hydrodynamic problems in astrophysics, such as colliding planets and stars, for which correct answers are unknown. The results presented in this thesis evaluate the adaptability or fitness of the method for typical hydrocode production problems. For finite hydrodynamic systems, boundary conditions are important. A reflective boundary condition with image particles is a good way to prevent a density anomaly at the boundary and to keep the fluxes continuous there. Boundary values of temperature and velocity can be separately controlled. The gradient algorithm, based on differentiating the smooth particle expression for (uρ) and (Tρ), does not show numerical instabilities for the stress tensor and heat flux vector quantities which require second derivatives in space when Fourier`s heat-flow law and Newton`s viscous force law are used. Smooth particle methods show an interesting parallel linking to them to molecular dynamics. For the inviscid Euler equation, with an isentropic ideal gas equation of state, the smooth particle algorithm generates trajectories isomorphic to those generated by molecular dynamics. The shear moduli were evaluated based on molecular dynamics calculations for the three weighting functions, B spline, Lucy, and Cusp functions. The accuracy and applicability of the methods were estimated by comparing a set of smooth particle Rayleigh-Benard problems, all in the laminar regime, to corresponding highly-accurate grid-based numerical solutions of continuum equations. Both transient and stationary smooth particle solutions reproduce the grid-based data with velocity errors on the order of 5%. The smooth particle method still provides robust solutions at high Rayleigh number where grid-based methods fails.

  18. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Viktor M.; Snarskii, Andrei A.; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  19. Single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in magnetoactive elastomers.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Viktor M; Snarskii, Andrei A; Zorinets, Denis; Shamonin, Mikhail

    2016-06-01

    Magnetoactive elastomers (MAEs) are composite materials comprised of micrometer-sized ferromagnetic particles in a nonmagnetic elastomer matrix. A single-particle mechanism of magnetostriction in MAEs, assuming the rotation of a soft magnetic, mechanically rigid particle with uniaxial magnetic anisotropy in magnetic fields is identified and considered theoretically within the framework of an alternative model. In this mechanism, the total magnetic anisotropy energy of the filling particles in the matrix is the sum over single particles. Matrix displacements in the vicinity of the particle and the resulting direction of the magnetization vector are calculated. The effect of matrix deformation is pronounced well if the magnetic anisotropy coefficient K is much larger than the shear modulus µ of the elastic matrix. The feasibility of the proposed magnetostriction mechanism in soft magnetoactive elastomers and gels is elucidated. The magnetic-field-induced internal stresses in the matrix lead to effects of magnetodeformation and may increase the elastic moduli of these composite materials.

  20. The toughening mechanism of rubber particles in polypropylene composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, L.; Xiao, J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Filling polypropylene materials with rubber particles can effectively increase the toughness of PP material and improve its cushioning properties. In this paper, we used the two kinds of method of the finite element analysis and experiment to study the rubber particles toughening mechanism, got the deformation process of particles when polypropylene material compressed and the yield stress of polypropylene after compression with particles filled or not.

  1. Spinel Oxides Growing on Fe—Cr Alloy Particles During Plasma Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweiss, O.; Dubský, J.; Voleník, K.; Had, J.; Leitner, J.; Seberíni, M.

    2001-07-01

    Oxidation reactions during plasma spraying of metallic powders give rise to oxide crusts on powder particle surfaces. The first oxidation stage occurs in flight of molten particles. It is usually followed by the second stage after hitting a substrate. To investigate the oxidation products immediately after the first stage, abrupt stopping of in-flight oxidation is possible by trapping and quenching the flying particles in liquid nitrogen. In oxide crusts on plasma sprayed and liquid nitrogen quenched particles of a Fe-12%Cr alloy, two spinel oxides were indicated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Both are solid solutions of the type Fe3O4 - Cr3O4 (i.e., Fe3- x Cr x O4, 0 ≤ x ≤ 3). One of the oxides, tetragonally distorted spinel, is characterized by the mean value of x ≈ 2.3. It is only stable at very high temperatures. The other spinel oxide is cubic with x slightly lower than 2, i.e. almost stoichiometric chromite FeCr2O4. From thermodynamic considerations it follows that in the Fe3O4 - Cr3O4 system there is no miscibility gap at high temperatures. The simultaneous existence of both oxides is probably due to non-equilibrium conditions during liquid nitrogen quenching of trapped particles.

  2. On the mechanics of continua with boundary energies and growing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papastavrou, Areti; Steinmann, Paul; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    Many biological systems are coated by thin films for protection, selective absorption, or transmembrane transport. A typical example is the mucous membrane covering the airways, the esophagus, and the intestine. Biological surfaces typically display a distinct mechanical behavior from the bulk; in particular, they may grow at different rates. Growth, morphological instabilities, and buckling of biological surfaces have been studied intensely by approximating the surface as a layer of finite thickness; however, growth has never been attributed to the surface itself. Here, we establish a theory of continua with boundary energies and growing surfaces of zero thickness in which the surface is equipped with its own potential energy and is allowed to grow independently of the bulk. In complete analogy to the kinematic equations, the balance equations, and the constitutive equations of a growing solid body, we derive the governing equations for a growing surface. We illustrate their spatial discretization using the finite element method, and discuss their consistent algorithmic linearization. To demonstrate the conceptual differences between volume and surface growth, we simulate the constrained growth of the inner layer of a cylindrical tube. Our novel approach toward continua with growing surfaces is capable of predicting extreme growth of the inner cylindrical surface, which more than doubles its initial area. The underlying algorithmic framework is robust and stable; it allows to predict morphological changes due to surface growth during the onset of buckling and beyond. The modeling of surface growth has immediate biomedical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, and tumor invasion. Beyond biomedical applications, the scientific understanding of growth-induced morphological instabilities and surface wrinkling has important implications in material sciences, manufacturing, and microfabrication, with applications in

  3. On the mechanics of continua with boundary energies and growing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Papastavrou, Areti; Steinmann, Paul; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-06-01

    Many biological systems are coated by thin films for protection, selective absorption, or transmembrane transport. A typical example is the mucous membrane covering the airways, the esophagus, and the intestine. Biological surfaces typically display a distinct mechanical behavior from the bulk; in particular, they may grow at different rates. Growth, morphological instabilities, and buckling of biological surfaces have been studied intensely by approximating the surface as a layer of finite thickness; however, growth has never been attributed to the surface itself. Here, we establish a theory of continua with boundary energies and growing surfaces of zero thickness in which the surface is equipped with its own potential energy and is allowed to grow independently of the bulk. In complete analogy to the kinematic equations, the balance equations, and the constitutive equations of a growing solid body, we derive the governing equations for a growing surface. We illustrate their spatial discretization using the finite element method, and discuss their consistent algorithmic linearization. To demonstrate the conceptual differences between volume and surface growth, we simulate the constrained growth of the inner layer of a cylindrical tube. Our novel approach towards continua with growing surfaces is capable of predicting extreme growth of the inner cylindrical surface, which more than doubles its initial area. The underlying algorithmic framework is robust and stable; it allows to predict morphological changes due to surface growth during the onset of buckling and beyond. The modeling of surface growth has immediate biomedical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of asthma, gastritis, obstructive sleep apnoea, and tumor invasion. Beyond biomedical applications, the scientific understanding of growth-induced morphological instabilities and surface wrinkling has important implications in material sciences, manufacturing, and microfabrication, with applications in

  4. Shearing Mechanisms and Complex Particle Growth in Nickel Superalloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Donald Paul

    Alloy 718 is a gamma"-strengthened Ni-base disk superalloy used in the aerospace industry, and it has been used prominently for decades. Though there has been extensive research into the processing/property relationships, there is very little known about the intermediate microstructure and mechanisms that are common in commercial 718 that dictate the yield strength. A variety of analytical techniques, including scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to investigate the microstructure of alloy 718 after various deformed conditions and heat treatment conditions. The gamma" in alloy 718 following a commercial heat treatment was found to have both monolithic gamma" particles as well as composite particles in which gamma' and gamma" share a planar phase boundary. Isothermal heat treatments were applied to solutionized samples, and it was found that low heat treatment temperatures produced a large percentage of composite particles, but high temperatures led to the formation of a primarily monolithic structure. Additionally, these composite particles were shown to have a desirable stabilizing effect at high temperatures, and they were seen to grow much more slowly than their monolithic counterparts. STEM analysis was able easily show the morphology of any edge-on gamma" particles, and EDS was capable of determining the general morphology of in-plane particles. EDS was also useful in determining a rough volume fraction of each phase in tin foils, and it was found that the volume fraction of gamma' was slightly larger than that of gamma" after commercial heat treatments. Deformation mechanisms were also characterized using STEM. Diffraction STEM was used on isolated dislocations and it was determined that isolated dislocations do not have contrast consistent with 1/2 dislocations, so some form of dislocation was thought to be operative. Atomic resolution STEM analysis uncovered a variety of mechanisms present

  5. Modeling the effects of particle deformation in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaochun; Zhao, Yongwu; Wang, Yongguang

    2012-09-01

    In a chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process, an active abrasive particle participating in the wear process will contact the pad and the wafer at the same time. The applied polishing load causes the deformation of the pad in the contact interface of the particle and the pad, and the deformation of the wafer in the contact interface of the particle and the wafer. Besides, this force causes the deformation of the abrasive particle. Based on the elastic-plastic micro-contact mechanics and abrasive wear theory, a novel model for material removal rate (MRR) with consideration of the abrasive particle deformation is presented in this paper. The deformation of the abrasive particle, affecting the indentation depth of the particle into the wafer, is quantitatively incorporated into the model. The results and analyses show that the present model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Mechanism of travelling-wave transport of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Hiroyuki; Seki, Kyogo; Kuromiya, Naoyuki

    2006-03-01

    Numerical and experimental investigations have been carried out on transport of particles in an electrostatic travelling field. A three-dimensional hard-sphere model of the distinct element method was developed to simulate the dynamics of particles. Forces applied to particles in the model were the Coulomb force, the dielectrophoresis force on polarized dipole particles in a non-uniform field, the image force, gravity and the air drag. Friction and repulsion between particle-particle and particle-conveyer were included in the model to replace initial conditions after mechanical contacts. Two kinds of experiments were performed to confirm the model. One was the measurement of charge of particles that is indispensable to determine the Coulomb force. Charge distribution was measured from the locus of free-fallen particles in a parallel electrostatic field. The averaged charge of the bulk particle was confirmed by measurement with a Faraday cage. The other experiment was measurements of the differential dynamics of particles on a conveyer consisting of parallel electrodes to which a four-phase travelling electrostatic wave was applied. Calculated results agreed with measurements, and the following characteristics were clarified. (1) The Coulomb force is the predominant force to drive particles compared with the other kinds of forces, (2) the direction of particle transport did not always coincide with that of the travelling wave but changed partially. It depended on the frequency of the travelling wave, the particle diameter and the electric field, (3) although some particles overtook the travelling wave at a very low frequency, the motion of particles was almost synchronized with the wave at the low frequency and (4) the transport of some particles was delayed to the wave at medium frequency; the majority of particles were transported backwards at high frequency and particles were not transported but only vibrated at very high frequency.

  7. Dirac particle in gravitational quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, Pouria

    2011-08-01

    In this Letter, we consider the effects of the Generalized (Gravitational) Uncertainty Principle (GUP) on the eigenvalues and the eigenfunctions of the Dirac equation. This form of GUP is consistent with various candidates of quantum gravity such as string theory, loop quantum gravity, doubly special relativity and black hole physics and predicts both a minimum measurable length and a maximum measurable momentum. The modified Hamiltonian contains two additional terms proportional to a( and a( where αi are Dirac matrices and a∼1/MPlc is the GUP parameter. For the case of the Dirac free particle and the Dirac particle in a box, we solve the generalized Dirac equation and find the modified energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions.

  8. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of drifting particles

    PubMed

    Bringuier

    2000-06-01

    This paper describes a method for obtaining nonequilibrium one-particle energy distributions of fermions or bosons. For the program to be carried out, particle transport should occur in the drifting mode in which the average velocity is much lower than the instantaneous velocity. Under this condition, the spectral current density has a drift-diffusion structure involving a mobility-diffusion relationship unrelated to statistics. When a local-equilibrium energy distribution is used, the linear response theory is recovered. Next, the particle-medium energy exchange is treated within a Fokker-Planck framework in order to obtain the nonequilibrium energy distribution; a nonlinear framework is used to account for the quantum-statistical correlations. Explicit formulas are obtained for homogeneous distributions at steady state. The rate of change of entropy is a simple generalization of the second law of thermodynamics. The positivity of the total entropy production stems from the positive definiteness of the diffusion tensors. Minimal entropy production is not necessarily achieved in the stationary state.

  9. Mechanisms and implications of air pollution particle associations with chemokines

    SciTech Connect

    Seagrave, JeanClare

    2008-11-01

    Inflammation induced by inhalation of air pollutant particles has been implicated as a mechanism for the adverse health effects associated with exposure to air pollution. The inflammatory response is associated with upregulation of various pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We have previously shown that diesel exhaust particles (DEP), a significant constituent of air pollution particulate matter in many urban areas, bind and concentrate IL-8, an important human neutrophil-attracting chemokine, and that the chemokine remains biologically active. In this report, we examine possible mechanisms of this association and the effects on clearance of the chemokine. The binding appears to be the result of ionic interactions between negatively charged particles and positively charged chemokine molecules, possibly combined with intercalation into small pores in the particles. The association is not limited to diesel exhaust particles and IL-8: several other particle types also adsorb the chemokine and several other cytokines are adsorbed onto the diesel particles. However, there are wide ranges in the effectiveness of various particle types and various cytokines. Finally, male Fisher 344 rats were intratracheally instilled with chemokine alone or combined with diesel exhaust or silica particles under isofluorane anesthesia. In contrast to silica particles, which do not bind the chemokine, the presence of diesel exhaust particles, which bind the chemokine, prolonged the retention of the chemokine.

  10. Mechanical stability of particle-stabilized droplets under micropipette aspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samudrala, Niveditha; Nam, Jin; Sarfati, Raphaël; Style, Robert W.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the mechanical behavior of particle-stabilized droplets using micropipette aspiration. We observe that droplets stabilized with amphiphilic dumbbell-shaped particles exhibit a two-stage response to increasing suction pressure. Droplets first drip, then wrinkle and buckle like an elastic shell. While particles have a dramatic impact on the mechanism of failure, the mechanical strength of the droplets is only modestly increased. On the other hand, droplets coated with the molecular surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate are even weaker than bare droplets. In all cases, the magnitude of the critical pressure for the onset of instabilities is set by the fluid surface tension.

  11. Magnetospheric plasma - Sources, wave-particle interactions and acceleration mechanisms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, T. W.

    1971-01-01

    Some of the basic problems associated with magnetospheric physics are reviewed. The sources of magnetospheric plasma, with auroral particles included as a subset, are discussed. The possible ways in which the solar wind plasma can gain access to the magnetosphere are outlined. Some important consequences of wave-particle interactions are examined. Finally, the basic mechanisms which energize or accelerate particles by reconnection and convection are explained.

  12. Effect of inclusion size on failure mechanism and mechanical properties of polymeric composites containing micro and nano particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jeong-Min

    The effect of particle size on the mechanical properties of polymeric composites was investigated experimentally and numerically. It was found from experiments that particle sizes at micro scale have little influence on the Young's modulus of the composite and that Young's modulus increases as the size of particles decreases at nano scale. It was also observed that tensile strength of the composite is significantly dependent on particle size. At 1 vol.% loading, the tensile strength increased as the particle size decreased. However, the trend for the composite with alumina nanoparticles of 3% volume fraction was found to be opposite. TEM and SEM micrographs showed higher likelihood of poor dispersions in the composite with 3 vol.% nanoparticles than that with 1 vol.%. Finite element analyses showed that total strain energy release rate for particle/matrix debonding growth decreases as particle size decreases and that sliding fracture mode becomes dominant as the debonding grows. It was found that interfacial fracture toughness does not depend on particle size in micron scale but increases substantially when the sliding fracture mode prevails. It was analyzed with molecular dynamics simulations that the Young's modulus enhancement by decrease of nanoparticle size may be attributed to stiff polymer layers around nanoparticles. It was also found that the stiff polymer layers around nanoparticle are more effective on improving the elastic modulus with smaller nanoparticles and stronger polymer-nanoparticle interactions.

  13. Morphological and Chemical Mechanisms of Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicities

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much of our understanding regarding the mechanisms for induction of disease following inhalation of respirable elongated mineral particles (REMPs) is based on studies involving the biological effects of asbestos fibers. The factors governing the disease potential of an exposure i...

  14. Particles, Waves, and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christoudouleas, N. D.

    1975-01-01

    Presents an explanation, without mathematical equations, of the basic principles of quantum mechanics. Includes wave-particle duality, the probability character of the wavefunction, and the uncertainty relations. (MLH)

  15. Classical phase space and statistical mechanics of identical particles.

    PubMed

    Hansson, T H; Isakov, S B; Leinaas, J M; Lindström, U

    2001-02-01

    Starting from the quantum theory of identical particles, we show how to define a classical mechanics that retains information about the quantum statistics. We consider two examples of relevance for the quantum Hall effect: identical particles in the lowest Landau level, and vortices in the Chern-Simons Ginzburg-Landau model. In both cases the resulting classical statistical mechanics is shown to be a nontrivial classical limit of Haldane's exclusion statistics.

  16. Statistical Mechanics of Confined Quantum Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.; Udayanandan, K. M.

    We develop statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of Bose and Fermi systems in relativistic harmonic oscillator (RHO) confining potential, which is applicable in quark gluon plasma (QGP), astrophysics, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) etc. Detailed study of QGP system is carried out and compared with lattice results. Furthermore, as an application, our equation of state (EoS) of QGP is used to study compact stars like quark star.

  17. Microfabricated Particles for Engineered Drug Therapies: Elucidation into the Mechanisms of Cellular Internalization of PRINT Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Stephanie E. A.; Napier, Mary E.; Ropp, Patricia A.; Tian, Shaomin; DeSimone, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the cellular internalization pathways of shape- and size-specific particles as a function of zeta potential in different cell types. Methods A top-down particle fabrication technique called PRINT was utilized to fabricate monodisperse 1 μm cylindrical particles. Cellular internalization of these PRINT particles was monitored using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and transmission electron microscopy. The endocytic pathway used by 1 μm cationic PRINT particles was evaluated using different inhibitory strategies. Cytotoxicity assays were used to determine the toxicity of both cationic and anionic PRINT particles in multiple cell types. Results Particle internalization was confirmed using confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanism of internalization of positively charged PRINT particles was found to be predominantly clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis with very few particles utilizing a caveolae-mediated endocytic pathway. The exposed charge on the surface of the particles had a significant effect on the rate of endocytosis in all cell types tested, except for the macrophage cells. No significant cytotoxicity was observed for all PRINT particles used in the present study. Conclusions Cylindrical 1 μm PRINT particles were readily internalized into HeLa, NIH 3T3, OVCAR-3, MCF-7, and RAW 264.7 cells. Particles with a positive zeta potential exhibited an enhanced rate of endocytosis compared to negatively charged particles with identical sizes and shapes. It was found that PRINT particles with a positive zeta potential were endocytosed into HeLa cells using predominantely clathrin-mediated and macropinocytotic pathways. PMID:18592353

  18. Water regime of mechanical-biological pretreated waste materials under fast-growing trees.

    PubMed

    Rüth, Björn; Lennartz, Bernd; Kahle, Petra

    2007-10-01

    In this study mechanical-biological pre-treated waste material (MBP) was tested for suitability to serve as an alternative surface layer in combination with fast-growing and water-consumptive trees for final covers at landfill sites. The aim was to quantify evapotranspiration and seepage losses by numerical model simulations for two sites in Germany. In addition, the leaf area index (LAI) of six tree species over the growing season as the driving parameter for transpiration calculations was determined experimentally. The maximum LAI varied between 3.8 and 6.1 m2 m(-2) for poplar and willow clones, respectively. The evapotranspiration calculations revealed that the use of MBP waste material for re-cultivation enhanced evapotranspiration by 40 mm year(-1) (10%) over an 11 year calculation period compared to a standard mineral soil. Between 82% (for LAI(max) = 3.8) and 87% (for LAI(max) = 6.1) of the average annual precipitation (506 mm) could be retained from the surface layer assuming eastern German climate conditions, compared with a retention efficiency between 79 and 82% for a mineral soil. Although a MBP layer in conjunction with water-consumptive trees can reduce vertical water losses as compared to mineral substrates, the effect is not sufficient to meet legal regulations.

  19. A mathematical description of a growing cell colony based on the mechanical bidomain model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auddya, Debabrata; Roth, Bradley J.

    2017-03-01

    The mechanical bidomain model is used to describe a colony of cells growing on a substrate. Analytical expressions are derived for the intracellular and extracellular displacements. Mechanotransduction events are driven by the difference between the displacements in the two spaces, corresponding to the force acting on integrins. The equation for the displacement consists of two terms: one proportional to the radius that is the same in the intracellular and extracellular spaces (the monodomain term) and one that is proportional to a modified Bessel function that is responsible for mechanotransduction (the bidomain term). The model predicts that mechanotransduction occurs within a few length constants of the colony’s edge, and an expression for the length constant contains the intracellular and extracellular shear moduli and the spring constant of the integrins coupling the two spaces. The model predictions are qualitatively consistent with experiments on human embryonic stem cell colonies, in which differentiation is localized near the edge.

  20. Transition from the mechanics of material points to the mechanics of structured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, necessity of creation of mechanics of structured particles is discussed. The way to create this mechanics within the laws of classical mechanics with the use of energy equation is shown. The occurrence of breaking of time symmetry within the mechanics of structured particles is shown, as well as the introduction of concept of entropy in the framework of classical mechanics. The way to create the mechanics of non-equilibrium systems in the thermodynamic approach is shown. It is also shown that the use of hypothesis of holonomic constraints while deriving the canonical Lagrange equation made it impossible to describe irreversible dynamics. The difference between the mechanics of structured particles and the mechanics of material points is discussed. It is also shown that the matter is infinitely divisible according to the laws of classical mechanics.

  1. Double Higgs mechanisms, supermassive stable particles and the vacuum energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Osvaldo P.; Gabbanelli, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, a hidden scenario which cast a long-lived superheavy particle A0 and simultaneously an extremely light particle a with mass ma ˜ 10-32-10-33 eV is presented. The potential energy V (a) of the particle a models the vacuum energy density of the universe ρc ≃ 10-47GeV4. On the other hand, the A0 particle may act as superheavy dark matter at present times and the products of its decay may be observed in high energy cosmic ray events. The hidden sector proposed here include light fermions with masses near the neutrino mass mν ˜ 10-2 eV and superheavy ones with masses of the order of the GUT scale, interacting through a hidden SU(2)L interaction which also affects the ordinary sector. The construction of such combined scenario is nontrivial since the presence of light particles may spoil the stability of the heavy particle A0. However, double Higgs mechanisms may be helpful for overcoming this problem. In this context, the stability of the superheavy particle A0 is ensured due to chiral symmetry arguments elaborated in the text.

  2. The kinetics of composite particle formation during mechanical alloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, B. J. M.; Courtney, T. H.

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics of composite particle formation during attritor milling of insoluble binary elemental powders have been examined. The effects of processing conditions (i.e., mill power, temperature, and charge ratio) on these kinetics were studied. Particle size distributions and fractions of elemental and composite particles were determined as functions of milling time and processing conditions. This allowed the deduction of phenomenological rate constants describing the propensity for fracture and welding during processing. For the mill-operating conditions investigated, the number of particles in the mill generally decreased with milling time, indicating a greater tendency for particle welding than fracture. Moreover, a bimodal size distribution is often obtained as a result of preferential welding. Copper and chromium 'alloy' primarily by encapsulation of Cr particles within Cu. This form of alloying also occurs in Cu-Nb alloys processed at low mill power and/or for short milling times. For other conditions, however, Cu-Nb alloys develop a lamellar morphology characteristic of mechanically alloyed two-phase ductile metals. Increasing mill power or charge (ball-to-powder weight) ratio (CR) increases the rate of composite particle formation.

  3. Effect of ethanol on 24-h hormonal changes in prolactin release mechanisms in growing male rats.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ortega, Vanesa; Cardinali, Daniel P; Cano, Pilar; Fernández-Mateos, Pilar; Reyes-Toso, Carlos; Esquifino, Ana I

    2006-12-01

    This study analyzes the effect of chronic ethanol feeding on 24-h variation of hypothalamic-pituitary mechanisms involved in prolactin regulation in growing male Wistar rats. Animals were maintained under a 12:12 h light/dark photoperiod (lights off at 2000 h), and they received a liquid diet for 4 wk, starting on d 35 of life. The ethanol-fed group received a similar diet to controls except that maltose was isocalorically replaced by ethanol. Ethanol replacement provided 36% of the total caloric content of the diet. Rats were killed at six time intervals every 4 h, beginning at 0900 h. Mean concentration of serum prolactin in ethanol-fed rats was 58.7% higher than in controls. Peak circulating prolactin levels occurred at the early phase of the activity span in both groups of rats, whereas a second peak was found late in the resting phase in ethanol-fed rats only. In control rats, median eminence dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and taurine levels exhibited two maxima, the major one preceding prolactin release and a second one during the first part of the resting phase. Median eminence DA and 5-HT turnover (as measured by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, DOPAC/DA, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio) showed a single maximum preceding prolactin, at 0100 h. Ethanol treatment did not affect median eminence DA or 5-HT levels but it decreased significantly their turnover rate. The midday peak in DA and 5-HT levels (at 1300 h) was abolished and the night peak (at 0100 h) became spread and blunted in the ethanol-fed rats. This was accompanied with the disappearance of the 0100 h peak in DA and 5-HT turnover and the occurrence of a peak in 5-HT turnover at 1700 h. Ethanol intake suppressed the night peak in median eminence GABA and taurine (at 0100 h) as well as the midday peak of GABA. Ethanol augmented pituitary levels of DOPAC and 5-HIAA. The results indicate that chronic ethanol administration affects the mechanisms that

  4. Mechanical Stability and Reversible Fracture of Vault Particles

    PubMed Central

    Llauró, Aida; Guerra, Pablo; Irigoyen, Nerea; Rodríguez, José F.; Verdaguer, Núria; de Pablo, Pedro J.

    2014-01-01

    Vaults are the largest ribonucleoprotein particles found in eukaryotic cells, with an unclear cellular function and promising applications as vehicles for drug delivery. In this article, we examine the local stiffness of individual vaults and probe their structural stability with atomic force microscopy under physiological conditions. Our data show that the barrel, the central part of the vault, governs both the stiffness and mechanical strength of these particles. In addition, we induce single-protein fractures in the barrel shell and monitor their temporal evolution. Our high-resolution atomic force microscopy topographies show that these fractures occur along the contacts between two major vault proteins and disappear over time. This unprecedented systematic self-healing mechanism, which enables these particles to reversibly adapt to certain geometric constraints, might help vaults safely pass through the nuclear pore complex and potentiate their role as self-reparable nanocontainers. PMID:24507609

  5. Empirical Research of College Students' Alternative Frameworks of Particle Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongmei

    2010-01-01

    Based on the constructive theory, about 300 college students of grade 05 of the electronic information specialty of Dezhou University are surveyed for their alternative frameworks of particle mechanics in college physics in this article. In the survey, the questionnaires are used to find out college students' alternative frameworks, and the…

  6. Undergraduate Students' Preferences of Knowledge to Solve Particle Mechanics Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luneta, Kakoma; Makonye, Judah P.

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the nature of undergraduate students' errors and misconceptions in particle mechanics. This paper provides in-depth descriptions of the errors presented by students and accounts for them in terms of students' procedural or conceptual knowledge. Specifically, this study analyses students' written responses to questions on…

  7. Phytoremediation and removal mechanisms in Bouteloua curtipendula growing in sterile hydrocarbon spiked cultures.

    PubMed

    Reynoso-Cuevas, L; Gallegos-Martínez, M E; Cruz-Sosa, F; Gutiérrez-Rojas, M

    2011-07-01

    Tolerance index and phytoremediation factors of side oats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) with recalcitrant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) phenanthrene (PHE), pyrene (PYR), and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and the resulting impact on phenotypic response, were evaluated in sterile conditions with whole plant growing in test-tube cultures with MS medium with PAH and compared with Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), control for this study. PAH mixture of PHE, PYR and BaP (1:1:1 w/w/w) blended with Maya crude oil (1:1 w/w), final concentration of 1500 mg kg(-1) was used. After 40 days, BaP removal, in the presence of Maya crude was superior compared with PHE and PYR removal Although the presence of PAH negatively affects the phenotypic response of the plants; sterile conditions experiments were helpful to evaluate phytoremediation factors to elucidate some important questions regarding phytoremediation mechanisms; in this study, B. curtipendula was able to phytostabilizate BaP associated to a significant hydrocarbon removal (57.4%) with high root accumulation but attenuated transport to stems, here reported as translocation factor. To our knowledge, this is the first time that quantifiable phytoremediation factors were used to evaluate the tolerance and removal capacity of a native semi-arid climate plant which is probably able to phytoremediate hydrocarbon contaminated soils.

  8. Adaptation and detoxification mechanisms of Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) growing on gold mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Melato, F A; Mokgalaka, N S; McCrindle, R I

    2016-01-01

    Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) was investigated for its potential use in the rehabilitation of gold mine tailings, its ability to extract and accumulate toxic metals from the tailings and its metal tolerant strategies. Vetiver grass was grown on gold mine tailings soil, in a hothouse, and monitored for sixteen weeks. The mine tailings were highly acidic and had high electrical conductivity. Vetiver grass was able to grow and adapt well on gold mine tailings. The results showed that Vetiver grass accumulated large amounts of metals in the roots and restricted their translocation to the shoots. This was confirmed by the bioconcentration factor of Zn, Cu, and Ni of >1 and the translocation factor of <1 for all the metals. This study revealed the defense mechanisms employed by Vetiver grass against metal stress that include: chelation of toxic metals by phenolics, glutathione S-tranferase, and low molecular weight thiols; sequestration and accumulation of metals within the cell wall that was revealed by the scanning electron microscopy that showed closure of stomata and thickened cell wall and was confirmed by high content of cell wall bound phenolics. Metal induced reactive oxygen species are reduced or eliminated by catalase, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase dismutase.

  9. Interaction mechanisms between ceramic particles and atomized metallic droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    1992-10-01

    SiC particles occurred during droplet solidification. A comparison of the present results to those anticipated from well-established kinetic and thermodynamic models led to some interesting findings. First, the models proposed by Boiling and Cisse[24] and Chernov et al.[58] predict relative low critical interface velocities necessary for entrapment, inconsistent with the present experimental findings. Second, although the observed correlation between the critical front velocity and droplet diameter was generally consistent with that predicted by Stefanescu et a/.’s model,[27] the dependence on the size of SiC particles was not. In view of this discrepancy, three possible mechanisms were proposed to account for the experimental findings: nucleation of α-Al on SiC particles, entrapment of SiC particles between primary dendrite arms, and entrapment of SiC particles between secondary dendrite arms.

  10. Molecular adsorption at particle surfaces: a PM toxicity mediation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Michaela; Brown, Leslie; Trought, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    surfactant was added at a fixed concentration lower than physiological lung lavage concentrations to ensure the lipid remained in suspension during experimentation ex situ. For dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) combinations with particles, visible particle agglomeration occurred within 1 h. Marked changes in the size distribution of the immersed particles were observed, compared to a phosphate buffer control. Differences in particle agglomeration and particle settling were observed between M120, R330, and R400. Reduction of DPPC occurred in a surface- and size-dependent manner. This indicates that surface adsorption was responsible for the observed agglomeration and the gross reductions in phospholipid concentrations. Combination of particles with fibrinogen and albumin revealed little agglomeration/precipitation at the protein concentrations chosen. However, surfactant protein (SP-D) was completely eliminated from suspension upon combination with all three-particle types. This reaction between SP-D particles was therefore concluded to be independent of surface chemistry. Further investigation as to whether this is size- or surface-area-dependent is recommended. The biological implication is that molecular adsorption at nonbiological particulate matter (PM) surfaces in BALF may mediate the toxicity of PM via one or both of these mechanisms, as in the case of biological particles.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Particle Ration Induced Apoptosis in Lymphocyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yufang

    Space radiation, composed of high-energy charged nuclei (HZE particles) and protons, has been previously shown to severely impact immune homeostasis in mice. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate acute lymphocyte depletion following exposure to HZE particle radiation mice were exposed to particle radiation beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory. We found that mice given whole body 5 6Fe particle irradiation (1GeV /n) had dose-dependent losses in total lymphocyte numbers in the spleen and thymus (using 200, 100 and 50 cGy), with thymocytes being more sensitive than splenocytes. All phenotypic subsets were reduced in number. In general, T cells and B cells were equally sensitive, while CD8+ T cells were more senstive than CD4+ T cells. In the thymus, immature CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes were exquisitely sensitive to radiation-induced losses, single-positive CD4 or CD8 cells were less sensitive, and the least mature double negative cells were resistant. Irradiation of mice deficient in genes encoding essential apoptosis-inducing proteins revealed that the mechanism of lymphocyte depletion is independent of Fas ligand and TRAIL (TNF-ralated apoptosis-inducing ligand), in contrast to γ-radiation-induced lymphocyte losses which require the Fas-FasL pathway. Using inhibitors in vitro, lymphocyte apoptosis induced by HZE particle radiation was found to be caspase dependent, and not involve nitric oxide or oxygen free radicals.

  12. Lagrangian Description for Particle Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics: Single-Particle Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Roderick I.

    2015-11-01

    A Lagrangian description is presented which can be used in conjunction with particle interpretations of quantum mechanics. A special example of such an interpretation is the well-known Bohm model. The Lagrangian density introduced here also contains a potential for guiding the particle. The advantages of this description are that the field equations and the particle equations of motion can both be deduced from a single Lagrangian density expression and that conservation of energy and momentum are assured. After being developed in a general form, this Lagrangian formulation is then applied to the special case of the Bohm model as an example. It is thereby demonstrated that such a Lagrangian description is compatible with the predictions of quantum mechanics.

  13. Saltating Snow Mechanics: High Frequency Particle Response to Mountain Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksamit, N. O.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    Blowing snow transport theory is currently limited by its dependency on the coupling of time-averaged measurements of particle saltation and suspension and wind speed. Details of the stochastic process of particle transport and complex bed interactions in the saltation layer, along with the influence of boundary-layer turbulence are unobservable with classic measurement techniques. In contrast, recent advances in two-phase sand transport understanding have been spurred by development of high-frequency wind and particle velocity measurement techniques. To advance the understanding of blowing snow, laser illuminated high-speed videography and ultrasonic anemometry were deployed in a mountain environment to examine saltation of snow over a natural snowpack in detail. A saltating snow measurement site was established at the Fortress Mountain Snow Laboratory, Alberta, Canada and instrumented with two Campbell CSAT3 ultrasonic anemometers, four Campbell SR50 ultrasonic snow depth sounders and a two dimensional Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) system. Measurements were collected during nighttime blowing snow events, quantifying snow particle response to high frequency wind gusts. This novel approach permits PTV to step beyond mean statistics of snow transport by identifying sub-species of saltation motion in the first 20 mm above the surface, as well as previously overlooked initiation processes, such as tumbling aggregate snow crystals ejecting smaller grains, then eventually disintegrating and bouncing into entrainment. Spectral characteristics of snow particle ejection and saltation dynamics were also investigated. These unique observations are starting to inform novel conceptualizations of saltating snow transport mechanisms.

  14. Mechanisms of Particle Charging by Surfactants in Nonpolar Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Zhou, Zhang-Lin; Alas, Guillermo; Behrens, Sven Holger

    2015-11-10

    Electric charging of colloidal particles in nonpolar solvents plays a crucial role for many industrial applications and products, including rubbers, engine oils, toners, or electronic displays. Although disfavored by the low solvent permittivity, particle charging can be induced by added surfactants, even nonionic ones, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood, and neither the magnitude nor the sign of charge can generally be predicted from the particle and surfactant properties. The conclusiveness of scientific studies has been limited partly by a traditional focus on few surfactant types with many differences in their chemical structure and often poorly defined composition. Here we investigate the surface charging of poly(methyl methacrylate) particles dispersed in hexane-based solutions of three purified polyisobutylene succinimide polyamine surfactants with "subtle" structural variations. We precisely vary the surfactant chemistry by replacing only a single electronegative atom located at a fixed position within the polar headgroup. Electrophoresis reveals that these small differences between the surfactants lead to qualitatively different particle charging. In the respective particle-free surfactant solutions we also find potentially telling differences in the size of the surfactant aggregates (inverse micelles), the residual water content, and the electric solution conductivity as well as indications for a significant size difference between oppositely charged inverse micelles of the most hygroscopic surfactant. An analysis that accounts for the acid/base properties of all constituents suggests that the observed particle charging is better described by asymmetric adsorption of charged inverse micelles from the liquid bulk than by charge creation at the particle surface. Intramicellar acid-base interaction and intermicellar surfactant exchange help rationalize the formation of micellar ions pairs with size asymmetry.

  15. A new mechanism for relativistic particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Markidis, Stefano; Marocchino, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Often in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasma, high energy populations are observed. Two puzzling factors still defy our understanding. First, such populations of high energy particles produce power law distributions that are not only ubiquitous but also persistent in time. Such persistence is in direct contradiction to the H theorem that states the ineluctable transition of physical systems towards thermodynamic equilibrium, and ergo Maxwellian distributions. Second, such high energy populations are efficiently produced, much more efficiently than processes that we know can produce. A classic example of such a situation is cosmic rays where power alws extend up to tremendolus energy ranges. In the present work, we identify a new mechanism for particle acceleration via wave-particle interaction. The mechanism is peculiar to special relativity and has no classical equivalent. That explains why it is not observed in most simulation studies of plasma processes, based on classical physics. The mechanism is likely to be active in systems undergoing streaming instabilities and in particular shocked systems. The new mechanism can produce energy increases vastly superior to previously known mechanisms (such as Fermi acceleration) and can hold the promise of explaining at least some of the observed power laws.

  16. Lagrangian Description for Particle Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics: Entangled Many-Particle Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, Roderick I.

    2017-02-01

    A Lagrangian formulation is constructed for particle interpretations of quantum mechanics, a well-known example of such an interpretation being the Bohm model. The advantages of such a description are that the equations for particle motion, field evolution and conservation laws can all be deduced from a single Lagrangian density expression. The formalism presented is Lorentz invariant. This paper follows on from a previous one which was limited to the single-particle case. The present paper treats the more general case of many particles in an entangled state. It is found that describing more than one particle while maintaining a relativistic description requires the specification of final boundary conditions as well as the usual initial ones, with the experimenter's controllable choice of the final conditions thereby exerting a backwards-in-time influence. This retrocausality then allows an important theoretical step forward to be made, namely that it becomes possible to dispense with the usual, many-dimensional description in configuration space and instead revert to a description in space-time using separate, single-particle wavefunctions.

  17. A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach to the investigation of particle-molecule interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloth, Marianne; Bilde, Merete; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.

    2003-06-01

    A quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical aerosol model is developed to describe the interaction between gas phase molecules and atmospheric particles. The model enables the calculation of interaction energies and time-dependent properties. We use the model to investigate how a succinic acid molecule interacts with an aqueous particle. We show how the interaction energies and linear response properties (excitation energies, transition moments, and polarizabilities) depend on the distance between aerosol particle and molecule and on their relative orientation. The results are compared with those obtained previously using a dielectric continuum model [Sloth et al., J. Phys. Chem. (submitted)].

  18. Particle Size Concentration Distribution and Influences on Exhaled Breath Particles in Mechanically Ventilated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Fang; Huang, Sheng-Hsiu; Wang, Yu-Ling; Chen, Chun-Wan

    2014-01-01

    Humans produce exhaled breath particles (EBPs) during various breath activities, such as normal breathing, coughing, talking, and sneezing. Airborne transmission risk exists when EBPs have attached pathogens. Until recently, few investigations had evaluated the size and concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients with different ventilation mode settings. This study thus broke new ground by not only evaluating the size concentration distributions of EBPs in mechanically ventilated patients, but also investigating the relationship between EBP level and positive expiratory end airway pressure (PEEP), tidal volume, and pneumonia. This investigation recruited mechanically ventilated patients, with and without pneumonia, aged 20 years old and above, from the respiratory intensive care unit of a medical center. Concentration distributions of EBPs from mechanically ventilated patients were analyzed with an optical particle analyzer. This study finds that EBP concentrations from mechanically ventilated patients during normal breathing were in the range 0.47–2,554.04 particles/breath (0.001–4.644 particles/mL). EBP concentrations did not differ significantly between the volume control and pressure control modes of the ventilation settings in the mechanically ventilated patients. The patient EBPs were sized below 5 µm, and 80% of them ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 µm. The EBPs concentrations in patients with high PEEP (> 5 cmH2O) clearly exceeded those in patients with low PEEP (≤ 5 cmH2O). Additionally, a significant negative association existed between pneumonia duration and EBPs concentration. However, tidal volume was not related to EBPs concentration. PMID:24475230

  19. Mechanisms of Budding of Nanoscale Particles through Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Herrero, Teresa; Velasco, Enrique; Hagan, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the budding of a nanoscale particle through a lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulations, free energy calculations, and an elastic theory, with the aim of determining the extent to which equilibrium elasticity theory can describe the factors that control the mechanism and efficiency of budding. The particle is a smooth sphere which experiences attractive interactions to the lipid head groups. Depending on the parameters, we observe four classes of dynamical trajectories: particle adhesion to the membrane, stalled partially wrapped states, budding followed by scission, and membrane rupture. In most regions of parameter space we find that the elastic theory agrees nearly quantitatively with the simulated phase behavior as a function of adhesion strength, membrane bending rigidity, and particle radius. However, at parameter values near the transition between particle adhesion and budding, we observe long-lived partially wrapped states which are not captured by existing elastic theories. These states could constrain the accessible system parameters for those enveloped viruses or drug delivery vehicles which rely on exo- or endocytosis for membrane transport. PMID:22803595

  20. Mechanical properties of polymeric composites with carbon dioxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalyuk, O. A.; Samsonov, A. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Smirnova, V. E.; Yudin, V. E.

    2017-02-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of a polymethylmethacrylate or polystyrene matrix with embedded silicon dioxide nanoparticles surface-modified by silazanes have been prepared by melting technology. The influence of particles on viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposites has been studied using dynamic mechanical analysis. It has been revealed that the addition of 20 wt % of SiO2 raises the flexural modulus of the nanocomposites by 30%.

  1. Unstable particles in non-relativistic quantum mechanics?

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Coronado, H.

    2011-10-14

    The Schroedinger equation is up-to-a-phase invariant under the Galilei group. This phase leads to the Bargmann's superselection rule, which forbids the existence of the superposition of states with different mass and implies that unstable particles cannot be described consistently in non-relativistic quantum mechanics (NRQM). In this paper we claim that Bargmann's rule neglects physical effects and that a proper description of non-relativistic quantum mechanics requires to take into account this phase through the Extended Galilei group and the definition of its action on spacetime coordinates.

  2. Spacetime alternatives in the quantum mechanics of a relativistic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.T. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH )

    1994-11-15

    Hartle's generalized quantum mechanics formalism is used to examine spacetime coarse grainings, i.e., sets of alternatives defined with respect to a region extended in time as well as space, in the quantum mechanics of a free relativistic particle. For a simple coarse graining and suitable initial conditions, tractable formulas are found for branch wave functions. Despite the nonlocality of the positive-definite version of the Klein-Gordon inner product, which means that nonoverlapping branches are not sufficient to imply decoherence, some initial conditions are found to give decoherence and allow the consistent assignment of probabilities.

  3. Morphological and Chemical Mechanisms of Elongated Mineral Particle Toxicities

    PubMed Central

    Aust, Ann E.; Cook, Philip M.; Dodson, Ronald F.

    2011-01-01

    Much of our understanding regarding the mechanisms for induction of disease following inhalation of respirable elongated mineral particles (REMP) is based on studies involving the biological effects of asbestos fibers. The factors governing the disease potential of an exposure include duration and frequency of exposures; tissue-specific dose over time; impacts on dose persistence from in vivo REMP dissolution, comminution, and clearance; individual susceptibility; and the mineral type and surface characteristics. The mechanisms associated with asbestos particle toxicity involve two facets for each particle's contribution: (1) the physical features of the inhaled REMP, which include width, length, aspect ratio, and effective surface area available for cell contact; and (2) the surface chemical composition and reactivity of the individual fiber/elongated particle. Studies in cell-free systems and with cultured cells suggest an important way in which REMP from asbestos damage cellular molecules or influence cellular processes. This may involve an unfortunate combination of the ability of REMP to chemically generate potentially damaging reactive oxygen species, through surface iron, and the interaction of the unique surfaces with cell membranes to trigger membrane receptor activation. Together these events appear to lead to a cascade of cellular events, including the production of damaging reactive nitrogen species, which may contribute to the disease process. Thus, there is a need to be more cognizant of the potential impact that the total surface area of REMP contributes to the generation of events resulting in pathological changes in biological systems. The information presented has applicability to inhaled dusts, in general, and specifically to respirable elongated mineral particles. PMID:21534085

  4. Effect of Particle Shape on Mechanical Behaviors of Rocks: A Numerical Study Using Clumped Particle Model

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Guan; Liu, Guang; Zhou, Chuang-bing

    2013-01-01

    Since rocks are aggregates of mineral particles, the effect of mineral microstructure on macroscopic mechanical behaviors of rocks is inneglectable. Rock samples of four different particle shapes are established in this study based on clumped particle model, and a sphericity index is used to quantify particle shape. Model parameters for simulation in PFC are obtained by triaxial compression test of quartz sandstone, and simulation of triaxial compression test is then conducted on four rock samples with different particle shapes. It is seen from the results that stress thresholds of rock samples such as crack initiation stress, crack damage stress, and peak stress decrease with the increasing of the sphericity index. The increase of sphericity leads to a drop of elastic modulus and a rise in Poisson ratio, while the decreasing sphericity usually results in the increase of cohesion and internal friction angle. Based on volume change of rock samples during simulation of triaxial compression test, variation of dilation angle with plastic strain is also studied. PMID:23997677

  5. Jetting instability mechanisms of particles from explosive dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Zhang, F.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of post-detonation 'particle' jets is widely observed in many problems associated with explosive dispersal of granular materials and liquids. Jets have been shown to form very early, however the mechanism controlling the number of jetting instabilities remains unresolved despite a number of active theories. Recent experiments involving cylindrical charges with a range of central explosive masses for dispersal of dry solid particles and pure liquid are used to formulate macroscopic numerical models for jet formation and growth. The number of jets is strongly related to the dominant perturbation during the shock interaction timescale that controls the initial fracturing of the particle bed and liquid bulk. Perturbations may originate at the interfaces between explosive, shock-dispersed media, and outer edge of the charge due to Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. The inner boundary controls the number of major structures, while the outer boundary may introduce additional overlapping structures and microjets that are overtaken by the major structures. In practice, each interface may feature a thin casing material that breaks up, thereby influencing or possibly dominating the instabilities. Hydrocode simulation is used to examine the role of each interface in conjunction with casing effects on the perturbation leading to jet initiation. The subsequent formation of coherent jet structures requires dense multiphase flow of particles and droplets that interact though inelastic collision, agglomeration, and turbulent flow. Macroscopic multiphase flow simulation shows dense particle clustering and major jet structures overtaking smaller instabilities. Late-time dispersal is controlled by particle drag and evaporation of droplets. Numerical results for dispersal and jetting evolution are compared with experiments.

  6. Liquid drops and surface tension with smoothed particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugent, S.; Posch, H. A.

    2000-10-01

    Smoothed particle applied mechanics (SPAM), also referred to as smoothed particle hydrodynamics, is a Lagrangian particle method for the simulation of continuous flows. Here we apply it to the formation of a liquid drop, surrounded by its vapor, for a van der Waals (vdW) fluid in two dimensions. The cohesive pressure of the vdW equation of state gives rise to an attractive, central force between the particles with an interaction range which is assumed to exceed the interaction range of all the other smoothed forces in the SPAM equations of motion. With this assumption, stable drops are formed, and the vdW phase diagram is well reproduced by the simulations. Below the critical temperature, the surface tension for equilibrated drops may be computed from the pressure excess in their centers. It agrees very well with the surface tension independently determined from the vibrational frequency of weakly excited drops. We also study strongly deformed drops performing large-amplitude oscillations, which are reminiscent of the oscillations of a large ball of water under microgravity conditions. In an appendix we comment on the limitations of SPAM by studying the violation of angular momentum conservation, which is a consequence of noncentral forces contributed by the full Newtonian viscous stress tensor.

  7. Particle adhesion studies relevant to chemical mechanical polishing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhenyu; Ryde, Niels P; Babu, S V; Matijević, Egon

    2005-10-25

    This study describes particle adhesion experiments carried out to elucidate interactions between particles in slurries used for polishing of wafers and disks. For this purpose the packed column technique was employed, which simulated chemical mechanical polishing of copper with silica and alumina, as well as of silicic oxide with ceria. The model systems consisted of uniform copper and glass beads as collectors, representing the wafers, and colloidal dispersions of silica, alumia, and silica coated with nanosize ceria, all of well-defined properties that are used as abrasives. It was shown that a strong correlation exists between deposition and detachment results of the adhesion studies and the polish rates measured using actual substrates with the same or similar slurries.

  8. A global pattern of mechanical stress polarizes cell divisions and cell shape in the growing Drosophila wing disc.

    PubMed

    Legoff, Loïc; Rouault, Hervé; Lecuit, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Organismal development is under genetic control. Ultimately, mechanical forces shape embryos. If we want to understand the precise regulation of size and shape in animals, we must dissect how forces are distributed in developing tissues, and how they drive cell behavior to shape organs. This has not been addressed fully in the context of growing tissues. As cells grow and divide, they exert a pressure on their neighbors. How these local stresses add up or dissipate as the tissue grows is an unanswered question. We address this issue in the growing wing imaginal disc of Drosophila larvae, the precursor of the adult wing. We used a quantitative approach to analyze the strains and stresses of cells of the wing pouch, and found a global pattern of stress whereby cells in the periphery of the tissue are mechanically stretched and cells in the center are compressed. This pattern has important consequences on cell shape in the wing pouch: cells respond to it by polarizing their acto-myosin cortex, and aligning their divisions with the main axis of cell stretch, thereby polarizing tissue growth. Ectopic perturbations of tissue growth by the Hippo signaling pathway reorganize this pattern in a non-autonomous manner, suggesting a synergy between tissue mechanics and growth control during wing disc morphogenesis.

  9. Fluctuating Nonlinear Spring Model of Mechanical Deformation of Biological Particles

    PubMed Central

    Kononova, Olga; Snijder, Joost; Kholodov, Yaroslav; Marx, Kenneth A.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.; Roos, Wouter H.; Barsegov, Valeri

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of virus capsids correlate with local conformational dynamics in the capsid structure. They also reflect the required stability needed to withstand high internal pressures generated upon genome loading and contribute to the success of important events in viral infectivity, such as capsid maturation, genome uncoating and receptor binding. The mechanical properties of biological nanoparticles are often determined from monitoring their dynamic deformations in Atomic Force Microscopy nanoindentation experiments; but a comprehensive theory describing the full range of observed deformation behaviors has not previously been described. We present a new theory for modeling dynamic deformations of biological nanoparticles, which considers the non-linear Hertzian deformation, resulting from an indenter-particle physical contact, and the bending of curved elements (beams) modeling the particle structure. The beams’ deformation beyond the critical point triggers a dynamic transition of the particle to the collapsed state. This extreme event is accompanied by a catastrophic force drop as observed in the experimental or simulated force (F)-deformation (X) spectra. The theory interprets fine features of the spectra, including the nonlinear components of the FX-curves, in terms of the Young’s moduli for Hertzian and bending deformations, and the structural damage dependent beams’ survival probability, in terms of the maximum strength and the cooperativity parameter. The theory is exemplified by successfully describing the deformation dynamics of natural nanoparticles through comparing theoretical curves with experimental force-deformation spectra for several virus particles. This approach provides a comprehensive description of the dynamic structural transitions in biological and artificial nanoparticles, which is essential for their optimal use in nanotechnology and nanomedicine applications. PMID:26821264

  10. Ambient particle inhalation and the cardiovascular system: potential mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, K; Stone, V; Seaton, A; MacNee, W

    2001-01-01

    Well-documented air pollution episodes throughout recent history have led to deaths among individuals with cardiovascular and respiratory disease. Although the components of air pollution that cause the adverse health effects in these individuals are unknown, a small proportion by mass but a large proportion by number of the ambient air particles are ultrafine, i.e., less than 100 nm in diameter. This ultrafine component of particulate matter with a mass median aerodynamic diameter less than 10 microm (PM(10) may mediate some of the adverse health effects reported in epidemiologic studies and for which there is toxicologic evidence to support this contention. The exact mechanism by which ultrafine particles have adverse effects is unknown, but these particles have recently been shown to enhance calcium influx on contact with macrophages. Oxidative stress is also to be anticipated at the huge particle surface; this can be augmented by oxidants generated by recruited inflammatory leukocytes. Atheromatous plaques form in the coronary arteries and are major causes of morbidity and death associated epidemiologically with particulate air pollution. In populations exposed to air pollution episodes, blood viscosity, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were higher. More recently, increases in heart rate in response to rising air pollution have been described and are most marked in individuals who have high blood viscosity. In our study of elderly individuals, there were significant rises in CRP, an index of inflammation. In this present review, we consider the likely interactions between the ultrafine particles the acute phase response and cardiovascular disease. PMID:11544157

  11. Solid particle erosion mechanisms of protective coatings for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousser, Etienne

    The main objective of this PhD project is to investigate the material loss mechanisms during Solid Particle Erosion (SPE) of hard protective coatings, including nanocomposite and nanostructured systems. In addition, because of the complex nature of SPE mechanisms, rigorous testing methodologies need to be employed and the effects of all testing parameters need to be fully understood. In this PhD project, the importance of testing methodology is addressed throughout in order to effectively study the SPE mechanisms of brittle materials and coatings. In the initial stage of this thesis, we studied the effect of the addition of silicon (Si) on the microstructure, mechanical properties and, more specifically, on the SPE resistance of thick CrN-based coatings. It was found that the addition of Si significantly improved the erosion resistance and that SPE correlated with the microhardness values, i.e. the coating with the highest microhardness also had the lowest erosion rate (ER). In fact, the ERs showed a much higher dependence on the surface hardness than what has been proposed for brittle erosion mechanisms. In the first article, we study the effects of the particle properties on the SPE behavior of six brittle bulk materials using glass and alumina powders. First, we apply a robust methodology to accurately characterize the elasto-plastic and fracture properties of the studied materials. We then correlate the measured ER to materials' parameters with the help of a morphological study and an analysis of the quasi-static elasto-plastic erosion models. Finally, in order to understand the effects of impact on the particles themselves and to support the energy dissipation-based model proposed here, we study the particle size distributions of the powders before and after erosion testing. It is shown that tests using both powders lead to a material loss mechanism related to lateral fracture, that the higher than predicted velocity exponents point towards a velocity

  12. A signed particle formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Sellier, Jean Michel

    2015-09-15

    A formulation of non-relativistic quantum mechanics in terms of Newtonian particles is presented in the shape of a set of three postulates. In this new theory, quantum systems are described by ensembles of signed particles which behave as field-less classical objects which carry a negative or positive sign and interact with an external potential by means of creation and annihilation events only. This approach is shown to be a generalization of the signed particle Wigner Monte Carlo method which reconstructs the time-dependent Wigner quasi-distribution function of a system and, therefore, the corresponding Schrödinger time-dependent wave-function. Its classical limit is discussed and a physical interpretation, based on experimental evidences coming from quantum tomography, is suggested. Moreover, in order to show the advantages brought by this novel formulation, a straightforward extension to relativistic effects is discussed. To conclude, quantum tunnelling numerical experiments are performed to show the validity of the suggested approach.

  13. Hydrodynamic mechanisms of cell and particle trapping in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, A.; Yazdi, S.; Ardekani, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Focusing and sorting cells and particles utilizing microfluidic phenomena have been flourishing areas of development in recent years. These processes are largely beneficial in biomedical applications and fundamental studies of cell biology as they provide cost-effective and point-of-care miniaturized diagnostic devices and rare cell enrichment techniques. Due to inherent problems of isolation methods based on the biomarkers and antigens, separation approaches exploiting physical characteristics of cells of interest, such as size, deformability, and electric and magnetic properties, have gained currency in many medical assays. Here, we present an overview of the cell/particle sorting techniques by harnessing intrinsic hydrodynamic effects in microchannels. Our emphasis is on the underlying fluid dynamical mechanisms causing cross stream migration of objects in shear and vortical flows. We also highlight the advantages and drawbacks of each method in terms of throughput, separation efficiency, and cell viability. Finally, we discuss the future research areas for extending the scope of hydrodynamic mechanisms and exploring new physical directions for microfluidic applications. PMID:24404005

  14. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  15. The rheology of a growing leaf: stress-induced changes in the mechanical properties of leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sahaf, Michal; Sharon, Eran

    2016-01-01

    We study in situ the mechanics and growth of a leaf. Young Nicotiana tabacum leaves respond to applied mechanical stress by altering both their mechanical properties and the characteristics of their growth. We observed two opposite behaviours, each with its own typical magnitude and timescale. On timescales of the order of minutes, the leaf deforms in response to applied tensile stress. During this phase we found a high correlation between the applied stress field and the local strain field throughout the leaf surface. For times over 12 hours the mechanical properties of the leaf become anisotropic, making it more resilient to deformation and restoring a nearly isotropic growth field despite the highly anisotropic load. These observations suggest that remodelling of the tissue allows the leaf to respond to mechanical perturbations by changing its properties. We discuss the relevance of the observed behaviour to the growth regulation that leads to proper leaf shape during growth. PMID:27651350

  16. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm.

  17. Probing the Mechanical Strength of an Armored Bubble and Its Implication to Particle-Stabilized Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccoen, Nicolas; Lequeux, François; Gunes, Deniz Z.; Baroud, Charles N.

    2016-01-01

    Bubbles are dynamic objects that grow and rise or shrink and disappear, often on the scale of seconds. This conflicts with their uses in foams where they serve to modify the properties of the material in which they are embedded. Coating the bubble surface with solid particles has been demonstrated to strongly enhance the foam stability, although the mechanisms for such stabilization remain mysterious. In this paper, we reduce the problem of foam stability to the study of the behavior of a single spherical bubble coated with a monolayer of solid particles. The behavior of this armored bubble is monitored while the ambient pressure around it is varied, in order to simulate the dissolution stress resulting from the surrounding foam. We find that above a critical stress, localized dislocations appear on the armor and lead to a global loss of the mechanical stability. Once these dislocations appear, the armor is unable to prevent the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding liquid, which translates into a continued reduction of the bubble volume, even for a fixed overpressure. The observed route to the armor failure therefore begins from localized dislocations that lead to large-scale deformations of the shell until the bubble completely dissolves. The critical value of the ambient pressure that leads to the failure depends on the bubble radius, with a scaling of Δ Pcollapse∝R-1 , but does not depend on the particle diameter. These results disagree with the generally used elastic models to describe particle-covered interfaces. Instead, the experimental measurements are accounted for by an original theoretical description that equilibrates the energy gained from the gas dissolution with the capillary energy cost of displacing the individual particles. The model recovers the short-wavelength instability, the scaling of the collapse pressure with bubble radius, and the insensitivity to particle diameter. Finally, we use this new microscopic understanding to predict

  18. Energetic Particle Synthesis of Metastable Layers for Superior Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Knapp, J.A.; Myers, S.M.; Dugger, M.T.; Friedmann, T.A.; Sullivan, J.P.; Monteiro, O.R.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G.; Christenson, T.

    1998-01-01

    Energetic particle methods have been used to synthesize two metastable layers with superior mechanical properties: amorphous Ni implanted with overlapping Ti and C, and amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) formed by vacuum-arc deposition or pulsed laser deposition. Elastic modulus, yield stress and hardness were reliably determined for both materials by fitting finite-element simulations to the observed layer/substrate responses during nanoindentation. Both materials show exceptional properties, i.e., the yield stress of amorphous Ni(Ti,C) exceeds that of hardened steels and other metallic glasses, and the hardness of DLC (up to 88 GPa) approaches that of crystalline diamond (approx. 100 GPa). Tribological performance of the layers during unlubricated sliding contact appears favorable for treating Ni-based micro-electromechanical systems: stick-slip adhesion to Ni is eliminated, giving a low coefficient of friction (approx. 0.3-0.2) and greatly reduced wear. We discuss how energetic particle synthesis is critical to forming these phases and manipulating their properties for optimum performance.

  19. Influence of the feeding mechanism on deposits of square particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, M.; Hidalgo, R. C.; Zuriguel, I.; Maza, D.; Pagonabarraga, I.

    2013-01-01

    In a previous paper [Hidalgo , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.103.118001 103, 118001 (2009)] it was shown that square particles deposited in a silo tend to align with a diagonal parallel to the gravity, giving rise to a deposit with very particular properties. Here we explore, both experimentally and numerically, the effect on these properties of the filling mechanism. In particular, we modify the volume fraction of the initial configuration from which the grains are deposited. Starting from a very dilute case, increasing the volume fraction results in an enhancement of the disorder in the final deposit characterized by a decrease of the final packing fraction and a reduction of the number of particles oriented with their diagonal in the direction of gravity. However, for very high initial volume fractions, the final packing fraction increases again. This result implies that two deposits with the same final packing fraction can be obtained from very different initial conditions. The structural properties of such deposits are analyzed, revealing that, although the final volume fraction is the same, their micromechanical properties notably differ.

  20. Formation mechanism of uniform CdS particles from condensed Cd(OH){sub 2} suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimoto, Tadao; Dirige, G.E.; Muramatsu, Atsushi

    1995-12-15

    The formation mechanism of uniform cadmium sulfide particles obtained in large quantities from condensed Cd(OH){sub 2} suspension in the presence of thioacetamide (TAA), gelatin and NH{sub 3}-NH{sub 4}{sup +} buffer system was investigated. Basically, the reaction proceeded through rapid dissolution of Cd(OH){sub 2} particles induced by the reaction of Cd{sup 2+} ions with S{sup 2{minus}} ions liberated from TAA in the solution phase. It was finished in ca. 1 min under the standard conditions, 0.5 mol/dm{sup 3} in Cd(OH){sub 2}, 0.55 mol/dm{sup 3} in TAA, 1 wt% in deionized gelatin, and 1.0 mol/dm{sup 3} NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} at 20 C and at pH 8.50 adjusted with NH{sub 3}. The resulting uniform and nearly spherical particles of CdS prepared under the standard conditions were 40 nm in mean diameter and were polycrystalline particles consisting of randomly oriented much smaller subcrystals (8.60 nm). Besides using the NH{sub 3}--NH{sub 4}{sup +} system in generating uniform CdS particles, employing borax/NaOH buffer system in the formation of spherical CdS particles was also possible. It was also found that S{sup 2{minus}} ions were furnished through a reaction, CH{sub 3}CSNH{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}CN + 2H{sup +} + S{sup 2{minus}}. This reaction was excessively accelerated by the rapid consumption of S{sup 2{minus}} ions so that it is thought to be a reversible reaction. The reaction was virtually stoichiometric and the contribution of hydrolysis of TAA was not observed. The uniform growth of the CdS particles was achieved by the controlled dissolution of the Cd(OH){sub 2} without aggregation of the growing CdS particles after an instantaneous nucleation.

  1. Carbonaceous Matter in Growing Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, M. V.; Stangl, C. M.; Horan, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric nanoparticles constitute the greatest portion of ambient aerosol loading by number. A major source of atmospheric nanoparticles is new particle formation (NPF), a gas to particle conversion process whereby clusters nucleate from gas phase precursors to form clusters on the order of one or a few nanometers and then grow rapidly to climatically relevant sizes. A substantial fraction of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) are thought to arise from NPF. In order to better predict the frequency, growth rates, and climatic impacts of NPF, knowledge of the chemical mechanisms by which nucleated nanoparticles grow is needed. The two main contributors to particle growth are (neutralized) sulfate and carbonaceous matter. Particle growth by sulfuric acid condensation is generally well understood, though uncertainty remains about the extent of base neutralization and the relative roles of ammonia and amines. Much less is known about carbonaceous matter, and field measurements suggest that nitrogen-containing species are important. In this presentation, recent work by our group will be described that uses a combination of ambient measurements, laboratory experiments and computational work to study carbonaceous matter in growing nanoparticles. These studies span a range of particle sizes from the initial adsorption of molecules onto a nanometer-size ammonium bisulfate seed cluster to reactions in particles that are large enough to support condensed-phase chemistry.

  2. The influence of follistatin on mechanical properties of bone tissue in growing mice with overexpression of follistatin.

    PubMed

    Gajos-Michniewicz, Anna; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Ochedalski, Tomasz; Piastowska-Ciesielska, Agnieszka

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical competence of bones is mainly associated with tissue quality that depends on proper bone metabolism processes. An imbalance in the regulation of bone metabolism leads to pathological changes in bone tissue leading to susceptibility to bone fractures and bone deterioration processes. Bone metabolism is regulated to a large extent by the members of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, i.e., activins and bone morphogenetic proteins. However, their function is regulated by a single-chain protein called follistatin (FS). The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that overexpression of FS in growing mice results in impairments in bone morphology and mechanical properties. Moreover, we wanted to investigate how geometrical, structural and material properties of bone tissue change with age. The experiment was performed on growing C57BL/6 TgNK14-mFst/6J mice, overexpressing FS (F mice) versus C57BL/6J mice used as controls (C mice). To establish how overexpression of FS influences bone tissue quality, we studied mice femurs to determine geometrical, structural and material properties of the skeleton. To determine mechanical resistance of bone tissue, femurs were loaded to failure in a three-point bending test. Obtained results indicated that overexpression of FS negatively influences bone metabolism. It was found that mutation results with a significant decrease of all measured biomechanical strength variables in F mice in comparison to C mice. Overexpression of FS leads to decreased quality of skeleton, increasing susceptibility to bone fractures.

  3. Modeling large RNAs and ribonucleoprotein particles using molecular mechanics techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, A; Tan, R K; Harvey, S C

    1994-01-01

    There is a growing body of low-resolution structural data that can be utilized to devise structural models for large RNAs and ribonucleoproteins. These models are routinely built manually. We introduce an automated refinement protocol to utilize such data for building low-resolution three-dimensional models using the tools of molecular mechanics. In addition to specifying the positions of each nucleotide, the protocol provides quantitative estimates of the uncertainties in those positions, i.e., the resolution of the model. In typical applications, the resolution of the models is about 10-20 A. Our method uses reduced representations and allows us to refine three-dimensional structures of systems as big as the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNAs, which are about one to two orders of magnitude larger than nucleic acids that can be examined by traditional all-atom modeling methods. Nonatomic resolution structural data--secondary structure, chemical cross-links, chemical and enzymatic footprinting patterns, protein positions, solvent accessibility, and so on--are combined with known motifs in RNA structure to predict low-resolution models of large RNAs. These structural constraints are imposed on the RNA chain using molecular mechanics-type potential functions with parameters based on the quality of experimental data. Surface potential functions are used to incorporate shape and positional data from electron microscopy image reconstruction experiments into our models. The structures are optimized using techniques of energy refinement to get RNA folding patterns. In addition to providing a consensus model, the method finds the range of models consistent with the data, which allows quantitative evaluation of the resolution of the model. The method also identifies conflicts in the experimental data. Although our protocol is aimed at much larger RNAs, we illustrate these techniques using the tRNA structure as an example and test-bed. Images FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:7521223

  4. Mechanical Stability of Polystyrene and Janus Particle Monolayers at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Lenis, Jessica; Razavi, Sepideh; Cao, Kathleen D; Lin, Binhua; Lee, Ka Yee C; Tu, Raymond S; Kretzschmar, Ilona

    2015-12-16

    The compressional instability of particle-laden air/water interfaces is investigated with plain and surface-anisotropic (Janus) particles. We hypothesize that the amphiphilic nature of Janus particles leads to both anisotropic particle-particle and particle-interface interactions that can yield particle films with unique collapse mechanisms. Analysis of Langmuir isotherms and microstructural characterization of the homogeneous polystyrene particle films during compression reveal an interfacial buckling instability followed by folding, which is in good agreement with predictions from classical elasticity theory. In contrast, Janus particle films exhibit a different behavior during compression, where the collapse mode occurs through the subduction of the Janus particle film. Our results suggest that particle-laden films comprised of surface-anisotropic particles can be engineered to evolve new material properties.

  5. Mechanical properties of growing melanocytic nevi and the progression to melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Alemi, Alexander; Ciusani, Emilio; Sethna, James P.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; National Research Council Of Italy Team; Lassp, Department Of Physics, Cornell University Team; Istituto Neurologico Carlo Besta Collaboration; Department Of Biosciences, University Of Milano Team

    2015-03-01

    Melanocytic nevi are benign proliferations that sometimes turn into malignant melanoma in a way that is still unclear from the biochemical and genetic point of view. Diagnostic and prognostic tools are then mostly based on dermoscopic examination and morphological analysis of histological tissues. To investigate the role of mechanics and geometry in the morpholgical dynamics of melanocytic nevi, we present a computational model for cell proliferation in a layered non-linear elastic tissue. Our simulations show that the morphology of the nevus is correlated to the initial location of the proliferating cell starting the growth process and to the mechanical properties of the tissue. We also demonstrate that melanocytes are subject to compressive stresses that fluctuate widely in the nevus and depend on the growth stage. Numerical simulations of cells in the epidermis releasing matrix metalloproteinases display an accelerated invasion of the dermis by destroying the basal membrane. Moreover, we show experimentally that osmotic stress and collagen inhibit growth in primary melanoma cells while the effect is much weaker in metastatic cells.

  6. Isoprene suppression of new particle formation: Potential mechanisms and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shan-Hu; Uin, Janek; Guenther, Alex B.; Gouw, Joost A.; Yu, Fangqun; Nadykto, Alex B.; Herb, Jason; Ng, Nga L.; Koss, Abigail; Brune, William H.; Baumann, Karsten; Kanawade, Vijay P.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Nenes, Athanasios; Olsen, Kevin; Goldstein, Allen; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Secondary aerosols formed from anthropogenic pollutants and natural emissions have substantial impacts on human health, air quality, and the Earth's climate. New particle formation (NPF) contributes up to 70% of the global production of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), but the effects of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) and their oxidation products on NPF processes in forests are poorly understood. Observations show that isoprene, the most abundant BVOC, suppresses NPF in forests. But the previously proposed chemical mechanism underlying this suppression process contradicts atmospheric observations. By reviewing observations made in other forests, it is clear that NPF rarely takes place during the summer when emissions of isoprene are high, even though there are sufficient concentrations of monoterpenes. But at present it is not clear how isoprene and its oxidation products may change the oxidation chemistry of terpenes and how NOx and other atmospheric key species affect NPF in forest environments. Future laboratory experiments with chemical speciation of gas phase nucleation precursors and clusters and chemical composition of particles smaller than 10 nm are required to understand the role of isoprene in NPF. Our results show that climate models can overpredict aerosol's first indirect effect when not considering the absence of NPF in the southeastern U.S. forests during the summer using the current nucleation algorithm that includes only sulfuric acid and total concentrations of low-volatility organic compounds. This highlights the importance of understanding NPF processes as function of temperature, relative humidity, and BVOC compositions to make valid predictions of NPF and CCN at a wide range of atmospheric conditions.

  7. Mechanisms for nano particle removal in brush scrubber cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yating; Guo, Dan; Lu, Xinchun; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the nano particle (<100 nm) removal behavior in brush scrubber cleaning is presented based on experiment results and theoretical analysis. The forces on the particles in different situations are analyzed and discussed. The adhesion forces of the van der Waals force, the electrostatic force, the brush load and the static friction between the particle and the wafer are calculated. The contact elastic force, hydrodynamic drag force and friction between the brush and the particle are considered as removal forces and are evaluated. The porous structure and roughness surface of brush material are considered in the hydrodynamic model to describe the brush deformation and the flow field in the cleaning process. The porous structure will result in decrease of hydrodynamic drag force. There are four situations of the particles relative to the brush roughness asperities for which the forces on the particle are different. When the particle is in contact with a brush asperity or on the wafer surface and in a semi-infinite fluid flow field, the particle may be removed by hydrodynamic force and elastic force in the presence of surfactant. When the particle is embedded in the brush asperity, the remove will realized when the friction caused by adhesion between the brush and the particle overcome the adhesion force between particle and wafer surface. The removed particles will be in the flow field or adhered on the brush surface and may redeposit on the wafer surface.

  8. Model Fe-Al Steel with Exceptional Resistance to High Temperature Coarsening. Part I: Coarsening Mechanism and Particle Pinning Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tihe; Zurob, Hatem S.; O'Malley, Ronald J.; Rehman, Kashif

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which austenite particles coarsen in a delta-ferrite matrix was investigated in a model Al-containing steel. Special emphasis was placed on the effect of volume fraction on the coarsening kinetics as well as the ability of the particles to pin the growth of delta-ferrite grains. The specimens were heated to temperatures in the range of 1123 K to 1583 K (850 °C to 1305 °C) in the austenite plus delta-ferrite two-phase region and held for times between 5 minutes and 288 hours, followed by water quenching. When the reheating temperature was higher than 1473 K (1200 °C), the coarsening of austenite particles was found to evolve as t 1/3, which is typical of volume diffusion-controlled behavior. For lower temperatures, the particle coarsening behavior followed t 1/4 kinetics which is consistent with a grain boundary diffusion-controlled process. The observations were interpreted in terms of the modified Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wanger theory by considering multi-component diffusion, particle volume fraction, and the fact that this two-phase material is a non-ideal solid solution. Three types of interaction between particle coarsening and grain growth were observed. Grain growth was completely pinned when the particle pinning force was much larger than the driving force for grain growth. When the particle pinning force was comparable to the driving force for grain growth, the delta-ferrite grains were observed to grow at a rate which is controlled by the kinetics of coarsening of the austenite particles. Finally, when the particle pinning force was smaller than the driving force for grain growth, significant grain growth occurred but its rate was lower than that expected in the absence of particle pinning. The results point to an effective approach for controlling grain growth at high temperatures.

  9. Biophysical mechanisms of trichloroethene uptake and loss in baldcypress growing in shallow contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nietch, C.T.; Morris, J.T.; Vroblesky, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    Wetland vegetation may be useful in the remediation of shallow contaminated aquifers. Mesocosm experiments were conducted to describe the regulatory mechanisms affecting trichloroethene (TCE) removal rates from groundwater by flood-adapted wetland trees at a contaminated site. TCE flux through baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L) Rich] seedlings grown in glass- carboys decreased from day to night and from August to December. The diel fluctuation coincided with changes in leaf-level physiology, as the daytime flux was significantly correlated with net photosynthesis but not with respiration at night. A decrease in seedling water use from summer to winter explained the large seasonal difference in TCE flux. A simple model that simulates gas-phase diffusion through aerenchyma tested the importance of diffusion of TCE vapor from roots to the stem. The modeled diffusive flux was within 64% of the observed value during the winter but could only explain 8% of the summer flux. Seedling water use was a good estimator of flux during the summer. Hence, evapotranspiration (ET) in the summer may serve as a good predictor for the potential of TCE removal by baldcypress trees, while diffusive flux may better approximate potential contaminant loss in the winter.Wetland vegetation may be useful in the remediation of shallow contaminated aquifers. Mesocosm experiments were conducted to describe the regulatory mechanisms affecting trichloroethene (TCE) removal rates from groundwater by flood-adapted wetland trees at a contaminated site. TCE flux through baldcypress [Taxodium distichum (L) Rich] seedlings grown in glass-carboys decreased from day to night and from August to December. The diel fluctuation coincided with changes in leaf-level physiology, as the daytime flux was significantly correlated with net photosynthesis but not with respiration at night. A decrease in seedling water use from summer to winter explained the large seasonal difference in TCE flux. A simple model that

  10. Why Cells Grow and Divide? General Growth Mechanism and How it Defines Cells’ Growth, Reproduction and Metabolic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2015-02-01

    We consider a general growth mechanism, which acts at cellular level and above (organs, systems and whole organisms). Using its mathematical representation, the growth equation, we study the growth and division mechanisms of amoeba and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show how this mechanism, together with biomolecular machinery, governs growth and reproduction of cells, and these organisms in particular. This mechanism provides revealing answers to fundamental questions of biology, like why cells grow and divide, why and when cells’ growth stops. It also sheds light on questions like why and how life originated and developed. Solving the growth equation, we obtain analytical expression for the growth curve of fission yeast as a function of geometrical characteristics and nutrient influxes for RNA and protein synthesis, and compare the computed growth curves with 85 experiments. Statistical evaluation shows that these growth curves correspond to experimental data significantly better than all previous approximations. Also, using the general growth mechanism, we show how metabolic characteristics of cells, their size and evolutionary traits relate, considering fission yeast. In particular, we found that fission yeast S. pombe consumes about 16-18 times more nutrients for maintenance needs than for biomass synthesis.

  11. Impact of distillers dried grains with solubles particle size on nutrient digestibility, DE and ME content, and flowability in diets for growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Liu, P; Souza, L W O; Baidoo, S K; Shurson, G C

    2012-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of particle size of distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on DE and ME content, diet DM, energy, N, P digestibility, and diet flowability for growing pigs. One DDGS source was processed through an Urshel Commitrol mill or a hammer mill to achieve mean particle sizes of 818, 595, and 308 μm. The basal control diet consisted of 96.8% corn with supplemental minerals and vitamins. Three experimental diets were formulated by replacing 30% of corn from the basal diet with DDGS of different particle sizes. Thirty-six growing pigs (initial BW of 40 ± 1.13 kg) were assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a randomized complete block design according to their BW block and housed in individual metabolic crates for a 9-d adaptation period followed by a 4-d total collection of feces and urine. Pigs were provided ad libitum access to water and fed an amount of their respective experimental diets equivalent to 3% of the initial BW of each pig. Feed, feces, and urine samples were analyzed for DM, GE, N, and P and used to calculate diet apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD). Gross energy was also used to calculate DE and ME of diets as well as the DE and ME content of corn and DDGS with different particle sizes. Diet drained and poured angles of repose were measured using a modified Hele-Shaw cell method to evaluate the diet flowability. Inclusion of 30% DDGS with an average particle size of 308 μm improved (P < 0.05) dietary ATTD of DM and GE as well as DE (4,006 vs. 3,783 kcal/kg DM) and ME (3,861 vs. 3,583 kcal/kg DM) compared with 818 μm DDGS. No differences (P > 0.05) were found in N and P digestibility among the 3 DDGS diets. The DDGS particle size of 595 μm had greater (P < 0.05) DE but not ME compared with 818 μm DDGS, and DE and ME were not different between 308 and 595 μm. Compared with a 595 or 818 μm DDGS, grinding DDGS to 308 μm reduced diet flowability as indicated by a greater (P < 0.05) drained angle of

  12. Low-Level Mechanical Vibrations can Reduce Bone Resorption and Enhance Bone Formation in the Growing Skeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Xie,L.; Jacobsen, J.; Busa, B.; Donahue, L.; Miller, L.; Rubin, C.; Judex, S.

    2006-01-01

    Short durations of extremely small magnitude, high-frequency, mechanical stimuli can promote anabolic activity in the adult skeleton. Here, it is determined if such signals can influence trabecular and cortical formative and resorptive activity in the growing skeleton, if the newly formed bone is of high quality, and if the insertion of rest periods during the loading phase would enhance the efficacy of the mechanical regimen. Eight-week-old female BALB/cByJ mice were divided into four groups, baseline control (n = 8), age-matched control (n = 10), whole-body vibration (WBV) at 45 Hz (0.3 g) for 15 min day{sup -1} (n = 10), and WBV that were interrupted every second by 10 of rest (WBV-R, n = 10). In vivo strain gaging of two additional mice indicated that the mechanical signal induced strain oscillations of approximately 10 microstrain on the periosteal surface of the proximal tibia. After 3 weeks of WBV, applied for 15 min each day, osteoclastic activity in the trabecular metaphysis and epiphysis of the tibia was 33% and 31% lower (P < 0.05) than in age-matched controls. Bone formation rates (BFR{center_dot}BS{sup -1}) on the endocortical surface of the metaphysis were 30% greater (P < 0.05) in WBV than in age-matched control mice but trabecular and middiaphyseal BFR were not significantly altered. The insertion of rest periods (WBV-R) failed to potentiate the cellular effects. Three weeks of either WBV or WBV-R did not negatively influence body mass, bone length, or chemical bone matrix properties of the tibia. These data indicate that in the growing skeleton, short daily periods of extremely small, high-frequency mechanical signals can inhibit trabecular bone resorption, site specifically attenuate the declining levels of bone formation, and maintain a high level of matrix quality. If WBV prove to be efficacious in the growing human skeleton, they may be able to provide the basis for a non-pharmacological and safe means to increase peak bone mass and, ultimately

  13. Effect of dietary boron on growth performance, calcium and phosphorus metabolism, and bone mechanical properties in growing barrows.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, T A; Spears, J W

    2001-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary boron (B) on growth performance, bone mechanical properties, and calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) metabolism in pigs. Thirty-six barrows were weaned at approximately 21 d of age and randomly assigned to receive one of three dietary treatments. Treatments consisted of 1) low-B basal diet (control), 2) basal + 5 mg B/kg diet, and 3) basal + 15 mg B/kg diet. Boron was supplemented as sodium borate. Barrows remained on their respective experimental diets throughout the nursery (35 d) and growing (30 d) phases of production. Blood samples were obtained from each barrow at the end of each phase. Following the 30-d growing period, eight barrows per treatment were transferred to stainless steel metabolism crates. Barrows had an adjustment period of 7 d, followed by a 7-d total collection of urine and feces. All barrows were fed at 90% of the previous ad libitum grower intake of the control animals during the adjustment and collection periods. At the end of the 7-d collection period, barrows were killed and femurs and fibulas were harvested for the assessment of bone mechanical properties. During the nursery phase, ADG and ADFI were increased (P < 0.05) by B supplementation. Boron did not affect (P = 0.34) feed efficiency during the nursery phase. During the growing phase, ADG and ADFI were increased (P < 0.05) by B supplementation. Boron did not affect (P = 0.97) feed efficiency during the growing phase. Boron did not affect (P = 0.44) bone ash percentage, but B supplementation increased (P < 0.05) bone ash P. Ultimate shear force of the fibula was increased (P < 0.05) in barrows supplemented with 15 mg B/kg diet compared to barrows fed diets supplemented with 5 mg B/kg diet. Apparent absorption and retention of Ca and P were not affected (P > 0.05) by dietary B. These data indicate that B supplementation to pigs can increase growth and bone strength without greatly affecting Ca and P metabolism.

  14. In Situ Mapping of the Mechanical Properties of Biofilms by Particle-tracking Microrheology.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su C; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Yang, Liang

    2015-12-04

    Bacterial cells are able to form surface-attached biofilm communities known as biofilms by encasing themselves in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The EPS serves as a physical and protective scaffold that houses the bacterial cells and consists of a variety of materials that includes proteins, exopolysaccharides and DNA. The composition of the EPS may change, which remodels the mechanic properties of the biofilm to further develop or support alternative biofilm structures, such as streamers, as a response to environmental cues. Despite this, there are little quantitative descriptions on how EPS components contribute to the mechanical properties and function of biofilms. Rheology, the study of the flow of matter, is of particular relevance to biofilms as many biofilms grow in flow conditions and are constantly exposed to shear stress. It also provides measurement and insight on the spreading of the biofilm on a surface. Here, particle-tracking microrheology is used to examine the viscoelasticity and effective crosslinking roles of different matrix components in various parts of the biofilm during development. This approach allows researchers to measure mechanic properties of biofilms at the micro-scale, which might provide useful information for controlling and engineering biofilms.

  15. Characterization of size-dependent mechanical properties of tip-growing cells using a lab-on-chip device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengzhi; Munglani, Gautam; Vogler, Hannes; Ndinyanka Fabrice, Tohnyui; Shamsudhin, Naveen; Wittel, Falk K; Ringli, Christoph; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Herrmann, Hans J; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-12-20

    Quantification of mechanical properties of tissues, living cells, and cellular components is crucial for the modeling of plant developmental processes such as mechanotransduction. Pollen tubes are tip-growing cells that provide an ideal system to study the mechanical properties at the single cell level. In this article, a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device is developed to quantitatively measure the biomechanical properties of lily (Lilium longiflorum) pollen tubes. A single pollen tube is fixed inside the microfluidic chip at a specific orientation and subjected to compression by a soft membrane. By comparing the deformation of the pollen tube at a given external load (compressibility) and the effect of turgor pressure on the tube diameter (stretch ratio) with finite element modeling, its mechanical properties are determined. The turgor pressure and wall stiffness of the pollen tubes are found to decrease considerably with increasing initial diameter of the pollen tubes. This observation supports the hypothesis that tip-growth is regulated by a delicate balance between turgor pressure and wall stiffness. The LOC device is modular and adaptable to a variety of cells that exhibit tip-growth, allowing for the straightforward measurement of mechanical properties.

  16. Transport effects due to particle erosion mechanisms. [in planetary rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    Various processes can erode the surfaces of planetary ring particles. Recent estimates for Saturn's rings suggest that a centimeter-thick surface layer could be eroded from an isolated ring particle in less than 1000 yr by meteoroid impacts alone. The atoms, molecules, and chips ejected from ring particles by erosion will arc across the rings along elliptical orbits. For moderate ring optical depths, ejecta will be absorbed or inelastically scattered upon reintersecting the ring plane. Continuous exchange of ejecta between different ring regions can lead to net radial transport of mass and angular momentum, to changes in particle sizes, and to the buildup of chip regoliths several centimeters deep on the surfaces of ring particles. Because most of the erosional ejecta are not lost but merely exchanged over short distances, the net erosion rate of the surfaces of these ring particles will be much less than that estimated for an isolated particle. Numerical solutions for time-dependent ballistic transport under various assumptions suggest pile-up and spillover effects especially near regions of preexisting high optical depth contrast, such as the inner edges of A and B rings. Global redistribution could be significant over billions of years. Other features in planetary ring systems may be influenced by ballistic transport.

  17. The role of mechanical forces in the planar-to-bulk transition in growing Escherichia coli microcolonies

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Matthew A. A.; Wacław, Bartłomiej; Allen, Rosalind J.; Cicuta, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical forces are obviously important in the assembly of three-dimensional multicellular structures, but their detailed role is often unclear. We have used growing microcolonies of the bacterium Escherichia coli to investigate the role of mechanical forces in the transition from two-dimensional growth (on the interface between a hard surface and a soft agarose pad) to three-dimensional growth (invasion of the agarose). We measure the position within the colony where the invasion transition happens, the cell density within the colony and the colony size at the transition as functions of the concentration of the agarose. We use a phenomenological theory, combined with individual-based computer simulations, to show how mechanical forces acting between the bacterial cells, and between the bacteria and the surrounding matrix, lead to the complex phenomena observed in our experiments—in particular the observation that agarose concentration non-trivially affects the colony size at transition. Matching these approaches leads to a prediction for how the friction between the bacteria and the agarose should vary with agarose concentration. Our experimental conditions mimic numerous clinical and environmental scenarios in which bacteria invade soft matrices, as well as shedding more general light on the transition between two- and three-dimensional growth in multicellular assemblies. PMID:24920113

  18. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  19. Note: Evaluation of slurry particle size analyzers for chemical mechanical planarization process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Sunjae; Kulkarni, Atul; Qin, Hongyi; Kim, Taesung

    2016-04-01

    In the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) process, slurry particle size is important because large particles can cause defects. Hence, selection of an appropriate particle measuring system is necessary in the CMP process. In this study, a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were compared for particle size distribution (PSD) measurements. In addition, the actual particle size and shape were confirmed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) results. SMPS classifies the particle size according to the electrical mobility, and measures the particle concentration (single particle measurement). On the other hand, the DLS measures the particle size distribution by analyzing scattered light from multiple particles (multiple particle measurement). For the slurry particles selected for evaluation, it is observed that SMPS shows bi-modal particle sizes 30 nm and 80 nm, which closely matches with the TEM measurements, whereas DLS shows only single mode distribution in the range of 90 nm to 100 nm and showing incapability of measuring small particles. Hence, SMPS can be a better choice for the evaluation of CMP slurry particle size and concentration measurements.

  20. ALTERED IRON HOMEOSTATIS AND THE MECHANISM OF BIOLOGIC EFFECT BY PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several features of the clinical presentation and changes in physiology and pathology following exposure to many diverse ambient air pollution particles are comparable, suggesting a common mechanism for their biological effect. We propose that a mechanism of biological effect com...

  1. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    SciTech Connect

    Motozuka, S.; Hayashi, K.; Tagaya, M.; Morinaga, M.

    2015-09-15

    Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp) particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the (001) planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method.

  2. Mechanisms of particle-induced activation of alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gercken, G; Berg, I; Dörger, M; Schlüter, T

    1996-11-01

    Bovine alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to quartz dusts, metal-containing dusts or silica particles coated with a single metal oxide. The release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) was measured in short-term incubations (90 min). The secretion of both ROI was markedly enhanced by silica particles coated with vanadium oxide and lowered by copper oxide-coated particles. The particle-induced ROI release was significantly decreased by the inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as phospholipase A2, suggesting the involvement of both enzymes in the NADPH oxidase activation. Quartz dusts induced a transient increase of free cytosolic calcium ion concentration, slight intracellular acidification, and depolarization of the plasma membrane. In the presence of EGTA or verapamil the rise of [Ca2+]i was diminished, suggesting an influx of extracellular calcium ions. The PKC inhibitor GF 109203X did not inhibit the quartz-induced calcium rise, while both the cytosolic acidification and depolarization were prevented. BSA-coating of the quartz particles abolished the calcium influx as well as the decrease of pHi, and possibly hyperpolarized the plasma membrane.

  3. Application the particle method in problems of mechanics deformable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhnoi, D. V.; Gabsalikova, N. F.; Miheev, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The work implemented method of deformation of ground-based particle method, which is a collection of mineral grains, which are linked to some system of forces on the contact areas between the mineral particles. Two-parameter potential Lennard-Jones and it is modified version were selected for describing the behavior of ground. Some model problems of straining layer of ground in the gravity field was decided. The calculations were performed on a heterogeneous computing cluster, on each of the seven components that were installed on three GPU AMD Radeon HD 7970.

  4. New mechanism of acceleration of particles by stellar black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmanov, Zaza

    In this paper, we study the efficiency of particle acceleration in the magnetospheres of stellar mass black holes. For this purpose, we consider the linearized set of the Euler equation, continuity equation and Poisson equation, respectively. After introducing the varying relativistic centrifugal force, we show that the charge separation undergoes the parametric instability, leading to generation of centrifugally-excited Langmuir waves. It is shown that these waves, via the Langmuir collapse damp by means of the Landau damping, as a result, energy transfers to particles accelerating them to energies of the order of 1016 eV.

  5. Roles of Colloidal Silicon Dioxide Particles in Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Dielectric Silicon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonseop; Singh, Rajiv K.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is carried out using slurry particles in contact with a wafer and a pad. The size and distribution of particles between the wafer and the pad play a crucial role in achieving desired CMP performance. Polishing rates and friction forces were measured as a function of particle size and solids loading, and surface finishes of silica wafers polished with colloidal silica particles were analyzed to validate the polishing mechanism. On the basis of polishing rate, friction force and surface finish, polishing occurring at the pad-particles-wafer interface was analyzed and an interfacial contact model was proposed. Understanding the polishing mechanism using colloidal particles makes it possible to achieve desired CMP performance.

  6. Integrating remotely sensed leaf area index and leaf nitrogen accumulation with RiceGrow model based on particle swarm optimization algorithm for rice grain yield assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hang; Zhu, Yan; Li, Wenlong; Cao, Weixing; Tian, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    A regional rice (Oryza sativa) grain yield prediction technique was proposed by integration of ground-based and spaceborne remote sensing (RS) data with the rice growth model (RiceGrow) through a new particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. Based on an initialization/parameterization strategy (calibration), two agronomic indicators, leaf area index (LAI) and leaf nitrogen accumulation (LNA) remotely sensed by field spectra and satellite images, were combined to serve as an external assimilation parameter and integrated with the RiceGrow model for inversion of three model management parameters, including sowing date, sowing rate, and nitrogen rate. Rice grain yield was then predicted by inputting these optimized parameters into the reinitialized model. PSO was used for the parameterization and regionalization of the integrated model and compared with the shuffled complex evolution-University of Arizona (SCE-UA) optimization algorithm. The test results showed that LAI together with LNA as the integrated parameter performed better than each alone for crop model parameter initialization. PSO also performed better than SCE-UA in terms of running efficiency and assimilation results, indicating that PSO is a reliable optimization method for assimilating RS information and the crop growth model. The integrated model also had improved precision for predicting rice grain yield.

  7. HIGH SPEED PARTICLE BEAM GENERATION: SIMPLE FOCUSING MECHANISMS. (R823980)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modern chemical characterization instruments employ an aerosol inlet that transmits atmospheric aerosols to the low pressure source region of a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, where particles are ablated and ionized using high energy irradiation. The ions when analyzed in the m...

  8. Inferring Growth Control Mechanisms in Growing Multi-cellular Spheroids of NSCLC Cells from Spatial-Temporal Image Data

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Margareta; Vignon-Clementel, Irene E.; Drasdo, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative single cell-based mathematical model for multi-cellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) of SK-MES-1 cells, a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line, growing under various nutrient conditions: we confront the simulations performed with this model with data on the growth kinetics and spatial labeling patterns for cell proliferation, extracellular matrix (ECM), cell distribution and cell death. We start with a simple model capturing part of the experimental observations. We then show, by performing a sensitivity analysis at each development stage of the model that its complexity needs to be stepwise increased to account for further experimental growth conditions. We thus ultimately arrive at a model that mimics the MCTS growth under multiple conditions to a great extent. Interestingly, the final model, is a minimal model capable of explaining all data simultaneously in the sense, that the number of mechanisms it contains is sufficient to explain the data and missing out any of its mechanisms did not permit fit between all data and the model within physiological parameter ranges. Nevertheless, compared to earlier models it is quite complex i.e., it includes a wide range of mechanisms discussed in biological literature. In this model, the cells lacking oxygen switch from aerobe to anaerobe glycolysis and produce lactate. Too high concentrations of lactate or too low concentrations of ATP promote cell death. Only if the extracellular matrix density overcomes a certain threshold, cells are able to enter the cell cycle. Dying cells produce a diffusive growth inhibitor. Missing out the spatial information would not permit to infer the mechanisms at work. Our findings suggest that this iterative data integration together with intermediate model sensitivity analysis at each model development stage, provide a promising strategy to infer predictive yet minimal (in the above sense) quantitative models of tumor growth, as prospectively of other tissue

  9. Particle size and surfactant effects on chemical mechanical polishing of glass using silica-based slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Zefang; Liu Weili; Song Zhitang

    2010-10-01

    This study explores the effect of particle size and surfactant on the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) of glass using colloidal silica-based slurry. It was found that the material removal rate strongly depends on the particle size and the types of surfactants and that the rms roughness was independent of particle size and correlated to surfactants. On the basis of polishing results, it was concluded that the main polishing mechanism was changed from indentation mechanism to surface-area mechanism, with the variation of particle size. In addition, the molecular structure, charge type, and lubricating effect of the surfactants play an important role in the dispersion of abrasive particles and in the CMP performance.

  10. Particle size of calcium carbonate does not affect apparent and standardized total tract digestibility of calcium, retention of calcium, or growth performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Merriman, L A; Stein, H H

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate particle size of calcium carbonate used in diets fed to growing pigs. Experiment 1 was conducted to determine apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), standardized total tract digestibility (STTD), and retention of Ca among diets containing calcium carbonate produced to different particle sizes, and Exp. 2 was conducted to determine if growth performance of weanling pigs is affected by particle size of calcium carbonate. In Exp. 1, 4 diets based on corn and potato protein isolate were formulated to contain 0.70% Ca and 0.33% standardized total tract digestible P, but the calcium carbonate used in the diets was ground to 4 different particle sizes (200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm). A Ca-free diet was formulated to determine basal endogenous losses of Ca. In Exp. 2, 4 diets were based on corn and soybean meal and the only difference among diets was that each diet contained calcium carbonate ground to the 4 particle sizes used in Exp. 1. In Exp. 1, 40 barrows (15.42 ± 0.70 kg initial BW) were allotted to the 5 diets with 8 replicate pigs per diet using a randomized complete block design, and in Exp. 2, 128 pigs with an initial BW of 9.61 ± 0.09 kg were randomly allotted to 4 experimental diets. Results of Exp. 1 indicated that basal endogenous losses of Ca were 0.329 g/kg DMI. The ATTD of Ca was 70.0 ± 3.2, 74.3 ± 2.7, 70.0 ± 2.9, and 72.1 ± 2.7 and the STTD of Ca was 74.2 ± 3.2, 78.5 ± 2.7, 74.1 ± 2.9, and 76.2 ± 2.7 for calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. Retention of Ca was 67.4 ± 3.1, 70.4 ± 2.6, 63.9 ± 2.8, and 67.2 ± 2.2 for diets containing calcium carbonate ground to 200, 500, 700, or 1,125 μm, respectively. There were no differences among diets for ATTD of Ca, STTD of Ca, or retention of Ca. The ATTD of P was 64.5 ± 1.7, 66.8 ± 2.6, 64.2 ± 3.0, and 63.2 ± 1.7% and retention of P was 61.4 ± 1.4, 63.8 ± 2.8, 61.9 ± 2.8, and 60.9 ± 1.5 for diets containing calcium

  11. Experimental investigations of mechanical and reaction responses for drop-weight impacted energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Yan-Qing; Wang, Ming-Yang; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2017-02-01

    Low-velocity drop-weight impact experiments on individual and multiple Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) energetic particles were performed using a modified drop-weight machine equipped with high-speed photography components. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. Comparisons between impacted salt and HMX particle show that jetting in HMX is mainly due to the motion of fragmented particles driven by gaseous reaction products. Velocity of jetting, flame propagation, and area expansion were measured via image processing, making it possible to quantify the chemical reaction or mechanical deformation violence at different stages.

  12. Experimental investigations of mechanical and reaction responses for drop-weight impacted energetic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-Wei; Wu, Yan-Qing; Wang, Ming-Yang; Huang, Feng-Lei

    2016-10-01

    Low-velocity drop-weight impact experiments on individual and multiple Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine (HMX) energetic particles were performed using a modified drop-weight machine equipped with high-speed photography components. Multiple particles experienced more severe burning reactions than an individual particle. Comparisons between impacted salt and HMX particle show that jetting in HMX is mainly due to the motion of fragmented particles driven by gaseous reaction products. Velocity of jetting, flame propagation, and area expansion were measured via image processing, making it possible to quantify the chemical reaction or mechanical deformation violence at different stages.

  13. Mechanisms underlying the redistribution of particles among the lung's alveolar macrophages during alveolar phase clearance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, B.E.; Oritz, J.B.; Steinkamp, J.A.; Tietjen, G.L.; Sebring, R.J. ); Oberdorster, G. )

    1991-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the particle redistribution phenomenon following the deposition of inhaled particles, as well as to obtain information about some of the mechanisms that may be operable in the redistribution of particles, lavaged lung free cell analyses and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses of lung tissue and were performed using lungs from rats after they were subchronically exposed to aerosolized dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). TEM analyses indicated that the in situ autolysis of particle-containing Alveolar Macropages (AM) is one important mechanism involved in the redistribution of particles. Evidence was also obtained that indicated that the engulfment of one particle-containing phagocyte by another phagocyte also occurs. Another prominent mechanism of the particle redistribution phenomenon may be the in situ proliferation of particle-laden AM. We used the macrophage cell line J774A.1 as a surrogate for AM to investigate how different particulate loads in macrophages may affect their abilities to proliferate. These in vitro investigations indicated that the normal rate of proliferation of macrophages is essentially unaffected by the containment of relatively high particulate burdens. Overall, the results of our investigations suggest that in situ autolysis of particle-containing AM and the rephagocytosis of freed particles by other phagocytes, the phagocytosis of effete and disintegrating particle-containing phagocytes by other AM, and the in situ division of particle-containing AM are likely mechanisms that underlie the post-depositional redistribution of particles among the lung's AM during alveolar phase clearance. 19 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Statistical mechanics of point particles with a gravitational interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabanol, M.-L.; Corson, F.; Pomeau, Y.

    2000-04-01

    We study the dynamics of N point particles with a gravitational interaction. The divergence of the microcanonical partition function prevents this system from reaching equilibrium. Assuming a random diffusion in phase space we deduce a scaling law involving time, which is numerically checked for 3 interacting masses in a quadratic nonsymmetrical potential. This random walk on the potential energy scale is studied in some detail and the results agree with the numerics.

  15. Control and formation mechanism of extended nanochannel geometry in colloidal mesoporous silica particles.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, I; Kalaparthi, V; Volkov, D O; Palantavida, S; Mordvinova, N E; Lebedev, O I; Owens, J

    2017-01-04

    A large class of colloidal multi-micron mesoporous silica particles have well-defined cylindrical nanopores, nanochannels which self-assembled in the templated sol-gel process. These particles are of broad interest in photonics, for timed drug release, enzyme stabilization, separation and filtration technologies, catalysis, etc. Although the pore geometry and mechanism of pore formation of such particles has been widely investigated at the nanoscale, their pore geometry and its formation mechanism at a larger (extended) scale is still under debate. The extended geometry of nanochannels is paramount for all aforementioned applications because it defines accessibility of nanochannels, and subsequently, kinetics of interaction of the nanochannel content with the particle surrounding. Here we present both experimental and theoretical investigation of the extended geometry and its formation mechanism in colloidal multi-micron mesoporous silica particles. We demonstrate that disordered (and consequently, well accessible) nanochannels in the initially formed colloidal particles gradually align and form extended self-sealed channels. This knowledge allows to control the percentage of disordered versus self-sealed nanochannels, which defines accessibility of nanochannels in such particles. We further show that the observed aligning the channels is in agreement with theory; it is thermodynamically favored as it decreases the Gibbs free energy of the particles. Besides the practical use of the obtained results, developing a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of morphogenesis of complex geometry of nanopores will open doors to efficient and controllable synthesis that will, in turn, further fuel the practical utilization of these particles.

  16. Particle erosion mechanisms and mass redistribution in Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durisen, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    A variety of physical processes can erode the surfaces of planetary ring particles. According to current estimates, the most efficient of these over the bulk of Saturn's rings is hypervelocity impact by 100 microns to one centimeter radius meteoroids. The atoms, molecules, and fragments ejected from ring particles by erosion arc across the rings along elliptical orbits to produce a tenuous halo of solid ejecta and an extensive gaseous atmosphere. Continuous exchange of ejecta between different ring regions can lead to net radial transport of mass and angular momentum. The equations governing this ballistic transport process are presented and discussed. Both numerical and analytic studies of idealized ring systems illustrate that ballistic transport can cause significant mass redistribution in the rings, especially near regions of high density contrast, such as the inner edges of the A and B rings. Ejecta exchanges can also alter local particle sizes and compositions and may produce pulverized regoliths at least several centimeters deep. The meteoroid erosion rate is so high that significant global torques and mass loss are possible on times shorter than a solar system life time.

  17. Mechanisms of direct detonation initiation via thermal explosion of radiatively heated gas-particles layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, V. P.; Ivanov, M. F.; Kiverin, A. D.; Yakovenko, I. S.

    Conceptual approach of detonation wave direct initiation by external radiative heating of microparticles locally suspended in flammable gaseous mixture is proposed. Combustion waves and detonation initiation mechanisms in the congestion regions of microparticles heated by radiation are studied numerically. Necessary criteria on geometrical scales of gas-particles layer and spatial uniformity of particles distribution for successful detonation initiation are formulated.

  18. Powder dispersion mechanisms within a dry powder inhaler using microscale particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiang; Wereley, Steven T; Heng, Paul W S; Chan, Lai Wah; Carvajal, M Teresa

    2016-12-05

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the ability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to visually assess dry powder dispersion within an inhaler. Herein, the study reports particle movement characterization of entrained low-micron particles within an inhaler to further scheme of potential mechanisms. Carrier based DPI formulations were prepared and placed in a transparent model Rotahaler(®) chamber for the aerosolization experiments. Then using the PIV, a high-speed camera, the dried powder dispersion was directly observed and analyzed for all, neat, binary and ternary systems. Powder dispersion mechanisms proposed include drag force, impact with obstacle and particle-particle collision; these different mechanisms depended on the powder flow properties. A revised ratio of aerodynamic response time (τA) to the mean time between collisions (τC) was found to be 6.8 indicating that particle collisions were of strong influence to particle dispersion. With image analysis techniques, visualization of particle flow pattern and collision regions was possible; suggesting that the various mechanisms proposed did govern the powder dispersion.

  19. MECHANISMS OF ACTION OF INHALED FIBERS, PARTICLES AND NANOPARTICLES IN LUNG AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: A symposium on the mechanisms of action of inhaled airborne particulate matter (PM),pathogenic particles and fibers such as silica and asbestos, and nanomaterials, defined as synthetic particles or fibers less than 100 nm in diameter, was held on October 27 and 28,
    ...

  20. Effects of butter naturally enriched with conjugated linoleic acid and vaccenic acid on blood lipids and LDL particle size in growing pigs

    PubMed Central

    Haug, Anna; Sjøgren, Per; Hølland, Nina; Müller, Hanne; Kjos, Nils P; Taugbøl, Ole; Fjerdingby, Nina; Biong, Anne S; Selmer-Olsen, Eirik; Harstad, Odd M

    2008-01-01

    Background Cow milk is a natural source of the cis 9, trans 11 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid (c9,t11-CLA) and trans vaccenic acid (VA). These fatty acids may be considered as functional foods, and the concentration in milk can be increased by e.g. sunflower oil supplementation to the dairy cow feed. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of regular butter with a special butter naturally enriched in c9,t11-CLA and VA on plasma lipids in female growing pigs. The experimental period lasted for three weeks and the two diets provided daily either 5.0 g c9,t11-CLA plus 15.1 g VA or 1.3 g c9,t11-CLA plus 3.6 g VA. Results The serum concentrations of c9,t11-CLA, VA and alpha-linolenic acid were increased and myristic (14:0) and palmitic acid (16:0) were reduced in the pigs fed the CLA+VA-rich butter-diet compared to regular butter, but no differences in plasma concentrations of triacylglycerol, cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, LDL particle size distribution or total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol were observed among the two dietary treatment groups. Conclusion Growing pigs fed diets containing butter naturally enriched in about 20 g c9,t11-CLA plus VA daily for three weeks, had increased serum concentrations of alpha-linolenic acid and decreased myristic and palmitic acid compared to pigs fed regular butter, implying a potential benefit of the CLA+VA butter on serum fatty acid composition. Butter enriched in CLA+VA does not appear to have significant effect on the plasma lipoprotein profile in pigs. PMID:18759970

  1. Assembly mechanisms of specialized core particles of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bai, Minghui; Zhao, Xian; Sahara, Kazutaka; Ohte, Yuki; Hirano, Yuko; Kaneko, Takeumi; Yashiroda, Hideki; Murata, Shigeo

    2014-07-16

    The 26S proteasome has a highly complicated structure comprising the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). Along with the standard CP in all eukaryotes, vertebrates have two more subtypes of CP called the immunoproteasome and the thymoproteasome. The immunoproteasome has catalytic subunits β1i, β2i, and β5i replacing β1, β2, and β5 and enhances production of major histocompatibility complex I ligands. The thymoproteasome contains thymus-specific subunit β5t in place of β5 or β5i and plays a pivotal role in positive selection of CD8+ T cells. Here we investigate the assembly pathways of the specialized CPs and show that β1i and β2i are incorporated ahead of all the other β-subunits and that both β5i and β5t can be incorporated immediately after the assembly of β3 in the absence of β4, distinct from the assembly of the standard CP in which β-subunits are incorporated in the order of β2, β3, β4, β5, β6, β1, and β7. The propeptide of β5t is a key factor for this earlier incorporation, whereas the body sequence seems to be important for the earlier incorporation of β5i. This unique feature of β5t and β5i may account for preferential assembly of the immunoproteasome and the thymoproteasome over the standard type even when both the standard and specialized subunits are co-expressed.

  2. [Effect of different mechanical loading on the expression of Notch signaling pathways in growing rabbits' condylar cartilage].

    PubMed

    Yan, F; Feng, J Y; Mou, T C; Liu, C Y; Sun, Z; Shi, C J

    2017-03-09

    Objective: To investigate the effect of different mechanical loading on the expression of Notch-1, Notch-3, Jagged-1 and Delta-like-1 in growing rabbits' condylar cartilage. Methods: Sixty-four ten-days-old rabbits were randomly divided into experimental and control groups. The rabbits in the experimental groups were fed on a powder diet, while the control groups were fed on a solid diet. The animals were sacrificed after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks. Notch-1, Notch-3, Jagged-1 and Delta-like-1 gene and protein expressions were examined by HE, immunohistochemistry, Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: At 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks, the anterior part of condylar cartilage in solid diet groups ([318.1±4.3], [342.4±2.6], [364.2±3.2], [380.7±6.0] mm, respectively) were thicker than those in powder diet groups ([275.4±2.6], [301.1±2.0], [322.3±3.3], [366.5±8.4] mm, respectively) (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the middle part (P>0.05). From 2 to 6 weeks, the posterior part of cartilage in solid diet groups ([444.1±1.5], [451.1±0.3], [476.4±5.7] mm, respectively) was thinner than those in power diet groups ([470.4±2.7], [494.3±2.9], [512.3±5.7] mm, respectively) (P<0.05). At 6 weeks, there were more mRNA expressions of Notch-3, Jagged-1 and Delta-like-1 in solid diet group than in power diet group (P<0.05). The Notch-1 protein could be found in all layers of condylar cartilage, especially in the surface of hypertrophic zone. The expressions of Notch-1, Notch-3, and Delta-like-1 protein were increased from 2 to 6 weeks, and decreased at 8 weeks. In solid diet groups, the protein expressions of Notch-1 (at 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks), Notch-3 (at 2, 4, 6 weeks), Jagged-1 (at 2, 4, 6 weeks) and Delta-like-1 (at 4, 6, 8 weeks) were greater than in power diet groups (P<0.05). Conclusions: Low masticatory loading may delay or inhibit the development of condylar cartilage and its growing factors such as Notch-1, Notch-3, Jagged-1

  3. Reaction Mechanisms and Particle Interaction in Burning Two-Phase Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreizin, Edward L.; Shoshin, Yuriy L.; Murdyy, Ruslan S.; Hoffmann, Vern K.

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to understand the mechanisms by which particle interactions affect ignition and combustion in the two-phase systems. Combustion of metal aerosols representing the two-phase systems is carried out in the microgravity environment enabling one to avoid the buoyant flows that mask the particle motion due to the particle-particle interaction effects. In addition, relatively large, e.g., 100 micron diameter particles can be used, that remain aerosolized (i.e., do not fall down as they would at normal gravity) so that their behavior ahead, behind, and within the propagating flame can be resolved optically. An experimental apparatus exploiting this approach has been designed for the 2.2-s drop tower microgravity experiments. A typical experiment includes fluidizing metal particles under microgravity in an acoustic field, turning off the acoustic exciter, and igniting the created aerosol at a constant pressure using a hot wire igniter. The flame propagation and details of the individual particle combustion and particle interactions are studied using high-speed movie and video cameras coupled with microscope lenses to resolve individual particles. Recorded flame images are digitized and various image processing techniques including flame position tracking, color separation, and pixel by pixel image comparisons are employed to understand the processes occurring in the burning aerosols. Condensed combustion products are collected after each experiment for the phase, composition, and morphology analyses. New experiments described in this paper address combustion of Ti and Al particle clouds in air and combustion of Mg particle clouds in CO2. In addition, microgravity combustion experiments have been conducted with the particles of the newly produced Al-Mg mechanical alloys aerosolized in air.

  4. Double-slit experiment with single wave-driven particles and its relation to quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Anders; Madsen, Jacob; Reichelt, Christian; Rosenlund Ahl, Sonja; Lautrup, Benny; Ellegaard, Clive; Levinsen, Mogens T; Bohr, Tomas

    2015-07-01

    In a thought-provoking paper, Couder and Fort [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 154101 (2006)] describe a version of the famous double-slit experiment performed with droplets bouncing on a vertically vibrated fluid surface. In the experiment, an interference pattern in the single-particle statistics is found even though it is possible to determine unambiguously which slit the walking droplet passes. Here we argue, however, that the single-particle statistics in such an experiment will be fundamentally different from the single-particle statistics of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanical interference takes place between different classical paths with precise amplitude and phase relations. In the double-slit experiment with walking droplets, these relations are lost since one of the paths is singled out by the droplet. To support our conclusions, we have carried out our own double-slit experiment, and our results, in particular the long and variable slit passage times of the droplets, cast strong doubt on the feasibility of the interference claimed by Couder and Fort. To understand theoretically the limitations of wave-driven particle systems as analogs to quantum mechanics, we introduce a Schrödinger equation with a source term originating from a localized particle that generates a wave while being simultaneously guided by it. We show that the ensuing particle-wave dynamics can capture some characteristics of quantum mechanics such as orbital quantization. However, the particle-wave dynamics can not reproduce quantum mechanics in general, and we show that the single-particle statistics for our model in a double-slit experiment with an additional splitter plate differs qualitatively from that of quantum mechanics.

  5. From Mechanical Motion to Brownian Motion, Thermodynamics and Particle Transport Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2008-01-01

    The motion of a particle in a medium is dealt with either as a problem of mechanics or as a transport process in non-equilibrium statistical physics. The two kinds of approach are often unrelated as they are taught in different textbooks. The aim of this paper is to highlight the link between the mechanical and statistical treatments of particle…

  6. Remeshed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    In computer aided surgery the accurate simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs is essential for the development of surgical simulators. In this paper we introduce particle based simulations of two different human organ materials modeled as linear viscoelastic solids. The constitutive equations for the material behavior are discretized using a particle approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method while the body surface is tracked using level sets. A key aspect of this approach is its flexibility which allows the simulation of complex time varying topologies with large deformations. The accuracy of the original formulation is significantly enhanced by using a particle reinitialization technique resulting in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The mechanical parameters of the systems used in the simulations are derived from experimental measurements on human cadaver organs. We compare the mechanical behavior of liver- and kidney-like materials based on the dynamic simulations of a tensile test case. Moreover, we present a particle based reconstruction of the liver topology and its strain distribution under a small local load. Finally, we demonstrate a unified formulation of fluid structure interaction based on particle methods.

  7. An integrated acoustic and dielectrophoretic particle manipulation in a microfluidic device for particle wash and separation fabricated by mechanical machining

    PubMed Central

    Çetin, Barbaros; Özer, Mehmet Bülent; Çağatay, Erdem; Büyükkoçak, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    In this study, acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis are utilized in an integrated manner to combine the two different operations on a single polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) chip in sequential manner, namely, particle wash (buffer exchange) and particle separation. In the washing step, particles are washed with buffer solution with low conductivity for dielectrophoretic based separation to avoid the adverse effects of Joule heating. Acoustic waves generated by piezoelectric material are utilized for washing, which creates standing waves along the whole width of the channel. Coupled electro-mechanical acoustic 3D multi-physics analysis showed that the position and orientation of the piezoelectric actuators are critical for successful operation. A unique mold is designed for the precise alignment of the piezoelectric materials and 3D side-wall electrodes for a highly reproducible fabrication. To achieve the throughput matching of acoustophoresis and dielectrophoresis in the integration, 3D side-wall electrodes are used. The integrated device is fabricated by PDMS molding. The mold of the integrated device is fabricated using high-precision mechanical machining. With a unique mold design, the placements of the two piezoelectric materials and the 3D sidewall electrodes are accomplished during the molding process. It is shown that the proposed device can handle the wash and dielectrophoretic separation successfully. PMID:26865905

  8. A mechanism for the production of ultrafine particles from concrete fracture.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Nassib; Rohan Jayaratne, E; Johnson, Graham R; Alroe, Joel; Uhde, Erik; Salthammer, Tunga; Cravigan, Luke; Faghihi, Ehsan Majd; Kumar, Prashant; Morawska, Lidia

    2017-03-01

    While the crushing of concrete gives rise to large quantities of coarse dust, it is not widely recognized that this process also emits significant quantities of ultrafine particles. These particles impact not just the environments within construction activities but those in entire urban areas. The origin of these ultrafine particles is uncertain, as existing theories do not support their production by mechanical processes. We propose a hypothesis for this observation based on the volatilisation of materials at the concrete fracture interface. The results from this study confirm that mechanical methods can produce ultrafine particles (UFP) from concrete, and that the particles are volatile. The ultrafine mode was only observed during concrete fracture, producing particle size distributions with average count median diameters of 27, 39 and 49 nm for the three tested concrete samples. Further volatility measurements found that the particles were highly volatile, showing between 60 and 95% reduction in the volume fraction remaining by 125 °C. An analysis of the volatile fraction remaining found that different volatile material is responsible for the production of particles between the samples.

  9. Morphological Variations of Explosive Residue Particles and Implications for Understanding Detonation Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Karim, Nadia; Blackman, Christopher S; Gill, Philip P; Morgan, Ruth M; Matjacic, Lidija; Webb, Roger; Ng, Wing H

    2016-04-05

    The possibility of recovering undetonated explosive residues following detonation events is well-known; however, the morphology and chemical identity of these condensed phase postblast particles remains undetermined. An understanding of the postblast explosive particle morphology would provide vital information during forensic examinations, allowing rapid initial indication of the explosive material to be microscopically determined prior to any chemical analyses and thereby saving time and resources at the crucial stage of an investigation. In this study, condensed phase particles collected from around the detonations of aluminized ammonium nitrate and RDX-based explosive charges were collected in a novel manner utilizing SEM stubs. By incorporating the use of a focused ion beam during analysis, for the first time it is possible to determine that such particles have characteristic shapes, sizes, and internal structures depending on the explosive and the distance from the detonation at which the particles are recovered. Spheroidal particles (10-210 μm) with microsurface features recovered following inorganic charge detonations were dissimilar to the irregularly shaped particles (5-100 μm) recovered following organic charge firings. Confirmatory analysis to conclude that the particles were indeed explosive included HPLC-MS, Raman spectroscopy, and mega-electron volt-secondary ionization mass spectrometry. These results may impact not only forensic investigations but also the theoretical constructs that govern detonation theory by indicating the potential mechanisms by which these particles survive and how they vary between the different explosive types.

  10. The cracking mechanism of silicon particles in an A357 aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Jien-Wei; Liu, Wen-Pin

    1996-11-01

    The cracking of Si particles in an A357 Al alloy has been investigated over a spectrum of stress and strain by varying aging strength and applying different tensile strains. The variation of the fraction of broken Si particles with stress, strain, and cleavage plane orientation has been obtained. The features of cracking reveal that cracking of Si particles is a very localized event. A dislocation pileup mechanism is the most probable one among all crack-initiation theories for explaining the behavior. Based on this mechanism, further deduction has been made to obtain the relationship between the fraction of broken particles and metallurgical factors. The present data, along with Gurlandrss and that of Low et al., have been found to verify this relationship for the effect of stress, strain, and cleavage plane orientation.

  11. Experimental investigation of particle deposition mechanisms in the lung acinus using microfluidic models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishler, Rami; Mulligan, Molly; Dubowski, Yael; Sznitman, Josue; Sznitman Lab-department of Biomedical Engineering Team; Dubowski Lab-faculty of Civil; Environmental Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    In order to experimentally investigate particle deposition mechanisms in the deep alveolated regions of the lungs, we have developed a novel microfluidic device mimicking breathing acinar flow conditions directly at the physiological scale. The model features an anatomically-inspired acinar geometry with five dichotomously branching airway generations lined with periodically expanding and contracting alveoli. Deposition patterns of airborne polystyrene microspheres (spanning 0.1 μm to 2 μm in diameter) inside the airway tree network compare well with CFD simulations and reveal the roles of gravity and Brownian motion on particle deposition sites. Furthermore, measured trajectories of incense particles (0.1-1 μm) inside the breathing device show a critical role for Brownian diffusion in determining the fate of inhaled sub-micron particles by enabling particles to cross from the acinar ducts into alveolar cavities, especially during the short time lag between inhalation and exhalation phases.

  12. Mechanism for Particle Transport and Size Sorting via Low-Frequency Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Scott, James S.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective sample handling tools to deliver and sort particles for analytical instruments that are planned for use in future NASA missions. Specifically, a need exists for a compact mechanism that allows transporting and sieving particle sizes of powdered cuttings and soil grains that may be acquired by sampling tools such as a robotic scoop or drill. The required tool needs to be low mass and compact to operate from such platforms as a lander or rover. This technology also would be applicable to sample handling when transporting samples to analyzers and sorting particles by size.

  13. Resuspension of allergen-containing particles under mechanical and aerodynamic disturbances from human walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, C.; Freihaut, J.; Bahnfleth, W.

    This study presents and develops a controlled and characterized method to explore the influence of specific occupant activity on the aerosolization of allergen-containing particles. Indoor allergen-related diseases are primarily inhalation sensitized and developed, suggesting an aerobiological pathway of allergen-containing carrier particles from dust reservoir to occupant respiration. But the pathways are not well understood or quantified. The influence of occupant walking on particle aerosolization is simulated by a system in which complex floor disturbances are deconvoluted into aerodynamic and mechanical components. Time resolved particle size distributions are measured for particles resuspended from representative samples of flooring materials and different types of floor disturbances in an environmentally controlled experimental chamber. Results indicate aerodynamic disturbances, relative to mechanical, dominate the particle resuspension behavior. Dust type, dust load and floor type showed marginal influences on a normalized surface loading basis. Humidity effects were not clear since during experiments the floor samples may not have reached moisture partitioning equilibrium with the controlled air humidity. Average resuspension rates ranged from 10 -7 to 10 -3 min -1, having phenomenological consistency with previous, large room or chamber investigations, suggesting the method can be utilized to develop a database for particle resuspension rates.

  14. Particle Disease: A Current Review of the Biological Mechanisms in Periprosthetic Osteolysis After Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sukur, Erhan; Akman, Yunus Emre; Ozturkmen, Yusuf; Kucukdurmaz, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory responses to wear debris cause osteolysis that leads to aseptic prosthesis loosening and hip arthroplasty failure. Although osteolysis is usually associated with aseptic loosening, it is rarely seen around stable implants. Aseptic implant loosening is a simple radiologic phenomenon, but a complex immunological process. Particulate debris produced by implants most commonly causes osteolysis, and this is called particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO). Objective: The objective of this review is to outline the features of particle-associated periprosthetic osteolysis to allow the physician to recognise this condition and commence early treatment, thereby optimizing patient outcome. Methods: A thorough literature search was performed using available databases, including Pubmed, to cover important research published covering particle-associated PPO. Results: Although osteolysis causes bone resorption, clinical, animal, and in vitro studies of particle bioreactivity suggest that particle-associated PPO represents the culmination of several biological reactions of many cell types, rather than being caused solely by the osteoclasts. The biological activity is highly dependent on the characteristics and quantity of the wear particles. Conclusion: Despite advances in total hip arthroplasty (THA), particle-associated PPO and aseptic loosening continue to be major factors that affect prosthetic joint longevity. Biomarkers could be exploited as easy and objective diagnostic and prognostic targets that would enable testing for osteolysis after THA. Further research is needed to identify new biomarkers in PPO. A comprehensive understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms is crucial for developing new therapeutic interventions to reverse or suppress biological responses to wear particles. PMID:27499822

  15. Wave-like variables of a classical particle and their connections to quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen

    2017-01-01

    In many texts, the transition from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics is achieved by substituting the action for the phase angle. The paper presents a different approach to show some connections between classical and quantum mechanics for a single particle for an audience at graduate and postgraduate levels. Firstly, it is shown that a wave equation of action can be derived under the free particle condition and the Legendre transform. The wave-like solutions of the action, Hamiltonian and momentum of the free particle are presented. Using the discrete approximation, the equation of motion of a single particle, in scalar potential field, is obtained in a similar form to Schrödinger’s equation. The rest of the paper discusses the propagation, superposition of the wave-like dynamic variables and their connections to quantum mechanics. The superposition of the variables of a particle is generally distinct from the superposition of classical waves (e.g. acoustics). The quantum superposition provides a self-consistent interpretation of the wave-like solutions of the variables. Connections between the classical and quantum relations for corresponding variables are observed from the one-to-one comparisons.

  16. Comparison of mechanical and tribotechnical properties of UHMWPE reinforced with basalt fibers and particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, S. V.; Kornienko, L. A.; Alexenko, V. O.; Qitao, Huang; Ivanova, L. R.

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical and tribotechnical properties of UHMWPE composites reinforced with basalt fibers and particles under dry sliding friction and abrasion were investigated. It is shown that adding of the basalt particles provides higher wear resistance under the dry sliding friction while at abrasion filling by the basalt fibers is more efficient since the wear resistance of the reinforced UHMWPE composites is by 3.7 times higher in contrast with the neat polymer. Wear mechanisms of the polymeric UHMWPE composites under various types of wear are discussed.

  17. COMPARATIVE IN VITRO CARDIAC TOXICITY OF PRIMARY COMBUSTION PARTICLES: IDENTIFICATION OF CAUSAL CONSTITUENTS AND MECHANISMS OF INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of causal particle characteristics and mechanisms of injury would allow linkage of particulate air pollution adverse health effects to sources. Research has examined the direct cardiovascular effects of air pollution particle constituents since previous studies dem...

  18. Mechanisms of Increased Particle and VOC Emissions during DPF Active Regeneration and Practical Emissions Considering Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-07

    Mechanisms involved in increased particle and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions during active and parked active regenerations of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) were investigated using heavy-duty trucks equipped with both a urea selective catalytic reduction system and a DPF (SCR + DPF) and a DPF-only. Particle emissions increased in the later part of the regeneration period but the mechanisms were different above and below 23 nm. Particles above 23 nm were emitted due to the lower filtering efficiency of the DPF because of the decreasing amount of soot trapped during regeneration. Small particles below 23 nm were thought to be mainly sulfuric acid particles produced from SO2 trapped by the catalyst, being released and oxidized during regeneration. Contrary to the particle emissions, VOCs increased in the earlier part of the regeneration period. The mean molecular weights of the VOCs increased gradually as the regeneration proceeded. To evaluate "practical emissions" in which increased emissions during the regeneration were considered, a Regeneration Correction Factor (RCF), which is the average emission during one cycle of regeneration/emission in normal operation, was adopted. The RCFs of PM and VOCs were 1.1-1.5, and those of PNs were as high as 3-140, although they were estimated from a limited number of observations.

  19. Self-Propulsion Mechanism of Active Janus Particles in Near-Critical Binary Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samin, Sela; van Roij, René

    2015-10-01

    Gold-capped Janus particles immersed in a near-critical binary mixture can be propelled using illumination. We employ a nonisothermal diffuse interface approach to investigate the self-propulsion mechanism of a single colloid. We attribute the motion to body forces at the edges of a micronsized droplet that nucleates around the particle. Thus, the often-used concept of a surface velocity cannot account for the self-propulsion. The particle's swimming velocity is related to the droplet shape and size, which is determined by a so-called critical isotherm. Two distinct swimming regimes exist, depending on whether the droplet partially or completely covers the particle. Interestingly, the dependence of the swimming velocity on temperature is nonmonotonic in both regimes.

  20. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2009-11-24

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria.

  1. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-07-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface.

  2. Chemo-Mechanical Characteristics of Mud Formed from Environmental Dust Particles in Humid Ambient Air

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ghassan; Yilbas, B. S.; Said, Syed A. M.; Al-Aqeeli, N.; Matin, Asif

    2016-01-01

    Mud formed from environmental dust particles in humid ambient air significantly influences the performance of solar harvesting devices. This study examines the characterization of environmental dust particles and the chemo-mechanics of dry mud formed from dust particles. Analytical tools, including scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, particle sizing, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterize dry mud and dust particles. A micro/nano tribometer is used to measure the tangential force and friction coefficient while tensile tests are carried out to assess the binding forces of dry mud pellets. After dry mud is removed, mud residuals on the glass surface are examined and the optical transmittance of the glass is measured. Dust particles include alkaline compounds, which dissolve in water condensate and form a mud solution with high pH (pH = 7.5). The mud solution forms a thin liquid film at the interface of dust particles and surface. Crystals form as the mud solution dries, thus, increasing the adhesion work required to remove dry mud from the surface. Optical transmittance of the glass is reduced after dry mud is removed due to the dry mud residue on the surface. PMID:27445272

  3. Entropy increase in confined free expansions via molecular dynamics and smooth-particle applied mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Posch, H. A.

    1999-02-01

    The eventual entropy increase of an ideal gas undergoing free expansion, ΔS=k ln(Vfin/V0), requires a ``coarse-grained'' hydrodynamic description because Gibbs' fine-grained entropy is unchanged in such a process. Smooth particle applied mechanics (SPAM) is well suited to the simulation and study of such problems because the particles in SPAM simulations can be of any size, from microscopic to macroscopic. SPAM furnishes a natural interpolation, or bridge, linking microscopic molecular dynamics to macroscopic continuum mechanics. We analyze particle-based simulations of ideal-gas free expansions from both the microscopic and the macroscopic points of view, comparing several dynamical estimates for the time development of the system entropy. Most of the entropy increase occurs rapidly, within a single sound traversal time. A local comoving version of turbulent hydrodynamics provides the most useful viewpoint for describing flows of this kind.

  4. Cyclic Polyynes as Examples of the Quantum Mechanical Particle on a Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    Many quantum mechanical models are discussed as part of the undergraduate physical chemistry course to help students understand the connection between eigenvalue expressions and spectroscopy. Typical examples covered include the particle in a box, the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. This article demonstrates that…

  5. Simple One-Dimensional Quantum-Mechanical Model for a Particle Attached to a Surface

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Francisco M.

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple one-dimensional quantum-mechanical model for a particle attached to a surface. It leads to the Schrodinger equation for a harmonic oscillator bounded on one side that we solve in terms of Weber functions and discuss the behaviour of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. We derive the virial theorem and other exact relationships…

  6. SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SIGNALING MECHANISMS IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO CARBON ULTRAFINE PARTICLES
    Y.M. Kim, A.G. Lenz, R. Silbajoris, I. Jaspers and J.M. Samet. Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering and Center for Environmental Medicine, University of North Carolina, ...

  7. Interfacial wave theory for dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal. I - Local instability mechanism. II - Wave-emission mechanism at the turning point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun

    1989-01-01

    The complicated dendritic structure of a growing needle crystal is studied on the basis of global interfacial wave theory. The local dispersion relation for normal modes is derived in a paraboloidal coordinate system using the multiple-variable-expansion method. It is shown that the global solution in a dendrite growth process incorporates the morphological instability factor and the traveling wave factor.

  8. Crystal growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neville, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    One objective is to demonstrate the way crystals grow and how they affect the behavior of material. Another objective is to compare the growth of crystals in metals and nonmetals. The procedures, which involve a supersaturated solution of a salt that will separate into crystals on cooling and the pouring off of an eutectic solution to expose the crystals formed by a solid solution when an alloy of two metals forms a solid and eutectic solution on cooling, are described.

  9. The energy dissipative mechanisms of the particle-fiber interface in a textile composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Quinn Patrick

    Impact resistant fabrics comprised of woven high performance fibers (e.g., Kevlar) have exhibited improved energy dissipative capability with the inclusion of nano- to micrometer sized particles. Upon impact, the particles embed and gouge adjacent fiber surfaces. While the particle-fiber interactions appear to be a primary mechanism for the increase in energy dissipation, the fundamentals of the nano- to micrometer sized gouging response of high performance fibers and the dissipation of energy due to particle gouging have not been studied previously. In this research, nanoindentation and nanoscratching techniques, which exploit probe sizes in the range of nano- to micrometers, were used to study the particle-fiber contact and develop nanoscale structure-property relationships of single Kevlar fibers. Atomic force microscopy based methods were used to create high resolution stiffness maps of fiber cross-sections, the results of which indicated that the stiffness of Kevlar 49 fibers is independent of radial position, while Kevlar KM2 fibers exhibit a reduced stiffness "shell" region (up to ˜300-350 nm thick). Instrumented indentation was used to evaluate the local response of Kevlar fibers with respect to orientation and contact size. For radial indentation, modifications to the traditional indentation analysis were developed to account for fiber curvature and finite size effects. A critical contact size was established above which the fiber response was independent of indenter size. This "homogeneous" response was used to estimate the local material properties of the Kevlar fibers through the application of an analytical model for indentation of a transversely isotropic material. The local properties of both fibers differed from their previously measured bulk properties, which was likely due, at least in part, to the deformation mechanisms of the fiber microstructure during indentation. Nanoindentation and nanoscratch tests were then conducted to study the

  10. Effect of the mechanical activation on size reduction of crystalline acetaminophen drug particles

    PubMed Central

    Biazar, Esmaeil; Beitollahi, Ali; Rezayat, S Mehdi; Forati, Tahmineh; Asefnejad, Azadeh; Rahimi, Mehdi; Zeinali, Reza; Ardeshir, Mahmoud; Hatamjafari, Farhad; Sahebalzamani, Ali; Heidari, Majid

    2009-01-01

    The decrease in particle size may offer new properties to drugs. In this study, we investigated the size reduction influence of the acetaminophen (C8H9O2N) particles by mechanical activation using a dry ball mill. The activated samples with the average size of 1 μm were then investigated in different time periods with the infrared (IR), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The results of the IR and XRD images showed no change in the drug structure after the mechanical activation of all samples. With the peak height at full width at half maximum from XRD and the Scherrer equation, the size of the activated crystallite samples illustrated that the AFM images were in sound agreement with the Scherrer equation. According to the peaks of the AFM images, the average size of the particles in 30 hours of activation was 24 nm with a normal particle distribution. The ICP analysis demonstrated the presence of tungsten carbide particle impurities after activation from the powder sample impacting with the ball and jar. The greatest reduction in size was after milling for 30 hours. PMID:20054432

  11. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of mixtures of particles in contact with different thermostats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosberg, A. Y.; Joanny, J.-F.

    2015-09-01

    We introduce a novel type of locally driven systems made of two types of particles (or a polymer with two types of monomers) subject to a chaotic drive with approximately white noise spectrum, but different intensity; in other words, particles of different types are in contact with thermostats at different temperatures. We present complete systematic statistical mechanics treatment starting from first principles. Although we consider only corrections to the dilute limit due to pairwise collisions between particles, meaning we study a nonequilibrium analog of the second virial approximation, we find that the system exhibits a surprisingly rich behavior. In particular, pair correlation function of particles has an unusual quasi-Boltzmann structure governed by an effective temperature distinct from that of any of the two thermostats. We also show that at sufficiently strong drive the uniformly mixed system becomes unstable with respect to steady states consisting of phases enriched with different types of particles. In the second virial approximation, we define nonequilibrium "chemical potentials" whose gradients govern diffusion fluxes and a nonequilibrium "osmotic pressure," which governs the mechanical stability of the interface.

  12. Fast Simulation of Membrane Filtration by Combining Particle Retention Mechanisms and Network Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupp, Armin; Griffiths, Ian; Please, Colin

    2016-11-01

    Porous membranes are used for their particle retention capabilities in a wide range of industrial filtration processes. The underlying mechanisms for particle retention are complex and often change during the filtration process, making it hard to predict the change in permeability of the membrane during the process. Recently, stochastic network models have been shown to predict the change in permeability based on retention mechanisms, but remain computationally intensive. We show that the averaged behaviour of such a stochastic network model can efficiently be computed using a simple partial differential equation. Moreover, we also show that the geometric structure of the underlying membrane and particle-size distribution can be represented in our model, making it suitable for modelling particle retention in interconnected membranes as well. We conclude by demonstrating the particular application to microfluidic filtration, where the model can be used to efficiently compute a probability density for flux measurements based on the geometry of the pores and particles. A. U. K. is grateful for funding from Pall Corporation and the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford. I.M.G. gratefully acknowledges support from the Royal Society through a University Research Fellowship.

  13. Mechanisms governing the interaction of metallic particles with nanosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Demos, Stavros G; Negres, Raluca A; Raman, Rajesh N; Shen, Nan; Rubenchik, Alexander M; Matthews, Manyalibo J

    2016-04-04

    The interaction of nanosecond laser pulses at 1064- and 355-nm with micro-scale, nominally spherical metallic particles is investigated in order to elucidate the governing interaction mechanisms as a function of material and laser parameters. The experimental model used involves the irradiation of metal particles located on the surface of transparent plates combined with time-resolved imaging capable of capturing the dynamics of particle ejection, plume formation and expansion along with the kinetics of the dispersed material from the liquefied layer of the particle. The mechanisms investigated in this work are informative and relevant across a multitude of materials and irradiation geometries suitable for the description of a wide range of specific applications. The experimental results were interpreted using physical models incorporating specific processes to assess their contribution to the overall observed behaviors. Analysis of the experimental results suggests that the induced kinetic properties of the particle can be adequately described using the concept of momentum coupling introduced to explain the interaction of plane metal targets to large-aperture laser beams. The results also suggest that laser energy deposition on the formed plasma affects the energy partitioning and the material modifications to the substrate.

  14. Turbulent particle transport in streams: can exponential settling be reconciled with fluid mechanics?

    PubMed

    McNair, James N; Newbold, J Denis

    2012-05-07

    Most ecological studies of particle transport in streams that focus on fine particulate organic matter or benthic invertebrates use the Exponential Settling Model (ESM) to characterize the longitudinal pattern of particle settling on the bed. The ESM predicts that if particles are released into a stream, the proportion that have not yet settled will decline exponentially with transport time or distance and will be independent of the release elevation above the bed. To date, no credible basis in fluid mechanics has been established for this model, nor has it been rigorously tested against more-mechanistic alternative models. One alternative is the Local Exchange Model (LEM), which is a stochastic advection-diffusion model that includes both longitudinal and vertical spatial dimensions and is based on classical fluid mechanics. The LEM predicts that particle settling will be non-exponential in the near field but will become exponential in the far field, providing a new theoretical justification for far-field exponential settling that is based on plausible fluid mechanics. We review properties of the ESM and LEM and compare these with available empirical evidence. Most evidence supports the prediction of both models that settling will be exponential in the far field but contradicts the ESM's prediction that a single exponential distribution will hold for all transport times and distances.

  15. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of < or = 5 microm, with virtually identical size distribution) birch or oak dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  16. Semiclassical modeling of quantum-mechanical multiparticle systems using parallel particle-in-cell methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauger, Dean Edward

    2001-08-01

    We are successful in building a code that models many particle dynamic quantum systems by combining a semiclassical approximation of Feynman path integrals with parallel computing techniques (particle-in-cell) and numerical methods developed for simulating plasmas, establishing this approach as a viable technique for multiparticle time-dependent quantum mechanics. Run on high-performance parallel computers, this code applies semiclassical methods to simulate the time evolution of wavefunctions of many particles. We describe the analytical derivation and computational implementation of these techniques in detail. We present a study to thoroughly demonstrate the code's fidelity to quantum mechanics, resulting in innovative visualization and analysis techniques. We introduce and exhibit a method to address fermion particle statistics. We present studies of two quantum-mechanical problems: a two-electron, one- dimensional atom, resulting in high-quality extractions of one- and two-electron eigenstates, and electrostatic quasi-modes due to quantum effects in a hot electron plasma, relevant for predictions about stellar evolution. We supply discussions of alternative derivations, alternative implementations of the derivations, and an exploration of their consequences. Source code is shown throughout this dissertation. Finally, we present an extensive discussion of applications and extrapolations of this work, with suggestions for future direction.

  17. Particle scale modeling of material removal and surface roughness in chemical mechanical polishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeruva, Suresh Babu

    2005-11-01

    Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is widely adopted in producing excellent local and global planarization of microelectronic devices. It has been demonstrated experimentally that the polishing performance is a result of the synergistic effect of both the chemicals and the particles involved in CMP. However, the fundamental mechanisms of material removal and the interactions of the chemical and mechanical effects are not well understood. A comprehensive model for CMP was developed taking into account both the chemical and mechanical effects for slurries with a given particle size distribution. The model developed (PERC II) is based on a previously developed model (PERC I). The chemical aspect is attributed to the chemical modification of the surface layer due to slurry chemistry, whereas the mechanical aspect is incorporated by indentation of particles into the modified layer and the substrate depending on the operating conditions. In this study, the effects of particle size and pad asperity distributions are included in the model. The contact area of pad with wafer was measured in dry and wet conditions in different pH solutions using optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy respectively. Pad surface mechanical properties in dry and wet states were also investigated using atomic force microscopy. The contact area results obtained were utilized in modeling to estimate the pad modulus leading to pad-wafer contact stress distribution. The predictions of the model show a reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The model is validated for oxide and metal CMP systems. The PERC II model not only predicts the overall removal rate, but also the surface roughness of the polished wafer in selected systems. The developed model can be used to optimize the current CMP systems and provide insights into future CMP endeavors.

  18. Impact of controlled particle size nanofillers on the mechanical properties of segmented polyurethane nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Finnigan, Bradley; Casey, Phil; Cookson, David; Halley, Peter; Jack, Kevin; Truss, Rowan; Martin, Darren

    2008-04-02

    The impact of average layered silicate particle size on the mechanical properties of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites has been investigated. At fixed addition levels (3 wt% organosilicate), an increase in average particle size resulted in an increase in stiffness. Negligible stiffening was observed for the smallest particles (30 nm) due to reduced long-range intercalation and molecular confinement, as well as ineffective stress transfer from matrix to filler. At low strain ({le}100%), an increase in filler particle size was associated with an increase in the rate of stress relaxation, tensile hysteresis, and permanent set. At high strain (1200%), two coexisting relaxation processes were observed. The rate of the slower (long-term) relaxation process, which is believed to primarily involve the hard segment rich structures, decreased on addition of particles with an average diameter of 200 nm or less. At high strain the tensile hysteresis was less sensitive to particle size, however the addition of particles with an average size of 200 nm or more caused a significant increase in permanent set. This was attributed to slippage of temporary bonds at the polymer-filler interface, and to the formation of voids at the sites of unaligned tactoids. Relative to the host TPU, the addition of particles with an average size of 30 nm caused a reduction in permanent set. This is a significant result because the addition of fillers to elastomers has long been associated with an increase in hysteresis and permanent set. At high strain, well dispersed and aligned layered silicates with relatively small interparticle distances and favourable surface interactions are capable of imparting a resistance to molecular slippage throughout the TPU matrix.

  19. A CFD study of the deep bed filtration mechanism for submicron/nano-particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Tung, K L; Chang, Y L; Lai, J Y; Chang, C H; Chuang, C J

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of the deep bed filtration for submicron and nano particles suspension was conducted by means of a force analysis on the suspended particles flow path through order-packed granular filter beds. The flow fields through the filter beds were calculated by using the commercial available CFD software--Fluent. Various types of granular packing structures, such as the simple cubic packing, body-centered packing and face-centered packing structures were chosen for analysis. The motion of suspended particle of 2.967, 0.816, 0.460 and 0.050 microm in diameter, respectively, were tracked by considering the following forces including a net gravitational force, hydraulic drag force, lift force, Brownian force, van der Waals force and a double layer force. The effects of the granular bed packing structure, the porosity of these beds and the suspended particle diameter on the capture efficiency of a granular filter bed were examined. The force analysis depicts that the inertial effect and van der Waals force increased the capture probability of particles on the granular filter bed while the lift force and the Brownian force decreased the particle deposition. Simulated results show that among the chosen packing structures, the face-center packed granular bed gives the greatest pressure drop and capture efficiency of particles due to the lower packing porosity. The simple cubic packed filter bed showed the lowest pressure drop and capture efficiency of particles due to the greatest packing porosity among the chosen packing structures. It is mainly due to the simple cubic packing structure in which there exists the free vertical downward flowing path and thus exhibits a higher packing porosity. The comparisons of the simulated capture efficiency with experimental results depicted that the body-centre packed granular bed showed the best approximation of capture efficiency compared to that of the randomly packed granular bed.

  20. By Different Cellular Mechanisms, Lymphatic Vessels Sprout by Endothelial Cell Recruitment Whereas Blood Vessels Grow by Vascular Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; McKay, Terri L.; Leontiev, Dmitry; Condrich, Terence K.; DiCorleto, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    The development of effective vascular therapies requires the understanding of all modes of vessel formation contributing to vasculogenesis, angiogenesis (here termed hemangiogenesis) and lymphangiogenesis. We show that lymphangiogenesis proceeds by blind-ended vessel sprouting via recruitment of isolated endothelial progenitor cells to the tips of growing vessels, whereas hemangiogenesis occurs by non-sprouting vessel expansion from the capillary network, during middevelopment in the quail chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). Blood vessels expanded out of capillaries that displayed transient expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (alphaSMA), accompanied by mural recruitment of migratory progenitor cells expressing SMA. Lymphatics and blood vessels were identified by confocal/fluorescence microscopy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, alphaSMA (expressed on CAM blood vessels but not on lymphatics), homeobox transcription factor Prox-1 (specific to CAM lymphatic endothelium), and the quail hematopoetic/vascular marker, QH-1. Expression of VEGFR-1 was highly restricted to blood vessels (primarily capillaries). VEGFR-2 was expressed intensely in isolated hematopoietic cells, lymphatic vessels and moderately in blood vessels. Prox-1 was absent from endothelial progenitor cells prior to lymphatic recruitment. Although vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(sub 165)) is a key regulator of numerous cellular processes in hemangiogenesis and vasculogenesis, the role of VEGF(sub 165) in lymphangiogenesis is less clear. Exogenous VEGF(sub 165) increased blood vessel density without changing endogenous modes of vascular/lymphatic vessel formation or marker expression patterns. However, VEGF(sub 165) did increase the frequency of blood vascular anastomoses and strongly induced the antimaturational dissociation of lymphatics from blood vessels, with frequent formation of homogeneous lymphatic networks.

  1. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO coated particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    I J van Rooyen; J H Neethling; J A A Engelbrecht; P M van Rooyen; G Strydom

    2012-10-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  2. Effect of the particle interactions on the structuration and mechanical strength of particulate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibrant, A. L. R.; Pauchard, L.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of the particles interaction on the mechanical strength of particulate materials. Starting from a dispersion of charged particles, the interparticle force can be modulated by the addition of ionic species. The structuration of the medium is then governed by the competition between drying and gelation processes. Rheological measurements show that addition of ionic species boosts the aggregation dynamics into a solid state and changes the structural properties of the final material. This last point is highlighted by precise measurements of i) the mechanical properties of particulate materials through crack pattern quantification, supported by indentation testing, and ii) the permeation properties during the drying process in a controlled geometry. In particular, these results show a decrease of the drained elastic modulus and an increase in the pore size when the ionic species content in the particulate material is increased. Hence, we show that the solid structure behaves mechanically as a network whose pore size increases when the electrostatic repulsion between particles is decreased. These results are consistent with the fact that the way particulate materials are structured determines their mechanical properties.

  3. Silver (Ag) Transport Mechanisms in TRISO Coated Particles: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    IJ van Rooyen; ML Dunzik-Gougar; PM van Rooyen

    2014-05-01

    Transport of 110mAg in the intact SiC layer of TRISO coated particles has been studied for approximately 30 years without arriving at a satisfactory explanation of the transport mechanism. In this paper the possible mechanisms postulated in previous experimental studies, both in-reactor and out-of reactor research environment studies are critically reviewed and of particular interest are relevance to very high temperature gas reactor operating and accident conditions. Among the factors thought to influence Ag transport are grain boundary stoichiometry, SiC grain size and shape, the presence of free silicon, nano-cracks, thermal decomposition, palladium attack, transmutation products, layer thinning and coated particle shape. Additionally new insight to nature and location of fission products has been gained via recent post irradiation electron microscopy examination of TRISO coated particles from the DOE’s fuel development program. The combined effect of critical review and new analyses indicates a direction for investigating possible the Ag transport mechanism including the confidence level with which these mechanisms may be experimentally verified.

  4. Particle in a box in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics and an electromagnetic analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasarathy, Anirudh; Isaacson, Joshua P.; Jones-Smith, Katherine; Tabachnik, Jason; Mathur, Harsh

    2013-06-01

    In PT-symmetric quantum mechanics a fundamental principle of quantum mechanics, that the Hamiltonian must be Hermitian, is replaced by another set of requirements, including notably symmetry under PT, where P denotes parity and T denotes time reversal. Here we study the role of boundary conditions in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics by constructing a simple model that is the PT-symmetric analog of a particle in a box. The model has the usual particle-in-a-box Hamiltonian but boundary conditions that respect PT symmetry rather than Hermiticity. We find that for a broad class of PT-symmetric boundary conditions the model respects the condition of unbroken PT symmetry, namely, that the Hamiltonian and the symmetry operator PT have simultaneous eigenfunctions, implying that the energy eigenvalues are real. We also find that the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint under the PT-symmetric inner product. Thus we obtain a simple soluble model that fulfills all the requirements of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics. In the second part of this paper we formulate a variational principle for PT-symmetric quantum mechanics that is the analog of the textbook Rayleigh-Ritz principle. Finally we consider electromagnetic analogs of the PT-symmetric particle in a box. We show that the isolated particle in a box may be realized as a Fabry-Perot cavity between an absorbing medium and its conjugate gain medium. Coupling the cavity to an external continuum of incoming and outgoing states turns the energy levels of the box into sharp resonances. Remarkably we find that the resonances have a Breit-Wigner line shape in transmission and a Fano line shape in reflection; by contrast, in the corresponding Hermitian case the line shapes always have a Breit-Wigner form in both transmission and reflection.

  5. Wave-Particle Interactions As a Driving Mechanism for the Solar Wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Our research has been focusing on a highly experimentally relevant issue: intermittency of the fluctuating fields in outflowing plasmas. We have contributed to both the theoretical and experimental research of the topic. In particular, we have developed a theoretical model and data analyzing programs to examine the issue of intermittency in space plasma outflows, including the solar wind. As fluctuating electric fields in the solar wind are likely to provide a heating and acceleration mechanism for the ions, our studies of the intermittency in turbulence in space plasma outflows help us toward achieving the goal of comparing major physical mechanisms that contribute to the driving of the fast solar wind. Our new theoretical model extends the utilities of our global hybrid model, which has allowed us to follow the kinetic evolution of the particle distributions along an inhomogeneous field line while the particles are subjected to various physical mechanisms. The physical effects that were considered in the global hybrid model included wave-particle interactions, an ambipolar electric field that was consistent with the particle distributions themselves, and Coulomb collisions. With an earlier version of the global hybrid model, we examined the overall impact on the solar wind flow due to the combination of these physical effects. In particular, we studied the combined effects of two major mechanisms that had been proposed as the drivers of the fast solar wind: (1) velocity filtration effect due to suprathermal electrons; (2) ion cyclotron resonance. Since the approval of this research grant, we have updated the model such that the effects due to these two driving mechanisms can be examined separately, thereby allowing us to compare their contributions to the acceleration of the solar wind. In the next section, we shall demonstrate that the velocity filtration effect is rather insignificant in comparison with that due to ion cyclotron resonance.

  6. Mechanical elasticity as a physical signature of conformational dynamics in a virus particle

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrasco, Carolina; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Gómez-Herrero, Julio; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2012-01-01

    In this study we test the hypothesis that mechanically elastic regions in a virus particle (or large biomolecular complex) must coincide with conformationally dynamic regions, because both properties are intrinsically correlated. Hypothesis-derived predictions were subjected to verification by using 19 variants of the minute virus of mice capsid. The structural modifications in these variants reduced, preserved, or restored the conformational dynamism of regions surrounding capsid pores that are involved in molecular translocation events required for virus infectivity. The mechanical elasticity of the modified capsids was analyzed by atomic force microscopy, and the results corroborated every prediction tested: Any mutation (or chemical cross-linking) that impaired a conformational rearrangement of the pore regions increased their mechanical stiffness. On the contrary, any mutation that preserved the dynamics of the pore regions also preserved their elasticity. Moreover, any pseudo-reversion that restored the dynamics of the pore regions (lost through previous mutation) also restored their elasticity. Finally, no correlation was observed between dynamics of the pore regions and mechanical elasticity of other capsid regions. This study (i) corroborates the hypothesis that local mechanical elasticity and conformational dynamics in a viral particle are intrinsically correlated; (ii) proposes that determination by atomic force microscopy of local mechanical elasticity, combined with mutational analysis, may be used to identify and study conformationally dynamic regions in virus particles and large biomolecular complexes; (iii) supports a connection between mechanical properties and biological function in a virus; (iv) shows that viral capsids can be greatly stiffened by protein engineering for nanotechnological applications. PMID:22797893

  7. Pre-activation of ice nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Kiselev, A.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Steinke, I.

    2015-10-01

    In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Already fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270-271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice subsaturated conditions. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  8. Pre-activation of ice-nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert; Kiselev, Alexei; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Steinke, Isabelle

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270-271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice-subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice-subsaturated conditions. This range is set by a combination of requirements from the negative Kelvin effect for condensation and a critical size of ice embryos for ice nucleation and melting. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  9. A micromanipulation particle tester for agglomeration contact mechanism studies in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, C. I.; Althaus, T.; Niederreiter, G.; Hounslow, M. J.; Palzer, S.; Salman, A. D.

    2012-10-01

    Pressure agglomeration of powders is widely applied in various industries and an increasing interest lies in the identification and description of contact mechanisms between particles, which are responsible for the compaction product properties. In this paper, the design and development of a novel micromanipulation particle tester (MPT) is presented. This device makes it possible to measure the deformation kinetics and resulting adhesion of two individual particles in contact under load, which are strongly influenced by the applied process conditions. The MPT set-up is, therefore, designed to offer a unique control over the process conditions most relevant to the compaction of powders: external stress, dwell or holding time at constant deformation, compression velocity as well as relative humidity and temperature determining the physical state and mechanical characteristics of hygrosensitive amorphous particles. The latter are often part of powder formulations, e.g. in the food industry, and have been used for force and contact-zone development studies with the MPT. The experimental results on the microscale level will deliver valuable quantitative information for an improved tailoring of pressure agglomeration process conditions of bulk solids.

  10. Mechanochemical mechanism for reaction of aluminium nano- and micrometre-scale particles.

    PubMed

    Levitas, Valery I

    2013-11-28

    A recently suggested melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM) for fast reaction of aluminium (Al) nano- and a few micrometre-scale particles during fast heating is reviewed. Volume expansion of 6% during Al melting produces pressure of several GPa in a core and tensile hoop stresses of 10 GPa in an oxide shell. Such stresses cause dynamic fracture and spallation of the shell. After spallation, an unloading wave propagates to the centre of the particle and creates a tensile pressure of 3-8 GPa. Such a tensile pressure exceeds the cavitation strength of liquid Al and disperses the melt into small, bare clusters (fragments) that fly at a high velocity. Reaction of the clusters is not limited by diffusion through a pre-existing oxide shell. Some theoretical and experimental results related to the MDM are presented. Various theoretical predictions based on the MDM are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments, which resolves some basic puzzles in combustion of Al particles. Methods to control and improve reactivity of Al particles are formulated, which are exactly opposite to the current trends based on diffusion mechanism. Some of these suggestions have experimental confirmation.

  11. Mechanism of Methylene Blue adsorption on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube particles.

    PubMed

    Manilo, Maryna; Lebovka, Nikolai; Barany, Sandor

    2016-04-01

    The kinetics of adsorption and parameters of equilibrium adsorption of Methylene Blue (MB) on hybrid laponite-multi-walled carbon nanotube (NT) particles in aqueous suspensions were determined. The laponite platelets were used in order to facilitate disaggregation of NTs in aqueous suspensions and enhance the adsorption capacity of hybrid particles for MB. Experiments were performed at room temperature (298 K), and the laponite/NT ratio (Xl) was varied in the range of 0-0.5. For elucidation of the mechanism of MB adsorption on hybrid particles, the electrical conductivity of the system as well as the electrokinetic potential of laponite-NT hybrid particles were measured. Three different stages in the kinetics of adsorption of MB on the surface of NTs or hybrid laponite-NT particles were discovered to be a fast initial stage I (adsorption time t=0-10 min), a slower intermediate stage II (up to t=120 min) and a long-lasting final stage III (up to t=24hr). The presence of these stages was explained accounting for different types of interactions between MB and adsorbent particles, as well as for the changes in the structure of aggregates of NT particles and the long-range processes of restructuring of laponite platelets on the surface of NTs. The analysis of experimental data on specific surface area versus the value of Xl evidenced in favor of the model with linear contacts between rigid laponite platelets and NTs. It was also concluded that electrostatic interactions control the first stage of adsorption at low MB concentrations.

  12. The Mechanism of Computed Tomography-Guided 125I Particle in Treating Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianzhong; Ma, Shaozeng; Yang, Guanghua; Wang, Lisen; Hou, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of malignant tumor has gradually increased. How to improve the survival and quality of life of patients who lose the opportunity for surgery or who are unwilling to receive surgery remains an obstacle. At present, 125I particle interstitial implant therapy has been applied in a variety of treatments of tumors. However, the mechanism of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I particle therapy in lung cancer has not been fully elucidated. Material/Methods A total of 42 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed between January 2013 and December 2013, including 19 patients who received CT-guided 125I particle therapy and 23 patients who received chemotherapy. Curative effect and adverse reactions at 6 months and 12 months were compared and analyzed. A rabbit lung cancer VX2 model was treated by 125I particle implantation therapy under CT guidance. The change in tumor volume was detected. Tumor cell apoptosis was tested by flow cytometry. Bcl-2 and Bax expression were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blot. Results 125I particle therapy obviously reduced tumor volume after 6 months and 12 months. It showed significantly higher efficiency (57.9%, 57.9%) and control (78.9%, 73.7%) than the rates of efficiency and control in the chemotherapy group (P<0.05). 125I particle implantation therapy markedly suppressed rabbit VX2 transplanted tumor cell proliferation, promoted tumor regression, induced tumor cell apoptosis, reduced Bcl-2 expression, and upregulated Bax expression level (P<0.05). Conclusions CT-guided 125I particle implantation therapy can inhibit tumor proliferation and growth by regulating the expression of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, which is a promising approach in lung cancer treatment. PMID:28095393

  13. Mechanics of semiflexible chains formed by poly(ethylene glycol)-linked paramagnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Sibani Lisa; Gast, Alice P

    2003-08-01

    Magnetorheological particles, permanently linked into chains, provide a magnetically actuated means to manipulate microscopic fluid flow. Paramagnetic colloidal particles form reversible chains by acquiring dipole moments in the presence of an external magnetic field. By chemically connecting paramagnetic colloidal particles, flexible magnetoresponsive chains can be created. We link the paramagnetic microspheres using streptavidin-biotin binding. Streptavidin coated microspheres are placed in a flow cell and a magnetic field is applied, causing the particles to form chains. Then a solution of polymeric linkers of bis-biotin-poly(ethylene glycol) molecules is added in the presence of the field. These linked chains remain responsive to a magnetic field; however, in the absence of an external magnetic field these chains bend and flex due to thermal motion. The chain flexibility is determined by the length of the spacer molecule between particles and is quantified by the flexural rigidity or bending stiffness. To understand the mechanical properties of the chains, we use a variety of optical trapping experiments to measure the flexural rigidity. Increasing the length of the poly(ethylene glycol) chain in the linker increases the flexibility of the chains.

  14. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers.

  15. Structure and biodegradation mechanism of milled B.mori silk particles

    PubMed Central

    Rajkhowa, Rangam; Hu, Xiao; Tsuzuki, Takuya; Kaplan, David L; Wang, Xungai

    2013-01-01

    Silk particles with a volume median d(0.5) of about 6 μm were prepared using a chemical free and efficient wet milling-spray drying process. Milling reduced the intermolecular stacking forces within the β-sheet crystallites without changing the intramolecular binding energy of the β-sheets. The rough morphology and the ultrafine size of the particles were responsible for significant surface modulated protease XIV degradation, about a three-fold increase compared to silk fibres. Fracture of brittle and porous enzyme hydrolysed particles produced a 72% fall in d(0.5) within the in-vitro experimental conditions. Of note, upon biodegradation, the thermal degradation temperature of silk increased, which was attributed to the formation of tight aggregates by the hydrolysed residual fibroin macromolecules. A model of the biodegradation mechanism of silk particles was developed based on these data. The model explains the process of disintegration of β-sheets within the microstructure, supported by quantitative secondary structural analysis and microscopic images. This study is useful to engineer silk particles for targeted biomedical applications and also in understating structural remodeling of debris if generated from silk-based implants. PMID:22746375

  16. Exocytosis of Alphaherpesvirus Virions, Light Particles, and Glycoproteins Uses Constitutive Secretory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Ian B.; Scherer, Julian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many molecular and cell biological details of the alphaherpesvirus assembly and egress pathway remain unclear. Recently we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy assay of pseudorabies virus (PRV) exocytosis, based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a virus-encoded pH-sensitive fluorescent probe. Here, we use this assay to distinguish three classes of viral exocytosis in a nonpolarized cell type: (i) trafficking of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane, (ii) exocytosis of viral light particles, and (iii) exocytosis of virions. We find that viral glycoproteins traffic to the cell surface in association with constitutive secretory Rab GTPases and exhibit free diffusion into the plasma membrane after exocytosis. Similarly, both virions and light particles use these same constitutive secretory mechanisms for egress from infected cells. Furthermore, we show that viral light particles are distinct from cellular exosomes. Together, these observations shed light on viral glycoprotein trafficking steps that precede virus particle assembly and reinforce the idea that virions and light particles share a biogenesis and trafficking pathway. PMID:27273828

  17. Mechanism for uptake of silica particles by monocytic U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Hetland, G; Namork, E; Schwarze, P E; Aase, A

    2000-07-01

    We examined the mechanism for uptake by monocytic cells of particles found in the atmosphere of some industrial work places. As a model system, irregular crystalline silica particles (SPs), sphere-like cryptocrystalline microsilica particles (MPs) and carbon particles (CPs) were exposed to pro-monocytic U937 cells. Plasma-treated SP and MP, but not CP, activated the alternative complement pathway, but bound little C3b. However, all particles adsorbed serum IgG, IgA and IgM unspecifically. Phenotyping of U937 cells for complement receptors (CRs) and Fcgamma receptors (FcgammaRs) showed that interferon gamma (INFgamma) increased expression of FcgammaRI, CR3 (CD11b/CD18) and CR4 (CD11c/CD18) and that phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) increased expression of CR4. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated higher phagocytosis of plasma-treated SP than native SP by both PMA- and INFgamma-stimulated, but not unstimulated, cells. MP and CP could not be distinguished from cellular structures. Inhibition experiments in SEM revealed uptake of heparin-plasma-treated SP via FcgammaRI on INFgamma-stimulated U937 cells, but could not exclude possible participation of CR3. The results indicate that plasma-treated SPs bind Ig and are internalized by differentiated monocytic cells via FcgammaRI, which is known to trigger cellular production of toxic oxygen species that may induce pulmonary inflammation in vivo.

  18. Size-dependent mechanical behavior of nanoscale polymer particles through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junhua; Nagao, Shijo; Odegard, Gregory M; Zhang, Zhiliang; Kristiansen, Helge; He, Jianying

    2013-12-21

    Anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACAs) are promising materials used for producing ultra-thin liquid-crystal displays. Because the mechanical response of polymer particles can have a significant impact in the performance of ACAs, understanding of this apparent size effect is of fundamental importance in the electronics industry. The objective of this research is to use a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to verify and gain physical insight into the observed size dependence effect in polymer particles. In agreement with experimental studies, the results of this study clearly indicate that there is a strong size effect in spherical polymer particles with diameters approaching the nanometer length scale. The results of the simulations also clearly indicate that the source for the increases in modulus is the increase in relative surface energy for decreasing particle sizes. Finally, the actual contact conditions at the surface of the polymer nanoparticles are shown to be similar to those predicted using Hertz and perfectly plastic contact theory. As ACA thicknesses are reduced in response to reductions in polymer particle size, it is expected that the overall compressive stiffness of the ACA will increase, thus influencing the manufacturing process.

  19. Size-dependent mechanical behavior of nanoscale polymer particles through coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Anisotropic conductive adhesives (ACAs) are promising materials used for producing ultra-thin liquid-crystal displays. Because the mechanical response of polymer particles can have a significant impact in the performance of ACAs, understanding of this apparent size effect is of fundamental importance in the electronics industry. The objective of this research is to use a coarse-grained molecular dynamics model to verify and gain physical insight into the observed size dependence effect in polymer particles. In agreement with experimental studies, the results of this study clearly indicate that there is a strong size effect in spherical polymer particles with diameters approaching the nanometer length scale. The results of the simulations also clearly indicate that the source for the increases in modulus is the increase in relative surface energy for decreasing particle sizes. Finally, the actual contact conditions at the surface of the polymer nanoparticles are shown to be similar to those predicted using Hertz and perfectly plastic contact theory. As ACA thicknesses are reduced in response to reductions in polymer particle size, it is expected that the overall compressive stiffness of the ACA will increase, thus influencing the manufacturing process. PMID:24359191

  20. Selecting the swimming mechanisms of colloidal particles: bubble propulsion versus self-diffusiophoresis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sijia; Wu, Ning

    2014-04-01

    Bubble propulsion and self-diffusiophoresis are two common mechanisms that can drive autonomous motion of microparticles in hydrogen peroxide. Although microtubular particles, when coated with platinum in their interior concave surfaces, can propel due to the formation and release of bubbles from one end, the convex Janus particles usually do not generate any visible bubble. They move primarily due to the self-diffusiophoresis. Coincidentally, the platinum films on those particles were typically coated by physical evaporation. In this paper, we use a simple chemical deposition method to make platinum-polystyrene Janus dimers. Surprisingly, those particles are propelled by periodic growth and collapse of bubbles on the platinum-coated lobes. We find that both high catalytic activity and rough surface are necessary to change the propulsion mode from self-diffusiophoresis to bubble propulsion. Our Janus dimers, with combined geometric and interfacial anisotropy, also exhibit distinctive motions at the respective stages of bubble growth and collapse, which differ by 5-6 orders of magnitude in time. Our study not only provides insight into the link between self-diffusiophoresis and bubble propulsion but also reveals the intriguing impacts of the combined geometric and interfacial anisotropy on self-propulsion of particles.

  1. Self-organized magnetic particles to tune the mechanical behavior of a granular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Meredith; Wang, Dong; Barés, Jonathan; Behringer, Robert P.

    2016-09-01

    Above a certain density a granular material jams. This property can be controlled by either tuning a global property, such as the packing fraction or by applying shear strain, or at the micro-scale by tuning grain shape, inter-particle friction or externally controlled organization. Here, we introduce a novel way to change a local granular property by adding a weak anisotropic magnetic interaction between particles. We measure the evolution of the pressure, P, and coordination number, Z, for a packing of 2D photo-elastic disks, subject to uniaxial compression. A fraction R m of the particles have embedded cuboidal magnets. The strength of the magnetic interactions between particles is too weak to have a strong direct effect on P or Z when the system is jammed. However, the magnetic interactions play an important role in the evolution of latent force networks when systems containing a large enough fraction of the particles with magnets are driven through unjammed to jammed states. In this case, a statistically stable network of magnetic chains self-organizes before jamming and overlaps with force chains once jamming occurs, strengthening the granular medium. This property opens a novel way to control mechanical properties of granular materials.

  2. Effect of Thermal Treatment of Fast Growing Wood Fibers on Physical and Mechanical Properties of Light Medium Density Fiberboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarusombuti, Songklod; Ayrilmis, Nadir; Fueangvivat, Vallayuth; Bauchongkol, Piyawade

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated physical and mechanical properties of the light medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels made from thermally treated wood fibers of eucalyptus camaldulensis at three different temperatures (393 K, 423 K or 453 K) for 30 or 60 min in a laboratory autoclave. The average thickness swelling of the panels decreased by 16-54% depending on the treatment temperature and time. However, the modulus of rupture, modulus of elasticity, and internal bond strength decreased by 16-37%, 9-25% and 10-39%, respectively. Based on the findings obtained from the present study, it may be said that wood fibers of E. camaldulensis treated at 453 K - 30 min can be used in the light MDF manufacture for use in humid conditions, such as kitchen and bathroom furniture requiring improved dimensional stability.

  3. Mechanism of self-propulsion in 3D-printed active granular particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, N.; Gnoli, A.; Maggi, C.; Puglisi, A.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2016-11-01

    Active granular particles can harness unbiased mechanical vibrations in the environment to generate directed motion. We provide a theoretical framework that connects the geometrical shape of a three dimensional object to its self-propulsion characteristics over a vertically vibrated plate. We find that a maximally efficient propulsion is achieved for structures having tilted flexible legs forming a characteristic angle with the vertical. Our predictions are verified by experimental observations on a class of 3D printed structures with smoothly varying geometrical features.

  4. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-01

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S-1 (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time Tgt(s) via growth rate v (m s-1): V×S-1 = vgr×Tr. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ρ (kg/m3), minimum and maximum doubling time Tdt (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program `Statistics' is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S-1 = 4.46ṡ10-11×Tdt was found, where vgr = 4.46×10-11 m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate vgr satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×vgr>h/2π and Tdt×M×vgr2>h/2π are valid, where h= 6.626×10-34 Jṡs is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

  5. Scaling of volume to surface ratio and doubling time in growing unicellular organisms: Do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasov, Atanas Todorov

    2014-10-06

    The scaling of physical and biological characteristics of the living organisms is a basic method for searching of new biophysical laws. In series of previous studies the author showed that in Poikilotherms, Mammals and Aves, the volume to surface ratio V×S{sup −1} (m) of organisms is proportional to their generation time T{sub gt}(s) via growth rate v (m s{sup −1}): V×S{sup −1} = v{sub gr}×T{sup r}. The power and the correlation coefficients are near to 1.0. Aim of this study is: i) to prove with experimental data the validity of the above equation for Unicellular organisms and ii) to show that perhaps, the cells are quantum-mechanical systems. The data for body mass M (kg), density ρ (kg/m{sup 3}), minimum and maximum doubling time T{sub dt} (s) for 50 unicellular organisms are assembled from scientific sources, and the computer program ‘Statistics’ is used for calculations. In result i) the analytical relationship from type: V×S{sup −1} = 4.46⋅10{sup −11}×T{sub dt} was found, where v{sub gr} = 4.46×10{sup −11} m/s and ii) it is shown that the products between cell mass M, cell length expressed by V/S ratio and growth rate v{sub gr} satisfied the Heisenberg uncertainty principle i.e. the inequalities V/S×M×v{sub gr}>h/2π and T{sub dt}×M×v{sub gr}{sup 2}>h/2π are valid, where h= 6.626×10{sup −34} J⋅s is the Planck constant. This rise the question: do cells appear quantum-mechanical systems?.

  6. Control mechanisms of soil particle size on the quality of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coplin, A.; Faiia, A. M.; Aho, K.; Kelson, S.; Virginia, R. A.; Xu, X.; Feng, X.

    2009-12-01

    The quality of soil organic matter (SOM), which measures the resistance of SOM to biological degradation, is an important factor controlling soil turnover rates and soil carbon sequestration. The main goals of this study were to evaluate how soil particle size affects the quality of SOM, the mechanism responsible for the relationship between particle size and SOM quality, and the potential impact of the relationship on carbon dynamics and sequestration. We used stable C and N isotopic ratios (δ13C and δ15N) to measure the relative quality of nine physically separated particle size fractions from soil collected in Hanover, NH, Suffolk County, Long Island, NY and the northeastern coast of Newfoundland mainland province (formerly Labrador), Canada. Radiocarbon dating, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imagery and X-ray microanalysis were used to investigate the mechanism of the observed quality-particle size relationship. At a given depth, Hanover soil yielded a strong nonlinear relationship between δ13C or δ15N and particle size, where low isotopic ratios were associated with large and small size fractions, while relatively high ratios with intermediate particles. When combined with the radiocarbon results, it shows that clay particle fractions contain high quality SOM that is disproportional to the radiocarbon age. This result suggests that SOM associated with clay-sized particles are physically protected from microbial decomposition, such that stable isotope ratios cease to change after aggregation while C-14 continues to decay. Both XRD and SEM studies confirmed the role of clay minerals (particularly vermiculite) for mineral protection of SOM. We explain the nonlinear relationship between δ13C or δ15N and particle size to be a result of the competing processes that cause reducing particle size of SOM with increasing the degree of degradation, and increasing mineral protection by aggregate structures with decreasing particle size

  7. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r , the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O (1 ) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014), 10.1088/1367-2630/16/5/055013]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009), 10.1063/1.3257638]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and

  8. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the

  9. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Bragg, Andrew D.; Ireland, Peter J.; Collins, Lance R.

    2015-08-27

    In this study, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str <<1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1)more » this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the “sweep-stick” mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str<<1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov and use this, together with the results from our analysis, to predict the analytic form of the RDF in the

  10. Mechanisms for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Andrew D; Ireland, Peter J; Collins, Lance R

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence. We analyze the exact, but unclosed, equation governing the radial distribution function (RDF) and compare the mechanisms it describes for clustering in the dissipation and inertial ranges. We demonstrate that in the limit Str≪1, where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover time scale at separation r, the clustering in the inertial range can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained fluid velocity gradient tensor at that scale. When Str≳O(1) this mechanism gives way to a nonlocal clustering mechanism. These findings reveal that the clustering mechanisms in the inertial range are analogous to the mechanisms that we identified for the dissipation regime [see New J. Phys. 16, 055013 (2014)]. Further, we discuss the similarities and differences between the clustering mechanisms we identify in the inertial range and the "sweep-stick" mechanism developed by Coleman and Vassilicos [Phys. Fluids 21, 113301 (2009)]. We show that the idea that initial particles are swept along with acceleration stagnation points is only approximately true because there always exists a finite difference between the velocity of the acceleration stagnation points and the local fluid velocity. This relative velocity is sufficient to allow particles to traverse the average distance between the stagnation points within the correlation time scale of the acceleration field. We also show that the stick part of the mechanism is only valid for Str≪1 in the inertial range. We emphasize that our clustering mechanism provides the more fundamental explanation since it, unlike the sweep-stick mechanism, is able to explain clustering in arbitrary spatially correlated velocity fields. We then consider the closed, model equation for the RDF given in Zaichik and Alipchenkov [Phys. Fluids 19, 113308 (2007)] and use this

  11. Mechanical properties of particle systems using a molecular dynamics approach inspired by continuum homogenization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andia, Pedro C.

    The topic of this dissertation is the study of the mechanical properties of solid material systems at the nanoscale. At such length scales, materials can be viewed as particle systems, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations help one understand their behavior as well as quantify their properties. However, mechanical concepts such as strain, stress and moduli were originally developed in continuum models, which are typically applied in space scales that range from the microscopic to the macroscopic. For this reason, a careful translation of ideas from continuum scales to the nanoscale is necessary. In essence, this thesis reviews and refines the continuum notions of average mechanical properties, such as stress and strain, and the meaning of such notions when MD is used to compute them. A Lagrangian-based approach is utilized for the purpose of determining the stress-deformation behavior of continua as well as of particle systems. At the continuum level, the mentioned Lagrangian-based approach is applied within homogenization theory for developing a nonlinear continuum homogenization model, which includes a novel constitutive relation for the stress. At the nanoscale, an MD method is presented as the extension of the continuum homogenization model. This MD method is able to simulate the behavior of particle systems under a given type of deformation as well as to generate stress-strain curves. In the process of developing the MD method, some concepts and techniques commonly used in MD, such as the virial stress and the Parrinello-Rahman method, are clarified.

  12. Thermo-Mechanical Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel Experiencing a Fast Control Rod Ejection Transient

    SciTech Connect

    Ortensi, J.; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-10-01

    A rapid increase of the temperature and the mechanical stress is expected in TRISO coated particle fuel that experiences a fast Total Control Rod Ejection (CRE) transient event. During this event the reactor power in the pebble bed core increases significantly for a short time interval. The power is deposited instantly and locally in the fuel kernel. This could result in a rapid increase of the pressure in the buffer layer of the coated fuel particle and, consequently, in an increase of the coating stresses. These stresses determine the mechanical failure probability of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR). A new calculation procedure has been implemented at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), which analyzes the transient fuel performance behavior of TRISO fuel particles in PBRs. This early capability can easily be extended to prismatic designs, given the availability of neutronic and thermal-fluid solvers. The full-core coupled neutronic and thermal-fluid analysis has been modeled with CYNOD-THERMIX. The temperature fields for the fuel kernel and the particle coatings, as well as the gas pressures in the buffer layer, are calculated with the THETRIS module explicitly during the transient calculation. Results from this module are part of the feedback loop within the neutronic-thermal fluid iterations performed for each time step. The temperature and internal pressure values for each pebble type in each region of the core are then input to the PArticle STress Analysis (PASTA) code, which determines the particle coating stresses and the fraction of failed particles. This paper presents an investigation of a Total Control Rod Ejection (TCRE) incident in the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular reactor design using the above described calculation procedure. The transient corresponds to a reactivity insertion of $3 (~2000 pcm) reaching 35 times the nominal power in 0.5 seconds. For each position in the core

  13. Particle disease: Biologic mechanisms of periprosthetic osteolysis in total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Goodman, Stuart B; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Raska, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies provide detailed insight into the triggering and amplification mechanisms of the inflammatory response associated with prosthetic wear particles, promoting final dominance of bone resorption over bone formation in multiple bone multicellular units around an implant. In fact, inflammation is a highly regulated process tightly linked to simultaneous stimulation of tissue protective and regenerative mechanisms in order to prevent collateral damage of periprosthetic tissues. A variety of cytokines, chemokines, hormones and specific cell populations, including macrophages, dendritic and stem cells, attempt to balance tissue architecture and minimize inflammation. Based on this fact, we postulate that the local tissue homeostatic mechanisms more effectively regulate the pro-inflammatory/pro-osteolytic cells/pathways in patients with none/mild periprosthetic osteolysis (PPOL) than in patients with severe PPOL. In this line of thinking, ‘particle disease theory’ can be understood, at least partially, in terms of the failure of local tissue homeostatic mechanisms. As a result, we envision focusing current research on homeostatic mechanisms in addition to traditional efforts to elucidate details of pro-inflammatory/pro-osteolytic pathways. We believe this approach could open new avenues for research and potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:22751380

  14. Growing 3C-SiC heteroepitaxial layers on α-SiC substrate by vapour-liquid-solid mechanism from the Al-Ge-Si ternary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzzi, Jean; Ferro, Gabriel; Cauwet, François; Souliere, Véronique; Carole, Davy

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we present and compare the results obtained from different Si-based melts (Ge-Si, Al-Si and Al-Ge-Si) for growing SiC layers on α-SiC substrate by vapour-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. It was found that, depending on melt composition, the deposit could be either a complete 3C or α-SiC layer or even a mixture of these polytypes. The binary Al-Si melt leads systematically to a highly p-type homoepitaxial α-SiC deposit while Ge-Si melt gives a non-intentional n-type doped layers of either 3C or 6H polytypes depending on growth conditions. However, highly p-type doped 3C heteroepitaxial deposit can be obtained if a small amount of Al is added to the Ge-Si binary liquid phase. This means that the VLS mechanism is very flexible and allows growing either n- or p-type SiC layers of 3C or 6H polytypes.

  15. Primary Surface Particle Motion as a Mechanism for YORP-Driven Binary Asteroid Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahnestock, Eugene G.; Scheeres, D. J.

    2008-09-01

    Within the largest class of binary asteroid systems -- asynchronous binaries typified by 1999 KW4 -- we hypothesize continued YORP spin-up of the rapidly rotating primary leads to recurring episodic lofting motion of primary equator regolith. We theorize this is a mechanism for transporting YORP-injected angular momentum from primary spin into the mutual orbit. This both enables binary primaries to continue to spin at near surface fission rates and produces continued orbit expansion on time scales several times faster than expansion predicted by tidal dissipation alone. This is distinct from the Binary Yorp (BYORP) phenomenon, not studied in this work but to be added to it later. We evaluate our hypotheses using a combination of techniques for an example binary system. First high-fidelity dynamic simulation of surface-originating particles in the full-detail gravity field of the binary components, themselves propagated according to the full two body problem, gives particle final disposition (return impact, transfer impact, escape). Trajectory end states found for regolith lofted at different initial primary spin rates and relative poses are collected into probability matrices, allowing probabilistic propagation of surface particles for long durations at low computational cost. We track changes to mass, inertia dyad, rotation state, and centroid position and velocity for each component in response to this mapped particle motion. This allows tracking of primary, secondary, and mutual orbit angular momenta over time, clearly demonstrating the angular momentum transfer mechanism and validating our hypotheses. We present current orbit expansion rates and estimated orbit size doubling times consistent with this mechanism, for a few binary systems. We also discuss ramifications of this type of rapid binary evolution towards separation, including the frequency with which "divorced binaries" on similar heliocentric orbits are produced, formation of triple systems such as

  16. On the mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Lance; Bragg, Andrew; Ireland, Peter

    2014-11-01

    In this talk, we consider the physical mechanism for the clustering of inertial particles in the inertial range of turbulence. By comparisons with DNS data we demonstrate that the mechanism in the theory of Zaichik et al. (Phys. Fluids 19, 113308, 2007) quantitatively describes the clustering of particles in the inertial range. We then analyze the theory for isotropic turbulence in the limit Reλ --> ∞ . For arbitrary St (Stokes number), there exists a separation in the inertial range beyond which Str << 1 , where Str is the Stokes number based on the eddy turnover timescale at separation r. The inertial-range clustering in this limit can be understood to be due to the preferential sampling of the coarse-grained velocity gradient tensor at that scale. At smaller separations, there may be transitions to Str ~ 1 , where a path history symmetry breaking effect dominates the clustering mechanism, and in some cases Str >> 1 , which implies ballistic behavior and a flat RDF. The scaling for each of these regimes is derived and compared to DNS, where applicable. Finally, we compare the results with the ``sweep-stick'' mechanism by Coleman and Vassilicos (Phys. Fluids 21, 113301, 2009) and discuss the similarities and differences between the two theories.

  17. Macromolecular crystal growing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Herren, Blair J. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Yost, Vaughn H. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A macromolecular crystal growing system especially designed for growing crystals in the low gravity of space as well as the gravity of earth includes at least one tray assembly, a carrier assembly which receives the tray, and a refrigeration-incubation module in which the carrier assembly is received. The tray assembly includes a plurality of sealed chambers with a plastic syringe and a plug means for the double tip of the syringe provided therein. Ganging mechanisms operate the syringes and plugs simultaneously in a precise and smooth operation. Preferably, the tray assemblies are mounted on ball bearing slides for smooth operation in inserting and removing the tray assemblies into the carrier assembly. The plugging mechanism also includes a loading control mechanism. A mechanism for leaving a syringe unplugged is also provided.

  18. Entropy increase in confined free expansions via molecular dynamics and smooth-particle applied mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, W.G.

    1999-02-01

    The eventual entropy increase of an ideal gas undergoing free expansion, {Delta}S=k&hthinsp;ln(V{sub fin}/V{sub 0}), requires a {open_quotes}coarse-grained{close_quotes} hydrodynamic description because Gibbs{close_quote} fine-grained entropy is unchanged in such a process. Smooth particle applied mechanics (SPAM) is well suited to the simulation and study of such problems because the particles in SPAM simulations can be of any size, from microscopic to macroscopic. SPAM furnishes a natural interpolation, or bridge, linking microscopic molecular dynamics to macroscopic continuum mechanics. We analyze particle-based simulations of ideal-gas free expansions from both the microscopic and the macroscopic points of view, comparing several dynamical estimates for the time development of the system entropy. Most of the entropy increase occurs rapidly, within a single sound traversal time. A local comoving version of turbulent hydrodynamics provides the most useful viewpoint for describing flows of this kind. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Mechanical disassembly of single virus particles reveals kinetic intermediates predicted by theory.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J P; de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2012-06-06

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T=1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly.

  20. Mechanical Disassembly of Single Virus Particles Reveals Kinetic Intermediates Predicted by Theory

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Milagros; Pérez, Rebeca; Carrillo, Pablo J.P.; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Mateu, Mauricio G.

    2012-01-01

    New experimental approaches are required to detect the elusive transient intermediates predicted by simulations of virus assembly or disassembly. Here, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to mechanically induce partial disassembly of single icosahedral T = 1 capsids and virions of the minute virus of mice. The kinetic intermediates formed were imaged by AFM. The results revealed that induced disassembly of single minute-virus-of-mice particles is frequently initiated by loss of one of the 20 equivalent capsomers (trimers of capsid protein subunits) leading to a stable, nearly complete particle that does not readily lose further capsomers. With lower frequency, a fairly stable, three-fourths-complete capsid lacking one pentamer of capsomers and a free, stable pentamer were obtained. The intermediates most frequently identified (capsids missing one capsomer, capsids missing one pentamer of capsomers, and free pentamers of capsomers) had been predicted in theoretical studies of reversible capsid assembly based on thermodynamic-kinetic models, molecular dynamics, or oligomerization energies. We conclude that mechanical manipulation and imaging of simple virus particles by AFM can be used to experimentally identify kinetic intermediates predicted by simulations of assembly or disassembly. PMID:22713577

  1. Correlation between erythropoietic activity and body growth rate in hypertransfused polycythemic growing rats as the result of an erythropoietin-dependent operating mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzini, C.E.; Alippi, R.M.; Barcelo, A.C.; Caro, J.

    1989-02-01

    The established relationship between erythropoietic activity and body growth rate in the polycythemic growing rat could be the result of either an erythropoietin (EPO)-dependent or an EPO-independent operating mechanism. The present study was thus undertaken to elucidate the nature of the aforementioned mechanism by assessing the ratio between plasma immunoreactive EPO (iEPO) concentration and erythropoietic activity in young hypertransfused rats for different body growth rates. Red blood cell (RBC)-59Fe uptake was about 75% in 21-day-old rats; it rapidly decreased with time when the animals were placed on a protein-free diet, approaching a level of about 1% by the 10th day of protein starvation. Over the same period plasma iEPO decreased from 55 mU/ml to 7 mU/ml. Body growth rate was 0. Following this ''protein depletion period'' the rats received diets containing different amounts of casein (''protein repletion period'') added isocalorically to the protein-free diet to elicit a rise in body growth rate. Statistically significant relationships (p less than 0.001) were found between dietary casein concentration and body growth rate (r = 0.991), dietary casein concentration and RBC-59Fe uptake (r = 0.991), dietary casein concentration and plasma iEPO level (r = 0.992), body growth rate and RBC-59Fe (r = 0.986), and body growth rate and plasma iEPO level (r = 0.994) in hypertransfused polycythemic rats during the protein repletion period. These findings suggest that the correlation between erythropoietic activity and growth rate in the growing rat is the result of an erythropoietin-dependent operating mechanism, which appears to be independent of the ratio tissue oxygen supply/tissue oxygen demand.

  2. Extracting the mechanical properties of microtubules from thermal fluctuation measurements on an attached tracer particle.

    PubMed

    Taute, Katja M; Pampaloni, Francesco; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of microtubules have been the subject of intense study during recent decades because of their importance to the many cell functions that they are involved in. Observations of microtubule thermal fluctuations have proven to be a reliable method to extract mechanical properties because they provide intrinsic calibration. While analysis of the entire microtubule shape is limited by spatial resolution to very long microtubules, we show that even for short microtubules, one can obtain high-precision fluctuation information from one point along the contour by the use of tracer particles attached to the microtubule. The information is sufficient to extract key mechanical parameters such as stiffness and first mode relaxation time. In this article, we discuss sample preparation as well as measurements and data analysis.

  3. Heterogeneous kinetics, products, and mechanisms of ferulic acid particles in the reaction with NO3 radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changgeng; Zhang, Peng; Wen, Xiaoying; Wu, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Methoxyphenols, as an important component of wood burning, are produced by lignin pyrolysis and considered to be the potential tracers for wood smoke emissions. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction between ferulic acid particles and NO3 radicals was investigated. Six products including oxalic acid, 4-vinylguaiacol, vanillin, 5-nitrovanillin, 5-nitroferulic acid, and caffeic acid were confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and the main pathways were NO3 electrophilic addition to olefin and the meta-position to the hydroxyl group. The uptake coefficient of NO3 radicals on ferulic acid particles was 0.17 ± 0.02 and the effective rate constant under experimental conditions was (1.71 ± 0.08) × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. The results indicate that ferulic acid degradation by NO3 can be an important sink at night.

  4. Smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics modeling of dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Colagrossi, Andrea; Souto-Iglesias, Antonio; Antuono, Matteo; Marrone, Salvatore

    2013-02-01

    The smoothed-particle-hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been used to study the evolution of free-surface Newtonian viscous flows specifically focusing on dissipation mechanisms in gravity waves. The numerical results have been compared with an analytical solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for Reynolds numbers in the range 50-5000. We found that a correct choice of the number of neighboring particles is of fundamental importance in order to obtain convergence towards the analytical solution. This number has to increase with higher Reynolds numbers in order to prevent the onset of spurious vorticity inside the bulk of the fluid, leading to an unphysical overdamping of the wave amplitude. This generation of spurious vorticity strongly depends on the specific kernel function used in the SPH model.

  5. A discrete mesoscopic particle model of the mechanics of a multi-constituent arterial wall

    PubMed Central

    Witthoft, Alexandra; Yazdani, Alireza; Peng, Zhangli; Bellini, Chiara; Humphrey, Jay D.; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels have unique properties that allow them to function together within a complex, self-regulating network. The contractile capacity of the wall combined with complex mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix enables vessels to adapt to changes in haemodynamic loading. Homogenized phenomenological and multi-constituent, structurally motivated continuum models have successfully captured these mechanical properties, but truly describing intricate microstructural details of the arterial wall may require a discrete framework. Such an approach would facilitate modelling interactions between or the separation of layers of the wall and would offer the advantage of seamless integration with discrete models of complex blood flow. We present a discrete particle model of a multi-constituent, nonlinearly elastic, anisotropic arterial wall, which we develop using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Mimicking basic features of the microstructure of the arterial wall, the model comprises an elastin matrix having isotropic nonlinear elastic properties plus anisotropic fibre reinforcement that represents the stiffer collagen fibres of the wall. These collagen fibres are distributed evenly and are oriented in four directions, symmetric to the vessel axis. Experimental results from biaxial mechanical tests of an artery are used for model validation, and a delamination test is simulated to demonstrate the new capabilities of the model. PMID:26790998

  6. A discrete mesoscopic particle model of the mechanics of a multi-constituent arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Witthoft, Alexandra; Yazdani, Alireza; Peng, Zhangli; Bellini, Chiara; Humphrey, Jay D; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-01-01

    Blood vessels have unique properties that allow them to function together within a complex, self-regulating network. The contractile capacity of the wall combined with complex mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix enables vessels to adapt to changes in haemodynamic loading. Homogenized phenomenological and multi-constituent, structurally motivated continuum models have successfully captured these mechanical properties, but truly describing intricate microstructural details of the arterial wall may require a discrete framework. Such an approach would facilitate modelling interactions between or the separation of layers of the wall and would offer the advantage of seamless integration with discrete models of complex blood flow. We present a discrete particle model of a multi-constituent, nonlinearly elastic, anisotropic arterial wall, which we develop using the dissipative particle dynamics method. Mimicking basic features of the microstructure of the arterial wall, the model comprises an elastin matrix having isotropic nonlinear elastic properties plus anisotropic fibre reinforcement that represents the stiffer collagen fibres of the wall. These collagen fibres are distributed evenly and are oriented in four directions, symmetric to the vessel axis. Experimental results from biaxial mechanical tests of an artery are used for model validation, and a delamination test is simulated to demonstrate the new capabilities of the model.

  7. Effect of Silica-Particle Characteristics on Impact/Usual Fatigue Properties and Evaluation of Mechanical Characteristics of Silica-Particle Epoxy Resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Isamu; Higashihara, Takashi; Kobayashi, Toshiro

    The structure (crystalline or amorphous) and shape (globular or irregular) of silica fillers were varied and their effects on the impact fatigue and usual fatigue properties in the particle-filled epoxy resins were investigated. The fatigue crack extension process was discussed in terms of initiation and propagation processes. Furthermore, the mechanical characteristics of the material were evaluated by considering the tensile properties, fatigue resistance and the fracture behavior. It has been found that the epoxy resin filled with irregular crystalline silica-particles possessed the best combination of mechanical properties.

  8. Influence of particle size on water absorption capacity and mechanical properties of polyethylene-wood flour composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zykova, A. K.; Pantyukhov, P. V.; Kolesnikova, N. N.; Popov, A. A.; Olkhov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Biocomposites based on low density polyethylene (LDPE) and birch wood flour (WF) were investigated. The mechanical properties and water absorption capacity were examined depending on the particle size of a filler in biocomposites. The aim of the paper is the investigation of composite properties depending on the filler particle size. The filler particle sizes were 0-80 µm, 80-140 µm, 140-200 µm, and 0-200 µm. The tensile strength of composite samples varied within the range 5.7-8.2 MPa. Elongation at break of composites varied within the range 5.1-7.5%. Highest mechanical properties were found in composites with the lowest filler fraction. Highest water absorption was observed in composition with a complex fraction of the filler. The influence of the filler particle size on composite properties was shown. It was found that an increase of the filler particle size decreases mechanical parameters and increases water absorption.

  9. Influence of protein hydrolysis on the mechanical properties of natural rubber composites reinforced with soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For natural rubber applications, the reinforcing fillers are used to improve the mechanical properties of the rubber. Soy protein particles have been shown to reinforce natural rubber. The hydrolysis conditions of soy protein are studied to understand its effect on the particle size and size distrib...

  10. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  11. Aging behavior and mechanical properties of maraging steels in the presence of submicrocrystalline Laves phase particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoudi, A.; Ghavidel, M.R. Zamanzad; Nedjad, S. Hossein; Heidarzadeh, A.; Ahmadabadi, M. Nili

    2011-10-15

    Cold rolling and annealing of homogenized Fe-Ni-Mn-Mo-Ti-Cr maraging steels resulted in the formation of submicrocrystalline Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Ti) Laves phase particles. Optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, tensile and hardness tests were used to study the microstructure, aging behavior and mechanical properties of the annealed steels. The annealed microstructures showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor tensile ductility was obtained after substantial age hardening in the specimens with 2% and 4% chromium. Increasing chromium addition up to 6% toughened the aged microstructure at the expense of the fracture stress by increasing the volume fraction of retained austenite. The Laves phase particles acted as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation. - Highlights: {yields} Laves phases dispersed in a BCC iron matrix by annealing of cold rolled samples. {yields} The samples showed age hardenability during subsequent isothermal aging at 753 K. {yields} Ultrahigh fracture stress but poor ductility was obtained after age hardening. {yields} Increasing chromium addition toughened the aged microstructure. {yields} Laves phase particles acting as crack nucleation sites during tensile deformation.

  12. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-23

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  13. Small bimetallic (Pt/Pd) particles by biosynthesis: transmission electron microscopy and quantum mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Becerra, R; Zorrilla, C; Canizal, G; Schabes-Retchkiman, P S; Liu, H B; Tavera-Davila, L; Rosano-Ortega, G; Rendon, L; Ascencio, J A

    2009-03-01

    Bimetallic Pd/Pt nanoparticles were synthesized by bio-reduction method. The structural characterizations were performed by high resolution transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The size distribution, shapes, structures and elemental distribution were studied for the synthesized samples. Molecular simulation methods based on quantum mechanics have been applied to acquire the further information on their structural stability, electronic properties etc. The results show that the particle size for the pH = 4 was bimodal with an average particle size of 3.2 nm and a variance of 1.8 nm. While for pH is 7 the average is 3.9 nm about the variance increase up to 3.7 nm, and larger particles can be found. By the HREM micrographs, it is identified fcc-like clusters with a few planar defects, which may be pure Pd or Pt, or bimetallic Pd/Pt. Theoretically the most stable configuration corresponds to the Pd18Pt37 eutectic-like structure, which implies a cluster in cluster form.

  14. The viscosity effect on marine particle flux: A climate relevant feedback mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taucher, J.; Bach, L. T.; Riebesell, U.; Oschlies, A.

    2014-04-01

    Oceanic uptake and long-term storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are strongly driven by the marine "biological pump," i.e., sinking of biotically fixed inorganic carbon and nutrients from the surface into the deep ocean (Sarmiento and Bender; Volk and Hoffert). Sinking velocity of marine particles depends on seawater viscosity, which is strongly controlled by temperature (Sharqawy et al.). Consequently, marine particle flux is accelerated as ocean temperatures increase under global warming (Bach et al.). Here we show that this previously overlooked "viscosity effect" could have profound impacts on marine biogeochemical cycling and carbon uptake over the next centuries to millennia. In our global warming simulation, the viscosity effect accelerates particle sinking by up to 25%, thereby effectively reducing the portion of organic matter that is respired in the surface ocean. Accordingly, the biological carbon pump's efficiency increases, enhancing the sequestration of atmospheric CO2 into the ocean. This effect becomes particularly important on longer time scales when warming reaches the ocean interior. At the end of our simulation (4000 A.D.), oceanic carbon uptake is 17% higher, atmospheric CO2 concentration is 180 ppm lower, and the increase in global average surface temperature is 8% weaker when considering the viscosity effect. Consequently, the viscosity effect could act as a long-term negative feedback mechanism in the global climate system.

  15. Algebraic roots of Newtonian mechanics: correlated dynamics of particles on a unique worldline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassandrov, Vladimir V.; Khasanov, Ildus Sh

    2013-05-01

    In the development of the old ideas of Stueckelberg-Wheeler-Feynman on the ‘one-electron Universe’, we study the purely algebraic dynamics of the ensemble of (two kinds of) identical point-like particles. These are represented by the (real and complex conjugate) roots of a generic polynomial system of equations that implicitly defines a single ‘worldline’. The dynamics includes events of ‘merging’ of a pair of particles modelling the annihilation/creation processes. Correlations in the location and motion of the particles-roots relate, in particular, to the Vieta formulas. After a special choice of the inertial-like reference frame, the linear Vieta formulas guarantee that, for any worldline, the law of (non-relativistic) momentum conservation is identically satisfied. Thus, the general structure of Newtonian mechanics follows from the algebraic properties of a worldline alone. A simple example of, unexpectedly rich, ‘polynomial dynamics’ is retraced in detail and illustrated via an animation (available from stacks.iop.org/JPhysA/46/175206/mmedia).

  16. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  17. Mechanical evaluation of SiC particle reinforced oxynitride glass and glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Lavelle, C. . Lab. de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface); Garnier, C.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y. . Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux)

    1994-07-01

    In silicon oxynitride glasses, the nitrogen occupies anion sites and is bonded to three silicons. Hence, replacement of divalent oxygen ions by trivalent nitrogen ones results in a considerable improvement of the mechanical resistance. In this exploratory work, the authors investigate some basic mechanical properties at room temperature of composite materials prepared by adding some SiC particles to a highly refractory Y-Mg-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glass. Taking advantage of both constituents, the brittle particulate composites exhibit much better fracture strength and toughness and higher elastic moduli than the glassy matrix. Due to the easy crystallization of the selected glass, a further improvement is attainable through a crystallization treatment of the matrix. Fracture toughness and Young's modulus as high as 5.4 MPa.m[sup 0.5] and 215 GPa respectively have been measured on the glass-ceramic composite containing 50 vol.% SiC.

  18. I. Statistical mechanics of bubbly liquids. II. Behavior of sheared suspensions of non-Brownian particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkovetsky, Yevgeny

    I. The dynamics of bubbles at high Reynolds numbers is studied from the viewpoint of statistical mechanics. Individual bubbles are treated as dipoles in potential flow. A virtual mass matrix of the system of bubbles is introduced, which depends on the instantaneous positions of the bubbles, and is used to calculate the energy of the bubbly flow as a quadratic form of the bubbles' velocities. The energy is shown to be the system's Hamiltonian and is used to construct a canonical ensemble partition function, which explicitly includes the total impulse of the suspension along with its energy. The Hamiltonian is decomposed into an effective potential due to the bubbles' collective motion and a kinetic term due to the random motion about the mean. An effective bubble temperature-a measure of the relative importance of the bubbles' relative to collective motion-is derived with the help of the impulse-dependent partition function. Two effective potentials are shown to operate: one, due to the mean motion of the bubbles, dominates at low bubble temperatures where it leads to their grouping in flat clusters normal to the direction of the collective motion, while the other, temperature invariant, is due to the bubbles' position-dependent virtual mass and results in their mutual repulsion. Numerical evidence is presented for the existence of the effective potentials, the condensed and dispersed phases and a phase transition. II. Suspensions of non-Brownian particles in simple shear flow of a Newtonian solvent in the range of particle phase concentration, φ, from 0.05 to 0.52, are studied numerically by Stokesian Dynamics. The simulations are a function of φ and the dimensionless shear rate, γ*, which measures the relative importance of the shear and short-ranged interparticle forces. The pair-distribution functions, shear viscosity, normal stress differences, suspension pressure, long-time self-diffusion coefficients, and mean square of the particle velocity fluctuations

  19. Statistical Mechanics of Colloidal Particles in Non-Conservative Force Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakil Moyses, Henrique

    Systems that are in mechanical equilibrium but are driven away from thermodynamic equilibrium present directed motion when in a thermal bath. This thesis explores this motion when systems are out of thermodynamic equilibrium due to the presence of non-conservative force fields. The first system we explored are Brownian vortexes. These are stochastic machines that use static non-conservative force fields to bias random thermal fluctuations into steadily circulating currents. The archetype for this class of systems is a colloidal sphere in an optical tweezer. Trapped near the focus of a strongly converging beam of light, the particle is displaced by random thermal kicks into the nonconservative part of the optical force field arising from radiation pressure, which then biases its diffusion. Assuming the particle remains localized within the trap, its time-averaged trajectory traces out a toroidal vortex. Unlike trivial Brownian vortexes, such as the biased Brownian pendulum, which circulate preferentially in the direction of the bias, the general Brownian vortex can change direction and even topology in response to temperature changes. In this thesis we introduce a theory based on a perturbative expansion of the Fokker-Planck equation for weak non-conservative driving. We show that the first-order solution takes the form of a modified Boltzmann relation and accounts for the rich phenomenology observed in experiments on micrometer-scale colloidal spheres in optical tweezers. Another system we explore are colloidal Janus particles composed of an optically absorbing and transparent faces. When illuminated by a defocused optical tweezer these particles swim vigorously, without requiring any chemical fuel. Most surprisingly, these optically activated colloidal swimmers circulate back and forth through the beam of light, tracing out regular sinuous patterns. In this thesis we propose a model for this class of light-activated swimmers in which a combination of radiation

  20. A cellular automaton for the signed particle formulation of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, J. M.; Kapanova, K. G.; Dimov, I.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new formulation of quantum mechanics, based on the concept of signed particles, has been suggested. In this paper, we introduce a cellular automaton which mimics the dynamics of quantum objects in the phase-space in a time-dependent fashion. This is twofold: it provides a simplified and accessible language to non-physicists who wants to simulate quantum mechanical systems, at the same time it enables a different way to explore the laws of Physics. Moreover, it opens the way towards hybrid simulations of quantum systems by combining full quantum models with cellular automata when the former fail. In order to show the validity of the suggested cellular automaton and its combination with the signed particle formalism, several numerical experiments are performed, showing very promising results. Being this article a preliminary study on quantum simulations in phase-space by means of cellular automata, some conclusions are drawn about the encouraging results obtained so far and the possible future developments.

  1. Equilibrium statistical mechanics for single waves and wave spectra in Langmuir wave-particle interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Firpo, M.-C.; Leyvraz, F.; Attuel, G.

    2006-12-15

    Under the conditions of weak Langmuir turbulence, a self-consistent wave-particle Hamiltonian models the effective nonlinear interaction of a spectrum of M waves with N resonant out-of-equilibrium tail electrons. In order to address its intrinsically nonlinear time-asymptotic behavior, a Monte Carlo code was built to estimate its equilibrium statistical mechanics in both the canonical and microcanonical ensembles. First, the single wave model is considered in the cold beam-plasma instability and in the O'Neil setting for nonlinear Landau damping. O'Neil's threshold, which separates nonzero time-asymptotic wave amplitude states from zero ones, is associated with a second-order phase transition. These two studies provide both a testbed for the Monte Carlo canonical and microcanonical codes, with the comparison with exact canonical results, and an opportunity to propose quantitative results to longstanding issues in basic nonlinear plasma physics. Then, the properly speaking weak turbulence framework is considered through the case of a large spectrum of waves. Focusing on the small coupling limit as a benchmark for the statistical mechanics of weak Langmuir turbulence, it is shown that Monte Carlo microcanonical results fully agree with an exact microcanonical derivation. The wave spectrum is predicted to collapse towards small wavelengths together with the escape of initially resonant particles towards low bulk plasma thermal speeds. This study reveals the fundamental discrepancy between the long-time dynamics of single waves, which can support finite amplitude steady states, and of wave spectra, which cannot.

  2. Diesel exhaust particles induce aberrant alveolar epithelial directed cell movement by disruption of polarity mechanisms.

    PubMed

    LaGier, Adriana J; Manzo, Nicholas D; Dye, Janice A

    2013-01-01

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following injury requires efficient and directed alveolar epithelial cell migration, this study's goal was to understand the mechanisms underlying alveolar epithelial cells response to DEP, particularly when exposure is accompanied with comorbid lung injury. Separate mechanistic steps of directed migration were investigated in confluent murine LA-4 cells exposed to noncytotoxic concentrations (0-100 μg/cm(2)) of either automobile-emitted diesel exhaust particles (DEP(A)) or carbon black (CB) particles. A scratch wound model ascertained how DEP(A) exposure affected directional cell migration and BCECF ratio fluorimetry-monitored intracellular pH (pHi). Cells were immunostained with giantin to assess cell polarity, and with paxillin to assess focal cell adhesions. Cells were immunoblotted for ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) to assess cytoskeletal anchoring. Data demonstrate herein that exposure of LA-4 cells to DEP(A) (but not CB) resulted in delayed directional cell migration, impaired de-adhesion of the trailing edge cell processes, disrupted regulation of pHi, and altered Golgi polarity of leading edge cells, along with modified focal adhesions and reduced ERM levels, indicative of decreased cytoskeletal anchoring. The ability of DEP(A) to disrupt directed cell migration at multiple levels suggests that signaling pathways such as ERM/Rho are critical for transduction of ion transport signals into cytoskeletal arrangement responses. These results provide insights into the mechanisms by which chronic exposure to traffic-based emissions may result in decrements in lung capacity.

  3. Functionalization effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes as templates for the synthesis of silica nanorods and study of growing mechanism of silica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung G; Wi, Rinbok; Imran, Muhammad; Park, Tae Jung; Lee, Jaebeom; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Do Hyun

    2010-07-27

    Silica nanorods were successfully prepared through a sol-gel process in the presence of carboxylic-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (C-SWCNTs). The effect of chemical functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on the growth of the silica layer was investigated using pristine SWCNTs (P-SWCNTs) and C-SWCNTS. The C-SWCNTs served as a unique template to fabricate silica hybrid composite materials. The crystalline formation and growing mechanism of the silica layer on C-SWCNTs were explained by the hydrolysis and chemical bonding between silica precursors and carboxylated SWCNTs. The C-SWCNTs, as templates, were successfully encapsulated using silica, and used templates were removed by oxidation at high temperature. Finally, silica nanorods/nanowires were synthesized in forms of mold, and this silica fabrication mechanism could be applied for large-scale production of silica nanomaterials and highly flexible nanocomposites. The sequence of a silica encapsulation process of C-SWCNTs and removed C-SWCNTs was characterized using SEM, TEM, EDX, FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, XRD, and electrical analysis.

  4. Detecting both the mass and position of an accreted particle by a micro/nano-mechanical resonator sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin; Liu, Yun

    2014-09-02

    In the application of a micro-/nano-mechanical resonator, the position of an accreted particle and the resonant frequencies are measured by two different physical systems. Detecting the particle position sometimes can be extremely difficult or even impossible, especially when the particle is as small as an atom or a molecule. Using the resonant frequencies to determine the mass and position of an accreted particle formulates an inverse problem. The Dirac delta function and Galerkin method are used to model and formulate an eigenvalue problem of a beam with an accreted particle. An approximate method is proposed by ignoring the off-diagonal elements of the eigenvalue matrix. Based on the approximate method, the mass and position of an accreted particle can be decoupled and uniquely determined by measuring at most three resonant frequencies. The approximate method is demonstrated to be very accurate when the particle mass is small, which is the application scenario for much of the mass sensing of micro-/nano-mechanical  resonators. By solving the inverse problem,  the position measurement becomes unnecessary, which is of some help to the mass sensing application  of a micro-/nano-mechanical resonator by reducing two measurement systems to one. How to apply the method to the general scenario of multiple accreted particles is also discussed.

  5. Kinetics and mechanisms of heterogeneous reaction of gaseous hydrogen peroxide on mineral oxide particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Chen, Zhongming; Shen, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xuan

    2011-04-15

    Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous reactions of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on aerosol surfaces may play an important role in tropospheric chemistry. The data concerning the kinetics and mechanisms of these reactions, however, are quite scarce so far. Here, we investigated, for the first time, the heterogeneous reactions of gaseous H(2)O(2) on SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3) particles, two major components of mineral dust aerosol, using transmission-Fourier Transform Infrared (T-FTIR) spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It is found that H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbs on SiO(2), and a small amount of molecularly adsorbed H(2)O(2) decomposes due to its thermal instability. For α-Al(2)O(3), catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) evidently occurs, but there is also a small amount of H(2)O(2) molecularly adsorbed on the particle surface. The BET uptake coefficients of H(2)O(2) on both particles appear to be independent of gaseous H(2)O(2) concentration (1.27-13.8 ppmv) and particle sample mass (2.8-6.5 mg for SiO(2) and 8.6-18.9 mg for α-Al(2)O(3)), but are strongly dependent on relative humidity with the values ranging from (1.55 ± 0.14) × 10(-8) and (1.21 ± 0.04) × 10(-7) at 2% RH to (0.61 ± 0.06) × 10(-8) and (0.76 ± 0.09) × 10(-7) at 76% RH for SiO(2) and α-Al(2)O(3), respectively. On the basis of the experimental results and literature data, the potential mechanisms for heterogeneous decomposition of H(2)O(2) were proposed, and the atmospheric implications of these reactions were discussed. It is found that heterogeneous reaction of H(2)O(2) on both mineral oxides plays a significant role in processing mineral aerosols, although its role as a sink for ambient H(2)O(2) is probably limited.

  6. Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation mechanisms from measured gas/particle partitioning of specific organic tracer compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunliang; Kreisberg, Nathan M; Worton, David R; Isaacman, Gabriel; Weber, Robin J; Liu, Shang; Day, Douglas A; Russell, Lynn M; Markovic, Milos Z; VandenBoer, Trevor C; Murphy, Jennifer G; Hering, Susanne V; Goldstein, Allen H

    2013-04-16

    In situ measurements of organic compounds in both gas and particle phases were made with a thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG) instrument. The gas/particle partitioning of phthalic acid, pinonaldehyde, and 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone is discussed in detail to explore secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation mechanisms. Measured fractions in the particle phase (f(part)) of 6,10,14-trimethyl-2-pentadecanone were similar to those expected from the absorptive gas/particle partitioning theory, suggesting that its partitioning is dominated by absorption processes. However, f(part) of phthalic acid and pinonaldehyde were substantially higher than predicted. The formation of low-volatility products from reactions of phthalic acid with ammonia is proposed as one possible mechanism to explain the high f(part) of phthalic acid. The observations of particle-phase pinonaldehyde when inorganic acids were fully neutralized indicate that inorganic acids are not required for the occurrence of reactive uptake of pinonaldehyde on particles. The observed relationship between f(part) of pinonaldehyde and relative humidity suggests that the aerosol water plays a significant role in the formation of particle-phase pinonaldehyde. Our results clearly show it is necessary to include multiple gas/particle partitioning pathways in models to predict SOA and multiple SOA tracers in source apportionment models to reconstruct SOA.

  7. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    DOE PAGES

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; ...

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containingmore » numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.« less

  8. Room temperature deformation mechanisms of alumina particles observed from in situ micro-compression and atomistic simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay D.; Mook, William M.; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Kotula, Paul G.; Hall, Aaron Christopher

    2015-09-22

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a solid-state deposition technology that has been developed to fabricate ceramic coatings nominally at room temperature. Sub-micron ceramic particles accelerated by pressurized gas impact, deform, and consolidate on substrates under vacuum. Ceramic particle consolidation in AD coatings is highly dependent on particle deformation and bonding; these behaviors are not well understood. In this work, atomistic simulations and in situ micro-compressions in the scanning electron microscope, and the transmission electron microscope (TEM) were utilized to investigate fundamental mechanisms responsible for plastic deformation/fracture of particles under applied compression. Results showed that highly defective micron-sized alumina particles, initially containing numerous dislocations or a grain boundary, exhibited no observable shape change before fracture/fragmentation. Simulations and experimental results indicated that particles containing a grain boundary only accommodate low strain energy per unit volume before crack nucleation and propagation. In contrast, nearly defect-free, sub-micron, single crystal alumina particles exhibited plastic deformation and fracture without fragmentation. Dislocation nucleation/motion, significant plastic deformation, and shape change were observed. Simulation and TEM in situ micro-compression results indicated that nearly defect-free particles accommodate high strain energy per unit volume associated with dislocation plasticity before fracture. As a result, the identified deformation mechanisms provide insight into feedstock design for AD.

  9. Antimicrobial, mechanical and thermal studies of silver particle-loaded polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Paul, Deepen; Paul, Sharmistha; Roohpour, Nima; Wilks, Mark; Vadgama, Pankaj

    2013-12-09

    Silver-particle-incorporated polyurethane films were evaluated for antimicrobial activity towards two different bacteria: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Distributed silver particles sourced from silver nitrate, silver lactate and preformed silver nanoparticles were mixed with polyurethane (PU) and variously characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and contact angle measurement. Antibacterial activity against E.coli was confirmed for films loaded with 10% (w/w) AgNO3, 1% and 10% (w/w) Ag lactate and preformed Ag nanoparticles. All were active against S. aureus, but Ag nanoparticles loaded with PU had a minor effect. The apparent antibacterial performance of Ag lactate-loaded PU is better than other Ag ion-loaded films, revealed from the zone of inhibition study. The better performance of silver lactate-loaded PU was the likely result of a porous PU structure. FESEM and FTIR indicated direct interaction of silver with the PU backbone, and XRD patterns confirmed that face-centred cubic-type silver, representative of Ag metal, was present. Young's modulus, tensile strength and the hardness of silver containing PU films were not adversely affected and possibly marginally increased with silver incorporation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated greater thermal stability.

  10. Differential adhesion between moving particles as a mechanism for the evolution of social groups.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thomas; Brunnet, Leonardo Gregory; De Monte, Silvia

    2014-02-01

    The evolutionary stability of cooperative traits, that are beneficial to other individuals but costly to their carrier, is considered possible only through the establishment of a sufficient degree of assortment between cooperators. Chimeric microbial populations, characterized by simple interactions between unrelated individuals, restrain the applicability of standard mechanisms generating such assortment, in particular when cells disperse between successive reproductive events such as happens in Dicyostelids and Myxobacteria. In this paper, we address the evolutionary dynamics of a costly trait that enhances attachment to others as well as group cohesion. By modeling cells as self-propelled particles moving on a plane according to local interaction forces and undergoing cycles of aggregation, reproduction and dispersal, we show that blind differential adhesion provides a basis for assortment in the process of group formation. When reproductive performance depends on the social context of players, evolution by natural selection can lead to the success of the social trait, and to the concomitant emergence of sizeable groups. We point out the conditions on the microscopic properties of motion and interaction that make such evolutionary outcome possible, stressing that the advent of sociality by differential adhesion is restricted to specific ecological contexts. Moreover, we show that the aggregation process naturally implies the existence of non-aggregated particles, and highlight their crucial evolutionary role despite being largely neglected in theoretical models for the evolution of sociality.

  11. [Adverse effects of ultrafine particles on the cardiovascular system and its mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Yi, Tie-ci; Li, Jian-ping

    2014-12-18

    Cardiovascular disease is one of the major threats to human. Air pollution, which , as it become a problem too serious to be ignored in China, is known to be an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Among all pollutants, ultrafine particles ( UFPs) , defined as particles with their diameter less than 0. 1 f.Lm, are a specific composition. They are very small in size, large in quantity and surface area, and most important, capable of passing through the air-blood barrier. These unique features of UFPs make them special in their impact on cardiovascular system. Nowadays, the influence of UFPs on the cardiovascular system has become a hot topic. On the one side, studies have shown that UFPs can cause inflammation and oxidative stress in the lung, and then induce systemic inflammation by releasing cytokine and reactive oxygen species into the circulation. On the other side, UFPs themselves can "spillout"into the circulation and interact with their targets. By this way, UFPs directly affect endothelial cells, myocardial cells and the autonomic nervous system, which ultimately result in increased cardiovascular events. We intend to make an overview about the recent progress about the influence of UFPs on human cardiovascular disease and the related mechanisms, and argue for more attention to this issue.

  12. On a theory of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electrodynamic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrovsky, A.O.

    1993-09-01

    This work is devoted to the theoretical studies of two-beam mechanisms of charged particle acceleration in electronic structures. The first section continues the outline of results of theoretical studies commenced in the intermediate report and considers the two-beam scheme of acceleration in the plasma waveguide. According to this scheme the strong current relativistic electron beam (REB) excites the intensive plasma waves accelerating the electrons of the second beam. The driving beam is assumed to be density-modulated. The preliminary modulation of the driving REB is shown to enhance substantially the acceleration efficiency of relativistic electrons of the driven beam. The second section deals with the two-beam acceleration in the vacuum corrugated waveguide. According to this scheme the excitation of electromagnetic waves and acceleration of driven beam electrons by them is accomplished under different Cherenkov resonances between the particles of beams and the corrugated waveguide field. The electromagnetic field in the periodic structure is known to be the superposition of spatial harmonics. With the small depth of the periodic nonuniformity the amplitudes of these harmonics decrease fast with their number increasing. Therefore, if the driving beam is in the Cherenkov resonance with the first spatial harmonic and the driven beam is in resonance with the zero space harmonic then the force accelerating the driven beam would be considerably bigger than the force decelerating the driving beam electrons.

  13. Antimicrobial, Mechanical and Thermal Studies of Silver Particle-Loaded Polyurethane

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Deepen; Paul, Sharmistha; Roohpour, Nima; Wilks, Mark; Vadgama, Pankaj

    2013-01-01

    Silver-particle-incorporated polyurethane films were evaluated for antimicrobial activity towards two different bacteria: Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Distributed silver particles sourced from silver nitrate, silver lactate and preformed silver nanoparticles were mixed with polyurethane (PU) and variously characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and contact angle measurement. Antibacterial activity against E.coli was confirmed for films loaded with 10% (w/w) AgNO3, 1% and 10% (w/w) Ag lactate and preformed Ag nanoparticles. All were active against S. aureus, but Ag nanoparticles loaded with PU had a minor effect. The apparent antibacterial performance of Ag lactate-loaded PU is better than other Ag ion-loaded films, revealed from the zone of inhibition study. The better performance of silver lactate-loaded PU was the likely result of a porous PU structure. FESEM and FTIR indicated direct interaction of silver with the PU backbone, and XRD patterns confirmed that face-centred cubic-type silver, representative of Ag metal, was present. Young’s modulus, tensile strength and the hardness of silver containing PU films were not adversely affected and possibly marginally increased with silver incorporation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated greater thermal stability. PMID:24956194

  14. Mechanism for thermal relic dark matter of strongly interacting massive particles.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-10-24

    We present a new paradigm for achieving thermal relic dark matter. The mechanism arises when a nearly secluded dark sector is thermalized with the standard model after reheating. The freeze-out process is a number-changing 3→2 annihilation of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) in the dark sector, and points to sub-GeV dark matter. The couplings to the visible sector, necessary for maintaining thermal equilibrium with the standard model, imply measurable signals that will allow coverage of a significant part of the parameter space with future indirect- and direct-detection experiments and via direct production of dark matter at colliders. Moreover, 3→2 annihilations typically predict sizable 2→2 self-interactions which naturally address the "core versus cusp" and "too-big-to-fail" small-scale structure formation problems.

  15. Smooth-particle applied mechanics: Conservation of angular momentum with tensile stability and velocity averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Wm. G.; Hoover, Carol G.; Merritt, Elizabeth C.

    2004-01-01

    Smooth-particle applied mechanics (SPAM) provides several approaches to approximate solutions of the continuum equations for both fluids and solids. Though many of the usual formulations conserve mass, (linear) momentum, and energy, the angular momentum is typically not conserved by SPAM. A second difficulty with the usual formulations is that tensile stress states often exhibit an exponentially fast high-frequency short-wavelength instability, “tensile instability.” We discuss these twin defects of SPAM and illustrate them for a rotating elastic body. We formulate ways to conserve angular momentum while at the same time delaying the symptoms of tensile instability for many sound-traversal times. These ideas should prove useful in more general situations.

  16. Tribology and Removal Rate Characteristics of Chemical Mechanical Planarization Pads Containing Water Soluble Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charns, L.; Philipossian, A.

    2006-07-01

    Novel non-porous pads incorporating different amounts of embedded water soluble particles (WSP) have been characterized and compared to a conventional porous pad for interlayer dielectric (ILD) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) applications. Removal rate results indicated that polishing with WSP pads was Prestonian in nature (similar to conventional porous pads). A decrease in removal rate at high combinations of pressure and velocity was observed during in-situ conditioning with WSP pads. This anomalous behavior was most likely due to the alternatively feeding and starving the wafer of slurry during in-situ conditioning since doubling the flow rate resolved the problem. The anomalous behavior, however, was not observed when conditioning was performed ex-situ. Frictional analysis indicated that polishing with WSP pads proceeded via boundary lubrication like the other porous pads with concentrically grooved surface geometries.

  17. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic radio plasma emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiklauri, D.; Thurgood, J. O.

    2015-12-01

    first co-author Jonathan O. Thurgood (QMUL) The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, an underlying mechanism for type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some authors report that no such processes occur and others draw conflicting conclusions, by using 2D, fully kinetic, particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams. Here we present the results of particle-in-cell simulations which for different physical parameters permit or prohibit the plasma emission. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to the frequency beat requirements. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses the emission. Comparison of our results indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, a plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability, which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that evidence of plasma emission in simulations must disentangle the two contributions and not simply interpret changes in total electromagnetic energy as the evidence of plasma emission. In summary, we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. Pre-print can be found at http://astro.qmul.ac.uk/~tsiklauri/jtdt1

  18. Configurations and control of magnetic fields for manipulating magnetic particles in microfluidic applications: magnet systems and manipulation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cao, Quanliang; Han, Xiaotao; Li, Liang

    2014-08-07

    The use of a magnetic field for manipulating the motion of magnetic particles in microchannels has attracted increasing attention in microfluidic applications. Generation of a flexible and controllable magnetic field plays a crucial role in making better use of the particle manipulation technology. Recent advances in the development of magnet systems and magnetic field control methods have shown that it has great potential for effective and accurate manipulation of particles in microfluidic systems. Starting with the analysis of magnetic forces acting on the particles, this review gives the configurations and evaluations of three main types of magnet system proposed in microfluidic applications. The interaction mechanisms of magnetic particles with magnetic fields are also discussed.

  19. Growth Mechanism of Primary and Eutectic TiB2 Particles in a Hypereutectic Steel Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Z. C.; He, B. B.; Li, Y. Z.; Huang, M. X.

    2017-04-01

    The growth mechanism of primary and eutectic TiB2 particles in a hypereutectic steel matrix composite (SMC) has been investigated by combining microstructure and crystallographic analysis in the present work. It is found that the TiB2 particles in the as-cast microstructure have complex morphologies including two kinds of primary particles and several categories of eutectic particles. Twin-induced dendritic growth of primary TiB2 particles and epitaxial growth of eutectic fibers are found in the present SMC by detailed crystallography analysis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the crystallographic features strongly affect the solidification process and the final microstructures. Finally, several alloying strategies are proposed to control the solidification microstructure.

  20. Quantum-mechanical and continual models of magnetic dynamics for antiferromagnetic particles in Mössbauer spectra analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischenko, I.; Chuev, M.

    2016-12-01

    A standard multi-level relaxation model of magnetic dynamics of single-domain particles together with recently developed quantum-mechanical and continual models of specific thermo- and magnetic dynamics of antiferromagnetic particles were applied to analyse temperature series of Mössbauer spectra of Fe2O3 based nanoparticles. Advantages of these models, their comparison and further generalizations are discussed on the example of the particular experimental data.

  1. The Prediction and Simulation for the Mechanical Properties of Ceramic-Based Composites Reinforced with Nano-Micro Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Dongmei; Hu Jinshan; Yang Hong; Zhou Yinglong

    2010-05-21

    The global-local homogenization method with precise period boundary conditions is applied to predict and simulate the mechanical properties of ceramic composites reinforced by spherical nano-micro particles with enwrapping and nesting arrays. The numerical simulation is performed with different size ratios of nano-micro particles, and different configurations for representative volume element. The results show that the low radius ratios of nano-micro particles produce a larger effective Young's modulus for its more uniform dispersion, and the hexagon RVE with nesting array can make an overestimation for effective elastic modulus of ceramic composites, and the interfacial damage between nano-microscopic particles and matrix degenerates the effective elastic modulus. It shows in this paper that it is significant to improve the mechanical properties of ceramic materials by mixing some nano- and micro-particles into the matrix with good designed array methods from the viewpoints of nano-microscopic crystal structure, and a rational interfacial damage model should be further proposed to investigate the toughening mechanism of ceramic-composites reinforced with nano-micro particles.

  2. Effect of microstructure of nano- and micro-particle filled polymer composites on their tribo-mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devaprakasam, D.; Hatton, P. V.; Möbus, G.; Inkson, B. J.

    2008-08-01

    In this work we have investigated the influence of nanoscale and microscale structure on the tribo-mechanical performance and failure mechanisms of two biocompatible dental polymer composites, with different reinforcing particulates, using advanced microscopy techniques. Nano- and micro structural analysis reveals the shape, size and distribution of the particles in the composites. In the microparticle filled polymer composite (microcomposite), the particles are of irregular shape with sharp edges with non-uniform distribution in the matrix. However, in the nanoparticle filled composites (nanocomposite), filler particles are spherical in shape with uniform distribution in the matrix. From nanoindentation measurements, hardness and reduced modulus of the microcomposite were found to be heterogeneous. However, the hardness and reduced modulus of the nanocomposite were found to be homogeneous. The nanocomposite shows better tribo-mechanical performance compared to that of the microcomposite.

  3. Mechanism and kinetics of organic matter degradation based on particle structure variation during pig manure aerobic composting.

    PubMed

    Ge, Jinyi; Huang, Guangqun; Huang, Jing; Zeng, Jianfei; Han, Lujia

    2015-07-15

    Characterization of the dynamic structure of composting particles may facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms of organic matter degradation during pig manure-wheat straw aerobic composting. In this study, changes in the size, shape, pores, chemical compositions, and crystal structures of pig manure particles during composting were investigated. The results showed that the median diameter (D50) decreased exponentially, while the particle aspect ratio and sphericity were unchanged, suggesting that particles were degraded uniformly along different radial directions. Pores had a mean diameter of 15-30 μm and were elliptical. The particle porosity increased linearly mainly because of hemicellulose degradation. Furthermore, the influence of particle structure variation on the first order rate constant (k) of organic matter degradation was corrected, which may facilitate the optimization of operation conditions. The k value was proportional to the reciprocal of D50 according to the specific surface area of particles, and it decreased with increased porosity due to the stabilized chemical compositions and crystal structures of particles. However, the applicability of these data to other composting materials should be verified.

  4. Growing Galaxies Gently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    New observations from ESO's Very Large Telescope have, for the first time, provided direct evidence that young galaxies can grow by sucking in the cool gas around them and using it as fuel for the formation of many new stars. In the first few billion years after the Big Bang the mass of a typical galaxy increased dramatically and understanding why this happened is one of the hottest problems in modern astrophysics. The results appear in the 14 October issue of the journal Nature. The first galaxies formed well before the Universe was one billion years old and were much smaller than the giant systems - including the Milky Way - that we see today. So somehow the average galaxy size has increased as the Universe has evolved. Galaxies often collide and then merge to form larger systems and this process is certainly an important growth mechanism. However, an additional, gentler way has been proposed. A European team of astronomers has used ESO's Very Large Telescope to test this very different idea - that young galaxies can also grow by sucking in cool streams of the hydrogen and helium gas that filled the early Universe and forming new stars from this primitive material. Just as a commercial company can expand either by merging with other companies, or by hiring more staff, young galaxies could perhaps also grow in two different ways - by merging with other galaxies or by accreting material. The team leader, Giovanni Cresci (Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri) says: "The new results from the VLT are the first direct evidence that the accretion of pristine gas really happened and was enough to fuel vigorous star formation and the growth of massive galaxies in the young Universe." The discovery will have a major impact on our understanding of the evolution of the Universe from the Big Bang to the present day. Theories of galaxy formation and evolution may have to be re-written. The group began by selecting three very distant galaxies to see if they could find evidence

  5. Particle-Based Geometric and Mechanical Modelling of Woven Technical Textiles and Reinforcements for Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadi, Reza

    affecting the textile geometry and constitutive behaviour under evolving loading; 5) validating simulation results with experimental trials; and 6) demonstrating the applicability of the simulation procedure to textile reinforcements featuring large numbers of small fibres as used in PMCs. As a starting point, the effects of reinforcement configuration on the in-plane permeability of textile reinforcements, through-thickness thermal conductivity of PMCs and in-plane stiffness of unidirectional and bidirectional PMCs were quantified systematically and correlated with specific geometric parameters. Variability was quantified for each property at a constant fibre volume fraction. It was observed that variability differed strongly between properties; as such, the simulated behaviour can be related to variability levels seen in experimental measurements. The effects of the geometry of textile reinforcements on the aforementioned processing and performance properties of the textiles and PMCs made from these textiles was demonstrated and validated, but only for simple cases as thorough and credible geometric models were not available at the onset of this work. Outcomes of this work were published in a peer-reviewed journal [101]. Through this thesis it was demonstrated that predicting changes in textile geometry prior and during loading is feasible using the proposed particle-based modelling method. The particle-based modelling method relies on discrete mechanics and offers an alternative to more traditional methods based on continuum mechanics. Specifically it alleviates issues caused by large strains and management of intricate, evolving contact present in finite element simulations. The particle-based modelling method enables credible, intricate modelling of the geometry of textiles at the mesoscopic scale as well as faithful mechanical modelling under load. Changes to textile geometry and configuration due to the normal compaction pressure, stress relaxation, in-plane shear

  6. Growing and Growing: Promoting Functional Thinking with Geometric Growing Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Design research methodology is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated instruction theory about students' development of functional thinking in the context of geometric growing patterns. The two research questions are: (1) How does students' functional thinking develop in the context of geometric growing patterns? (2) What are…

  7. Coupling Discrete and Continuum Mechanics in Low Concentration, Particle-Laden Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Paul; Houchens, Brent; Kim, Albert

    2008-11-01

    The study of particle-laden flow plays a critical role in pressure-driven membrane filtration such as microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF), and reverse osmosis (RO). Hydrodynamic and inter-particle interactions, coupled to the ambient crossflow field, are well documented in literature. Transport of particles is originated due to Brownian and shear-induced diffusion, and convection due to the axial crossflow and transverse permeate flow. These effects are modeled using Hydrodynamic Force Bias Monte Carlo (HFBMC) simulations to predict the deposition of the particles on the membrane surface. In addition, the particles in the simulation are also subject to electrostatic double layer repulsion and van der Waals attraction both between particles and between the particles and membrane surfaces. In conjunction with the hydrodynamics, the change in particle potential determines the transition probability that a proposed, random move of a particle will be accepted. In the current study, these discrete particle effects at the microscopic level are coupled to the continuum flow via an apparent local viscosity, yielding a quasi-steady-state velocity profile. This velocity profile is dynamically updated in order to refine the hydrodynamic interactions. The resulting simulation predicts the formation of a cake layer of deposited interacting particles on the membrane surface.

  8. A "TEST OF CONCEPT" COMPARISON OF AERODYNAMIC AND MECHANICAL RESUSPENSION MECHANISMS FOR PARTICLES DEPOSITED ON FIELD RYE GRASS (SECALE CERCELE). PART I. RELATIVE PARTICLE FLUX RATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resuspension of uniform latex micro spheres deposited on a single seed pod of field rye grass stalk and head was investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. The experiment was designed to distinguish aerodynamic (viscous and turbulent) mechanisms from mechanical resuspension re...

  9. Two-Stage Acceleration Mechanism for Impulsive Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Wu, S.; Tan, A.

    2006-12-01

    et al., JGR, 110A, 12111, 2005). The predictions on the enhancements of 3He/4He, Fe/O, ^{22}Ne/20Ne, and (Z>50)/O, the high charge states of Si, and Fe, the energy spectra of electrons, ions, and hard X-rays in the impulsive or 3He-rich solar energetic particle events agree with the measurements. In this presentation, we will overview the two-acceleration mechanism for the impulsive solar energetic particle events and reveal its further theoretical developments and observational demonstrations.

  10. Triggering Mechanisms and Inflammatory Effects of Combustion Exhaust Particles with Implication for Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Øvrevik, Johan; Refsnes, Magne; Låg, Marit; Brinchmann, Bendik C; Schwarze, Per E; Holme, Jørn A

    2016-12-21

    A number of biological responses may contribute to the carcinogenic effects of combustion-derived particulate matter (CPM). Here, we focus on mechanisms that trigger CPM-induced pro-inflammatory responses. Inflammation has both genotoxic and non-genotoxic implications and is considered to play a central role in development of various health outcome associated with CPM exposure, including cancer. Chronic, low-grade inflammation may cause DNA damage through a persistent increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced and released by activated immune cells. Moreover, a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines display mitogenic, motogenic, morphogenic and/or angiogenic properties and may therefore contribute to tumour growth and metastasis. The key triggering events involved in activation of pro-inflammatory responses by CPM and soluble CPM components can be categorized into (i) formation of ROS and oxidative stress, (ii) interaction with the lipid layer of cellular membranes, (iii) activation of receptors, ion channels and transporters on the cell surface and (iv) interactions with intracellular molecular targets including receptors such as the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). In particular, we will elucidate the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) using human lung epithelial cells as a model system.

  11. Particle-in-Cell Modeling of Magnetized Argon Plasma Flow Through Small Mechanical Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Adam B. Sefkow and Samuel A. Cohen

    2009-04-09

    Motivated by observations of supersonic argon-ion flow generated by linear helicon-heated plasma devices, a three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) code is used to study whether stationary electrostatic layers form near mechanical apertures intersecting the flow of magnetized plasma. By self-consistently evaluating the temporal evolution of the plasma in the vicinity of the aperture, the PIC simulations characterize the roles of the imposed aperture and applied magnetic field on ion acceleration. The PIC model includes ionization of a background neutral-argon population by thermal and superthermal electrons, the latter found upstream of the aperture. Near the aperture, a transition from a collisional to a collisionless regime occurs. Perturbations of density and potential, with mm wavelengths and consistent with ion acoustic waves, propagate axially. An ion acceleration region of length ~ 200-300 λD,e forms at the location of the aperture and is found to be an electrostatic double layer, with axially-separated regions of net positive and negative charge. Reducing the aperture diameter or increasing its length increases the double layer strength.

  12. Formation mechanism of chalcogenide nanocrystals confined inside genetically engineered virus-like particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ziyou; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Li, Rui; Prevelige, Peter E.; Gupta, Arunava

    2014-01-01

    Engineered virus-like particles (VLP) are attractive for fabricating nanostructured materials for applications in diverse areas such as catalysis, drug delivery, biomedicine, composites, etc. Basic understanding of the interaction between the inorganic guest and biomolecular host is thus important for the controlled synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles inside VLP and rational assembly of ordered VLP-based hierarchical nanostructures. We have investigated in detail the formation mechanism and growth kinetics of semiconducting nanocrystals confined inside genetically engineered bacteriophage P22 VLP using semiconducting CdS as a prototypical example. The selective nucleation and growth of CdS at the engineered sites is found to be uniform during the early stage, followed by a more stochastic growth process. Furthermore, kinetic studies reveal that the presence of an engineered biotemplate helps in significantly retarding the reaction rate. These findings provide guidance for the controlled synthesis of a wide range of other inorganic materials confined inside VLP, and are of practical importance for the rational design of VLP-based hierarchical nanostuctures.

  13. Understanding the mechanisms of sickle cell disease by simulations with a discrete particle model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Katrina; Lin, Guang; Pan, Wenxiao

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder characterized by rigid, sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs). Because of their rigidity and shape, sickle cells can get stuck in smaller blood vessels, causing blockages and depriving oxygen to tissues. This study develops and applies mathematical models to better understand the mechanism of SCD. Two-dimensional models of RBCs and blood vessels have been constructed by representing them as discrete particles interacting with different forces. The nonlinear, elastic property of healthy RBCs could be adequately reproduced using a cosine angle bending force and a worm-like chain spring force. With the ability to deform, RBCs can squeeze through narrow blood vessels. In modeling sickle cells as rigid bodies and applying repelling and friction forces from the blood vessel, this study shows that geometrical factors (dimensions of the sickle cell and blood vessels) as well as rigidity and adhesiveness of the sickle cell all play an important role in determining how, and if, sickle cells become trapped within narrow blood capillaries. With lack of data to validate the model, this study primarily provides a sensitivity analysis of factors influencing sickle cell occlusion and identified critical data to support future modeling.

  14. Formation mechanism of chalcogenide nanocrystals confined inside genetically engineered virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ziyou; Bedwell, Gregory J.; Li, Rui; Prevelige, Peter E.; Gupta, Arunava

    2014-01-01

    Engineered virus-like particles (VLP) are attractive for fabricating nanostructured materials for applications in diverse areas such as catalysis, drug delivery, biomedicine, composites, etc. Basic understanding of the interaction between the inorganic guest and biomolecular host is thus important for the controlled synthesis of inorganic nanoparticles inside VLP and rational assembly of ordered VLP-based hierarchical nanostructures. We have investigated in detail the formation mechanism and growth kinetics of semiconducting nanocrystals confined inside genetically engineered bacteriophage P22 VLP using semiconducting CdS as a prototypical example. The selective nucleation and growth of CdS at the engineered sites is found to be uniform during the early stage, followed by a more stochastic growth process. Furthermore, kinetic studies reveal that the presence of an engineered biotemplate helps in significantly retarding the reaction rate. These findings provide guidance for the controlled synthesis of a wide range of other inorganic materials confined inside VLP, and are of practical importance for the rational design of VLP-based hierarchical nanostuctures. PMID:24452221

  15. Effect of mechanical vibration on platinum particle agglomeration and growth in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloyan, Georgiy; Sobel, Marcus; Das, Kiranmoy; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2012-09-01

    The effect of mechanical vibration on Platinum (Pt) particle agglomeration and growth in the catalyst layer of a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) for a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) was investigated. A series of experiments were conducted using a 300-h accelerated test with potential cycling and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Each of the 300-h accelerated tests used different constant mechanical vibration conditions (frequency and acceleration). It was observed that the average diameter of Pt particles under vibration is 10% smaller than the ones that were under no vibration conditions. The Pt particles in the order of 2-2.5 nm in the pristine state have grown to approximately 6 nm (after 300-h accelerated test without vibration condition) and to approximately 5.47 nm (after 300 h accelerated test under 1 g 20 Hz vibration condition).

  16. Particle size studies to reveal crystallization mechanisms of the metal organic framework HKUST-1 during sonochemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Mitchell R; Senthilnathan, Sethuraman; Balzer, Christopher J; Shan, Bohan; Chen, Liang; Mu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Systematic studies of key operating parameters for the sonochemical synthesis of the metal organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1(also called CuBTC) were performed including reaction time, reactor volume, sonication amplitude, sonication tip size, solvent composition, and reactant concentrations analyzed through SEM particle size analysis. Trends in the particle size and size distributions show reproducible control of average particle sizes between 1 and 4μm. These results along with complementary studies in sonofragmentation and temperature control were conducted to compare these results to kinetic crystal growth models found in literature to develop a plausible hypothetical mechanism for ultrasound-assisted growth of metal-organic-frameworks composed of a competitive mechanism including constructive solid-on-solid (SOS) crystal growth and a deconstructive sonofragmentation.

  17. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of the heat bath for two Brownian particles.

    PubMed

    De Bacco, Caterina; Baldovin, Fulvio; Orlandini, Enzo; Sekimoto, Ken

    2014-05-09

    We propose a new look at the heat bath for two Brownian particles, in which the heat bath as a "system" is both perturbed and sensed by the Brownian particles. Nonlocal thermal fluctuations give rise to bath-mediated static forces between the particles. Based on the general sum rule of the linear response theory, we derive an explicit relation linking these forces to the friction kernel describing the particles' dynamics. The relation is analytically confirmed in the case of two solvable models and could be experimentally challenged. Our results point out that the inclusion of the environment as a part of the whole system is important for micron- or nanoscale physics.

  18. Evidence of an oxidative mechanism for the hemolytic activity of silica particles.

    PubMed Central

    Razzaboni, B L; Bolsaitis, P

    1990-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species resulting from the interaction of silica dust particles with red blood cell membranes was investigated; particularly, the effect of surface hydroxyl (silanol) group concentration on the rate of formation of such reactive oxygen species was investigated. The rate of formation was measured indirectly through the effect of catalase, a hemoprotein peroxidase, on silica-induced hemolysis. It was found that the addition of exogenous catalase to erythrocytes markedly reduces the hemolysis caused by silica particles. Furthermore, the amount of catalase required for deactivation of silica per unit area of particle surface is lower for fumed silica particles and calcined crystalline particles than for uncalcined, crystalline silica, suggesting a correlation between the concentration of OH groups at the silica particle surface and its potential for generation of H2O2. The addition of albumin, a copper chelator, also decreases hemolysis. These results suggest that the hemolysis caused by silica particles is at least partly related to the formation of H2O2 at the particle surface and its subsequent reaction with Cu+ ions. The relationship between the concentration of surface silanol groups on the silica surface and the amount of catalase required to decrease hemolysis may also provide a method for testing potential fibrogenicity of respirable dusts. PMID:2176590

  19. A solid-phase mechanism of shock-wave formation of dust particles of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, E. E.; Mikhailov, A. L.; Khvorostin, V. N.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of formation of dust particles in solid as a result of shock-wave destruction of the initial crystalline material structure and subsequent coalescence of atomic clusters (nanoparticles), which leads to the aggregation of mesocrystalline particles (grains) in the shocked layer, is discussed.

  20. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration mechanisms with colliding magnetized laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Fiksel, G.; Nilson, P.; Haberberger, D.; Chang, P.-Y.; Barnak, D.

    2015-11-01

    Significant particle energization is observed to occur in many astrophysical environments, and in the standard models this acceleration occurs as a part of the energy conversion processes associated with collisionless shocks or magnetic reconnection. A recent generation of laboratory experiments conducted using magnetized laser-produced plasmas has opened opportunities to study these particle acceleration processes in the laboratory. Ablated plasma plumes are externally magnetized using an externally-applied magnetic field in combination with a low-density background plasma. Colliding unmagnetized plasmas demonstrated ion-driven Weibel instability while colliding magnetized plasmas drive magnetic reconnection. Both magnetized and unmagnetized colliding plasma are modeled with electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations which provide an end-to-end model of the experiments. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we provide predictions of particle acceleration driven by reconnection, resulting from both direct x-line acceleration and Fermi-like acceleration at contracting magnetic fields lines near magnetic islands.

  1. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations of fundamental and harmonic plasma radio emission mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurgood, J. O.; Tsiklauri, D.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The simulation of three-wave interaction based plasma emission, thought to be the underlying mechanism for Type III solar radio bursts, is a challenging task requiring fully-kinetic, multi-dimensional models. This paper aims to resolve a contradiction in past attempts, whereby some studies indicate that no such processes occur. Methods: We self-consistently simulate three-wave based plasma emission through all stages by using 2D, fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations of relaxing electron beams using the EPOCH2D code. Results: Here we present the results of two simulations; Run 1 (nb/n0 = 0.0057, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 16) and Run 2 (nb/n0 = 0.05, vb/ Δvb = vb/Ve = 8), which we find to permit and prohibit plasma emission respectively. We show that the possibility of plasma emission is contingent upon the frequency of the initial electrostatic waves generated by the bump-in-tail instability, and that these waves may be prohibited from participating in the necessary three-wave interactions due to frequency conservation requirements. In resolving this apparent contradiction through a comprehensive analysis, in this paper we present the first self-consistent demonstration of fundamental and harmonic plasma emission from a single-beam system via fully kinetic numerical simulation. We caution against simulating astrophysical radio bursts using unrealistically dense beams (a common approach which reduces run time), as the resulting non-Langmuir characteristics of the initial wave modes significantly suppresses emission. Comparison of our results also indicates that, contrary to the suggestions of previous authors, an alternative plasma emission mechanism based on two counter-propagating beams is unnecessary in an astrophysical context. Finally, we also consider the action of the Weibel instability which generates an electromagnetic beam mode. As this provides a stronger contribution to electromagnetic energy than the emission, we stress that

  2. Material removal mechanism and material removal rate model of polishing process for quartz glass using soft particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Defu; Chen, Guanglin; Hu, Qing

    2015-10-01

    Fiber arrays are used to connect arrayed waveguide chips. The end-faces of fiber array components are multi-materials non-uniform surfaces. Their low polishing quality has become a bottleneck that restricts coupling performance of integrated photo-electronic devices. The chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is normally used to improve the polishing quality of the end-faces of fiber array components. It is very important to optimize process parameters by researching the mechanical behavior of nanoparticles and material microstructure evolution on the CMP interfaces. Based on the elastic and hyper-elastic contact of the soft polishing particle with quartz glass and polishing pad, the material removal mechanism at molecular scale of polishing process for quartz glass using soft polishing particles is investigated, and the material removal rate model is also derived by using Arrhenius theory and molecule vibration theory. Theoretical and experimental results show that the material is mainly removed by the interfacial tribo-chemical effect between polishing particle and quartz glass during CMP process. The depth of a single particle embedding into the quartz glass is at molecular scale, and the superficial molecules of quartz glass are removed by chemical reactions because of enough energy obtained. The material removal rate of quartz glass during CMP process is determined by the polishing pressure, the chemical reagents and its concentration, and the relative movement speed between the quartz glass workpiece and the polishing pad.

  3. Thermo-mechanical characterization of siliconized E-glass fiber/hematite particles reinforced epoxy resin hybrid composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    V. R., Arun prakash; Rajadurai, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this present work hybrid polymer (epoxy) matrix composite has been strengthened with surface modified E-glass fiber and iron(III) oxide particles with varying size. The particle sizes of 200 nm and <100 nm has been prepared by high energy ball milling and sol-gel methods respectively. To enhance better dispersion of particles and improve adhesion of fibers and fillers with epoxy matrix surface modification process has been done on both fiber and filler by an amino functional silane 3-Aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS). Crystalline and functional groups of siliconized iron(III) oxide particles were characterized by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy analysis. Fixed quantity of surface treated 15 vol% E-glass fiber was laid along with 0.5 and 1.0 vol% of iron(III) oxide particles into the matrix to fabricate hybrid composites. The composites were cured by an aliphatic hardener Triethylenetetramine (TETA). Effectiveness of surface modified particles and fibers addition into the resin matrix were revealed by mechanical testing like tensile testing, flexural testing, impact testing, inter laminar shear strength and hardness. Thermal behavior of composites was evaluated by TGA, DSC and thermal conductivity (Lee's disc). The scanning electron microscopy was employed to found shape and size of iron(III) oxide particles adhesion quality of fiber with epoxy matrix. Good dispersion of fillers in matrix was achieved with surface modifier APTMS. Tensile, flexural, impact and inter laminar shear strength of composites was improved by reinforcing surface modified fiber and filler. Thermal stability of epoxy resin was improved when surface modified fiber was reinforced along with hard hematite particles. Thermal conductivity of epoxy increased with increase of hematite content in epoxy matrix.

  4. The mechanisms of fine particle generation and electrification during Mount St. Helens volcanic eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Microscopical investigation of volcanic ash collected from ground stations during Mount St. Helens eruptions reveal a distinctive bimodel size distribution with high concentrations of particle ranges at (1) 200-100 microns and (2) 20-0.1 microns. Close examination of individual particles shows that most larger ones are solidified magma particles of porous pumice with numerous gas bubbles in the interior and the smaller ones are all glassy fragments without any detectable gas bubbles. Elemental analysis demonstrates that the fine fragments all have a composition similar to that of the larger pumice particles. Laboratory experiments suggest that the formation of the fine fragments is by bursting of glassy bubbles from a partially solidified surface of a crystallizing molten magma particle. The production of gas bubbles is due to the release of absorbed gases in molten magma particles when solubility decreases during phase transition. Diffusion cloud chamber experiments strongly indicate that sub-micron volcanic fragments are highly hygroscopic and extremely active as cloud condensation nuclei. Ice crystals also are evidently formed on those fragments in a supercooled (-20 C) cloud chamber. It has been reported that charge generation from ocean volcanic eruptions is due to contact of molten lava with sea water. This seems to be insufficient to explain the observed rapid and intense lightning activities over Mount St. Helens eruptions. Therefore, a hypothesis is presented here that highly electrically charged fine solid fragments are ejected by bursting of gas bubbles from the surface of a crystallizing molten magma particles.

  5. On the fluorescence enhancement mechanism of Er3+ in germanate glass containing silver particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Bao-Jiu; Shen, Ren-Sheng; Zhang, Jin-Su; Sun, Jia-Shi; Cheng, Li-Hong; Zhong, Hai-Yang; Tian, Yue; Fu, Shao-Bo; Du, Guo-Tong

    2013-02-01

    The spectral properties of trivalent erbium ions (Er3+) are systematically studied in a melt-quenched germanate glass (60 GeO2-20PbO-10BaO-10K2O-0.1Ag2O) containing silver (Ag) particles. Thermal treatment of the material leads to the precipitation of Ag particles as observed by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed by absorption spectrum for the obvious surface plasmon resonance peak of Ag particles. The fluorescence from Er3+ in the 10-min-annealed sample with Ag particles is found to be 4.2 times enhanced compared with the unannealed sample excited by 488-nm Ar+ laser. A comparison is made between a spectral study performed on the unannealed Er3+-doped sample and the one annealed for 20 min. The data of absorption cross section and Judd—Ofelt intensity parameters show the agreement between the two samples no matter whether there are Ag particles, indicating that the introduction of Ag particles by post-heat treatment has no effect on the crystal field environment of Er3+ ions. The fluorescence enhancement is attributed to the surface plasmon oscillations of Ag particles in germanate glass.

  6. DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES INDUCE ABERRANT ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL DIRECTED CELL MOVEMENT BY DISRUPTION OF POLARITY MECHANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disruption of the respiratory epithelium contributes to the progression of a variety of respiratory diseases that are aggravated by exposure to air pollutants, specifically traffic-based pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Recognizing that lung repair following inj...

  7. Nanodiamond particles induce IL-8 expression through a transcript stabilization mechanism in human airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanodiamond particles (NDP) prepared by detonational processes have a number of industrial and analytical applications. Previous in vitro studies have reported NDP to be biologically inert with negligible cytotoxicity, implying that they are potentially suitable for biomedical ap...

  8. MECHANISMS OF NANODIAMOND PARTICLE INDUCED IL-8 EXPRESSION IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanodiamond particles (NDP) prepared by detonation under confined conditions have a number of industrial and analytical applications. Previous in vitro studies have reported NDP to be biologically inert with negligible cytotoxicity, implying that they are potentially suitable for...

  9. Phase-space quantum mechanics study of two identical particles in an external oscillatory potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieto, Luis M.; Gadella, Manuel

    1993-01-01

    This simple example is used to show how the formalism of Moyal works when it is applied to systems of identical particles. The symmetric and antisymmetric Moyal propagators are evaluated for this case; from them, the correct energy levels of energy are obtained, as well as the Wigner functions for the symmetric and antisymmetric states of the two identical particle system. Finally, the solution of the Bloch equation is straightforwardly obtained from the expressions of the Moyal propagators.

  10. Fine Particle Emissions from Residual Fuel Oil Combustion: Characterization and Mechanisms of Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-04

    NC, 1999. 3 . Bachmann, J. D ., Damberg, R. J., Caldwell, J. C., Ed- wards, C., and Koman, P. D ., Review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards...residual fuel oil combustion to be suspect, as far as emission of toxic fine particles is concerned. Build- ing upon previous work examining the...control number. 1. REPORT DATE 04 AUG 2000 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3 . DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fine Particle Emissions from Residual

  11. Development of an ash particle deposition model considering build-up and removal mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kjell Strandstroem; Christian Muellera; Mikko Hupa

    2007-12-15

    Slagging and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces in power boilers fired with fossil fuels and fuel mixtures has a significant influence on boiler efficiency and availability. Mathematical modelling has long been considered a suitable method to assist boiler operators to determine optimized operating conditions for an existing furnace. The ultimate goal in ash deposition prediction is hereby the determination of the total amount of material deposited and hence the determination of the total reduction in efficiency. Depending on the fuels fired the total deposited mass is a combination of ash particle deposition and ash particle erosion due to non-sticky particles. The novel ash particle deposition model presented in this work considers deposition of sticky ash particles, cleansing of deposit by non-sticky sand particles and sticking of sand due to contact with sticky ash. The steady-state modelling results for the total amount of ash deposited on the deposition probe of an entrained flow reactor presented in this work agree well with the experimental data. Only at very high fractions of sand added as non-sticky material, a significant influence of the sand on the overall mass deposited was found. Since the model considers sticking of non-sticking sand due to contact with sticky ash, the fraction of sand deposited on the probe was especially studied. Using a correction factor to consider the influence of operating time on the steady-state simulations led to good agreement between simulations and experimental data. 12 refs., 10 figs.

  12. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-15

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 {mu}m). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of {approx}900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH{sup -}) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  13. Jetting mechanisms of particles under shock wave acceleration: the role of force chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kun

    The particle jetting phenomenon is widely observed in many problems associated with blast/shock dispersal of granular materials, although its origin is still unidentified. We carried out discrete element simulations of the shock dispersal of two-dimensional particle rings in order to extract the particle-scale evolution of the shocked rings in terms of the velocity profile and the force-chain networks. Initially the force chains distribute uniformly along the circumference, but after several dozens of microseconds, they disseminate into a handful of blobs which mainly consist of long linear or branched chains align with the radial direction. These blobs are separated by zones featuring relatively sparse force chains which take forms of short chains or small compact polygons. The radial-like force chains in blobs serves as the channels transferring the momentum from the inner layers to outer layers, resulting in fast moving blocks without appreciable velocity differences. By contrast, the shock energy in the zones with short force chains is largely dissipated among the particle collision. Thus particles in these zones lag behind those bound by strong force chains. The resultant heterogeneous velocity profile acts as the precursor of the ensuing particle jetting.

  14. Effect of particle size on compaction of materials with different deformation mechanisms with and without lubricants.

    PubMed

    Almaya, Ahmad; Aburub, Aktham

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of excipient particle size on compaction properties of brittle, plastic and viscoelastic materials with and without added lubricants. Sieve cuts of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), starch and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate were obtained by sieving, then samples were tested without lubrication or with added lubricant (0.5% Mg stearate mixed for either 5 or 30-min). Compacts were left overnight before testing. It was found that in the absence of lubricant, compact tensile strength (TS) was dependent on particle size only for starch. With Mg stearate, lubricant sensitivity shows a strong dependence on excipient particle size for both starch and MCC, where smaller particles are less affected by lubricant. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate was not sensitive to lubricant even after 30 min mixing. This study highlights that in the absence of lubricant, initial particle size of excipients has no impact on compact strength not only for dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (brittle), but also for MCC (plastic). On the other hand, TS is dependent on particle size both with or without added lubricant for starch (viscoelastic).

  15. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  16. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cr-SiC Particles-Reinforced Fe-Based Alloy Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fu-cheng; Du, Xiao-dong; Zhan, Ma-ji; Lang, Jing-wei; Zhou, Dan; Liu, Guang-fu; Shen, Jian

    2015-12-01

    In this study, SiC particles were first coated with Cr to form a layer that can protect the SiC particles from dissolution in the molten pool. Then, the Cr-SiC powder was injected into the tail of molten pool during plasma-transferred arc welding process (PTAW), where the temperature was relatively low, to prepare Cr-SiC particles reinforced Fe-based alloy coating. The microstructure and phase composition of the powder and surface coatings were analyzed, and the element distribution and hardness at the interfacial region were also evaluated. The protective layer consists of Cr3Si, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, which play an important role in the microstructure and mechanical properties. The protective layer is dissolved in the molten pool forming a flocculent region and a transition region between the SiC particles and the matrix. The tribological performance of the coating was also assessed using a ring-block sliding wear tester with GGr15 grinding ring under 490 and 980 N load. Cr-SiC particles-reinforced coating has a lower wear rate than the unreinforced coating.

  17. The Effect of SiC Particle Addition During FSW on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, M.; Abdollahzadeh, A.; Bagheri, B.; Omidvar, H.

    2015-12-01

    Welding and joining of magnesium alloys exert a profound effect on magnesium application expansion, especially in ground and air transportations where large-size, complex components are required. Due to specific physical properties of magnesium, its welding requires great control. In general, the solid-state nature of friction stir welding (FSW) process has been found to produce a low concentration of defects. In the current research, specimens from AZ31 magnesium alloy were welded together using the friction stir process with previously inserted SiC powder particles in the nugget zone. In other words, during the FSW process, the pre-placed SiC particles were stirred throughout the nugget zone of the weld. The results indicated that proper values of rotation and translation speeds led to good appearance of weld zone and suitable distribution of SiC particles producing increased weld strength. The comparison of the microstructures and mechanical properties of FS-welded AZ31 with those of FS-welded one using pre-placed SiC particles showed that the addition of SiC particles decreased the grain size and increased the strength and the formability index.

  18. A Detailed Study of the Chemistry and Mechanisms of Particle Growth during Nucleation Events in a Polluted Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, J.; Zhang, Q.; Stanier, C.; Pandis, S.; Canagaratna, M. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    increase of ultrafine organics was often observed at late morning or in early afternoon. There is evidence that condensation of photochemically produced secondary organic compounds might be the major mechanism for this increase. We also observed simultaneous rises of ultrafine organics and sulfate during the initial growth phase of the two events. Because the growth of ultrafine organics seemed to slow down when particles became more neutralized, it is possible that these initial growth was due to acid-catalyzed formation of secondary organic aerosol from photochemically produced oxidized organic vapors. Among all these four species, nitrate was always the least important in the growth.

  19. Effect of Particle Size on the Mechanical Properties of Semi-Solid, Powder-Rolled AA7050 Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xia; Liu, Yunzhong

    2016-12-01

    The AA7050 alloy strips can be successfully prepared by semi-solid powder rolling. The effect and factors of particle size on the microstructure, relative density, and mechanical properties were discussed. The results show that coarse starting powders require less liquid to achieve high relative density, and the formed strips have lower elongation compared with that prepared with the fine starting powders. The strength is more related to defects, whereas elongation partially depends on the grain size. Additionally, the fracture mechanism of strips prepared with fine powders is the ductile fracture because many dimples are observed. For relative density, when the initial liquid fraction is lower than 10%, the difference of deformation degree is the main factor. When the liquid fraction is higher than 10-20%, premature solidification and more particle interfaces are the two main factors.

  20. Physical and Mechanical Properties of LoVAR: A New Lightweight Particle-Reinforced Fe-36Ni Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, Timothy; Tricker, David; Tarrant, Andrew; Michel, Robert; Clune, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Fe-36Ni is an alloy of choice for low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) for optical, instrument and electrical applications in particular where dimensional stability is critical. This paper outlines the development of a particle-reinforced Fe-36Ni alloy that offers reduced density and lower CTE compared to the matrix alloy. A summary of processing capability will be given relating the composition and microstructure to mechanical and physical properties.

  1. Effects of Compressive Force, Particle Size and Moisture Content on Mechanical Properties of Biomass Grinds

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Sudhagar; Tabil, Lope Jr.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2006-03-01

    Chemical composition, moisture content, bulk and particle densities, and geometric mean particle size were determined to characterize grinds from wheat and barley straws, corn stover and switchgrass. The biomass grinds were compressed for five levels of compressive forces (1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4400 N) and three levels of particle sizes (3.2, 1.6 and 0.8 mm) at two levels of moisture contents (12% and 15% (wb) to establish the compression and relaxation data. Corn stover grind produced the highest compact density at low pressure during compression. Compressive force, particle size and moisture content of grinds significantly affected the compact density of barley straw, corn stover and switchgrass grinds. However, different particle sizes of wheat straw grind did not produce any significant difference on compact density. Barley straw grind had the highest asymptotic modulus among all other biomass grinds indicating that compact from barley straw grind were more rigid than those of other compacts. Asymptotic modulus increased with an increase in maximum compressive pressure. The trend of increase in asymptotic modulus (EA) with the maximum compressive pressure ( 0) was fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Keywords: Biomass grinds, chemical composition, compact density and asymptotic modulus

  2. Mechanism of natural organic matter removal by polyaluminum chloride: effect of coagulant particle size and hydrolysis kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Ni, Jinren; Qu, Jiuhui; Chow, Christopher W K; Liu, Hailong

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of natural organic matter (NOM) removal by AlCl(3) and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated through bench-scale tests. The fraction distributions of NOM and residual Al after coagulation in solution, colloid and sediment were analyzed as changes of coagulant dosage and pH. The influence of NOM, coagulant dose and pH on coagulation kinetics of AlCl(3) was investigated using photometric dispersion analyzer compared with PACl. Monomeric Al species (Al(a)) shows high ability to satisfy some unsaturated coordinate bonds of NOM to facilitate particle and NOM removal, while most of the flocs formed by Al(a) are small and difficult to settle. Medium polymerized Al species (Al(b)) can destabilize particle and NOM efficiently, while some flocs formed by Al(b) are not large and not easy to precipitate as compared to those formed by colloidal or solid Al species (Al(c)). Thus, Al(c) could adsorb and remove NOM efficiently. The removal of contaminant by species of Al(a), Al(b) and Al(c) follows mechanisms of complexation, neutralization and adsorption, respectively. Unlike preformed Al(b) in PACl, in-situ-formed Al(b) can remove NOM and particle more efficiently via the mechanism of further hydrolysis and transfer into Al(c) during coagulation. While the presence of NOM would reduce Al(b) formed in-situ due to the complexation of NOM and Al(a).

  3. Assessment of mechanical behavior of PLA composites reinforced with Mg micro-particles through depth-sensing indentations analysis.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, S C; Frutos, E; Benavente, R; Lorenzo, V; González-Carrasco, J L

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the mechanical characterization by depth-sensing indentation (DSI) of PLLA and PLDA composites reinforced with micro-particles of Mg (up to 15wt%), which is a challenging task since the indented volume must provide information of the bulk composite, i.e. contain enough reinforcement particles. The composites were fabricated by combining hot extrusion and compression moulding. Physico-chemical characterization by TGA and DSC indicates that Mg anticipates the thermal degradation of the polymers but does not compromise their stability during processing. Especial emphasis is devoted to determine the effect of strain rate and Mg content on mechanical behavior, thus important information about the visco-elastic behavior and time-dependent response of the composites is obtained. Relevant for the intended application is that Mg addition increases the elastic modulus and hardness of the polymeric matrices and induces a higher resistance to flow. The elastic modulus obtained by DSI experiments shows good agreement with that obtained by uniaxial compression tests. The results indicate that DSI experiments are a reliable method to calculate the modulus of polymeric composites reinforced with micro-particles. Taking into consideration the mechanical properties results, PLA/Mg composite could be used as substitute for biodegradable monolithic polymeric implants already in the market for orthopedics (freeform meshes, mini plates, screws, pins, …), craniomaxillofacial, or spine.

  4. An investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of electrochemically coated Ag(4)Sn dental alloy particles condensed in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquez, Jose Antonio

    As part of the ongoing scientific effort to develop a new amalgam-like material without mercury, a team of metallurgists and electrochemists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, announced in 1993 the development of a new Ag-Sn dental alloy system without mercury that sought to replace conventional dental amalgams. They used spherical Ag3Sn and Ag4Sn intermetallic dental alloy particles, commonly used in conventional dental alloys, and coated them with electrodeposited silver with newly-developed electrolytic and immersion techniques. The particles had relatively pure silver coatings that were closely adherent to the intermetalfic cores. These silver-coated particles, due to silver's plasticity at room temperature, were condensed into PlexiglasRTM molds with the aid of an acidic surface activating solution (HBF4) and a mechanical condensing device, producing a metal-matrix composite with Ag3,4Sn filler particles surrounded by a cold-welded silver matrix. Since silver strain hardens rather easily, the layers had to be condensed in less than 0.5 mm increments to obtain a dense structure. Mechanical testing at NIST produced compressive strength values equal to or greater than those of conventional dental amalgams. Because of its potential for eliminating mercury as a constituent in dental amalgam, this material created a stir in dental circles when first developed and conceivably could prove to be a major breakthrough in the field of dental restoratives. To date, the chief impediments to its approval for human clinical applications by the Food and Drug Administration are the potentially-toxic surface activating solution used for oxide reduction, and the high condensation pressures needed for cold welding because of the tendency for silver to strain harden. In this related study, the author, who has practiced general dentistry for 25 years, evaluates some of the mechanical and microstructural properties of these

  5. Process for preparation of large-particle-size monodisperse latexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderhoff, J. W.; Micale, F. J.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Kornfeld, D. M. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Monodisperse latexes having a particle size in the range of 2 to 40 microns are prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization in microgravity. A reaction mixture containing smaller monodisperse latex seed particles, predetermined amounts of monomer, emulsifier, initiator, inhibitor and water is placed in a microgravity environment, and polymerization is initiated by heating. The reaction is allowed to continue until the seed particles grow to a predetermined size, and the resulting enlarged particles are then recovered. A plurality of particle-growing steps can be used to reach larger sizes within the stated range, with enlarge particles from the previous steps being used as seed particles for the succeeding steps. Microgravity enables preparation of particles in the stated size range by avoiding gravity related problems of creaming and settling, and flocculation induced by mechanical shear that have precluded their preparation in a normal gravity environment.

  6. The classical and quantum mechanics of a particle on a knot

    SciTech Connect

    Sreedhar, V.V.

    2015-08-15

    A free particle is constrained to move on a knot obtained by winding around a putative torus. The classical equations of motion for this system are solved in a closed form. The exact energy eigenspectrum, in the thin torus limit, is obtained by mapping the time-independent Schrödinger equation to the Mathieu equation. In the general case, the eigenvalue problem is described by the Hill equation. Finite-thickness corrections are incorporated perturbatively by truncating the Hill equation. Comparisons and contrasts between this problem and the well-studied problem of a particle on a circle (planar rigid rotor) are performed throughout.

  7. Spin-Zero Particles must be Bosons: A New Proof within Nonrelativistic Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peshkin, Murray

    2006-01-01

    The key assumption is that of Leinaas and Myrheim and of Berry and Robbins, here specialized to spin zero: for n particles, the argument of the wave function should be the unordered multiplet { r 1, r 2,..., r n }. I also make use of the requirement that wave functions in the domain of the Hamiltonian must be continuous functions of the spatial variables. The new proof presented here has advantages of simplicity and transparency in comparison with earlier work based on the same two principles and it uses weaker assumptions, especially avoiding the use of rotations of the relative coordinate of identical particles.

  8. The mechanics of active matter: Broken-symmetry hydrodynamics of motile particles and granular layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Sriram; Simha, R. Aditi

    2006-09-01

    This articles reviews briefly our recent theoretical results on order, fluctuations and flow in collections of self-driven particles, in suspension or on a solid surface. The theoretical approach we have developed applies not only to collections of organisms such as schools of fish or collectively swimming bacteria, but also to motor-microtubule extracts with ATP and, most surprisingly, to agitated monolayers of orientable granular particles. We contrast the behaviour of these active systems with that of thermal equilibrium systems with the same symmetry. As an illustration of the role of activity we show that active smectics in three dimensions show true long-range order, unlike their thermal equilibrium counterparts.

  9. Consequences of Growing Up Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Greg J., Ed.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, Ed.

    The consequences and correlates of growing up poor as well as the mechanisms through which poverty influences children are explored. This book is organized with a primary focus on research findings and a secondary concern with policy implications. The chapters are: (1) "Poor Families, Poor Outcomes: The Well-Being of Children and Youth" (Jeanne…

  10. Particle film mechanisms of action that reduce environmental stress in 'Empire' apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heat stress is a limiting factor of plant productivity throughout the world, and kaolin-based particle films (PF) have demonstrated that the reflective nature of the resulting plant surface can increase plant productivity primarily by reducing temperature in fruit, leaf, and canopy. The purpose of ...

  11. Seepage erosion mechanisms of bank collapse: three-dimensional seepage particle mobilization and undercutting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage flow initiates undercutting, similar to development and headward migration of internal gullies, by liquefaction of soil particles, followed by mass wasting of the bank. Although seepage erosion has three-dimensional characteristics, two-dimensional lysimeters have been used in previous resea...

  12. MECHANISMS OF INORGANIC PARTICLE FORMATION DURING SUSPENSION HEATING OF SIMULATED AQEOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of measurements of metal partitioning between the fine condensation aerosol and the larger particles produced during rapid heating of polydisperse droplet streams of aqueous solutions containing nitrates of Cd, Pb, and Ni in a laboratory scale furnace. rim...

  13. Quantum mechanical treatment of a constrained particle on two dimensional sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangiri, L.; Panahi, H.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we study the motion of a particle on two dimensional sphere. By writing the Schrodinger equation, we obtain the wave function and energy spectra for three dimensional harmonic oscillator potential plus trigonometric Rosen-Morse non-central potential. By letting three special cases for intertwining operator, we investigate the energy spectra and wave functions for Smorodinsky-Winternitz potential model.

  14. Voyager 2 observations of energetic particle variations in the Ganymede wake region - A possible acceleration mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tariq, G.F.; Armstrong, T. P.; Collison, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    Voyager 2's passage through the downstream corotation region of Ganymede found disturbances in the field and particle environment. Large fluctuations in the intensities and energy spectra of ions in the 0.1-to 4.0-MeV interval were also observed with the low energy charged particle experiment. All ion species were evidently affected, up through medium (C, N, O) nuclei. Electrons intensities, while disturbed, did not behave similarly to the ions. These effects are probably associated with the wake produced by the absorption of Jovian magnetospheric corotating plasma by Ganymede. A two-dimensional theoretical model for perturbed field in the wake region is proposed and it is shown by direct numerical simulation of exact particle trajectories that such perturbations are capable of modulating the charged particle energies to about the observed amount for the observed magnetic and plasma parameters. Analysis shows that the energization process is dependent on the pitch angles of the energetic ions and the process itself is nonadiabatic (the Larmor radius is approximately the size of the disturbance region).

  15. Progress in Solving the Elusive Ag Transport Mechanism in TRISO Coated Particles: What is new?

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella Van Rooyen

    2014-10-01

    The TRISO particle for HTRs has been developed to an advanced state where the coating withstands internal gas pressures and retains fission products during irradiation and under postulated accidents. However, one exception is Ag that has been found to be released from high quality TRISO coated particles when irradiated and can also during high temperature accident heating tests. Although out- of- pile laboratory tests have never hither to been able to demonstrate a diffusion process of Ag in SiC, effective diffusion coefficients have been derived to successfully reproduce measured Ag-110m releases from irradiated HTR fuel elements, compacts and TRISO particles It was found that silver transport through SiC does not proceed via bulk volume diffusion. Presently grain boundary diffusion that may be irradiation enhanced either by neutron bombardment or by the presence of fission products such as Pd, are being investigated. Recent studies of irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), transmission kukuchi diffraction (TKD) patterns and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) have been used to further the understanding of Ag transport through TRISO particles. No silver was observed in SiC grains, but Ag was identified at triple-points and grain boundaries of the SiC layer in the TRISO particle. Cadmium was also found in some of the very same triple junctions, but this could be related to silver behavior as Ag-110m decays to Cd-110. Palladium was identified as the main constituent of micron-sized precipitates present at the SiC grain boundaries and in most SiC grain boundaries and the potential role of Pd in the transport of Ag will be discussed.

  16. The effect of structural defects in SiC particles on the static & dynamic mechanical response of a 15 volume percent SiC/6061-Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Song, S.G.; Zurek, A.K.; Gray, G.T. III

    1995-09-01

    Static and Dynamic mechanical tests, and microstructural examinations performed on a SiC particle reinforced 6061-Al matrix composite indicated that particle cracking significantly affected the strength, strain hardening, and failure mechanism of the composite. Cracks were observed to nucleate and propagate on stacking faults and interfaces between the various phases within the reinforcing SiC particles. Planar defects were the predominant artifacts seen in the SiC particles. Partial dislocations were also observed bounding the stacking faults within the reinforcement phase.

  17. Control of adhesion force between ceria particles and polishing pad in shallow trench isolation chemical mechanical planarization.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jihoon; Moon, Jinok; Bae, Jae-Young; Yoon, Kwang Seob; Sigmund, Wolfgang; Paik, Ungyu

    2014-06-01

    The adhesion force between ceria and polyurethane (PU) pad was controlled to remove the step height from cell region to peripheral region during Shallow Trench Isolation Chemical Mechanical Planarization (STI-CMP) for NAND flash. Picolinic acid was found to be adsorbed on ceria particles at pH 4.5 following a Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorbed amount of 0.36 mg/m2. The ceria suspension with full surface coverage of picolinic acid showed a threefold increase in the number of adhered ceria particles on the PU pad over non-coated ceria particles. It was shown that the coverage percent of picolinic acid on ceria corresponds well with the amount percent of adsorbed ceria on PU pad. The change in adsorbed particles was directly reflected in the CMP polishing process where significant improvements were achieved. Particularly, convex areas on the chip experienced higher friction force from the attached abrasives on the PU pad than concave areas. As a result, the convex areas have increased removal rate of step height compared to the ceria suspension without picolinic acid. The changing profiles of convex areas are reported during the step height reduction as a function of polishing time.

  18. A laboratory study of particle ploughing and pore-pressure feedback: A velocity-weakening mechanism for soft glacier beds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomason, J.F.; Iverson, N.R.

    2008-01-01

    If basal-water discharge and pressure are sufficiently high, a soft-bedded glacier will slip over its bed by ploughing, the process in which particles that span the ice-bed interface are dragged across the bed surface. Results of laboratory experiments indicate that resistance to ploughing can decrease with increasing ploughing velocity (velocity weakening). During ploughing at various velocities (15-400 ma-1), till was compacted in front of idealized particles, causing pore pressures there that were orders of magnitude higher than the ambient value. This excess pore pressure locally weakened the till in shear, thereby decreasing ploughing resistance by a factor of 3.0-6.6 with a six-fold increase in ploughing velocity. Characteristic timescales of pore-pressure diffusion and compaction down-glacier from ploughing particles depend on till diffusivity, ploughing velocity and sizes of ploughing particles. These timescales accurately predict the ranges of these variables over which excess pore pressure and velocity weakening occurred. Existing ploughing models do not account for velocity weakening. A new ploughing model with no adjustable parameters predicts ploughing resistance to no worse than 38% but requires that excess pore pressures be measured. Velocity weakening by this mechanism may affect fast glacier flow, sediment transport by bed deformation and basal seismicity.

  19. Evaluation of shear stress accumulation on blood components in normal and dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves using smoothed particle hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, S; Maleki, H; Hassan, I; Kadem, L

    2012-10-11

    Evaluating shear induced hemodynamic complications is one of the major concerns in design of the mechanical heart valves (MHVs). The monitoring of these events relies on both numerical simulations and experimental measurements. Currently, numerical approaches are mainly based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. A more straightforward evaluation can be based on the Lagrangian analysis of the whole blood. As a consequence, Lagrangian meshfree methods are more adapted to such evaluation. In this study, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a fully meshfree particle method originated to simulate compressible astrophysical flows, is applied to study the flow through a normal and a dysfunctional bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs). The SPH results are compared with the reference data. The accumulation of shear stress patterns on blood components illustrates the important role played by non-physiological flow patterns and mainly vortical structures in this issue. The statistical distribution of particles with respect to shear stress loading history provides important information regarding the relative number of blood components that can be damaged. This can be used as a measure of the response of blood components to the presence of the valve implant or any implantable medical device. This work presents the first attempt to simulate pulsatile flow through BMHVs using SPH method.

  20. Effect of mechanical vibration on platinum particle agglomeration and growth in proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diloyan, Georgiy

    The objective of the current research is to study the effect of mechanical vibration on catalyst layer degradation via Platinum (Pt) particle agglomeration and growth in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM Fuel Cell). This study is of great importance, since many PEM fuel cells operate under a vibrating environment, such as the case of vehicular applications, and this may influence the catalyst layer degradation and fuel cell performance. Through extensive literature review, there are only few researches that have been studied the effect of mechanical vibration on PEM fuel cells. These studies focused only on PEM fuel cell performance under vibration for less than 50 hours and none of them considered the degradation of the fuel cell components, such as MEA and its catalyst layer. To study the effect of the mechanical vibration on the catalyst layer an accelerated test with potential cycling was specially designed to simulate a typical vehicle driving condition. The length of the accelerated test was designed to be 300 hour with potential cycling comprised of idle running, constant load, triangle (variable) load and overload running at various mechanical vibration conditions. These mechanical vibration conditions were as follows: 1g 20 Hz, 1g 40 Hz, 4g 20 Hz and 4g 40 Hz. No vibration tests were also conducted to study the influence of operating time and were used as a baseline for comparison study. The series of accelerated tests were followed by microscopy and spectroscopy analyses using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-Ray diffraction (XRD). An ESEM was used to qualitatively analyze pristine and degraded catalyst. TEM and XRD were used to quantitatively analyze catalyst layer degradation via Pt agglomeration and growth in pristine and degraded states. For each test condition, PEM fuel cell performance by means of Voltage - Current (VI) curves was

  1. Direct path from microscopic mechanics to Debye shielding, Landau damping and wave-particle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escande, D. F.; Elskens, Yves; Doveil, F.

    2015-02-01

    The derivation of Debye shielding and Landau damping from the N-body description of plasmas is performed directly by using Newton’s second law for the N-body system. This is done in a few steps with elementary calculations using standard tools of calculus and no probabilistic setting. Unexpectedly, Debye shielding is encountered together with Landau damping. This approach is shown to be justified in the one-dimensional case when the number of particles in a Debye sphere becomes large. The theory is extended to accommodate a correct description of trapping and chaos due to Langmuir waves. On top of their well-known production of collisional transport, the repulsive deflections of electrons are shown to produce shielding, in such a way that each particle is shielded by all other ones, while keeping in uninterrupted motion.

  2. Formating double layer mechanism by electric charged particle stream in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan-jun, Ma; Qian-li, Yang; Xiao-qing, Li

    1998-08-01

    In this paper, two-fluid equations have been solved after having considered magnetic field generated by charged particle stream. Finally, the distribution of electric field Ez(z, r) and its growth rate γ in plasma have been obtained. From the expression of Ez(z, r) it can be known that the double layer has been formed. With the increase of disturbance γ will be larger, and finally this will result in the interruption of electric current and occurrence of burst.

  3. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-01

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 μm). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of ˜900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH-) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB)

  4. Mechanical properties of concrete containing a high volume of tire-rubber particles.

    PubMed

    Khaloo, Ali R; Dehestani, M; Rahmatabadi, P

    2008-12-01

    Due to the increasingly serious environmental problems presented by waste tires, the feasibility of using elastic and flexible tire-rubber particles as aggregate in concrete is investigated in this study. Tire-rubber particles composed of tire chips, crumb rubber, and a combination of tire chips and crumb rubber, were used to replace mineral aggregates in concrete. These particles were used to replace 12.5%, 25%, 37.5%, and 50% of the total mineral aggregate's volume in concrete. Cylindrical shape concrete specimens 15 cm in diameter and 30 cm in height were fabricated and cured. The fresh rubberized concrete exhibited lower unit weight and acceptable workability compared to plain concrete. The results of a uniaxial compressive strain control test conducted on hardened concrete specimens indicate large reductions in the strength and tangential modulus of elasticity. A significant decrease in the brittle behavior of concrete with increasing rubber content is also demonstrated using nonlinearity indices. The maximum toughness index, indicating the post failure strength of concrete, occurs in concretes with 25% rubber content. Unlike plain concrete, the failure state in rubberized concrete occurs gently and uniformly, and does not cause any separation in the specimen. Crack width and its propagation velocity in rubberized concrete are lower than those of plain concrete. Ultrasonic analysis reveals large reductions in the ultrasonic modulus and high sound absorption for tire-rubber concrete.

  5. Particle-scale CO2 adsorption kinetics modeling considering three reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Dong-Myung; Sun, Xin

    2013-09-01

    In the presence of water (H2O), dry and wet adsorptions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and physical adsorption of H2O happen concurrently in a sorbent particle. The three reactions depend on each other and have a complicated, but important, effect on CO2 capturing via a solid sorbent. In this study, transport phenomena in the sorbent were modeled, including the tree reactions, and a numerical solving procedure for the model also was explained. The reaction variable distribution in the sorbent and their average values were calculated, and simulation results were compared with experimental data to validate the proposed model. Some differences, caused by thermodynamic parameters, were observed between them. However, the developed model reasonably simulated the adsorption behaviors of a sorbent. The weight gained by each adsorbed species, CO2 and H2O, is difficult to determine experimentally. It is known that more CO2 can be captured in the presence of water. Still, it is not yet known quantitatively how much more CO2 the sorbent can capture, nor is it known how much dry and wet adsorptions separately account for CO2 capture. This study addresses those questions by modeling CO2 adsorption in a particle and simulating the adsorption process using the model. As adsorption temperature changed into several values, the adsorbed amount of each species was calculated. The captured CO2 in the sorbent particle was compared quantitatively between dry and wet conditions. As the adsorption temperature decreased, wet adsorption increased. However, dry adsorption was reduced.

  6. Influence of jet milling and particle size on the composition, physicochemical and mechanical properties of barley and rye flours.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Antonios; Kyriakakis, Georgios; Evageliou, Vasiliki; Protonotariou, Styliani; Mandala, Ioanna; Ritzoulis, Christos

    2017-01-15

    Finer barley and rye flours were produced by jet milling at two feed rates. The effect of reduced particle size on composition and several physicochemical and mechanical properties of all flours were evaluated. Moisture content decreased as the size of the granules decreased. Differences on ash and protein contents were observed. Jet milling increased the amount of damaged starch in both rye and barley flours. True density increased with decreased particle size whereas porosity and bulk density increased. The solvent retention capacity profile was also affected by jet milling. Barley was richer in phenolics and had greater antioxidant activity than rye. Regarding colour, both rye and barley flours when subjected to jet milling became brighter, whereas their yellowness was not altered significantly. The minimum gelation concentration for all flours was 16%w/v. Barley flour gels were stronger, firmer and more elastic than the rye ones.

  7. Quantum-mechanical relaxation model for characterization of fine particles magnetic dynamics in an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mischenko, I.; Chuev, M.

    2016-12-01

    Principal difference of magnetic nanoparticles from the bulk matter which cannot be ignored when constructing upon them combined metamaterials and modern devices is the essential influence on their behavior thermal fluctuations of the environment. These disturbances lead to specific distributions of the particles characteristics and to stochastic reorientations of their magnetic moments. On the basis of quantum-mechanical representation of the particle possessing intrinsic magnetic anisotropy and being placed onto the external magnetic field we developed general approach to describe equilibrium magnetization curves and relaxation Mössbauer spectra of magnetic nanoparticles for diagnostics of magnetic nanomaterials in the whole temperature or external field ranges. This approach has universal character and may be applied not only to the systems under thermal equilibrium, but may in principle describe macroscopic dynamical phenomena such as magnetization reversal.

  8. Characterization and modeling of illite crystal particles and growth mechanisms in a zoned hydrothermal deposit, Lake City, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bove, D.J.; Eberl, D.D.; McCarty, D.K.; Meeker, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Mean thickness measurements and crystal-thickness distributions (CTDs) of illite particles vary systematically with changes in hydrothermal alteration type, fracture density, and attendant mineralization in a large acid-sulfate/Mo-porphyry hydrothermal system at Red Mountain, near Lake City, Colorado. The hydrothermal illites characterize an extensive zone of quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration beneath two deeply rooted bodies of magmatic-related, quartz-alunite altered rock. Nineteen illites from a 3000 ft vertical drill hole were analyzed by XRD using the PVP-10 intercalation method and the computer program MudMaster (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique). Mean crystallite thicknesses, as determined from 001 reflections, range from 5-7 nanometers (nm) at depths from 0-1700 ft, then sharply increase to 10-16 nm at depths between 1800-2100 ft, and decrease again to 4-5 nm below this level. The interval of largest particle thickness correlates strongly with the zone of most intense quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration (QSP) and attendant high-density stockwork fracturing, and with the highest concentrations of Mo within the drill core. CTD shapes for the illite particles fall into two main categories: asymptotic and lognormal. The shapes of the CTDs are dependent on conditions of illite formation. The asymptotic CTDs correspond to a nucleation and growth mechanism, whereas surface-controlled growth was the dominant mechanism for the lognormal CTDs. Lognormal CTDs coincide with major through-going fractures or stockwork zones, whereas asymptotic CTDs are present in wallrock distal to these intense fracture zones. The increase in illite particle size and the associated zone of intense QSP alteration and stockwork veining was related by proximity to the dacitic magma(s), which supplied both reactants and heat to the hydrothermal system. However, no changes in illite polytype, which in other studies reflect temperature transitions, were observed within this interval.

  9. Toxicity of Mineral Dusts and a Proposed Mechanism for the Pathogenesis of Particle-Induced Lung Diseases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; Zeidler-Erdely, P.; Scully, R.R.; Meyers, V.; Wallace, W.; Hunter, R.; Renne, R.; McCluskey, R.; Castranova, V.; Barger, M.; Meighan, T.; James, J.T.

    2015-01-01

    Humans will set foot on the moon again. The lunar surface has been bombarded for 4 billion years by micrometeoroids and cosmic radiation, creating a layer of fine dust having a potentially reactive particle surface. To investigate the impact of surface reactivity (SR) on the toxicity of particles, and in particular, lunar dust (LD), we ground 2 Apollo 14 LD samples to increase their SR and compare their toxicity with those of unground LD, TiO2 and quartz. Intratracheally instilled at 0, 1, 2.5, or 7.5 mg/rat, all dusts caused dose-dependent increases in pulmonary lesions, and enhancement of biomarkers of toxicity assessed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). The toxicity of LD was greater than that of TiO2 but less than that of quartz. Three LDs differed 14-fold in SR but were equally toxic; quartz had the lowest SR but was most toxic. These results show no correlation between particle SR and toxicity. Often pulmonary toxicity of a dust can be attributed to oxidative stress (OS). We further observed dose-dependent and dustcytotoxicity- dependent increases in neutrophils. The oxidative content per BALF cell was also directly proportional to both the dose and cytotoxicity of the dusts. Because neutrophils are short-lived and release of oxidative contents after they die could initiate and promote a spectrum of lesions, we postulate a general mechanism for the pathogenesis of particle-induced diseases in the lung that involves chiefly neutrophils, the source of persistent endogenous OS. This mechanism explains why one dust (e.g., quartz or nanoparticles) is more toxic than another (e.g., micrometer-sized TiO2), why dust-induced lesions progress with time, and why lung cancer occurs in rats but not in mice and hamsters exposed to the same duration and concentration of dust.

  10. Growing for different ends.

    PubMed

    Catts, Oron; Zurr, Ionat

    2014-11-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative biology are usually discussed in relation to biomedical research and applications. However, hand in hand with developments of this field in the biomedical context, other approaches and uses for non-medical ends have been explored. There is a growing interest in exploring spin off tissue engineering and regenerative biology technologies in areas such as consumer products, art and design. This paper outlines developments regarding in vitro meat and leather, actuators and bio-mechanic interfaces, speculative design and contemporary artistic practices. The authors draw on their extensive experience of using tissue engineering for non-medical ends to speculate about what lead to these applications and their possible future development and uses. Avoiding utopian and dystopian postures and using the notion of the contestable, this paper also mentions some philosophical and ethical consideration stemming from the use of non-medical approaches to tissue constructs. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  11. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY: Material removal rate in chemical-mechanical polishing of wafers based on particle trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianxiu, Su; Xiqu, Chen; Jiaxi, Du; Renke, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Distribution forms of abrasives in the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) process are analyzed based on experimental results. Then the relationships between the wafer, the abrasive and the polishing pad are analyzed based on kinematics and contact mechanics. According to the track length of abrasives on the wafer surface, the relationships between the material removal rate and the polishing velocity are obtained. The analysis results are in accord with the experimental results. The conclusion provides a theoretical guide for further understanding the material removal mechanism of wafers in CMP.

  12. Studies on supercritical hydrothermal syntheses of uranium and lanthanide oxide particles and their reaction mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, DongKi; Tsukahara, Takehiko; Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Ikeda, Yasuhisa

    2015-11-01

    In order to develop preparation method of raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels by supercritical hydrothermal (SH) treatments, we have investigated behavior of aqueous solutions dissolving U(VI), Ln(III) (Ln: lanthanide = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), Cs(I), and Sr(II) nitrate or chloride compounds under SH conditions (temperature = 400-500 °C, pressure = 30-40 MPa). As a result, it was found that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) compounds produce LnO2, that Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Nd, Sm) compounds are hardly converted to their oxides, and that LnCl3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Tb), CsNO3, and Sr(NO3)2 do not form their oxide compounds. Furthermore, HNO2 species were detected in the liquid phase obtained after treating HNO3 aqueous solutions containing Ln(NO3)3 (Ln = Ce, Pr, Tb) under SH conditions, and also NO2 and NO compounds were found to be produced by decomposition of HNO3. From these results, it was proposed that the Ln oxide (LnO2) particles are directly formed with oxidation of Ln(III) to Ln(IV) by HNO3 and HNO2 species in the SH systems. Moreover, the uranyl ions were found to form U3O8 and UO3 depending on the concentration of HNO3. From these results, it is expected that the raw metal oxide particles for low decontaminated MOX fuels are efficiently prepared by the SH method.

  13. Cluster formation and drag reduction-proposed mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the bottom spray fluid-bed coater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li Kun; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Liew, Celine Valeria

    2015-04-01

    Bottom spray fluid-bed coating is a common technique for coating multiparticulates. Under the quality-by-design framework, particle recirculation within the partition column is one of the main variability sources affecting particle coating and coat uniformity. However, the occurrence and mechanism of particle recirculation within the partition column of the coater are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to visualize and define particle recirculation within the partition column. Based on different combinations of partition gap setting, air accelerator insert diameter, and particle size fraction, particle movements within the partition column were captured using a high-speed video camera. The particle recirculation probability and voidage information were mapped using a visiometric process analyzer. High-speed images showed that particles contributing to the recirculation phenomenon were behaving as clustered colonies. Fluid dynamics analysis indicated that particle recirculation within the partition column may be attributed to the combined effect of cluster formation and drag reduction. Both visiometric process analysis and particle coating experiments showed that smaller particles had greater propensity toward cluster formation than larger particles. The influence of cluster formation on coating performance and possible solutions to cluster formation were further discussed.

  14. Effects of thermal and mechanical processing on microstructures and desired properties of particle-strengthened copper-chromium-niobium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Kenneth Reed

    Ternary Cu-Cr-Nb alloys, particularly Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb (in at.%), have demonstrated good thermal stability as well as high strength and high conductivity at low and high temperatures. This behavior---due to the insoluble and strong Cr2Nb intermetallic phase that forms from the 2:1 Cr/Nb ratio---has put Cu-Cr-Nb alloys at the forefront as the next-generation particle-strengthened Cu alloys for aerospace applications. The initial powder material, produced by Ar-gas atomization, has a bimodal size distribution of Cr2Nb precipitates. Primary Cr2Nb precipitates, formed congruently from the melt, are typically ˜1 mum in size, and secondary Cr2Nb particles, precipitated from atomized solid solution, are typically 30--200 nm in size. This study provides the first detailed examination of the stability and strengthening effects of these particles in Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. Extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb exposed to temperatures of up to 1323 K for up to 100 hr sustained a drop in strength of only 25--30%. This investigation also revealed that the primary particles, usually situated at grain boundaries and triple points, provide a direct grain boundary pinning effect, and moreover, an indirect, grain boundary strengthening effect, but virtually no Orowan strengthening effect. The secondary Cr2Nb particles, typically found within grains (and to a lesser extent, at grain boundaries), do provide Orowan strengthening. For extruded material, it was established that grain-boundary strengthening (Hall-Petch effect) accounts for about two-thirds of the overall strength of material, with Orowan effects essentially contributing the remainder. The proven thermal stability, strengthening effects and, more importantly, strength retention, was the driving force to further improve upon these attributes via microstructural refinement of Cu-Cr-Nb alloys. Mechanical milling (MM) of Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb and Cu-8 Cr-2 Nb produced an increase in hot pressed Vickers hardness of 122% and 96%, respectively. However, MM also

  15. Mechanical alignment of particles for use in fabricating superconducting and permanent magnetic materials

    DOEpatents

    Nellis, William J.; Maple, M. Brian

    1992-01-01

    A method for mechanically aligning oriented superconducting or permanently magnetic materials for further processing into constructs. This pretreatment optimizes the final crystallographic orientation and, thus, properties in these constructs. Such materials as superconducting fibers, needles and platelets are utilized.

  16. Uncoating Mechanism of Carnation Mottle Virus Revealed by Cryo-EM Single Particle Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Qin-Fen; Gao, Yuan-Zhu; Xie, Li; Li, Hong-Mei; Hong, Jian; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Genome uncoating is a prerequisite for the successful infection of plant viruses in host plants. Thus far, little is known about the genome uncoating of the Carnation mottle virus (CarMV). Here, we obtained two reconstructions of CarMV at pH7 in the presence (Ca-pH7) and absence (EDTA-pH7) of calcium ions by Cryo-EM single particle analysis, which achieved 6.4 Å and 8 Å resolutions respectively. Our results showed that chelation of the calcium ions under EDTA-pH7 resulted in reduced interaction between the subunits near the center of the asymmetric unit but not overall size change of the viral particles, which indicated that the role of the calcium ions in CarMV was not predominantly for the structural preservation. Part of the genomic RNA closest to the capsid was found to be located near the center of the asymmetric unit, which might result from the interaction between genomic RNA and Lys194 residues. Together with the electrostatic potential analysis on the inner surface of the asymmetric unit, the reduced interaction near the center of the asymmetric unit under EDTA-pH7 suggested that the genome release of CarMV might be realized through the center of the asymmetric unit. PMID:26442593

  17. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Growing ... > For Parents > Growing Pains Print A A A What's in ...

  18. Comparing addition of ZrO II particles in micron and nano scale on microstructure and mechanical behavior of aluminum-matrix composites produced by vortex route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghchesara, M. A.; Karimi, M.; Abdizadeh, H.; Baharvandi, H. R.

    2007-07-01

    Aluminum matrix composites are important engineering materials in automotive, aerospace and other applications because of their low weight, high specific strength and better physical and mechanical properties compared to pure aluminum. ZrO II particles as reinforcement were selected to add aluminum with micron and nano size. Al/ZrO II composites were produced by direct incorporation (vortex method) in different temperatures and 5 volume percents of ZrO II particles. Microstructure of the samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical composition of the phases was studied by XRD. Hardness, and density of these composites were also measured. The microstructure and mechanical properties tests of composites and study the effect of particle size, resulted the better properties compared to matrix aluminum. Homogeneous dispersion of the reinforcement particles in the matrix aluminum was observed. The results show enhancing the composites properties for all samples compared to the monolithic alloy. However there are some differences in results because of particle size of ceramics and therefore differences between particles surface area. Maximum volume percent that can be added to A356 aluminum alloy is 5 vol.%, for nano ZrO II particles, but it seems that is more than 5 vol.% for micron particles. Increasing of viscosity, porosities and much more defects are caused by increasing volume percents and using smaller particles. The casting processing is difficult in these conditions. Furthermore, optimum temperatures of casting for micron and nano zirconia particles are not the same.

  19. Investigation of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Solid Particle Formation Mechanisms Using ILAS and AVHRR Observations in the Arctic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irie, H.; Pagan, K. L.; Tabazadeh, A.; Legg, M. J.; Sugita, T.

    2004-01-01

    Satellite observations of denitrification and ice clouds in the Arctic lower stratosphere in February 1997 are used with Lagrangian microphysical box model calculations to evaluate nucleation mechanisms of solid polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles. The occurrences of ice clouds are not correlated in time and space with the locations of back trajectories of denitrified air masses, indicating that ice particle surfaces are not always a prerequisite for the formation of solid PSCs that lead to denitrification. In contrast, the model calculations incorporating a pseudoheterogeneous freezing process occurring at the vapor-liquid interface can quantitatively explain most of the observed denitrification when the nucleation activation free energy for nitric acid dihydrate formation is raised by only approx.10% relative to the current published values. Once nucleated, the conversion of nitric acid dihydrate to the stable trihydrate phase brings the computed levels of denitrification closer to the measurements. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols and particles (0345, 4801); 0320 Atmospheric Composition and SblctureC: loud physics and chemistry; 0340 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Middle atmosphere-composition and chemistry

  20. A covariant extrapolation of the noncovariant two particle Wheeler-Feynman Hamiltonian from the Todorov equation and Dirac's constraint mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crater, Horace; Yang, Dujiu

    1991-09-01

    A semirelativistic expansion in powers of 1/c2 is canonically matched through order (1/c4) of the two-particle total Hamiltonian of Wheeler-Feynman vector and scalar electrodynamics to a similar expansion of the center of momentum (c.m.) total energy of two interacting particles obtained from covariant generalized mass shell constraints derived with the use of the classical Todorov equation and Dirac's Hamiltonian constraint mechanics. This determines through order 1/c4 the direct interaction used in the covariant Todorov constraint equation. We show that these interactions are momentum independent in spite of the extensive and complicated momentum dependence of the potential energy terms in the Wheeler-Feynman Hamiltonian. The invariant expressions for the relativistic reduced mass and energy of the fictitious particle of relative motion used in the Todorov equation are also dynamically determined through this order by this same procedure. The resultant covariant Todorov equation then not only reproduces the noncovariant Wheeler-Feynman dynamics through order 1/c4 but also implicitly provides a rather simple covariant extrapolation of it to all orders of 1/c2.

  1. Thermo-mechanical and Microstructural Characterization of Geopolymers with α-Al2O3 Particle Filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. S.; Jia, D. C.; He, P. G.; Wang, M. R.

    2009-10-01

    Geopolymers with different content of α-Al2O3 particle filler were prepared. The thermo-mechanical and microstructural characterization of the obtained geopolymers were systematically studied by flexural strength and thermal shrinkage measurements, TG-DTA (thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis), XRD (X-ray diffractometry), and SEM (scanning electron microscopy). The results show that the addition of α-Al2O3 particle filler not only increases the onset crystalline temperature but also reduces the crystalline velocity of the geopolymers. The thermal shrinkage of the geopolymers increases with increasing heat treatment temperatures due to the water loss and densification. The flexural strength of the geopolymers increases with the increase of heat treatment temperatures from RT to 1200 °C, and shows a sharp increase in the range from 600 °C to 800 °C due to crystallization and solidification. The increase in content of α-Al2O3 particle filler can clearly reduce the thermal shrinkage and maintain a higher porosity at high temperatures. However, it has no distinct influence on the flexural strength after heat treatment. This is mainly attributed to the higher thermal resistance and strength of α-Al2O3.

  2. Particle Engineering Via Mechanical Dry Coating in the Design of Pharmaceutical Solid Dosage Forms.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li; Morton, David A V; Zhou, Qi Tony

    2015-01-01

    Cohesive powders are problematic in the manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms because they exhibit poor flowability, fluidization and aerosolization. These undesirable bulk properties of cohesive powders represent a fundamental challenge in the design of efficient pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Recently, mechanical dry coating has attracted increasing attention as it can improve the bulk properties of cohesive powders in a cheaper, simpler, safer and more environment-friendly way than the existing solvent-based counterparts. In this review, mechanical dry coating techniques are outlined and their potential applications in formulation and manufacturing of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms are discussed. Reported data from the literature have shown that mechanical dry coating holds promise for the design of superior pharmaceutical solid formulations or manufacturing processes by engineering the interfaces of cohesive powders in an efficient and economical way.

  3. Equilibrium statistical mechanics of self-consistent wave-particle system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elskens, Yves

    2005-10-01

    The equilibrium distribution of N particles and M waves (e.g. Langmuir) is analysed in the weak-coupling limit for the self-consistent hamiltonian model H = ∑rpr^2 /(2m) + ∑jφjIj+ ɛ∑r,j(βj/ kj) (kjxr- θj) [1]. In the canonical ensemble, with temperature T and reservoir velocity v < jφj/kj, the wave intensities are almost independent and exponentially distributed, with expectation = kBT / (φj- kjv). These equilibrium predictions are in agreement with Monte Carlo samplings [2] and with direct simulations of the dynamics, indicating equivalence between canonical and microcanonical ensembles. [1] Y. Elskens and D.F. Escande, Microscopic dynamics of plasmas and chaos (IoP publishing, Bristol, 2003). [2] M-C. Firpo and F. Leyvraz, 30th EPS conf. contr. fusion and plasma phys., P-2.8 (2003).

  4. Transformation mechanism of Te particles into Te nanotubes and nanowires during solvothermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2006-04-01

    Tellurium (Te) nanotubes and nanowires have been controllably and directly transformed from the commercially available Te particles by the solvothermal process in different solvents. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern and the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern reveal that the as-synthesized Te nanotubes and nanowires are single crystalline and hexagonal in nature. The morphology evolution of the Te nanostructures along with the reaction time indicates that the formation of Te nanotubes or nanowires resulted from the rolling of Te nanobelt. Moreover, a semi-experimental parameter taking into account the physiochemical properties of solvents, including the surface tension, vapor pressure and Hansen parameters, is presented to judge the formation of Te nanotubes or nanowires.

  5. Non-thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Sironi, Lorenzo; Narayan, Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Ms <~ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with Ms = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ~= 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  6. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ≅ 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  7. Mechanical Properties for an Arbitrary Arrangement of Rigid Spherical Particles Embedded in an Elastic Matrix (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-13

    Lin, C. F., Seaman, L., XDT Investigations by Computational Simulations of Mechanical Response Using a New Viscous Intenal Damage Model, 11th...International Detonation Symposium, Snowmass , CO, August 30-September 4, 1998 Office Of Naval Research ONR-33300-5, 170-178. Phan-Thien, N., Kim, S

  8. Interfacial Microstructure and Enhanced Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber Composites Caused by Growing Generation 1-4 Dendritic Poly(amidoamine) on a Fiber Surface.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Zhang, Ruliang; Gao, Fucheng; He, Maoshuai; Wang, Chengguo; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Lifen; Cui, Hongzhi

    2016-08-23

    In an attempt to improve the mechanical properties of carbon fiber composites, propagation of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by in situ polymerization on a carbon fiber surface was performed. During polymerization processes, PAMAM was grafted on carbon fiber by repeated Michael addition and amidation reactions. The changes in surface microstructure and the chemical composition of carbon fibers before and after modification were investigated by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. All the results indicated that PAMAM was successfully grown on the carbon fiber surface. Such propagation could significantly increase the surface roughness and introduce sufficient polar groups onto the carbon fiber surface, enhancing the surface wettability of carbon fiber. The fractured surface of carbon fiber-reinforced composites showed a great enhancement of interfacial adhesion. Compared with those of desized fiber composites, the interlaminar shear strength and interfacial shear strength of PAMAM/fiber-reinforced composites showed increases of 55.49 and 110.94%, respectively.

  9. Mechanism of follicular trapping: similarities and differences in trapping of antibody-complexed antigens and carbon particles in the follicles of the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Groeneveld, P.H.; Eikelenboom, P.; van Rooijen, N.

    1983-02-01

    Both immune complexes and carbon particles were trapped in spleen follicles soon after intravenous injection. The localization pattern of carbon particles and immune complexes were identical 24 hr after injection. Since there is no reason to believe that lymphocytes are involved in the transport of carbon particles from the marginal zone towards the follicle centers, these results indicate that follicular trapping is based on a purely mechanical process. Pretreatment with endotoxin completely prevented the trapping of immune complexes but not carbon particles. Endotoxin administered after the injection of immune complexes caused the rapid removal of trapped complexes from the follicles. However, the effect of endotoxin on trapped carbon particles was less pronounced. Apart from a mechanical trapping of diffusing compounds in the follicular web, a distinct phase is suggested in which immune complexes are fixed to and retained on the surface of the follicular dendritic cells.

  10. Structure of Aichi Virus 1 and Its Empty Particle: Clues to Kobuvirus Genome Release Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Sabin, Charles; Füzik, Tibor; Škubník, Karel; Pálková, Lenka; Lindberg, A. Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aichi virus 1 (AiV-1) is a human pathogen from the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family. Worldwide, 80 to 95% of adults have antibodies against the virus. AiV-1 infections are associated with nausea, gastroenteritis, and fever. Unlike most picornaviruses, kobuvirus capsids are composed of only three types of subunits: VP0, VP1, and VP3. We present here the structure of the AiV-1 virion determined to a resolution of 2.1 Å using X-ray crystallography. The surface loop puff of VP0 and knob of VP3 in AiV-1 are shorter than those in other picornaviruses. Instead, the 42-residue BC loop of VP0 forms the most prominent surface feature of the AiV-1 virion. We determined the structure of AiV-1 empty particle to a resolution of 4.2 Å using cryo-electron microscopy. The empty capsids are expanded relative to the native virus. The N-terminal arms of capsid proteins VP0, which mediate contacts between the pentamers of capsid protein protomers in the native AiV-1 virion, are disordered in the empty capsid. Nevertheless, the empty particles are stable, at least in vitro, and do not contain pores that might serve as channels for genome release. Therefore, extensive and probably reversible local reorganization of AiV-1 capsid is required for its genome release. IMPORTANCE Aichi virus 1 (AiV-1) is a human pathogen that can cause diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and fever. AiV-1 is identified in environmental screening studies with higher frequency and greater abundance than other human enteric viruses. Accordingly, 80 to 95% of adults worldwide have suffered from AiV-1 infections. We determined the structure of the AiV-1 virion. Based on the structure, we show that antiviral compounds that were developed against related enteroviruses are unlikely to be effective against AiV-1. The surface of the AiV-1 virion has a unique topology distinct from other related viruses from the Picornaviridae family. We also determined that AiV-1 capsids form compact shells

  11. Development of high-porosity resorcinol formaldehyde aerogels with enhanced mechanical properties through improved particle necking under CO2 supercritical conditions.

    PubMed

    Alshrah, Mohammed; Tran, Minh-Phuong; Gong, Pengjian; Naguib, Hani E; Park, Chul B

    2017-01-01

    A new high porosity resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogel with improved particle necking is presented in this work. This RF aerogel was developed under CO2 supercritical drying conditions without any structural shrinkage. The water content and the catalyst percentage were varied to modify the particles' nucleation and growth mechanisms and to control particle-particle connections. The nucleation mechanism solely dependent on the initial catalyst percentage; the number of nuclei increased with the catalyst percentage. However, the growth and connection of the particles dependent on both the water content and the catalyst percentage through their effect on the pH value. As the water content increased to have a larger void fraction, the pH value decreased. Consequently, the spherical growth of the particles became dominant and, thereby, the connection of the particles became more difficult. But as the catalyst percentage increased, the pH value increased, and the connection of the particles became facilitated with the formation of necks around the particles. As a result, the semi-fibril-like structure was developed with a high void fraction. A 30% increase in the structural elasticity and a very low thermal conductivity of 0.0249W/mK were obtained.

  12. A mechanism for the abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flare particle events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cartwright, B. G.; Mogro-Campero, A.

    1973-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed to account for the recently reported abundance enhancements of heavy nuclei in solar flares. The mechanism requires two acceleration stages for its operation: First, fully stripped ions are accelerated to suprathermal energies, and subsequently, a fraction of these ions are Fermi accelerated to higher energies. It is shown that because injection into Fermi acceleration is rigidity dependent and the ions may pick up electrons during transport to the Fermi acceleration region, an enhancement of the abundances of heavy nuclei can occur. The degree of the enhancement depends on a number of factors particular to each flare, so that the degree of enhancement may be variable from flare to flare, or may be a function of time within a given flare. In some flares, conditions may be such that no enhancement would be expected.

  13. Dynamics of classical particles in oval or elliptic billiards with a dispersing mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, Diogo Ricardo da; Dettmann, Carl P.; Oliveira, Juliano A. de; Leonel, Edson D.

    2015-03-15

    Some dynamical properties for an oval billiard with a scatterer in its interior are studied. The dynamics consists of a classical particle colliding between an inner circle and an external boundary given by an oval, elliptical, or circle shapes, exploring for the first time some natural generalizations. The billiard is indeed a generalization of the annular billiard, which is of strong interest for understanding marginally unstable periodic orbits and their role in the boundary between regular and chaotic regions in both classical and quantum (including experimental) systems. For the oval billiard, which has a mixed phase space, the presence of an obstacle is an interesting addition. We demonstrate, with details, how to obtain the equations of the mapping, and the changes in the phase space are discussed. We study the linear stability of some fixed points and show both analytically and numerically the occurrence of direct and inverse parabolic bifurcations. Lyapunov exponents and generalized bifurcation diagrams are obtained. Moreover, histograms of the number of successive iterations for orbits that stay in a cusp are studied. These histograms are shown to be scaling invariant when changing the radius of the scatterer, and they have a power law slope around −3. The results here can be generalized to other kinds of external boundaries.

  14. Performance of mixed formulations for the particle finite element method in soil mechanics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monforte, Lluís; Carbonell, Josep Maria; Arroyo, Marcos; Gens, Antonio

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a computational framework for the numerical analysis of fluid-saturated porous media at large strains. The proposal relies, on one hand, on the particle finite element method (PFEM), known for its capability to tackle large deformations and rapid changing boundaries, and, on the other hand, on constitutive descriptions well established in current geotechnical analyses (Darcy's law; Modified Cam Clay; Houlsby hyperelasticity). An important feature of this kind of problem is that incompressibility may arise either from undrained conditions or as a consequence of material behaviour; incompressibility may lead to volumetric locking of the low-order elements that are typically used in PFEM. In this work, two different three-field mixed formulations for the coupled hydromechanical problem are presented, in which either the effective pressure or the Jacobian are considered as nodal variables, in addition to the solid skeleton displacement and water pressure. Additionally, several mixed formulations are described for the simplified single-phase problem due to its formal similitude to the poromechanical case and its relevance in geotechnics, since it may approximate the saturated soil behaviour under undrained conditions. In order to use equal-order interpolants in displacements and scalar fields, stabilization techniques are used in the mass conservation equation of the biphasic medium and in the rest of scalar equations. Finally, all mixed formulations are assessed in some benchmark problems and their performances are compared. It is found that mixed formulations that have the Jacobian as a nodal variable perform better.

  15. Investigation of the reaction mechanism for the four-particle photodisintegration of a carbon nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanas'ev, S. N.; Gorbenko, E. S.; Khodyachikh, A. F.

    2007-05-01

    The four-particle photodisintegration of a carbon nucleus in the reactions 12C(γ, p)3H2α and 12C(γ, n)3H2α is investigated by a method that employs a diffusion chamber in a magnetic field. It is shown that these reactions proceed according a sequential-type scheme: excited states of 11B and 11C nuclei decay to weakly excited states of 8Be, 7Li, and 7Be nuclei. It is concluded that nucleons are knocked out from the s shell. In the excitation curve for the 2α system in the reaction 12C(γ, p)3H2α, a resonance is found between the maxima corresponding to the ground and the first excited state of the 8Be nucleus, and this resonance is identified as a ghost anomaly. The branching fractions of the decay modes are determined. The angular distributions of nucleons in the reaction c.m. frame are measured. The energy dependence of the asymmetry coefficient for the angular distributions is obtained. A fast increase in this coefficient is observed in the energy range 38 40 MeV. It is concluded that the asymmetry coefficient depends on the excitation energy of the final nucleus in the region of intermediate photon energies.

  16. Quantum mechanics of a constrained particle and the problem of prescribed geometry-induced potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Luiz C. B.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; Ribeiro, Fábio G.

    2017-04-01

    The experimental techniques have evolved to a stage where various examples of nanostructures with non-trivial shapes have been synthesized, turning the dynamics of a constrained particle and the link with geometry into a realistic and important topic of research. Some decades ago, a formalism to deduce a meaningful Hamiltonian for the confinement was devised, showing that a geometry-induced potential (GIP) acts upon the dynamics. In this work we study the problem of prescribed GIP for curves and surfaces in Euclidean space R3, i.e., how to find a curved region with a potential given a priori. The problem for curves is easily solved by integrating Frenet equations, while the problem for surfaces involves a non-linear 2nd order partial differential equation (PDE). Here, we explore the GIP for surfaces invariant by a 1-parameter group of isometries of R3, which turns the PDE into an ordinary differential equation (ODE) and leads to cylindrical, revolution, and helicoidal surfaces. Helicoidal surfaces are particularly important, since they are natural candidates to establish a link between chirality and the GIP. Finally, for the family of helicoidal minimal surfaces, we prove the existence of geometry-induced bound and localized states and the possibility of controlling the change in the distribution of the probability density when the surface is subjected to an extra charge.

  17. Theoretical and Computational Methods Towards a Relativistic Quantum Mechanical Many-Particle Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tony C.

    It has been shown that the Fokker-Wheeler-Feynman (FWF) model could be rewritten to yield a physically acceptable relativistic many-particle Lagrangian. Contrary to Wheeler and Feynman's postulates, the model satisfies causality and can be generalised to include arbitrary forces. The 1/c power series of the FWF Lagrangian to order (1/c) ^4 contains accelerations. A procedure of quantizing the theory for such a Lagrangian is presented and it is then found that the accelerations approximately introduce an independent harmonic mode which is in agreement with resonances recently observed in Positronium collisions processes. This result may be of fundamental physical importance and requires further investigation. However, the refinement of this calculation requires the creation of new computational tools. To this end, a new method is presented in which both the eigenfunctions and eigenenergies are determined algebraically as power series in the order parameter, where each coefficient of the series is obtained in closed form. This method avoids the complications of a basis set and makes extensive use of symbolic computation. It is then applied to two model problems, namely the one-body Dirac equation for testing purposes and a special case of the two-body Dirac equation for which one obtains previously unknown closed form solutions.

  18. Apparatus for growing crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Thomas J. (Inventor); Witt, August F. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An improved apparatus and method for growing crystals from a melt employing a heat pipe, consisting of one or more sections, each section serving to control temperature and thermal gradients in the crystal as it forms inside the pipe.

  19. How Your Baby Grows

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Pregnancy week by week Pregnancy week by week Week by week Videos Swipe to advance Learn ... grows each week during pregnancy. Pick your week. Weeks 1-2 Conception (also called fertilization) usually happens ...

  20. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  1. High-resolution chemical analysis by STEM-EELS of nanosized oxide particles in a mechanically-alloyed FeCrAl intermetallic

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.G. Muñoz-Morris, M.A.

    2015-05-15

    The chemical composition of nanosized oxides has been analysed in a mechanically-alloyed (MA) iron–chromium–aluminium intermetallic containing yttria additions using an aberration-corrected, high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The oxide particles are seen to contain yttrium and oxygen only, but very little of the matrix metallic elements, while the matrix in the immediate vicinity shows a very low iron content. Possible reasons for the change of matrix composition outside the particle-matrix interface are discussed. - Highlights: • High-resolution chemical analysis of oxide particles was performed using STEM-EELS. • Oxide particles contain Y and O but essentially no elements from the Fe–Cr–Al matrix. • The matrix immediately outside the particles appears to be depleted in Fe. • Diffusion of Y during particle growth possibly transports vacancies to the interface.

  2. Growing America's Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2016-06-01

    The emerging U.S. bioenergy industry provides a secure and growing supply of transportation fuels, biopower, and bioproducts produced from a range of abundant, renewable biomass resources. Bioenergy can help ensure a secure, sustainable, and economically sound future by reducing U.S. dependence on foreign oil, developing domestic clean energy sources, and generating domestic green jobs. Bioenergy can also help address growing concerns about climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions to create a healthier environment for current and future generations.

  3. Chimeric Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Displaying Conserved Enterovirus 71 Epitopes Elicit Protective Neutralizing Antibodies in Mice through Divergent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiaohua; Ku, Zhiqiang; Liu, Qingwei; Wang, Xiaoli; Shi, Jinping; Zhang, Yunfang; Kong, Liangliang; Cong, Yao

    2014-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major causative agent of hand, food, and mouth disease, which frequently occurs in young children. Since there are 11 subgenotypes (A, B1 to B5, and C1 to C5) within EV71, an EV71 vaccine capable of protecting against all of these subgenotypes is desirable. We report here the vaccine potential and protective mechanism of two chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) presenting conserved neutralizing epitopes of EV71. We show that fusions of hepatitis B core antigen (HBc) with the SP55 or SP70 epitope of EV71, designated HBcSP55 and HBcSP70, respectively, can be rapidly generated and self-assembled into VLPs with the epitopes displayed on the surface. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs induced carrier- and epitope-specific antibody responses in mice. Anti-HBcSP55 and anti-HBcSP70 sera, but not anti-HBc sera, were able to neutralize in vitro multiple genotypes and strains of EV71. Importantly, passive immunization with anti-HBcSP55 or anti-HBcSP70 sera protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 infections. Interestingly, anti-HBcSP70 sera could inhibit EV71 attachment to susceptible cells, whereas anti-HBcSP55 sera could not. However, both antisera were able to neutralize EV71 infection in vitro at the postattachment stage. The divergent mechanism of neutralization and protection conferred by anti-SP70 and anti-SP55 sera is in part attributed to their respective ability to bind authentic viral particles. Collectively, our study not only demonstrates that chimeric VLPs displaying the SP55 and SP70 epitopes are promising candidates for a broad-spectrum EV71 vaccine but also reveals distinct mechanisms of neutralization by the SP55- and SP70-targeted antibodies. PMID:24131712

  4. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Processing on Microstructures and Desired Properties of Particle-Strengthened Cu-Cr-Nb Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Kenneth Reed

    2000-01-01

    Ternary Cu-Cr-Nb alloys, particularly Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb (in at.%), have demonstrated good thermal stability as well as high strength and conductivity at elevated temperatures. The initial powder material has a bimodal size distribution of Cr2Nb precipitates. Primary Cr2Nb precipitates are approx. 1 micron, and secondary Cr2Nb particles are 30-200 nm. The particle coarsening was analyzed and found to follow LSW-type behavior, This study provides a detailed examination of the stability and strengthening effects of Cr2Nb particles. This investigation also revealed that the primary particles provide direct grain boundary pinning and indirect grain boundary strengthening but virtually no Orowan strengthening. The secondary particles found within grains do provide Orowan strengthening. For extruded material, grain bound-ary strengthening (Hall-Petch effect) accounts for two-thirds of the strength with Orowan effects contributing the remainder. The proven advantages of Cu-Cr-Nb were the motivation to improve these attributes via microstructural refinement. Mechanical milling (MM) of Cu- 4 Cr-2 Nb and Cu-8 Cr-2 Nb produced an increase in hot pressed Vickers hardness of 122% and 96%, respectively. The increase in hardness was more due to Cu grain-size refinement than to Cr,,Nb refinement. This study also demonstrated enhanced stability of MM Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb. Hot pressed 4 h milled Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb experienced only a 22% drop in hardness when annealed at 1273 K for 50 h versus a 30% drop for extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb. The goal of improving the strength and stability of Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb to better than such properties for as- extruded Cu-8 Cr-4 Nb has been met. In addition, a figure-of-merit (FOM) coupling hardness and thermal conductivity was maximized for the case of 4 h milled Cu-4 Cr-2 Nb material. Overall, Cu-Cr-Nb alloys not only possess high strength, conductivity and thermal stability but also can be further developed to improve strength and stability.

  5. Structure, phase content and mechanical properties of aluminium with hard particles after shock-wave compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkov, S.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Turuntaev, I.

    2015-04-01

    The possibilities to combine metal and metal oxide powders in various compositions open a broad range of mechanical and thermal behavior. When using in nanostructured components the resulting materials might exhibit even more interesting properties, like product effectiveness, tensile strength, wear resistance, endurance and corrosion resistance. Intermetallics like TiAl could be obtained as TiAlx in a quality similar to that obtained from melting where only eutectic mixture can be produced. Similar effects are possible when compacting nanoceramic powders whereas these can be combined with intermetallics. Currently, it is very difficult to produce wires and special shaped parts from high temperature superconducting materials. The compacting by explosives could solve this problem.The present paper uses explosion compacting of Al nanoparticles to create nanocomposite with increased physico-mechanical properties. Russian civil explosive Uglenit was chosen as high energy material (HEM) for shock-wave compaction. The different schemes and conditions were suggested to run the explosion process. Al nanoparticles as produced by electric wire explosion contain 8-10% of aluminum oxide. That aluminum oxide can serve as strengthening material in the final nanocomposite which may be generated in various compositions by explosive compacting. Further modifications of nanocomposites were obtained when including nanodiamonds into the mixture with aluminum nanoparticles with different percentages. The addition of nanodiamonds results in a substantial strengthening effect. The experiments with compacting aluminum nanoparticles by explosives are described in detail including the process variations and conditions. The physico-mechanical properties of the nanocomposites are determined and discussed by considering the applied conditions. Especially, microstructure and phases of the obtained nanocomposites are analyzed by X-ray diffraction.

  6. Thiol surface complexation on growing CdS clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Swayambunathan, V.; Hayes, D.; Schmidt, K.H.; Liao, Y.X.; Meisel, D. )

    1990-05-09

    The growth of small CdS colloidal particles has been initiated by pulse radiolytic release of sulfide from thiol (3-mercapto-1,2-propanediol, RSH) in the presence of Cd{sup 2+} ions. The kinetics and stoichiometry of the ensuring reactions were followed by conductivity, absorption spectroscopy, and light-scattering techniques. The final CdS product has been identified by electron diffraction. The formation of Cd-thiolate complexes at the surface of the particles is indicated by conductivity and by energy dispersive analysis of X-ray (EDAX) results. The rate of formation of CdS clusters is strongly pH dependent due to the pH effect on the stability of Dd{sup 2+}/HS{sup {minus}} complexes. At low pHs (4.0-5.3) the growth mechanism is proposed to be primarily a cluster-molecule process. At this pH range Cd{sup 2+} ions at the CdS particle surface complex with thiolate ions stronger than in the bulk of the solution. The size control of the particles by thiols is proposed to result from a competition of thiolate ions with HS{sup {minus}} ions for cadmium ions at the surface of the growing particles.

  7. Mechanical strain induced valley-dependent quantum magnetotransport of Dirac particles in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Shengli; Liu, Daqing; Wang, Vei

    2015-12-01

    We have explored the mechanical strain effects on the magnetotransport in graphene with a 1D electrostatic periodic potential in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. We find that, in a strong magnetic field regime, the conductivity exhibits a superposition of the Shubnikov-de Haas and Weiss oscillations in each valley due to the electrical modulation. Especially, the strain removes the valley degeneracy of Landau levels in inversion symmetric Dirac cones. Accordingly, this causes the valley-dependence of the conductivity. These phenomena, absent in a freestanding graphene, are a consequence of the anomalous spectrum of carriers in a fully stained graphene.

  8. In Situ Reaction Kinetics and Microstructure Evolution in Preparing Particle-Containing Copper Alloys by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mingxing; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Xukai

    2015-04-01

    To improve alloy properties and the distribution level of TiB2 particles in the alloy matrix, mechanical alloying was used to prepare the Cu-TiB2 alloy. But even after long-time ball milling, the in situ reaction between Cu-B and Cu-Ti alloy powders still cannot be observed in the whole process. The kinetics of the in situ reaction during high-temperature heat treatment was first investigated and led to the following results. With the increase of heat-treatment time t or diffusion depth X, both the moving speed Δ x/Δ t of reaction front edge and nucleation rate Z( x) of TiB2 particles decrease at a fast rate and finally stabilize at a very low level. The falling rate of moving speed Δ x/Δ t increases with the decrease of temperature. Although the C Ti' value of the Ti element gives a poor effect on the moving speed Δ x/Δ t, it significantly affects the nucleation rate of TiB2 particles, and its falling rate increases with a decreasing C Ti' value. And for the same diffusion depth X and C Ti', the nucleation rate of TiB2 decreases with increasing the heat-treatment temperature. These results were verified by the microstructure change after the heat treatments at temperatures of 773 K, 973 K, and 1173 K (500 °C, 700 °C, and 900 °C), respectively. Finally, the best combination of ball-milling and heat-treatment conditions was obtained.

  9. Investigating longitudinal changes in the mechanical properties of MCF-7 cells exposed to paclitaxol using particle tracking microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Bekah, Devesh; Rui, Min; Kumaradas, J. Carl; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-02-01

    Evidence suggests that compression and shear wave elastography are sensitive to the mechanical property changes occuring in dying cells following chemotherapy, and can hence be used to monitor cancer treatment response. A qualitative and quantitative understanding of the mechanical changes at the cellular level would allow to better infer how these changes affect macroscopic tissue mechanical properties and therefore allow the optimization of elastographic techniques (such as shear wave elastography) for the monitoring of cancer therapy. We used intracellular particle tracking microrheology (PTM) to investigate the mechanical property changes of cells exposed to paclitaxol, a mitotic inhibitor used in cancer chemotherapy. The average elastic and viscous moduli of the cytoplasm of treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells were calculated for frequency ranges between 0.2 and 100 rad s-1 (corresponding to 0.03 and 15.92 Hz, respectively). A significant increase in the complex shear modulus of the cell cytoplasm was detected at 12 h post treatment. At 24 h after drug exposure, the elastic and viscous moduli increased by a total of 191.3 Pa (>8000×) and 9 Pa (˜9×), respectively for low frequency shear modulus measurements (at 1 rad s-1). At higher frequencies (10 rad s-1), the elastic and viscous moduli increased by 188.5 Pa (˜60×) and 1.7 Pa (˜1.1×), respectively. Our work demonstrates that PTM can be used to measure changes in the mechanical properties of treated cells and that cell elasticity significantly increases by 24 h after chemotherapy exposure.

  10. Stress-induced birefringence in elastomers doped with ferrofluid magnetic particles: Mechanical and optical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sena, C.; Bailey, C.; Godinho, M. H.; Figueirinhas, J. L.; Palffy-Muhoray, P.; Figueiredo Neto, A. M.

    2006-05-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles from magnetic colloidal suspensions were incorporated in the urethane/urea elastomer (PU/PBDO) by adding to the prepolymers solution in toluene diverse amounts of magnetite grains. It is shown that ferrofluid grains can be efficiently incorporated into the elastomer according to this procedure. Mechanical and optical experiments performed show that the elastomer preparation procedure (casting) introduces a structural anisotropy on the optically isotropic sample. This fact is put in evidence by the measurements of the Young's moduli and orientation of the sample's optical axis under stress. The dependence of the phase shift of both the pure and ferrofluid-doped elastomer samples under strain is linear, and the strain-optic coefficient is show to be linear with the ferrofluid concentration.

  11. New nano-particle-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels by conventional thermo-mechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Maziasz, P. J.

    2007-08-01

    For increased fusion power plant efficiency, steels for operation at 650 °C and higher are sought. Based on the science of precipitate strengthening, a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) was developed that increased the strength from room temperature to 700 °C of commercial nitrogen-containing steels and new steels designed for the TMT. At 700 °C increases in yield stress of 80 and 200% were observed for a commercial steel and a new steel, respectively, compared to commercial normalized-and-tempered steels. Creep-rupture strength was similarly improved. Depending on the TMT, precipitates were up to eight-times smaller at a number density four orders of magnitude greater than those in a conventionally heat treated steel of similar composition.

  12. Mechanical and biological properties of hydroxyapatite reinforced with 40 vol. % titanium particles for use as hard tissue replacement.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chenglin; Xue, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Jingchuan; Yin, Zhongda

    2004-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA)-based composite reinforced with 40 vol. % Ti particles was fabricated by the optimal technical condition of hot pressing technique. The mechanical and biological properties of the composite were studied by mechanical and in vivo methods. The experimental results show that HA and Ti phases are the predominant phases of the composite with partially decomposition of HA phase into alpha-Ca3(PO4)2 and Ca4O(PO4)2. Comparing with HA-20 vol. % Ti composite manufactured under the same conditions, HA-40 vol. % Ti composite with similar elastic modulus (79.3 GPa) and Vicker's hardness (2.94GPa) has a higher bending strength (92.1 MPa). Moreover, fracture toughness of HA-40 vol. % Ti composite with crack bridging as the chief toughening mechanisms can reach 2.692 MPa m(-1) , which can meet the basic toughness demand of the replaced hard tissues for heavy load-bearing applications. Work of fracture of HA-40 vol. % Ti composite is 91.2J m2, which is 22.9 times that of pure HA ceramic and even 2.4 times that of Al2O3 bioceramic. The results of in vivo studies show HA-40 vol. % Ti composite has excellent biocompatibility and could integrate with bone. In the early stage after the implantation of the samples, the osteointegration ability of the composite is better than that of pure titanium.

  13. Effect of Y2O3 and TiC Reinforcement Particles on Intermetallic Formation and Hardness of Al6061 Composites via Mechanical Alloying and Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Lin, Chen-Han

    2015-08-01

    Al6061-based composites reinforced with 2 wt pctY2O3 and 2 wt pctTiC particles produced by mechanical alloying were investigated. The reinforced particles play important roles in the microstructural development and in determining the properties of the alloys. High-energy ball milling can facilitate a solid-state reaction between reinforced particles and the Al matrix, and the reaction kinetics of atomic diffusion can be accelerated enormously by subsequent sintering processing. As a result, complex intermetallic compounds and oxide particles can be formed in the alloy. In this study, the effect of reinforcement on phase formation and mechanical properties of Al6061-based composites has been examined. The results suggest that nano-Y2O3 particles can act as nucleation sites to facilitate formation of Al-Si-Y-O-based oxide particles. The addition of TiC particles can effectively refine the grain structure and encourage formation of iron-rich intermetallic compounds. Nanoindentation was used to understand the local variations in mechanical properties of the Al6061-based composites.

  14. Relating the current science of ion-defect behavior in ice to a plausible mechanism for directional charge transfer during ice particle collisions.

    PubMed

    Devlin, J Paul

    2011-11-28

    A melding of modern experimental results descriptive of fundamental ion defect properties of ice is presented as a logical basis of a mechanism for the preferential transfer of positive charge from large to small colliding ice particles. The result may relate to the electrification of storm clouds. It is broadly agreed that such localized charge transfer during collision of small upwardly mobile ice particles with falling ice granules (i.e., graupel/hail) can lead to macroscopic charge separation capable of initiating lightning strikes during the expansion stage of a storm cell. Though the larger particles are thought to become negatively charged during the collisions neither a generally favored charge-exchange agent nor a preferred mechanism for the directional particle-to-particle charge transfer exists. Nevertheless, should ionic point defects of ice play a key role, the fundamental properties of ice defects considered here must apply. They include: (1) above 140 K protons move readily within and on the surface of ice while hydroxide ions are orders-of-magnitude less mobile, (2) whether generated by dissociation of HCl buried in ice, during neat ice particle growth, or at platinum-ice interfaces, interior protons move to and apparently collect at the ice-vacuum interface, and (3) proton activity and populations are orders-of-magnitude greater at the surface of ice films and free-standing ice particles than in the interior. From these fundamentals an untested argument is developed that within an ensemble of free floating ice particles the proton density at the surface is greater for larger particles. This implies a plausible proton-based mechanism that is consistent with current concepts of ice particle charging through collisions.

  15. Investigation of the Triggering Mechanism of Magnetospheric Substorm via 2-1/2 D Full-Particle Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchino, H.; Machida, S.

    2012-12-01

    A physical process of the substorm triggering in the Earth's Magnetotail is thought to be closely related to the magnetic reconnection and the tearing instability. Recently we proposed a new scheme of the substorm onset called "Catapult Current Sheet Relaxation (CCSR) Model " to physically understand the results from GEOTAIL and THEMIS data. The CCSR Model has characters that are the decrease of the total pressure and thinning of the current sheet at the distance about -12Re in the magnetotail a few minutes before the substorm onset, and the simultaneous occurrence of the dipolarization at X~-10Re and the magnetic reconnection at X~-20Re at the time of the onset. In this study, we investigate a stability of the current sheet and the particle acceleration via particle simulation in order to assess the validity of the CCSR model and to clarify the mechanism of substorm onset. We give an initial magnetic field structure which is akin to the Earth's dipole magnetic field together with a stretched magnetic field by thin current sheet, and further add a weak northward magnetic field at the place where Near-Earth Neutral Line is expected to be formed. The results of simulation contain similar features that characterize the CCSR Model. A physically interpretation of the simulation result with the linear instability theory as well as comparison with observations will be given.

  16. Cluster analysis of stress corrosion mechanisms for steel wires used in bridge cables through acoustic emission particle swarm optimization.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Wenyao

    2017-05-01

    Stress corrosion is the major failure type of bridge cable damage. The acoustic emission (AE) technique was applied to monitor the stress corrosion process of steel wires used in bridge cable structures. The damage evolution of stress corrosion in bridge cables was obtained according to the AE characteristic parameter figure. A particle swarm optimization cluster method was developed to determine the relationship between the AE signal and stress corrosion mechanisms. Results indicate that the main AE sources of stress corrosion in bridge cables included four types: passive film breakdown and detachment of the corrosion product, crack initiation, crack extension, and cable fracture. By analyzing different types of clustering data, the mean value of each damage pattern's AE characteristic parameters was determined. Different corrosion damage source AE waveforms and the peak frequency were extracted. AE particle swarm optimization cluster analysis based on principal component analysis was also proposed. This method can completely distinguish the four types of damage sources and simplifies the determination of the evolution process of corrosion damage and broken wire signals.

  17. The mechanisms of plant stress mitigation by kaolin-based particle films and its applications in horticultural and agricultural crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Kaolin-based particle films have utility in reducing insect, heat, light, and uv stress in plants due to the reflective nature of the particles. Particle films with a residue density of 1 to 3 g/ square meter have been evaluated in a range of crops and agricultural environments. The particle film ...

  18. Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D.; Katz, Joel D.; Hurley, George F.

    1988-01-01

    A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

  19. Decaying and growing eigenmodes in open quantum systems: Biorthogonality and the Petermann factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Young

    2009-10-01

    We study the biorthogonality between decaying and growing eigenmodes in one-dimensional potential barrier problems. It is shown that Petermann factors Kn of the eigenmodes, a measure of nonorthogonality, are involved in decaying mechanism of an initially confined particle. We also show that the decay tail of the growing modes at an exceptional point (EP), where Kn become infinite, is not exponential, but ˜t2e-ΓEPt , ΓEP the decay rate of the decaying mode at EP. In addition, the geometrical phase near an EP is illustrated by the evolution of wave function.

  20. Microstructure and Mechanical Performance of Cu-Sn-Ti-Based Active Braze Alloy Containing In Situ Formed Nano-Sized TiC Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinenbach, Christian; Transchel, Robert; Gorgievski, Klea; Kuster, Friedrich; Elsener, Hans Rudolf; Wegener, Konrad

    2015-05-01

    A Cu-Sn-Ti-based active brazing filler alloy was in situ reinforced with nanosized TiC particles by adding different amounts of a cellulose nitride-based binder. The TiC particles emanate from a reaction of the Ti within the filler alloy with the carbon from the binder that does not decompose completely during heating. The correlation between the microstructure and mechanical performance was studied. In addition, the effect of different binder amounts on the shear strength and cutting performance of brazed diamond grains was studied in shear tests and single grain cutting tests. The results clearly show that the mechanical performance of the brazed diamond grains can be improved by the formation of TiC particles. This is attributed to particle strengthening of the filler alloy matrix as well as to the decreasing grain size and more homogeneous distribution of the (Cu,Sn)3Ti5 phase with increasing amount of binder.

  1. Growing Old in Sweden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglind, Hans

    This document contains the bases of lectures delivered in Florida by a visiting Stockholm University sociology professor. The first chapter, "Growing Old in Sweden," includes information on the income, standard of living, and quality of services available to the elderly in that country. That information is presented within the changing…

  2. Growing into Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvy, Harvey; Robbins, Pam

    2005-01-01

    New school principals have the necessity to lead at the very time they are learning the ropes of their new jobs. Some essential themes are identified that can guide new principals into growing in their new leadership roles, which are presented and discussed.

  3. Growing through Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barbara J.

    "Growing through Literature" is a curriculum using Joan M. and Erik H. Erikson's theory of the Life Cycle as a structure for selecting and teaching literature to inner-city high school students at Brighton High School in Massachusetts. The program consists of four component parts: Journals, Selected Stories, Discussion, and…

  4. Growing Up with "1984."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franza, August

    1983-01-01

    Relates changing student reaction to George Orwell's "1984" over 20 years of teaching. Finds present high school students' acceptance of Orwell's bleak world vision both a sign of student honesty and a frightening indication of the growing reality of the book. (MM)

  5. GROWING SEEDS, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elementary Science Study, Newton, MA.

    THIS TEACHER'S GUIDE IS DESIGNED FOR USE WITH AN ELEMENTARY SCIENCE STUDY UNIT, "GROWING SEEDS," IN WHICH SUCH BASIC SCIENCE SKILLS AND PROCESSES AS MEASUREMENT, OBSERVATION, AND HYPOTHESIS FORMATION ARE INTRODUCED THROUGH STUDENT ACTIVITIES INVOLVING SEEDS, GERMINATION, AND SEEDLING GROWTH. THE MATERIALS WERE DEVELOPED FOR USE IN…

  6. Families on the Grow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Irene K.; Phillips, Marjorie M.

    This correspondence course was designed to help parents better understand their growing children and themselves as parents. The introduction briefly sketches the importance of the family in child development. Each of the five illustrated lessons contains 7 to 12 pages on one aspect of family life. Each lesson contains a set of objectives, a…

  7. Geometry and Mechanics of Thin Growing Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Smith, Gabriel; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas

    We investigate how thin sheets of arbitrary shapes morph under the isotropic in-plane expansion of their top surface, which may represent several stimuli such as nonuniform heating, local swelling and differential growth. Inspired by geometry, an analytical model is presented that rationalizes how the shape of the disk influences morphing, from the initial spherical bending to the final isometric limit. We introduce a new measure of slenderness that describes a sheet in terms of both thickness and plate shape. We find that the mean curvature of the isometric state is three fourth's the natural curvature, which we verify by numerics and experiments. We finally investigate the emergence of a preferred direction of bending in the isometric state, guided by numerical analyses. The scalability of our model suggests that it is suitable to describe the morphing of sheets spanning several orders of magnitude. NSF Grant CMMI-1300860.

  8. Experimental investigations on the fluid-mechanics of an electrospun heart valve by means of particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Costantino; Gasbarroni, Pier Luca; Romano, Giovanni Paolo

    2016-12-01

    End-stage failing heart valves are currently replaced by mechanical or biological prostheses. Both types positively contribute to restore the physiological function of native valves, but a number of drawbacks limits the expected performances. In order to improve the outcome, tissue engineering can offer an alternative approach to design and fabricate innovative heart valves capable to support the requested function and to promote the formation of a novel, viable and correctly operating physiological structure. This potential result is particularly critical if referred to the aortic valve, being the one mainly exposed to structural and functional degeneration. In this regard, the here proposed study presents the fabrication and in vitro characterization of a bioresorbable electrospun heart valve prosthesis using the particle image velocimetry technique either in physiological and pathological fluid dynamic conditions. The scaffold was designed to reproduce the aortic valve geometry, also mimicking the fibrous structure of the natural extracellular matrix. To evaluate its performances for possible implantation, the flow fields downstream the valve were accurately investigated and compared. The experimental results showed a correct functionality of the device, supported by the formation of vortex structures at the edge of the three cusps, with Reynolds stress values below the threshold for the risk of hemolysis (which can be comprised in the range 400-4000N/m(2) depending on the exposure period), and a good structural resistance to the mechanical loads generated by the driving pressure difference.

  9. Computational modeling of lava domes using particle dynamics to investigate the effect of conduit flow mechanics on flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husain, Taha Murtuza

    Large (1--4 x 106 m3) to major (> 4 x 106 m3) dome collapses for andesitic lava domes such as Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat are observed for elevated magma discharge rates (6--13 m3/s). The gas rich magma pulses lead to pressure build up in the lava dome that result in structural failure of the over steepened canyon-like walls which may lead to rockfall or pyroclastic flow. This indicates that dome collapse intimately related to magma extrusion rate. Variation in magma extrusion rate for open-system magma chambers is observed to follow alternating periods of high and low activity. Periodic behavior of magma exhibits a rich diversity in the nature of its eruptive history due to variation in magma chamber size, total crystal content, linear crystal growth rate and magma replenishment rate. Distinguished patterns of growth were observed at different magma flow rates ranging from endogenous to exogenous dome growth for magma with varying strengths. Determining the key parameters that control the transition in flow pattern of the magma during its lava dome building eruption is the main focus. This dissertation examines the mechanical effects on the morphology of the evolving lava dome on the extrusion of magma from a central vent using a 2D particle dynamics model. The particle dynamics model is coupled with a conduit flow model that incorporates the kinetics of crystallization and rheological stiffening to investigate important mechanisms during lava dome building eruptions. Chapter I of this dissertation explores lava dome growth and failure mechanics using a two-dimensional particle-dynamics model. The model follows the evolution of fractured lava, with solidification driven by degassing induced crystallization of magma. The particle-dynamics model emulates the natural development of dome growth and rearrangement of the lava dome which is difficult in mesh-based analyses due to mesh entanglement effects. The deformable talus evolves naturally as a frictional

  10. The nature of catalyst particles and growth mechanisms of GaN nanowires grown by Ni-assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiaojun; Burke, Robert A; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-02-25

    The structure and chemistry of the catalyst particles that terminate GaN nanowires grown by Ni-assisted metal-organic chemical vapor deposition were investigated using a combination of electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and x-ray energy dispersive spectrometry. The crystal symmetry, lattice parameter, and chemical composition obtained reveal that the catalyst particles are Ni(3)Ga with an ordered L 1(2) structure. The results suggest that the catalyst is a solid particle during growth and therefore favor a vapor-solid-solid mechanism for the growth of GaN nanowires under these conditions.

  11. Effect of additive particles on mechanical, thermal, and cell functioning properties of poly(methyl methacrylate) cement

    PubMed Central

    Khandaker, Morshed; Vaughan, Melville B; Morris, Tracy L; White, Jeremiah J; Meng, Zhaotong

    2014-01-01

    The most common bone cement material used clinically today for orthopedic surgery is poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). Conventional PMMA bone cement has several mechanical, thermal, and biological disadvantages. To overcome these problems, researchers have investigated combinations of PMMA bone cement and several bioactive particles (micrometers to nanometers in size), such as magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica. A study comparing the effect of these individual additives on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional properties of PMMA would be important to enable selection of suitable additives and design improved PMMA cement for orthopedic applications. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of inclusion of magnesium oxide, hydroxyapatite, chitosan, barium sulfate, and silica additives in PMMA on the mechanical, thermal, and cell functional performance of PMMA. American Society for Testing and Materials standard three-point bend flexural and fracture tests were conducted to determine the flexural strength, flexural modulus, and fracture toughness of the different PMMA samples. A custom-made temperature measurement system was used to determine maximum curing temperature and the time needed for each PMMA sample to reach its maximum curing temperature. Osteoblast adhesion and proliferation experiments were performed to determine cell viability using the different PMMA cements. We found that flexural strength and fracture toughness were significantly greater for PMMA specimens that incorporated silica than for the other specimens. All additives prolonged the time taken to reach maximum curing temperature and significantly improved cell adhesion of the PMMA samples. The results of this study could be useful for improving the union of implant-PMMA or bone-PMMA interfaces by incorporating nanoparticles into PMMA cement for orthopedic and orthodontic applications. PMID:24920906

  12. Particle-size distributions of low-angle normal fault breccias: Implications for slip mechanisms on weak faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Amy; Axen, Gary; Selverstone, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Slip on low-angle normal faults is not well understood because they slip at high angles to the maximum principal stress directions. These faults are considered weak and their motion cannot be explained using standard Byerlee friction and Andersonian fault mechanics. One proposed mechanism for weak fault slip is reduction of effective normal stress induced by high pore-fluid pressure. This mechanism is likely to allow dilation of the fault zone and, therefore, affect the particle-size distribution of fault breccia, which has been shown to differ for unconstrained versus constrained comminution. High pore-fluid pressure can cause dilation which leads to unconstrained comminution. We analyze samples from the footwalls of two low-angle normal faults in southern California (West Salton and Whipple detachment faults) to determine the fault-rock textures and grain-size distributions (GSDs). The GSDs are fractal with fractal dimensions ranging from ˜2.6 to 3.4. The lower end of this range is thought to reflect constrained comminution and only occurs in samples from the footwall of a small-offset "minidetachment" fault about 100 m below the Whipple detachment. The higher fractal dimensions are common in cataclasites related to the main faults and also reflect constrained comminution but are overprinted by shear localization. Our GSDs are similar to those from natural and laboratory-deformed fault rocks from strong faults. We conclude that if high pore-fluid pressure aided slip on these faults, it did not strongly affect mechanisms by which brecciation occurs, implying that fluid pressure generally was sublithostatic. Independent evidence exists for lithostatic fluid pressure that having dropped or cycled to hydrostatic levelsin the minidetachment, but our GSD results suggest that periods of high fluid pressure were too short or infrequent for unconstrained comminution to have been the dominant cataclastic mechanism. Fractal dimensions of ˜2.6 for these samples suggest

  13. Effect of Adhesion Between Submicron Filler Particles and a Polymeric Matrix on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Resin-Based Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolova, O. Yu.; Biktagirova, I. R.; Danilaev, M. P.; Klabukov, M. A.; Polsky, Yu. E.; Pillai, Saju; Tsentsevitsky, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of composites based on an ED-20 epoxy resin, modified with ZnO and ZnO particles untreated or encapsulated in polystyrene, were studied. It is shown that the introduction of polystyrene-encapsulated ZnO submicroparticles into the epoxy resin changed its supramolecular structure in comparison with that of the resin filled with untreated ones. It was established that the presence of shell on the filler particles affected the mechanical properties of the polymer composites — their hardness increased by 22.5% and elastic modulus by 13%.

  14. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Growing up with Retinoblastoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Tom

    2005-01-01

    An account is given of growing up as a child blinded as a result of a cancer of the eye known as retinoblastoma. The role of his mother is brought out, variously as a source of objective knowledge, of one's personal worth, and of the worth of other people in one's community. The strengths and weaknesses of his first school in his home area and…

  17. From laser particle acceleration to the synthesis of extremely neutron rich isotopes via the novel fission-fusion mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Thirolf, P. G.

    2015-02-24

    High-power, short pulse lasers have emerged in the last decade as attractive tools for accelerating charged particles (electrons, ions) to high energies over mm-scale acceleration lengths, thus promising to rival conventional acceleration techniques in the years ahead. In the first part of the article, the principles of laser-plasma interaction as well as the techniques and the current status of the acceleration of electron and ion beams will be briefly introduced. In particular with the upcoming next generation of multi-PW class laser systems, such as the one under construction for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), very efficient acceleration mechanisms for brilliant ion beams like radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) come into reach. Here, ultra-dense ion beams reaching solid-state density can be accelerated from thin target foils, exceeding the density of conventionally accelerated ion beams by about 14 orders of magnitude. This unique property of laser-accelerated ion beams can be exploited to explore the scenario of a new reaction mechanism called ‘fission-fusion’, which will be introduced in the second part of the article. Accelerating fissile species (e.g. {sup 232}Th) towards a second layer of the same material will lead to fission both of the beam-like and target-like particles. Due to the close to solid-state density of the accelerated ion bunches, fusion may occur between neutron-rich (light) fission products. This may open an access path towards extremely neutron-rich nuclides in the vicinity of the N=126 waiting point of the astrophysical r process. ‘Waiting points’ at closed nucleon shells play a crucial role in controlling the reaction rates. However, since most of the pathway of heavy-element formation via the rapid-neutron capture process (r-process) runs in ‘terra incognita’ of the nuclear landscape, in particular the waiting point at N=126 is yet unexplored and will remain largely inaccessible to conventional

  18. From laser particle acceleration to the synthesis of extremely neutron rich isotopes via the novel fission-fusion mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirolf, P. G.

    2015-02-01

    High-power, short pulse lasers have emerged in the last decade as attractive tools for accelerating charged particles (electrons, ions) to high energies over mm-scale acceleration lengths, thus promising to rival conventional acceleration techniques in the years ahead. In the first part of the article, the principles of laser-plasma interaction as well as the techniques and the current status of the acceleration of electron and ion beams will be briefly introduced. In particular with the upcoming next generation of multi-PW class laser systems, such as the one under construction for the ELI-Nuclear Physics project in Bucharest (ELI-NP), very efficient acceleration mechanisms for brilliant ion beams like radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) come into reach. Here, ultra-dense ion beams reaching solid-state density can be accelerated from thin target foils, exceeding the density of conventionally accelerated ion beams by about 14 orders of magnitude. This unique property of laser-accelerated ion beams can be exploited to explore the scenario of a new reaction mechanism called `fission-fusion', which will be introduced in the second part of the article. Accelerating fissile species (e.g. 232Th ) towards a second layer of the same material will lead to fission both of the beam-like and target-like particles. Due to the close to solid-state density of the accelerated ion bunches, fusion may occur between neutron-rich (light) fission products. This may open an access path towards extremely neutron-rich nuclides in the vicinity of the N=126 waiting point of the astrophysical r process. `Waiting points' at closed nucleon shells play a crucial role in controlling the reaction rates. However, since most of the pathway of heavy-element formation via the rapid-neutron capture process (r-process) runs in `terra incognita' of the nuclear landscape, in particular the waiting point at N=126 is yet unexplored and will remain largely inaccessible to conventional nuclear reaction

  19. Force-Velocity Measurements of a Few Growing Actin Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Brangbour, Coraline; du Roure, Olivia; Helfer, Emmanuèle; Démoulin, Damien; Mazurier, Alexis; Fermigier, Marc; Carlier, Marie-France; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2011-01-01

    The polymerization of actin in filaments generates forces that play a pivotal role in many cellular processes. We introduce a novel technique to determine the force-velocity relation when a few independent anchored filaments grow between magnetic colloidal particles. When a magnetic field is applied, the colloidal particles assemble into chains under controlled loading or spacing. As the filaments elongate, the beads separate, allowing the force-velocity curve to be precisely measured. In the widely accepted Brownian ratchet model, the transduced force is associated with the slowing down of the on-rate polymerization. Unexpectedly, in our experiments, filaments are shown to grow at the same rate as when they are free in solution. However, as they elongate, filaments are more confined in the interspace between beads. Higher repulsive forces result from this higher confinement, which is associated with a lower entropy. In this mechanism, the production of force is not controlled by the polymerization rate, but is a consequence of the restriction of filaments' orientational fluctuations at their attachment point. PMID:21541364

  20. Statistical mechanics of a single particle in a multiscale random potential: Parisi landscapes in finite-dimensional Euclidean spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Yan V.; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2008-08-01

    We construct an N-dimensional Gaussian landscape with multiscale, translation invariant, logarithmic correlations and investigate the statistical mechanics of a single particle in this environment. In the limit of high dimension N → ∞ the free energy of the system and overlap function are calculated exactly using the replica trick and Parisi's hierarchical ansatz. In the thermodynamic limit, we recover the most general version of the Derrida's generalized random energy model (GREM). The low-temperature behaviour depends essentially on the spectrum of length scales involved in the construction of the landscape. If the latter consists of K discrete values, the system is characterized by a K-step replica symmetry breaking solution. We argue that our construction is in fact valid in any finite spatial dimensions N >= 1. We discuss the implications of our results for the singularity spectrum describing multifractality of the associated Boltzmann-Gibbs measure. Finally we discuss several generalizations and open problems, such as the dynamics in such a landscape and the construction of a generalized multifractal random walk.

  1. Negligible particle-specific toxicity mechanism of silver nanoparticles: the role of Ag+ ion release in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    De Matteis, Valeria; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Galeone, Antonio; Brunetti, Virgilio; De Luca, Elisa; Kote, Sachin; Kshirsagar, Prakash; Sabella, Stefania; Bardi, Giuseppe; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is supported by many observations in literature, but no mechanism details have been proved yet. Here we confirm and quantify the toxic potential of fully characterized AgNPs in HeLa and A549 cells. Notably, through a specific fluorescent probe, we demonstrate the intracellular release of Ag(+) ions in living cells after nanoparticle internalization, showing that in-situ particle degradation is promoted by the acidic lysosomal environment. The activation of metallothioneins in response to AgNPs and the possibility to reverse the main toxic pathway by Ag(+) chelating agents demonstrate a cause/effect relationship between ions and cell death. We propose that endocytosed AgNPs are degraded in the lysosomes and the release of Ag(+) ions in the cytosol induces cell damages, while ions released in the cell culture medium play a negligible effect. These findings will be useful to develop safer-by-design nanoparticles and proper regulatory guidelines of AgNPs. From the clinical editor: The authors describe the toxic potential of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) in human cancer cell lines. Cell death following the application of AgNPs is dose-dependent, and it is mostly due to Ag+ ions. Further in vivo studies should be performed to gain a comprehensive picture of AgNP-toxicity in mammals.

  2. Analysis and Quantification of Coupling Mechanisms of External Signal Perturbations on Silicon Detectors for Particle Physics Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteche, F.; Rivetta, C.; Iglesias, M.; Echeverria, I.

    2016-05-01

    Silicon detectors have been used in astrophysics satellites and particle detectors for high energy physics (HEP) experiments. For HEP applications, EMC studies have been conducted in silicon detectors to characterize the impact of external noise on the system. They have shown that problems associated with the new generation of silicon detectors are related with interferences generated by the power supplies and auxiliary equipment connected to the device. Characterization of these interferences along with the coupling and their propagation into the susceptible front-end circuits is required for a successful integration of these systems. This paper presents the analysis of the sensitivity curves and coupling mechanisms between the noise and the front-end electronics that have been observed during the characterization of two silicon detector prototypes: the CMS-Silicon tracker detector (CMS-ST) and Silicon Vertex Detector (Belle II-SVD). As a result of these studies, it is possible to identify critical elements in prototypes to take corrective actions in the design and improve the front-end electronics performance.

  3. Explanation of the Quantum-Mechanical Particle-Wave Duality through the Emission of Watt-Less Gravitational Waves by the Dirac Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, Friedwardt

    2016-01-01

    An explanation of the quantum-mechanical particle-wave duality is given by the watt-less emission of gravitational waves from a particle described by the Dirac equation. This explanation is possible through the existence of negative energy, and hence negative mass solutions of Einstein's gravitational field equations. They permit to understand the Dirac equation as the equation for a gravitationally bound positive-negative mass (pole-dipole particle) two-body configuration, with the mass of the Dirac particle equal to the positive mass of the gravitational field binding the positive with the negative mass particle, and with the mass particles making a luminal "Zitterbewegung" (quivering motion), emitting a watt-less oscillating positive-negative space curvature wave. It is shown that this thusly produced "Zitterbewegung" reproduces the quantum potential of the Madelung-transformed Schrödinger equation. The watt-less gravitational wave emitted by the quivering particles is conjectured to be de Broglie's pilot wave. The hypothesised connection of the Dirac equation to gravitational wave physics could, with the failure to detect gravitational waves by the LIGO antennas and pulsar timing arrays, give a clue to extended theories of gravity, or a correction of astrophysical models for the generation of such waves.

  4. Particle image velocimetry study of pulsatile flow in bi-leaflet mechanical heart valves with image compensation method.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing; Yeo, Tony Joon Hock; Zhao, Yong; Hwang, Ned H C

    2006-12-01

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is an important technique in studying blood flow in heart valves. Previous PIV studies of flow around prosthetic heart valves had different research concentrations, and thus never provided the physical flow field pictures in a complete heart cycle, which compromised their pertinence for a better understanding of the valvular mechanism. In this study, a digital PIV (DPIV) investigation was carried out with improved accuracy, to analyse the pulsatile flow field around the bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve (MHV) in a complete heart cycle. For this purpose a pulsatile flow test rig was constructed to provide the necessary in vitro test environment, and the flow field around a St. Jude size 29 bi-leaflet MHV and a similar MHV model were studied under a simulated physiological pressure waveform with flow rate of 5.2 l/min and pulse rate at 72 beats/min. A phase-locking method was applied to gate the dynamic process of valve leaflet motions. A special image-processing program was applied to eliminate optical distortion caused by the difference in refractive indexes between the blood analogue fluid and the test section. Results clearly showed that, due to the presence of the two leaflets, the valvular flow conduit was partitioned into three flow channels. In the opening process, flow in the two side channels was first to develop under the presence of the forward pressure gradient. The flow in the central channel was developed much later at about the mid-stage of the opening process. Forward flows in all three channels were observed at the late stage of the opening process. At the early closing process, a backward flow developed first in the central channel. Under the influence of the reverse pressure gradient, the flow in the central channel first appeared to be disturbed, which was then transformed into backward flow. The backward flow in the central channel was found to be the main driving factor for the leaflet rotation in the valve

  5. Investigation of Preparation and Mechanisms of a Dispersed Particle Gel Formed from a Polymer Gel at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guang; Dai, Caili; Zhao, Mingwei; You, Qing; Chen, Ang

    2013-01-01

    A dispersed particle gel (DPG) was successfully prepared from a polymer gel at room temperature. The polymer gel system, morphology, viscosity changes, size distribution, and zeta potential of DPG particles were investigated. The results showed that zirconium gel systems with different strengths can be cross-linked within 2.5 h at low temperature. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) results showed that the particles were polygonal particles with nano-size distribution. According to the viscosity changes, the whole preparation process can be divided into two major stages: the bulk gel cross-linking reaction period and the DPG particle preparation period. A polymer gel with a 3-dimensional network was formed in the bulk gel cross-linking reaction period whereas shearing force and frictional force were the main driving forces for the preparation of DPG particles, and thus affected the morphology of DPG particles. High shearing force and frictional force reduced the particle size distribution, and then decreased the zeta potential (absolute value). The whole preparation process could be completed within 3 h at room temperature. It could be an efficient and energy-saving technology for preparation of DPG particles. PMID:24324817

  6. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt

  7. 7 CFR 319.37-8 - Growing media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Approved growing media are baked expanded clay pellets, coal cinder, coir, cork, glass wool, organic and inorganic fibers, peat, perlite, phenol formaldehyde, plastic particles, polyethylene, polymer stabilized... polymer, vermiculite, volcanic rock, or zeolite, or any combination of these media. Growing media must...

  8. Low-solubility particles and a Trojan-horse type mechanism of toxicity: the case of cobalt oxide on human lung cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of toxicity of metal oxide particles towards lung cells are far from being understood. In particular, the relative contribution of intracellular particulate versus solubilized fractions is rarely considered as it is very challenging to assess, especially for low-solubility particles such as cobalt oxide (Co3O4). Methods This study was possible owing to two highly sensitive, independent, analytical techniques, based on single-cell analysis, using ion beam microanalysis, and on bulk analysis of cell lysates, using mass spectrometry. Results Our study shows that cobalt oxide particles, of very low solubility in the culture medium, are readily incorporated by BEAS-2B human lung cells through endocytosis via the clathrin-dependent pathway. They are partially solubilized at low pH within lysosomes, leading to cobalt ions release. Solubilized cobalt was detected within the cytoplasm and the nucleus. As expected from these low-solubility particles, the intracellular solubilized cobalt content is small compared with the intracellular particulate cobalt content, in the parts-per-thousand range or below. However, we were able to demonstrate that this minute fraction of intracellular solubilized cobalt is responsible for the overall toxicity. Conclusions Cobalt oxide particles are readily internalized by pulmonary cells via the endo-lysosomal pathway and can lead, through a Trojan-horse mechanism, to intracellular release of toxic metal ions over long periods of time, involving specific toxicity. PMID:24669904

  9. Alloying Behavior and Properties of Al-Based Composites Reinforced with Al85Fe15 Metallic Glass Particles Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Pressing Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lanxiang; Yang, LiKun; Leng, Jinfeng; Wang, Tongyang; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles with high onset crystallization temperature (1209 K) were synthesized by a mechanical alloying method. High-quality 6061Al-based composites reinforced with Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles were fabricated by a vacuum hot-pressing sintering technique. The glass particles with flake-like shape are distributed uniformly in the Al matrix. The bulk composites possess high relative density, excellent hardness and strength. The microhardness values of the Al-based bulk composites with the additions of 20 vol.% and 30 vol.% Al85Fe15 particles are 204 MPa and 248 MPa, respectively, which are much higher than that of 6061Al (61 MPa). The compressive yield strength of the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite is 478 MPa, which is enhanced by 273% compared with 6061Al. The amorphous characteristic and homogeneous dispersion of glass particles account for the excellent mechanical properties of the Al-based composites. In addition, the corrosion behavior of Al-based composites in a seawater solution has been investigated by electrochemical polarization measurements. Compared to 6061Al, the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite shows the lower corrosion/passive current density and larger passive region, indicating the greatly enhanced corrosion resistance.

  10. Study on the synthesis and formation mechanism of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} particles by microwave irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Shen, Honglie He, Xiancong

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} microparticles were fabricated by low-cost chemical method. • The ball cactus-like shaped microparticles are with a diameter about 250 nm. • The optical band energy of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} microparticles is obtained to be about 1.5 eV. • The CuS nuclei firstly form, and serve as the growth point for Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) particles were successfully synthesized by microwave assisted solvothermal method. The structure, shape, composition, and optical properties of these particles were investigated with X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, and UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. The results show that the as-prepared particles had single phase, stoichiometric composition, and a ball cactus-like shape with a diameter about 250 nm, when reaction time is 10 min. The formation mechanism of the CZTS particles was investigated by evaluation of samples prepared with different reaction time. According to the proposed growth mechanism of CZTS particles, the copper sulfide nuclei firstly forms, and serves as the starting point for the nucleation and growth of CZTS.

  11. Simplified mechanism for new particle formation from methanesulfonic acid, amines, and water via experiments and ab initio calculations

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Matthew L.; Varner, Mychel E.; Perraud, Véronique; Ezell, Michael J.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Airborne particles affect human health and significantly influence visibility and climate. A major fraction of these particles result from the reactions of gaseous precursors to generate low-volatility products such as sulfuric acid and high-molecular weight organics that nucleate to form new particles. Ammonia and, more recently, amines, both of which are ubiquitous in the environment, have also been recognized as important contributors. However, accurately predicting new particle formation in both laboratory systems and in air has been problematic. During the oxidation of organosulfur compounds, gas-phase methanesulfonic acid is formed simultaneously with sulfuric acid, and both are found in particles in coastal regions as well as inland. We show here that: (i) Amines form particles on reaction with methanesulfonic acid, (ii) water vapor is required, and (iii) particle formation can be quantitatively reproduced by a semiempirical kinetics model supported by insights from quantum chemical calculations of likely intermediate clusters. Such an approach may be more broadly applicable in models of outdoor, indoor, and industrial settings where particles are formed, and where accurate modeling is essential for predicting their impact on health, visibility, and climate. PMID:23090988

  12. Sleep to grow smart?

    PubMed

    Volk, Carina; Huber, Reto

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is undisputable an essential part of our life, if we do not sleep enough we feel the consequences the next day. The importance of sleep for healthy brain functioning has been well studied in adults, but less is known for the role of sleep in the paediatric age. Childhood and adolescence is a critical phase for brain development. The increased need for sleep during this developmental phase fosters the growing recognition for a central role of sleep during development. In this review we summarize the findings that demonstrate a close relationship between sleep and brain maturation, discuss the consequences of insufficient sleep during childhood and adolescence and outline initial attempts that have been made in order to improve sleep in this age range.

  13. Growing a market economy

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, N.; Pryor, R.J.

    1997-09-01

    This report presents a microsimulation model of a transition economy. Transition is defined as the process of moving from a state-enterprise economy to a market economy. The emphasis is on growing a market economy starting from basic microprinciples. The model described in this report extends and modifies the capabilities of Aspen, a new agent-based model that is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories on a massively parallel Paragon computer. Aspen is significantly different from traditional models of the economy. Aspen`s emphasis on disequilibrium growth paths, its analysis based on evolution and emergent behavior rather than on a mechanistic view of society, and its use of learning algorithms to simulate the behavior of some agents rather than an assumption of perfect rationality make this model well-suited for analyzing economic variables of interest from transition economies. Preliminary results from several runs of the model are included.

  14. Mechanisms of Size and Shape Selection and Control in Self-Assembly of Colloid Particles Synthesized from Nanosize Crystalline Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Privman, Vladimir

    2007-03-01

    The importance of well-defined dispersions of particles of different shapes, ranging in sizes from nanometer to colloidal, has been widely recognized in applications and in basic studies of advanced materials. Our program endeavors to advance understanding of formation of uniform particles of simple and composite structure, with focus on synthesis involving self-assembly of nanosize particles and their new unique properties for dimensions smaller than the typical submicron-size colloid scales. Presently, there is convincing experimental evidence that many monodispersed colloids of various shapes, obtained by precipitation in solutions, are formed by aggregation of such nanocrystalline subunits. Our group's theoretical explanation of this process expands the classical model of formation of uniform particles, by LaMer, and offers an interesting link between nanosize and micrometer size particles.

  15. Indentation analysis of nano-particle using nano-contact mechanics models during nano-manipulation based on atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeinabi, Khadijeh; Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad

    2011-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy is applied to measure intermolecular forces and mechanical properties of materials, nano-particle manipulation, surface scanning and imaging with atomic accuracy in the nano-world. During nano-manipulation process, contact forces cause indentation in contact area between nano-particle and tip/substrate which is considerable at nano-scale and affects the nano-manipulation process. Several nano-contact mechanics models such as Hertz, Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov (DMT), Johnson-Kendall-Roberts-Sperling (JKRS), Burnham-Colton-Pollock (BCP), Maugis-Dugdale (MD), Carpick-Ogletree-Salmeron (COS), Pietrement-Troyon (PT), and Sun et al. have been applied as the continuum mechanics approaches at nano-scale. In this article, indentation depth and contact radius between tip and substrate with nano-particle for both spherical and conical tip shape during nano-manipulation process are analyzed and compared by applying theoretical, semiempirical, and empirical nano-contact mechanics models. The effects of adhesion force, as the main contrast point in different nano-contact mechanics models, on nano-manipulation analysis is investigated for different contact radius, and the critical point is discussed for mentioned models.

  16. Particle-image velocimetry investigation of the fluid-structure interaction mechanisms of a natural owl wing.

    PubMed

    Winzen, A; Roidl, B; Schröder, W

    2015-09-15

    The increasing interest in the development of small flying air vehicles has given rise to a strong need to thoroughly understand low-speed aerodynamics. The barn owl is a well-known example of a biological system that possesses a high level of adaptation to its habitat and as such can inspire future small-scale air vehicle design. The combination of the owl-specific wing geometry and plumage adaptations with the flexibility of the wing structure yields a highly complex flow field, still enabling the owl to perform stable and at the same time silent low-speed gliding flight. To investigate the effects leading to such a characteristic flight, time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry (TR-SPIV) measurements are performed on a prepared natural owl wing in a range of angles of attack 0° ≤ α ≤ 6° and Reynolds numbers 40,000 ≤ Re(c) ≤ 120,000 based on the chord length at a position located at 30% of the halfspan from the owl's body. The flow field does not show any flow separation on the suction side, whereas flow separation is found on the pressure side for all investigated cases. The flow field on the pressure side is characterized by large-scale vortices which interact with the flexible wing structure. The good agreement of the shedding frequency of the pressure side vortices with the frequency of the trailing-edge deflection indicates that the structural deformation is induced by the flow field on the pressure side. Additionally, the reduction of the time-averaged mean wing curvature at high Reynolds numbers indicates a passive lift-control mechanism that provides constant lift in the entire flight envelope of the owl.

  17. Reactivity of NaCl with Secondary Organic Acids: An Important Mechanism of the Chloride Depletion in Sea Salt Particles Mixed with Organic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Laskin, A.; Kelly, S.; Gilles, M. K.; Shilling, J. E.; Zelenyuk, A.; Wilson, J. M.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Sea salt particles, one of the major sources of atmospheric aerosols, undergo complex multi-phase reactions and have profound consequences on their physical and chemical properties, thus on climate. Depletion of chloride in sea salt particles was reported in previous field studies and was attributed to the acid displacement of sea salt chlorides with inorganic acids, such as nitric and sulfuric acids. Some studies have also showed that the chloride deficit cannot be fully compensated for this mechanism. We present an important pathway contributing to this chloride depletion: reactions of weak organic acids with sea salt particles. NaCl particles internally mixed with secondary organic materials generated from the reactions of limonene and alpha-pinene with ozone served as surrogates for sea salt particles mixed with organic materials. Chemical imaging analysis of these particles was conducted using complementary techniques including computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS), and micro-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (micro-FTIR). Substantial chloride depletion and formation of organic salts were observed along with distinctive changes in particle morphology after hydration/dehydration processes. The results indicate that secondary organic acids can effectively react with NaCl particles resulting in displacement of chloride and release of gaseous HCl. This is consistent with a recent field study showing chloride depletion in sea salt particles mixed with organic materials which cannot be fully compensated by inorganic acid displacement. Although the formation of the organic salts is not thermodynamically favored in bulk aqueous solution, these reactions are driven by the high volatility and evaporation of gaseous HCl in particles, especially during hydration/dehydration processes. The

  18. Effects of the ultrasonic flexural vibration on the interaction between the abrasive particles; pad and sapphire substrate during chemical mechanical polishing (CMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenhu; Lu, Xinchun; Pan, Guoshun; Lei, Yuanzhong; Luo, Jianbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the technique of ultrasonic flexural vibration assisted chemical mechanical polishing (UFV-CMP) was used for sapphire substrate CMP. The functions of the polishing pad, the silica abrasive particles, and the chemical additives of the slurry such as pH value regulator and dispersant during the sapphire's UFV-CMP were investigated. The results showed that the actions of the ultrasonic and silica abrasive particles were the main factors in the sapphire material removal rate (MMR) and the chemical additives were helpful to decrease the roughness of sapphire. Then the effects of the flexural vibration on the interaction between the silica abrasive particles, pad and sapphire substrate from the kinematics and dynamics were investigated to explain why the MRR of UFV-CMP was bigger than that of the traditional CMP. It indicated that such functions improved the sapphire's MRR: the increasing of the contact silica particles' motion path lengths on the sapphire's surface, the enhancement of the contact force between the contact silica particles and the sapphire's surface, and the impaction of the suspending silica particles to the sapphire's surface.

  19. Manufacturing of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents--effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on particle structure and mechanical strength.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Nicolas; Bowen, James; Pacek, Andrzej; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-02-01

    The effect of ionic strength of agarose solution and quenching temperature of the emulsion on the structure and mechanical strength of agarose-based chromatographic adsorbents was investigated. Solutions of agarose containing different amounts of NaCl were emulsified at elevated temperature in mineral oil using a high-shear mixer. The hot emulsion was quenched at different temperatures leading to the gelation of agarose and formation of soft particles. Analysis of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images of particle surfaces shows that pore size of particles increases with ionic strength and/or high quenching temperature. Additionally it has been found that the compressive strength of particles measured by micromanipulation also increases with ionic strength of the emulsion and/or high quenching temperature but these two parameters have no significant effect on the resulting particle size and particle size distribution. Results from both characterization methods were compared with Sepharose 4B, a commercial agarose-based adsorbent. This is the first report examining the effect of ionic strength and cooling conditions on the microstructure of micron-sized agarose beads for bioseparation.

  20. Fluid mechanic assessment of the total cavopulmonary connection using magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping and digital particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Ensley, A E; Ramuzat, A; Healy, T M; Chatzimavroudis, G P; Lucas, C; Sharma, S; Pettigrew, R; Yoganathan, A P

    2000-01-01

    The total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) is currently the most promising modification of the Fontan surgical repair for single ventricle congenital heart disease. The TCPC involves a surgical connection of the superior and inferior vena cavae directly to the left and right pulmonary arteries, bypassing the right heart. In the univentricular system, the ventricle experiences a workload which may be reduced by optimizing the cavae-to-pulmonary anastomosis. The hypothesis of this study was that the energetic efficiency of the connection is a consequence of the fluid dynamics which develop as a function of connection geometry. Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping (MRPVM) and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) were used to evaluate the flow patterns in vitro in three prototype glass models of the TCPC: flared zero offset, flared 14 mm offset, and straight 21 mm offset. The flow field velocity along the symmetry plane of each model was chosen to elucidate the fluid mechanics of the connection as a function of the connection geometry and pulmonary artery flow split. The steady flow experiments were conducted at a physiologic cardiac output (4 L/min) over three left/right pulmonary flow splits (70/30, 50/50, and 30/70) while keeping the superior/inferior vena cavae flow ratio constant at 40/60. MRPVM, a noninvasive clinical technique for measuring flow field velocities, was compared to DPIV, an established in vitro fluid mechanic technique. A comparison between the results from both techniques showed agreement of large scale flow features, despite some discrepancies in the detailed flow fields. The absence of caval offset in the flared zero offset model resulted in significant caval flow collision at the connection site. In contrast, offsetting the cavae reduced the flow interaction and caused a vortex-like low velocity region between the caval inlets as well as flow disturbance in the pulmonary artery with the least total flow. A positive correlation was also

  1. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-02-04

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health.

  2. Effect of low-energy alpha-particles irradiation on surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldabergenova, T. M.; Kislitsin, S. B.; Larionov, A. S.; Yar-Mukhamedova, G. S.

    2016-11-01

    Effect of radiation by low-energy alpha-particles on the surface structure and physical-mechanical properties of high-purity tungsten was studied. Samples of tungsten were irradiated by 4He+2 ions with the energy of 45 keV at low-energy channel of accelerator DC-60 in Astana branch of Institute Nuclear Physics. Irradiation fluence was 1.5 × 1018 cm-2, irradiation temperature was 150°C. Experimentally found that irradiation with low-energy alpha particles results in formation of helium filled bubbles in the straggling region.

  3. Effect of reinforcing particle type on morphology and age-hardening behavior of Al–4.5 wt.% Cu based nanocomposites synthesized through mechanical milling

    SciTech Connect

    Mostaed, A.; Saghafian, H.; Mostaed, E.; Shokuhfar, A.; Rezaie, H.R.

    2013-02-15

    The effects of reinforcing particle type (SiC and TiC) on morphology and precipitation hardening behavior of Al–4.5%Cu based nanocomposites synthesized via mechanical milling were investigated in the current work. In order to study the microstructure and morphology of mechanically milled powder, X-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were utilized. Results revealed that at the early stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are polycrystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the TiC particles as reinforcement. But, at the final stages of mechanical milling, when reinforcing particles are single crystal, the alloying process is enhanced more in the case of using the SiC ones. Transmission electron microscopy results demonstrated that Al–4.5 wt.%Cu based nanocomposite powders were synthesized and confirmed that the mutual diffusion of aluminum and copper occurs through the interfacial plane of (200). The hardness results showed that not only does introducing 4 vol.% of reinforcing particles (SiC or TiC) considerably decrease the porosity of the bulk composite samples, but also it approximately doubles the hardness of Al–4.5 wt.%Cu alloy (53.4 HB). Finally, apart from TEM and scanning electron microscopy observation which are localized, a decline in hardness in the TiC and SiC contained samples, respectively, after 1.5 and 2 h aging time at 473 K proves the fact that the size of SiC particles is smaller than the size of the TiC ones. - Highlights: ► HRTEM results show mutual diffusion of Al and Cu occurs through the (200) planes. ► TiC particles enhance alloying process more than the SiC ones at the early stages of MM. ► SiC particles enhance alloying process more than the TiC ones at the final stages of MM.

  4. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers.

  5. Chitosan membranes containing micro or nano-size bioactive glass particles: evolution of biomineralization followed by in situ dynamic mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Caridade, Sofia G; Merino, Esther G; Alves, Natália M; Bermudez, Verónica de Zea; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Mano, João F

    2013-04-01

    A new family of biodegradable polymer/bioactive glass (BG) composite materials has emerged based on the availability of nano-sized bioactive particles. Such novel biocomposites can have enhanced performance, in terms of mechanical properties and bioactivity, and they can be designed to be used in bone regeneration approaches. In this work, membranes of chitosan (CTS) and chitosan with bioactive glass (BG) both micron and nano sized particles (CTS/μBG, CTS/nBG, respectively) were prepared by solvent casting. Microstructural and mechanical properties were evaluated in order to compare the effects of the incorporation of micro (μBG) and nano (nBG) particles in the chitosan matrix. In vitro bioactivity tests were performed to characterize the apatite layer that is formed on the surface of the material after being immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF). The biomineralization process on the biomaterials was also followed using non-conventional dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), both online and offline. In such DMA experiments, the change in the storage modulus, E', and the loss factor, tan δ, were measured as a function of the immersion time in SBF. The results demonstrated that CTS/nBG membranes possess enhanced mechanical properties and higher bioactivity in comparison with the CTS/μBG membranes. Such results suggest the potential of nBG for the development of bioactive composites for bone regeneration applications.

  6. A possible mechanism for the capture of microparticles by the earth and other planets of the solar system. [planetary gravitation effects on cosmic dust particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibenedetto, F.

    1973-01-01

    By application of Lyttleton's theory for the formation of comets, it is shown that a possible mechanism for the origin and formation of a concentration of cosmic particles around the earth and the other planets of the solar system exists. In the vicinity of the neutral point, where the velocity of colliding particles is not greater than 6 km/s, it is found that if the solid particles after collision must remain in a solid state, there can be no possibility of accretion for Mercury, Mars, and the Moon, where the maximum value of the distance of the center of the planet to the asymptotic trajectory is less than the radius of the planet. On the other hand, the capture radii of microparticles in solid form varies from a minimum of 2.95 planetary radii for Venus and 3.47 for the Earth, to about 986 for Jupiter.

  7. Effect of mechanical milling on particle size, magnetic susceptibility and dielectric of synthetic toner colorant magnetite extracted from Indonesian iron sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulaikah, S.; Mufti, N.; Fuad, A.; Dwi, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    As a colorant and additive substance for toner, magnetite (Fe3O4) has become main mineral that can produce electrical charge on printing process. In this research, we reports the effect of mechanical milling time to magnetic susceptibility, morphology and dielectric properties of synthetic toner The standard of the grain size of toner including of magnetite dissolved, are ranged from 2 to 10 micron or less, depending on the kind of toner. The results of this research show that the average of particle size decreases from 15μm to 5 μm by milling time between 6 hour to 9 hour and almost constant up to 12 hour. The magnetic susceptibility of the sample decreases as decreasing particle size, while the dielectric constant increases as decreasing particle size.

  8. How Do Galaxies Grow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Astronomers have caught multiple massive galaxies in the act of merging about 4 billion years ago. This discovery, made possible by combining the power of the best ground- and space-based telescopes, uniquely supports the favoured theory of how galaxies form. ESO PR Photo 24/08 ESO PR Photo 24/08 Merging Galaxies in Groups How do galaxies form? The most widely accepted answer to this fundamental question is the model of 'hierarchical formation', a step-wise process in which small galaxies merge to build larger ones. One can think of the galaxies forming in a similar way to how streams merge to form rivers, and how these rivers, in turn, merge to form an even larger river. This theoretical model predicts that massive galaxies grow through many merging events in their lifetime. But when did their cosmological growth spurts finish? When did the most massive galaxies get most of their mass? To answer these questions, astronomers study massive galaxies in clusters, the cosmological equivalent of cities filled with galaxies. "Whether the brightest galaxies in clusters grew substantially in the last few billion years is intensely debated. Our observations show that in this time, these galaxies have increased their mass by 50%," says Kim-Vy Tran from the University of Zürich, Switzerland, who led the research. The astronomers made use of a large ensemble of telescopes and instruments, including ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Hubble Space Telescope, to study in great detail galaxies located 4 billion light-years away. These galaxies lie in an extraordinary system made of four galaxy groups that will assemble into a cluster. In particular, the team took images with VIMOS and spectra with FORS2, both instruments on the VLT. From these and other observations, the astronomers could identify a total of 198 galaxies belonging to these four groups. The brightest galaxies in each group contain between 100 and 1000 billion of stars, a property that makes them comparable

  9. Influence of stability and mechanical properties of a spinal fixation device on production of wear debris particles in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Y; Bauer, T W; Nitto, H; Kambic, H E; Muschler, G F

    2000-01-01

    A prospective and quantitative animal study was performed to evaluate the production of wear particles from a spinal fixation device, and to test the hypothesis that the concentration of wear debris particles adjacent to spinal fixation hardware is correlated with the stiffness of the spinal fusion construct and local bone formation at the fusion site. An established canine segmental spinal fusion model with three interfacet fusions was used in this study. Several bone substitute materials were grafted to the area of the interfacet fusion. Internal fixation was performed on both sides of the spinous processes at each site using a stainless steel plate system in 19 dogs. After 12 weeks, spinal segments were excised, then 3-dimensional computerized tomography was used to measure bone volume and bone area of the individual fusion sites. The stiffness of each segment was tested using a servohydraulic materials testing machine. Biopsies were obtained from the soft tissues immediately around the plate system, and wear particles were collected and characterized using an electrical resistance particle analyzer, light and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Biopsies from para-spinal tissue from adjacent, unoperated spinal levels served as negative controls. Histologically, 24 of 57 specimens (42.1%) showed only fibrous tissue with no recognizable macrophages, inflammation, or debris. Fourteen of 57 specimens (24.6%), however, contained many particles that were composed of Fe, Cr, and Ni, corresponding to elements found in the fixation hardware. Another 19 specimens showed only occasional particles. The mean concentration of particles from the tissue around the plate system was 2.8 x 10(9) per gram dry tissue weight, compared to 0.5 x 10(9) particles per gram for controls (p < 0.05). Statistical analyses showed significant inverse correlation between the log particle number and stiffness (r = -0.41, p < 0.01), bone volume (r

  10. Numerical study into the morphology and formation mechanisms of three-dimensional particle structures in vibrated cylindrical cavities with various heating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2016-10-01

    The present analysis extends the author's earlier work [Lappa, Phys. Fluids 26, 093301 (2014), 10.1063/1.4893078] on the properties of patterns formed by the spontaneous accumulation and ordering of solid particles in certain types of flow. It is shown that under certain conditions, when subjected to vibrations to induce natural flow, nonisothermal fluids with dispersed solid particles are characterized by intervals of solid-pattern-forming behavior due to particle rearrangements preceded by intervals in which no recognizable structures of solid matter can be detected. The dynamics of these systems are highly nonlinear in nature. Because this family of particle attractors is known to exhibit strong sensitivity to the symmetry properties of the considered vibrated system and related geometrical constraints, the present study attempts to clarify the related dynamics in a geometry with curved walls (cylindrical enclosure). In particular, by assuming vibrations always directed perpendicularly to the imposed temperature gradient, we show that the morphology, spatial extension (percentage of physical volume occupied), separation (spatial distance), and mechanisms responsible for the formation of the resulting particle structures change significantly according to whether the temperature gradient is parallel or perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the cylinder. This indicates that the physics is not invariant with respect to 90° rotations in space of the specific forcing considered (direction of the imposed temperature gradient and associated perpendicular vibrations). Additional insights into the problem are obtained by assessing separately the influence played by the time-averaged (mean) and oscillatory effects. According to the numerical results, the intriguing diversity of particle agglomerates results from the different role or importance played by (curved or straight) boundaries in constraining particles and from the different structure and topology of the

  11. The need for growing crystals in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.

    1981-01-01

    Payoffs of crystal growth in space in the areas of understanding growth and melt flow mechanisms, the growth of more uniform crystals with fewer defects, and the growth of crystals difficult or impossible to grow on Earth are summarized. The advantages of various heating methods are summarized. Critical devices requiring the uniformity and lower defect density of crystals grown in space are listed.

  12. Growing a Forest for the Trees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Growing Ideas, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes a tree studies program in a fourth-grade classroom. Students collected local tree seeds and seeds from supermarket fruits, researched growing conditions, and grew seeds under various conditions. Students kept journals on local trees, observing seed dispersal mechanisms and examining rings on trunk slices. Inquiry-based tree studies…

  13. Mechanical properties of viruses.

    PubMed

    de Pablo, Pedro J; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2013-01-01

    Structural biology techniques have greatly contributed to unveil the relationships between structure, properties and functions of viruses. In recent years, classic structural approaches are being complemented by single-molecule techniques such as atomic force microscopy and optical tweezers to study physical properties and functions of viral particles that are not accessible to classic structural techniques. Among these features are mechanical properties such as stiffness, intrinsic elasticity, tensile strength and material fatigue. The field of virus mechanics is contributing to materials science by investigating some physical parameters of "soft" biological matter and biological nano-objects. Virus mechanics studies are also starting to unveil the biological implications of physical properties of viruses. Growing evidence indicate that viruses are subjected to internal and external forces, and that they may have adapted to withstand and even use those forces. This chapter describes what is known on the mechanical properties of virus particles, their structural determinants, and possible biological implications, of which several examples are provided.

  14. The effect of different powder particle size on mechanical properties of sintered alumina, resin- and glass-infused alumina.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Giordano, Russell; Pober, Richard

    2009-02-01

    In this study, the compaction and sintering behavior of fine alumina powders of different particle sizes and the effect of matrix particle size on biaxial strength and fracture toughness of infused matrices were investigated. Three different alumina powders, In-Ceram alumina, A16SG, and RC172 were selected, representing a range of particle size and shape. RC172 and A16SG were dry-pressed. In-Ceram alumina was slip-cast following manufacturer's recommendations. Dry-pressed ceramic blocks were sectioned into disks with a thickness of 1.5-mm. Uninfused disks were sintered at four temperatures between 1250 degrees C and 1400 degrees C. For glass or resin infused specimens, alumina disks were sintered at 1250 degrees C for 2 h and separated into two groups for glass infusion and resin (UDMA/TEGDMA) infusion. Disks were tested for biaxial flexural strength with a universal testing machine (Instron) at 0.5-mm/min crosshead speeds. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range tests revealed that alumina disks with different smaller particle sizes have significantly higher biaxial strength (p < 0.05). The strength of the alumina matrix was greatly increased by glass and resin infusion. The biaxial strength of resin-infused alumina increased as particle size decreased, whereas strength of glass-infused alumina was constant.

  15. Bone Mineral Density, Mechanical, Microstructural Properties and Mineral Content of the Femur in Growing Rats Fed with Cactus Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) Cladodes as Calcium Source in Diet

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Becerra, Ezequiel; Gutiérrez-Cortez, Elsa; Del Real, Alicia; Rojas-Molina, Alejandra; Rodríguez-García, Mario; Rubio, Efraín; Quintero-García, Michelle; Rojas-Molina, Isela

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical, microstructural properties, mineral content and bone mineral density (BMD) of the femur were evaluated in growing rats fed with Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Mill. (Cactaceae) cladodes at different maturity stages as calcium source. Male weanling rats were fed with cladodes at early maturity stage (25 and 60 days of age, belonging to groups N-60 and N-200, respectively) and cladodes at late maturity stage (100 and 135 days of age, belonging to groups N-400 and N-600, respectively) for 6 weeks. Additionally, a control group fed with calcium carbonate as calcium source was included for comparative purposes. All diets were fitted to the same calcium content (5 g/kg diet). The failure load of femurs was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.05) in groups N-60 and N-200 in comparison to N-400, N-600 and control groups. The cortical width (Ct.Wi) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) of the femurs in control and N-600 groups were significantly higher (p ≤ 0.05) than Ct.Wi and Tb.Th of femurs in groups N-60 and N-200. Trabecular separation of the femurs in N-60 and N-200 groups showed the highest values compared with all experimental groups. The highest calcium content in the femurs were observed in control, N-600 and N-400 groups; whereas the lowest phosphorus content in the bones were detected in N-200, N-600 and N-400 groups. Finally, the BMD in all experimental groups increased with age; nevertheless, the highest values were observed in N-600 and control groups during pubertal and adolescence stages. The results derived from this research demonstrate, for the first time, that the calcium found in Opuntia ficus indica cladodes is actually bioavailable and capable of improving mineral density and mechanical and microstructural properties of the bones. These findings suggest that the consumption of cladodes at late maturity stage within the diet might have a beneficial impact on bone health. PMID:28165410

  16. Thermo-Mechanical Response of a TRISO Fuel Particle in a Fusion/Fission Engine for Incineration of Weapons Grade Plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Caro, M; DeMange, P; Marian, J; Caro, A

    2009-12-08

    The Laser Inertial Fusion-based (LIFE) engine is an advanced energy concept under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). LIFE engine could be used to drive a subcritical fission blanket with fertile or fissile fuel. Current LIFE engine designs envisages fuel in pebble bed form with TRISO (tristructural isotropic) particles embedded in a graphite matrix, and pebbles flowing in molten salt Flibe (2LiF+BeF{sub 2}) coolant at T {approx} 700C. Weapons-grade plutonium (WGPu) fuel is an attractive option for LIFE engine involving the achievement of high fractional burnups in a short lifetime frame. However, WGPu LIFE engine operating conditions of high neutron fast fluence, high radiation damage, and high Helium and Hydrogen production pose severe challenges for typical TRISO particles. The thermo-mechanical fuel performance code HUPPCO (High burn-Up fuel Pebble Performance COde) currently under development accounts for spatial and time dependence of the material elastic properties, temperature, and irradiation swelling and creep mechanisms. In this work, some aspects of the thermo-mechanical response of TRISO particles used for incineration of weapons grade fuel in LIFE engine are analyzed. Preliminary results show the importance of developing reliable high-fidelity models of the performance of these new fuel designs and the need of new experimental data relevant to WGPu LIFE conditions.

  17. Growing networks with superjoiners.

    PubMed

    Jabr-Hamdan, Ameerah; Sun, Jie; Ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We study the Krapivsky-Redner (KR) network growth model, but where new nodes can connect to any number of existing nodes, m, picked from a power-law distribution p(m)∼m^{-α}. Each of the m new connections is still carried out as in the KR model with probability redirection r (corresponding to degree exponent γ_{KR}=1+1/r in the original KR model). The possibility to connect to any number of nodes resembles a more realistic type of growth in several settings, such as social networks, routers networks, and networks of citations. Here we focus on the in-, out-, and total-degree distributions and on the potential tension between the degree exponent α, characterizing new connections (outgoing links), and the degree exponent γ_{KR}(r) dictated by the redirection mechanism.

  18. Growing networks with superjoiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabr-Hamdan, Ameerah; Sun, Jie; ben-Avraham, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    We study the Krapivsky-Redner (KR) network growth model, but where new nodes can connect to any number of existing nodes, m , picked from a power-law distribution p (m ) ˜m-α . Each of the m new connections is still carried out as in the KR model with probability redirection r (corresponding to degree exponent γKR=1 +1 /r in the original KR model). The possibility to connect to any number of nodes resembles a more realistic type of growth in several settings, such as social networks, routers networks, and networks of citations. Here we focus on the in-, out-, and total-degree distributions and on the potential tension between the degree exponent α , characterizing new connections (outgoing links), and the degree exponent γKR(r ) dictated by the redirection mechanism.

  19. Mechanisms associated with the generation of biologically active human immunodeficiency virus type 1 particles from defective proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, M; Hoxie, J A; Reddy, M V; Srinivasan, A; Reddy, E P

    1991-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the etiological agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV exhibits extensive genetic diversity and it is apparent that an infected individual contains different populations of distinct viral strains, a large proportion of which has been found surprisingly to be defective for replication. A similar phenomenon has also been observed with some cell lines that are known to produce infectious viral particles but harbor defective proviral genomes. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of this phenomenon by cloning proviral genomes of HIV from a cell line that was capable of producing high titers of biologically active HIV particles that readily induced syncytia with CD4+ cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes. This cell line was found to contain five proviral genomes, all of which, when tested individually, failed to produce replication-competent viruses upon transfection into human cells. However, when a specific combination of two proviral genomes was used in such transfection studies, it was possible to obtain biologically active, replication-competent viral particles that infected and replicated in CD4+ cell lines and induced syncytia characteristic of HIV. Such a result may be due to homologous recombination between proviral DNAs occurring in cells after transfection and/or complementation of replication-defective proviral DNAs. The diploid nature of the viral RNA genome present in the viral particle may enable the persistence of defective HIV genomes. Images PMID:2006168

  20. Effect of processing methods on the mechanical properties of natural rubber filled with stearic acid modified soy protein particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural rubber was reinforced with stearic acid modified soy protein particles prepared with a microfluidizing and ball milling process. Longer ball milling time tends to increase tensile strength of the rubber composites. Elastic modulus of the composites increased with the increasing filler concen...

  1. Nanoscale characterization and magnetic reversal mechanism investigation of electrospun NiFe2O4 multi-particle-chain nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junli; Fu, Jiecai; Tan, Guoguo; Li, Fashen; Luo, Caiqin; Zhao, Jianguo; Xie, Erqing; Xue, Desheng; Zhang, Haoli; Mellors, Nigel J; Peng, Yong

    2012-04-21

    NiFe(2)O(4) multi-particle-chain nanofibres have been successfully fabricated using electrospinning followed by calcination, and their morphology, chemistry and crystal structure were characterized at the nanoscale. Individual NiFe(2)O(4) nanofibres were found to consist of many nanocrystallites stacked along the nanofibre axis. Chemical analysis shows that the atomic ratio of Ni : Fe is 1 : 2, indicating that the composition was NiFe(2)O(4). The crystal structure of individual NiFe(2)O(4) multi-particle-chain nanofibres proved to be polycrystalline with a face centered cubic (fcc) structure. The nanocrystallites in the nanofibres were revealed to have a single-crystal structure with random crystallographic orientations. The magnetic measurements reveal that the NiFe(2)O(4) multi-particle-chain nanofibres have a coercivity force of 166 Oe. A "chain of sheets" micromagentism model was proposed to interpret the observed magnetic behaviour of the NiFe(2)O(4) multi-particle-chain nanofibres. Simulation studies of the coercivity are in good agreement with the experimental results at room temperature. It is believed that this work will significantly expand the use and application of these compounds in the field of biomagnetic nano-devices and improve understanding of the magnetic origin of spinel ferrites.

  2. Self-Assembled Colloidal Particle Clusters from In Situ Pickering-Like Emulsion Polymerization via Single Electron Transfer Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinfeng; Zhao, Weiting; Pan, Mingwang; Zhu, Lei

    2016-08-01

    A simple route is reported to synthesize colloidal particle clusters (CPCs) from self-assembly of in situ poly(vinylidene fluoride)/poly(styrene-co-tert-butyl acrylate) [PVDF/P(St-co-tBA)] Janus particles through one-pot seeded emulsion single electron transfer radical polymerization. In the in situ Pickering-like emulsion polymerization, the tBA/St/PVDF feed ratio and polymerization temperature are important for the formation of well-defined CPCs. When the tBA/St/PVDF feed ratio is 0.75 g/2.5 g/0.5 g and the reaction temperature is 35 °C, relatively uniform raspberry-like CPCs are obtained. The hydrophobicity of the P(St-co-tBA) domains and the affinity of PVDF to the aqueous environment are considered to be the driving force for the self-assembly of the in situ formed PVDF/P(St-co-tBA) Janus particles. The resultant raspberry-like CPCs with PVDF particles protruding outward may be promising for superhydrophobic smart coatings.

  3. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  4. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jianyuan; Jamal, M Mazen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world. However, it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate. An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer, particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma, has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States. This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population, as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and, ultimately, leads to adenocarcinoma. Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however, it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively. In fact, its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies. The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options. PMID:23236223

  5. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  6. Microstructure and Strain Rate Effects on the Mechanical Behavior of Particle Reinforced Epoxy-Based Reactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    properties between metals on polymer substrates using X- ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In their work, they focused on two main groups of metals...versus substrate temperature for DEA/air- oxidized Al heated in vacuum. The error bars are derived from estimated uncertainties in measuring peak... production of an interphase around the particles. To corroborate their findings they showed two distinct peaks in the free volume distribution from PALS

  7. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of conventionally-cast Al matrix composites reinforced by quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe particles using continuous ball indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, E.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, D. H.

    2000-10-01

    Room temperature mechanical properties of the Al/(AlCuFe)p and Al96Cu4/(AlCuFe)p cast composites were estimated from uniaxial compressive test and continuous ball indentation technique. Values of the Young's modulus and yield stress determined from continuous ball indentation tests were slightly overestimated, suggesting a surface effect on the mechanical properties. However, it was shown that the Al-Cu-Fe particles provided a significant increase of the elastic modulus, yield stress, and strain hardening, especially in the range up to 10% volume fraction of reinforcements. Also, determination of the hardness by continuous-ball-indentation tests revealed a strong influence of the matrix strength on the mechanical properties of the conventionally cast composites.

  8. Growing local likelihood network: Emergence of communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Small, M.

    2015-10-01

    In many real situations, networks grow only via local interactions. New nodes are added to the growing network with information only pertaining to a small subset of existing nodes. Multilevel marketing, social networks, and disease models can all be depicted as growing networks based on local (network path-length) distance information. In these examples, all nodes whose distance from a chosen center is less than d form a subgraph. Hence, we grow networks with information only from these subgraphs. Moreover, we use a likelihood-based method, where at each step we modify the networks by changing their likelihood to be closer to the expected degree distribution. Combining the local information and the likelihood method, we grow networks that exhibit novel features. We discover that the likelihood method, over certain parameter ranges, can generate networks with highly modulated communities, even when global information is not available. Communities and clusters are abundant in real-life networks, and the method proposed here provides a natural mechanism for the emergence of communities in scale-free networks. In addition, the algorithmic implementation of network growth via local information is substantially faster than global methods and allows for the exploration of much larger networks.

  9. Particle size effect and the mechanism of hematite reduction by the outer membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Zhi; Arenholz, Elke; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2016-11-01

    The cycling of iron at the Earth's near surface is profoundly influenced by dissimilatory metal reducing microorganisms, and many studies have focused on unraveling electron transfer mechanisms between these bacteria and Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxides. However, these efforts have been complicated by the fact that these minerals often occur in the micro- to nanosize regime, and in relevant natural environments as well as in the laboratory are subject to aggregation. The nature of the physical interface between the cellular envelope, the outer-membrane cytochromes responsible for facilitating the interfacial electron transfer step, and these complex mineral particulates is thus difficult to probe. Previous studies using whole cells have reported reduction rates that do not correlate with particle size. In the present study we isolate the interaction between the decaheme outer-membrane cytochrome OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis and nanoparticulate hematite, examining the reduction rate as a function of particle size and reaction products through detailed characterization of the electron balance and the structure and valence of iron at particle surfaces. By comparison with abiotic reduction via the smaller molecule ascorbic acid, we show that the reduction rate is systematically controlled by the sterically accessible interfacial contact area between OmcA and hematite in particle aggregates; rates increase once pore throat sizes in aggregates become as large as OmcA. Simultaneous measure of OmcA oxidation against Fe(II) release shows a ratio of 1:10, consistent with a cascade OmcA oxidation mechanism heme by heme. X-ray absorption spectroscopies reveal incipient magnetite on the reacted surfaces of the hematite nanoparticles after reaction. The collective findings establish the importance of accessibility of physical contact between the terminal reductases and iron oxide surfaces, and through apparent consistency of observations help reconcile behavior reported at the larger

  10. Ground-level enhancement of solar cosmic rays on October 28, 2003: A mechanism of the generation of particles in the sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krymsky, G. F.; Grigoryev, V. G.; Starodubtsev, S. A.; Taneev, S. N.

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal mechanisms of the generation of solar cosmic rays, the spectrum of an event of the groundlevel enhancement on October 28, 2003 (the GLE65 event) in a maximally wide energy range has been analyzed using direct measurements of solar particle fluxes on the ACE, GOES, and WIND spacecrafts, as well as measurements on the worldwide network of neutron monitors. The spectrum in the relativistic energy range has been estimated within the previously proposed "effective-energy method." In this method, each ground-based instrument is assigned the corresponding effective momentum (or energy) of primary particles at which the flux of solar cosmic rays is determined. The effective momentum is chosen such that errors in the determination of the solar-particle spectrum are minimized. It has been shown that the error of the estimate of the effective momentum within the proposed method for the determination of solar-particle fluxes is no more than 20 MeV/ c. It has been found that the spectrum of solar cosmic rays from the event under study measured in the orbit of the Earth extends from ≈40 keV to ≈5 GeV and is described by a power law with an exponential cutoff at relativistic energies. A quasilinear theory of the regular acceleration of charged particles by shock waves in the lower corona of the Sun, which was developed at the Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, has been used to reveal the nature of solar cosmic rays. It has been shown that the acceleration of solar cosmic rays on the front of a coronal shock wave in the event under study ended at a distance of no longer than four radii of the Sun.

  11. Mechanism of transport of IFT particles in C. elegans cilia by the concerted action of kinesin-II and OSM-3 motors.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyu; Ou, Guangshuo; Civelekoglu-Scholey, Gul; Blacque, Oliver E; Endres, Nicholas F; Tao, Li; Mogilner, Alex; Leroux, Michel R; Vale, Ronald D; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2006-09-25

    The assembly and function of cilia on Caenorhabditis elegans neurons depends on the action of two kinesin-2 motors, heterotrimeric kinesin-II and homodimeric OSM-3-kinesin, which cooperate to move the same intraflagellar transport (IFT) particles along microtubule (MT) doublets. Using competitive in vitro MT gliding assays, we show that purified kinesin-II and OSM-3 cooperate to generate movement similar to that seen along the cilium in the absence of any additional regulatory factors. Quantitative modeling suggests that this could reflect an alternating action mechanism, in which the motors take turns to move along MTs, or a mechanical competition, in which the motors function in a concerted fashion to move along MTs with the slow motor exerting drag on the fast motor and vice versa. In vivo transport assays performed in Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) protein and IFT motor mutants favor a mechanical competition model for motor coordination in which the IFT motors exert a BBS protein-dependent tension on IFT particles, which controls the IFT pathway that builds the cilium foundation.

  12. The Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) yo-yo despin and solar array deployment mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellogg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    The SAMPEX spacecraft, successfully launched in July 1992, carried a yo-yo despin system and deployable solar arrays. The despin and solar array mechanisms formed an integral system as the yo-yo cables held the solar array release mechanism in place. The SAMPEX design philosophy was to minimize size and weight through the use of a predominantly single string system. The design challenge was to build a system in a limited space, which was reliable with minimal redundancy. This paper covers the design and development of the SAMPEX yo-yo despin and solar array deployment mechanisms. The problems encountered during development and testing will also be discussed.

  13. Understanding of the mechanical and structural changes induced by alpha particles and heavy ions in the French simulated nuclear waste glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakurt, G.; Abdelouas, A.; Guin, J.-P.; Nivard, M.; Sauvage, T.; Paris, M.; Bardeau, J.-F.

    2016-07-01

    Borosilicate glasses are considered for the long-term confinement of high-level nuclear wastes. External irradiations with 1 MeV He+ ions and 7 MeV Au5+ ions were performed to simulate effects produced by alpha particles and by recoil nuclei in the simulated SON68 nuclear waste glass. To better understand the structural modifications, irradiations were also carried out on a 6-oxides borosilicate glass, a simplified version of the SON68 glass (ISG glass). The mechanical and macroscopic properties of the glasses were studied as function of the deposited electronic and nuclear energies. Alpha particles and gold ions induced a volume change up to -0.7% and -2.7%, respectively, depending on the glass composition. Nano-indentations tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of the irradiated glasses. A decrease of about -22% to -38% of the hardness and a decrease of the reduced Young's modulus by -8% were measured after irradiations. The evolution of the glass structure was studied by Raman spectroscopy, and also 11B and 27Al Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS-NMR) on a 20 MeV Kr irradiated ISG glass powder. A decrease of the silica network connectivity after irradiation with alpha particles and gold ions is deduced from the structural changes observations. NMR spectra revealed a partial conversion of BO4 to BO3 units but also a formation of AlO5 and AlO6 species after irradiation with Kr ions. The relationships between the mechanical and structural changes are also discussed.

  14. Hyperangular momenta and energy partitions in multidimensional many-particle classical mechanics: The invariance approach to cluster dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sevryuk, Mikhail B.; Lombardi, Andrea; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2005-09-15

    Rigorous and complete definitions of two partitions and one expansion for the kinetic energy of a general N-particle classical system are given. Our recent work, which also provides examples of applications to the molecular dynamics of nanoaggregates, based on computer programs formulated on the basis of the theory presented here, is extended to cover arbitrary physical space dimensions. The partitions and the expansion are in terms of quantities conceived to be instantaneous phase-space invariants - a far-reaching generalization of integrals of the motion. These quantities are introduced setting out as starting points the position matrix Z of the system and the time derivative of Z. In the simplest case, the matrix Z contains the mass-scaled Cartesian coordinates of the N particles. From the position matrix, the kinematic rotations naturally arise through orthogonal transformations, as a concept 'dual' to the ordinary physical rotations. The physical meaning of each partition (expansion) term is clearly described and emphasized, and formulas for the various quantities are provided as well as inequalities among them. Proofs are presented making extensive use of the singular value decomposition (SVD) of matrices and of the signed SVD, an extended version overcoming possible singularities for particular values of N.

  15. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the mechanism of binding of apoA-I to high density lipoprotein particles

    PubMed Central

    Lund-Katz, Sissel; Nguyen, David; Dhanasekaran, Padmaja; Kono, Momoe; Nickel, Margaret; Saito, Hiroyuki; Phillips, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The partitioning of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) molecules in plasma between HDL-bound and -unbound states is an integral part of HDL metabolism. We used the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique to monitor in real time the reversible binding of apoA-I to HDL. Biotinylated human HDL2 and HDL3 were immobilized on a streptavidin-coated SPR sensor chip, and apoA-I solutions at different concentrations were flowed across the surface. The wild-type (WT) human and mouse apoA-I/HDL interaction involves a two-step process; apoA-I initially binds to HDL with fast association and dissociation rates, followed by a step exhibiting slower kinetics. The isolated N-terminal helix bundle domains of human and mouse apoA-I also exhibit a two-step binding process, consistent with the second slower step involving opening of the helix bundle domain. The results of fluorescence experiments with pyrene-labeled apoA-I are consistent with the N-terminal helix bundle domain interacting with proteins resident on the HDL particle surface. Dissociation constants (Kd) measured for WT human apoA-I interactions with HDL2 and HDL3 are about 10 µM, indicating that the binding is low affinity. This Kd value does not apply to all of the apoA-I molecules on the HDL particle but only to a relatively small, labile pool. PMID:19786567

  16. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition

    SciTech Connect

    Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

    2003-08-24

    Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

  17. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  18. Anatomy of Particle Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringuier, E.

    2009-01-01

    The paper analyses particle diffusion from a thermodynamic standpoint. The main goal of the paper is to highlight the conceptual connection between particle diffusion, which belongs to non-equilibrium statistical physics, and mechanics, which deals with particle motion, at the level of third-year university courses. We start out from the fact…

  19. Effect of heterogeneous precipitation on age-hardening of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle dispersion Al-4mass% Cu composite produced by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, S.; Hatayama, T.; Matsugi, K.; Yanagisawa, O.

    2000-04-14

    The acceleration of aging kinetics has been frequently observed in aluminum matrix composites produced by ingot or powder metallurgy. Recently, in the mechanically alloyed (MA) Al-4mass%Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites, the authors have found that the age-hardening response significantly decreases, and that considerable stable {theta} phases are formed at a very short aging time. The purposes of this study are to investigate the local precipitation behaviors, and attempt to clarify the dominant microstructural factors of the decrease in the age-harden ability and the acceleration of the age-hardening kinetics in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particle dispersion Al-4mass%Cu composites produced by mechanical alloying. In order to build a basis for comparison, the age-hardening behaviors of the unreinforced matrix alloy (IM alloy), which is produced by ingot metallurgy technique, are also investigated.

  20. Effect of nano SiO2 particles on the morphology and mechanical properties of POSS nanocomposite dental resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhi; Sun, Yi; Zeng, Fanlin; Xie, Weili; Liu, Yang; Geng, Lin

    2014-12-01

    Nanocomposite dental resins composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposite matrix and 0, 0.5,1, 1.5 and 2 wt% nano SiO2 as filler were prepared by light curing method. The nanocomposite resins were characterized by performing compressive, three-point flexure, nanoindentation and nanoscratch testings as well as optical microscopy and scanning electron microscope analysis. The effects of different nano SiO2 contents were studied on compressive strength, flexural strength, hardness and resistance of composite resin. From the mechanical results, it was found that nano SiO2 effectively enhanced the mechanical properties of the composite resins at low content. With the increase of the nano SiO2 content, the mechanical properties decreased. It was attributed to the content of nano SiO2 and dispersion of nanoparticles in matrix.

  1. Birth of space plant growing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashinskiy, A.; Nechitaylo, G.

    1983-01-01

    The attempts, and successes, to grow plants in space, and get them to fully develop, bloom and produce seeds using orchids are presented. The psychological advantages of the presence of plants onboard space vehicles and space stations is indicated.

  2. Sociology: The growing climate divide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    2011-07-01

    Climate change has reached the level of a 'scientific consensus', but is not yet a 'social consensus'. New analysis highlights that a growing divide between liberals and conservatives in the American public is a major obstacle to achieving this end.

  3. Degradation mechanisms of Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: The Role of Particle Size

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Kang; Groom, Daniel J.; Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Zhiwei; Gummalla, Mallika; Ball, Sarah C.; Myers, Deborah J.; Ferreira, Paulo J.

    2014-10-14

    Five membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) with different average sizes of platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (2.2, 3.5, 5.0, 6.7, and 11.3 nm) in the cathode were analyzed before and after potential cycling (0.6 to 1.0 V, 50 mV/s) by transmission electron microscopy. Cathodes loaded with 2.2 nm and 3.5 nm catalyst nanoparticles exhibit the following changes during electrochemical cycling: (i) substantial broadening of the size distribution relative to the initial size distribution, (ii) presence of coalesced particles within the electrode, and (iii) precipitation of sub-micron-sized particles with complex shapes within the membrane. In contrast, cathodes loaded with 5.0 nm, 6.7 nm and 11.3 nm size catalyst nanoparticles are significantly less prone to the aforementioned effects. As a result, the electrochemically-active surface area (ECA) of MEA cathodes loaded with 2.2 nm and 3.5 nm nanoparticle catalysts degrades dramatically within 1,000 cycles of operation, while the electrochemically-active surface area of MEA cathodes loaded with 5.0 nm, 6.7 nm and 11.3 nm nanoparticle catalysts appears to be stable even after 10,000 cycles. The loss in MEA performance for cathodes loaded with 2.2 nm and 3.5 nm nanoparticle catalysts appears to be due to the loss in electrochemically-active surface area concomitant with the observed morphological changes in these nanoparticle catalysts

  4. Method for growing plants aeroponically.

    PubMed

    Zobel, R W; Del Tredici, P; Torrey, J G

    1976-03-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for growing plants with their roots bathed in nutrient mist is described. The aeroponics system uses a spinner from a home humidifier to propel nutrient solution into a polyethylene-lined plywood box atop which plants are supported on plastic light-fixture "egg crating." Success in growing a number of herbaceous and woody species, including nodulated legumes and nonlegumes, is reported.

  5. Direct mechanical energy measures of hammer mill comminution of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover and analysis of their particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bitra, V.S.P; Womac, A.R.; Chevanan, Nehru; Miu, P.I.; Smith, D.R.; Igathinathane, C.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine

    2009-07-01

    Biomass particle size impacts handling, storage, conversion, and dust control systems. Size reduction mechanical energy was directly measured for switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum L.), and corn stover (Zea mays L.) in an instrumented hammer mill. Direct energy inputs were determined for hammer mill operating speeds from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 3.2 mm integral classifying screen and mass input rate of 2.5 kg/min with 90 - and 30 -hammers. Overall accuracy of specific energy measurement was calculated as 0.072 MJ/Mg. Particle size distributions created by hammer mill were determined for mill operating factors using ISO sieve sizes from 4.75 to 0.02 mm in conjunction with Ro-Tap sieve analyzer. A wide range of analytical descriptors were examined to mathematically represent the range of particle sizes in the distributions. Total specific energy (MJ/Mg) was defined as size reduction energy to operate the hammer mill plus that imparted to biomass. Effective specific energy was defined as energy imparted to biomass. Total specific energy for switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover grinding increased by 37, 30, and 45% from 114.4, 125.1, and 103.7 MJ/Mg, respectively, with an increase in hammer mill speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm for 90 -hammers. Corresponding total specific energy per unit size reduction was 14.9, 19.7, and 13.5 MJ/Mg mm, respectively. Effective specific energy of 90 -hammers decreased marginally for switchgrass and considerably for wheat straw and it increased for corn stover with an increase in speed from 2000 to 3600 rpm. However, effective specific energy increased with speed to a certain extent and then decreased for 30 -hammers. Rosin Rammler equation fitted the size distribution data with R2 > 0.995. Mass relative span was greater than 1, which indicated a wide distribution of particle sizes. Hammer milling of switchgrass, wheat straw, and corn stover with 3.2 mm screen resulted in well-graded fine-skewed mesokurtic

  6. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  7. Characteristics and mechanisms of the bystander response in monolayer cell cultures exposed to very low fluences of alpha particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, John B.; Azzam, Edouard I.; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Nagasawa, Hatsumi

    2005-02-01

    When confluent cultures of mammalian cells are irradiated with very low fluences of alpha particles whereby only occasional cells receive any radiation exposure, genetic changes are observed in the non-irradiated ("bystander") cells. Upregulation of the p53 damage-response pathway as well as activation of proteins in the MAPK family occurred in bystander cells; p53 was phosphorylated on the serine 15 residue suggesting that the upregulation of p53 was a consequence of DNA damage. Damage signals were transmitted to bystander cells through gap junctions, as confirmed by the use of genetically manipulated cells including connexin43 knockouts. Expression of connexin43 was markedly enhanced by irradiation. A moderate bystander effect was observed for specific gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations. This effect was markedly enhanced in cells defective in the non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway. Finally, an upregulation of oxidative metabolism occurred in bystander cells; the increased levels of reactive oxygen species appeared to be derived from flavine-containing oxidase enzymes. We hypothesize that genetic effects observed in non-irradiated bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative base damage; >90% of mutations in bystander cells were point mutations. When bystander cells cannot repair DNA double strand breaks, they become much more sensitive to the induction of chromosomal aberrations and mutations, the latter consisting primarily of deletion mutants. While we propose that the genetic effects occurring in bystander cells are a consequence of oxidative stress, the nature of the signal that initiates this process remains to be determined.

  8. Structure of the hepatitis E virus-like particle suggests mechanisms for virus assembly and receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, Tom S.Y.; Liu, Zheng; Ye, Qiaozhen; Mata, Douglas A.; Li, Kunpeng; Yin, Changcheng; Zhang, Jingqiang; Tao, Yizhi Jane

    2009-08-25

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), a small, non-enveloped RNA virus in the family Hepeviridae, is associated with endemic and epidemic acute viral hepatitis in developing countries. Our 3.5-{angstrom} structure of a HEV-like particle (VLP) shows that each capsid protein contains 3 linear domains that form distinct structural elements: S, the continuous capsid; P1, 3-fold protrusions; and P2, 2-fold spikes. The S domain adopts a jelly-roll fold commonly observed in small RNA viruses. The P1 and P2 domains both adopt {beta}-barrel folds. Each domain possesses a potential polysaccharide-binding site that may function in cell-receptor binding. Sugar binding to P1 at the capsid protein interface may lead to capsid disassembly and cell entry. Structural modeling indicates that native T = 3 capsid contains flat dimers, with less curvature than those of T = 1 VLP. Our findings significantly advance the understanding of HEV molecular biology and have application to the development of vaccines and antiviral medications.

  9. Mechanical stability analysis of carrageenan-based polymer gel for magnetic resonance imaging liver phantom with lesion particles

    PubMed Central

    In, Eunji; Naguib, Hani; Haider, Masoom

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Medical imaging is an effective technique used to detect and prevent disease in cancer research. To optimize medical imaging, a calibration medium or phantom with tissue-mimicking properties is required. Although the feasibility of various polymer gel materials has previously been studied, the stability of the gels’ properties has not been investigated. In this study, we fabricated carrageenan-based polymer gel to examine the stability of its properties such as density, conductivity, permittivity, elastic modulus, and T1 and T2 relaxation times over six weeks. We fabricated eight samples with different carrageenan and agar concentrations and found that the density, elastic modulus, and compressive strength fluctuated with no specific pattern. The elastic modulus in sample 4 with 3 wt. % carrageenan and 1.5 wt. % agar fluctuated from 0.51 to 0.64 MPa in five weeks. The T1 and T2 relaxation times also varied by 23% to 29%. We believe that the fluctuation of these properties is related to the change in water content of the sample due to cycles of water expulsion and absorption in their containers. The fluctuation of the properties should be minimized to achieve accurate calibration over the shelf life of the phantom and to serve as the standard for quality assurance. Furthermore, a full liver phantom with spherical lesion particles was fabricated to demonstrate the potential for phantom production. PMID:26158073

  10. Mechanical stability analysis of carrageenan-based polymer gel for magnetic resonance imaging liver phantom with lesion particles.

    PubMed

    In, Eunji; Naguib, Hani; Haider, Masoom

    2014-10-01

    Medical imaging is an effective technique used to detect and prevent disease in cancer research. To optimize medical imaging, a calibration medium or phantom with tissue-mimicking properties is required. Although the feasibility of various polymer gel materials has previously been studied, the stability of the gels' properties has not been investigated. In this study, we fabricated carrageenan-based polymer gel to examine the stability of its properties such as density, conductivity, permittivity, elastic modulus, and [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] relaxation times over six weeks. We fabricated eight samples with different carrageenan and agar concentrations and found that the density, elastic modulus, and compressive strength fluctuated with no specific pattern. The elastic modulus in sample 4 with 3 wt. % carrageenan and 1.5 wt. % agar fluctuated from 0.51 to 0.64 MPa in five weeks. The [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] relaxation times also varied by 23% to 29%. We believe that the fluctuation of these properties is related to the change in water content of the sample due to cycles of water expulsion and absorption in their containers. The fluctuation of the properties should be minimized to achieve accurate calibration over the shelf life of the phantom and to serve as the standard for quality assurance. Furthermore, a full liver phantom with spherical lesion particles was fabricated to demonstrate the potential for phantom production.

  11. Quantum grow--A quantum dynamics sampling approach for growing potential energy surfaces and nonadiabatic couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Godsi, Oded; Peskin, Uri; Collins, Michael A.

    2010-03-28

    A quantum sampling algorithm for the interpolation of diabatic potential energy matrices by the Grow method is introduced. The new procedure benefits from penetration of the wave packet into classically forbidden regions, and the accurate quantum mechanical description of nonadiabatic transitions. The increased complexity associated with running quantum dynamics is reduced by using approximate low order expansions of the nuclear wave function within a Multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree scheme during the Grow process. The sampling algorithm is formulated and applied for three representative test cases, demonstrating the recovery of analytic potentials by the interpolated ones, and the convergence of a dynamic observable.

  12. Mechanism of Zn Particle Oxidation by H2O and CO2 in the Presence of ZnO.

    PubMed

    Weibel, David; Jovanovic, Zoran R; Gálvez, Elena; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-11-25

    In this work we investigate the mechanism of Zn oxidation with CO2 and/or H2O to produce solar derived fuels (CO and/or H2) as part of the Zn/ZnO thermochemical redox cycle. It has been observed that the ZnO contamination of Zn produced by solar thermal reduction of ZnO (solar Zn) facilitates oxidation of the metallic Zn by CO2 and H2O, allowing for nearly complete conversion at temperatures as low as 350 °C. Reaching the same reaction extent starting with pure Zn requires considerably higher temperatures which imposes use of unconventional hard-to-operate reaction configurations utilizing Zn as vapor. The mechanism of this enhancement is investigated by studying the oxidation of solid Zn diluted with ZnO or Al2O3 at 350-400 °C utilizing thermogravimetry. It is found that ZnO acts as the site for the oxidation of Zn originating from the vapor phase, thereby serving as a sink for Zn vapor and maintaining the driving force for sustainable Zn sublimation. As this Zn sublimation competes with the growth of an impervious ZnO scale over the surface of the remaining solid Zn, the presence of the ZnO increases the reaction extent according to the magnitude of its surface area. This mechanism is supported by energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, revealing a substantial deposition of produced ZnO over the surface of the ZnO-seeded Al2O3 diluent.

  13. Morphological instability of a thermophoretically growing deposit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castillo, Jose L.; Garcia-Ybarra, Pedro L.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1992-01-01

    The stability of the planar interface of a structureless solid growing from a depositing component dilute in a carrier fluid is studied when the main solute transport mechanism is thermal (Soret) diffusion. A linear stability analysis, carried out in the limit of low growth Peclet number, leads to a dispersion relation which shows that the planar front is unstable either when the thermal diffusion factor of the condensing component is positive and the latent heat release is small or when the thermal diffusion factor is negative and the solid grows over a thermally-insulating substrate. Furthermore, the influence of interfacial energy effects and constitutional supersaturation in the vicinity of the moving interface is analyzed in the limit of very small Schmidt numbers (small solute Fickian diffusion). The analysis is relevant to physical vapor deposition of very massive species on cold surfaces, as in recent experiments of organic solid film growth under microgravity conditions.

  14. Mechanism of activation of the mouse c-mos oncogene by the LTR of an intracisternal A-particle gene.

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, M; Luria, S; Rechavi, G; Givol, D

    1984-01-01

    In the mouse myeloma XRPC-24 the DNA of an intracisternal A-particle (IAP) is inserted within the coding region of c-mos. This insertion splits the c-mos into a 3' rc-mos and a 5' rc-mos separated by approximately 4.7 kb of IAP DNA. The insertion is in a head-to-head orientation and brings the 5' LTR of the IAP in juxtaposition to the 3' rc-mos such that the IAP and the 3' rc-mos are transcribed in opposite directions. The intact c-mos gene is usually dormant, whereas the 3' rc-mos is actively transcribed and is capable of transforming NIH3T3 cells. In an effort to understand the nature of this activation we mapped the 5' ends of the 3' rc-mos mRNA present in XPRC-24. We found two main mRNA start sites, one mapping to the junction of the 3' rc-mos and the 5' LTR, and the other located 10 nucleotides upstream to this junction, within the 5' LTR. This result indicates that the 3' rc-mos in XRPC-24 was activated by insertion of a promoter provided by the LTR of an IAP genome. Furthermore, the 5' LTR appears to possess promoter activities in two directions. This conclusion was confirmed by the fact that this 5' LTR, in both orientations, was able to activate the bacterial gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) in the modular vector pSVOCAT. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:6098457

  15. Experimental Demonstration of Collisionless Particle Acceleration Mechanisms and Entrainment of Ambient Plasma Ions by a Rapidly Expanding Diamagnetic Cavity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonde, J.; Vincena, S. T.; Gekelman, W. N.

    2015-12-01

    The collisionless coupling of an expanding diamagnetic cavity to a magnetized, ambient plasma is studied in a laboratory environment using a laser-produced plasma (LPP). The seed LPP rapidly expands with velocities up to the background Alfvén speed, vexp ≤ vA. The boundary layer of the expansion is characterized with in situ diagnostics as a cylindrical version of the Ferraro-Rosenbluth current sheath. Maintenance of quasi-neutrality in this sheath forms an electric field opposing the cross-field expansion which simultaneously drives the electron current that forms the diamagnetic cavity, decelerates the LPP ions to stagnation, and accelerates ambient ions inward. The field topology across the background magnetic field is identical to that described by Bernhardt, et al. [1] for the AMPTE magnetotail barium releases. The boundary along the magnetic field, however, is shown to contain an electric field with E·B ≠ 0, which is absent in simple fluid models of diamagnetic cavities. The electric fields at this boundary help explain previous observations in the experiment of the ejection of suprathermal electrons and return currents that generated whistler- and Alfvén-wave radiation in the ambient plasma. Magnetic loops and an emissive probe measure the magnetic field and electrostatic potential along 3 dimensions while a laser-induced fluorescence scheme measures the cross-field flow of the ambient argon ions as they penetrate the diamagnetic cavity. Particle orbit solvers employing the measured fields corroborate the flow diagnostic and predict strong outflows of ambient ions with higher charge to mass ratios after diamagnetic cavity collapse. This experiment was conducted in the Large Plasma Device at the Basic Plasma Science Facility and funded by grants from the US Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. [1] P.A. Bernhardt, R.A. Roussel-Dupre, M.B. Pongratz, J. Geophys. Res. 92, 57777 (1987).

  16. Effect of re-implanted particles from intramedullary reaming on mechanical properties and callus formation. A laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Hammer, T O; Wieling, R; Green, J M; Südkamp, N P; Schneider, E; Müller, C A

    2007-11-01

    This study investigated the quality and quantity of healing of a bone defect following intramedullary reaming undertaken by two fundamentally different systems; conventional, using non-irrigated, multiple passes; or suction/irrigation, using one pass. The result of a measured re-implantation of the product of reaming was examined in one additional group. We used 24 Swiss mountain sheep with a mean tibial medullary canal diameter between 8 mm and 9 mm. An 8 mm 'napkin ring' defect was created at the mid-diaphysis. The wound was either surgically closed or occluded. The medullary cavity was then reamed to 11 mm. The Reamer/Irrigator/Aspirator (RIA) System was used for the reaming procedure in groups A (RIA and autofilling) and B (RIA, collected reamings filled up), whereas reaming in group C (Synream and autofilling) was performed with the Synream System. The defect was allowed to auto-fill with reamings in groups A and C, but in group B, the defect was surgically filled with collected reamings. The tibia was then stabilised with a solid locking Unreamed Humerus Nail (UHN), 9.5 mm in diameter. The animals were killed after six weeks. After the implants were removed, measurements were taken to assess the stiffness, strength and callus formation at the site of the defect. There was no significant difference between healing after conventional reaming or suction/irrigation reaming. A significant improvement in the quality of the callus was demonstrated by surgically placing captured reamings into the defect using a graft harvesting system attached to the aspirator device. This was confirmed by biomechanical testing of stiffness and strength. This study suggests it could be beneficial to fill cortical defects with reaming particles in clinical practice, if feasible.

  17. Parasites grow larger in faster growing fish hosts.

    PubMed

    Barber, Iain

    2005-02-01

    Parasites depend on host-derived energy for growth and development, and so are potentially affected by the host's ability to acquire nutrients under competitive foraging scenarios. Although parasites might be expected to grow faster in hosts that are better at acquiring nutrients from natural ecosystems, it is also possible that the most competitive hosts are better at countering infections, if they have an improved immune response or are able to limit the availability of nutrients to parasites. I first quantified the ability of uninfected three-spined sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus to compete in groups for sequentially-presented food items, and then exposed either the best or worst competitors to infective stages of the cestode Schistocephalus solidus. Fish were subsequently raised in their original groups, under competitive feeding regimes, for 96 days, after which fish and parasite growth was determined. Unexpectedly, pre-exposure host competitive ability had no effect on susceptibility to infection, or on post-infection growth rate. Furthermore, despite a 120-fold variation in parasite mass at the end of the study, pre-infection competitive ability was not related to parasite growth. The closest predictor of parasite mass was body size-corrected host growth rate, indicating that the fastest growing fish developed the largest parasites. Faster growing hosts therefore apparently provide ideal environments for growing parasites. This finding has important implications for ecology and aquaculture.

  18. Rotating Vessels for Growing Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottingham, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Rotating vessels have been proposed as means of growing larger, more nearly uniform protein crystals than would otherwise be possible in the presence of normal Earth gravitation. Heretofore, nonrotating vessels have been used. It is difficult to grow high-quality protein crystals in the terrestrial gravitational field because of convection plumes created by the interaction between gravitation and density gradients in protein-solution depletion layers around growing crystals. The density gradients and the associated convection plumes cause the surfaces of growing crystals to be exposed to nonuniform solution densities, thereby causing the crystals to form in irregular shapes. The microgravitational environment of outer space has been utilized to eliminate gravitation-induced convection, but this approach is generally not favorable because of the high cost and limited availability of space flight. The use of a rotating vessel according to the proposal is intended to ameliorate the effects of gravitation and the resultant convection, relative to the corresponding effects in a non-rotating vessel. The rotation would exert an averaging effect over time, distributing the convective force on the depletion layer. Therefore, the depletion layer would be more nearly uniform and, as a result, the growing crystal would be more nearly perfect. The proposal admits of variations (see figure), including the following: The growing crystal could be rotated about its own central axis or an external axis. The crystal-growth vessel could be of any of various shapes, including cylindrical, hemispherical, conical, and combinations thereof. The crystal-growth vessel could be suspended in a viscous fluid in an outer vessel to isolate the growing crystal from both ambient vibrations and vibrations induced by a mechanism that drives the rotation. The rotation could be coupled to the crystal-growth vessel by viscous or magnetic means. The crystal-growth vessel could be supported within the

  19. The role of fine material and grain size distribution on excess pore pressure dissipation and particle support mechanisms in granular deposits based in large-scale physical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palucis, M. C.; Kaitna, R.; Tewoldebrhan, B.; Hill, K. M.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    The dominant mechanisms behind sustained mobilization in granular debris flows are poorly understood, and experiments are needed to determine the conditions under which the fluid can fully support the coarse fraction. However, field-scale studies are difficult to instrument and constrain and laboratory studies suffer from scaling issues. A 4-m rotating drum located at UC Berkeley's Richmond Field Station allowed us to perform reproducible experiments with materials similar to those in the field to explore mechanisms relevant to slow pore fluid pressure dissipation. Specifically, we performed a series of experiments to assess the role of fines and grain size distribution on the rate of pore fluid pressure dissipation upon deposition of a granular mass. For each experiment we kept the total mass of the gravel particles constant and varied the amount of fines (from no fines to amounts found in an actual debris flow deposit) and the gravel particle size distribution (from a single grain size to a range found in natural flows). We first rotated each mixture in the drum, during which we monitored fluid pressures at the base of the flows (near the wall of the drum and at the center). Then we stopped the drum and continued to monitor the fluid pressures. Immediately upon stopping, the pore fluid pressure was nearly hydrostatic for the gravel-water flows, and any elevated pore pressure quickly dissipated. On the other hand, the mixtures with fines contents close to those found in actual debris flows had elevated pore pressures indicating they were almost fully liquefied. Furthermore, the rate of pore pressure dissipation was an order of magnitude slower than when no fines were present; the grain size distribution of the coarse fraction did not strongly influence the dissipation rates in either case. We also placed a cobble upon a fines-rich mixture after cessation of motion above the center pressure sensor, and observed that the pore fluid pressure rose instantly, bearing

  20. [Growing old as a woman].

    PubMed

    Boyer-Weinmann, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Growing old as a woman. Since Diderot, a classic writer, and his friend Sophie Volland with whom he corresponded, debated the difference between the "handsome old man" and "beautiful old age", or a hypothetical "beautiful old woman", the representations of growing old have changed, to the benefit of women. Has the considerable contribution of female writers to the debate played a role? In what ways does literature, through its figurations of the ages of life, provide a valuable perspective of the contemporary mutations of the view of old age?

  1. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action of Bacteriophage K/nano-emulsion formulations against S. aureus via measurement of particle size and zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Patricia Perez; Jenkins, A Toby A; Arnot, Tom C

    2016-03-01

    In earlier work we have demonstrated the effect that nano-emulsions have on bacterial growth, and most importantly the enhanced bacteriophage infectivity against Staphylococcus aureus in planktonic culture when phage are carried in nano-emulsions. However, the mechanisms of enhancement of the bacteriophage killing effect are not specifically understood. This work focuses on the investigation of the possible interactions between emulsion droplets and bacterial cells, between emulsion droplets and bacteriophages, and finally interactions between all three components: nano-emulsion droplets, bacteria, and bacteriophages. The first approach consists of simple calculations to determine the spatial distribution of the components, based on measurements of particle size. It was found that nano-emulsion droplets are much more numerous than bacteria or bacteriophage, and due to their size and surface area they must be covering the surface of both cells and bacteriophage particles. Stabilisation of bacteriophages due to electrostatic forces and interaction with nano-emulsion droplets is suspected, since bacteriophages may be protected against inactivation due to 'charge shielding'. Zeta potential was measured for the individual components in the system, and for all of them combined. It was concluded that the presence of nano-emulsions could be reducing electrostatic repulsion between bacterial cells and bacteriophage, both of which are very negatively 'charged'. Moreover, nano-emulsions lead to more favourable interaction between bacteriophages and bacteria, enhancing the anti-microbial or killing effect. These findings are relevant since the physicochemical properties of nano-emulsions (i.e. particle size distribution and zeta potential) are key in determining the efficacy of the formulation against infection in the context of responsive burn wound dressings-which is the main target for this work.

  2. Thermal oxidation of medical Ti6Al4V blasted with ceramic particles: Effects on the microstructure, residual stresses and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lieblich, M; Barriuso, S; Multigner, M; González-Doncel, G; González-Carrasco, J L

    2016-02-01

    Roughening of Ti6Al4V by blasting with alumina or zirconia particles improves the mechanical fixation of implants by increasing the surface area available for bone/implant apposition. Additional thermal oxidation treatments of the blasted alloy have already shown to be a complementary low-cost solution to enhancing the in vitro biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of the alloy. In this work, the effects of oxidation treatment on a grit blasted Ti6Al4V biomedical alloy have been analysed in order to understand the net effect of the combined treatments on the alloy fatigue properties. Synchrotron radiation diffraction experiments have been performed to measure residual stresses before and after the treatments and microstructural and hardness changes have been determined. Although blasting of Ti6Al4V with small spherical zirconia particles increases the alloy fatigue resistance with respect to unblasted specimens, fatigue strength after oxidation decreases below the unblasted value, irrespective of the type of particle used for blasting. Moreover, at 700°C the as-blasted compressive residual stresses (700MPa) are not only fully relaxed but even moderate tensile residual stresses, of about 120MPa, are found beneath the blasted surfaces. Contrary to expectations, a moderate increase in hardness occurs towards the blasted surface after oxidation treatments. This can be attributed to the fact that grit blasting modifies the crystallographic texture of the Ti6Al4V shifting it to a random texture, which affects the hardness values as shown by additional experiments on cold rolled samples. The results indicate that the oxidation treatment performed to improve biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of grit blasted Ti6Al4V should be carried out with caution since the alloy fatigue strength can be critically diminished below the value required for high load-bearing components.

  3. First-Principle Investigation on the Bonding Mechanism of the Silicon Particles on the Copper Foil in Cold Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun; Liu, Juanfang; Chen, Qinghua

    For lithium-ion batteries, the composite silicon-based electrodes can prevent from losing electrical contact and hence retain the capacity over many cycles. To uncover the adhesion mechanism on the interface formed by the copper foil and the thin silicon coatings during the cold gas dynamic spraying (CGDS) at the microscopic level, the first-principle calculations are performed to investigate the interface properties between them. The ideal work of adhesion, fracture toughness and the interface electronic properties are analyzed. It is found that all the atoms on the interface have vertical displacements, and covalent and ionic bonds are formed between the interfacial Cu and Si atoms which increases the bonding strength. However, the ideal work of adhesion on the interface is lower than one of the Cu bulk and Si bulk, so that fracture would be easier to take place on the interface.

  4. How faceted liquid droplets grow tails

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Shani; Sapir, Zvi; Schultz, Moty; Butenko, Alexander V.; Ocko, Benjamin M.; Deutsch, Moshe; Sloutskin, Eli

    2016-01-01

    Liquid droplets, widely encountered in everyday life, have no flat facets. Here we show that water-dispersed oil droplets can be reversibly temperature-tuned to icosahedral and other faceted shapes, hitherto unreported for liquid droplets. These shape changes are shown to originate in the interplay between interfacial tension and the elasticity of the droplet’s 2-nm-thick interfacial monolayer, which crystallizes at some T = Ts above the oil’s melting point, with the droplet’s bulk remaining liquid. Strikingly, at still-lower temperatures, this interfacial freezing (IF) effect also causes droplets to deform, split, and grow tails. Our findings provide deep insights into molecular-scale elasticity and allow formation of emulsions of tunable stability for directed self-assembly of complex-shaped particles and other future technologies. PMID:26733673

  5. Numerical Modeling of Plasmas in which Nanoparticles Nucleate and Grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Pulkit

    Dusty plasmas refer to a broad category of plasmas. Plasmas such as argon-silane plasmas in which particles nucleate and grow are widely used in semiconductor processing and nanoparticle manufacturing. In such dusty plasmas, the plasma and the dust particles are strongly coupled to each other. This means that the presence of dust particles significantly affects the plasma properties and vice versa. Therefore such plasmas are highly complex and they involve several interesting phenomena like nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport. Dusty plasma afterglow is equally complex and important. Especially, residual charge on dust particles carries special significance in several industrial and laboratory situations and it has not been well understood. A 1D numerical model was developed of a low-pressure capacitively-coupled plasma in which nanoparticles nucleate and grow. Polydispersity of particle size distributions can be important in such plasmas. Sectional method, which is well known in aerosol literature, was used to model the evolving particle size and charge distribution. The numerical model is transient and one-dimensional and self consistently accounts for nucleation, growth, coagulation, charging and transport of dust particles and their effect on plasma properties. Nucleation and surface growth rates were treated as input parameters. Results were presented in terms of particle size and charge distribution with an emphasis on importance of polydispersity in particle growth and dynamics. Results of numerical model were compared with experimental measurements of light scattering and light emission from plasma. Reasonable qualitative agreement was found with some discrepancies. Pulsed dusty plasma can be important for controlling particle production and/or unwanted particle deposition. In this case, it is important to understand the behavior of the particle cloud during the afterglow following plasma turn-off. Numerical model was modified to self

  6. The Contradiction Between the Measurement Theory of Quantum Mechanics and the Theory that the Velocity of Any Particle Can Not be Larger than the Velocity of Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Y.; Shen, Z. J.; Shen, G. T.; Yang, B. C.

    1996-01-01

    By the measurement theory of quantum mechanics and the method of Fourier transform,we proved that the wave function psi(x,y,z,t)= (8/((2(pi)(2L(exp (1/2)))(exp 3))(Phi(L,t,x)Phi(L,t,y)Phi(L,t,z)). According to the theory that the velocity of any particle can not be larger than the velocity of light and the Born interpretation, when absolute value of delta greater than (ct+ L),Phi(L,t,delta) = 0. But according to the calculation, we proved that for some delta, even if absolute value of delta is greater than (ct+L), Phi(L,t,delta) is not equal to 0.

  7. Exploring Classroom Hydroponics. Growing Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Gardening Association, Burlington, VT.

    Growing Ideas, the National Gardening Association's series for elementary, middle, and junior high school educators, helps teachers engage students in using plants and gardens as contexts for developing a deeper, richer understanding of the world around them. This volume's focus is on hydroponics. It presents basic hydroponics information along…

  8. Growing Crystals on the Ceiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christman, Robert A.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method of studying growing crystals in a classroom utilizing a carrousel projector standing vertically. A saturated salt solution is placed on a slide on the lens of the projector and the heat from the projector causes the water to evaporate and salt to crystalize. (Author/DS)

  9. Growing Crystals for Infrared Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1984-01-01

    Unidirectional solidification yields bulk crystals with compositional homogeneity. Unidirectionaly crystal-growth furnace assembly travels vertically so crystal grows upward from bottom tapered end of ampoule. Separately controlled furnaces used for hot (upper) and cold (lower) zones. New process produces ingots with radial compositional homogeneity suitable for fabricating infrared detectors.

  10. Colleges' Earmarks Grow, Amid Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainard, Jeffrey; Hermes, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    A record-breaking number of Congressional pork-barrel projects this year has loaded college and university plates with more earmarks than ever before, despite growing worries that the noncompetitive grants undermine the American scientific enterprise, and in spite of promises by some lawmakers to cut back. An analysis by "The Chronicle" shows that…

  11. Growing Ideas, 1990-1993.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pranis, Eve, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This series of journals includes volumes 1-4 of "Growing Ideas," a journal of garden-based learning. Each issue provides instructional ideas, horticultural information and a forum for exchange among teachers using classroom gardening to stimulate learning. Ideas in each issue are separated into three sections. The "Green Tips"…

  12. How Does Your Garlic Grow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimabukuro, Mary A.; Fearing, Vickie

    1993-01-01

    Garlic is an ideal plant for the elementary classroom. It grows rapidly in water without aeration for several weeks and remains relatively free of microbial contamination. Simple experiments with garlic purchased at grocery stores can illustrate various aspects of plant growth. (PR)

  13. Organization of growing random networks

    SciTech Connect

    Krapivsky, P. L.; Redner, S.

    2001-06-01

    The organizational development of growing random networks is investigated. These growing networks are built by adding nodes successively, and linking each to an earlier node of degree k with an attachment probability A{sub k}. When A{sub k} grows more slowly than linearly with k, the number of nodes with k links, N{sub k}(t), decays faster than a power law in k, while for A{sub k} growing faster than linearly in k, a single node emerges which connects to nearly all other nodes. When A{sub k} is asymptotically linear, N{sub k}(t){similar_to}tk{sup {minus}{nu}}, with {nu} dependent on details of the attachment probability, but in the range 2{lt}{nu}{lt}{infinity}. The combined age and degree distribution of nodes shows that old nodes typically have a large degree. There is also a significant correlation in the degrees of neighboring nodes, so that nodes of similar degree are more likely to be connected. The size distributions of the in and out components of the network with respect to a given node{emdash}namely, its {open_quotes}descendants{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ancestors{close_quotes}{emdash}are also determined. The in component exhibits a robust s{sup {minus}2} power-law tail, where s is the component size. The out component has a typical size of order lnt, and it provides basic insights into the genealogy of the network.

  14. Growing an Emerging Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birx, Donald L.; Anderson-Fletcher, Elizabeth; Whitney, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The emerging research college or university is one of the most formidable resources a region has to reinvent and grow its economy. This paper is the first of two that outlines a process of building research universities that enhance regional technology development and facilitate flexible networks of collaboration and resource sharing. Although the…

  15. Growing Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, growing patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…

  16. Growing Up in Interracial Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Philip; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Provides excerpts from personal accounts presented at a 1984 conference on the needs of children of interracial families: "Communicating is the Key" (Philip Spivey); "Growing Up with an Asian American Heritage" (Clarence L. Chen); "An Hispanic Perspective on Biracial, Bicultural Families" (Irma Garcia Rose); and…

  17. Mechanism insights into enhanced trichloroethylene removal using xanthan gum-modified microscale zero-valent iron particles.

    PubMed

    Xin, Jia; Han, Jun; Zheng, Xilai; Shao, Haibing; Kolditz, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    This report focuses on the enhancement in trichloroethylene (TCE) removal from contaminated groundwater using xanthan gum (XG)-modified, microscale, zero-valent iron (mZVI). Compared with bare mZVI, XG-coated mZVI increased the TCE removal efficiency by 30.37% over a 480-h experimental period. Because the TCE removal is attributed to both sorption and reduction processes, the contributions from sorption and reduction were separately investigated to determine the mechanism of XG on TCE removal using mZVI. The results showed that the TCE sorption capacity of mZVI was lower in the presence of XG, whereas the TCE reduction capacity was significantly increased. The FTIR spectra confirmed that XG, which is rich in hydrophilic functional groups, was adsorbed onto the iron surface through intermolecular hydrogen bonds, which competitively repelled the sorption and mass transfer of TCE toward reactive sites. The variations in the pH, Eh, and Fe(2+) concentration as functions of the reaction time were recorded and indicated that XG buffered the solution pH, inhibited surface passivation, and promoted TCE reduction by mZVI. Overall, the XG-modified mZVI was considered to be potentially effective for the in-situ remediation of TCE contaminated groundwater due to its high stability and dechlorination reactivity.

  18. Photodegradation mechanism of two dyes: the influence of adsorption behavior on the novel TiO2 particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yi-zhong

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between adsorption behavior and photocatalytic mechanism of the two dyes was investigated. Adsorption isotherms showed that the adsorption of cationic pink FG was Langmuir type behavior, while the reactive brilliant red k-2G was Freundlich type behavior. The increasing pH favored the adsorption of FG but have little effect on the photodegradation. The increasing pH favored the adsorption and the photodegradation of k-2G. The presence of scavenger of hvb+ and OH* radical potassium iodide inhibited the degradation of k-2G, free radicals scavenger tetranitromethane inhibited the photodegradation of FG. These results indicated that the photodegradation of FG mainly via free radicals in solution, and the photodegradation of k-2G was mainly on the catalysts surface or near the interface of solid and solution by react with hvb+ and surface-bound OH*. The different effect of SO4(2-), HCO3- on the adsorption and photodegradation of two dyes confirmed these results.

  19. The use of mechanical alloying for the preparation of palladized magnesium bimetallic particles for the remediation of PCBs.

    PubMed

    Coutts, Janelle L; Devor, Robert W; Aitken, Brian; Hampton, Michael D; Quinn, Jacqueline W; Clausen, Christian A; Geiger, Cherie L

    2011-09-15

    The kinetic rate of dechlorination of a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB-151) by mechanically alloyed Mg/Pd was studied for optimization of the bimetallic system. Bimetal production was first carried out in a small-scale environment using a SPEX 8000M high-energy ball mill with 4-μm-magnesium and palladium impregnated on graphite, with optimized parameters including milling time and Pd-loading. A 5.57-g sample of bimetal containing 0.1257% Pd and ball milled for 3 min resulted in a degradation rate of 0.00176 min(-1)g(-1) catalyst as the most reactive bimetal. The process was then scaled-up, using a Red Devil 5400 Twin-Arm Paint Shaker, fitted with custom plates to hold milling canisters. Optimization parameters tested included milling time, number of ball bearings used, Pd-loading, and total bimetal mass milled. An 85-g sample of bimetal containing 0.1059% Pd and ball-milled for 23 min with 16 ball bearings yielded the most reactive bimetal with a degradation rate of 0.00122 min(-1)g(-1) catalyst. Further testing showed adsorption did not hinder extraction efficiency and that dechlorination products were only seen when using the bimetallic system, as opposed to any of its single components. The bimetallic system was also tested for its ability to degrade a second PCB congener, PCB-45, and a PCB mixture (Arochlor 1254); both contaminants were seen to degrade successfully.

  20. Reaction Mechanism for Direct Propylene Epoxidation by Alumina-Supported Silver Aggregates. The Role of the Particle / Support Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lei; Yin, Chunrong; Mehmood, Faisal; Liu, Bin; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Sungsik; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Vajda, S.; Curtiss, Larry A.

    2013-11-21

    Sub-nanometer Ag aggregates on alumina supports have been found to be active toward direct propylene epoxidation to propylene oxide by molecular oxygen at low temperatures, with a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation (Science 328, p. 224, 2010). In this work, we computationally and experimentally investigate the origin of the high reactivity of the sub-nanometer Ag aggregates. Computationally, we study O2 dissociation and propylene epoxidation on unsupported Ag19 and Ag20 clusters, as well as alumina-supported Ag19. The O2 dissociation and propylene epoxidation apparent barriers at the interface between the Ag aggregate and the alumina support are calculated to be 0.2 and 0.2~0.4 eV, respectively. These barriers are somewhat lower than those on sites away from the interface. The mechanism at the interface is similar to what was previously found for the silver trimer on alumina and can account for the high activity observed for the direct oxidation of propylene on the Ag aggregates. The barriers for oxygen dissociation on these model systems both at the interface and on the surfaces are small compared to crystalline surfaces, indicating that availability of oxygen will not be a rate limiting step for the aggregates, as in the case of the crystalline surfaces. Experimentally, we investigate Ultrananocrystalline Diamond (UNCD)-supported silver aggregates under reactive conditions of propylene partial oxidation. The UNCD-supported Ag clusters are found to be not measurably active toward propylene oxidation, in contrast to the alumina supported Ag clusters. This suggests that the lack of metal-oxide interfacial sites of the Ag-UNCD catalyst, limits the epoxidation catalytic activity. This combined computational and experimental study shows the importance of the metal-oxide interface as well as the non-crystalline nature of the alumina-supported sub-nanometer Ag aggregate catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  1. Role of oxygen vacancies on light emission mechanisms in SrTiO3 induced by high-energy particles

    DOE PAGES

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Agulló-López, F.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Light emission under MeV hydrogen and oxygen ions in stoichiometric SrTiO3 are identified at temperatures of 100 K, 170 K and room-temperature. MeV ions predominately deposit their energies to electrons in SrTiO3 with energy densities orders of magnitude higher than from UV or x-ray sources but comparable to femtosecond lasers. The ionoluminescence (IL) spectra can be resolved into three main Gaussian bands at 2.0 eV, 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, whose relative contributions strongly depend on irradiation temperature, electronic energy loss and irradiation fluence. Two main bands, observed at 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, are intrinsic and associated with electron–holemore » recombination in the perfect SrTiO3 lattice. The 2.8 eV band is attributed to recombination of free (conduction) electrons with an in-gap level, possibly related to self-trapped holes. Self-trapped excitons (STEs) are considered suitable candidates for the 2.5 eV emission band, which implies a large energy relaxation in comparison to the intrinsic edge transition. The dynamics of electronic excitation, governs a rapid initial rise of the intensity; whereas, accumulated irradiation damage (competing non-radiative recombination channels) accounts for a subsequent intensity decrease. The previously invoked role of isolated oxygen vacancies for the blue luminescence (2.8 eV) does not appear consistent with the data. An increasing well-resolved band at 2.0 eV dominates at 170 K and below. It has been only previously observed in heavily strained and amorphous SrTiO3, and is, here, attributed to transitions from d(t 2g) conduction band levels to d(e g) levels below the gap. In accordance with ab initio theoretical calculations they are associated to trapped electron states in relaxed Ti3+ centers at an oxygen vacancy within distorted TiO6 octahedra. The mechanism of defect evolution monitored during real-time IL experiments is presented. In conclusion, the light emission data confirm that IL is a useful tool to

  2. Role of oxygen vacancies on light emission mechanisms in SrTiO3 induced by high-energy particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespillo, M. L.; Graham, J. T.; Agulló-López, F.; Zhang, Y.; Weber, W. J.

    2017-04-01

    Light emission under MeV hydrogen and oxygen ions in stoichiometric SrTiO3 are identified at temperatures of 100 K, 170 K and room-temperature. MeV ions predominately deposit their energies to electrons in SrTiO3 with energy densities orders of magnitude higher than from UV or x-ray sources but comparable to femtosecond lasers. The ionoluminescence (IL) spectra can be resolved into three main Gaussian bands at 2.0 eV, 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, whose relative contributions strongly depend on irradiation temperature, electronic energy loss and irradiation fluence. Two main bands, observed at 2.5 eV and 2.8 eV, are intrinsic and associated with electron–hole recombination in the perfect SrTiO3 lattice. The 2.8 eV band is attributed to recombination of free (conduction) electrons with an in-gap level, possibly related to self-trapped holes. Self-trapped excitons (STEs) are considered suitable candidates for the 2.5 eV emission band, which implies a large energy relaxation in comparison to the intrinsic edge transition. The dynamics of electronic excitation, governs a rapid initial rise of the intensity; whereas, accumulated irradiation damage (competing non-radiative recombination channels) accounts for a subsequent intensity decrease. The previously invoked role of isolated oxygen vacancies for the blue luminescence (2.8 eV) does not appear consistent with the data. An increasing well-resolved band at 2.0 eV dominates at 170 K and below. It has been only previously observed in heavily strained and amorphous SrTiO3, and is, here, attributed to transitions from d(t 2g) conduction band levels to d(e g) levels below the gap. In accordance with ab initio theoretical calculations they are associated to trapped electron states in relaxed Ti3+ centers at an oxygen vacancy within distorted TiO6 octahedra. The mechanism of defect evolution monitored during real-time IL experiments is presented. In conclusion, the light emission data confirm that IL is a

  3. Biochar as growing media additive and peat substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, C.; Harttung, T.

    2014-04-01

    Environmental concerns raised the demand for alternative growing media substituting sphagnum peat. However growing media formulations still depend on peat and alternatives are limited. Biochar is carbonized plant material and could be an appropriate additive or even substitute for sphagnum peat. Freshly produced, it is free from pathogens, has a low nutrient content (if produced from nutrient poor feedstock), a very high structural stability and likely other favourable properties such as air capacity and water holding capacity. Preliminary tests were conducted to compare biochar with other growing media and growing media additives. The growth of a miniature sunflower, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) was measured in different growing media such as biochar, perlite, clay granules, sphagnum peat and peat mixed with biochar in the ratios 1 : 4, 1 : 1 and 4 : 1 (25, 50 and 75%, by volume). Fresh biochar has a similar EC than peat which is even lower after rinsing with water. Due to the relatively high pH of biochar, it could be added to peat instead of lime in a concentration of up to 75%. The growth of the sunflower was similar in all growing media. Only the plant weight was slightly higher of plants that grew in perlite or peat. There is a large potential for optimization such as selection of particle size and feedstock for biochar production and growing media formulations for specific plant requirements.

  4. Biochar as a growing media additive and peat substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, C.; Harttung, T.

    2014-09-01

    Environmental concerns raised the demand for alternative growing media substituting Sphagnum peat. However growing media formulations still depend on peat and alternatives are limited. Biochar is carbonized plant material and could be an appropriate additive or even substitute for Sphagnum peat. Freshly produced, it is free from pathogens, has a low nutrient content (if produced from nutrient-poor feedstock), a very high structural stability and likely other favourable properties such as air capacity and water-holding capacity. Preliminary tests were conducted to compare biochar with other growing media and growing media additives. The growth of a miniature sunflower, pH and electrical conductivity (EC) was measured in different growing media such as biochar, perlite, clay granules, Sphagnum peat and peat mixed with biochar in the ratios 1 : 4, 1 : 1 and 4 : 1 (25, 50 and 75%, by volume). Fresh biochar has a similar EC to peat which is even lower after rinsing with water. Due to the relatively high pH of biochar, it could be added to peat instead of lime in a concentration of up to 75%. The growth of the sunflower was similar in all growing media. Only the plant weight was slightly higher of plants that grew in perlite or peat. There is a large potential for optimization such as selection of particle size and feedstock for biochar production and growing media formulations for specific plant requirements.

  5. Stream Clustering of Growing Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Zaigham Faraz; Spiliopoulou, Myra

    We study incremental clustering of objects that grow and accumulate over time. The objects come from a multi-table stream e.g. streams of Customer and Transaction. As the Transactions stream accumulates, the Customers’ profiles grow. First, we use an incremental propositionalisation to convert the multi-table stream into a single-table stream upon which we apply clustering. For this purpose, we develop an online version of K-Means algorithm that can handle these swelling objects and any new objects that arrive. The algorithm also monitors the quality of the model and performs re-clustering when it deteriorates. We evaluate our method on the PKDD Challenge 1999 dataset.

  6. Silicone Granulomas, a Growing Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Curreri, Alexis T.; Taylor, Gina A.; Burris, Katy

    2016-01-01

    The formation of granulomas is known to be a possible adverse effect of liquid silicone administration, used for soft tissue augmentation. Its plumping effects provide enhancement of certain body parts, such as the lips, hips, and buttocks. The desire for enhancement, perhaps influenced by popular culture and an unrealistic standard of beauty, leads individuals to seek silicone injections. There is a growing population of women and men receiving injections by unlicensed, unskilled “practitioners” not related to the healthcare profession. Complications under such circumstances are not uncommon, particularly the emergence of silicone granulomas, and the authors’ medical center has seen an increase in such cases. In this case report, the authors illustrate a young patient with significant complications from her silicone injections, review current therapies for silicone granulomas, and discuss this growing medical problem. PMID:27386046

  7. Mechanical and tribological property comparison of melt-compounded nanocomposites of atomic-layer-deposition-coated polyamide particles and commercial nanofillers

    SciTech Connect

    Nevalainen, K.; Suihkonen, R.; Etelaeaho, P.; Vuorinen, J.; Jaervelae, P.; Isomaeki, N.; Hintze, C.; Leskelae, M.

    2009-07-15

    Mechanical and tribological properties of melt-compounded titanium dioxide nanocomposites of atomic-layer-deposition (ALD)-coated polyamide particles and commercial nanofillers were compared. The nanofiller dispersion in the polyamide matrix was studied using transmission electron microscopy showing very different morphology for the ALD-created and the traditional nanocomposites: former appearing as ribbons in the matrix whereas latter composing from spherical clusters. The effect of such morphology change on the specimen's mechanical response subjected to tensile and impact loading was investigated. The results demonstrated that ALD-created nanocomposites possess significantly higher Young's modulus than pure and traditionally filled polyamide matrix. However, transition from ductile to brittle behavior occurs especially for the ALD-created nanocomposites. Notched impact strength experiments supported this, suggesting that the impact strength of ALD-created composites decreased significantly compared to pure polyamide matrix, whereas traditionally melt-compounded nanocomposites showed no significant changes. Furthermore, the tribological properties of the selected specimens were determined and the effect of the nanofiller on the friction and scratching properties of the polyamide matrix is discussed.

  8. Thermally assisted mechanical dewatering (TAMD) of suspensions of fine particles: analysis of the influence of the operating conditions using the response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Akrama; Fernandez, Aurora; Chituchi, Toma-Mihai; Arlabosse, Patricia

    2008-08-01

    Thermally assisted mechanical dewatering (TAMD) is a new process for energy-efficient liquid/solids separation which enhances conventional-device efficiency. The main idea of this process is to supply a flow of heat in mechanical dewatering processes to favour the reduction of the liquid content. This is not a new idea but the proposed combination, especially the chosen operating conditions (temperature <100 degrees C and pressure <3000 kPa) constitutes an original approach and a significant energy saving since the liquid is kept in liquid state. Response surface methodology was used to evaluate the effects of the processing parameters of TAMD on the final dry solids content, which is a fundamental dewatering parameter and an excellent indicator of the extent of TAMD. In this study, a two-factor central composite rotatable design was used to establish the optimum conditions for the TAMD of suspensions of fine particles. Significant regression models, describing changes on final dry solids content with respect to independent variables, were established with regression coefficients (usually called determination coefficients), R(2), greater than 80%. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory filtration/compression cell, firstly on different compressible materials: synthetic mineral suspensions such as talc and synthetic organic suspensions such as cellulose, and then on industrial materials, such as bentonite sludge provided by Soletanche Bachy Company. Experiment showed that the extent of TAMD for a given material is particularly dependent on their physical and chemical properties but also on processing parameters.

  9. Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, John

    2014-05-01

    Part 1. The Winning of the Principles: 1. Introduction; 2. The beginnings of statics. Archimedes. Problem of the lever and of the centre of gravity; 2. Experimental verification and applications of the principle of the lever; 3. The centre of gravity; 4. The balance; 5. Stevinus of Bruges. The principle of the inclined plane; 6. The parallelogram of forces; 7. The principle of virtual work; 8. Review of the principles of statics; 9. The beginnings of dynamics. Galileo. The problem of falling bodies; 10. Huyghens. The problem of uniform motion in a circle. 'Centrifugal force'; 11. Final statement of the principles of dynamics. Extension to the motions of the heavenly bodies. The law of universal gravitation. Newton; Part II. Mathematical Statement of the Principles: Introduction; 12. Kinematics; 13. Kinetics of a particle moving in a straight line. The laws of motion; 14. Experimental verification of the laws of motion. Atwood's machine; 15. Work and energy; 16. The parallelogram law; 17. The composition and resolution of forces. Resultant. Component. Equilibrium; 18. Forces in one plane; 19. Friction; Part III. Application to Various Problems: 20. Motion on an inclined plane. Brachistochrones; 21. Projectiles; 22. Simple harmonic motion; 23. The simple pendulum; 24. Central forces. The law of gravitation; 25. Impact and impulsive forces; Part IV. The Elements of Rigid Dynamics: 26. The compound pendulum. Huyghens' solution; 27. D'alembert's principle; 28. Moment of inertia; 29. Experimental determination of moments of inertia; 30. Determination of the value of gravity by Kater's pendulum; 31. The constant of gravitation, or weighing the Earth. The Cavendish experiment; Answers to the examples; Index.

  10. The low-resolution structure of nHDL reconstituted with DMPC with and without cholesterol reveals a mechanism for